WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon 14 decay radioisotopes

  1. Measurement of specific radioactivity of tryptophan labeled with carbon-14 in plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with a synchronized accumulating radioisotope detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of specific radioactivity by a high-performance liquid chromatograph with a synchronized accumulating radioisotope detector was conducted. Accuracy of measurement for an authentic sample containing 0.2 nCi of tryptophan labeled with carbon-14 exceeded 95%. In the case of a plasma sample obtained 120 min following intravenous administration of 15 muCi of labeled tryptophan to a rat, the coefficient of variation was 7.0%

  2. Biological Effects of Transmutation and Decay of Incorporated Radioisotopes. Proceedings of a Panel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Panel on the Biological Effects of Transmutation and Decay of Incorporated Radioisotopes was held by the International Atomic Energy Agency in Vienna on 9 - 13 October 1967. Fourteen experts from nine countries, representing various relevant disciplines, attended. The Panel investigated the modes and mechanisms of action associated with transmutation and decay radiation events. The aim was to achieve a clearer picture of the present status of these studies and at the same time to help define the main problems and suggest possible ways of solving them. The Panel might thus go some way towards defining the hazards of using labelled compounds in human beings and standards for setting body-burden levels. The papers and discussions centred on the role which such physical and chemical factors of radioisotope decay as transmutation, recoil energy and disintegration radiation play in producing injury when such isotopes as 3H, 14C and 32P are incorporated into vital cellular macro-molecules. Past and present studies on mutation production, chromosome aberration, macro- molecular lesions, and cell survival, were reviewed and analysed. Data, concepts and experimental approaches were examined with an eye to possible productive lines of investigation. The present book contains the papers and discussions

  3. Outlook on radioisotope production at TRIGA SSR 14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INR Pitesti, endowed with a research nuclear reactor of TRIGA SSR 14 MW type, has developed activities of radioisotope production, being at present licensed for production and selling Ir-192 sources for industrial gamma radiography and Co-60 sources (2,000 Ci) for medical uses (cobalto therapy). A collaboration was initiated with the CPR Department of IFIN-HH Bucharest, particularly after the WWR-S reactor shutdown on December 21, 1997. In the frame of this program the INR Pitesti offers services of raw material irradiations followed by the radioisotope production performed subsequently at the Radioisotope Production Department (CPR) of IFIN-HH Bucharest which also deals with selling the product on internal market . The experimental facilities with the two TRIGA reactors (TRIGA SSR 14 MW and TRIGA ACPR) of INR Pitesti are described. The maximum neutron flux is 2.9 · 1014 n/cm2s. The irradiation channels are of two neutron spectra types. Also the neutron flux is characterized by radial and axial distribution which are taken into account when a given raw material is to be irradiated, to avoid perturbing non-homogeneities in the raw material activation. Five irradiation devices are presented. Preparations are currently under way for production of fission radioisotopes Mo-99, I-131 and Xe-133 and activation radioisotope I-125 for medical application

  4. The comparison of benzene and CO2 absorption methods for radioisotope 14C dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It had been conducted to research of age determination of carbon samples using CO2 absorption method. This method as alternative to benzene synthesis method for radioisotope 14C dating.The aim of the method is to support some hydrology research's especially groundwater dating using environmental radioisotope 14C.The results which obtain by CO2 absorption method then compared with the results of benzene synthesis method consists of background counter, standard counter, activity and age limit, age, and material cost or component. The research show that compared with benzene synthesis method, sample preparation using CO2 absorption method is more simple and relatively low cost. The use of CO2 absorption method can save the cost about 75 %. The different of both methods is age limit detection. The results of age limit detection when using CO2 absorption and synthesis benzene methods are 33,310 years and 47,533 years respectively. Whereas, based on t test, the age results of both methods for the same sample are obtained relatively equal. (author)

  5. High efficiency direct thermal to electric energy conversion from radioisotope decay using selective emitters and spectrally tuned solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Flood, Dennis J.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems are attractive possibilities for direct thermal-to-electric energy conversion, but have typically required the use of black body radiators operating at high temperatures. Recent advances in both the understanding and performance of solid rare-earth oxide selective emitters make possible the use of TPV at temperatures as low as 1200K. Both selective emitter and filter system TPV systems are feasible. However, requirements on the filter system are severe in order to attain high efficiency. A thin-film of a rare-earth oxide is one method for producing an efficient, rugged selective emitter. An efficiency of 0.14 and power density of 9.2 W/KG at 1200K is calculated for a hypothetical thin-film neodymia (Nd2O3) selective emitter TPV system that uses radioisotope decay as the thermal energy source.

  6. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  7. Overview on radioisotope production at TRIGA-SSR 14 MW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the technical support provided at Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti to accomplish various services concerning isotope production. Also it is presented the study to produce, in collaboration with Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN) Bucharest, I-131, Au-198, Mo-99, Ir-192 isotopes for medical uses. There is presented neutron physics computation for the TRIGA core to establish the proper experimental locations to accomplish the radioisotope production. (authors)

  8. Chemical separation of carbon -14 in radwastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 has a long half-life of 5730 years and decays by beta emission of 156KeV to the stable nuclide, Nitrogen-14. Carbon-14 is produced mostly by the neutron activation of naturally occurring oxygen-17 in water molecules of the reactor coolant and Nitrogen-14 from nitrogen gas dissolved in the reactor coolant. Most of these carbon-14 are known to be discharged as gaseous wastes. The chemical forms of the gaseous emissions of carbon-14 from PWR stations range from 10∼26% as 14CO2 and 74∼90% as 14CH4 and other hydrocarbons, compared to about 95% as 14CO2 and 5% as 14CH4 and other hydrocarbons in BWR station gaseous emissions. Knowles reported that although the exact nature of these organic compounds was not identified, most of the carbon-14 was present as forms of organic species in a PWR primary coolant. Praudic measured the contents of the total organic and inorganic carbon-14 in waste trench leachates of New York commercial LLW disposal site and found that 74 ∼ 98% of carbon-14 was organic. In 1991, Dayal and Kirby reported that carbon-14 identified in LLW trench leachates from the Maxi Fiats site were carbonate and bicarbonate as inorganic carbon-14 and citric acid and palmitic acid as organic carbon-14. Thus concentrated Boric acid waste solutions(CB) which has generated from domestic NPP were classified into organic and inorganic carbon-14 with wet oxidation method in order to grasping a existing ratio of organic carbon-14 from total one due to affecting an environment

  9. Method of preparing orotic acid labelled with radioisotope 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method is presented of universally labelled (U-14C)-orotic acid of a mole activity higher than 250 mCi/mMole. The Claisen condensation with (1,2-14C)-oxalic acid ethylester and (1,2-14C)-acetic acid ethylester having mole activities higher than 50 mCi/milliatom 14C results in the sodium salt of (U-14C)-oxalacetic acid ethylester. When reacted with S-methyl-(14C)-isothiouronium iodide (having an activity higher than 50 mCi/mMole), the substance yields S-methyl-(U-14C)-2-thioorotic acid ethylester whose hydrolysis in an acid medium results in (U-14C)-orotic acid. The (U-14C)-orotic acid can easily be separated from the reaction mixture in the form of precipitate which chemically and radiochemically is almost pure. When an inactive oxalic acid ethylester is used for synthesis, (2,4,5-14C)-orotic acid of a mole activity higher than 150 mCi/mMole can be prepared using the procedure described. (B.S.)

  10. Decay of 226Ra by 14C emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the pioneering experiment by Rose and Jones in 1984 demonstrating 14C decay of 223Ra, spontaneous emission of clusters heavier than α particles but lighter than fission products could be found in several cases to be a rare decay mode of heavy nuclei. This new kind of radioactivity has branching ratios relative to α decay well below 10-9. For energetical reasons the emitted fragments are even-even and the daughter nucleus lies close to the doubly magic 208Pb. Polycarbonate track-recording foils which are sensitive to energetic carbon nuclei but not to α particles are very well suited detectors for the study of 14C emission radioactivity. The tracks are made visible under a microscope by etching techniques. Observation of spontaneous emission of 14C from 226Ra claimed by Hourani et al. and Barwick et al. has been confirmed. Since thick sources of 226Ra were used in these experiments the experimental definitions of decay energy and mass were not very accurate. The experiment described in the thesis measured for the first time charge and energy of the emitted fragments by using thin 226Ra sources and polycarbonate track-recording films. The decay mode could thus be identified unambiguously. The track detector was calibrated with tandem-accelerated 14C and 16O ions and tested by observing the now well established 14C emission from 223Ra; for this decay mode a branching ratio of (5,0 ± 1,0).10-10 relative to α decay was found in agreement with values from the literature. In the case of 226Ra the result for 14C/α ratio is (2,3 ± 1,2).10-11. The order of magnitude of the branching ratios can be reproduced by theoretical models. Estimates of partial half-lifes of Ra and other heavy isotopes for rare decay modes are discussed in the theoretical section of the thesis. 100 refs., 3 tabs., 30 figs. (Author)

  11. Sodium VCHP with Carbon-Carbon Radiator for Radioisotope Stirling Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarau, Calin; Anderson, William G.; Miller, William O.; Ramirez, Rogelio

    2010-01-01

    In a Stirling radioisotope system, heat must continually be removed from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules to maintain the modules and surrounding insulation at acceptable temperatures. The Stirling converter normally provides this cooling. If the Stirling convertor stops in the current system the insulation is designed to spoil, preventing damage to the GPHS at the cost of an earlier termination of the mission. An alkali-metal Variable Conductance Heat Pipe (VCHP) can be used to allow multiple stops and restarts of the Stirling convertor. A sodium VCHP with a Haynes 230 envelope was designed and fabricated for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), with a baseline 850° C heater head temperature. When the Stirling convertor is stopped, the heat from the GPHS is rejected to the Cold Side Adapter Flange using a low-mass, carbon-carbon radiator. The VCHP is designed to activate with a AT of 30° C. The 880° C temperature when the Stirling convertor is stopped is high enough to avoid risking standard ASRG operation, but low enough to save most of the heater head life. The VCHP has low mass and low thermal losses for normal operation. The design has been modified from an earlier, stainless steel prototype with a nickel radiator. In addition to replacing the nickel radiator with a low mass carbon-carbon radiator, the radiator location has been moved from the ASRG case to the cold side adapter flange. This flange already removes two-thirds of the heat during normal operation, so it is optimized to transfer heat to the case. The VCHP was successfully tested with a turn-on ΔT of 30° C in three orientations: horizontal, gravity-aided, and against gravity.

  12. Development and characterization of carbon-bonded carbon fiber insulation for radioisotope space power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, G.C.; Robbins, J.M.

    1985-06-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), an improved radioisotope heat source, employs a unique thermal insulation material, carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF), to protect the fuel capsule and to help achieve the highest possible specific power. The CBCF insulation is made from chopped rayon fiber about 10 ..mu..m in diameter and 250 ..mu..m long, which is carbonized and bonded with phenolic resin particles. The CBCF shapes, both tubes and plates, are formed in a multiple molding facility by vacuum molding a water slurry of the carbonized chopped-rayon fiber (54 wt %) and phenolic resin (46 wt %). The molded shapes are subsequently dried and cured. Final carbonization of the resin is at 1600/sup 0/C. Machining to close tolerances (+-0.08 mm) is accomplished by conventional tooling and fixturing. The resulting material is an excellent lightweight insulation with a nominal density of 0.2 Mg/m/sup 3/ and a thermal conductivity of 0.24 W(m.K) in vacuum at 2000/sup 0/C. Several attributes that make CBCF superior to other known high-temperature insulation materials for the GPHS application have been identified. It has the excellent attributes of light weight, low thermal conductivity, chemical compatibility, and high-temperature capabilities. The mechanical strength of CBCF insulation is satisfactory for the GPHS application; it has passed vibration tests simulating launch conditions. The basic fabrication technique was refined to eliminate undesirable large pores and cracks often present in materials fabricated by earlier techniques. Also, processing was scaled up to incease the fabrication rate by a factor of 10. The specific properties of the CBCF were tailored by adjusting material and processing variables to obtain the desired results. We report here how work on CBCF characterization and development conducted at ORNL from 1978 through 1980 has contributed to the GPHS program to meet the requirements of both the Galileo and Ulysees Missions.

  13. Compilation of carbon-14 data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review and critical analysis was made of the original sources of carbon-14 in the graphite moderator and reflector zones of the eight Hanford production reactors, the present physical and chemical state of the carbon-14, pathways (other than direct combustion) by which the carbon-14 could be released to the biosphere, and the maximum rate at which it might be released under circumstances which idealistically favor the release. Areas of uncertainty are noted and recommendations are made for obtaining additional data in three areas: (1) release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated graphite saturated with aerated water; (2) characterization of carbon-14 deposited outside the moderator and reflector zones; and (3) corrosion/release rate of carbon-14 from irradiated steel and aluminum alloys

  14. Similar lethal effect in mammalian cells for two radioisotopes of copper with different decay schemes, 64Cu amd 67Cu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decays of 64Cu incorporated in human malignant (A549) or monkey non-malignant (CVI) cells lead to cell death. When plotted as a function of the radioactivity introduced in the growth medium (μCi/ml at t = O), the residual colony-forming capability decreases exponentially. The slope of the corresponding curve is steeper for A549 than for CV1 cells. Different data show that the cellular lethal event is a consequence of 64Cu transmutation and not of the irradiation by the simultaneously emitted β- and β+ particles. Liquid holding results show that the lethal event is irreparable. The decays of 67Cu, another radioisotope of copper, lead to cell death with the same exponential survival curve and the same lethal efficiency as for 64Cu, in spite of their different decay schemes. The lethal efficiency of both copper isotopes is close to that of 125I utilized in the form of iododeoxyuridine under the same experimental conditions as 64Cu and 67Cu. (author)

  15. Power from Radioisotopes (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R; Mead, Robert L

    1971-01-01

    This booklet discusses Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP), called isotope power generators, that are based on using heat from the decay of radioisotopes to produce electricity. These are the SNAP systems with odd-numbered designators. The basics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are discussed and their uses as power sources in space exploration and on earth are described. Various radioisotope heat sources are discussed and a table of RTGs built under the SNAP program listing their uses, electrical power, weight, the radioisotope used, the radioisotope's half-life, and the generator life is given.

  16. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document gives a first introduction to 14C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  17. Energy of the 14O superallowed positron decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The threshold energy of the 14N(p,n)14O reaction has been measured to be 6354.35(18) keV relative to a 1-V standard, and an earlier value has been withdrawn. This leads to a Qec value for the superallowed positron decay of 14O of 2831.53(17) keV and a recommended mean value of Qec=2831.47(14) keV

  18. Carbon-14 in tree rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate how reliably the carbon 14 content of tree rings reflects that of atmospheric carbon dioxide, two types of determinations were carried out: (1) carbon 14 determinations in annual rings from the beginning of this century until 1974 and (2) carbon 14 determinations in synchronous wood from the North American bristlecone pine and from European oak trees, dendrochronologically dated to have grown in the third and fourth century B.C. The first series of measurements showed that bomb-produced radiocarbon was incorporated in wood at a time when it was converted from sapwood to heartwood, whenever radiocarbon from bomb testing was present in the atmosphere. The second series showed that wood more than 2000 years old and grown on two different continents at different altitudes had, within the limits of experimental error, the same radiocarbon content. This work and other experimental evidence, obtained in part by other laboratories, show that tree rings reflect the average radiocarbon content of global atmospheric carbon dioxide accurately within several parts per mil. In rare cases, deviations of up to 10 parts per thousand may be possible. This means that a typical single radiocarbon date for wood or charcoal possesses an intrinsic uncertainty (viz., an estimated ''one-sigma error'' in addition to all the other errors) of the order of +-50 years. This intrinsic uncertainty is independent of the absolute age of the sample. More accurate dates can, in principle, be obtained by the so-called method of ''wiggle matching.''

  19. Exciton decay dynamics in individual carbon nanotubes at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Gokus, Tobias; Hartschuh, Achim; Harutyunyan, Hayk; Allegrini, Maria; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred; Green, Alexander A.; Hersam, Mark C.; Araujo, Paulo T.; Jorio, Ado

    2008-01-01

    We studied the exciton decay dynamics of individual semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes at room temperature using time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photoluminescence decay from nanotubes of the same (n,m) type follows a single exponential decay function, however, with lifetimes varying between about 1 and 40 ps from nanotube to nanotube. A correlation between broad photoluminescence spectra and short lifetimes was found and explained by defects promoting both nonradi...

  20. Radioisotope instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, J F; Silverleaf, D J

    1971-01-01

    International Series of Monographs in Nuclear Energy, Volume 107: Radioisotope Instruments, Part 1 focuses on the design and applications of instruments based on the radiation released by radioactive substances. The book first offers information on the physical basis of radioisotope instruments; technical and economic advantages of radioisotope instruments; and radiation hazard. The manuscript then discusses commercial radioisotope instruments, including radiation sources and detectors, computing and control units, and measuring heads. The text describes the applications of radioisotop

  1. Radioisotope applications in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short mention of the economic importance of the industrial application of radioisotopes the most necessary fundamental principles of nuclear physics are given. The nature and the laws of the radioactive decay are illustrated, the interaction of radiation with matter and the absorption laws are described and the production of radioisotopes are mentioned. Subsequent the various detectors for measuring radioactivity are described with a short reference to the problems of the electronic measuring devices. At the end the various measuring techniques and the methods of application for radioisotopes in industry are illustrated. (author)

  2. The results of the IFIN-HH and INR Pitesti cooperation in obtaining radioisotopes at TRIGA -- SSR-14 MW reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short history is presented about the radioisotope production at the 2 MW WWRS reactor of the Institut of Atomic Physics Bucharest, beginning with July 1957. In 1967 a catalogue was issued, containing 44 products, radioisotopes and labelled combinations produced by the laboratory for radioisotope preparation (CPR). Later, in 1971 the Technical Report Series nr. 128, issued by IAEA, mentioned 10 Romania technologies for preparation of radioactive products. During 1994-1998 obtaining the 99m Tc ROMTEC generated from fission 99 Mo was one of the main objective of the CPR. After the WWRS reactor shutdown on December 21, 1997 the radioisotope production developed by the TRIGA -- SSR-14 MW reactor, at Pitesti. Two important radioisotopes used in medicine on therapy purposes focused our main attention: 131 I used as pharmaceutical, 1'31 INa solution and gelatine capsules and 192 Ir used as brachytherapy sources. The following radionuclides were produced: 99 Mo and 198 Au used as radiopharmaceuticals, 32 P, 51 Cr for life sciences and 134 Cs, 60 Co, 110m Ag for industrial applications. The designing of new targets to be irradiated as the irradiation conditions were different from those of the WWRS reactor both as geometry and neutron flux values. The chosen solutions were adapted for two different irradiation zones: the reactor core zone, with high flux values of (8-12) x 1013 n/cm2s and maximum imposed external diameter of the irradiation capsule of 12 mm, and the reflector zone with (2-5) x 1013 n/cm2s flux values and external diameter of maximum 25 mm. New types of aluminium (of nuclear purity) capsules, sealed by electron beam welding, were prepared. The primary package was chosen according to the irradiated materials, such as: - small aluminium capsules in the case of powder targets and small quartz vials for iridium needles. By difference of the past WWRS reactor situation, when about 80 g weight targets were prepared in order to obtain 131 I and 99 Mo, in this

  3. Radioisotope studies on coconut nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on coconut nutrition using radioisotopes are reviewed. Methods of soil placement and plant injection techniques for feeding nutrients to coconut have been studied, and irrigation practices for efficient uptake and utilization of nutrients are suggested. The absorption, distribution and translocation pattern of radioactive phosphorus and its incorporation into the nucleic acid fraction in healthy and root (wilt) diseased coconut palms have been studied. Carbon assimilation rates (using carbon-14) in spherical, semispherical and erect canopied coconut palms having different yield characteristics are reviewed and discussed. (author)

  4. Evaluation of carbon-14 life cycle in reactors VVER-1000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is aimed at the evaluation of carbon-14 life cycle in light water reactors VVER-1000. Carbon-14 is generated as a side product in different systems of nuclear reactors and has been an issue not only in radioactive waste management but mainly in release into the environment in the form of gaseous effluents. The principal sources of this radionuclide are in primary cooling water and fuel. Considerable amount of C-14 is generated by neutron reactions with oxygen 17O and nitrogen 14N present in water coolant and fuel. The reaction likelihood and consequently volume of generated radioisotope depends on several factors, especially on the effective cross-section, concentrations of parent elements and conditions of power plant operating strategies. Due to its long half-life and high capability of integration into the environment and thus into the living species, it is very important to monitor the movement of carbon-14 in all systems of nuclear power plant and to manage its release out of NPP. The dominant forms of radioactive carbon-14 are the hydrocarbons owing to the combinations with hydrogen used for absorption of radiolytic oxygen. These organic compounds, such as formaldehyde, methyl alcohol, ethyl alcohol and formic acid can be mostly retained on ion exchange resins used in the system for purifying primary cooling water. The gaseous carbon compounds (CH4 and CO2) are released into the atmosphere via the ventilation systems of NPP. Based on the information and data obtained from different sources, it has been designed a balance model of possible carbon-14 pathways throughout the whole NPP. This model includes also mass balance model equations for each important node in system and available sampling points which will be the background for further calculations. This document is specifically not to intended to describe the best monitoring program attributes or technologies but rather to provide evaluation of obtained data and find the optimal way to upgrade

  5. The preparation of carrier free short lived radioisotopes with a 14 MeV neutron generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of carrier free radioaluminum, magnesium, sodium and halogens is described. 28Al, 29Al, 27Mg and 24Na are produced by (n,p) reactions with SiO2, Al2O3 and MgO. Tens of μCi of these isotopes were obtained with recoveries of 15-50%. The radioisotopes of halogens are prepared by irradiating of alkyl halides taking advantage of the Szilard Chalmers reaction and extracting the inorganic halides with water, or aqueous solution of bisulfite in order to increase the recovery. Three factors are important for the target material: a density smaller than 1 gram/cc so that the aqueous phase will be the down phase in the separating funnel; a boiling point not too low to avoid the vapors of the target material to cause radioactive contamination by breathing, and not too high to allow the removal of the dissolved organic material in the aqueous phase by a fast distillation. This limits the boiling point of the target material to 70-80 deg C. (B.G.)

  6. Carbon-14 Bomb-Pulse Dating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchholz, B A

    2007-12-16

    Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950s and early 1960s doubled the concentration of carbon-14 atmosphere and created a pulse that labeled everything alive in the past 50 years as carbon moved up the food chain. The variation in carbon-14 concentration in time is well-documented and can be used to chronologically date all biological materials since the mid-1950s.

  7. Carbon-14 dating with the 14UD accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon-14 accelerator mass spectroscopy system is now in routine operation on the 14UD accelerator. It offers a modest precision of ∼ 3% for samples that are >10% modern. Its performances and some of recent applications are briefly discussed

  8. The carbon 14 and environment; Le carbone 14 et l'environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    This article resume the history and the properties of the carbon 14 ({sup 14}C). We also find the different origins and the produced quantities. The carbon transfers in environment are explained and so the {sup 14}C. The biological effects and the sanitary aspects are clarified. The measurements of carbon 14 are given as well its application through the dating. The waste management is tackled. (N.C.)

  9. Application of radioisotopes in entomology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope techniques are effective in entomology and studies on insects physiology. The study presents the use of radioisotopes in pest control programs: Methods of insects irradiation and the concept of biological half-life of the radioisotopes in comparison with physical half-life are explained. Main radioisotopes used in entomology are:3H, 14Ca, 32P, 35S, 38Cl. Other radioisotopes contributing to studies on insects are: 198Au, 134Cs, 131I, 86Rb, 65Zn, 59Fe, 45Ca, 24Na, 22Na. Radiation doses specific to each radioisotopes are given in tables. As an example of the application of radioisotopes in pest control: the determination of insects population density by means of releasing irradiated male insects than chasing them; studying of reproduction activity of Agrotis ipsilon; studying of egg laying of Heliocoverpa armigera moth. 15 refs. 2 figs. 2 tabs

  10. Decay of cacti and carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvie, Laurence A. J.

    2006-03-01

    Cacti contain large quantities of Ca-oxalate biominerals, with C derived from atmospheric CO2. Their death releases these biominerals into the environment, which subsequently transform to calcite via a monohydrocalcite intermediate. Here, the fate of Ca-oxalates released by plants in arid environments is investigated. This novel and widespread form of biomineralization has unexpected consequences on C cycling and calcite accumulation in areas with large numbers of cacti. The magnitude of this mineralization is revealed by studying the large columnar cactus Carnegiea gigantea (Engelm.) Britton and Rose in southwestern Arizona (locally called the saguaro). A large C. gigantea contains on the order of 1×105 g of the Ca-oxalate weddellite—CaC2O4·2H2O. In areas with high C. gigantea density, there is an estimated 40 g Catm m-2 sequestered in Ca-oxalates. Following the death of the plant, the weddellite transforms to calcite on the order to 10-20 years. In areas with high saguaro density, there is an estimated release of up to 2.4 g calcite m-2 year-1 onto the desert soil. Similar transformation mechanisms occur with the Ca-oxalates that are abundant in the majority of cacti. Thus, the total atmospheric C returned to the soil of areas with a high number density of cacti is large, suggesting that there may be a significant long-term accumulation of atmospheric C in these soils derived from Ca-oxalate biominerals. These findings demonstrate that plant decay in arid environments may have locally significant impacts on the Ca and inorganic C cycles.

  11. Which way radioisotopes?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sion, N.

    2011-03-15

    The cancellation of the MAPLES program and the impending retirement of the NRU reactor in 2016 (all utilizing Highly Enriched Uranium HEU for their targets) plus the rigours of non proliferation treaties, has created an increasingly short supply of radioisotopes. Alternate pathways must be found, even created, to maintain the supply of radioisotopes i.e. Mo-99 (decaying into Tc-99m) as well as to provide the several other types of isotopes used in nuclear medicine in order to maintain Canada's leadership in science, innovation and public health. Medical isotopes help locate cancers with precision, therapeutically treat cancers, and provide physicians the diagnostic tools to save lives. (author)

  12. Carbon 14 and tritium radioactivity of alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of measuring carbon 14 radioactivity of alcohols has been perfected in order to establish the correct determination of synthetic alcohol added to fermentation alcohol. The specific carbon and tritium activity of alcohol of different origins have been determined for 1973 and 1974. The Suess effect and nuclear fall-out are observed

  13. MODIFYING V-14 RUBBER WITH CARBON FIBERS

    OpenAIRE

    Shadrinov N. V.; Nartakhova S. I.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of carbon fibers and modified carbon fibers on properties of industrially produced V-14 rubber is examined. The dependences of physical and mechanical properties, hardness, abrasion resistance and resistance in aggressive environment on few amount of filled fiber are established. Structural properties of reinforced elastomeric composites are studied by scanning electron microscopy. Elastomeric layer on the surface of modified carbon fiber, confirmed with high adhesion is identified

  14. Carbon-14 measurements in aquifers with methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of various groundwater systems indicates that methane is a common trace constituent and occasionally a major carbon species in groundwaters. Thermocatalytic methane had delta13Csub(CH4)>-45 per mille and microbially produced or biogenic methane had delta13Csub(CH4)13C values for the inorganic carbon. Thermocatalytic methane had no apparent effect on the inorganic carbon. Because methanogenesis seriously affects the carbon isotope geochemistry of groundwaters, the correction of raw 14C ages of affected groundwaters must consider these effects. Conceptual models are developed which adjust the 14C activity of the groundwater for the effects of methanogenesis and for the dilution of carbon present during infiltration by simple dissolution of rock carbonate. These preliminary models are applied to groundwaters from the Alliston sand aquifer where methanogenesis has affected most samples. In this system, methanogenic bacteria using organic matter present in the aquifer matrix as substrate have added inorganic carbon to the groundwater which has initiated further carbonate rock dissolution. These processes have diluted the inorganic carbon 14C activity. The adjusted groundwater ages can be explained in terms of the complex hydrogeology of this aquifer, but also indicate that these conceptual models must be more rigorously tested to evaluate their appropriateness. (author)

  15. Reactor-produced therapeutic radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The significant worldwide increase in therapeutic radioisotope applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology requires the dependable production of sufficient levels of radioisotopes for these applications (Reba, 2000; J. Nucl. Med., 1998; Nuclear News, 1999; Adelstein and Manning, 1994). The issues associated with both accelerator- and reactor-production of therapeutic radioisotopes is important. Clinical applications of therapeutic radioisotopes include the use of both sealed sources and unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources. Targeted radiopharmaceutical agents include those for cancer therapy and palliation of bone pain from metastatic disease, ablation of bone marrow prior to stem cell transplantation, treatment modalities for mono and oligo- and polyarthritis, for cancer therapy (including brachytherapy) and for the inhibition of the hyperplastic response following coronary angioplasty and other interventional procedures (For example, see Volkert and Hoffman, 1999). Sealed sources involve the use of radiolabeled devices for cancer therapy (brachytherapy) and also for the inhibition of the hyperplasia which is often encountered after angioplasty, especially with the exponential increase in the use of coronary stents and stents for the peripheral vasculature and other anatomical applications. Since neutron-rich radioisotopes often decay by beta decay or decay to beta-emitting daughter radioisotopes which serve as the basis for radionuclide generator systems, reactors are expected to play an increasingly important role for the production of a large variety of therapeutic radioisotopes required for these and other developing therapeutic applications. Because of the importance of the availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes for these applications, an understanding of the contribution of neutron spectra for radioisotope production and determination of those cross sections which have not yet been established is important. This

  16. Bond Rupture following C14 and T3 Beta Decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a result of nuclear transformations an atom acquires a recoil energy, and a portion of this energy becomes associated with the chemical bond or bonds joining the activated atom to the molecule. Usually sufficient energy is deposited in these bonds to permit the activated atom to dissociate from the remainder of the molecule. Bond-rupture, however, usually does not occur with 100% efficiency. Momentum transfer to an atom in a molecule (internal excitation and bond-rupture) have been discussed recently with reference to activation of atoms joined to a molecule by only one bond. Additional molecules are considered in the present paper, and data presented on the net recoil energy required for bond- rupture, the rotational and vibrational excitation energies received by the rupturing bond, the internal energy of the radical originally bonded to the activated atom, and the kinetic energy of the radicals. It is shown that, on the average, the recoil energy that must be acquired by the activated atom in order to rupture from the molecule is about 25% greater than that calculated assuming a pseudo-diatomic molecule. Data are also presented for certain C14 and T3 beta-decay recoil processes. For C14O2 it is calculated that a net N14 recoil energy s 1.92 times the ON-O+ bond dissociation energy is required for bond-rupture. Since the NO+2 product may possess about 0.6 to 1.0 eV of electronic excitation energy, the ON-O+ bond dissociation energy is not uniquely defined. The calculated value of non-bond-rupture is 73 - 87% in good agreement with the reported experimental value of 81%. Similar data are also presented for such molecules as CH3T, C2H5T, C3H7T, and C142H6. (author)

  17. Accounting carbon storage in decaying root systems of harvested forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, G Geoff; Van Lear, David H; Hu, Huifeng; Kapeluck, Peter R

    2012-05-01

    Decaying root systems of harvested trees can be a significant component of belowground carbon storage, especially in intensively managed forests where harvest occurs repeatedly in relatively short rotations. Based on destructive sampling of root systems of harvested loblolly pine trees, we estimated that root systems contained about 32% (17.2 Mg ha(-1)) at the time of harvest, and about 13% (6.1 Mg ha(-1)) of the soil organic carbon 10 years later. Based on the published roundwood output data, we estimated belowground biomass at the time of harvest for loblolly-shortleaf pine forests harvested between 1995 and 2005 in South Carolina. We then calculated C that remained in the decomposing root systems in 2005 using the decay function developed for loblolly pine. Our calculations indicate that the amount of C stored in decaying roots of loblolly-shortleaf pine forests harvested between 1995 and 2005 in South Carolina was 7.1 Tg. Using a simple extrapolation method, we estimated 331.8 Tg C stored in the decomposing roots due to timber harvest from 1995 to 2005 in the conterminous USA. To fully account for the C stored in the decomposing roots of the US forests, future studies need (1) to quantify decay rates of coarse roots for major tree species in different regions, and (2) to develop a methodology that can determine C stock in decomposing roots resulting from natural mortality. PMID:22535427

  18. Accounting Carbon Storage in Decaying Root Systems of Harvested Forests

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, G. Geoff; Van Lear, David H.; Hu, Huifeng; Kapeluck, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    Decaying root systems of harvested trees can be a significant component of belowground carbon storage, especially in intensively managed forests where harvest occurs repeatedly in relatively short rotations. Based on destructive sampling of root systems of harvested loblolly pine trees, we estimated that root systems contained about 32% (17.2 Mg ha−1) at the time of harvest, and about 13% (6.1 Mg ha−1) of the soil organic carbon 10 years later. Based on the published roundwood output data, we...

  19. Radioisotopes in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are extensively used in nuclear medicine to allow physicians to explore bodily structures. The thyroid, bones, heart, liver and many other organs can be easily imaged and disorder in their functions revealed. Technetium-99, a radioisotope is a decay product of Molybdenum-99, a radionuclide with half life of sixty-six hours is discussed. It is widely used in nuclear medical procedure. In this application, the radio nuclide is chemically attached to a drug chosen for its tendency to collect in specific organ of the body and the so is then injected into the patient's body. After a short time, half life of only six hours, an image is collected with a radio sensitive detector for analysis. Technetium-99 decays by isomeric process which emits gamma rays and low energy beta particles. (author)

  20. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doxylamine succinate, N,N-dimethyl-2-[1-phenyl-1-(2-pyridinyl)-ethoxy]ethanamine succinate is an antihistamine used primarily as a sedative. Carbon-14 labeled doxylamine succinate, required for toxicological studies, was synthesized in two steps starting from 2-benzoyl pyridine. (author)

  1. Comparative analysis of taxonomic, functional, and metabolic patterns of microbiomes from 14 full-scale biogas reactors by metagenomic sequencing and radioisotopic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Fotidis, Ioannis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-01-01

    Background Biogas production is a very complex process due to the high complexity in diversity and interactions of the microorganisms mediating it, and only limited and diffuse knowledge exists about the variation of taxonomic and functional patterns of microbiomes across different biogas reactors......, and their relationships with the metabolic patterns. The present study used metagenomic sequencing and radioisotopic analysis to assess the taxonomic, functional, and metabolic patterns of microbiomes from 14 full-scale biogas reactors operated under various conditions treating either sludge or manure...

  2. Trends in the development of radioisotope batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved methods for producing radioisotopes by nuclear fuel reprocessing and the rapid development of microelectronics offer new possibilities for utilizing radioisotope batteries. A review is given of the main principles of conversion of decay energy into electric power. The current state of such energy sources is evaluated. Finally, new fields of application and further trends in the development are indicated. (author)

  3. Concentration of carbon-14 in plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 survey program initiated 1960 to gather data on current levels of carbon-14 in environments. Plants essential oil and fermented alcohol were selected as sample materials. The carbon contained in these materials is fixed from atmospheric carbon dioxide by anabolism, so they well reflect the variation of carbon-14 in biosphere. Thymol; Thymol was obtained from the essential oil of Orthodon Japonicium Benth which was cultivated and harvested every year in the experimental field of NIRS and Chiba University. The methylation was carried out to eliminate the strong quenching action of the phenolic group of thymol. Eighteen grams of thymol methyl ether was used as liquid scintillator by adding 0.4% PPO and 0.01% POPOP. Menthol; Menthol was obtained from Mentha arvensis L which was cultivated in the east part of Hokkaido and prepared by Kitami Factory of Federation of Agricultural Cooperative Society of Hokkaido. The chemical conversion of menthol to p-cymene was carried out and used as liquid scintillator as same as above sample. Lemongrass oil; Lemongrass oil was obtained from Cymbopogon citratus Stapf which was cultivated in Izu Experimental Station of Medicinal Plants, National Institute of Hygienic Science located Minami-Izu, Shizuoka Pref. The p-cymene derived from Lemongrass oil was used as liquid scintillator. Alcohol; All sample of fermented alcohol were obtained from the Alcohol Factories of Ministry of Trade and Industry. Raw materials of alcohol were sweet potatos cultivated in several prefectures in Japan ''high test'' molasses and blackstrap molasses imported from several countries of Asia, South America and South Africa, crude alcohol imported from U.S.A., Argentina and Brazil. Mixed solvent of 10 ml sample alcohol and 10 ml toluene or p-xylene containing 0.8% PPO and 0.1% dimethyl POPOP was used as liquid scintillator. (author)

  4. The lichens, tritium and carbon 14 integrators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report concerns a research for the tritium and for the carbon 14 in lichens in a spirit of bio-indication: the first results appear in Daillant and al (2004 ) and additional results were presented to the congress B.I.O.M.A.P. in Slovenia, organized collectively by the institute Josef Stefan from Ljubljana and the international atomic energy agency from Vienna (Daillant and al 2003). (N.C.)

  5. Radioisotope generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioisotope generator is described in which it is possible to interupt the elution process at any desired time, i.e. before the electron flacon is full. The interuption is performed in such a way that sterile air is simultaneously admitted into the generator, into both the column and the elution flacon. (Th.P.)

  6. LDEO Carbon 14 Data from Selected Sea floor Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Carbon-14 data in this file were compiled by W.F. Ruddiman and staff at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Data include 974 carbon-14...

  7. A gaseous measurement system for carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane: An analytical methodology to be applied in the evaluation of the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane produced via microbial activity in volcanic tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study were to develop a gaseous measurement system for the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane produced via microbial activity or geochemical action on leachate in tuff; to determine the trapping efficiency of the system for carbon-14 dioxide; to determine the trapping efficiency of the system for carbon-14 methane; to apply the experimentally determined factors regarding the system's trapping efficiency for carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane to a trapping algorithm to determine the activity of the carbon-14 dioxide and carbon-14 methane in a mixed sample; to determine the minimum detectable activity of the measurement process in picocuries per liter; and to determine the lower limit or detection of the measurement process in counts per minute

  8. Carbon-14 measurement using carbon dioxide absorption method - Our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-C14 measurement using absorption technique consists of direct absorption of sample carbon dioxide into an absorber - scintillator mixture. This technique is a simple, fast, less expensive and less hazardous technique compared to benzene synthesis or any other technique. This techniques enable us in preparing six/seven samples in a day while benzene synthesis technique takes two days for the preparation of one sample. It is useful for radiocarbon age up to about 38,000 a BP (∼1 pMC), which is adequate for most of the hydrological investigations. All the total dissolved inorganic carbon (TDIC) is precipitated as barium carbonate from the ∼60 to 70 liters of water at the site. In the laboratory, it is reacted with orthophosphoric acid to give carbon dioxide (CO2). This carbon dioxide is transferred into 0.5 L capacity cylinder. The reaction and collection of gas is done under vacuum using a glass vacuum line. Carbon dioxide is directly absorbed in 11.5 ml of carbasorb + 11 ml of Permaflour V (commercially not available) or its equivalent scintillator in the specially made absorption apparatus. Since, absorption process is exothermic, temperature of the medium is maintained at about 220 deg. C, it results in the absorption of ∼7 m moles of carbon dioxide per mL of cabasorb. As reaction progresses, bubbles can be seen rising slowly. The end point is marked by rapid rise in the solution level. Carbon dioxide obtained from oxalic acid (Standard) and background carbon dioxide are also absorbed in the same quantity of absorber and scintillator mixture. Samples, standard and background are transferred in 22 mL teflon vials and counted in low level liquid scintillation counter (LKB Wallac 1220 Quantulus) for 1000 minutes. The counting efficiency at best factor of merit (AON/ON/√B) is ∼60 % where AON is normalized net count rate of standard and B is the background count rate. The mean count rate of last fifteen background samples is 0.64 ± .0005 cpm with an

  9. Soil metabolic transformations of carbon-14-myo-inositol, carbon-14-phytic acid and carbon-14-iron(III) phytate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uniformly labelled 14C-phytic acid and 14C-iron(III) phytate were synthesized from uniformly labelled 14C-myo-inositol. The three compounds were incubated in an Andosol sandy loam at 70% field capacity and 36.50C for a 12-day period. Myo-inositol, phytic acid and iron(III) phytate underwent a 61.0, 1.9 and 0% microbial oxidation respectively to CO2 during the incubation period. The rate of fixation of 14C-phytic acid was illustrated by its rapid decline in metabolism in the 12-day period. The metabolism rate of phytic was considerably reduced by the presumed formation of iron(III) and aluminium phytate. The metabolism rate of myo-inositol was reduced nine-fold after an initial rapid metabolism during the first day of incubation. The following mechanisms were observed in the soil metabolism of myo-inositol: (1) soil mineral-inositol carbon adsorption, (2) humic acid-inositol carbon adsorption, (3) the phosphorylation of myo-inositol, and (4) the epimerization of myo-inositol to chiro-inositol. The formation of (1) and (2) was found to be highly dependent upon microbial activity. Interactions (1), (2) and (3)are considered as possible mechanisms for the inhibition of the microbial oxidation of myo-inositol. The inhibition of myo-inositol oxidation via adsorption or phosphorylation is considered to be due to the chemical blockage of the stereo-specific microbial oxidative attack on the axial hydroxyl group. (author)

  10. Radioisotopes - byproducts of the uranium cycle with commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several fission products are used in industry, medicine and research. Cesium 137 and strontium 90 are the most useful long-lived fission products recovered from the processing of spent reactor fuel. The short-lived isotopes molybdenum 99, xenon 133 and iodine 131 are more widely used, particularly in medicine. Technetium 99, daughter of molybdenum 99, is now the most widely used isotope for in-vivo diagnosis. More than 65 percent of all the molybdenum 99 from which this material is derived comes from uranium targets irradiated in reactors at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Transuranic elements produced by successive neutron capture/decay events in a reactor have at least one commercial application: americium 241 is used in domestic and industrial smoke detectors. Plutonium 238 or americium 241 are combined with beryllium as neutron sources for oil well logging or moisture measurement. Many other isotopes are produced by target irradiation in reactors, including cobalt 60, iodine 125, carbon 14 and iridium 192. New uses are being found for the tritium produced in CANDU reactors by neutron capture in heavy water. Many radioisotopes produced as byproducts of the nuclear fuel cycle have become essential to our high standard of living. Canada is not only the world's largest uranium producer but also the major supplier of reactor isotopes

  11. Radioisotopes in Hydrology. Proceedings of a Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing emphasis on the development of water resources poses problems which are of interest to all countries, both developing and advanced, where the demand for water is continuously rising. There is no doubt that greater efforts must be made to evaluate, control and develop water resources using all scientific means available and during recent years increasing attention has been directed to the supplementation of hydrological methods with radioisotope techniques. These techniques have already been applied to a number of problems and their potential usefulness demonstrated. Radioisotopes can be used for stream discharge measurements with an accuracy as good as that obtainable with conventional methods. They are also finding increasing application in the measurement of groundwater direction and velocity, the study of suspected interconnections between different sources of water, and the investigation of mixing processes in rivers and lakes. Radioisotope techniques have been used in different parts of the world for studying the transport of silt in rivers and harbours. Present research is directed towards making these investigations on a quantitative basis which, if successful, would be of great importance in the design of hydraulic structures. The method of finding out the age of groundwater by measuring its natural tritium content can be applied to the determination of the recharge rate of groundwater bodies, so enabling a more rational use of the groundwater reserves without fear of overexploitation. Current research is aimed at using carbon-14 for groundwater-dating to extend the age measurable by tritium. A Symposium on the use of radioisotopes in hydrology was organized by the Agency and held in March 1963 in Tokyo in co-operation with the Japanese Government, for whose material and other assistance and generous hospitality the Agency wishes to record its grateful appreciation. The Symposium was attended by about 100 participants from 14 countries and 5

  12. Laboratory Experiments to Evaluate Matrix Diffusion of Dissolved Organic Carbon Carbon-14 in Southern Nevada Fractured-rock Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyatt [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-05-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) is used to estimate groundwater ages by comparing the DIC 14C content in groundwater in the recharge area to the DIC 14C content in the downgradient sampling point. However, because of chemical reactions and physical processes between groundwater and aquifer rocks, the amount of DIC 14C in groundwater can change and result in 14C loss that is not because of radioactive decay. This loss of DIC 14C results in groundwater ages that are older than the actual groundwater ages. Alternatively, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C in groundwater does not react chemically with aquifer rocks, so DOC 14C ages are generally younger than DIC 14C ages. In addition to chemical reactions, 14C ages may also be altered by the physical process of matrix diffusion. The net effect of a continuous loss of 14C to the aquifer matrix by matrix diffusion and then radioactive decay is that groundwater appears to be older than it actually is. Laboratory experiments were conducted to measure matrix diffusion coefficients for DOC 14C in volcanic and carbonate aquifer rocks from southern Nevada. Experiments were conducted using bromide (Br-) as a conservative tracer and 14C-labeled trimesic acid (TMA) as a surrogate for groundwater DOC. Outcrop samples from six volcanic aquifers and five carbonate aquifers in southern Nevada were used. The average DOC 14C matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 2.9 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was approximately the same at 1.7 x 10-7 cm2/s. The average Br- matrix diffusion coefficient for volcanic rocks was 10.4 x 10-7 cm2/s, whereas the average for carbonate rocks was less at 6.5 x 10-7 cm2/s. Carbonate rocks exhibited greater variability in

  13. Searches for heavy neutrinos from 35S, 14C, and 63Ni beta decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have searched for the effect of a neutrino of mass 17 keV/c2 in the beta decay of 35S with an apparatus incorporating a high resolution solid state detector and a super conducting solenoid. The experimental mixing probability of the 17keV neutrino is consistent with zero. The experimental sensitivity is verified by measurements with a mixed source of 35S and 14C, which artificially produces a distortion in the beta spectrum similar to that expected from the massive neutrino. Recently, we have performed similar searches in the beta decay of 14C and 63Ni. Results of these new measurements will be presented

  14. Simulation of groundwater flow in the Voltaian (around Tamale) using carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studying the process of groundwater flow in subsurface systems using numerical simulation has been widely practiced. The purpose of this study was to establish a 2D groundwater flow model for evaluating groundwater resources of the Voltaian Basin (around Tamale) in the Northern Region of Ghana. To understand the rate of abstraction of groundwater in the study area, a finite-element, steady-state groundwater flow model was used to simulate groundwater flow in the aquifer. COMSOL Multiphysics' (FEMLAB) Earth Science Module (ESM) package which is finite element analysis and solver software was used. The radioisotope used in the study was Carbon-14. Three wells were sampled for Carbon-14 concentration and used for the model verification, based on elevation. From the results, groundwater in the study area moves generally from higher to lower hydraulic head along paths perpendicular to the equipotential lines. The groundwater flow paths in the aquifer in the study area indicated that flow is predominantly regional. There was a regional groundwater flow from Kashegu to Nawuni. Kanshegu appears to be recharge area and Nawuni as discharge area. The flow rate obtained using Carbon-14 date was 2.86×10-7 m/s. The overall flow rate obtained from the model simulations was 2.66×10-7 m/s with an error margin of 6%. (author)

  15. Nuclear Structure Effects in the Exotic Decay of $^{225}$Ac via $^{14}$C Emission

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % IS323 \\\\ \\\\ We propose to build at Isolde a high intensity $^{225}$Ac source by $\\beta$-decay of $^{225}$(Ra+Fr) beam, to be used at the superconducting spectrometer SOLENO of IPN-Orsay in order to study a possible fine structure in the spectrum of $^{14}$C ions spontaneously emitted by $^{225}$Ac.

  16. The lichens, tritium and carbon 14 integrators; Les lichens, integrateurs de tritium et de carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daillant, O

    2007-07-01

    The present report concerns a research for the tritium and for the carbon 14 in lichens in a spirit of bio-indication: the first results appear in Daillant and al (2004 ) and additional results were presented to the congress B.I.O.M.A.P. in Slovenia, organized collectively by the institute Josef Stefan from Ljubljana and the international atomic energy agency from Vienna (Daillant and al 2003). (N.C.)

  17. Behavior of carbon-14 in the Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 released from the nuclear facilities is an important radionuclide for the safety assessment, because it tends to accumulate in environment through food chain and has a significant impact to personal dose. Carbon-14 has been monitored routinely as one of the main gaseous radionuclides exhausted from the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) since October of 1991. Furthermore, behavior of carbon-14 in TRP has been investigated through the reprocessing operation and the literature survey. This report describes the result of investigation about the behavior of carbon-14 in TRP as followings. 1. Only a very small amount of carbon-14 in the fuel was liberated into the shear off-gas and most of it was liberated into the dissolver off-gas. Part of the carbon-14 was trapped at the caustic scrubber installed in the off-gas treatment process, and untrapped carbon-14 was released into the environment from the main stack. Amount of carbon-14 released from the main stack was about 4.1∼6.5 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed. 2. Carbon-14 trapped at the caustic scrubbers installed in the dissolver off-gas and in the vessel off-gas treatment process is transferred to the low active waste vessel. Amount of carbon-14 transferred to the low active waste vessel was about 5.4∼9.6 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed. 3. The total amount of carbon-14 input to TRP was summed up to about 11.9∼15.5 GBq every ton of uranium reprocessed considering the released amount from the main stack and the trapped amount in the off-gas treatment devices. The amount of nitrogen impurity in the initial fuel was calculated about 15∼22ppm of uranium metal based on the measured carbon-14. 4. The solution in the low active waste vessel is concentrated at the evaporator. Most of the carbon-14 in the solution was transferred into concentrated solution. 5. Total Vitrification Demonstration Facility (TVF) started to operate in 1994. Since then, carbon-14 has been measured in the second sub stack

  18. Radioisotopes in the training of medical students

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the discovery of radioisotopes for the progress of science in general and that of biochemistry and physiology in particular has led us to provide experimental practice which enables medical students to become effectively acquainted with the properties and methods of use of radioisotopes, the measurement of their activity, and the possible risks involved in handling them. We have included in the exercises in quantitative determination for third-year medical students (the last pre-clinical year), practice in calibrating micropipettes using a 24Na solution prepared in the TRICO Centre's reactor by irradiating sodium carbonate with slow neutrons. The students make several GM-counter measurements of the activity of the stock solution over a period of time and of the activity of five samples taken with two different micropipettes. They then calculate, by measuring the decay in activity, the half-life of the isotope and relate their measurements to a reference time. In this way they calculate the volume of their micropipettes and the accuracy of the measurements. By means of a statistical analysis they compare the averages for the two pipettes and the accuracy of two operators. (author)

  19. Radioisotopes as Political Instruments, 1946–1953

    OpenAIRE

    Creager, Angela N. H.

    2009-01-01

    The development of nuclear «piles», soon called reactors, in the Manhattan Project provided a new technology for manufacturing radioactive isotopes. Radioisotopes, unstable variants of chemical elements that give off detectable radiation upon decay, were available in small amounts for use in research and therapy before World War II. In 1946, the U.S. government began utilizing one of its first reactors, dubbed X-10 at Oak Ridge, as a production facility for radioisotopes available for purchas...

  20. INR capabilities for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope production at INR Pitesti was developed upon the basis of two TRIGA reactors, one stationary and the other pulsed (TRIGA SSR 14 MW and TRIGA ACPR 20000 MW). The TRIGA SSR 14 MW presents two types of neutron spectra in the irradiations channels: a thermal spectrum from a water channel in the core and a channel in the reflector, suitable for irradiations of materials with high thermal neutron cross sections; a hard spectrum of the fuel type obtained through the removal of a fuel pin in a cluster, suitable for irradiations of nuclides with significant epithermal. For the radioisotope production five irradiation devices were used: capsules with the raw materials; capsules for iridium; capsules for radioisotope of medical use; irradiations pins and capsules; capsules with pins. These devices are used for irradiations in the core for production of radioisotopes of industrial use (for instance 192 Ir). For irradiations in the reflector with develop special devices for the production of radioisotope medical used (131 I, 192 Ir and 60 Co). Underway are studies for establishing the optimal conditions for the production of the fission products 99 Mo, 131 I, 133 Xe and of 125 I produce by neutron activation

  1. The optimization of the estimation of carbon-14 in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The urinalysis method for carbon-14 currently used by the bioassay laboratory of the Dosimetric Research Branch at CRNL has been tested and optimized for both sensitivity and efficiency. Urine is first treated with an enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of urea, the major carbon-containing component of urine; carbon dioxide is then liberated by the measured addition of excess acid and collected in 2-aminoethanol. The aminoethanol can be directly counted by the addition of a liquid scintillation cocktail. This method can be used to measure both the specific activity, (Bq/g-carbon) or the total activity of carbon-14 released from the urine sample

  2. Cluster Decay of the High-lying excited states in $^{14}$C

    CERN Document Server

    Tian, Z Y; Li, Z H; Lin, C J; Li, Q T; Ge, Y C; Lou, J L; Jiang, W; Li, J; Yang, Z H; Feng, J; Li, P J; Chen, J; Liu, Q; Zang, H L; Yang, B; Zhang, Y; Chen, Z Q; Liu, Y; Sun, X H; Ma, J; Jia, H M; Xu, X X; Yang, L; Ma, N R; Sun, L J

    2016-01-01

    A cluster-transfer experiment of $^9\\rm{Be}(^9\\rm{Be},^{14}\\rm{C}\\rightarrow\\alpha+^{10}\\rm{Be})\\alpha$ at an incident energy of 45 MeV was carried out in order to investigate the molecular structure in high-lying resonant states in $^{14}$C. This reaction is of extremely large $Q$-value, making it an excellent case to select the reaction mechanism and the final states in outgoing nuclei. The high-lying resonances in $^{14}$C are reconstructed for three sets of well discriminated final states in $^{10}$Be. The results confirm the previous decay measurements with clearly improved decay-channel selections and show also a new state at 23.5(1) MeV. The resonant states at 22.4(3) and 24.0(3) MeV decay primarily into the typical molecular states at about 6 MeV in $^{10}$Be, indicating a well developed cluster structure in these high-lying states in $^{14}$C. Further measurements of more states of this kind are suggested.

  3. Structure and decay pattern of linear-chain state in 14C

    CERN Document Server

    Baba, T

    2016-01-01

    The linear-chain states of $^{14}$C are theoretically investigated by using the antisymmetrized molecular dynamics. The calculated excitation energies and the $\\alpha$ decay widths of the linear-chain states were compared with the observed data reported by the recent experiments. The properties of the positive-parity linear-chain states reasonably agree with the observation, that convinces us of the linear-chain formation in the positive-parity states. On the other hand, in the negative-parity states, it is found that the linear-chain configuration is fragmented into many states and do not form a single rotational band. As a further evidence of the linear-chain formation, we focus on the $\\alpha$ decay pattern. It is shown that the linear-chain states decay to the excited states of daughter nucleus $^{10}{\\rm Be}$ as well as to the ground state, while other cluster states dominantly decay into the ground state. Hence, we regard that this characteristic decay pattern is a strong signature of the linear-chain f...

  4. Differential monitoring of tritium and carbon-14 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gaseous sampling system was developed to differentially collect all major volatile forms of tritium and carbon-14 according to chemical class. These chemical forms include: tritiated forms of water, hydrogen and organics; as well as 14C-containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and organics. Sampling campaigns involving the use of this differential 3H and 14C collection system have been successfully conducted at a high level liquid waste solidification plant, at a spent fuel storage facility and in the vicinity of power reactors

  5. Biomass carbon-14 ratio measured by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement methods of a biomass carbon ratio in biomass products based on 14C-radiocarbon concentration have been reviewed. Determination of the biomass carbon ratio in biomass products is important to secure the reliance in the commercial market, because the 'biomass products' could contain products from petroleum. The biomass carbon ratio can be determined from percent Modern Carbon (pMC) using ASTM D6866 methods. The pMC value is calculated from the comparison between the 14C in sample and 14C in reference material. The 14C concentration in chemical products can be measured by liquid scintillation counter (LSC) and accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). LSC can be applicable to determine the biomass carbon ratio for liquid samples such as gasoline with bioethanol (E5 or E10). On the other hand, AMS can be used to determine the biomass carbon ratio for almost all kinds of organic and inorganic compounds such as starch, cellulose, ethanol, gasoline, or polymer composite with inorganic fillers. AMS can accept the gaseous and solid samples. The graphite derived from samples included in solid phase is measured by AMS. The biomass carbon of samples derived from wood were higher than 100% due to the effect of atomic bomb test in the atmosphere around 1950 which caused the artificial 14C injection. Exact calculation methods of the biomass carbon ratio from pMC will be required for the international standard (ISO standard). (author)

  6. Carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid [1-14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect for the decarbonation of lactic acid[1-14C] in sulfuric acid has been measured in the temperature interval of 20-90 deg C. The experimental values of (k12C/k14C) are compared with the theoretical 14C kinetic isotope effect calculated assuming that one carbon-oxygen stretching vibration is lost in the rate-determining step. The discrepancy between experimentally observed temperature dependence of the 14C kinetic isotope effect and the theoretical one is explained by the possible side reactions wich change the apparent degrees of decarbonylation and isotopic composition of CH3CHOHCOOH[1-14C] used in experiments aiming at the determination of carbon-14 kinetic isotope effect in the decarbonylation process itself. (author) 6 refs.; 1 tab

  7. Radioisotope Power Supply Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Between 1998 and 2003, Hi-Z Technology developed and built a 40 mW radioisotope power supply (RPS) that used a 1 watt radioisotope heater unit (RHU) as the energy...

  8. Carbon-14: Some evidence of migration and experiments on immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 that is produced in nuclear reactors by reactions on C, N and O is one of the most biologically dangerous nuclides that are subject to global dispersion (H-3, 85-Kr, 129-I). It is assumed that about 20-30% of C-14 is released to atmosphere from NPPs and 80-70% remains in the fuel and will be released during reprocessing. Atmospheric dispersion of C-14 in the form of carbon dioxide cannot go without consequence for the environment, particularly for the vegetation. This influence of the carbon-14 release from a radio-chemical facility in Russia on the nearby forest is illustrated in the first part of the report by data on C-14 concentration in the barks of trees, analyzed year by year and showing yearly variation of C-14 releases. The second part of the report deals with the study of stability of portland-cement compounds and Ca, Ba and Sr carbonates to the leaching processes. Leaching tests were done on specially prepared samples of compounds, containing various (from 30% to 70%) concentrations of Ca, Sr or Ba carbonates, tagged by C-14. Distilled water was used as leaching agent. Leaching was conducted for 46 hours and C-14 concentrations and pH of resulting waters were monitored. Differential leaching rates and leaching coefficients were analyzed and general compound behavior and its dynamics has been observed

  9. First direct determination of the superallowed $\\beta$-decay $Q_{EC}$-value for $^{14}$O

    CERN Document Server

    Valverde, A A; Brodeur, M; Bryce, R A; Cooper, K; Eibach, M; Gulyuz, K; Izzo, C; Morrissey, D J; Redshaw, M; Ringle, R; Sandler, R; Schwarz, S; Sumithrarachchi, C S; Villari, A C C

    2015-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the $^{14}\\text{O}$ superallowed Fermi $\\beta$-decay $Q_{EC}$-value, the last of the so-called "traditional nine" superallowed Fermi $\\beta$-decays to be measured with Penning trap mass spectrometry. $^{14}$O, along with the other low-$Z$ superallowed $\\beta$-emitter, $^{10}$C, is crucial for setting limits on the existence of possible scalar currents. The new ground state $Q_{EC}$ value, 5144.364(25) keV, when combined with the energy of the $0^+$ daughter state, $E_x(0^+)=2312.798(11)$~keV [Nucl. Phys. A {\\bf{523}}, 1 (1991)], provides a new determination of the superallowed $\\beta$-decay $Q_{EC}$ value, $Q_{EC}(\\text{sa}) = 2831.566(28)$ keV, with an order of magnitude improvement in precision, and a similar improvement to the calculated statistical rate function $f$. This is used to calculate an improved $\\mathcal{F}t$-value of 3073.8(2.8) s.

  10. The preparation of glucose uniformly labelled with carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plant, (Zea mais, L) and culture conditions for an optimum production of glucose has been chosen. To achieve the labelling of glucose, photosynthesis and carboxylation are carried on, under an artificial atmosphere of 14CO2 produced from 14C-barium carbonate. Following photosynthesis the sugars are extracted, and then the extract purified by several methods. The purified glucose is finally, degraded and the specific radioactivity is determined in each of its carbon atoms. (Author) 37 refs

  11. The preparation of glucosa uniformly labelled with carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plant, (Zea mais, L) and culture conditions for an optimun production of glucose has been chosen. To achieve the labelling of glucose, photosynthesis and carboxilation are carried on under an artificial atmosphere of 14CO2 produced from 14C-barium carbonate. Following photosynthesis, the sugars are extracted and then the extract purified by several methods. The purified glucose is, finally, degraded and the specific radiactivity is determined in each of its carbon atoms. (author)

  12. Hydrodynamic aspects of carbon-14 groundwater dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of man-made hydraulic disturbances on the 14C ages of groundwater from confined aquifers is examined, also taking into account 14C diffusion, which has an effect on 14C ages only if the hydrostatic pressure in the lower, confined aquifer is not more than 0.5m higher than that in the upper, unconfined aquifer. If the water head of the lower aquifer exceeds this value, the 14C ages of the confined groundwater are reliable. If the water head is lower, the 14C water ages rapidly approach values of a few thousand years, which no longer reflect the history of the groundwater regeneration. With regard to the palaeohydrogeological situation in Central Europe and the Central Sahara during the last 40,000 years, the 14C ages of Holocene groundwater, and the duration of the preceding hiatus of the groundwater regeneration during the last glacial period, can be determined reliably. 14C ages older than that are too small in many cases; thus, groundwater velocities derived from such data are too great. Recently operations were started to use the groundwater from confined aquifers associated with rates for lowering the water table at 0.1-0.5m/a that result in a rapid decrease in the 14C ages determined for these aquifers, delayed for one or two decades after the beginning of the withdrawal. The 3H level and the chemical content of the groundwater may also be changed after the same delay period. Changes of this kind can be used to estimate the hydraulic properties of the aquifer system. In conclusion, an interpretation of the 14C content of the groundwater from confined aquifers in terms of its age is only possible if the water head of the confined aquifer has not been lower than that of the upper aquifer for even a relatively short period. (author)

  13. IAEA advisory group meeting on nuclear structure and decay data, Zeist, The Netherlands, 11-14 May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Nuclear Data Section convened the fifth meeting of the international nuclear structure and decay data network at Zeist near Utrecht, in The Netherlands, 11-14 May 1982. The meeting was attended by 24 scientists from 11 Member States and 2 international organizations, concerned with the compilation, evaluation, and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. (author)

  14. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled Taxol (paclitaxel)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reductive cleavage of the C13 side chain of Taxol (1, paclitaxel) followed by regioselective silylation gave 7-triethylsilylbaccatin III (4). 3-O-Triethysilylation of 5 and subsequent reaction with benzoyl chloride-C7-14C gave azetidinone 7. Coupling of 4 and 7 followed by deprotection gave 1.26 g of Taxol-N3'-14C (11) having a specific activity of 26.5 mCi/mmol and a radiochemical purity of 95%. (author)

  15. Lethal Effect on Bacterium of Decay of Incorporated Radioactive Atoms (3H, 14C, 32P)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effect of decay of 3H, 14C and 32P incorporated into a bacterium depends on the nature of the organic molecule labelled, on the position of the isotope within it and on the isotope itself. In sum, results obtained to date show that: The decay of 3H atoms incorporated into certain macromolecules of a bacterium causes sterilization through ionization by the ß- particle emitted; transmutation is of negligible importance. This self-irradiation is comparable in effect with X-rays and is affected in a similar manner by the same factors: temperature, presence of a radioprotector, radiosensitivity of the strain. Decay of 14C or 32P atoms incorporated into bacterial DNA is lethal because of the transmutation effect; ionizations produced by emitted ß- particles may be disregarded. Survival curves for 32P transmutations depend on the experimental conditions. Some of the results obtained with 32P are similar to those obtained with X-rays, e.g. effects of temperature, radical capture and oxygen, while others are similar to those of u.v. light, e.g., effect of growth conditions. Comparative tests made with 32P indicate that the recoil energy of transmutation is not the phenomenon responsible for the lethal effect observed. Comparison of the results obtained after X-irradiation or decay of 3H or 32P incorporated into the DNA of bacteria of the same strain of E. coli shows that the efficiency of a 32P transmutation is about four times greater than that of an ionization produced at random within the same DNA. (author)

  16. The role of the chemist in the development and production of radioisotope preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Isotope Production Centre of the Atomic Energy Board manufactures and markets a large number of important radioisotopes for use in medical, industrial and research fields which, previously, had to be imported. The development and production of radioisotope products require a multi-disciplinary approach in which a team effort by chemists, physicists, engineers, biologists and physicians is applied. Radioisotopes are usually used in the form of sealed radiation sources, simple inorganic compounds or radioisotope-labelled molecules. Sealed radiation sources such as cobalt-60 and iridium-192 are applied widely in the industrial field in, for example, level-high and level- density measurements, radiation sterilisation of medical equipment, and gamma radiography of structures. For industrial tracer and research purposes sodium-24, argon-41, bromine-82, iodine-131 and gold-198 are regularly used in simple chemical form. There are some thousands of radioisotope-labelled compounds of which the largest group compromises compounds of tritium, carbon-14 and sulphur-35. Because the last-mentioned isotopes have long physical half-lives and poor detectability in in vivo systems, they are used in vitro mainly in biomedical research. Radioisotopes such as iodine-131, iodine-123, indium-111, technetium-99m, krypton-81m and gallium-67 are in great demand for in vivo medical examinations because of their suitably short half-lives and detectability by the gamma camera. Iodine-125, a radioisotope which is usually manufactured in a nuclear reactor, plays a very important role in radioimmuoassays(RIA). The latter technique is an unusually sensitive, spesific in vitro analytical method which enables scientists to determine nanogram to picogram amounts of chemical compounds in blood. The design, development and manufacture of radioisotope preparations for a variety of uses offer an interesting challenge to the chemist now as well as in the future

  17. Diffusion of Implanted Radioisotopes in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Implantation of radioisotopes into metal and semiconductor samples is performed. The implanted isotope or its decay-product should have a half-life long enough for radiotracer diffusion experiments. Such radioisotopes are utilized to investigate basic diffusion properties in semiconductors and metals and to improve our understanding of the atomic mechanisms of diffusion. For suitably chosen systems the combination of on-line production and clean implantation of radioisotopes at the ISOLDE facility opens new possibilities for diffusion studies in solids. \\\\ \\\\ The investigations are concentrated on diffusion studies of $^{195}$Au in amorphous materials. The isotope $^{195}$Au was obtained from the mass 195 of the mercury beam. $^{195}$Hg decays into $^{195}$Au which is a very convenient isotope for diffusion experiments. \\\\ \\\\ It was found that $^{195}$Au is a slow diffusor in amorphous Co-Zr alloys, whereas Co is a fast diffusor in the same matrix. The ``asymmetry'' in the diffusion behaviour is of considerab...

  18. Carbon-14 in reactor plant water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method for the analysis of 14C in reactor plant water and various waste streams previously used at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has been shown to be ineffective for samples which contain organic compounds. The previous method consisted of acidification and refluxing of the sample, precipitation of the liberated CO2, and subsequent analysis by the liquid scintillation method. The method was simple but it did not convert all compounds containing 14C in the sample to CO2. The new method, while it is based on the previous method, has been improved by employing a strong oxidant, potassium persulfate and silver nitrate, for more complete oxidation of the organics to CO2. The new method yields 14C values that have typically been one to two orders of magnitude higher than the values obtained using the former method. This indicates that most of the 14C present in the current reactor water samples being analyzed is associated with trace amounts of organics

  19. Current status of radio-isotopes utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utilization of radioisotopes were reviewed briefly in a categorized manner. In plant biochemistry, long lived radioactive carbon ,14C, was applied to clarify such metabolic processes as photosynthesis, respiration and protein synthesis, etc., while radioactive oxygen ,18O, was used to study the O2 generation mechanism. Radioactive phosphorus ,32P, was used to detect the amount, grain size of phosphatic fertilizer as well as the time and depth for better utilization. Radioactive sulphur ,35S, and nitrogen ,15N, could be of use in studies of protein metabolism in plants. Radioactive tracers of other minerals such as N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mo, B, and Co were also used to detect their specific role in plants. Use of radioactive isotopes in protein synthesis and transfer of genetic information was described. Radioactive iodine ,131I, binding capacity of milk proteins, and radio trace studies in the iodine turn over in the use of radioactive iodine were summarized. (Mukohata, S.)

  20. Determination of carbon-14 environmental samples by mixing 14CO2 with a liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 (14CO2) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO2) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discused and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author)

  1. Determination of Carbon-14 in environmental samples by mixing 14CO2 with a liquid scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the determination of Carbon-14 (14CO2) in environmental samples has been developed. The method use the direct absorption of the carbon dioxide into Carbosorb, followed with incorporation of the mixture (Carbosorb-CO2) to the liquid scintillator. The results obtained to apply this method and the benzene synthesis, usual in our laboratory, are discussed and compared. The method of collection of atmospheric samples is also described. (Author) 10 refs

  2. Carbon-14 labelled sucrose transportation in an Arabidopsis thaliana using an imaging plate and real time imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an approach to increased production of rape seed oil from Brassica napus L., Arabidopsis thaliana, a species from the same Brassicaceae family, was used to investigate transport behavior and distribution of matter in the plant body. In this study, sucrose, an initial metabolic product of photosynthesis, labeled with carbon-14 was used. The sucrose was applied to A. thaliana via the surface of a rosette leaf. Using the real time radioisotope imaging system we developed and an imaging plate (IP), images of whole or part of the sample were obtained. The sucrose assimilation products were accumulated in maturing tissue such as flowers and fruits, and in a joint part. From the comparison among branches and stems, it was indicated that there were different patterns of demand and distribution of sucrose assimilation products depending on the tissue and its growing stage. This might be caused by either morphological reason such as diameter and location of the sieve tube, or genetic factors such as an activity of a membrane transport protein. Because of self-absorption of carpels, it was difficult to observe the accumulation of carbon-14 in the seeds inside the fruits; however, an IP image of a frozen section of a fruit revealed that carbon-14 transport to seeds was higher than that of carpels. These methods will help us gain insight into matter transport and strategies to improve the production of rape seed oil. (author)

  3. A time like our own? Radioisotopic calibration of the Ordovician greenhouse to icehouse transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. Elliot; Singer, Brad S.; Simo, Toni

    2011-11-01

    Gaussian apparent age distributions with a small number of readily identified outliers and stratigraphically-consistent weighted mean ages of 454.1 ± 1.4 Ma (51 of 57), 450.7 ± 1.4 Ma (39 of 74), and 450.3 ± 1.9 Ma (96 of 144) for the Millbrig, Dygerts, and Rifle Hill bentonites, respectively (2σ analytical uncertainties relative to 28.201 Ma for FCs). The Millbrig age is consistent with the existing U-Pb ages for both the underlying Deicke bentonite and the Kinnekulle bentonite of Sweden. The new age model permits the assembly of the first complete radioisotopically-calibrated composite δ 13C curve for the Ordovician, the first icehouse to occur subsequent to the Cambrian explosion. The resulting δ 13C composite integrates all available graptolite and conodont biostratigraphic with radioisotopic ages and indicates that previous biostratigraphic composites incorporate 2σ errors up to ~ 5 Ma. When viewed without temporal distortions, isotopic carbon excursions (ICEs) in the Ordovician appear to have occurred at a similar tempo as ICEs in the better resolved Cenozoic greenhouse to icehouse transition. Although boundary conditions for oceanography, biogeography, and continental configuration are strikingly different, the tempo of isotopic changes, growth of south-polar ice sheets, and concurrent oceanic and geomorphic responses bears both similarities and differences with the better understood Cenozoic era.

  4. Searches for massive neutrino emission in 14C beta and 55Fe electron-capture decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985 Simpson reported evidence for the emission of a 17 keV mass neutrino in a small fraction of tritium beta decays. An experimental controversy ensued in which a number of both positive and negative results were reported. The beta spectrum of 14C was collected in a unique 14C-doped planar germanium detector and a distortion was observed that initially confirmed Simpson's result. Further tests linked this distortion to a splitting of the collected charge between the central detector and the surrounding guard ring in a fraction of the events. A second 14C measurement showed no evidence for emission of a 17 keV mass neutrino. In a related experiment, a high statistics electron-capture internal-bremsstrahlung photon spectrum of 55Fe was collected with a coaxial germanium detector. A local search for departures from a smooth shape near the endpoint was performed, using a second-derivative technique. An upper limit of 0.65% (95% C.L.) for the mixing Of a neutrino in the mass range 5--25 keV was established. The upper limit on the mixing of a 17 keV mass neutrino was 0.14% (95% C.L.)

  5. Economical Radioisotope Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Almost all robotic space exploration missions and all Apollo missions to the moon used Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) to provide electrical power...

  6. Transport of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presently the amount of radioisotopes increased very much and the application spread to wide fields in Japan. Since facilities using radioisotopes are distributed to every place in the country, every transport means such as airplanes, automobiles, railways, ships and mail are employed. The problems in the transport of radioisotopes include too much difference in the recognition of criticality among the persons concerning the transportation and treatment, knowledges of shielding and energy difference in the types of radiation and handling of sealed and unsealed sources and the casks for transport. IAEA established the latest regulation on the package of radioisotopes in 1973, and in Japan, the related regulations will be revised according to the IAEA's regulation in near future. The present status in the inspection at the time of shipment, supervision, and the measures to the accidents are described for the transport means of airplanes, ships and automobiles. Finally, concerning the insurance for cargo, the objects of the insurance for radioisotopes include either the radioisotopes contained in casks for transportation or radioisotopes only. Generally, radioisotopes are accepted in all-risk condition including casks and limited to the useful radioisotopes for peaceful use. (Wakatsuki, Y

  7. Production of radioisotopes using a cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclotron produced radioisotopes are generally neutron deficient and decay by EC or β+ emission. They find major applications in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The production processes involve rather sophisticated technology and the areas needing research and development work include nuclear data, targetry, chemical processing, remote control, automation and quality control. A comparison of the various parameters relevant to the production of radioisotopes using a nuclear reactor and a cyclotron is given. The cyclotron products are more expensive than the reactor products; they are, however, far superior to the latter as far as in-vivo functional studies are concerned. (author)

  8. Monitoring of carbon 14 in atmospheric carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A purpose of this article is to present the first data of the atmospheric C-14 monitoring in CO2 form. In the Prague-Bulovka locality atmospheric CO2 have been continuously collected by absorption in 0.7 M NaOH solution. The samples were one month cumulated. Afterwards, the CO2 was extracted from the NaOH solution and benzene was synthesised. The benzene was measured by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The monitoring results from January to July 2001 period are discussed and compared with the results from other countries. (authors)

  9. Carbon-14 geochemistry at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Kimberly A.; Kaplan, Daniel I.

    2013-05-10

    Carbon-14 is among the key radionuclides driving risk at the E-Area Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Much of this calculated risk is believed to be the result of having to make conservative assumptions in risk calculations because of the lack of site-specific data. The original geochemical data package (Kaplan 2006) recommended that performance assessments and composite analyses for the SRS assume that {sup 14}C did not sorbed to sediments or cementitious materials, i.e., that C-14 K{sub d} value (solid:liquid concentration ratio) be set to 0 mL/g (Kaplan 2006). This recommendation was based primarily on the fact that no site-specific experimental work was available and the assumption that the interaction of anionic {sup 14}C as CO{sub 2}{sup 2-}) with similarly charged sediments or cementitious materials would be minimal. When used in reactive transport equations, the 0 mL/g Kd value results in {sup 14}C not interacting with the solid phase and moving quickly through the porous media at the same rate as water. The objective of this study was to quantify and understand how aqueous {sup 14}C, as dissolved carbonate, sorbs to and desorbs from SRS sediments and cementitious materials. Laboratory studies measuring the sorption of {sup 14}C, added as a carbonate, showed unequivocally that {sup 14}C-carbonate K{sub d} values were not equal to 0 mL/g for any of the solid phases tested, but they required several months to come to steady state. After six months of contact, the apparent K{sub d} values for a clayey sediment was 3,000 mL/g, for a sandy sediment was 10 mL/g, for a 36-year-old concrete was 30,000 mL/g, and for a reducing grout was 40 mL/g. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that (ad)sorption rates were appreciably faster than desorption rates, indicating that a kinetic sorption model, as opposed to the steady-state K{sub d} model, may be a more accurate description of the {sup 14}C-carbonate sorption process. A second study

  10. Synthesis of carbon-14 analogue of 1,5 diaryl-5-[14C]-1,2,3-triazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two 1,2,3-triazole anticonvulsants, 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-(4-methyl-phenyl)-1,2,3-triazole and 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-phenyl-1,2,3-triazole, both labeled with carbon-14 in the 5-position were prepared from para-tolunitrile-[cyano-14C] and benzonitrile-[cyano-14C], respectively

  11. Evidence for the emission of a 17-keV neutrino in the β decay of 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the β spectrum of 14C using a germanium detector containing a crystal with 14C dissolved in it. We find a feature in the β spectrum 17 keV below the end point which can be explained by the hypothesis that there is a heavy neutrino emitted in the β decay of 14C with a mass of 17±2 keV and an emission probability of (1.40±0.45±0.14)%

  12. Carbon 14 dating method; Methode de datation par le carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Ph

    2000-07-01

    This document gives a first introduction to {sup 14}C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the {sup 14}C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of {sup 14}C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  13. Radioisotope measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioisotope measurement system installed at L.M.R. (Ezeiza Atomic Center of CNEA) allows the measurement of nuclear activity from a wide range of radioisotopes. It permits to characterize a broad range of radioisotopes at several activity levels. The measurement hardware as well as the driving software have been developed and constructed at the Dept. of Instrumentation and Control. The work outlines the system's conformation and its operating concept, describes design characteristics, construction and the error treatment, comments assay results and supplies use advices. Measuring tests carried out employing different radionuclides confirmed the system performing satisfactorily and with friendly operation. (author)

  14. A detective from the past called carbon 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis is carried out using Radiometry or Accelerator mass spectrometry. After the system allowing to date the age of any organic rest - whether a fossil, a wood fragment, a parchment or a seed - is an isotope called carbon-14. An atom that comes from reactions nuclear produced in the atmosphere and cosmic-ray-induced they interact with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. This element they absorb it plants in photosynthesis and then passes to the animals remained almost unchanged during the life of the organism. to the meet the initial ratio of c-14 that had been in the atmosphere before his death, the remains that are left in it determine the elapsed time. (Author)

  15. Behaviour of carbon-14 in graphite irradiated by neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of carbon-14 extraction from graphite irradiated by neutrons based on the thermal effect to graphite in a technological vacuum or air current is a basically new approach. When irradiated graphite is heated in a technological vacuum and in an air current, extraction of carbon-14 takes place and reaches as much as 99.5%. The mass of graphite decreases approximately by 10% in every 5 hours of heating. At the same time, its substance in different units can vary in wide ranges: from 3,5 to 110 kBq/g. This can be explained in terms of both the different substance of nitrogen impurities in graphite and different fluency of thermal neutrons

  16. Progressive extraction method applied to isotopic exchange of carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotopic exchange in natural settings is essentially an irreversible process, so that it progresses continuously until there is complete isotopic equilibrium. In soils, this process involves interaction between isotopes in the liquid and solid phases, and complete isotopic equilibrium may take a very long time. Measurements after partial isotopic exchange have been used to characterize the labile fraction of elements in soils. We describe a method to characterize the extent of isotopic exchange, with application here to incorporation of inorganic carbon-14 (14C) into mineral carbonates and organic matter in soils. The procedure uses a continuous addition of extractant, acid, or H2O2in the examples presented here, coupled with sequential sampling. The method has been applied to demonstrate the degree of isotopic exchange in soil. The same strategy could be applied to many other elements, including plant nutrients. (author)

  17. Radiative Neutron Capture on Carbon-14 in Effective Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rupak, Gautam; Fernando, Lakma; Vaghani, Akshay

    2012-01-01

    The cross section for radiative capture of neutron on carbon-14 is calculated using the model-independent formalism of halo effective field theory. The dominant contribution from E1 transition is considered, and the cross section is expressed in terms of elastic scattering parameters of the effective range expansion. Contributions from both resonant and non-resonant interaction are calculated. Significant interference between these leads to a capture contribution that deviates from simple Bre...

  18. The management of carbon-14 in Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Canada, Derived Emission Limits (DELs) for the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities are set to ensure that the dose to a member of a critical group from one year's release does not exceed the limit on annual dose to a member of the public set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. The Advisory Committee on Radiological Protection (ACRP) has expressed concerns as to whether this procedure provides adequate protection to members of the public, including future generations, for certain radionuclides such as a carbon-14 (14C), which can accumulate in the environment and which can be dispersed, through environmental processes, beyond the local region where the critical group is assumed to live. The ACRP subsequently established a Working Group to review the production, release, environmental levels, and waste management of 14C arising in CANDU power reactors. The ACRP recommendations resulting from this review can be summarized as · Given the current levels of emissions from CANDU nuclear power stations resulting from the use of a carbon dioxide annulus gas and the limitations in the calculation and use of collective dose, the ACRP sees no need for and additional collective dose limit to be applied to these sources. · The AECB should require licensees of power reactors and waste management sites to provide an annual inventory of 14C held within reactor buildings and waste management sites; to provide information on the stability of the ion exchange resins and their continuing ability to retain the 14C; to demonstrate on an ongoing basis that releases of 14C are maintained at a small fraction of the emission limits; and to report annually the critical group and local collective doses arising from releases of 14C. 61 refs., 25 tabs., 4 figs

  19. A Radioisotope Inventory Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radioisotope Inventory Program maintains an accurate and up-to-date inventory of all radioisotopes used on campus. An instruction manual provides easy to use directions for using the program. The program is implemented on a Hewlett-Packard HP-85 microcomputer and can be used on other systems. The commands allow updating and changing licensee information easily and quickly. Data Security is maintained by placing the data on a removable tape cartridge and locking the cartridge

  20. Radioisotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author explains clearly what is radiography, enumerates four major factors in considering a practical source to use namely half-life, penetrating power, half value layer and specific activity and also the advantages and disadvantages in using isotopes. Common radioisotopes used in industrial radiography are iridium, cesium, cobalt and thulium. Main uses of the radioisotopes are for radiographic testing like welding castings, forgoings etc.; thickness, level or density measurement and tracing. (RTD)

  1. Measurement of neutrino electron scattering and inverse beta-decay of carbon using neutrinos from stopped muon decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-neutrino electron elastic scattering and two-body electron- neutrino carbon scattering reactions were observed using a 15 ton fine-grained detector and neutrinos from μ+ decay at rest. The data was obtained during an exposure to neutrinos produced in LAMPF proton beam-stop. Based on identification of 262±46 νee- events the total cross-section for νee- → νee- was measured to be σ(νeE-) = (3.09±0.54(stat)±0.39(syst)) x 10-43 cm2. The interference between the weak charged and neutral currents was measured for the first time. The interference was found to be destructive, with a magnitude 0.97±0.22 times the value predicted by the WSG theory. The total cross-section was also used to measure sin2θW = 0.24±0.06(stat)±0.04(syst). The data restricts the maximum allowed value of the neutrino magnetic moment to be less than 1.3 x 10-9 Bohr magnetrons for νe and 8.8 x 10-10 for νmu. In a separate analysis, 182±22 12C(νe,e-) 12N(gs) events with subsequent 12N(β+) 12C were observed, corresponding to a total cross-section, σ(νe12C → e-12N(gs)) = (1.03 ± 0.12(stat) ± 0.10(sys)) x10-41 cm2. This was the first observation of e-induced transitions between specific nuclear states. The results is good agreement with theoretical predictions

  2. Verification of the dispersion model by airborne carbon 14C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides insight in the verification of the Lagrangean dispersion model for dose calculation in the environment. The verification method was based on the measurement of the airborne carbon 14C concentration which can be slightly increased close to the nuclear power plant. The results proved that this method is sensitive enough and that the sensitivity analysis can be used for model verification or for identification of possible improvements of the used meteorological data. The Lagrangean model is used at Krsko nuclear power plant (NPP) for calculation of dispersion coefficients and dose in the environment. To show compliance with the authorized dose limits it is required to present a realistic calculation of the dose to the public. This is a numerical model designed to calculate air pollution dispersion in the area of 25km x 25km. The model uses on-line local meteorological measurements. The same model was already verified for another location around a coal- fired power plant based on emission and environmental measurements of SO2. Krsko NPP is placed near the Sava River in a semiopened basin surrounded by several hills. The region is characterized by low winds and frequent thermal inversions. This paper presents a verification of the short range dispersion model based on the fact that the airborne carbon 14C concentration can be slightly increased close to the nuclear power plant. Other radioactive effluents are not detectable in the environment and carbon 14C measurements are accurate enough to detect small deviations from natural 14C levels and to compare them with the calculated concentration based on 14C effluents. The most of airborne 14C is released during the refuelling outage. Within the pre-selected period of ten days, increased effluents of 14C in the form of CO2 were sampled from the plant ventilation. The average atmospheric dispersion parameters were calculated for two locations in the environment where CO2 sampling plates were installed

  3. Measurements of carbon-14 with cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCartt, A. D.; Ognibene, T.; Bench, G.; Turteltaub, K.

    2015-10-01

    Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) is the most sensitive method for quantitation of 14C in biological samples. This technology has been used in a variety of low dose, human health related studies over the last 20 years when very high sensitivity was needed. AMS helped pioneer these scientific methods, but its expensive facilities and requirements for highly trained technical staff have limited their proliferation. Quantification of 14C by cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) offers an approach that eliminates many of the shortcomings of an accelerator-based system and would supplement the use of AMS in biomedical research. Our initial prototype, using a non-ideal wavelength laser and under suboptimal experimental conditions, has a 3.5-modern, 1- σ precision for detection of milligram-sized, carbon-14-elevated samples. These results demonstrate proof of principle and provided a starting point for the development of a spectrometer capable of biologically relevant sensitivities.

  4. Cholestyramine-enhanced fecal elimination of carbon-14 in rats after administration of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate or potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, J.D.; Gibson, S.J.; Ober, R.E.

    1984-12-01

    After a single intravenous dose of ammonium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanoate (( /sup 14/C)PFO, 13.3 mg/kg) or of potassium (/sup 14/C)perfluorooctanesulfonate (( /sup 14/C)PFOS, 3.4 mg/kg) to rats, cholestyramine fed daily as a 4% mixture in feed was shown to increase the total carbon-14 eliminated via feces and to decrease liver concentration of carbon-14. Rats were fed cholestyramine in feed for 14 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFO and for 21 days after administration of (/sup 14/C)PFOS. Control rats were administered radiolabeled fluorochemical but were not treated with cholestyramine. Cholestyramine treatment increased mean cumulative carbon-14 elimination in feces by 9.8-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFO and by 9.5-fold for rats administered (/sup 14/C)PFOS. After (/sup 14/C)PFO, a mean of 4% of the dose of carbon-14 was in liver of cholestyramine-treated rats at 14 days versus 7.6% in control rats; after (/sup 14/C)PFOS, 11.3% of the dose was in liver at 21 days versus 40.3% in control rats. After administration of either radiolabeled compound, plasma and red blood cell carbon-14 concentrations, which were relatively lower than liver concentrations, were also significantly reduced by cholestyramine treatment.

  5. Cholestyramine-enhanced fecal elimination of carbon-14 in rats after administration of ammonium [14C]perfluorooctanoate or potassium [14C]perfluorooctanesulfonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a single intravenous dose of ammonium [14C]perfluorooctanoate [( 14C]PFO, 13.3 mg/kg) or of potassium [14C]perfluorooctanesulfonate [( 14C]PFOS, 3.4 mg/kg) to rats, cholestyramine fed daily as a 4% mixture in feed was shown to increase the total carbon-14 eliminated via feces and to decrease liver concentration of carbon-14. Rats were fed cholestyramine in feed for 14 days after administration of [14C]PFO and for 21 days after administration of [14C]PFOS. Control rats were administered radiolabeled fluorochemical but were not treated with cholestyramine. Cholestyramine treatment increased mean cumulative carbon-14 elimination in feces by 9.8-fold for rats administered [14C]PFO and by 9.5-fold for rats administered [14C]PFOS. After [14C]PFO, a mean of 4% of the dose of carbon-14 was in liver of cholestyramine-treated rats at 14 days versus 7.6% in control rats; after [14C]PFOS, 11.3% of the dose was in liver at 21 days versus 40.3% in control rats. After administration of either radiolabeled compound, plasma and red blood cell carbon-14 concentrations, which were relatively lower than liver concentrations, were also significantly reduced by cholestyramine treatment

  6. Investigations on the biokinetics of carbon 14 in algae cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of 14C by Scenedesmus quadricauda is quantitatively investigated by simulation models of radio ecological relevance. Due to the complexing of the procedures in the natural ecosystem, it was only possible to consider idealized conditions. The batch culture ressembles the conditons of still waters or relatively still waters without notable water exchange. The effect of the 14C enrichment, as well as the drastic carbon reduction in the substrate as a result of algae growth, was avoided in the modified batch culture under conditions of simultaneous substrate diffusion by means of a permeation system. The 14C and 12C uptake of the cells thus took place solely under the conditions of constant concentration in the culture medium. The consequences for flowing water resulting from a nuclear power plant accident are to be simulated for the extent of the 14C uptake by green algae using the continuous culture model with dynamic 14C exposure. The continuous infusion of 14C in the continuous culture corresponds to the possible cases where 14C escapes into a flowing water at a constant rate over a long period of time, whether this may be via chronical release from a nuclear power plant or by 'fallout' resulting from nuclear arms testing. The results shown lead to the conclusion that the emission of 14C to the environment, which according to prognoses will be considerably higher after the year 2000, presents a serious radioactivity potential which man and environment will have to live with should these developments continue and the prognoses come true. (orig./MG)

  7. New batch system for 14C accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS): Graphite target preparation at the INGEIS Laboratories, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present a new batch system for the production of graphite from CO2 is functioning at the INGEIS 14C laboratory. The main goal of the system is to do specific targets by catalytic reduction for a new AMS system which is being installed in the building of the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (Beninson et al., 2000). There are two methods for determining very low concentrations of radio nuclides: measuring the radiation emitted by their radioactive decay or measuring the particular atoms themselves. The atom counting method is more efficient in the case of long-lived radio nuclides, i.e. radionuclides with half-lives much longer than a given measuring time (v.gr.14C, βemitter, T1/2 = 5730 years) and for samples with small radioisotope abundance. In the case of age measurement, the majority of dates have been determined by radioactive decay counting techniques. For 14C low activity samples, specially those older, larger samples, 1 to 10 g of elemental carbon are required to achieve good counting statistic. Due to their low activity, samples older than 50.000 years may not be reliably dated by β counting. An example illustrates differences between the counting method and the AMS: a 2 cm human hair contains about one mg of carbon in the form of a protein compound, keratin. One mg of carbon has 5 x 1019 stable 12C atoms. Like global atmospheric ratio 14C /12C = is ca 1,2 x 1012, contains also 6 x 107 atoms of 14C and only one of these atoms decays in one hour. Conversely, this one mg used up in the ion source of an AMS can collect 6 x 10514C atoms. This examples clearly shows the enormous gain in detection efficiency of atom collection of AMS over decay counting method of measurement (au)

  8. A detective from the past called carbon 14; Un detective del pasado llamado carbono 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trintan, R. M.

    2015-07-01

    The analysis is carried out using Radiometry or Accelerator mass spectrometry. After the system allowing to date the age of any organic rest - whether a fossil, a wood fragment, a parchment or a seed - is an isotope called carbon-14. An atom that comes from reactions nuclear produced in the atmosphere and cosmic-ray-induced they interact with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. This element they absorb it plants in photosynthesis and then passes to the animals remained almost unchanged during the life of the organism. to the meet the initial ratio of c-14 that had been in the atmosphere before his death, the remains that are left in it determine the elapsed time. (Author)

  9. Carbon and nitrogen additions induce distinct priming effects along an organic-matter decay continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Hu, Yuehua; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Liu, Yongwen; Schaefer, Douglas; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2016-01-01

    Decomposition of organic matter (OM) in soil, affecting carbon (C) cycling and climate feedbacks, depends on microbial activities driven by C and nitrogen (N) availability. However, it remains unknown how decomposition of various OMs vary across global supplies and ratios of C and N inputs. We examined OM decomposition by incubating four types of OM (leaf litter, wood, organic matter from organic and mineral horizons) from a decay continuum in a subtropical forest at Ailao Mountain, China with labile C and N additions. Decomposition of wood with high C:N decreased for 3.9 to 29% with these additions, while leaf decomposition was accelerated only within a narrow C:N range of added C and N. Decomposition of OM from organic horizon was accelerated by high C:N and suppressed by low C:N, but mineral soil was almost entirely controlled by high C:N. These divergent responses to C and N inputs show that mechanisms for priming (i.e. acceleration or retardation of OM decomposition by labile inputs) vary along this decay continuum. We conclude that besides C:N ratios of OM, those of labile inputs control the OM decay in the litter horizons, while energy (labile C) regulates decomposition in mineral soil. This suggests that OM decomposition can be predicted from its intrinsic C:N ratios and those of labile inputs. PMID:26806914

  10. Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Paul C.; Mason, Lee S.; Schifer, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    High-efficiency radioisotope power generators will play an important role in future NASA space exploration missions. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs) have been identified as a candidate generator technology capable of providing mission designers with an efficient, high-specific-power electrical generator. SRGs high conversion efficiency has the potential to extend the limited Pu-238 supply when compared with current Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). Due to budgetary constraints, the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) was canceled in the fall of 2013. Over the past year a joint study by NASA and the Department of Energy (DOE) called the Nuclear Power Assessment Study (NPAS) recommended that Stirling technologies continue to be explored. During the mission studies of the NPAS, spare SRGs were sometimes required to meet mission power system reliability requirements. This led to an additional mass penalty and increased isotope consumption levied on certain SRG-based missions. In an attempt to remove the spare power system, a new generator architecture is considered, which could increase the reliability of a Stirling generator and provide a more fault-tolerant power system. This new generator called the Modular Stirling Radioisotope Generator (MSRG) employs multiple parallel Stirling convertor/controller strings, all of which share the heat from the General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. For this design, generators utilizing one to eight GPHS modules were analyzed, which provided about 50 to 450 W of direct current (DC) to the spacecraft, respectively. Four Stirling convertors are arranged around each GPHS module resulting in from 4 to 32 Stirling/controller strings. The convertors are balanced either individually or in pairs, and are radiatively coupled to the GPHS modules. Heat is rejected through the housing/radiator, which is similar in construction to the ASRG. Mass and power analysis for these systems indicate that specific

  11. Industry benefits from radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency since its inception has always sought to promote the industrial use of radioisotopes. Among other ways, it has arranged scientific conferences on various aspects of the question, and has selected and published general information. Industry's attitude to any innovation, however, is the same the world over - viz. does it pay? The Agency, therefore, decided to collect information on the economic benefits derived from the use of radioisotopes in industry, described in terms of 'savings', It arranged for an international survey of these benefits, and at the same time for the collection of information on how radioisotopes are being utilized today. In April 1962 the Agency invited selected Member States to participate in the survey, and in response national governments collected detailed information from industrial organizations in their countries in the fields of prospecting, mining and manufacturing. The radioisotope techniques were grouped under the heads of radioisotope gauging, industrial radiography, ionization applications, tracing, massive irradiation and miscellaneous applications. The national reports from the participating countries recently reached the Agency, which is preparing a comprehensive report on radioisotope use and economics. In order to assess the contents of the various reports and to establish the best means of interpreting and presenting the material, the Agency convened a Study Group in Vienna from 16 to 20 March 1964. About 60 participants from Member States and international organizations discussed the reports, the latest developments in isotope utilization, and how the use of isotopes in industry could be further encouraged. The survey was prepared with care, as there have been few precedents to guide such an investigation on such a scale. Although its main purpose is to make an economic assessment, it has necessarily had to start with the consideration of techniques, and information was collected both

  12. Radioisotope Power Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope power programme of the US Atomic Energy Commission has brought forth a whole new technology of the use of radioisotopes as energy sources in electric power generators. Radioisotope power systems are particularly suited for remote applications where long-lived, compact, reliable power is needed. Able to perform satisfactorily under extreme environmental conditions of temperature, sunlight and electromagnetic radiations, these ''atomic batteries'' are attractive power sources for remote data collecting devices, monitoring systems, satellites and other space missions. Radioisotopes used as fuels generally are either alpha or beta emitters. Alpha emitters are the preferable fuels but are more expensive and less available than beta fuels and are generally reserved for space applications. Beta fuels separated from reactor fission wastes are being used exclusively in land and sea applications at the present. It can be expected, however, that beta emitters such as stiontium-90 eventually will be used in space. Development work is being carried out on generators which will use mixed fission products as fuel. This fuel will be less expensive than the pure radioisotopes since the costs of isotope separation and purification are eliminated. Prototype thermoelectric generators, fuelled with strontium-90 and caesium-137, are now in operation or being developed for use in weather stations, marine navigation aids and deep sea monitoring devices. A plutonium-238 thermoelectric generator is in orbit operating as electric power source in a US Navy TRANSIT satellite. Generators are under development for use on US National Aeronautics and Space Administration missions. The large quantities of radioactivity involved in radioisotope power sources require that special attention be given to safety aspects of the units. Rigid safety requirements have been established and extensive tests have been conducted to insure that these systems can be employed without creating undue

  13. Radioisotopes in education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioisotopes and nuclear techniques can in many cases greatly contribute to the value of teaching. With these techniques it is often possible to introduce demonstrations or experiments which explain phenomena otherwise difficult to understand. The choice of the program must be adapted to the teaching level. This requires previous training of the teachers and the provision of basic equipment. (author)

  14. Radioisotopes in Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Philip S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Fuccillo, Jr., Domenic A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Gerrard, Martha W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Lafferty, Jr., Robert H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    1967-05-01

    Radioisotopes, man-made radioactive elements, are used in industry primarily for measuring, testing and processing. How and why they are useful is the subject of this booklet. The booklet discusses their origin, their properties, their uses, and how they may be used in the future.

  15. Radioisotopic heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a radioisotopic heat source and method for a long life electrical generator. The source includes plutonium dioxide shards and yttrium or hafnium in a container of tantalum-tungsten-hafnium alloy, all being in a nickel alloy outer container, and subjected to heat treatment of from about 15700F to about 17200F for about one h

  16. Study on behavior and treatment of radioiodine and carbon-14 at reprocessing of spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of dissolver Off-gas (DOG) is one of important operation in the head-end process of spent fuel reprocessing. Radioiodine, carbon-14 are contained in the DOG. Confinement of radioiodine is required and the reduction of carbon-14 will be required following ALARA principle. In the present study spent fuel dissolution and off-gas treatment tests were carried out using spent fuel with burnups of 8,000 , 29,000 and 44,000 MWd·t-1. Behavior of radioiodine and carbon-14 was investigated. In addition, several adsorbents for carbon dioxide to capture carbon-14 from the DOG were tested in a cold equipment. (author)

  17. Cosmogenic radioisotopes on LDEF surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, J. C.; Albrecht, A.; Herzog, G.; Klein, J.; Middleton, R.

    1992-01-01

    The radioisotope Be-7 was discovered in early 1990 on the front surface, and the front surface only, of the LDEF. A working hypothesis is that the isotope, which is known to be mainly produced in the stratosphere by spallation of nitrogen and oxygen nuclei with cosmic ray protons or secondary neutrons, diffuses upward and is absorbed onto metal surfaces of spacecraft. The upward transport must be rapid, that is, its characteristic time scale is similar to, or shorter than, the 53 day half-life of the isotope. It is probably by analogy with meteoritic metal atmospheric chemistry, that the form of the Be at a few 100 km altitude is as the positive ion Be(+) which is efficiently incorporated into the ionic lattice of oxides, such as Al2O3, Cr2O3, Fe2O3, etc., naturally occurring on surfaces of Al and stainless steel. Other radioisotopes of Be, Cl, and C are also produced in the atmosphere, and a search was begun to discover these. Of interest are Be-10 and C-14 for which the production cross sections are well known. The method of analysis is accelerator mass spectrometry. Samples from LDEF clamp plates are being chemically extracted, purified, and prepared for an accelerator run.

  18. Manual of radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Manual of Radioisotope Production has been compiled primarily to help small reactor establishments which need a modest programme of radioisotope production for local requirements. It is not comprehensive, but gives guidance on essential preliminary considerations and problems that may be met in the early stages of production. References are included as an aid to the reader who wishes to seek further in the extensive literature on the subject. In preparing the Manual, which is in two parts, the Agency consulted several Member States which already have long experience in radioisotope production. An attempt has been made to condense this experience, firstly, by setting out the technical and economic considerations which govern the planning and execution of an isotope programme and, secondly, by providing experimental details of isotope production processes. Part I covers topics common to all radioisotope processing, namely, laboratory design, handling and dispensing of radioactive solutions, quality control, measurement and radiological safety. Part II contains information on the fifteen radioisotopes in most common use. These are bromine-82, cobalt-58, chromium-51, copper-64, fluorine-18, gold-198, iodine-131, iron-59, magnesium-28, potassium-42, sodium-24, phosphorus-32, sulphur-35, yttrium-90 and zinc-65. Their nuclear properties are described, references to typical applications are given and published methods of production are reviewed; also included are descriptions in detail of the production processes used at several national atomic energy organizations. No attempt has been made to distinguish the best values for nuclear data or to comment on the relative merits of production processes. Each process is presented essentially as it was described by the contributor on the understanding that critical comparisons are not necessary for processes which have been well tried in practical production for many years. The information is presented as a guide to enable

  19. The rates of carbon cycling in several soils from AMS14C measurements of fractionated soil organic matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    14C mean residence times (MRT) of fractionated organic matter are reported for three pre-bomb soil profiles. Comparisons of organic matter extracted with acid and base showed that the longest MRTs were associated with the non-acid-hydrolysable fraction. The MRT of organic matter in a soil layer represents a combination of the rates of several processes, including decay to CO2 and transport out of the layer. In some instances (notably in the A horizon of the Podzol soil studied in this paper), the MRT is dominated by the rate of transport, rather than the rate of decay. Thus it is important to use the distribution and balance of carbon in the soil profile to assess the meaning of the MRT with respect to influencing atmospheric CO2

  20. The future radiological burden due to carbon 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global cycling of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels and of radiocarbon released from nuclear power facilities has been simulated using a seven-box-model. The model is built up by two boxes for the atmosphere (stratosphere, troposphere), three boxes for the ocean (mixed surface layer, deep sea and sediments), and two boxes for the biosphere (short- and long-lived biota) with non-linear troposphere-biota and troposphere-ocean surface layer exchange rates and linear fluxes between the other reservoirs. The biota growth factor, the exchange of the atmospheric CO2 with the ocean, and the preindustrial atmospheric CO2 content were fitted using the records of the atmospheric CO2 concentration in Mauna Loa, the Suess-effect until 1954, and the response to the C-14 from nuclear weapons tests. The two scenarios considered are (I) annual energy growth rates of 2% and 4%, no nuclear power; (II) a upper and lower estimate of C-14 releases and a best estimate without retention and with a retention factor of four at the fuel reprocessing plants. Assuming logistic source functions for the increase of fossil fuel combustion and an exponentiel growth of nuclear power until the year 2020, the CO2 concentration of the troposphere reaches the 2-5 fold of the preindustrial level around 2100. Simultaneously, the specific C-14 activity of the atmosphere is decreased. The individual lifetime dose commitments (70 y) are found between 0.85 and 0.45 mSv (natural values: 0.73 mSv) and the collective dose commitments until 2100 are about 10% of those due to naturally produced C-14. (orig.)

  1. The test of carbon 14C introducing to sugar beet plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon 14 was introduced to sugar beet plant by photosynthesis. The changes of radioactivity were investigated. It was stated that lower 25 % of carbon 14 stay in leaves, and about 75 % flow to roots in the form of sucrose 14C. (author)

  2. Purifications of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders for neutrinoless double beta decay experiment, AMoRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AMoRE (Advanced Mo based Rare process Experiment) collaboration is going to use calcium molybdate crystals to search for neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo isotope. In order to make the crystal, we use calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders as raw materials. Therefore it is highly necessary to reduce potential sources for radioactive backgrounds such as U and Th in the powders. In this talk, we will present our studies for purification of calcium carbonate and molybdenum oxide powders

  3. Improved quality control of carbon-14 labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IUT Ltd is a producer of carbon-14 labelled organic compounds like benzene, methanol, phenol, formaldehyde, Na-acetates and also special ordered compounds. The quality control of these compounds is carried out by means of HPLC and GC-MS due to chemical purity. Molar activity was determined by Liquid Scintillation Counting and HPLC being equipped by a radioactivity detector. Unfortunately the accuracy of the activity determination was arrived only ±4% relatively. This error is too high because of the large dilution factors. In respect of the IUT accreditation as an analytical laboratory in Germany the accuracy had to be improved remarkably. Therefore the GC-MS-determination of molar activities of labelled compounds is used as the 14C-labelled compound. A special evaluation code is used to determine the enrichment values relative to the unlabelled molecules. Taking into account the results of GC-MS the accuracy of molar activity determination is improved to ±2%. The spectra evaluation is demonstrated and some examples are discussed

  4. Carbonates in leaching reactions in context of 14C dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Danuta; Czernik, Justyna

    2015-10-01

    Lime mortars as a mixture of binder and aggregate may contain carbon of various origins. If the mortars are made of totally burnt lime, radiocarbon dating of binder yields the real age of building construction. The presence of carbonaceous aggregate has a significant influence on the 14C measurements results and depending on the type of aggregate and fraction they may cause overaging. Another problem, especially in case of hydraulic mortars that continue to be chemically active for a very long time, is the recrystallization usually connected with rejuvenation of the results but also, depending on local geological structures, with so called reservoir effect yielding apparent ages. An attempt in separating the binder from other carbonaceous components successfully was made for samples from Israel by Nawrocka-Michalska et al. (2007). The same preparation procedure, after taking into account the petrographic composition, was used for samples coming from Poland, Nawrocka et al. (2009). To verify the procedure used previously for non-hydraulic samples determination an experimental tests on carbonaceous mortars with crushed bricks from Novae in Bulgaria were made. Additionally, to identify different carbonaceous structures and their morphology, a cathodoluminescence and scanning electron microscope with electron dispersive spectrometer were applied. The crushed bricks and brick dust used in mortars production process have been interpreted as an alternative use to other pozzolanic materials. The reaction between lime and pozzolanic additives take place easily and affects the rate and course of carbonates decomposition in orthophosphric acid, during the samples pretreatment for dating. The composition of the Bulgarian samples together with influence of climate conditions on mortar carbonates do not allow for making straightforward conclusions in chronology context, but gives some new guidelines in terms of hydraulic mortars application for dating. This work has mainly

  5. States and future trends of the studies of radioisotopic batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history and current situation of radioisotopic batteries are reviewed, with the emphasis on the introduction of various power-generation mechanisms by nuclear decay energy. The newly developed theories and the new progress are presented. More than that, an insight is given into the prospect and future direction of this field

  6. The preparation of glucose uniformly labelled with carbon-14; Preparacion de glucosa uniformemente marcada con carbono-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, M. D.; Suarez, C.; Rodrigo, M. E.

    1978-07-01

    The plant, (Zea mais, L) and culture conditions for an optimum production of glucose has been chosen. To achieve the labelling of glucose, photosynthesis and carboxylation are carried on, under an artificial atmosphere of 14CO{sub 2} produced from 14{sup C}-barium carbonate. Following photosynthesis the sugars are extracted, and then the extract purified by several methods. The purified glucose is finally, degraded and the specific radioactivity is determined in each of its carbon atoms. (Author) 37 refs.

  7. Chemical and biological evolution of (U-14C)phenol sorbed on activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods describing the chemical and biological evolution of (U-14C)phenol adsorbed on activated carbon are given with or without the use of bacteria. Without bacteria, the (U-14C)phenol initially adsorbed is not removed from the carbon after adding a solution of unlabelled phenol through the column for eight days. With bacteria, the (U-14C)phenol initially present, is removed (60-70%) from activated carbon with a solution containing unlabelled phenol, nitrogen and phosphorus. (author)

  8. Radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) presents its radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals 2002 catalogue. In it we found physical characteristics of 9 different reactor produced radioisotopes ( Tc-99m, I-131, Sm-153, Ir-192, P-32, Na-24, K-42, Cu-64, Rb-86 ), 7 radiopharmaceuticals ( MDP, DTPA, DMSA, Disida, Phitate, S-Coloid, Red Blood Cells In-Vivo, Red Blood Cells In-Vitro) and 4 labelled compounds ( DMSA-Tc99m, DTPA-Tc99m, MIBG-I131, EDTMP-Sm153 ). In the near future the number of items will be increased with new reactor and cyclotron products. Our production system will be certified by ISO 9000 on March 2003. CCHEN is interested in being a national and an international supplier of these products (RS)

  9. Radioisotopes and rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To stimulate research into problems of rice cultivation, the International Atomic Energy Agency has placed several research contracts with agricultural institutes in some of its Member States. Some of these research projects deal with problems of soil-plant relations and fertilization, and rice is one of the main crops on which studies are being made. A panel of experts convened by the Agency met in Vienna in May this year to discuss some of the outstanding problems in the uses of radioisotopes in soil-plant relations and fertilization studies, and problems concerning rice were among the principal subjects considered. In a paper presented at the panel meeting. Professor S. Mitsui, of the University of Tokyo, reviewed some of the main uses of radioisotopes in studying problems of rice soils and rice cultivation and suggested several specific topics in this field which could be investigated by isotope techniques

  10. Radio-isotope converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the surface power density required for thermoelectric and thermionic converters, available radioactive sources are surveyed and listed. Curves of specific minimum diameter versus thermal flux density are given. 210Po and 242Cm appear to be suitable for direct thermionic when alpha emitters such as 238Pu and 244Cm are still suitable for thermoelectric conversion. This mode will also work with beta emitters 170Tm, 90Sr, 144Ce and 137Cs. Some thermoelectric radioisotope heated converters are suggested. (authors)

  11. Radioisotope analyzer of barium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principle of operation and construction of radioisotope barium sulphate analyzer type MZB-2 for fast determination of barium sulphate content in barite ores and enrichment products are described. The gauge equipped with Am-241 and a scintillation detector enables measurement of barium sulphate content in prepared samples of barite ores in the range 60% - 100% with the accuracy of 1%. The gauge is used in laboratories of barite mine and ore processing plant. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  12. Radioisotope programme in Iran

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Research Centre of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran has taken up a program for the production of short-lived radioisotopes. The initial purpose of this program was to give service to isotope users, mainly researchers, who were importing radioisotopes. With the commissioning of the reactor and installation of handling facilities at the temporary isotope laboratories at NRC the scope of the production program elaborated. Meanwhile the application of radiopharmaceuticals in medicine was actively encouraged. The production of radioisotopes in medicine is one of the prime objectives. The development of Tc-99m technology in NRC of AEOI will not only meet the demands of existing nuclear medicine centres, but also help the country to develop know-how in this important area. The output of this project will be the production and supply of Tc-99m generator, which is a primary objective with the technical assistance of IAEA. At the present moment the Tc-99m is processing using Mo-99 produced in the NRC reactor by irradiation Mo03. In view of the easier availability of fission product Mo-99 from several suppliers, now the NRC is seriously considering the preparation of Tc-99m generators using imported fission Mo-99. We are also working on the production of high specific activity Cr-51, P-32, S-33 and Au-198 colloid and some other short-lived radioisotopes in milicurie level. Iodine-131 is processed using the wet distillation method with good recovery. The iodine-131 is tested for radiochemical purity tellurium content and radionuclide purity and is found to be satisfactory. With these studies the processing and quality control of I-131 can be considered complete and batches of one curie activity can be planned. Specifications have been standardized for I-131 labelled formulations radiopharmaceuticals. (Author)

  13. Current utilization of research reactor on radioisotopes production in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main technical parameters of the four research reactors and their current utilization status in radioisotope manufacture and labeling compounds preparation are described. The radioisotopes, such as Co-60 sealed source, Ir-192 sealed source, γ-knife source, I-131, I-125, Sm-153, P-32 series products, In-113m generator, Tc-99m gel generator, Re-188 gel generator, C-14, Ba-131, Sr-89, 90Y, etc., and their labeling compounds prepared from the reactor produced radionuclides, such as I-131-MIBG, I-131-Hippure, I-131-capsul, Sm-153-EDTMP, Re-186-HEDP, Re-186-HA, C-14-urea, and radioimmunoassay kits etc. are presented as well. Future development plan of radioisotopes and labeling compounds in China is also given. Simultaneously, the possibility and methods of bilateral or multilateral co-operation in utilization of research reactor, personnel and technology exchange of radioisotope production and labeling compounds is also discussed. (author)

  14. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country's main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community

  15. Radioisotopes for medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, S. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW (Australia). Radiopharmaceuticals Division

    1998-03-01

    For more than 3 decades, the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation has been the country`s main supplier of radioisotopes for medical applications. The use of radioisotopes in medicine has revolutionised the diagnosis, management and treatment of many serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke. It is also beginning to play a key role in neurological disorders such as Parkinson and Alzheimers disease and epilepsy. More recently there has been considerable growth in the application of nuclear medicine to treat sport-related injuries - especially wrist, ankle and knees where more common techniques do not always enable accurate diagnosis. Australia is a recognised leader in nuclear medicine. This can be partially attributed to the close relationship between ANSTO and the medical community in providing opportunities to develop and evaluate new agents to support more effective patient care. A list of commercial isotopes produced in the reactor or the cyclotron and used in medical applications is given. Nuclear medicine plays an important role in the clinical environment and the timely supply of radioisotopes is a key element. ANSTO will continue to be the premier supplier of currently available and developing isotopes to support the health and well being of the Australian community 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  16. Uptake of bomb-produced carbon-14 by the Pacific Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collection of seawater samples for carbon-14 analysis was performed from 1957 through 1972. The dissolved inorganic carbon was extracted on board the ships and returned to the laboratory for processing. Samples were analyzed for carbon-14 by gas proportional counting of acetylene prepared by conversion of carbon dioxide to acetylene via lithium carbide. Carbon-14 results are reported for 312 surface and 96 sub-surface Pacific Ocean samples and for 34 surface and 53 sub-surface Indian Ocean samples. The precision of measurements was generally from 0.5 to 1.5 percent (one-sigma). The purpose of the seawater measurements was to determine the distribution of bomb carbon-14 in the surface of the Pacific and Indian Oceans, the change in carbon-14 concentration with depth, and the rate of uptake of bomb carbon-14 by the oceans. The oceans are the largest reservoir of exchangeable carbon. The CO2 of the atmosphere exchanges with that of the sea through molecular exchange. In the surface Pacific, a strong latitudinal variation in carbon-14 concentration was found. By 1971, maxima of about 25 percent above pre-bomb levels were found at mid-latitudes of both hemispheres; this finding is attributed to relatively weak vertical mixing in the gyral circulation systems. A 1971 equatorial excess of only about 11 percent is caused by upwelling of sub-surface water and mixture of low carbon-14 Peru Current water into the equatorial system. South of the Antarctic Convergence surface radiocarbon levels rapidly decrease. To the North of the North Pacific gyre maximum, carbon-14 levels show a minimum at about 400N, apparently due to an influx of low carbon-14 water from north of Japan. Levels then rise to a maximum at 450N to 480N, before decreasing further north

  17. Use of the small proportional counter for carbon 14 measurement in 10 milligram carbon samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ten years ago, the measurement of C-14/C-12 ratios in 10 milligram carbon samples seemed to be technically out of reach. However, two developments that make this goal possible have recently occurred: the first is an entirely new mass-spectrometric separation of C-14 and C-12 ions and their subsequent estimation by counting, while the second is simply the extension of conventional proportional counter operation (using CO2 as counter gas) to very small size carbon samples. The first method is very fast, precise, and capable of treating samples of even sub-milligram size, but requires an expensive installation. The second method is slow (counting times of two months or more are necessary), can probably be made sufficiently precise to handle most problems, works down to sample sizes of 10 mg carbon, and is relatively inexpensive, especially to install in already existing radiocarbon laboratories. It is this second method and its implications that are discussed in the present paper

  18. Advances in Radioisotope Handling Facilities and Automation of Radioisotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Founded in 1959, the Institute of Isotopes of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences began to produce radioactive isotopes in 1964. Since then, it has become a major Hungarian centre of research, development and production relating to the application of radioisotopes. Since 1993 a part of the former Institute has been operating as the Institute of Isotopes Co., Ltd. The main advances in radioisotope handling facilities and automation of radioisotope production are presented here. (author)

  19. Utilization of radioisotopes in the agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of radioisotopes utilization in the agriculture, such as, the use of gamma radiation for genetic improvement of plants; the use of C14 as tracer for comprehension of the vegetable physiology; the use of nitrogen and phosphorus isotopes in soil fertilization and plant nutrition; the use of radiation for inset sterelization and, measurement of the humidity and density of soils by neutron moderation and attenuation of gamma radiation, are presented. (M.C.K.)

  20. The natural thermoluminescence of meteorites. VI - Carbon-14, thermoluminescence and the terrestrial ages of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, P. H.; Jull, A. J. T.; McKeever, S. W. S.; Sears, D. W. G.

    1993-06-01

    A relationship is noted between the natural thermoluminescence (TL) levels and the C-14-derived terrestrial ages for meteorite finds from the U.S. Prairie States and Roosevelt County, NM; those in the Sahara are also in accord with calculated TL decay curves, for 'storage' temperatures equal to the approximate average annual temperatures at individual sites. This discussion is limited to the empirical correspondence between the two methodologies, and to theoretical decay curves for a single 'average' ordinary chondrite.

  1. Resonant Auger decay of Ar 2p3/2-14s and 2p3/2-14p states excited by electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger spectra of resonantly excited 2p3/2-14s and 2p3/2-14p states in argon were measured by (e,2e) technique. The 99.2-eV scattered electrons were detected in coincidence with L3-M23M23 Auger electrons, and the experiment was performed at 343.6- and 344.9-eV electron impact to tune the energy loss to the energy of the dipole-allowed and the dipole-forbidden excitations, respectively. The resonant Auger spectra are obtained upon subtraction of the overlapping signal due to the outer-shell ionization, which was recorded at 340-eV electron-impact energy. The most intense groups of Auger transitions from 2p3/2-14s (J=1,2) and 2p3/2-14p (J=0,1,2,3) states are identified by comparison with the results of the two-step model, based on distorted-wave Born approximation with exchange and multiconfiguration descriptions of the relaxed states. The 4 s spectrum displays a substantially larger shake-up contribution than the one observed in photoexcitation experiments, which may be explained by the interference of the resonant decay path with the direct ionization excitation of the Ar 3p subshell. The majority of the observed 4p signal is assigned to the monopole and quadrupole excitations of the ground state.

  2. Synthesis of carbon-14 labelled indolic 5HT{sub 1} receptor agonists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterhouse, Ian; Cable, K.M.; Fellows, Ian; Wipperman, M.D.; Sutherland, D.R. [Glaxo Wellcome Research and Development, Stevenage (United Kingdom). Isotope Chemistry Unit

    1996-11-01

    Syntheses of carbon-14 labelled versions of indolic 5HT{sub 1} agonists sumatriptan (GR43175), GR40370 and naratriptan (GR85548) are described. Introduction of the label via cyanation of ketoformanilides, formed by oxidative cleavage of an indole ring, ensured incorporation of carbon-14 at the metabolically stable C-2 position of the indole. (author).

  3. Radioisotopes in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa de Lima, Joao Jose [Servico de Biofisica/Biomatematica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra (Portugal)

    1998-11-01

    Radioisotopes are extensively used in medicine for diagnosis, either in vivo or in vitro, for therapeutics and also for investigation purposes. Nuclear medicine (Nm) studies in vivo are used to detect minimal amounts of radiopharmaceuticals in organs (the morphology) and their course over time (the function), resulting from physico-chemical interactions of the tracers within the body, in the sequence of specific physiological processes. In vitro applications of radioisotopes have become a most important tool in biochemical analysis. Therapeutic uses of radioisotopes cover from external gamma-ray sources in teleradiotherapy to direct cell irradiation in metabolic therapy. The information, which is conveyed by NM, is essentially metabolic and differs from that supplied by the other imaging techniques, which is basically structural. This quality is important in early detection and diagnosis. Efforts have steadily been made to bring NM imaging as close as possible to an ideal medical diagnostic tool: non-invasive and allowing studies yielding functional, morphological, three-dimensional and quantitative information simultaneously. Of the two tomographic techniques available in NM, positron emission tomography (PET) is probably closer to this goal than single-photon emission tomography (SPECT). High-contrast functional images of the dynamics of labelled molecules (native or functionally similar) that are metabolized by the organs under investigation, are obtained with these techniques. Nuclear medicine has progressed as a result of advances in four strategic areas: the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, the technology and reliability of detectors, the capacity for modelling the metabolic fate of the inputs in the biological systems, and finally the ability to extract and process data. (author)

  4. Searches for massive neutrino emission in {sup 14}C beta and {sup 55}Fe electron-capture decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wietfeldt, F.E. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-05-01

    In 1985 Simpson reported evidence for the emission of a 17 keV mass neutrino in a small fraction of tritium beta decays. An experimental controversy ensued in which a number of both positive and negative results were reported. The beta spectrum of {sup 14}C was collected in a unique {sup 14}C-doped planar germanium detector and a distortion was observed that initially confirmed Simpson`s result. Further tests linked this distortion to a splitting of the collected charge between the central detector and the surrounding guard ring in a fraction of the events. A second {sup 14}C measurement showed no evidence for emission of a 17 keV mass neutrino. In a related experiment, a high statistics electron-capture internal-bremsstrahlung photon spectrum of {sup 55}Fe was collected with a coaxial germanium detector. A local search for departures from a smooth shape near the endpoint was performed, using a second-derivative technique. An upper limit of 0.65% (95% C.L.) for the mixing Of a neutrino in the mass range 5--25 keV was established. The upper limit on the mixing of a 17 keV mass neutrino was 0.14% (95% C.L.).

  5. Radioisotope powered light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Case, F. N.; Remini, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Radioisotopes have been used for a number of years to excite phosphors to produce visible light. The advent of the nuclear age, however, made possible the preparation of radionuclides in larger quantities at relatively low prices, and with radiation properties that greatly expanded the potential applications for such lights. Current energy conservation needs and inflation leading to even higher costs for maintenance and capital equipment has provided the incentive for development of illuminators for air field markers using both byproduct krypton-85 and processed tritium. Background and current status of these developments are discussed.

  6. Radioisotope powered light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have been used for a number of years to excite phosphors to produce visible light. The advent of the nuclear age, however, made possible the preparation of radionuclides in larger quantities at relatively low prices, and with radiation properties that greatly expanded the potential applications for such lights. Current energy conservation needs and inflation leading to even higher costs for maintenance and capital equipment has provided the incentive for development of illuminators for air field markers using both byproduct krypton-85 and processed tritium. Background and current status of these developments are discussed

  7. Frontiers in radioisotope application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes and radiation are being used in numerous and diverse fields to benefit mankind. A glimpse at the recent advances in terms of usage of new radionuclides or new techniques, in some of the important areas are discussed. Use of radionuclides in medicine, industries, agriculture and water resource management are delineated. The various uses of radiation such as cancer therapy, sterilization of medical products, disinfestation of food products, food preservation, industrial radiography, nucleonic gauges, crop mutation to raise better quality seeds, cross-linking and curing of materials, coatings etc. and treatment of municipal waste are discussed. (author). 56 refs., 4 tabs

  8. Effect of dead carbon on the 14C dating of the speleothem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Yanjun; Warren Beck; PENG Zicheng; ZHANG Zhaofeng

    2005-01-01

    Based on the comparison of dating results among high-precision TIMS U-series and AMS 14C as well as the published 14C dating results and their band counting ages (i.e. calendar ages), this paper discusses the effect of dead carbon on the speleothem 14C dating. The result shows that the fraction of incorporated dead carbon during the formation of speleothem varies. The change in the fraction of dead carbon would result in big deviation in the 14C age of the speleothem. It is indispensable to take the dead carbon into consideration when dating the speleothem using the 14C method or studying the atmospheric 14C concentration during the past with the speleothem.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of coordination polymer nanoparticles as radioisotope tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coordination polymer nanoparticles (NPs) with gamma-emitting nuclide (Au-198), 411 keV, 675 keV, 822 keV and 1087 keV were prepared by coordination polymerization of the radioisotope Au3+ ions and 1,4-bis(imidazole-1-ylmethyl)benzene in an aqueous solution at room temperature for 3 h. Here, the radioisotope Au3+ ions were prepared by dissolution of Au-198 foil, which was prepared by neutron irradiation from the HANARO reactor, in KCN aqueous solution. The successful synthesis of the radioisotope coordination polymer NPs with 5±0.5 nm was confirmed via UV–vis spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDXS), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and Gamma spectroscopy analysis. The synthesized radioisotope coordination polymer NPs can be used as radiotracers in science, engineering, and industrial fields

  10. Effect of industrial fuel combustion on the carbon-14 level of atmospheric CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As was previously noticed in 1953 by SUESS, the radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 was slightly lower in the 20th century (before the increase in the carbon-14 level due to the addition of artificial 14C) than at the time before the beginning of the industrial revolution in the 19th century. An exact knowledge of the magnitude of this effect is of interest in connection with the question of the rate of isotope exchange between atmospheric CO2 and the bicarbonates of the oceans. However, the radiocarbon level in the CO2 of the atmosphere is also subject to natural fluctuations caused by a variable cosmic-ray production rate of carbon-14. To investigate this the authors have cross-correlated sunspot numbers (as indicators of cosmic-ray activity) with the carbon-14 level in wood, and have detected a significant coherence between the two time series. The observed coherence permits an extrapolation of the natural carbon-14 values beyond the time of the beginning of artificial combustion of fossil fuel, around 1880. The results show that the observed small decrease in the carbon-14 level is somewhat affected by the increase of the production rate of carbon-14, as a consequence of relatively low solar activity during the preceding decades. The effect of industrial fuel combustion upon the carbon-14 level of the atmosphere can then be estimated for the Northern Hemisphere to be in the vicinity of -3%. (author)

  11. Radioisotopes and radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The field of radioisotopes and radiation processing has grown enormously all over the world with India being no exception. The chemistry and radiochemistry related inputs to the overall technology development and achievements have been, and will continue to be, of considerable value and importance in this multi-disciplinary and multi-specialty field. Harnessing further benefits as well as sustaining proven applications should be the goal in planning for the future. An objective analysis of the socio-economic impact and benefits from this field to the society at large will undoubtedly justify assigning continued high priority, and providing adequate resources and support, to relevant new projects and programmes on the anvil in the area of radioisotopes and radiation technology. It is necessary to nurture and strengthen inter-disciplinary and multi-specialty collaborations and cooperation - at both national and international level as a rule (not as exception) - for greater efficiency, cost-effectiveness and success of ongoing endeavors and future developments in this important field

  12. Safe Handling of Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under its Statute the International Atomic Energy Agency is empowered to provide for the application of standards of safety for protection against radiation to its own operations and to operations making use of assistance provided by it or with which it is otherwise directly associated. To this end authorities receiving such assistance are required to observe relevant health and safety measures prescribed by the Agency. As a first step, it has been considered an urgent task to provide users of radioisotopes with a manual of practice for the safe handling of these substances. Such a manual is presented here and represents the first of a series of manuals and codes to be issued by the Agency. It has been prepared after careful consideration of existing national and international codes of radiation safety, by a group of international experts and in consultation with other international bodies. At the same time it is recommended that the manual be taken into account as a basic reference document by Member States of the Agency in the preparation of national health and safety documents covering the use of radioisotopes.

  13. Radioisotope method for demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastroesophageal scintigraphy with 99mTc pertechnetate was performed in 17 patients for diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux. Two of these patients had sclerodermia, 2 had undergone gastric resection for gastroduodenal ulcer, 3 had chronic gastroduodenitis, 5 - duodenal ulcer, 1 - gastric ulcer, 1 - gastric ulcer+hiatus hernia, 1 six-year-old child -duodenal ulcer and 2 infants - gastritis. 99mTv-sulphocolloid was orally introduced in dose 7,40 mBq for adults, 4,44 mBq for infants, 5,18 mBq for children younger than 14 years and 5,92 mBq for patients having undergone gastric resection. Gastroesophageal reflux was demonstrated in 4 patients, the data of the radioisotopic examination being verified by fibrogastroscopy. The radioisotopic method for demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux is an original, physiological and noninvasive method of low radiation load for demonstration of gastroesophageal reflux, requiring no intubation

  14. PS1-14bj: A Hydrogen-Poor Superluminous Supernova With a Long Rise and Slow Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Lunnan, R; Berger, E; Milisavljevic, D; Jones, D O; Rest, A; Fong, W; Fransson, C; Margutti, R; Drout, M R; Blanchard, P K; Challis, P; Cowperthwaite, P S; Foley, R J; Kirshner, R P; Morell, N; Riess, A G; Roth, K C; Scolnic, D; Smartt, S J; Smith, K W; Villar, V A; Chambers, K C; Draper, P W; Huber, M E; Kaiser, N; Kudritzki, R -P; Magnier, E A; Metcalfe, N; Waters, C

    2016-01-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of PS1-14bj, a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) at redshift $z=0.5215$ discovered in the last months of the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey. PS1-14bj stands out by its extremely slow evolution, with an observed rise to maximum light $\\gtrsim 125$ days in the rest frame, and exponential decline out to $\\sim 250$ days past peak at a measured rate of $9.75\\times 10^{-3}$ mag day$^{-1}$, consistent with fully-trapped $^{56}$Co decay. This is the longest rise time measured in a SLSN to date, and the first SLSN to show a rise time consistent with pair-instability supernova (PISN) models. Compared to other slowly-evolving SLSNe, it is spectroscopically similar to the prototype SN 2007bi at maximum light, though somewhat lower in luminosity ($L_{\\rm peak} \\simeq 4.4 \\times 10^{43}~{\\rm erg~s}^{-1}$) and with a flatter peak than previous events. In addition to its slow evolution, PS1-14bj shows a number of peculiar properties, including a near-constant color temperatur...

  15. Phenomenological Study of W′ Boson Decaying to Muon and Missing Transverse Energy at 14 TeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many possible extensions of the Standard Model (SM) are predicted by theories. A possible abstracted extension of the SM is the so-called Sequentail Standard Model (SSM). The SSM model predicts signature of new charged gauge boson W′. In this paper, the discovery potential of new heavy charged gauge boson (W′) decaying to a muon and a neutrino at center of mass energy 14 TeV has been studied. An assumption has been made that the early data of the second run of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) correspond to an integrated luminosity of 300 fb-1. The Monte Carlo (MC) signal samples are generated with the multipurpose event generator Pythia 6, while the background samples are generated with the matrix element generator Mad Graph 5 followed by hadronization and parton showering by using Pythia 8 and then we used Delphes for fast detector simulation

  16. Modelling accidental releases of carbon 14 in the environment: application as an excel spreadsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An application as an Excel spreadsheet of the simplified modelling approach of carbon 14 transfer in the environment developed by Tamponnet (2002) is presented. Based on the use of growth models of biological systems (plants, animals, etc.), the one-pool model (organic carbon) that was developed estimates the concentration of carbon 14 within the different compartments of the food chain and in fine the dose to man by ingestion in the case of a chronic or accidental release of carbon 14 in a river or the atmosphere. Data and knowledge have been implemented on Excel using the object-oriented programming language VisualBasic (Microsoft Visual Basic 6.0). The structure of the conceptual model and the Excel sheet are first briefly exposed. A numerical application of the model under a scenario of an accidental release of carbon 14 in the atmosphere is then presented. Simulation results and perspectives are discussed. (author)

  17. Radioisotope production in Malaysia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Anuar Wan Awang [Medical Technology Div., Malaysian Inst. for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) (Malaysia)

    1998-10-01

    Production of Mo-99 by neutron activation of Mo-99 in Malaysia began as early as 1984. Regular supply of the Tc-99m extracted from it to the hospitals began in early 1988 after going through formal registration with the Malaysian Ministry of Health. Initially, the weekly demand was about 1.2 Ci of Mo-99 which catered the needs of 3 nuclear medicine centres. Sensitive to the increasing demand of Tc-99m, we have producing our own Tc-99m generator from imported TeO{sub 2} because irradiation TeO{sub 2} with our reactor give low yield of I-131. We have established the production of radioisotope for industrial use. By next year, Sm-153 EDTMP will be produce after we have license from our competent authority. (author)

  18. Agricultural application of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiations and isotopic tracers laboratory (R.I.T.L.) is duly approved B-class laboratory for handling radioactivity and functions as a central research facility of our university which has played a very significant role in ushering green revolution in the country. Radiolabelled fertilizers, insecticides and isotopes mostly supplied by Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, (BRIT) Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) are being used in our university for the last three decades to study the uptake of fertilizers, micro nutrients, photosynthesis and photorespiration studies in different crop plants, soil-water-plant relations and roots activity, pesticides and herbicides mode of action, plants physiology and microbiology. Main emphasis of research so far has been concentrated on the agricultural productivity. The present talk is an attempt to highlight the enormous potential of radioisotopes to evolve better management of crop system for eco-friendly and sustainable agriculture in the next century. (author)

  19. Radioisotopes in sedimentology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have two main uses in sedimentology: they are used for the study of sediment movements in rivers and seas, and for continuous measurements of the amount of sediment suspended in a given medium. These two uses are considered in detail, and brief accounts given of some other uses. Study of sediment movements. After describing the basic technique used in sediment movement studies (injection of a labelled sediment or a simulator into the current, followed by tracking the radioactivity), the author enumerates as fully as possible the problems that can be solved with the help of this technique. Essentially, these problems fall into two groups: 1. Problems related to civil engineering works in coastal areas: the siltation of harbour channels and docks, the formation of banks and bars, the choice of sites for disposing of dredged sediment, the siting of ports, coastline protection, etc. Problems associated with civil engineering works in and near rivers; siting of the water intakes of hydroelectric and nuclear power stations, the effects of construction work on the transport of solids, the construction of dams, the protection of river banks, the construction of jetties, the siltation of lakes, etc. Problems common to these include the transport of effluent and the calibration of hydraulic models. The bibliography is based mainly on fairly recent references and on current research work. 2. Problems related to basic or applied research conducted mainly by universities and research centres: the study of the Quarternary of a particular region, pure sedimentology, the investigation of major sediment transport currents, the confirmation or refutation of transport theories, research into fundamental transport phenomena associated with channel experiments. After referring to the possible exploitation of natural tracers (contained in radioactive waste and fallout), the author discusses the technical aspects of using artificial tracers: the choice of radioisotope

  20. Cardiovascular: radioisotopic angiocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopic angiocardiography, performed after the intravenous injection of 99/sup m/Tc-labeled pertechnetate or albumin, is a simple, rapid, and safe procedure which permits identification and physiologic assessment of a wide variety of congenital and acquired cardiovascular lesions in infants and children. These include atrial and ventricular septal defect, tetralogy of Fallot, pulmonic stenosis, aortopulmonary window, transposition of the great vessels, valvular stenosis and/or insufficiency, myocardial lesions, and lesions of the great vessels. The simplicity of the procedure lends itself to repeated measurements to assess the effects of therapy or to follow the course of the disease. A wide spectrum of congenital and acquired cardiovascular diseases have been studied which have particular application to the pediatric age group. (auth)

  1. 14C in fractions of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report carbon isotope ratios of fractions of natural organic compounds in ground waters isolated from the Stripa mine (Sweden) and the Milk River aquifer (Alberta, Canada). High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fractions of the organic carbon were characterized and these, along with dissolved inorganic carbon, were analysed for δ13C and 14C. The 14C results suggest that the dissolved organic carbon originates from a combination of soil organic matter and kerogen in the aquifer matrix. The high-molecular-weight fractions show a predominant soil origin, whereas the low-molecular-weight fractions are often strongly influenced by kerogen. (author)

  2. Stable Isotopic Evidence for a Pedogenic Origin of Carbonates in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quade, J; Cerling, T E

    1990-12-14

    Layered carbonate and silica encrust fault fractures exposed in Trench 14 near Yucca Mountain, site of the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository in southern Nevada. Comparison of the stable carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of the fracture carbonates with those of modern soil carbonates in the area shows that the fracture carbonates are pedogenic in origin and that they likely formed in the presence of vegetation and rainfall typical of a glacial climate. Their isotopic composition differs markedly from that of carbonate associated with nearby springs. The regional water table therefore remained below the level of Trench 14 during the time that the carbonates and silica precipitated, a period probably covering parts of at least the last 300,000 years. PMID:17818282

  3. Synthesis of the monosodium salt of carbon-14 labeled paclitaxel (Taxol) 2`-ethyl carbonate 7-phosphonooxymethyl ether, a potential prodrug of paclitaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dischino, D.D.; Shuhui Chen; Golik, Jerzy; Walker, D.W.; Wong, H.S.L. [Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Richard L. Gelb Center for Research and Development, Wallingford, CT (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The monosodium salt of carbon-14 labeled paclitaxel (Taxol) [N3`-{sup 14}COPh] 2`-ethyl carbonate 7-phosphonooymethyl ether, was prepared from C-14 labeled paclitaxel [N3`-{sup 14}COPh] in 5 steps. The radiochemical purity of the final product was greater than 99% and the specific activity was 25 {mu}Ci/mg. (author).

  4. The search for new radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus-30 was the first artificial radioisotope, it was produced by F. and I. Joliot-Curie in 1934, since then 2460 new nuclei have been discovered. This document reviews the radioisotopes known and the methods used to separate them. The authors describe the discovery of new radioisotopes such as Nickel-78 produced in the fission of high energy uranium ions impinging on a lead target (IPN-GSI collaboration) and the discovery of Nickel-48 by a team CENBG-Ganil. All this experience is useful for the processing of nuclear wastes by using transmutation. (A.C.)

  5. Measurement of the branching ratios for the Standard Model Higgs decays into muon pairs and into Z boson pairs at a 1.4 TeV CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)701211; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, Ivanka; Grefe, Christian; Kacarevic, Goran; Lukic, Strahinja; Pandurovic, Mila; Roloff, Philipp Gerhard; Smiljanic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the Higgs production cross-section times the branching ratios for its decays into μ+μ- and ZZ* pairs at a 1.4 TeV CLIC collider is investigated in this paper. The Standard Model Higgs boson with a mass of 126 GeV is dominantly produced via WW fusion in e+e- collisions at 1.4 TeV centre-of-mass energy. Analyses for both decay channels are based on a full simulation of the CLIC_ILD detector. All relevant physics and beam-induced background processes are taken into account. An integrated luminosity of 1.5 ab 1 and unpolarised beams are assumed. For the H-->ZZ* decay, the purely hadronic final state (ZZ*--> qq ̄qq ̄) is considered as well as ZZ* decays into two jets and two leptons (ZZ*--> qq ̄l+l- ). It is shown that the branching ratio for the Higgs decay into a muon pair times the Higgs production cross-section can be measured with 38% statistical uncertainty. It is also shown that the statistical uncertainty of the Higgs branching fraction for decay into a Z boson pair times the Hi...

  6. Synthesis of δ-aminolevulic acid. Application to the introduction of carbon-14 and of tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several new syntheses of δ aminolevulic acid (δ A.L.A.) have been studied. 14C-4 δ - aminolevulic acid has been obtained from 14C allylacetic carboxylic acid with a yield of 30 per cent with respect to barium carbonate and with a specific activity of 32 mCi/mM. The 14C-1 or 14C-2 δ-A.L.A. has been prepared from the 14C-1 or 14C-2 acetate with a yield of 55 per cent with respect to the acetate. Finally the tritiated δ-A.L.A. has been obtained for the first time by tritiation of ethyl phthalimidodehydrolevulate. (author)

  7. Radiocarbon 14C differentiation of sparkling and carbonated wines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specific 14C-activities, percent of modern 14C-activity, and calculated percent of fermentation CO2 are presented for CO2 contained in commercial sparkling wines, labeled as champagne or produced by the bulk (charmat) process. These data are given for the production years 1976-1982. The survey encompassed effervescent wines produced in Spain, Italy, West Germany, California, and New York. Addition of synthetic CO2 to approximately 40 samples represented as sparkling wines was indicated by low 14C-activities of CO2 in these wines. Data for 14C-activity were also presented for the ethanol distilled from sparkling wines for the years 1977-1980. In all cases, the 14C-activity of ethanol was appropriate to the year of vintage

  8. The learning of the evolution and temporary characteristics of the decay nuclei 14C, 238U, 232Th, 40K, 87Rb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum-mechanical method, which was proposing earlier for the theoretical description of the resonance scattering of the γ-quantum, was generalizing with Doppler effect using. New algorithm for the definition of the characteristic functions for the energy distribution, decay probability and decay functions elaborated. It gives possibility more precise estimate temporary characteristics of the nuclei chronometers and to define a number of the steps of the γ-absorption γ-emission in the decay process. It is give the quantum- mechanical ground of the necessity of revision of the temporary characteristics of the nuclei-chronometers. The calculations have been doing for the concrete case decay of exited nuclei 14C, 238U, 232Th, 40K, 87Rb under room temperature taking into account Doppler effect and without it. 4 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  9. Modelling the behaviour of carbon 14 released by nuclear power plants in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under routine operation, French nuclear power plants of the PWR type release small amounts of carbon 14 in the environment either as airborne or liquid effluents. With the improvement of nuclear waste management, resulting in a significant reduction in corrosion products discharges, carbon 14 currently stands out as one of the main contributor to the individual dose to the public. Besides, with the decrease in military weapon tests fallout levels, nuclear reactors liquid releases are becoming the dominant artificial source of carbon 14 in rivers, downstream of power plants. To properly assess the fate of carbon 14 in rivers and to calculate individual doses to critical groups, a time-dependent food chain model was developed which considered the migration of carbon 14 in rivers and the transfer to terrestrial environments through irrigation with river water. Processes included in the model are: (1) dilution and equilibrium between the different forms of dissolved inorganic carbon in water, (2) exchange of carbon dioxide between water and atmosphere, (3) transfer to aquatic organisms, (4) transfer of irrigation water in the soil profile, (5) loss from the soil through volatilisation, (6) incorporation in plants by way of photosynthesis (7) transfer to livestock. This model is implemented on the Loire river and the modelling results are compared with the data obtained in radioecological surveys. These elements are then used to calculate doses to humans and non-human biota and assess the contribution from natural and industrial origins. (author)

  10. Milliwatt Radioisotope Stirling Convertor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Studies of potential space missions have highlighted the need for very small electric power supplies for a variety of applications. The light weight radioisotope...

  11. Radioisotope Dating with Accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Richard A.

    1979-01-01

    Explains a new method of detecting radioactive isotopes by counting their accelerated ions rather than the atoms that decay during the counting period. This method increases the sensitivity by several orders of magnitude, and allows one to find the ages of much older and smaller samples. (GA)

  12. Results of interagency effort to determine carbon-14 source term in low-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary estimate of the risks from the shallow land disposal of low-level radioactive wastes by EPA in 1984-1985 indicated that Carbon-14 caused virtually all of the risk and that these risks were relatively high. Therefore, an informal interagency group, which included the US Department of Energy, US Geological Survey, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and US Environmental Protection Agency, formed in 1985 to obtain up-to-date information on the activity and chemical form of Carbon-14 in the different types of LLW and how Carbon-14 behaves after disposal. The EPA acted as a focal point for collating the information collected by all of the Agencies and will publish a report in Fall 1986 on the results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. Of particular importance, the study showed that Carbon-14 activity in LLW was overestimated approximately 2000%. This paper summarizes results of the Carbon-14 data collection effort. 40 references, 1 figure, 3 tables

  13. Radioisotope production at 14 MW TRIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few years after reactor first start-up it was developed a program for small-scale isotope production, as a complementary activity to the main activities at TRIGA reactor i.e. fuel and material testing in loops and capsules. We aimed to obtain radioactive material for industrial and medical use, of medium and high specific activity. In this paper, one is briefly described the irradiation conditions, irradiation devices, post-irradiation handling and the steps intended for improving the quality of this activity, referring particularly to some widely used isotopes as Ir-192, I-125, and Co-60 and to some radiopharmaceuticals (Mo-99 and I-131). One concludes by suggesting some ways to improve and enlarge isotope production at TRIGA: i. to optimize the channel filling with thinner iridium disks (0.25 mm) by re-spacing them; ii. to design and operate a better charging and discharging system of the ampoules irradiated in peripheral berylium channels; iii. to start fast neutron irradiations for getting medium half life isotopes such as P-32 and S-35; iv. to allocate a new high flux irradiation channel for cobalt, without interfering with the rest of the irradiations. (authors)

  14. Interactive student training and evaluation software for radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper is focused on interactive student work with computer for detailed understanding of the radioactive decay, fission and fusion, as well as correct writing the nuclear reactions. A PHP program has been made in order to verify the accuracy of some nuclear reaction equations and to answer general questions about radioisotopes. The program is available at: http://academicdirect.ro/virtual_library/molecular_dynamics/radio_isotopes/ . (author)

  15. Asphalt in carbon-14-dated archaeological samples from Terqa, Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are reported of an organic geochemical study to verify contamination in 14C dated archaeological samples, which could account for much older apparent ages than expected. The data indicate that ancient asphalt must be the source of contamination, showing that caution should be exercised, in interpreting 14C dates of archaeological samples from areas containing asphalt or other fossil fuel deposits. (U.K.)

  16. Industrial applications of radioisotope tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope tracing techniques are powerful tools for analysing the behaviour of large systems and investigating industrially or economically important processes. The results of radioisotope experiments can yield important information, for example, on parameters such as flow rates, mixing phenomena, flow abnormalities and leaks. Some examples of current AAEC research are described, covering studies on hearth drainage in blast furnaces, flow behaviour in waste-water treatment ponds, and sediment transport in marine environments

  17. Behavior of environmental carbon-14 and tritium in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 14C activity in plants began to rise appreciably above normal in 1957, and the level rose almost linearly with the rate of 7% per year to the level in 1959. Steep increase of the level to a peak in 1963, between 85% and 90% above normal, shows the effect of large scale nuclear explosions through the end of 1962. Liquid scintillation counting was used as a sensitive assay method of 14C and 3H. For 14C determination, the naturally incorporated 14C into alcohol and essential oils (thymol, menthol and lemongrass oil) and used, and water samples were used for 3H measurement. The total amount 65 x 1027 of 14C atoms has been produced in nuclear tests, and this amount is about 3% of the total amount of 14C in nature. The 3H concentration in rivers, streams and ponds decreased exponentially from 600 pCi/l in 1967 to 150 pCi/l in 1972, with the half life of 2.5yr. The difference of the 3H concentration in surface water according to the sampling locations implies geographical and meteorological variations in fallout 3H level. It is said conclusively that environmental waters in Japan have not been influenced by the discharge effluent of the facilities with regard to tritium contamination and that tritium content in precipitation still play an important role in reflecting annual variation of tritium concentration to surface waters. (J.P.N.)

  18. Atmospheric nuclear weapons test history narrated by carbon-14 in human teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons since 1945 caused a significant increase in the concentration of atmospheric 14C. The 14C concentration in plants that assimilate 14C directly by photosynthesis reflects the atmospheric 14C concentration. Carbon-14 is then transferred into the human body through the food chain. Based on animal experiments, the collagen in human teeth is metabolically inert after its formation. This implies that the collagen of each tooth retains the 14C concentration which reflects the 14C concentration in the blood at the time collagen metabolism ceased. The distribution of the 14C concentration in the collagen of teeth from subjects of various ages would follow a pattern similar to that shown by soft tissues. In this paper the authors elucidate the relationship between the number of nuclear weapon tests and the distribution of 14C concentration in teeth

  19. Rhenium Radioisotopes for Therapeutic Radiopharmaceutical Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beets, A.L.; Knapp, F.F., Jr.; Kropp, J.; Lin, W.-Y.; Pinkert, J.; Wang, S.-Y.

    1999-01-18

    The availability of therapeutic radioisotopes at reasonable costs is important for applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology, Rhenium-186 (Re-186) and rhenium-1 88 (Re-188) are two reactor-produced radioisotope which are attractive for a variety of therapeutic applications, Rhenium-186 has a half-life of 90 hours and decays with emission of a &particle with a maximum energy of 1.08 MeV and a 135 keV (9Yo) gamma which permits imaging. In contrast, Re- 188 has a much shorter half-life of 16.9 hours and emits a p-particle with a much higher energy of 2.12 MeV (Em=) and a 155 keV gamma photon (15Yo) for imaging. While Re-186 is unavailable from a generator system and must be directly produced in a nuclear reactor, Re-188 can also be directly produced in a reactor with high specific activity, but is more conveniently and cost-effectively available as carrier-free sodium perrhenate by saline elution of the alumina-based tungsten-188 (W1 88)/Re-l 88 generator system [1-2]. Since a comprehensive overviewofRe-186 and Re-188 therapeutic agents is beyond the scope of this &tended Abstrac4 the goal is to provide key examples of various agents currently in clinical use and those which are being developed for important clinical applications.

  20. Medical application of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. Clinical research for radionuclide therapy 2. Development of in vitro assay method with radioisotope 3. Development of binary therapy; Boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy 4. Development of diagnostic methods in radionuclide imaging. The results can be applied for the following objectives: 1) Radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial 2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research 3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology 4) The result of the project will be expected to develop the new radioimmunoassay for drug monitoring following the clinical experiments 5) Boron porphyrin has been successfully labeled with iodine. This enables the pharmacodynamic study of the boron compound in human body 6) A method to evaluate the biological effect of neutrons on tumor cells has been developed 7) The establishment of macro- and microscopic dose assessment using alpha-track autoradiography 8) Clinical application of PDT in bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer and skin cancer 9) Radionuclide imaging of estrogen receptor in breast cancer, lipid metabolism, gene therapy, cancers, brain function and heart disease

  1. Medical application of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Chang Woon; Lim, S. M.; Kim, E. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    In this project, we studied following subjects: 1. Clinical research for radionuclide therapy 2. Development of in vitro assay method with radioisotope 3. Development of binary therapy; Boron neutron capture therapy and photodynamic therapy 4. Development of diagnostic methods in radionuclide imaging. The results can be applied for the following objectives: (1) Radionuclide therapy will be applied in clinical practice to treat the cancer patients or other diseases in multi-center trial (2) The newly developed monoclonal antibodies and biomolecules can be used in biology, chemistry or other basic life science research (3) The new methods for the analysis of therapeutic effects, such as dosimetry, and quantitative analysis methods of radioactivity, can be applied in basic research, such as radiation oncology and radiation biology (4) The result of the project will be expected to develop the new radioimmunoassay for drug monitoring following the clinical experiments (5) Boron porphyrin has been successfully labeled with iodine. This enables the pharmacodynamic study of the boron compound in human body (6) A method to evaluate the biological effect of neutrons on tumor cells has been developed (7) The establishment of macro- and microscopic dose assessment using alpha-track autoradiography (8) Clinical application of PDT in bladder cancers, oropharyngeal cancer and skin cancer (9) Radionuclide imaging of estrogen receptor in breast cancer, lipid metabolism, gene therapy, cancers, brain function and heart disease.

  2. Synthesis of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon marked with carbon-14: (b, d e f) dibenzo-chrysene 14C-7,14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (b, d e f) dibenzo-chrysene C-7,14 has been synthesized from radioactive carbon dioxide and the organic magnesium compound derived from 1,5 dibromo naphthalene. The product has been purified by a very precise series of fractionated chromatographs on alumina having a chromatographic activity. This has necessitated the development of a special technique. (author)

  3. Carbon 14 absorption and translocation in sugar cane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant-cane stools were labelled with sup(14) CO sub(2), in the field, at Goiana-PE, Brazil, when 3, 7 and 11 months old. Each stool was enclosed in a chamber with sup(14) CO sub(2) for 90 minutes. The sub(14) C photosynthetic were measured in leaves, stalks, roots and soil 24 hours after labelling. Roots were divided into alive and dead and soil into rhizosphere and outer soil. At the end of the labelling period at 3, 7 and 11 months, 2, 19 and 1% of the initial sup(14) CO sub(2) were recovered in the plant and the soil. The low recovery of sub(14) C at 3 months could be attribute to losses by respiration and lack of sampling of the top growing point. The low CO sub(2) fixation and losses at first sampling in the 7 month old labelling were attributed to low light intensity during the day of labelling. Most of the recovered sub(14) C (>80%) was founded in the leaves but all plant parts received labelled photosynthetic. At 3 months, most of the sub(14) C translocated from the leaves went to the living roots (83%); at 7 and 11 months it went to the stalks (69 and 66%). While the roots received less than 2%. Root masses did not vary consistently along the plant cycle and dead root masses were always less than 10% of the total root mass. Radioactivity in the dead roots was always very low. These results suggest that the root system have a low turnover rate after 3 months old. (author)

  4. Manual for reactor produced radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes find extensive applications in several fields including medicine, industry, agriculture and research. Radioisotope production to service different sectors of economic significance constitutes an important ongoing activity of many national nuclear programmes. Radioisotopes, formed by nuclear reactions on targets in a reactor or cyclotron, require further processing in almost all cases to obtain them in a form suitable for use. Specifications for final products and testing procedures for ensuring quality are also an essential part of a radioisotope production programme. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has compiled and published such information before for the benefit of laboratories of Member States. The first compilation, entitled Manual of Radioisotope Production, was published in 1966 (Technical Reports Series No. 63). A more elaborate and comprehensive compilation, entitled Radioisotope Production and Quality Control, was published in 1971 (Technical Reports Series No. 128). Both served as useful reference sources for scientists working in radioisotope production worldwide. The 1971 publication has been out of print for quite some time. The IAEA convened a consultants meeting to consider the need for compiling an updated manual. The consultants recommended the publication of an updated manual taking the following into consideration: significant changes have taken place since 1971 in many aspects of radioisotope production; many radioisotopes have been newly introduced while many others have become gradually obsolete; considerable experience and knowledge have been gained in production of important radioisotopes over the years, which can be preserved through compilation of the manual; there is still a need for a comprehensive manual on radioisotope production methods for new entrants to the field, and as a reference. It was also felt that updating all the subjects covered in the 1971 manual at a time may not be practical considering the

  5. Carbon-14 ages of Allan Hills meteorites and ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fireman, E. L.; Norris, T.

    1982-01-01

    Allan Hills is a blue ice region of approximately 100 sq km area in Antarctica where many meteorites have been found exposed on the ice. The terrestrial ages of the Allan Hills meteorites, which are obtained from their cosmogenic nuclide abundances are important time markers which can reflect the history of ice movement to the site. The principal purpose in studying the terrestrial ages of ALHA meteorites is to locate samples of ancient ice and analyze their trapped gas contents. Attention is given to the C-14 and Ar-39 terrestrial ages of ALHA meteorites, and C-14 ages and trapped gas compositions in ice samples. On the basis of the obtained C-14 terrestrial ages, and Cl-36 and Al-26 results reported by others, it is concluded that most ALHA meteorites fell between 20,000 and 200,000 years ago.

  6. Synthesis of carbon-14 labeled Taxol (paclitaxel). [Anticancer agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, D.G.; Swigor, J.E. (Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Syracuse, NY (United States). Pharmaceutical Research Inst.); Kant, Joydeep; Schroeder, D.R. (Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Wallingford, CT (United States). Pharmaceutical Research Inst.)

    1994-10-01

    Reductive cleavage of the C13 side chain of Taxol (1, paclitaxel) followed by regioselective silylation gave 7-triethylsilylbaccatin III (4). 3-O-Triethysilylation of 5 and subsequent reaction with benzoyl chloride-C7-[sup 14]C gave azetidinone 7. Coupling of 4 and 7 followed by deprotection gave 1.26 g of Taxol-N3'-[sup 14]C (11) having a specific activity of 26.5 mCi/mmol and a radiochemical purity of 95%. (author).

  7. Results of excretion analyses on carbon 14 and their interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personal monitoring of routinely radiation exposed persons according to paragraph 25 of the Austrian Radiation Protection Regulation usually can be performed with sufficient accuracy. A real problem, however, exists in the evaluation of the obtained data for calculating the dose commitment. The presented work reports some experiences with a routine monitoring program for 14C and gives a statistical review of the results from urinalysis of employees in the Research Center Seibersdorf for the period 1976-1978. For typical cases of incorporation, the received doses were estimated and proposals for organizing an effective survey program for workers handling 14C were made. (Auth.)

  8. Carbon-14 as an indicator of CO2 pollution in cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of fossil fuels in cities, and especially in industrial areas, releases large quantities of carbon dioxide into the local atmosphere. This carbon dioxide does not contain carbon-14, with the result that the carbon-14 content of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is locally depleted. The degree of depletion provides a measure for the carbon dioxide pollution at the sampling site. Since growing plants represent a convenient average sample of the carbon dioxide in the air, the leaves of deciduous trees can be used for comparing the magnitude of local pollution in different localities during the summer growing period. A series of leaf samples collected in 1973 from Europe, North America and South Africa reveals the expected differences in the degree of pollution. Extreme instances occur in Scholven (Ruhrgebiet, Germany), where the average day-time carbon dioxide content during the summer months is found to be 8.7% above normal, and in Manhatten, New York City, where the corresponding figure is 6.4%. The technique can easily be extended to include the winter months by directly absorbing carbon dioxide in a hydroxide solution during different seasons. The proposed method is sensitive but much less time-consuming than the continuous measurement of the carbon dioxide concentration in the air. It thus lends itself to the monitoring of impact areas of pollution. (author)

  9. Identification of ultra-fine magnetic particles in weakly magnetic carbonates using time-decay of viscous remanence

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chadima, Martin; Chadimová, Leona

    American Geophysical Union, 2015. [AGU Fall Meeting. 14.12.2015-18.12.2015, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : magnetism * carbonates * paleomagnetism Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm15/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/83872

  10. Report on the workshop "Decay spectroscopy at CARIBU: advanced fuel cycle applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics". 14-16 April 2011, Argonne National Laboratory, USA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondev, F.; Carpenter, M.P.; Chowdhury, P.; Clark, J.A.; Lister, C.J.; Nichols, A.L.; Swewryniak, D. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (Univ. of Massachusetts); (Univ. of Surrey)

    2011-10-06

    A workshop on 'Decay Spectroscopy at CARIBU: Advanced Fuel Cycle Applications, Nuclear Structure and Astrophysics' will be held at Argonne National Laboratory on April 14-16, 2011. The aim of the workshop is to discuss opportunities for decay studies at the Californium Rare Isotope Breeder Upgrade (CARIBU) of the ATLAS facility with emphasis on advanced fuel cycle (AFC) applications, nuclear structure and astrophysics research. The workshop will consist of review and contributed talks. Presentations by members of the local groups, outlining the status of relevant in-house projects and availabile equipment, will also be organized. time will also be set aside to discuss and develop working collaborations for future decay studies at CARIBU. Topics of interest include: (1) Decay data of relevance to AFC applications with emphasis on reactor decay heat; (2) Discrete high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy following radioactive decya and related topics; (3) Calorimetric studies of neutron-rich fission framgents using Total ABsorption Gamma-Ray Spectrometry (TAGS) technique; (4) Beta-delayed neutron emissions and related topics; and (5) Decay data needs for nuclear astrophysics.

  11. Study of rock porosity by impregnation with carbon-14- methylmethacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation of porosity and spatial porosity distribution to enable the determination of mineral specific characteristics was conducted on tonalite and mica gneiss from the Olkiluoto site in Eurajoki. The method that was used involved impregnation of the rocks with 14C-methyl-methacrylate, irradiation polymerization, autoradiography and optical densitometry with application of digital image processing techniques. The accuracy of the method was estimated by comparing the results with those obtained by water impregnation method. The 14C-polymethyl- methacrylate (14CPMMA) method provided an effective means of determining the different porous phases in the rock matrix which vary in their diffusive properties. With increased tracer activity and an improved measurement system, the 14CPMMA method allowed porosity detection down to 0.05 vol.per cent with spatial resolution of 20 μm. The porosity was found to lie at grain boundaries of the fresh unaltered rock. The spatial porosity was fairly evenly distributed in the rock with a fine grain size. Anisotropy of porous phases was observed in fine- and medium-grained tonalite and mica gneiss samples. Inter- and intracrystalline fissures of quartz and plagioclase were observed. Most porous phases, with 0.6-1.6 vol. per cent porosity, were biotite, serisite, epidote and cordierite minerals. The bulk porosities of the samples varied between 0.10 vol.per cent and 0.19 vol.per cent. (orig.) (9 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.)

  12. Assessment of carbon-14 control technology and costs for the LWR fuel cycle. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is an effort to incorporate present knowledge of carbon-14 behavior in Light Water Reactors and Fuel Reprocessing Plants into Designs compatible with present technology. The impact of radioactive effluents are considered according to the traditional measure of maximum radiation dose to individuals, summation of individual annual doses to obtain a total population dose, and the environmental dose commitment. The sources of carbon-14 in LWR's and fuel reprocessing facilities are identified. Systems for the removal of carbon-14 in existing and future plants are addressed from both a technological and economic standpoint. Existing technology indicates that caustic scrubbing is the most cost-effective alternative for concurrently removing C-14 from waste-gas streams and leaving it in a form compatible with permanent disposal conditions

  13. Immobilization of carbon 14 contained in spent fuel hulls through melting-solidification treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The melting-solidification treatment of spent nuclear fuel hulls is a potential technique to improve immobilization/stabilization of carbon-14 which is mobile in the environment due to its weakly absorbing properties. Carbon-14 can be immobilized in a solid during the treatment under an inert gas atmosphere, where carbon is not oxidized to gaseous form and remains in the solid. A series of laboratory scale experiments on retention of carbon into an alloy waste form was conducted. Metallic zirconium was melted with metallic copper (Zr/Cu=8/2 in weight) at 1200 deg C under an argon atmosphere. Almost all of the carbon remained in the resulting zirconium-copper alloy. (authors)

  14. Applications of radioisotopes in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, radioisotope techniques have found ever-increasing application to the investigation of industrial process plant. The chemical industry in particular was quick to appreciate this potential and in ICI the substantial scope for radioisotope applications led some 20 years ago to the establishment of a group specializing in this field. This group, Physics and Radioisotope Services has flourished and now carries out work for all parts of ICI as well as for external companies. An important factor in the growth of this organization has been the realization on the part of production management of the enormous savings which can result from the successful applications of radioisotope techniques. Measurements can, in general, be made while the plant is on-line disrupting the operating conditions and thus saving down-time. In addition, the rapidity and convenience with which the measurements can be made (utilizing as they do equipment external to the process) leads to a direct reduction in service costs. In parallel with the growth of radioisotope techniques in plant investigation, there has been a continuous development of instruments which utilize the properties of radioactive materials in process measurement and control. These so-called ''nucleonic'' instruments are now used widely throughout industry. Typically, ICI manufactures and installs over 300 such instruments every year on its own plants along-through the number of gauges installed throughout industry is much greater than this. The range of radioisotope techniques and instruments is extremely wide and this topic has itself been the subject of several symposia (1), (2), (3), (4), (5). For this reason, it is impractical to attempt a full coverage here. We have chosen rather to restrict the paper to those techniques and instruments which have been found to be used most extensively. This selection has been made by analyzing the work spectrum of Physics and Radioisotope Services which carries out in

  15. Displacement of carbon-14 labelled amino acids from leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The displacement of amino acids from nature leaves was investigated. The amino acids (Ala, Asn, Asp, Glu, Gln, Val, Leu, Lys, Ser, Pro) were applied on the leaves in L-form, uniformly labelled with 14C, and the type and direction of displacement have been observed. Most of the studies have been carried out on bush beans aged 3 to 4 weeks. The experiments were carried out in climatic chambers; in one case, barley plants just reaching maturity were used. In order to find out whether the applied amino acids were also displaced in their original form, freeze-dried plants were extracted and the 14C activity of the various fraction was determined. The radioactivity of some free amino acids was determined after two-dimensional separation by thin film chromatography. (orig./HK)

  16. Groundwater's carbon 14 age distribution in the Konya closed basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Konya Closed basin extending from Taurids at the south toward Salt Lake at the north covers and area of 80,000 sq.km. Apart from the surface water transfer from neighboring basins, groundwater is the only potable water resource in this area where determination of groundwater age is crucial in view of understanding of the timing or recharge and flow dynamics. 14C model ages at 8 drilling wells scattered along the regional flow path extending between Taurids and Salt Lake were determined. Results indicate that groundwater age increases progressively from recent to ca. 40 ky BP along the flow path. This linear increase with distance from recharge area suggests a homogenous groundwater velocity distribution (3m/year) in the basin. 14C model and hydraulic (kinematic) ages are in agreement. 18O content of groundwater points out a steady decrease of recharge temperature (up to 60C) throughout the Wurm glacial period

  17. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blowers, Paul, E-mail: paul.blowers@cefas.co.uk [Cefas Lowestoft Laboratory, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft, Suffolk, NR33 0HT (United Kingdom); Caborn, Jane, E-mail: jane.a.caborn@nnl.co.uk [NNL, Springfields, Salwick, Preston, Lancashire, PR4 0XJ (United Kingdom); Dell, Tony [Veterinary Laboratories Agency, New Haw, Addlestone, Surrey, KT15 3NB (United Kingdom); Gingell, Terry [DSTL, Radiation Protection Services, Crescent Road, Alverstoke, Gosport, Hants, PO12 2DL (United Kingdom); Harms, Arvic [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Long, Stephanie [Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland, 3 Clonskeagh Square, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14, Ireland (United Kingdom); Sleep, Darren [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Stewart, Charlie [UKAEA (Waste Management Group), Chemical Support Services, D1310/14, Dounreay, Thurso, Caithness, KW14 7TZ (United Kingdom); Walker, Jill [Radiocarbon Dating, The Old Stables, East Lockinge, Wantage, Oxon OX12 8QY (United Kingdom); Warwick, Phil E. [GAU-Radioanalytical, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-15

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the {sup 14}C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing {sup 14}C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  18. Determination of carbon-14 in environmental level, solid reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intercomparison exercise to determine the 14C activity concentrations in a range of solid, environmental level materials was conducted between laboratories in the UK. IAEA reference materials, C2, C6 and C7, and an in-house laboratory QA material were dispatched in 2006 to ten laboratories comprising of members of the Analyst Informal Working Group (AIWG) and one other invited party. The laboratories performed the determinations using a number of techniques, and using the results each one was evaluated in terms of levels of precision, sensitivity and limits of detection. The results of the study show that all techniques are capable of successfully analysing 14C in environmental level materials, however, a shortage of certified environmental reference materials exists. The suitability of the IAEA reference materials and other material for use as reference materials was also assessed.

  19. Study of a Dolomitic Aquifer with Carbon-14 and Tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dolomite Series which outcrops over an extensive area of the Transvaal is frequently subdivided into separate groundwater compartments by vertical diabase dykes to form well-defined aquifers which usually overflow in strong springs at the lowest point on the surface. The hydrology of one such compartment has been analysed to provide figures for the aquifer characteristics which can be compared with the results of the isotope data. The recharge rate of the aquifer is found to be 17.7 mm/yr and the storage capacity is about 57 times the annual recharge. Expressions for the age distribution in an idealized model of the aquifer and the age of the water discharging from the spring are derived and used to determine the recharge and capacity from the 14C and tritium data. The initial 14C content of the groundwater varies from 80 to 90% with the result that this isotope is relatively unsuitable for quantitative deductions of recharge etc. Both 14C and tritium show a linear increase in age with depth in accordance with the theory. From the tritium results a recharge rate of 11.5 mm/yr, and a storage capacity of 106 times the annual recharge is deduced. Practically the same results are obtained from the tritium content of the spring water if the initial tritium content of the recharge, extrapolated from the age-depth curve (7 TU), is used and the relationship between average age and apparent age of the discharge employed. (author)

  20. Study of a dolomitic aquifer with carbon-14 and tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dolomite Series which outcrops over an extensive area of the Transvaal is frequently subdivided into separate groundwater compartments by vertical diabase dykes to form well-defined aquifers which usually overflow in strong springs at the lowest point on the surface. The hydrology of one such compartment has been analysed to provide figures for the aquifer characteristics which can be compared with the results of the isotope data. The recharge rate of the aquifer is found to be 17.7 mm/yr and the storage capacity is about 57 times the annual recharge. Expressions for the age distribution in an idealized model of the aquifer and the age of the water discharging from the spring are derived and used to determine the recharge and capacity from the 14C and tritium data. The initial 14C content of the groundwater varies from 80 to 90% with the result that this isotope is relatively unsuitable for quantitative deductions of recharge etc. Both 14C and tritium show a linear increase in age with depth in accordance with the theory. From the tritium results a recharge rate of 11.5 mm/yr, and a storage capacity of 106 times the annual recharge is deduced. Practically the same results are obtained from the tritium content of the spring water if the initial tritium content of the recharge, extrapolated from the age-depth curve (7 TU), is used and the relationship between average age and apparent age of the discharge employed. (author)

  1. Radioisotopes for All - Low-energy accelerators for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Since the development of the tracer principle by George de Hevesy in 1913, radioisotopes have become an integral part of medical practice and research. The imaging modalities Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) have significantly enhanced our understanding of human biology and the development and progression of disease. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) combines the cancer killing of radiation therapy with the targeting precision of immunotherapy to provide personalised cancer treatment. The technetium-99m crisis in 2008 highlighted the fragility of the current radioisotope supply network. Despite the significant impact of the shortages, only a handful of potential solutions have begun to be explored and developed. The supply of Tc-99m is again in doubt, with the shutdown of the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten looming in 2014. Low-energy accelerators have the potential to greatly increase the availability of radioisotopes by providing a small, lower-cost production solution. Implementing these as a system of localised production centres that supply a small area would greatly reduce the impact of a facility shutdown and eliminate the risk of world-wide shortages. An accelerator system that is not tailored to the production of a single isotope will allow researchers to explore new options for SPECT, PET and RIT and improve access to radioisotopes for medical testing. The potential of low-energy accelerators for radioisotope production will be explored. Several case studies of production will be presented using both well-established and new isotopes to the fields of nuclear imaging and radiotherapy. These will include zirconium-89, iodine-123 and titanium-45. Calculated yields will be compared to predicted nuclear medicine requirements. Expected radionuclidic impurities will also be quantified with a discussion of suitable, simple radiochemical separation systems. The DC electrostatic

  2. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  3. Two dimensional model study of atmospheric transport using carbon-14 and strontium-90 as inert tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study tests the transport processes in the LLNL two-dimensional chemical-radiative-transport model using recently reanalyzed carbon-14 and strontium-90 data. These radioactive tracers were produced bythe atmospheric nuclear bomb tests of 1952--58 and 1961--62, and they were measured at a few latitudes up to 35 kilometers over the period 1955--1970. Selected horizontal and vertical eddy diffusion coefficients were varied in the model to test their sensitivity to short and long term transpose of carbon-14. A sharp transition of Kzz and Kyy through the tropopause, as opposed to a slow transition between the same limiting values, shows a distinct improvement in the calculated carbon-14 distributions, a distinct improvement in the calculated seasonal and latitudinal distribution of ozone columns (relative to TOMS observations), and a very large difference in the calculated ozone reduction by a possible fleet of High Speed Civil Transports. Calculated northern hemisphere carbon-14 is more sensitive to variation of Kyy than are global ozone columns. Strontium-90 was used to test the LLNL tropopause height at four different latitudes. Starting with the 1960 background distribution of carbon-14, we calculate the input of carbon-14 as the sum of each nuclear test of the 1961--62 series, using two bomb-cloud rise models. With the Seitz bomb-rise formulation in the LLNL model, we find good agreement between calculated and observedcarbon-14 (with noticeable exceptions at the north polar tropopause and the short-term mid-latitude mid-stratosphere) between 1963 and 1970

  4. Medical Radioisotope Scanning, Vol. II. Proceedings of the Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical applications of radioisotopes continue to grow in number and importance and medical centres in almost all countries of the world are now using radioactive materials both in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. An increasing proportion of these applications involves studies of the spatial distribution of radioactive material within the human body, for which purpose highly specialized scanning methods have been elaborated. By these methods it is possible to study the position, size and functional state of different organs, to detect tumours, cysts and other abnormalities and to obtain much useful information about regions of the body that are otherwise inaccessible, except by surgery. Progress in scanning methods in recent years has been very rapid and there have been many important advances in instrumentation and technique. The development of new forms of the gamma camera and of colour-scanning techniques are but two examples of recent improvements. The production of new radioisotopes and new labelled compounds has further extended the scope of these methods. To survey these new advances the International Atomic Energy Agency held a Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Athens from 20-24 April 1964. The scientific programme of the meeting covered all aspects of scanning methods including theoretical principles, instrumentation, techniques and clinical applications. The World Health Organization assisted in the selection of papers by providing a consultant to the selection committee. The meeting followed the earlier IAEA/WHO Seminar on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Vienna in 1959, which was attended by 36 participants and at which 14 papers were presented. Some idea of the growth of interest in the subject may be gained from the fact that the Symposium was attended by 160 participants from 26 countries and 4 international organizations, and that 58 papers were presented. The published proceedings, comprising two volumes, contain all the

  5. Medical Radioisotope Scanning. Vol. I. Proceedings of the Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medical applications of radioisotopes continue to grow in number and importance and medical centres in almost all countries of the world are now using radioactive materials both in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. An increasing proportion of these applications involves studies of the spatial distribution of radioactive material within the human body, for which purpose highly specialized scanning methods have been elaborated. By these methods it is possible to study the position, size and functional state of different organs, to detect tumours, cysts and other abnormalities and to obtain much useful information about regions of the body that are otherwise inaccessible, except by surgery. Progress in scanning methods in recent years has been very rapid and there have been many important advances in instrumentation and technique. The development of new forms of the gamma camera and of colour-scanning techniques are but two examples of recent improvements. The production of new radioisotopes and new labelled compounds has further extended the scope of these methods. To survey these new advances the International Atomic Energy Agency held a Symposium on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Athens from 20 - 24 April 1964. The scientific programme of the meeting covered all aspects of scanning methods including theoretical principles, instrumentation, techniques and clinical applications. The World Health Organization assisted in the selection of papers by providing a consultant to the selection committee. The meeting followed the earlier IAEA/WHO Seminar on Medical Radioisotope Scanning in Vienna in 1959, which was attended by 36 participants and at which 14 papers were presented. Some idea of the growth of interest in the subject may be gained from the fact that the Symposium was attended by 160 participants from 26 countries and 4 international organizations, and that 58 papers were presented. The published proceedings, comprising two volumes, contain all the

  6. Characteristics study of a system for carbon 14 dating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The developing of a radiocarbon dating laboratory, specially built to deal with carbonate samples from underground water, at the Institute de Energia Atomica, required the optimization of a benzene synthetizer, and also of the operative conditions of the liquid scintillator counter, used in sample measurements. An average yield of about 70% was obtained in our benzenic synthesis. If more refined conditions were used, better results could have been obtained, but the reported yield is good enough for our necessities. A comparison of the ages of several shell samples was done between the Geochronology Laboratory, belonging to the Instituto de Geociencias, at Sao Paulo University and our dating laboratory. The agreement between the results was fairly good, according to the precision required

  7. Radioisotope methods in environmental hydrogeology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with the regularities of distribution of two radioisotopes, tritium and radiocarbon, in the ground water system as well as with the applications of their indicatory feature to solve problems of environmental hydrogeology. The concept and objectives of environmental hydrogeology, methodology of radioisotopic hydrosphere studies and evolution of hydrogeological processes by radioisotopic methods have been discussed. The experience gained from applying the isotope methods for environmental hydrogeology purposes in the Baltic Artesian Basin covering all the three Baltic states - Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, as well as the Kaliningrad Region of Russia is generalized. This experience could be useful for specialists of other countries as well, especially those studying artesian basins of a platform type in the areas of former continental glaciers. 185 refs., 91 figs., 34 tabs

  8. Source and age of carbon in peatland surface waters: new insights from 14C analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Michael; Garnett, Mark; Dinsmore, Kerry; Leith, Fraser

    2013-04-01

    Peatlands are a significant source of carbon to the aquatic environment which is increasingly being recognised as an important flux pathway (both lateral and vertical) in total landscape carbon budgets. Determining the source and age of the carbon (in its various forms) is a key step to understanding the stability of peatland systems as well as the connectivity between the soil carbon pool and the freshwater environment. Novel analytical and sampling methods using molecular sieves have been developed for (1) within-stream, in situ sampling of CO2 in the field and (2) for the removal/separation of CO2 in the laboratory prior to 14C analysis of CH4. Here we present dual isotope (δ13C and 14C) data from freshwater systems in UK and Finnish peatlands to show that significant differences exist in the source and age of CO2, DOC (dissolved organic carbon) and POC (particulate organic carbon). Individual peatlands clearly differ in terms of their isotopic freshwater signature, suggesting that carbon cycling may be "tighter" in some systems compared to others. We have also measured the isotopic signature of different C species in peatland pipes, which appear to be able to tap carbon from different peat depths. This suggests that carbon cycling and transport within "piped-peatlands" may be more complex than previously thought. Some of our most recent work has focussed on the development of a method to measure the 14C component of CH4 in freshwaters. Initial results suggest that CH4 in peatland streams is significantly older than CO2 and derived from a much deeper source. We have also shown that the age (but not the source) of dissolved CO2 changes over the hydrological year in response to seasonal changes in discharge and temperature. Radiocarbon measurements in the peat-riparian-stream system suggest that a significant degree of connectivity exists in terms of C transport and cycling, although the degree of connectivity differs for individual C species. In summary, 14C

  9. Carbon-14 as a Tracer of Land-to-Ocean Organic Carbon Transfers in Eight Northeastern US Rivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossler, K.; Bauer, J. E.

    2011-12-01

    Rivers link the terrestrial and ocean carbon cycles, transporting and transforming an aggregate of upstream C exports. We used natural abundance 14C and 13C to identify controls on particulate and dissolved organic carbon (POC and DOC, respectively) for rivers draining eight different watershed subregions in the northeastern US. The rivers presented a range of lithology, land-use and other anthropogenic impacts (e.g., presence of nuclear and fossil-fuel power plants and waste-water treatment plants). POC and DOC δ13C signatures (per sample) ranged from -34 % to -22 % and -28 % to -15 %, respectively; while discharge-weighted means ranged from -29 % to -26 % (POC) and -28 % to -25 % (DOC), reflecting the predominance of C3 vegetation in the region. In contrast, Δ14C signatures were much more variable, ranging from -224 % to +1,230 % for POC and -233 % to +1,960 % for DOC (per sample), and with discharge-weighted means ranging from -160 % to +340 % (POC) and -60 % to +480 % (DOC). Samples depleted in 14C (i.e., Δ14C systems was of organic materials highly enriched in 14C (Δ14C = +163 % to +1,960 %), most likely because of 14C inputs from upstream nuclear power plants. Nuclear reactors were also present in two of the other watersheds, but did not elevate the 14C signatures. For all four watersheds with nuclear reactors, however, radiocarbon inputs likely resulted in underestimation of aged C contributions. Studies utilizing 14C as a tracer for natural and anthropogenic controls on C and organic matter inputs and fluxes, should take into consideration the various and sometimes opposing influences on the integrated signatures.

  10. 14C in fractions of dissolved organic carbon in ground water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we report carbon isotope ratios of fractions of natural organic compounds in ground waters isolated from the Stripa mine (Sweden) and the Milk River aquifer (Alberta, Canada). High-molecular-weight and low-molecular-weight fractions of the organic carbon were characterized and these, along with dissolved inorganic carbon, were analysed for δ13C and 14C. The 14C results suggest that the dissolved organic carbon originates from a combination of soil organic matter and kerogen in the aquifer matrix. The high-molecular-weight fractions show a predominant soil origin, whereas the low-molecular-weight fractions are often strongly influenced by kerogen. (author). 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. ANITA-2000 activation code package - updating of the decay data libraries and validation on the experimental data of the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frisoni Manuela

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ANITA-2000 is a code package for the activation characterization of materials exposed to neutron irradiation released by ENEA to OECD-NEADB and ORNL-RSICC. The main component of the package is the activation code ANITA-4M that computes the radioactive inventory of a material exposed to neutron irradiation. The code requires the decay data library (file fl1 containing the quantities describing the decay properties of the unstable nuclides and the library (file fl2 containing the gamma ray spectra emitted by the radioactive nuclei. The fl1 and fl2 files of the ANITA-2000 code package, originally based on the evaluated nuclear data library FENDL/D-2.0, were recently updated on the basis of the JEFF-3.1.1 Radioactive Decay Data Library. This paper presents the results of the validation of the new fl1 decay data library through the comparison of the ANITA-4M calculated values with the measured electron and photon decay heats and activities of fusion material samples irradiated at the 14 MeV Frascati Neutron Generator (FNG of the NEA-Frascati Research Centre. Twelve material samples were considered, namely: Mo, Cu, Hf, Mg, Ni, Cd, Sn, Re, Ti, W, Ag and Al. The ratios between calculated and experimental values (C/E are shown and discussed in this paper.

  12. Rapid localization of carbon 14-labeled molecules in biological samples by ion mass microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report here on the ability of secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to provide rapid imaging of the intracellular distribution of 14C-labeled molecules. The validity of this method, using mass discrimination of carbon 14 atoms, was assessed by imaging the distribution of two molecules of well-known metabolism, [14C]-thymidine and [14C]-uridine, incorporated by human fibroblasts in culture. As expected, 14C ion images showed the presence of [14C]-thymidine in the nucleus of dividing cells, whereas [14C]-uridine was present in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus of all cells, with a large concentration in the nucleoli. The time required to obtain the distribution images with the SMI 300 microscope was less than 6 min, whereas microautoradiography, the classical method for mapping the tissue distribution of 14C-labeled molecules, usually requires exposure times of several months. Secondary ion mass spectrometry using in situ mass discrimination is proposed here as a very sensitive method which permits rapid imaging of the subcellular distribution of molecules labeled with carbon 14

  13. Carbon-14 transfer into rice plants from a continuous atmospheric source: observations and model predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 (14C) is one of the most important radionuclides from the perspective of dose estimation due to the nuclear fuel cycle. Ten years of monitoring data on 14C in airborne emissions, in atmospheric CO2 and in rice grain collected around the Tokai reprocessing plant (TRP) showed an insignificant radiological effect of the TRP-derived 14C on the public, but suggested a minor contribution of the TRP-derived 14C to atmospheric 14C concentrations, and an influence on 14C concentrations in rice grain at harvest. This paper also summarizes a modelling exercise (the so-called rice scenario of the IAEA's EMRAS program) in which 14C concentrations in air and rice predicted with various models using information on 14C discharge rates, meteorological conditions and so on were compared with observed concentrations. The modelling results showed that simple Gaussian plume models with different assumptions predict monthly averaged 14C concentrations in air well, even for near-field receptors, and also that specific activity and dynamic models were equally good for the prediction of inter-annual changes in 14C concentrations in rice grain. The scenario, however, offered little opportunity for comparing the predictive capabilities of these two types of models because the scenario involved a near-chronic release to the atmosphere. A scenario based on an episodic release and short-term, time-dependent observations is needed to establish the overall confidence in the predictions of environmental 14C models

  14. Study of a method of detection for natural carbon-14 using a liquid scintillator, recent variations in the natural radio-activity due to artificial carbon-14 (1963); Etude d'une methode de detection du carrons 14 naturel, utilisant un scintillateur liquide - variations recentes de l'activite naturelle dues au carbone 14 artificiel (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, C. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-06-15

    Among the various natural isotopes of carbon, a radioactive isotope, carbon-14, is formed by the action of secondary neutrons from cosmic rays on nitrogen in the air. Until 1950, the concentration of this isotope in ordinary carbon underwent weak fluctuations of about 2-3 per cent. The exact measurement of this concentration 6 X 10{sup 12} Ci/gm of carbon, and of its fluctuations, are difficult and in the first part of this report a highly sensitive method is given using a liquid scintillator. Since 1950 this natural activity has shown large fluctuations because of the carbon-14 formed during nuclear explosions, and in the second part, the evolution in France of this specific activity of carbon in the atmosphere and biosphere is examined. In the last part is studied the local increase in carbon activity in the atmosphere around the Saclay site, an increase caused by the carbon-14 given off as C{sup 14}O{sub 2}, by the reactors cooled partially with exterior air. (author) [French] Parmi les differents isotopes naturels du carbone, un isotope radioactif, le carbone 14, est forme par l'action de neutrons secondaires due aux rayons cosmiques sir l'azote de l'air. Jusqu'en 1950, la concentration de cet isotope dans le carbone ordinaire est soumise a des fluctuations de faible amplitude, de l'ordre de 2 a 3 pour cent. Les mesures precises de cette concentration, 6. 10{sup -12} Ci/g de carbone, et de ses fluctuations sont delicates, et dans la premiere partie de ce rapport, on decrit une methode de detection a grande sensibilite utilisant un scintillateur liquide. Depuis 1950, cette activite naturelle subit des fluctuations importantes dues au carbone 14 forme lors des explosions nucleaires, et dans la seconde partie, on examine l'evolution en France de l'activite specifique du carbone de l'atmosphere et ce la biosphere. Dans la derniere partie, on etudie l'accroissement local de l'activite du carbone de l'air aux

  15. Apparatus for eluting a daughter radioisotope from a parent radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for eluting a sterile daughter radioisotope from a parent radioisotope including a case, a generator having a supply of the parent radioisotope therein, a primary shield enclosing the generator for shielding against radioactive emissions from the parent radioisotope, and an annular wall extending up from the bottom of the case defining a compartment for reception of the primary shield thereby to hold the latter in position within the case is described. A vertical web extends between the annular wall and an exterior wall of the case. An auxiliary shield of suitable shielding material (e.g., lead) generally of the height of the primary shield is provided, this auxiliary shield having an inner cylindric surface conforming generally to the outer surface of the annular wall and having a slot therein for receiving the web. Thus, with the auxiliary shield positioned in the case adjacent the annular wall and with the web received by the slot, the auxiliary shield is held by the web in position in the case for shielding the user from excessive radioactive emissions from the generator in the event the radioactive emissions from the generator exceed the shielding capability of the primary shield

  16. Production and Development of Radioisotopes in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this paper is to review the current activities at HANARO for the radioisotope production and related research activities in Korea, Also, the future directions in radioisotope production and its applications are described. (author)

  17. Vertical transport of carbon-14 into deep-sea food webs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearcy, W. G.; Stuiver, Minze

    1983-04-01

    During the years 1973 to 1976 the carbon-14 content was higher in epipelagic and vertically migrating, upper mesopelagic animals (caught between 0 and 500 m) than in lower mesopelagic, bathypelagic, and abyssobenthic animals (500 to 5180 m) in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Only one species of deep-sea fish had a Δ14C value as high as surface-caught fish. The 14C content of most animals was higher pre-bomb levels, but the relatively low 14C content of most deep-sea animals indicates that the majority of their carbon was not derived directly from a near-surface food chain labeled with bomb carbon. A mean residence time of about 35 y was estimated for the organic carbon pool for abyssobenthic animals based on the relative increase of radiocarbon in surface-dwelling animals since 1967. The results suggest that rapidly sinking particles from surface waters, such as fecal pellets, are not the major source of organic carbon for deep-sea fishes and large benthic invertebrates.

  18. Dissolved Organic Carbon 14C in Southern Nevada Groundwater and Implications for Groundwater Travel Times

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershey, Ronald L. [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Fereday, Wyall [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute; Thomas, James M [Nevada University, Reno, NV (United States). Desert Research Institute

    2016-08-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) carbon-14 (14C) ages must be corrected for complex chemical and physical reactions and processes that change the amount of 14C in groundwater as it flows from recharge to downgradient areas. Because of these reactions, DIC 14C can produce unrealistically old ages and long groundwater travel times that may, or may not, agree with travel times estimated by other methods. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) 14C ages are often younger than DIC 14C ages because there are few chemical reactions or physical processes that change the amount of DOC 14C in groundwater. However, there are several issues that create uncertainty in DOC 14C groundwater ages including limited knowledge of the initial (A0) DOC 14C in groundwater recharge and potential changes in DOC composition as water moves through an aquifer. This study examines these issues by quantifying A0 DOC 14C in recharge areas of southern Nevada groundwater flow systems and by evaluating changes in DOC composition as water flows from recharge areas to downgradient areas. The effect of these processes on DOC 14C groundwater ages is evaluated and DOC and DIC 14C ages are then compared along several southern Nevada groundwater flow paths. Twenty-seven groundwater samples were collected from springs and wells in southern Nevada in upgradient, midgradient, and downgradient locations. DOC 14C for upgradient samples ranged from 96 to 120 percent modern carbon (pmc) with an average of 106 pmc, verifying modern DOC 14C ages in recharge areas, which decreases uncertainty in DOC 14C A0 values, groundwater ages, and travel times. The HPLC spectra of groundwater along a flow path in the Spring Mountains show the same general pattern indicating that the DOC compound composition does not change along this flow path

  19. Radioisotopes in Studies on the Ecology of Tick Vectors of Disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of mass rearing of radioisotope-tagged immature ticks by collecting the progeny of engorged females of three species inoculated with carbon-14 glucose or glycine prior to oviposition. The incorporation of radiochemicals internally into ticks reduces the chance of loss of the radioactive label when moulting occurs, or under natural conditions. Most treated ticks laid eggs. The amount of radioactivity in the progeny could be controlled by controlling the size of the dose administered to the parent ticks. However, differences in radioactivity in the progeny of treated ticks in relation to the day of oviposition were noted. This activity declined progressively through the ninth day. Differences were also noted in relation to the radiochemical used. Most of the carbon-14 glycine (79.0%]o) received by the engorged females remained in the parents, whereas most of the carbon-14 glucose (77.5 %) received was transferred to the progeny. Hatching of eggs labelled by this method was less than in untreated oviposits. Radiosensitivity in the eggs was also noted and was related to the size of the dose administered to the parent tick. No hatching occurred when the average radioactivity of the labelled eggs exceeded 637 counts/min per egg over background. Nevertheless, many highly radioactive eggs hatched, and larvae with counts as high as 510 counts/min per larva over background were observed. The biological characteristics of the tagged larvae were apparently unaffected by incorporation of radiochemicals into these individuals. The proportion of marked larvae which attached to hosts was similar to the proportion of unmarked larvae which attached. The duration of survival of fasting, radioisotope-tagged larvae, under laboratory conditions, was similar to the period of survival of nonradioactive larvae. No apparent loss in radioactivity in fasting larvae held for up to 70 days under laboratory conditions was detected. This demonstration of

  20. Sampling and monitoring of carbon-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews the possibilities from sampling and monitoring C-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities. After oxidation of various forms of carbon-14 in the off-gas into CO2 three main processes for trapping are used either separately or in combination. These are sorption, freezing and chemical processes. Absorption in alkaline solutions or solids or molecular sieve adsorption are the most frequently used methods. The main counting methods used are gas proportional counting and liquid scintillation counting

  1. Carbon-14 production compared to oxygen isotope records from Camp Century, Greenland and Devon Island, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 production rate variations that are not explainable by geomagnetic changes are thought to be in antiphase with solar activity and as such should be in antiphase with paleotemperature records or proxy temperature histories such as those obtainable from oxygen isotope analyses of ice cores. Oxygen isotope records from Camp Century, Greeland and Devon Island Ice Cap are in phase with each other over thousands of years and in antiphase to the 14C production rate residuals. (Auth.)

  2. Practice of the safe handling of radioisotopes using naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We proposed a practical protocol for the safe handling of radiation and radioisotopes using the naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs) 87Rb and 40K. The protocol can be utilized for the education and training course for radiation handling workers. Rubidium chloride solutions were used for the practice of dilution of unsealed radioisotopes instead of 32P. Rubidium chloride and potassium chloride solid radiation sources were used for the practice of monitoring of the surface contamination using the GM survey meter instead of 32P and 14C. Rubidium chloride solutions were also used for the practice of the contamination check by the smear method. Substitution of the radioisotopes under the Laws Concerning the Prevention from Radiation Hazards due to Radioisotope and others to NORMs can be successfully achieved without notable demerits. We supposed that most of the practice for the safe handling of radioisotopes could be carried out outside a controlled area. (author)

  3. Uses of radioisotopes in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research project, an inventory for the different radioisotopes that were imported by public and private sectors of Sudan in the period between ( 2007-2011) has been set up. These organizations import the appropriates for different but in general we classify them into these applications: Medical, Industrial, Agricultural and Research. However, each broad discipline is subdivided into subgroups. This inventory will help those who are willing to establish research reactors in Sudan on the type and power of the reactors to be purchases according to the actual needs of Sudan with forecasting of the near and for future needs. Also the expenditure that has been spent by these organizations have been estimated for most of the radioisotopes. It was observed that almost 50% of the expenditure went for the fright charges as these radioisotopes need special handling and care by installing a research reactor in Sudan, the cost of purchasing will be cut down several folds. Also it will help in availability of the radioisotopes with very short half lives (hours to days). This will be reflected in the cut down the cost of tests and provision of new tests.(Author)

  4. Physical and bacterial controls on inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon during a sea ice growth and decay experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, J.; Delille, B.; Kaartokallio, H.;

    2014-01-01

    We investigated how physical incorporation, brine dynamics and bacterial activity regulate the distribution of inorganic nutrients and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in artificial sea ice during a 19-day experiment that included periods of both ice growth and decay. The experiment was performed...... major changes in DOC concentrations. (3) Different forms of DOC have different properties and hence incorporation efficiencies. In particular, the terrestrially-derived DOC from the river water was less efficiently incorporated into sea ice than the DOC in the seawater. Therefore the main factors...... regulating the distribution of the dissolved compounds within sea ice are clearly a complex interaction of brine dynamics, biological activity and in the case of dissolved organic matter, the physico-chemical properties of the dissolved constituents themselves....

  5. Preparation and evaluation of the homogeneity of milk as a candidate reference material for carbon-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot project was initiated to study the feasibility of preparing milk as a candidate reference material for 14C near environmental levels. Two materials, MK-B at natural level of 14C and MK-C4 at an elevated level, have been prepared from pasteurized 2% dairy milk. MK-C4 was spiked with an appropriate amount of 14C-methylated casein tracer to achieve the elevated level. Several samples from MK-B and MK-C4 have been analyzed to test the homogeneity of these materials for the distribution of 14C. The samples were combusted in oxygen under 20 atmospheres pressure using a Parr bomb. The 14C concentrations were determined by liquid scintillation counting using Carbo-Sorb/Permafluor E+ cocktail. The results indicate that these materials are homogeneous with respect to 14C concentration even in sub-sample sizes of 0.25 g of the freeze-dried material. The precision of our 14C measurements, as expressed by the % relative standard deviation, is within 5%. The accuracy has been tested by analyzing replicate samples of the IAEA 14C quality assurance materials, C-3 (cellulose) and C-6 (ANU sucrose) and found to be within 3%. The lower limits of detection are 0.08, 0.05 and 0.02 Bq.g-1 of carbon for 20 ml of liquid scintillation mixture (Carbo-Sorb/Permafluor E+ = ∼0.67) loaded with up to 0.4g of carbon from the sample and counted for 3 cycles of 60, 180 and 1000 min each, respectively. Our measurements of 14C specific activities of MK-B and MK-C4 are 0.26 ± 0.01 and 15.3 ± 0.4 Bq.g-1 of carbon, respectively. (author)

  6. Application of radioisotopes to the investigation of the kinetics and mechanism of reactions of some inorganic complex compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are invaluable tools in the study of many types of inorganic chemical reactions, particularly those involving complex ionic substances in aqueous solution. One important approach is through research on the rates and mechanisms of isotopic exchange processes. For example, a series of studies has been made of the exchange between carbon-14-labelled ''free'' carbonate and the ligand carbonate in octahedral complex ions of the type CoA2CO3+, where A = 2 NH3, ethylenediamine (en), propylenediamine (pn), or trimethylenediamine (tn). These studies have led to a rather thorough understanding of the nature of this kind of ligand substitution reaction, and of the part played by the non-exchanging amine ligands in the process. Similar studies of oxalate exchange with tris-oxalato complexes of the form M (C2O4)3-3, where M = Co (III), Cr (III), or Rh (III), have been equally fruitful. An alternative technique, applicable only when using low-atomic-weight radioisotopes such as carbon-14, is to observe the equilibrium or kinetic isotope effects in the reaction of interest. I t has, for instance, been possible to interpret differences in the ligand carbonate exchange mechanism of Coen2CO3+ and Cotn2CO3+ on the basis of equilibrium isotope-effect measurements made on the carbonate exchange reaction. Similarly, data on the kinetic isotope effect in the acid-catalysed aquation of the Co (NH3)4CO3+ ion has supported deductions as to the nature of the rate-determining bond-breakage step in such reactions. Finally, the mechanistic path of certain atoms or radicals in inorganic reactions, where a choice between alternative explanations must be made, is frequently facilitated by a radioactive tracer experiment. An example is the proof that cyanide does not appear as a rapidly exchanging intermediate in the oxidation of thiocyanate ion by hydrogen peroxide, although cyanide is an important end-product. (author)

  7. Radioisotope methodology course radioprotection aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement knowledge in molecular and cell biology, biochemistry, medicine and pharmacology, which has taken place during the last 50 years, after World War II finalization, is really outstanding. It can be safely said that this fact is principally due to the application of radioisotope techniques. The research on metabolisms, biodistribution of pharmaceuticals, pharmacodynamics, etc., is mostly carried out by means of techniques employing radioactive materials. Radioisotopes and radiation are frequently used in medicine both as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The radioimmunoanalysis is today a routine method in endocrinology and in general clinical medicine. The receptor determination and characterization is a steadily growing methodology used in clinical biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine. The use of radiopharmaceuticals and radiation of different origins, for therapeutic purposes, should not be overlooked. For these reasons, the importance to teach radioisotope methodology is steadily growing. This is principally the case for specialization at the post-graduate level but at the pre graduate curriculum it is worthwhile to give some elementary theoretical and practical notions on this subject. These observations are justified by a more than 30 years teaching experience at both levels at the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1960 we began to teach Physics III, an obligatory pregraduate course for biochemistry students, in which some elementary notions of radioactivity and measurement techniques were given. Successive modifications of the biochemistry pregraduate curriculum incorporated radiochemistry as an elective subject and since 1978, radioisotope methodology, as obligatory subject for biochemistry students. This subject is given at the radioisotope laboratory during the first semester of each year and its objective is to provide theoretical and practical knowledge to the biochemistry students, even

  8. Radioisotope x-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope x-ray fluorescence and x-ray preferential absorption (XRA) techniques are used extensively for the analysis of materials, covering such diverse applications as analysis of alloys, coal, environmental samples, paper, waste materials, and metalliferous mineral ores and products. Many of these analyses are undertaken in the harsh environment of industrial plants and in the field. Some are continuous on-line analyses of material being processed in industry, where instantaneous analysis information is required for the control of rapidly changing processes. Radioisotope x-ray analysis systems are often tailored to a specific but limited range of applications. They are simpler and often considerably less expensive than analysis systems based on x-ray tubes. These systems are preferred to x-ray tube techniques when simplicity, ruggedness, reliability, and cost of equipment are important; when minimum size, weight, and power consumption are necessary; when a very constant and predictable x-ray output is required; when the use of high-energy x-rays is advantageous; and when short x-ray path lengths are required to minimize the absorption of low-energy x-rays in air. This chapter reviews radioisotope XRF, preferential absorption, and scattering techniques. Some of the basic analysis equations are given. The characteristics of radioisotope sources and x-ray detectors are described, and then the x-ray analytical techniques are presented. The choice of radioisotope technique for a specific application is discussed. This is followed by a summary of applications of these techniques, with a more detailed account given of some of the applications, particularly those of considerable industrial importance. 79 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs

  9. Development of a radioisotope heat source for the two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Edwin I.; McNeil, Dennis C.; Amos, Wayne R.

    1992-01-01

    Described is a radioisotope heat source for the Two-Watt Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) which is being considered for possible application by the U.S. Navy and for other Department of Defense applications. The heat source thermal energy (75 Wt) is produced from the alpha decay of plutonium-238 which is in the form of high-fired plutonium dioxide. The capsule is non-vented and consists of three domed cylindrical components each closed with a corresponding sealed end cap. Surrounding the fuel is the liner component, which is fabricated from a tantalum-based alloy, T-111. Also fabricated from T-111 is the next component, the strength member, which serves to meet pressure and impact criteria. The outermost component, or clad, is the oxidation- and corrosion-resistant nickel-based alloy, Hastelloy S. This paper defines the design considerations, details the hardware fabrication and welding processes, discusses the addition of yttrium to the fuel to reduce liner embrittlement, and describes the testing that has been conducted or is planned to assure that there is fuel containment not only during the heat source operational life, but also in case of an accident environment.

  10. Algal C-14 and total carbon metabolisms 2. Experimental observations with the diatom Skeletonema costatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, P.J.L.; Robinson, C.; Søndergaard, M.; Jespersen, A.M.; Bentley, T.L.; Lefevre, D.; Richardson, Katherine; Riemann, B.

    1996-01-01

    Three sets of comparisons of net and gross inorganic carbon assimilation and C-14 uptake were made with an axenic culture of Skeletonema costatum. The comparisons showed that in the physiological window studied (10-20% of the intrinsic generation time and gross photosynthesis/respiration ratios of......2. The conclusion drawn was that over the time scale studied, the C-14 technique was measuring net photosynthesis, consistent with essentially 100% recycling of respiratory CO2. The study has shown that we now possess the basis to make a rigorous analysis of net, gross CO2 fixation and net C-14...

  11. 14.7% efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cells using single walled carbon nanotubes/carbon composite counter electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Cao, Kun; Cui, Jin; Liu, Shuangshuang; Qiao, Xianfeng; Shen, Yan; Wang, Mingkui

    2016-03-01

    A single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) possesses excellent hole conductivity. This work communicates an investigation of perovskite solar cells using a mesoscopic TiO2/Al2O3 structure as a framework in combination with a certain amount of SWCNT-doped graphite/carbon black counter electrode material. The CH3NH3PbI3-based device achieves a power conversion efficiency of 14.7% under AM 1.5G illumination. Detailed investigations show an increased charge collection in this device compared to that without the SWCNT additive.A single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) possesses excellent hole conductivity. This work communicates an investigation of perovskite solar cells using a mesoscopic TiO2/Al2O3 structure as a framework in combination with a certain amount of SWCNT-doped graphite/carbon black counter electrode material. The CH3NH3PbI3-based device achieves a power conversion efficiency of 14.7% under AM 1.5G illumination. Detailed investigations show an increased charge collection in this device compared to that without the SWCNT additive. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07347b

  12. Recharge in northern clime calcareous sandy soils: soil water chemical and carbon-14 evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical analyses were performed on soil water extracted from two cores taken from a sandy calcareous soil near Delhi, Ontario. Calcite saturation is attained within the unsaturated zone over short distances and short periods of time, whereas dolomite undersaturation persists to the groundwater table. The progressive dissolution of dolomite by soil water, within the unsaturated zone, after calcite saturation is reached results in calcite supersaturation. Deposition of iron and manganese oxyhydroxide phases occurs at the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary. This is a result of soil water neutralization due to carbonate dissolution during infiltration but may also reflect the increased rate of oxidation of dissolved ferrous and manganous ions at higher pH's. The role of bacteria in this process has not been investigated. The depth of the carbonate leached/unleached zone boundary in a calcareous soil has important implications for 14C groundwater dating. The depth of this interface at the study site (= approximately 2 m) does not appear to limit 14C diffusion from the root zone to the depth at which carbonate dissolution occurs. Thus, soil water achieves open system isotopic equilibrium with the soil CO2 gas phase. It is calculated that in soils with similar physical properties to the study soil but with depths of leaching of 5 m or more, complete 14C isotopic equilibration of soil water with soil gas would not occur. Soil water, under these conditions would recharge to the groundwater exhibiting some degree of closed system 14C isotopic evolution. (author)

  13. Study of barytocalcite as a conditioning matrix for carbon 14: Comparison of several synthesis routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massoni, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.massoni@cea.fr; Rosen, Jeremy; Chartier, Myriam; Cozzika, Théodore

    2013-10-15

    Carbon-14 arising from the spent nuclear fuel reprocessing can disseminate into natural cycles and then its sequestration could be advantageous. In this study, we focus on the ceramic phase barytocalcite BaCa(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} (8.08 wt.% C) obtained from different synthesis routes. We show that several elaboration routes are possible but only two emerge ensuring a high reaction yield for a fast process. The first is a room temperature aqueous precipitation with nitrated precursors and the other is a double salt high temperature reaction with carbonated starting compounds, both of these precursors being compatible with the usual carbon-14 trapping process. The sensibility to experimental conditions of reference synthesis route and the reaction mechanisms are investigated and discussed.

  14. A potent IκB kinase-β inhibitor labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latli, Bachir; Eriksson, Magnus; Hrapchak, Matt; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2016-06-30

    3-Amino-4-(1,1-difluoro-propyl)-6-(4-methanesulfonyl-piperidin-1-yl)-thieno[2,3-b]pyridine-2-carboxylic acid amide (1) is a potent IκB Kinase-β (IKK-β) inhibitor. The efficient preparations of this compound labeled with carbon-14 and deuterium are described. The carbon-14 synthesis was accomplished in six radiochemical steps in 25% overall yield. The key transformations were the modified Guareschi-Thorpe condensation of 2-cyano-(14) C-acetamide and a keto-ester followed by chlorination to 2,6-dichloropyridine derivative in one pot. The isolated dichloropyridine was then converted in three steps in one pot to [(14) C]-(1). The carbon-14 labeled (1) was isolated with a specific activity of 54.3 mCi/mmol and radiochemical purity of 99.8%. The deuterium labeled (1) was obtained in eight steps and in 57% overall chemical yield using 4-hydroxypiperidine-2,2,3,3,4,5,5,6,6-(2) H9 . The final three steps of this synthesis were run in one pot. PMID:27073120

  15. Present status of OAP radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope Production Program (RP), Office of Atoms for Peace (OAP) is a non-profit government organization which responsible for research development and service of radioisotopes. Several research works on radioisotope production have been carried on at OAP. The radioisotope products of successful R and D have been routinely produced to supply for medical, agriculture and research application. The main products are 131I (solution and capsule), 131I-MIBG, 131I-Hippuran, 153Sm-EDTMP, 153Sm-HA, and 99mTc-radiopharmaceutical kits to serve local users. Radioisotopes are very beneficial for science and human welfare so as almost of our products and services are mainly utilized for medical purpose for both diagnosis and therapy. OAP has a policy to serve and response to that community by providing radioisotopes and services with high quality but reasonable price. This policy will give the opportunity to the community to utilize these radioisotopes for their healthcare. (author)

  16. Variation of 14C, 137Cs and stable carbon composition in forest soil and its implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, about 70% of land area is covered by forest. Therefore, forest ecosystem plays a vital role in ultimate fate of radionuclides and carbon cycle in terrestrial environment. Three undisturbed forest soil profiles were collected from Ibaraki Prefecture, Japan. The 137Cs data illustrate that maximum fallout deposition of 137Cs took place around 1964. 14C determination shows that 14C also has peak values in the top 10 cm of the soil profiles ascribed to the highest bomb 14C level in 1960's. The 13C data show that the turnover dynamics of soil organic carbon could be described very well by progressive enrichment values of δ13C. (author)

  17. Preparation of 14C-Labeled Multi-walled Carbon Nano-tubes for Biodistribution Investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method allowing the 14C-labeling of carboxylic acid functions of carbon nano-tubes is described. The key step of the labeling process is a de-carbonylation reaction that has been developed and optimized with the help of a screening method. The optimized process has been successfully applied to multi-walled carbon nano-tubes (MWNTs), and the corresponding 14C-labeled nano-tubes were used to investigate their in vivo behavior. Preliminary results obtained after i.v. contamination of rats revealed liver as the main target organ. Radiolabeling of NTs with a long-life radioactive nucleus like 14C, coupled to a highly sensitive autoradiographic method, that provides a unique detection threshold, will make it possible to determine for a long time period whether or not NTs remain in any organs after animal exposure. (authors)

  18. Photosynthesis and assimilate partitioning characteristics of the coconut palm as observed by carbon-14 labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique was developed on the use of carbon dioxide(carbon-14 labelled) rapid labelling of foliage and to ascertain photosynthesis and partitioning characteristics of labelled assimilate into other parts of the coconut palm. An eight-year-old Tall x Tall young coconut palm growing under field conditions at Bandirippuwa Estate and with six developing bunches , was selected for this study. The labelling was carried out on a bright sunny day and soil was at field capacity. Seventh leaf from the youngest open leaf was used for labelling with 5 mCi of sodium bi carbonate (Carbon-14 labelled). The results revealed that within 24 hours, 60% of the labelled assimilate was partitioned into other parts of the palm and at the end of the seventh day about 18% of the labelled assimilate still remained in the labelled leaf. Among the developing bunches fifth and sixth bunches from the youngest developing bunch received more labelled assimilate than young developing bunches above them. It was revealed that partitioning of assimilate into various ''sinks'' is determined by the developmental stage or activeness of the ''sink''. The proportion of C-14 labelled carbon assimilate, partitioned into developing bunches was substantially low compared to the total amount of labelled carbon fixed by the labelled leaf. Further, it was observed that partitioning of assimilated labelled carbon into the young leaves above, as well as the mature leaves below the labelled leaf. The complex vascular anatomy of the palms could be attributed to this pattern of partitioning of assimilates into upper and lower leaves from the labelled leaf

  19. Progress in the Use of Isotopes: The Atomic Triad - Reactors, Radioisotopes and Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libby, W. F.

    1958-08-04

    Recent years have seen a substantial growth in the use of isotopes in medicine, agriculture, and industry: up to the minute information on the production and use of isotopes in the U.S. is presented. The application of radioisotopes to industrial processes and manufacturing operations has expanded more rapidly than any one except its most ardent advocates expected. New uses and new users are numerous. The adoption by industry of low level counting techniques which make possible the use of carbon-14 and tritium in the control of industrial processes and in certain exploratory and research problems is perhaps most promising of current developments. The latest information on savings to industry will be presented. The medical application of isotopes has continued to develop at a rapid pace. The current trend appears to be in the direction of improvements in technique and the substitution of more effective isotopes for those presently in use. Potential and actual benefits accruing from the use of isotopes in agriculture are reviewed. The various methods of production of radioisotopes are discussed. Not only the present methods but also interesting new possibilities are covered. Although isotopes are but one of the many peaceful uses of the atom, it is the first to pay its way. (auth)

  20. High purity materials as targets for radioisotope production: Needs and challenges

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Shivarudrappa; K V Vimalnath

    2005-07-01

    Radionuclides have become powerful and indispensable tools in many endeavours of human activities, most importantly in medicine, industry, biology and agriculture, apart from R&D activities. Ready availability of radionuclides in suitable radiochemical form, its facile detection and elegant tracer concepts are responsible for their unprecedented use. Application of radioisotopes in medicine has given birth to a new branch, viz. nuclear medicine, wherein radioisotopes are used extensively in the diagnosis and treatment of variety of diseases including cancer. Artificial transmutation of an element employing thermal neutrons in a reactor or high energy particle accelerators (cyclotrons) are the routes of radioisotope production world over. Availability of high purity target materials, natural or enriched, are crucial for any successful radioisotope programme. Selection of stable nuclides in suitable chemical form as targets with desired isotopic and chemical purity are among the important considerations in radioisotope production. Mostly the oxide, carbonate or the metal itself are the preferred target forms for neutron activation in a research reactor. Chemical impurities, particularly from the elements of the same group, put a limitation on the purity of the final radioisotope product. Whereas the isotopic impurities result in the production of undesirable radionuclidic impurities, which affect their effective utilization. Isotope Group, BARC, is in the forefront of radioisotope production and supply in the country, meeting demands for gamut of radioisotope applications indigenously for over four decades now. Radioisotopes such as 131I, 99Mo, 32P, 51Cr, 153Sm, 82Br, 203Hg, 198Au etc are produced in TBq quantities every month and supplied to several users and to Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT). Such a large production programme puts a huge demand on the reliable sources of availability of high purity target materials which are at present mostly met

  1. Recent progress in development of radioisotope production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Byung Mok [HANARO Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-10-01

    The Korea multipurpose research reactor, HANARO(Hi-flux Advanced Neutron Application Reactor) is designed and constructed to obtain high density neutron flux (max. 5x10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}sec) with relatively low thermal output (30 MW) in order to utilize for various studies such as fuel and material test, radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiment, neutron transmutation doping, etc. HANARO has 32 vertical channels (3 in-core, 4 out-core, 25 reflector) and 7 horizontal channels. KAERI has constructed 4 concrete hot cells for production of Co-60, Ir-192, etc. and 6 lead hot cells for production of medical RIs(I-131, Mo-99, etc.). Other 11 lead hot cells will be completed by Feb. 1998 for production of Sm-153, Dy-165, Ho-166, etc. Clean room facilities were installed for production of radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  2. Physiological conditions and uptake of inorganic carbon-14 by plant roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uptake of inorganic 14C by bean plant roots was measured. The plants were grown in a nutrient solution culture at pH 6 and a NaH14CO3 tracer was added to the growth medium. Photosynthesis and transpiration were varied by exposing the aerial portions of the plants to different atmospheric CO2 concentrations, humidities and light levels in a cuvette system. Leaf concentrations of 14C were measured at the end of the experiments using liquid scintillation counting. Plant uptake of 14C via the roots was independent of the photosynthetic rate and, in most cases, could be predicted by knowing the transpiration rate and the nutrient solution concentration. However, when a less efficient root-medium aeration system was used, 14C uptake was greater than that predicted using transpiration, a phenomenon observed by other researchers. This contrasted to results of another experiment where the measured uptake of iodine was much slower than that predicted using transpiration. Knowledge of transpiration rates is useful in predicting inorganic carbon uptake via the roots and in estimating 14C transport from contaminated soils to biota. Also, the independence of the uptake from photosynthesis and ambient CO2 concentrations suggests that future increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations may not have a direct effect on root uptake of soil carbon. (author)

  3. Radioisotope handling facilities and automation of radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a survey is made of the advances in radioisotope handling facilities, as well as the technical conditions and equipment used for radioisotope production, it can be observed that no fundamental changes in the design principles and technical conditions of conventional manufacture have happened over the last several years. Recent developments are mainly based on previous experience aimed at providing safer and more reliable operations, more sophisticated maintenance technology and radioactive waste disposal. In addition to the above observation, significant improvements have been made in the production conditions of radioisotopes intended for medical use, by establishing aseptic conditions with clean areas and isolators, as well as by introducing quality assurance as governing principle in the production of pharmaceutical grade radioactive products. Requirements of the good manufacturing practice (GMP) are increasingly complied with by improving the technical and organizational conditions, as well as data registration and documentation. Technical conditions required for the aseptic production of pharmaceuticals and those required for radioactive materials conflicting in some aspects are because of the contrasting contamination mechanisms and due consideration of the radiation safety. These can be resolved by combining protection methods developed for pharmaceuticals and radioactive materials, with the necessary compromise in some cases. Automation serves to decrease the radiation dose to the operator and environment as well as to ensure more reliable and precise radiochemical processing. Automation has mainly been introduced in the production of sealed sources and PET radiopharmaceuticals. PC controlled technologies ensure high reliability for the production and product quality, whilst providing automatic data acquisition and registration required by quality assurance. PC control is also useful in the operation of measuring instruments and in devices used for

  4. The radioisotopes and radiations program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This program of the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina refers to the application and production of radionuclides, their compounds and sealed sources. The applications are carried out in the medical, agricultural, cattle raising and industrial areas and in other engineering branches. The sub-program corresponding to the production of radioactive materials includes the production of radioisotopes and of sealed sources, and an engineering service for radioactive materials production and handling facilities. The sub-program of applications is performed through several groups or laboratories in charge of the biological and technological applications, intensive radiation sources, radiation dosimetry and training of personnel or of potential users of radioactive material. Furthermore, several aspects about technology transfer, technical assistance, manpower training courses and scholarships are analyzed. Finally, some legal aspects about the use of radioisotopes and radiations in Argentina are pointed out. (M.E.L.)

  5. Radiobiological half-lives for carbon-14 and hydrogen-3 leucine in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In vivo estimates of protein metabolism in many are often made by oral or intravenous administration of leucine or its ∼-ketoacid, ∼-ketoisocaproate, labeled with 14C or 3H. Previous estimates of radiation dose from such tracers have been based on the measurement of 14CO2 in breath. Using measurements of the decay of 3H or 14C leucine from plasma proteins, longer biological half-lives for these compounds were obtained. The estimated total-body radiation absorbed dose is 0.97 mrad/uCi for [1-14C]KIC (or [1-14C]leucine) and 0.11 mrad/+Ci for ]4,5-3H]leucine (or [3H]KIC). Assuming administered doses of 100 μCi each, the total-body radiation absorbed dose is still well within the limits set by the FDA for Radioactive Drug Research Committees. 12 references, 3 figures, 3 tables

  6. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the column’s length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (±0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However

  7. Automation Systems for Radioisotope Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 50 years the company Hans Waelischmiller GmbH (HWM) has worked in the field of nuclear technology worldwide and designed and manufactured equipment for nuclear installations as well as complete turnkey projects. This report deals with the activity of HWM in the field of production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals as well as in the handling of radioactive materials in nuclear medicine departments in hospitals. (author)

  8. Physical aspects of radioisotope brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report represents an attempt to provide, within a necessarily limited compass, an authoritative guide to all important physical aspects of the use of sealed gamma sources in radiotherapy. Within the report, reference is made wherever necessary to the more extensive but scattered literature on this subject. While this report attempts to cover all the physical aspects of radioisotope 'brachytherapy' it does not, of course, deal exhaustively with any one part of the subject. 384 refs, 3 figs, 6 tabs

  9. Improvement of radioisotope production technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The widespreading and deepgoing applications of radioisotopes results the increasing demands on both quality and quantity. This in turn stimulating the production technology to be improved unceasingly to meet the different requirements on availability, variety, facility, purity, specific activity and specificity. The major approaches of achieving these improvements including: optimizing mode of production; enhancing irradiation conditions; amelioration target arrangement; adapting nuclear process and inventing chemical processing. (author)

  10. Carbon-14 in waste packages for spent fuel in a tuff repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 is produced naturally by cosmic ray neutrons in the upper atmosphere. It is also produced in nuclear reactors, in amounts much smaller than the global inventory. About one-third of this is released directly to the atmosphere, and the other two-thirds remains in the spent fuel. Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established limits on release of the 14C in spent fuel. This is of particular concern for the proposed repository in tuff, because of the unsaturated conditions and the consequent possibility of gaseous transport of 14C as CO2. Existing measurements and calculations of the 14C inventory in spent fuel are reviewed. The physical distribution and chemical forms of the 14C are discussed. Available data on the release of 14C from spent fuel in aqueous solutions and in gaseous environments of air, nitrogen, and helium are reviewed. Projected 14C behavior in a tuff repository is described. It is concluded that 14C release measurements from spent fuel into moist air at temperatures both above and below the in situ boiling point of water as well as detailed transport calculations for the tuff geological environment will be needed to determine whether the 10CFR60 and 40CFR191 requirements can be met. 56 refs., 1 tab

  11. Sampling and monitoring of carbon-14 in gaseous effluents from nuclear facilities - a literature survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C-14 compounds produced in the coolant may be released mainly together with off-gas and waste water from the coolant purification and treatment system. In reactors the release of C-14 will occur mainly in gaseous effluents and only a few percent in liquid effluents. Reported releases from BWRs range from 260 to 670 GBq/GW(e) x year and from 90 to 430 GBq/GW(e) x year for PWRs. At BWRs the condenser air ejector contributes the main inplant release pathway, whereas in PWRs the off-gas treatment vents are the main pathway for C-14 release. C-14 sampling methods depend generally on the C-14 being in the form of CO2. The off-gas discharges from BWRs are mainly in the form of CO2 whereas in PWRs a major fraction of the released C-14 is in the form of hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide (generally 80-100%). Sampling systems in PWRs should therefore be equipped with a catalytic oxidizer to convert all C-14 to CO2 before trapping. The purpose of this study is to provide information on the techniques available for sampling and monitoring C-14

  12. Radioisotopes for therapy: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radionuclides made great impact in the history of nuclear sciences both at the end of 19th century with the discoveries of Becquerel and madame Curie and later in 1934, when Frederic Joliet and Irene Curie demonstrated the production of the first artificial radioisotopes, 30P, by bombardment of 27Al by alpha particles. The subsequent invention of cyclotron and setting up of nuclear reactor opened the floodgate for production of artificial radionuclides. Currently, majority of radionuclides are made artificially by transforming a stable nuclide into an unstable state and thus far over 2500 radionuclides have been produced artificially. Use of radionuclides in various fields immediately followed their production and last century has witnessed tremendous growth in the applications of radiation and radioisotopes, in diverse fields such as medicine, industry, agriculture, food preservation, water resource management, environmental studies, etc. While radiation and radioisotopes are used both for diagnosis as well as for therapy in the field of medicine, therapeutic applications are among the earliest, which began as an empirical science in the beginning and developed into a well structured modality with time. (author)

  13. Modelling the Environmental Transfer of Tritium and Carbon-14 to Biota and Man. Report of the Tritium and Carbon-14 Working Group of EMRAS Theme 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen and carbon are biologically-regulated, essential elements that are highly mobile in the environment and the human body. As isotopes of these elements, tritium and 14C enter freely into water (in the case of tritium), plants, animals and humans. This complex behaviour means that there are substantial uncertainties in the predictions of models that calculate the transfer of tritium and 14C through the environment. The EMRAS Tritium/C14 Working Group (WG) was set up to establish the confidence that can be placed in the predictions of such models, to recommend improved modelling approaches, and to encourage experimental work leading to the development of data sets for model testing. The activities of the WG focused on the assessment of models for organically bound tritium (OBT) formation and translocation in plants and animals, the area where model uncertainties are largest. Environmental 14C models were also addressed because the dynamics of carbon and OBT are similar. The goals of the WG were achieved primarily through nine test scenarios in which model predictions were compared with observations obtained in laboratory or field studies. Seven of the scenarios involved tritium, covering terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems and steady-state and dynamic conditions. The remaining two scenarios concerned 14C, one addressing steady-state concentrations in plants and the other time-dependent concentrations in animals. The WG also considered one model intercomparison exercise involving the calculation of doses following a hypothetical, short-term release of tritium to the atmosphere in a farming area. Finally, the WG discussed the nature of OBT and proposed a definition to promote common understanding and usage within the international tritium community. The models used by the various participants varied in complexity from simple specific activity approaches to dynamic compartment models and process-oriented models, in which the various transfer processes were

  14. Algal C-14 and total carbon metabolisms 2. Experimental observations with the diatom Skeletonema costatum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, P.J.L.; Robinson, C.; Søndergaard, M.;

    1996-01-01

    of 2-3), C-14 uptake into the particulate plus the dissolved fractions approximated to net photosynthesis. Rate constants derived from the chemically determined changes were used to parameterize models that accounted for the respiration of photosynthetic products and for the recycling of respiratory CO......2. The conclusion drawn was that over the time scale studied, the C-14 technique was measuring net photosynthesis, consistent with essentially 100% recycling of respiratory CO2. The study has shown that we now possess the basis to make a rigorous analysis of net, gross CO2 fixation and net C-14......Three sets of comparisons of net and gross inorganic carbon assimilation and C-14 uptake were made with an axenic culture of Skeletonema costatum. The comparisons showed that in the physiological window studied (10-20% of the intrinsic generation time and gross photosynthesis/respiration ratios...

  15. A moderator ion exchange model to predict carbon-14 behaviour during operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-14 emissions from CANDU 6 stations are reduced through the removal of inorganic carbon ions by the ion exchange (IX) columns in the moderator purification system. A model has been developed to simulate the ion exchange behaviour of anions and cations present in the moderator. The model can be used to generate breakthrough curves for IX columns. Results from the program were compared to breakthrough curves generated by a small-scale experimental facility as well as data collected from Wolsong-3 where the IX column remained in service well past the recommended time. In both cases, the breakthrough curves were similar to the collected data. (author)

  16. An analytical method for estimating the 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of 14N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing 14N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The 14N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation

  17. An analytical method for estimating the {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance parameters of organic compounds with complex free induction decays for radiation effects studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iselin, L.H.

    1992-12-31

    The use of {sup 14}N nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as a radiation dosimetry tool has only recently been explored. An analytical method for analyzing {sup 14}N NQR complex free induction decays is presented with the background necessary to conduct pulsed NQR experiments. The {sup 14}N NQR energy levels and possible transitions are derived in step-by-step detail. The components of a pulsed NQR spectrometer are discussed along with the experimental techniques for conducting radiation effects experiments using the spectrometer. Three data analysis techniques -- the power spectral density Fourier transform, state space singular value decomposition (HSVD), and nonlinear curve fitting (using the downhill simplex method of global optimization and the Levenberg-Marquart method) -- are explained. These three techniques are integrated into an analytical method which uses these numerical techniques in this order to determine the physical NQR parameters. Sample data sets of urea and guanidine sulfate data are used to demonstrate how these methods can be employed to analyze both simple and complex free induction decays. By determining baseline values for biologically significant organics, radiation effects on the NQR parameters can be studied to provide a link between current radiation dosimetry techniques and the biological effects of radiation.

  18. Feasibility study on polonium-209 as radioisotope fuel for space nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the performance and the production method of alternative isotopes of 238Pu as a radioisotope fuel for use in space radioisotope power generators. Polonium-209 has the possibility to be an alternative material of 238Pu. It has enough half-time of 102 years and the specific power of 490 W/kg. From the simulation, the beam current of 14 A with 40 MeV proton energy provides 1 kg/yr of 209Po annually. (author)

  19. Carbon-14 in neutron-irradiated graphite for graphite-moderated reactors. Joint research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Matsuo, Hideto [Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Facility Decommissioning Technology Center, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    The graphite moderated gas cooled reactor operated by the Japan Atomic Power Company was stopped its commercial operation on March 1998, and the decommissioning process has been started. Graphite material is often used as the moderator and the reflector materials in the core of the gas cooled reactor. During the operation, a long life nuclide of {sup 14}C is generated in the graphite by several transmutation reactions. Separation of {sup 14}C isotope and the development of the separation method have been recognized to be critical issues for the decommissioning of the reactor core. To understand the current methodologies for the carbon isotope separation, literature on the subject was surveyed. Also, those on the physical and chemical behavior of {sup 14}C were surveyed. This is because the larger part of the nuclides in the graphite is produced from {sup 14}N by (n,p) reaction, and the location of them in the material tends to be different from those of the other carbon atoms. This report summarizes the result of survey on the open literature about the behavior of {sup 14}C and the separation methods, including the list of the literature on these subjects. (author)

  20. Non-radiative Exciton Decay in Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrah, Mark; Swan, Anna

    2010-03-01

    Experiments have shown step-wise changes in the fluorescence intensity from single-walled carbon nanotubes [1,2]. It has been proposed that the underlying mechanism for the step-wise changes is diffusion-limited quenching of excitons at defects [1]. This property has been used to demonstrate single-molecule detection for biological applications [3]. We perform a Monte-Carlo simulation of nanotube fluorescence with a diffusion-limited quenching model. The fluorescence intensity is seen to depend on the mean-square distance between defects, implying a nonlinear dependence on the number of defects. The intensity for consecutive defect counts can overlap depending on the positions of the defects. [4pt] [1] Cognet, L. et al. Science 316, 1465-1468 (2007).[0pt] [2] Jin, H. et al. Nano Lett. 8, 4299-4304 (2008).[0pt] [3] Heller, D. A. et al. Nature Nanotech. 4, 114-120 (2009).

  1. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalomba Mboyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  2. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,26Mg,56Fe(π+,π-)/sup 13,14/O,26Si,56Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub π/ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to 14O(0+, 5.92 MeV), 14O(2+, 7.77 MeV), 56Ni(gs), 13O(gs), and 13O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The 13O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup π/ = 1/2-. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the Δ33 resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub π/ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references

  3. Strength, decay branching ratios, and angular distribution of the 0.987 MeV resonance in the {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marta, Michele; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Erhard, Martin; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd Rudolf; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, R.; Trompler, Erik; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), Dresden (Germany); Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Menegazzo, Roberto [INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy; Szuecs, Tamas [Atomki, Debrecen (Hungary)

    2009-07-01

    The {sup 14}N(p,{gamma}){sup 15}O reaction controls the rate of the hydrogen burning CNO cycle. This reaction has recently been re-studied at E<500 keV at different facilities, including LUNA. However, also data at higher energy play a role in determining the extrapolated cross section in the R-matrix framework. Here we report on a new measurement of the absolute strength, decay branching ratio, and angular distribution of the E=0.987 MeV (E{sub x} = 8.284 MeV) resonance carried out at the high-current FZD Tandetron.

  4. The synthesis of the insecticides Aldrin and Dieldrin labelled with carbon-14 at high specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldrin is the trade name given by Shell Chemicals to 1, 2, 3, 4, 10, 10-hexachloro-1, 4, 4a, 5, 8, 8a-hexahydro-exo-1, 4-endo-5, 8-dimethanonapthalene. Acetylene-1, 2-C14 is converted successively to tetrachloroethane and trichloroethylene, and this is condensed with carbon tetrachloride by the Prins reaction in the presence of aluminium chloride to octachlorocyclopentene. Dechlorination gives hexachlorocyclopentadiene which undergoes a Diels-Alder addition to bicyclo(2, 2, 1) hepta-2,5-diene to give aldrin-C14 in 12% yield from barium carbonate. Oxidation of Aldrin gives the 6,7 epoxide, Dieldrin, in 87% yield. The paper includes an account of the separation of octachlorocyclopentene from the crude product of the Prins reaction by gas-liquid chromatography and of the separation of Aldrin and Dieldrin on a small preparative scale by reversed-phase paper chromatography. (author)

  5. Flux of carbon from 14C-enriched leaf litter throughout a forest soil mesocosm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froberg, Mats J. [Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine; Swanston, Christopher W. [USFS; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The role of DOC for the build-up of soil organic carbon pools is still not well known, but it is thought to play a role in the transport of carbon to a greater depth where it becomes more stable. The aim of this study was to elucidate within-year dynamics of carbon transport from litter to the O (Oe and Oa) and A horizons. Mesocosms with constructed soil profiles were used to study dynamics of C transport from 14C-enriched (about 1000 ) leaf litter to the Oe/Oa and A horizons as well as the mineralization of leaf litter. The mesocosms were placed in the field for 17 months during which time fluxes and 14C content of DOC and CO2 were measured. Changes in 14C in leaf litter and bulk soil C pools were also recorded. Significant simultaneous release and immobilization of DOC occurring in both the O and A horizons was hypothesized. Contrary to our hypothesis, DOC released from the labeled Oi horizon was not retained within the Oe/Oa layer. DOC originating in the unlabeled Oe/Oa layer was also released for transport. Extensive retention of DOC occurred in the A horizon. DOC leaching from A horizon consisted of a mix of DOC from different sources, with a main fraction originating in the A horizon and a smaller fraction leached from the overlaying horizons. The C and 14C budget for the litter layer also indicated a surprisingly large amount of carbon with ambient Δ14C-signature to be respired from this layer. Data for this site also suggested significant contributions from throughfall to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport into and respiration from the litter layer. The results from this study showed that DOC retentionwas low in the O horizon and therefore not important for the O horizon carbon budget. In the A horizon DOC retention was extensive, but annual DOC input was small compared to C stocks and therefore not important for changes in soil C on an annual timescale.

  6. Synthesis of 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-5-[14C]-1,2,3- triazole and 1-(4-sulfonamide-phenyl)-5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-5-[14C]-1,2,3- triazole as novel carbon-14 anticonvulsant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two 1,2,3-triazole anticonvulsants, 1-(4-methylsulfone-phenyl)-5-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-5-[14C]-1,2,3-triazole and 1-(4-sulfonamide-phenyl)-5-(4- fluoro-phenyl)-5-[14C]-1,2,3-triazole, both labeled with carbon-14 in the 5-position were prepared from para-fluoro-benzonitrile-[cyano-14C]. (author)

  7. Reexposure and advection of C-14-depleted organic carbon from old deposits at the upper continental slope

    OpenAIRE

    Tesi, Tommaso; Goñi, Miguel A.; Langone, Leonardo; Puig, Pere; Canals, Miquel; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Durrieu De Madron, Xavier; Calafat, Antoni; Palanques, Albert; Heussner, Serge; Davies, Maureen H.; Drexler, Tina M.; Fabres, Joan; Miserocchi, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    Outcrops of old strata at the shelf edge resulting from erosive gravity-driven flows have been globally described on continental margins. The reexposure of old strata allows for the reintroduction of aged organic carbon (OC), sequestered in marine sediments for thousands of years, into the modern carbon cycle. This pool of reworked material represents an additional source of C-14-depleted organic carbon supplied to the ocean, in parallel with the weathering of fossil organic carbon delivered ...

  8. Carbon-14 immobilization via the CO2-Ba(OH)2 hydrate gas-solid reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although no restrictions have been placed on the release of carbon-14, it has been identified as a potential health hazard due to the ease in which it may be assimilated into the biosphere. The intent of the Carbon-14 Immobilization Program, funded through the Airborne Waste Program Management Office, is to develop and demonstrate a novel process for restricting off-gas releases of carbon-14 from various nuclear facilities. The process utilizes the CO2-Ba(OH)2 hydrate gas-solid reaction to directly remove and immobilize carbon-14. The reaction product, BaCO3, possesses both the thermal and chemical stability desired for long-term waste disposal. The process is capable of providing decontamination factors in excess of 1000 and reactant utilization of greater than 99% in the treatment of high volumetric, airlike (330 ppM CO2) gas streams. For the treatment of an air-based off-gas stream, the use of packed beds of Ba(OH)2.8H2O flakes to remove CO2 has been demonstrated. However, the operating conditions must be maintained between certain upper and lower limits with respect to the partial pressure of water. If the water vapor pressure in the gas is less than the dissociation vapor pressure of Ba(OH)2.8H2O, the bed will deactivate. If the vapor pressure is considerably greater, pressure drop problems will increase with increasing humidity as the particles curl and degrade. Results have indicated that when operated in the proper regime, the bulk of the increase in pressure drop results from the conversion of Ba(OH)2.8H2O to BaCO3 and not from the hydration of the commercial Ba(OH)2.8H2O (i.e. Ba(OH)2.7.50H2O) to Ba(OH)2.8H2O

  9. The use of barytocalcite for carbon 14 immobilization: One-year leaching behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent nuclear fuel reprocessing process is one of the anthropogenic sources of carbon-14, and since this element is highly mobile in the geosphere, its sequestration is necessary. Several phases and industrial solutions to immobilize this radionuclide have been studied, including the barytocalcite phase BaCa(CO3)2 at 8.08 wt.% of C, which has many advantages such as its low specific volume of carbon. Recently, different options to synthesize this phase have been reported. Here we report on the aqueous durability of barytocalcite, studied for one year with pure water at 30 °C, in order to complete the behavior studies. Unexpected leaching behavior was encountered: it had been supposed that barytocalcite would only leach slowly, but after 1 year, it was no longer present. It appears that its simple CaCO3 and BaCO3 constituents precipitated, though the overall carbon loss was low during the period studied. This research gives a new insight into the behavior of this phase regarding carbon-14 immobilization

  10. Measurement of the carbon 14 activity at natural level in air samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study was to measure the carbon 14 activity at natural level in air samples using classical methods of radiochemistry and beta counting. Three different methods have been tested in order to minimise the detection limit. In the three methods, the first step consists in trapping the atmospheric carbon 14 into NaOH (1N) using a bubbling chamber. The atmospheric carbon dioxide reacts with NaOH to form Na2CO3. In the first method the Na2CO3 solution is mixed with a liquid scintillate and is directly analysed by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The detection limit is approximately 1 Bq/m3 of air samples. The second method consists in evaporating the carbonate solution and then counting the solid residue with a proportional gas circulation counter. The detection limit obtained is lower than the first method (0.4 Bq/m3 of air samples). In the third method, Na2CO3 is precipitated into CaCO3 in presence of CaCl2. CaCO3 is then analysed by LSC. This method appear to be the most appropriate, the detection limit is 0.05 Bq/m3 of air samples. (author)

  11. Relationship between carbon-14 concentrations in atmospheric CO2 and environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentration of organically-bound 14C in the tree-ring cellulose of a pine tree grown in Shika-machi (37.1degN, 136.5degE), Ishikawa prefecture, Japan, was measured for the ring-years from 1949 to 1999 and compared with those in several trees from East Asia region reported by other researchers. Temporal variation of organically-bound 14C concentration in the tree-ring cellulose in Shika-machi showed essentially similar variations to those of other reports. However, small difference of Δ14C values was found during the period of 1970-1981 between our data and those of other reports, in addition to the difference during the period of 1963-1967 caused by the so-called latitude dependence of the 14C variations in the northern troposhere. These results suggest that the 14C concentration in atmospheric CO2 was considerably disturbed during the period of 1970-1981, especially in 1970, 1976, and 1978-1981, in the East Asia region. This phenomenon may be interpreted by the possibility of the several times of injections of 14C originated from a series of Chinese thermonuclear bomb tests. Temporal variation of 14C concentration in atmospheric CO2 in Kanazawa city, Ishikawa prefecture, Japan (36.3degN, 136.4degE), was also measured during the period of 1991-1999. An interesting result in comparing 14C concentrations in the tree-ring cellulose with those of atmospheric CO2 is that each of 14C concentrations in a series of tree rings reflected summer means of 14C concentrations in atmospheric CO2. It suggests that the carbon necessary for synthesizing tree-ring cellulose was mainly supplied from atmospheric CO2 in summer season. It is noteworthy that surface soils collected from different sites were found to demonstrate extremely low 14C concentrations than atmospheric CO2. It may be ascribed to the slow exchange rate of carbon between soils and atmospheric CO2. (author)

  12. Chemical Characterization and Removal of Carbon-14 from Irradiated Graphite II - 13023

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Approximately 250,000 tonnes of irradiated graphite waste exists worldwide and that quantity is expected to increase with decommissioning of Generation II reactors and deployment of Generation IV gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. This situation indicates the need for a graphite waste management strategy. Of greatest concern for long-term disposal of irradiated graphite is carbon-14 (C-14), with a half-life of 5730 years. Study of irradiated graphite from some nuclear reactors indicates C-14 is concentrated on the outer 5 mm of the graphite structure. The aim of the research presented last year and updated here is to identify the chemical form of C-14 in irradiated graphite and develop a practical method by which C-14 can be removed. A nuclear-grade graphite, NBG-18, and a high-surface-area graphite foam, POCOFoamR, were exposed to liquid nitrogen (to increase the quantity of C-14 precursor) and neutron-irradiated (1013 neutrons/cm2/s). Finer grained NBG-25 was not exposed to liquid nitrogen prior to irradiation at a neutron flux on the order of 1014 /cm2/s. Characterization of pre- and post-irradiation graphite was conducted to determine the chemical environment and quantity of C-14 and its precursors via the use of surface sensitive characterization techniques. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to evaluate the morphological features of graphite samples. The concentration, chemical composition, and bonding characteristics of C-14 and its precursors were determined through X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), and Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis Spectroscopy (EDX). Results of post-irradiation characterization of these materials indicate a variety of surface functional groups containing carbon, oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen. During thermal treatment, irradiated graphite samples are heated in the presence of an inert carrier gas (with or without oxidant gas), which carries off gaseous products

  13. Design of a Chemical Processing Apparatus for Radioisotopes of Short Half-Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has appeared to us useful to make suggestions to radiochemists having at their disposal a small reactor (e. g., 1012 n/cm2s flux) regarding which radioisotopes they can prepare and the minimum equipment required. The paper comprises three main parts: 1. Possible radioisotopes, which may be divided into two categories: (a) radioisotopes for medical uses, including: Na24, K42, Br82, Cu64, As76, Hg197 and colloidal Au198; and (b) radioisotopes for scientific or industrial uses, including in addition to the above-named: Sb122, As77, Mn56 and Au198 (chloride). 2. Chemical processing, in which two categories of radioisotopes emerge: (a) the category involving simple solution, normally requiring either cold dissolution in water or dilute acid or hot dissolution in concentrated acids. This category includes: Na24, K42, Br12, Hg197, Sb122, Mn56 and Au198 (chloride). (b) The category involving complex separations or transformations, in which fall preparations by Szilard-Chalmers effect, reactions (n, p), (n, γ), followed by β-decay or formation of colloids. The following maybe mentioned: Cu54, As76, As77 and colloidal Au198 and 3. Preparation areas. It is essential that these radioisotopes be prepared in leak-tight and shielded areas and be grouped according to their affinities. We accordingly suggest an apparatus consisting of 3 cells 2 m in length by 1 m in depth, linked together by a conveyor and used, e.g., for the following processes: 1st cell: Introduction of containers, opening and preparation of Na24, K42, and Br82; 2nd cell: Preparation of two out of the following three radioisotopes : Cu64, As76 and colloidal Au198; and 3rd cell: Bringing into solution of radioisotopes for various uses and preparation of Hg197. (author)

  14. A study of the levels and distribution of carbon-14 and iodine-129 in the Irish marine and terrestrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sellafield nuclear fuel reprocessing plant is considered to be the largest single source of global anthropogenic carbon-14 discharge, as well as a substantial source of iodine-129. This study addresses the effects of these releases on the Irish coastal marine environment. In particular, spatial trends in the carbon-14 content of seaweed (Fucus spp.) were assessed by collecting and analysing samples from well-distributed locations around the Irish coastline. Temporal trends were studied by comparing carbon-14 concentrations in present-day samples with levels found in archive material collected at the same locations during research campaigns conducted in the mid-1980s and mid-1990s. Contamination by carbon-14 discharged from Sellafield was most evident in seaweeds from the northeastern Irish coast. This indicates that the pattern of residual currents and, in particular, the south to north transfer of water known to predominate in the Irish Sea, largely controls the spatial distribution of carbon-14 releases. Maximum carbon-14 discharge levels to the marine environment from Sellafield were mirrored by peak concentrations found in seaweed from the mid-1990s and in present-day samples. Concentrations of carbon-14 in seaweed from the west coast of Ireland correspond closely with values measured for seaweeds from the Atlantic coast of northwest Spain and do not appear to be significantly affected by Sellafield discharges

  15. Research trends in radioisotopes: a scientometric analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes or radionuclides are radioactive forms of elements and are usually produced in research reactors and accelerators. They have wide ranging applications in healthcare, industry, food and agriculture, and environmental monitoring. Following over five decades of vast experience accumulated, radioisotope technology has developed to a high degree of sophistication and it is estimated that about 200 radioisotopes are in regular use. This paper attempts to highlight the publication status and growth of radioisotope research across the world and make quantitative and qualitative assessment by way of analyzing the following features of research output based on Web of Science database during the period 1993-2012. (author)

  16. Medical radioisotopes for the next century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are widely used in medicine (Nuclear Medicine) for diagnosis, palliation and therapy of heart disease, cancer, muscoskeletal and neurological conditions. The radioisotopes used are both reactor and cyclotron produced. The utilisation is currently growing and is expected to continue to grow over the next 10-20 years. The combination of radioisotope and delivery vehicle can be designed to meet the intended end use. This paper will deal with the main approaches to the use of radioisotopes for Nuclear medicine ad future prospects for the area

  17. Human folate metabolism using 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arjomand, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Duecker, S. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Johnson, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schneider, P. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zulim, R. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bucholz, B. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vogel, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1999-03-25

    Folate is a water soluble vitamin required for optimal health, growth and development. It occurs naturally in various states of oxidation of the pteridine ring and with varying lengths to its glutamate chain. Folates function as one-carbon donors through methyl transferase catalyzed reactions. Low-folate diets, especially by those with suboptimal methyltransferase activity, are associated with increased risk of neural tube birth defects in children, hyperhomocysteinemic heart disease, and cancer in adults. Rapidly dividing (neoplastic) cells have a high folate need for DNA synthesis. Chemical analogs of folate (antifolates) that interfere with folate metabolism are used as therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. Although much is known about folate chemistry, metabolism of this vitamin in vivo in humans is not well understood. Since folate levels in blood and tissues are very low and methods to measure them are inadequate, the few previous studies that have examined folate metabolism used large doses of radiolabeled folic acid in patients with Hodgkin's disease and cancer (Butterworth et al. 1969, Krumdieck et al. 1978). A subsequent protocol using deuterated folic acid was also insufficiently sensitive to trace a physiologic folate dose (Stites et al. 1997). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool that overcomes the limitations of traditional mass spectrometry and of decay counting of long lived radioisotopes (Vogel et al. 1995). AMS can detect attomolar concentrations of 14 C in milligram-sized samples enabling in vivo radiotracer studies in healthy humans. We used AMS to study the metabolism of a physiologic 80 nmol oral dose of 14 C-folic acid (1/6 US RDA) by measuring the 14 C-folate levels in serial plasma, urine and feces samples taken over a 150-day period after dosing a healthy adult volunteer.

  18. Human folate metabolism using 14C-accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folate is a water soluble vitamin required for optimal health, growth and development. It occurs naturally in various states of oxidation of the pteridine ring and with varying lengths to its glutamate chain. Folates function as one-carbon donors through methyl transferase catalyzed reactions. Low-folate diets, especially by those with suboptimal methyltransferase activity, are associated with increased risk of neural tube birth defects in children, hyperhomocysteinemic heart disease, and cancer in adults. Rapidly dividing (neoplastic) cells have a high folate need for DNA synthesis. Chemical analogs of folate (antifolates) that interfere with folate metabolism are used as therapeutic agents in cancer treatment. Although much is known about folate chemistry, metabolism of this vitamin in vivo in humans is not well understood. Since folate levels in blood and tissues are very low and methods to measure them are inadequate, the few previous studies that have examined folate metabolism used large doses of radiolabeled folic acid in patients with Hodgkins disease and cancer (Butterworth et al. 1969, Krumdieck et al. 1978). A subsequent protocol using deuterated folic acid was also insufficiently sensitive to trace a physiologic folate dose (Stites et al. 1997). Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an emerging bioanalytical tool that overcomes the limitations of traditional mass spectrometry and of decay counting of long lived radioisotopes (Vogel et al. 1995). AMS can detect attomolar concentrations of 14 C in milligram-sized samples enabling in vivo radiotracer studies in healthy humans. We used AMS to study the metabolism of a physiologic 80 nmol oral dose of 14 C-folic acid (1/6 US RDA) by measuring the 14 C-folate levels in serial plasma, urine and feces samples taken over a 150-day period after dosing a healthy adult volunteer

  19. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfer - FY 1985

  20. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1986-08-01

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfer - FY 1985.

  1. Study of the Production Mechanisms and Decay Properties of Charmed Particles Observed in Nuclear Emulsions Coupled to the NA14 Spectrometer

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aims of this test experiment are: \\item a)~~~~to check the expected improvement in scanning speed and efficiency, due to the use of the microstrip vertex detector of the NA14 set-up and to the help of automated microscopes; \\item b)~~~~to evaluate the enrichment factor in the charmed event content of the sample to be searched, due to the particle identification power and the vertex detector of NA14; \\item c)~~~~to collect some 100 pairs of charmed particles, produced and decaying in emulsion, which would allow a comparison with the results from the WA58 experiment, in particular about the possible energy dependence of the production mechanism of associated @L^c|+~$\\bar{D}$. \\end{enumerate} The incident beam will consist of tagged photons between 70 and 150-200~GeV.

  2. Radio-isotopic myocardial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non invasive study of the myocardium with radio-isotopes is effected either with radio-elements labeling on recently infarcted myocardium, such as PYP Tc 99m, or after I.V. injection of Tl 201 extracted by normal myocardium or after I.V. injection of radio-element which study the myocardial metabolism. The fixation of PYP Tc 99m, bordering that of calcium, appears 24 hours after the onset of the myocardial infarction; then it reduces and disappears a week later; its persistency gives evidence of an evolution to ventricular anevrism. The relatively low sensitivity and specificity of this test should induce to reserve if for precise cases. 201 Tl realizes a map of the myocardial flow because this radio-isotope reflects with damping the variations of coronary flow. The scintigraphy is made either after stress test or after I.V. injection of dipyridamole, and the sensitivity and specificity of the test is better than electrocardiographic exercise stress test. The predictive value of the test for a patient highly depends of the prevalence of the coronary disease for this patient; however the results of Tl scintigraphy are far from an ideal test; quantitative or semi-quantitative analysis of the image compared to the analogical image seems to improve sensitivity for detection of coronary disease. After myocardial infarction, its best use is to detect a left anterior descending stenosis after posterior or inferior infarction. Among the possible radio-elements of myocardial metabolism, scintigraphy with fatty acids opens interesting prospects for the study of the myocardial clearance of the radio-isotope, that reflects the global or regional myocardial metabolism

  3. An assessment of the inventory of Carbon-14 in the oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oceanic inventory for natural 14C is 19.6x1029 atoms, an estimate similar to those found by other methods. The 14C produced from nuclear weapons (1972) is 550x1026 atoms and 52% was in the oceans. From 1972 to 1985 132x1026 atoms of bomb 14C were added. The nuclear power industry produces 0.5x1026 atoms per year (17% of natural production rate). Most estimates by varying methods indicate an exchange time of carbon from atmosphere to ocean of about seven years or about 22 moles m-2 yr-1 for the surface ocean. The oceanic distribution generally has higher concentrations in low to mid latitudes, and low concentrations in the most southern regions, with the deep ocean retaining levels similar to those before nuclear testing

  4. 14C Activity and Global Carbon Cycle Changes over the Past 50,000 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughen, K.; Lehman, S.; Southon, J.; Overpeck, J.; Marchal, O.; Herring, C.; Turnbull, J.

    2004-01-01

    A series of 14C measurements in Ocean Drilling Program cores from the tropical Cariaco Basin, which have been correlated to the annual-layer counted chronology for the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) ice core, provides a high-resolution calibration of the radiocarbon time scale back to 50,000 years before the present. Independent radiometric dating of events correlated to GISP2 suggests that the calibration is accurate. Reconstructed 14C activities varied substantially during the last glacial period, including sharp peaks synchronous with the Laschamp and Mono Lake geomagnetic field intensity minimal and cosmogenic nuclide peaks in ice cores and marine sediments. Simulations with a geochemical box model suggest that much of the variability can be explained by geomagnetically modulated changes in 14C production rate together with plausible changes in deep-ocean ventilation and the global carbon cycle during glaciation.

  5. Source terms; isolation and radiological consequences of carbon-14 waste in the Swedish SFR repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source term, isolation capacity, and long-term radiological exposure of 14C from the Swedish underground repository for low and intermediate level waste (SFR) is assessed. The prospective amount of 14C in the repository is assumed to be 5 TBq. Spent ion exchange resins will be the dominant source of 14C. The pore water in the concrete repository is expected to maintain a pH of >10.5 for a period of at least 106 y. The cement matrix of the repository will retain most of the 14CO32- initially present. Bacterial production of CO2 and CH4 from degradation of ion-exchange resins and bitumen may contribute to 14C release to the biosphere. However, CH4 contributes only to a small extent to the overall carbon loss from freshwater ecosystems. The individual doses to local and regional individuals peaked with 5x10-3 and regional individuals peaked with 5x10-3 and 8x10-4 μSv y-1 respectively at about 2.4x104 years. A total leakage of 8.4 GBq of 14C from the repository will cause a total collective dose commitment of 1.1 manSv or 130 manSv TBq-1. (authors)

  6. Applications of radioisotopes in agriculture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    India has large population which is engaged in agriculture or related activities. With many agro-climatic zones, diversity in crops and traditional largely plant food based diets, there is need to meet these and increase agricultural production in the face of increasing constraints. Radiations and radioisotopes can contribute significantly to these developments. Mutation breeding is very useful technique in Indian context. Basic technique can be applied where a radiation source or irradiation service and facility to grow few thousand plants are available. Radiation processing can save the valuable food which is subject to spoilage by microbes and insects. Value addition by export is possible by meeting the quarantine and hygienisation conditions

  7. A liquid xenon radioisotope camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaklad, H.; Derenzo, S. E.; Muller, R. A.; Smadja, G.; Smits, R. G.; Alvarez, L. W.

    1972-01-01

    A new type of gamma-ray camera is discussed that makes use of electron avalanches in liquid xenon and is currently under development. It is shown that such a radioisotope camera promises many advantages over any other existing gamma-ray cameras. Spatial resolution better than 1 mm and counting rates higher than one million C/sec are possible. An energy resolution of 11% FWHM has recently been achieved with a collimated Hg-203 source using a parallel-plate ionization chamber containing a Frisch grid.

  8. Survey of industrial radioisotope savings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Only three decades after the discovery of artificial radioactivity and two after radioisotopes became available in quantity, methods employing these as sources or tracers have found widespread use, not only in scientific research, but also in industrial process and product control. The sums spent by industry on these new techniques amount to millions of dollars a year. Realizing the overall attitude of industry to scientific progress - to accept only methods that pay relatively quickly - one can assume that the economic benefits must be of a still larger order of magnitude. In order to determine the extent to which radioisotopes are in daily use and to evaluate the economic benefits derived from such use, IAEA decided to make an 'International Survey on the Use of Radioisotopes in Industry'. In 1962, the Agency invited a number of its highly industrialized Member States to participate in this Survey. Similar surveys had been performed in various countries in the 1950's. However, the approaches and also the definition of the economic benefits differed greatly from one survey to another. Hence, the Agency's approach was to try to persuade all countries to conduct surveys at the same time, concerning the same categories of industries and using the same terms of costs, savings, etc. In total, 24 Member States of the Agency agreed to participate in the survey and in due course they submitted contributions. The national reports were discussed at a 'Study Group Meeting on Radioisotope Economics', convened in Vienna in March 1964. Based upon these discussions, the national reports have been edited and summarized. A publication showing the administration of the Survey and providing all details is now published by the Agency. From the publication it is evident that in general the return of technical information was quite high, of the order of 90%, but, unfortunately the economic response was much lower. However, most of the reports had some bearing on the economic aspects

  9. Analytical Validation of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry for Pharmaceutical Development: the Measurement of Carbon-14 Isotope Ratio.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keck, B D; Ognibene, T; Vogel, J S

    2010-02-05

    Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is an isotope based measurement technology that utilizes carbon-14 labeled compounds in the pharmaceutical development process to measure compounds at very low concentrations, empowers microdosing as an investigational tool, and extends the utility of {sup 14}C labeled compounds to dramatically lower levels. It is a form of isotope ratio mass spectrometry that can provide either measurements of total compound equivalents or, when coupled to separation technology such as chromatography, quantitation of specific compounds. The properties of AMS as a measurement technique are investigated here, and the parameters of method validation are shown. AMS, independent of any separation technique to which it may be coupled, is shown to be accurate, linear, precise, and robust. As the sensitivity and universality of AMS is constantly being explored and expanded, this work underpins many areas of pharmaceutical development including drug metabolism as well as absorption, distribution and excretion of pharmaceutical compounds as a fundamental step in drug development. The validation parameters for pharmaceutical analyses were examined for the accelerator mass spectrometry measurement of {sup 14}C/C ratio, independent of chemical separation procedures. The isotope ratio measurement was specific (owing to the {sup 14}C label), stable across samples storage conditions for at least one year, linear over 4 orders of magnitude with an analytical range from one tenth Modern to at least 2000 Modern (instrument specific). Further, accuracy was excellent between 1 and 3 percent while precision expressed as coefficient of variation is between 1 and 6% determined primarily by radiocarbon content and the time spent analyzing a sample. Sensitivity, expressed as LOD and LLOQ was 1 and 10 attomoles of carbon-14 (which can be expressed as compound equivalents) and for a typical small molecule labeled at 10% incorporated with {sup 14}C corresponds to 30 fg

  10. Survey of literature on dispersion ratio and collection ratio of radioisotopes in animal study using radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of literature in the title was performed to know the actual status of the dispersion from excretion and expiration studies of radioisotopes since, at present, the probable dispersion ratio is assumed to be 100% in calculation for legally permitted use of radioisotopes which conceivably being far from the real status and being incompatible with the guideline for pharmacokinetic studies requiring the recovery of >95% of dosed radioactivity in balance study. There are two interpretations for the dispersion; it is the expiration ratio and it is the fraction unrecovered. Survey was done on 11 Japanese and foreign journals in 1985-1996 publishing most of pharmacokinetic studies and on 650 compounds in 358 facilities with 1,975 experiments in total. In those experiments, the total recovery of radioactivity was 95% in average, unrecovered fraction, 5% and expiration ratio, 2%. As for unclide, 14C, 3H, 125I and 35S were surveyed since they occupied 99.4% of the experiments and their dispersion was <5%. Rats were used in 70% of the experiments and the dispersion in all animal experiments was about 5%. Administration route was regardless of the dispersion. (K.H.)

  11. Safety Analysis for a Radioisotope Stirling Generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting safety analyses of various lowpower Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) design concepts for the U. S. Department of Energy. These systems are electrical power generators converting thermal energy from plutonium (238Pu) decay to electrical energy via a Stirling cycle generator. The design and function are similar to the RTG (Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator) used in space missions since the early 1960's, with a more efficient Stirling cycle generator replacing the proven thermoelectric converter. This paper discusses the methods the INL is employing in the safety analysis effort, along with the software tools, lessons learned, and results. The overall goal of our safety analyses is to determine the probability of an accidental plutonium release over the life of the generator. Historical accident rates for various transportation modes were investigated using event tree methods. Source terms were developed for these accidents including primarily impact, fire, and creep rupture. A negative result was defined as rupture of the tantalum alloy containment vessel surrounding the encapsulated plutonia pellet. Damage due to identified impact accidents was evaluated using non-linear finite element software tools. Material models, gathered from a wide variety of sources, included strain-rate and temperature dependencies on yield strength, strain hardening, and rupture. Both individual component and overall system simulation results will be validated by impact testing to be conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Results from deterministic impact, fire, and creep rupture analyses were integrated into the probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment by correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. This approach presented challenges, which are addressed. Other significant issues include limitations of reliable material data at high temperatures and strain rates and development of a technique to

  12. Proportion of biogenic carbon in flue gas by carbon-14 measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of this project is closely related to EU's emissions trading system and to the current and future monitoring needs therein. The determination of fossil part of emissions originated from various fuels by stack measurements or by laboratory analyses could possibly find users also in other fields outside the ETS (e.g. waste incineration). After the market analysis and preliminary measurements carried out in the previous Biocarbon project this project focused on the development of the sampling method for stack measurements and to the validation of isotope measurements. The results obtained for fossil proportion of the fuel by current methods will be compared to those obtained by isotope measurements. The operation of the sampling system was tested in long period tests in plant conditions. Moreover, the sample preparation methods and isotope measurements were validated by measuring the proportions of biogenic and fossil carbon of known traffic fuel mixtures. The developed service concept can also be utilised as a fraud prevention measure related to the expanding international biofuels-trade. (orig.)

  13. Synthesis of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon marked with carbon-14: (b, d e f) dibenzo-chrysene {sup 14}C-7,14; Synthese d'un hydrocarbure aromatique polycyclique marque au carbone 14: le dibenzo (b, d e f) chrysene {sup 14}C-7,14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatelain, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    (b, d e f) dibenzo-chrysene C-7,14 has been synthesized from radioactive carbon dioxide and the organic magnesium compound derived from 1,5 dibromo naphthalene. The product has been purified by a very precise series of fractionated chromatographs on alumina having a chromatographic activity. This has necessitated the development of a special technique. (author) [French] Le dibenzo (b, d e f) chrysene 14C-7,14 a ete synthetise au depart de gaz carbonique radioactif et de bis-organomagnesien derive du dibromo-1,5 naphtalene. Le produit a ete purifie par une serie de chromatographies fractionnees sur alumine d'activite chromatographique tres precise. Ceci a fait l'objet d'une mise au point de technique. (auteur)

  14. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transporation System Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The US Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent ma or changes in the US Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined

  15. Notification prescribing the quantities of radioisotopes and others

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The notification is wholly revised under the order and the regulations for enforcing the law concerning prevention from radiation hazards due to radioisotopes. The concentration of isotopes emitting radiation shall be 0.002 micro-curie per gram. When not tightly sealed, the quantity of such isotopes shall be 0.1 micro-curie for strontium 90 and isotopes emitting alpha rays, 1 micro-curie for isotopes emitting radiation with half-life of more than 30 days, 10 micro-curie for isotopes emitting radiation with half-life of less than 30 days and 100 micro-curie for Hydrogen 3, Beryllium 7, Carbon 14, Fluorine 18, etc. The quantity of isotopes shall be more than 10 curie for those with automatic indicators and more than 3,000 curie for those interlocked. In the controlled area the permissible dose of exterior radiation is 30 mili-rem for a week. The maximum permissible exposure dose for the workers engaged in radiation business is 3 rem for 3 months. The maximum permissible accumulative dose for such workers is a figure (unit rem) calculated by a formula D = 5(N-18), when D means the permissible accumulative dose and N number of the age. The permissible exposure dose is 12 rem for the urgent work and 1.5 rem for a year for the persons who enter into the controlled area on business. The maximum permissible density in the air, under water and on the surface, etc. are in detail prescribed with tables attached. (Okada, K.)

  16. The global balance of carbon monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstock, Bernhard; Yup Chang, Tai

    2011-01-01

    Radioactive carbon-14 monoxide produced by cosmic ray neutrons provides a useful tracer to deduce the residence time of carbon monoxide in the troposphere. From the steady-state equations for stable carbon monoxide and radioactive carbon monoxide, the production rate of stable carbon monoxide can also be derived. This rate is an order of magnitude greater than that estimated for CO sources such as the oceans, combustion, and chlorophyll decay. The oxidation of tropospheric methane initiated b...

  17. Validation test for carbon-14 migration and accumulation in a Canadian shield lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This particular BIOMOVS II Technical Report is concerned with modelling the transfer of C-14 through the aquatic food chain following release to a Canadian shield lake. Model performance has been tested against field data supplied by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Carbon-14 was added in 1978 to the epilimnion of a small Canadian Shield lake to investigate primary production and carbon dynamics. Data from this experiment were used within BIOMOVS II to provide a validation test, which involved modelling the fate of the C-14 added to the lake. The nature of the spike and the subsequent monitoring allowed the investigation of both short-term processes relevant to evaluation of the impacts of accidental releases as well as longer-term processes relevant to routine release and to solid waste disposal. Four models participated in the scenario: 1) a simple mass balance model of a lake (AECL, Whiteshell Laboratories, Canada); 2) a relatively complex deterministic dynamic compartment model (QuantiSci Ltd.,UK); 3) a complex deterministic model (Studsvik Model A) and a more complex probabilistic model (Studsvik Model B; Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Sweden). Endpoints were C-14 concentrations in water, sediment and whitefish over a thirteen year period. Each model produced reasonable predictions when compared to the observed data and when uncertainty is taken into consideration. About 0.2 to 0.4% of the initial C-14 inventory to the lakes remained in the water at the end of the study, because of internal recycling of C-14 from sediments. The simple AECL model did not account for this internal recycling of C-14 and, in this respect, its predictions were not as realistic as those of the QuantiSci and Studsvik models for concentrations in water. However, the AECL model predictions for the C-14 inventory remaining in lake sediment were closest to the observed values. Overall, Studsvik Model B was the most accurate in simulating C-14 concentrations in water and in whitefish, but

  18. Development of Radioisotope Tracer Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project is aimed to develop the radiotracer technology for process optimization and trouble-shooting to establish the environmental and industrial application of radiation and radioisotopes. The advanced equipment and software such as high speed data acquisition system, RTD model and high pressure injection tool have developed. Based on the various field application to the refinery/petrochemical industries, the developed technology was transfer to NDT company for commercial service. For the environmental application of radiotracer technology, injector, detector sled, core sampler, RI and GPS data logging system are developed and field tests were implemented successfully at Wolsung and Haeundae beach. Additionally tracer technology were also used for the performance test of the clarifier in a wastewater treatment plant and for the leak detection in reservoirs. From the experience of case studies on radiotracer experiment in waste water treatment facilities, 'The New Excellent Technology' is granted from the ministry of environment. For future technology, preliminary research for industrial gamma transmission and emission tomography which are new technology combined with radioisotope and image reconstruction are carried out

  19. Decontamination of radioisotope production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strippable coating method use phosphoric glycerol and irradiated latex as supporting agents have been investigated. The investigation used some decontaminating agents: EDTA, citric acid, oxalic acid and potassium permanganate were combined with phosphoric glycerol supporting agent, then EDTA Na2, sodium citric, sodium oxalic and potassium permanganate were combined with irradiated latex supporting agent. The study was needed to obtain the representative operating data, will be implemented to decontamination the Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The experiment used 50x50x1 mm stainless steel samples and contaminated by Cs-137 about 1.1x10-3 μCi/cm2. This samples according to inner cover of Hot Cell material, and Hot Cell activities. The decontamination factor results of the investigation were: phosphoric glycerol as supporting agent, about 20 (EDTA as decontaminating agent) to 47 (oxalic acid as decontaminating agent), and irradiated latex as supporting agent, about 11.5 (without decontamination agent) to 27 (KMnO4 as decontaminating agent). All composition of the investigation have been obtained the good results, and can be implemented for decontamination of Hot Cell for radioisotope production. The irradiated latex could be recommended as supporting agent without decontaminating agent, because it is very easy to operate and very cheap cost. (author)

  20. Interactions of 14C-labeled multi-walled carbon nanotubes with soil minerals in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes are often modified to be stable in the aqueous phase by adding extensive hydrophilic surface functional groups. The stability of such CNTs in water with soil or sediment is one critical factor controlling their environmental fate. We conducted a series of experiments to quantitatively assess the association between water dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and three soil minerals (kaolinite, smectite, or shale) in aqueous solution under different sodium concentrations. 14C-labeling was used in these experiments to unambiguously quantify MWCNTs. The results showed that increasing ionic strength strongly promoted the removal of MWCNTs from aqueous phase. The removal tendency is inversely correlated with the soil minerals’ surface potential and directly correlated with their hydrophobicity. This removal can be interpreted by the extended Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (EDLVO) theory especially for kaolinite and smectite. Shale, which contains large and insoluble organic materials, sorbed MWCNTs the most strongly. - Graphical abstract: The stability of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in an aqueous system containing kaolinite, smectite or shale as model soil minerals is investigated using the 14C-labeling technique. Highlights: ► The interactions between MWCNTs and kaolinite, smectite, or shale were probed. ► Surface potential and hydrophobicity of the particles governs their interactions. ► EDLVO can be used to interpret the interactions. ► Insoluble organic materials in shale strongly sorb MWCNTs.

  1. Current Status of Radioisotope Applications in Defence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Bhatnagar

    1987-07-01

    Full Text Available Reviews the current status of radioisotope applications in Defence- R&D Establishments, Defence Inspectorates, Ordnance Factories, Public Sector Undertakings under the Defence Ministry, Army, Navy and Air Force Establishments and Military Hospitals. It also lists the users of film badge service in Defence. Training programmes in radioisotope applications in Defence conducted by DRDO organisations have also been highlighted.

  2. Environmental levels of carbon-14 around a Swedish nuclear power plant measured with accelerator mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenström, K.; Erlandsson, B.; Hellborg, R.; Wiebert, A.; Skog, G.

    1996-06-01

    14C is one of the radionuclides which are produced by nuclear power plants. The main part of the 14C, which is released during normal operation, is produced through neutron induced reactions in the cooling water and is released as airborne effluents (such as CO 2 and hydrocarbons) through the ventilation system of the plant to the surrounding environment. Because of the biological importance of carbon and the long half-life of 14C, it is of interest to measure the releases and their incorporation into living material in the environment of the power plants. In this pilot study the accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) facility at the University of Lund has been used to measure the 14C activity concentration in vegetation around a Swedish nuclear power plant. AMS is suitable mainly because of the accuracy obtained within a short measuring time, which makes it possible to analyze a sufficient number of samples for a thorough investigation. The results of this study demonstrate that the AMS method is suitable for investigations of the influence on the local environment of reactor-released 14C by analysis of living material. To test dispersion models, however, air sampling both of emission source and in the surrounding of the plant seems more suitable.

  3. Decay constants in geochronology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IgorM.Villa; PaulR.Renne

    2005-01-01

    Geologic time is fundamental to the Earth Sciences, and progress in many disciplines depends critically on our ability to measure time with increasing accuracy and precision. Isotopic geochronology makes use of the decay of radioactive nuclides as a help to quantify the histories of rock, minerals, and other materials. Both accuracy and precision of radioisotopic ages are, at present, limited by those of radioactive decay constants. Modem mass spectrometers can measure isotope ratios with a precision of 10-4 or better. On the other hand, the uncertainties associated with direct half-life determinations are, in most cases, still at the percent level. The present short note briefly summarizes progress and problems that have been encountered during the Working Group's activity.

  4. Application of the dose limitation system to the control of carbon-14 releases from heavy-water-moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy-water-moderated reactors produce substantially more carbon-14 than light-water reactors. Applying the principles of the systems of dose limitation, the paper presents the rationale used for establishing the release limit for effluents containing this nuclide and for the decisions made regarding the effluent treatment in the third nuclear power station in Argentina. Production of carbon-14 in PHWR and the release routes are analysed in the light of the different effluent treatment possibilities. An optimization assessment is presented, taking into account effluent treatment and waste management costs, and the collective effective dose commitment due to the releases. The contribution of present carbon-14 releases to future individual doses is also analysed in the light of an upper bound for the contribution, representing a fraction of the individual dose limits. The paper presents the resulting requirements for the effluent treatment regarding carbon-14 and the corresponding regulatory aspects used in Argentina. (author)

  5. Simulation of carbon cycling, including dissolved organic carbon transport, in forest soil locally enriched with 14C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipping, Ed [Lancaster Environment Center; Chamberlain, Paul M. [Lancaster Environment Center; Froberg, Mats J. [Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The DyDOC model was used to simulate organic matter decomposition and dissolved organic matter (DOM) transport in deciduous forest soils at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Tennessee, USA. The model application relied on extensive data from the Enriched Background Isotope study (EBIS), which made use of a local atmospheric enrichment of radiocarbon to establish a large-scale manipulation experiment with different inputs of 14C from both above-ground and below-ground litter. The aim of the modelling was to test if the processes that constitute DyDOC can explain the available observations for C dynamics in the ORR. More specifically we used the model to investigate the origins of DOM, its dynamics within the soil profile, and how it contributes to the formation of stable carbon in the mineral soil. The model was first configured to account for water transport through the soil, then observed pools and fluxes of carbon and 14C data were used to fit the model parameters that describe the rates of the metabolic transformations. The soils were described by a thin O-horizon, a 15 cm thick A-horizon and a 45-cm thick B-horizon. Within the thin O-horizon, litter is either converted to CO2 or to a second organic matter pool, which is converted to CO2 at a different rate, both pools being able to produce DOM. The best model performance was obtained by assuming that adsorption of downwardly transported DOM in horizons A and B, followed by further conversion to stable forms, produces mineral-associated carbon pools, while root litter is the source of non-mineral associated carbon, with relatively short residence times. In the simulated steady-state, most carbon entering the O-horizon leaves quickly as CO2, but 17% (46 gC m-2 a-1) is lost as DOC in percolating water. The DOM comprises mainly hydrophobic material, 40% being derived from litter and 60% from older organic matter pools (residence time ~ 10 years). Most of the DOM is converted to CO2 in the mineral soil, over

  6. Role of radioisotopes in the study of insect pests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although the use of nuclear techniques, particularly radioisotopes, in entomological research is less than a century old, the contribution of radioisotopes to the science of studying insects (Entomology) is indispensable. In fact, radioisotopes provided a very important and sometimes a unique tool for solving many research problems in entomology. This article discusses the most important and widely used applications of radioisotopes in studying insect pests. In particular, it concentrates on the subject of radioisotopes used in entomological research, methods of labeling insect with radioisotopes, half life of radioisotopes, and the role of radioisotopes in physiological, ecological, biological and behavioral studies of insects. (author)

  7. Activity calculation of radioisotopes in HFETR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity calculating method and formulas of seven kinds of radioisotopes for High Flux Engineering Test REactor (HFETR) are given. The perturbation of targets to neutron fluence rate is considered while targets are put into the neutron fluence rate field of reactor core. All perturbing factors of seven kinds of radioisotopes being used in HFETR are presented. After considering the perturbation, the calculating accuracy of radioisotope activity has been raised 10%. The given method and formulas have ended the history of all activities estimated by experiences, except for that of 60Co, in the radioisotope production of HFETR. The conclusions are also useful and instructive for the production of radioisotopes in HFETR. (8 tabs.)

  8. Neutron-rich radioisotope production in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses Australia's Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) and the applications of the range of radioisotopes it will produce. The ANSTO's RRR will produce radioisotopes that have medical., industrial and environmental applications. Medicinal radioisotopes would provide the nuclear medicine physicians and oncologists with the necessary tool to non-invasively diagnose and cure diseases, ranging from cancer to infections. Industrial radioisotopes provide the industrial community with high technology tools to evaluate and assess the status of high reliability equipment with respect to safety and functionality in a non-destructive modality. The current commercial radioisotope sources include 60Co, 169Yb and 192Ir with source strengths limited by the HlFAR neutron flux and capacity. These sources are primarily used for industrial X ray moisture, level and thickness gauging. The RRR will allow expansion of the commercial source strengths and allow ANSTO to meet the growing commercial Australasian market for radioactive sources

  9. Utilization of Tritium and Carbon-14 in Studies of Isotope Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The utility of tritium in organic research has been augmented by the development of a simple method for determining C14 and tritium in the same sample. The non-volatile, radioactive material, in a film that is 'infinitely thick' to tritium radiation, is counted in a windowless, gas-fiow proportional counter; the film is then re-counted when covered with a screen that stops all radiation from tritium but allows a fraction of that from C14 to pass. By introduction of one isotope at a point removed from the reaction centre, an isotope effect for the other can be determined from changes in the tritium-C14 ratio in the reactant and/or products as the reaction proceeds. Carriers of reactant, products or derivatives can be added at any point to facilitate isolation, because the analytical method depends primarily on the tritium-C14 ratio. Methods for utilizing the double-label technique will be illustrated by a study of isotope effects in the oxidation of the penultimate carbon of certain labelled polyols with Acetobacter suboxydans. Six D-mannitols position-labelled either with C14 or with tritium at C1, C2 or C3 were prepared. For these, isotope effects (k*/k) of 0.93, 0.23, and 0.71, respectively, were found with C14 at C2, tritium at C2, and tritium at C3; no detectable isotope effects were found for the remaining Dmannitols. In the oxidation of position-labelled D-glucitols, an isotope effect of 0.24 was found for tritium at C5; no detectable effect was found for either C14 or tritium at C1. The techniques are suitable for studying a variety of chemical and biological reactions. (author)

  10. Measurements of the Water Vapour, Tritium and Carbon-14 Content of the Middle Stratosphere over Southern England

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, F; Goldsmith, P.; Green, H F; Holt, A.; Parham, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the water vapour, tritium and carbon-14 content of the stratosphere at heights of between 80,000 and 100,000 feet, made over England during the years 1956 to 1960, are described. The tritium and carbon-14 concentrations are greater than those expected from natural production due to the cosmic radiation. The bulk of these two isotopes, at present in the stratosphere, has been injected there during the course of thermonuclear explosions. Mass spectrometric analyses show that t...

  11. Determination of the carbon content of domestic farm produces to estimate offsite C-14 ingestion dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon content of grains, leafy and root vegetables, and fruits which the Koreans usually eat were calculated to use in the estimation of offsite C-14 ingestion dose. With the data of food intake per day in the Report on 1998 national health and nutrition survey- dietary intake survey, 5 age-group integrate d intake of the 4 farm produce groups were extracted for food items and the amount. Intake percentage in each food group were taken as food weighing factor for the foods. Carbon content was calculated using protein, fat, and carbohydrate content of the foods, and multiplied by the corresponding food weighing factor to derive the content of the food groups. The calculated carbon content of grains, leafy and root vegetables, and fruits were 39.%, 4.2%, 8.0%, and 5.9% respectively. Grains and fruits were not much different from ODCM for carbon content, but vegetables were higher by 0.7%∼4.5%

  12. Application of radioisotopes in pharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: To use of radioisotopes in the processes of receiving radiopharmaceutical diagnostic means it is widely know [1]. Radioactivity labeled chemical compounds, pharmacological kinetics of which allows one solving a concrete diagnostic problem in an organism are used in radio pharmaceutics. In spite of this choice of the radioisotope, possessing the most favorable nuclei-physical characteristics for it to be detected and minimization of beam loadings, be of great importance. Development of a method of introduction of a radioisotope also has important value, as it is included into chemical structure of a radiopharmaceutical preparation. One more way of use of radioisotopes in pharmaceutics is their use as a radioactive mark at a stage of creation of a new medical product. And in this case, all those moments, which are listed above, take place. Preparations labeling by radioisotopes are used basically for their studying pharmacological kinetics. In Institute of nuclear physics AS RU, in recent years, works are done on studying pharmacological kinetics of some new medical products, which have been synthesized in the Tashkent pharmaceutical institute. These preparations are on the basis of microelements with a complex set of properties possessing expressed biological activity and have great value in pharmaceutical science of Republic of Uzbekistan. Reception of labeled compounds of all preparations was carried out by a method of introduction of a radioisotope at a stage of their synthesis. The work presents the results of researches on synthesis and study of pharmacological kinetics of radioactively labeled preparations - PIRACIN, labeled by radioisotope 69mZn; FERAMED, labeled by radioisotope 59Fe; COBAVIT, labeled by radioisotope 57Co; VUC, labeled by radioisotope57Co

  13. Prise en compte du carbone 14 dans le modèle PASIM

    OpenAIRE

    Duclos, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    J'ai effectué mon stage de fin d'étude d'ingénieur ISIMA au sein de l'Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique (INRA), dans l'Unité de Recherche sur l'Ecosystème Prairial (UREP). Mon stage a été effectué en collaboration avec l'Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN). J'ai été chargé d'ajouter la gestion du carbone 14 au sein de PaSim, modèle de simulation de prairie gérant déjà les flux de carbone et d'azote. Il m'a donc fallu faire la distinction, au...

  14. Carbon isotope (14C, 12C) measurements to quantify sources of atmospheric carbon monoxide in urban air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atmospheric air samples were collected during the Winter of 1989-90 in Albuquerque, NM USA, for carbon isotope (14C, 12C) analysis of carbon monoxide (CO). An experimental sample design was prepared to target periods when the concentration of CO exceeds the 9 μL/L (volume fraction), 8 hour National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) and during periods of attainment. Sampling sites, time of day, sampling duration, and meteorology were carefully considered so that source impacts be optimal. A balanced sampling factorial design was used to yield maximum information from the constraints imposed; the number of samples was limited by the number of sample canisters available, time, and resources. Carbon isotope measurements of urban air, ''clean-air'' background from Niwot Ridge, Colorado, average (wood) logs and oxygenated-gasolines were used in a 3-source model to calculate the contribution of woodburning to the total atmospheric CO burden in Albuquerque. Results show that the estimated fractional contribution of residential wood combustion (Θ' RWC) ranged from 0 to 0.30 of CO concentrations corrected for ''clean-air'' background. For these same samples, the respective CO concentrations attributed to woodburning range from 0 to 0.90 μmol/mol (mole fraction), well below the NAAQS. In all cases, fossil CO is the predominant source of ambient CO concentrations ranging from 0.96 to 6.34 μmol/mol. A final comment is made on the potential of fossil CO measurements as an indirect tracer of atmospheric benzene, relevant to exposure risk estimates of motor vehicle emissions and occupational health and safety standards. (author). 26 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Tritium- and carbon-14-contents of wines of different vintage from the northern and southern hemisphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14 and tritium radioactivity contents of up to 19 vintages of German and Southafrican wines were compared. A similar large dependence of the 14C- and of the 3H-activity in the German wine on the nuclear weapon tests of the years 1962/63 was found out. The radioactivity level is also 1977/78 still essentially higher than before 1950. The Southafrican wines have been influenced considerably less by nuclear explosions. The highest 3H-values were found in the vintage 1963 of the German wine with 5910 pCi/litre and in the vintage 1964 of the Southafrican wine with 510 pCi/litre. (orig.)

  16. Linear accelerator for radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 200- to 500-μA source of 70- to 90-MeV protons would be a valuable asset to the nuclear medicine program. A linear accelerator (linac) can achieve this performance, and it can be extended to even higher energies and currents. Variable energy and current options are available. A 70-MeV linac is described, based on recent innovations in linear accelerator technology; it would be 27.3 m long and cost approx. $6 million. By operating the radio-frequency (rf) power system at a level necessary to produce a 500-μA beam current, the cost of power deposited in the radioisotope-production target is comparable with existing cyclotrons. If the rf-power system is operated at full power, the same accelerator is capable of producing an 1140-μA beam, and the cost per beam watt on the target is less than half that of comparable cyclotrons

  17. Radioisotope studies under pathologic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a general discussion on salivary pathology, before dealing with the various salivary gland diseases which can draw real advantage from radioisotope studies. Clinical problems related to the salivary glands first concern diffuse or focal glandular swelling. Focal swelling includes inflammatory or metastatic deposits in preauricular or submandibular lymph nodes, cysts, abscesses, foci of inflammation, benign and malignant neoplasms of the salivary glands themselves or of surrounding blood or lymph vessels, nerves, connective tissue, and oral mucosa. Primary tumors of the salivary glands are rare and usually benign. The combination of a systemic disease with dry mouth and dry eyes due to inflamed conjunctiva and cornea because of decreased fluid production, forms Sjogren syndrome. It may also cause diffuse glandular swelling. Chronic alcoholism, cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipoproteinemia, and malnutrition are other pathologic conditions sometimes associated with diffuse salivary gland swelling

  18. US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Houten, N.C.

    1989-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987.

  19. US Department of Energy radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) prepared this edition of the radioisotope customer list at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This is the 25th report in a series dating from 1964. This report covers DOE radioisotope sales and distribution activities by its facilities to domestic, foreign and other DOE facilities for FY 1988. The report is divided into five sections: radioisotope suppliers, facility contacts, and radioisotopes or services supplied; a list of customers, suppliers, and radioisotopes purchased; a list of radioisotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers -- FY 1988. Radioisotopes not previously reported in this series of reports were argon-37, arsenic-72, arsenic-73, bismuth-207, gadolinium-151, rhenium-188, rhodium-101, selenium-72, xenon-123 and zirconium-88. The total value of DOE radioisotope sales for FY 1988 was $11.1 million, an increase of 3% from FY 1987

  20. Analysis and Characterization of Organic Carbon in Early Holocene Wetland Paleosols using Ramped Pyrolysis 14C and Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, L.; Schreiner, K. M.; Fernandez, A.; Rosenheim, B. E.; Tornqvist, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Radiocarbon analyses are a key tool for quantifying the dynamics of carbon cycling and storage in both modern soils and Quaternary paleosols. Frequently, bulk 14C dates of paleosol organic carbon provide ages older than the time of soil burial, and 14C dates of geochemical fractions such as alkali and acid extracts (operationally defined as humic acids) can provide anomalously old ages when compared to coeval plant macrofossil dates. Ramped pyrolysis radiocarbon analysis of sedimentary organic material has been employed as a tool for investigating 14C age spectra in sediments with multiple organic carbon sources. Here we combine ramped pyrolysis 14C analysis and biomarker analysis (lignin-phenols and other cupric oxide products) to provide information on the source and diagenetic state of the paleosol organic carbon. We apply these techniques to immature early Holocene brackish wetland entisols from three sediment cores in southeastern Louisiana, along with overlying basal peats. Surprisingly, we find narrow 14C age spectra across all thermal aliquots from both paleosols and peats. The weighted bulk 14C ages from paleosols and overlying peats are within analytical error, and are comparable to independently analyzed 14C AMS dates from charcoal fragments and other plant macrofossils from each peat bed. Our results suggest high turnover rates of carbon in soils relative to input of exogenous carbon sources. These data raise broader questions about processes within the active soil and during pedogenesis and burial of paleosols that can effectively homogenize radiocarbon content in soils across the thermochemical spectrum. The concurrence of paleosol and peat 14C ages also suggests that, in the absence of peats with identifiable plant macrofossils, ramped pyrolysis 14C analyses of paleosols may be used to provide ages for sea-level indicators.

  1. Measurement and analysis of Carbon-14 released from pressurized water reactor in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the amount of Carbon-14 released from pressurized water reactor (PWR) is small and its concentration is low, it is not used as a main monitored nuclide for environmental release in PWR in general. However, the dose conversion coefficient of C-14 in CO2 is relatively high, there is a possibility to overestimate public exposure dose with the assumption that all amount of C-14 is resulted from CO2. Therefore, a monitoring plan should be established to manage the effluent from PWR in safe. This plan consists of (1) specifying the chemical form of C-14 (2) evaluating its effect on environment. The majority of the C-14 released from PWR is in a gaseous form in CO2 and CH4. In order to monitor C-14 in PWR, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power (KHNP) devised C-14 sampling instrument which can collect CO2 and methane separately. It is composed of three main components, that is, primary CO2 sampler, a methane oxidisation assembly and a secondary CO2 sampler. The primary CO2 sampler has one water bubbler and two NaOH bubblers. The water bubbler prevents the accumulation of NaOH at other bubblers, 2M-NaOH bubblers collect all CO2 in the gas to produce sodium carbonate (Na2CO3). Then the methane oxidisation assembly convert methane and CO to CO2. The catalyst is composed of equal mixture of Alumina with Palladium coating (1.0%) and Platinum coating (0.5%). The temperature of a furnace is maintained 500 .deg. C approximately, to convert CO and methane into CO2. Retaining time of the gas in catalytic is designed to be about 25 seconds to maximize conversion. After the catalytic conversion, the gas is cooled and is passed through the NaOH solution bubblers. The concentration of CO2 and methane at main vent lines in Yonggwang Unit-3 was analyzed using Gas Chromatography in order to evaluate the optimal treatment condition for the sample and estimate the optimal operating time for this device. As a result, the concentration of CO2 was approximately 450 ppm in average and that of

  2. The use of radioisotopes for the study of flotation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper considers methods of studying flotation processes with radioisotopes and nuclear radiation. Radioisotopes can be used for studying the fixation of flotation reagents on the surface of minerals where monomolecular coverage of the surface is incomplete. Radiometric and microautoradiographic methods are used in this research. The use of collector reagents containing radioisotopes has explained why some sulphides are difficult to separate by flotation. This difficulty is related to the material composition and structure of these minerals and to the chemical bonds within their crystal lattices. The simultaneous use of radiometric and autoradiographic methods accompanied by solvent-washing of the mineral particles showed the conditions under which dixanthate and other products of the interaction of xanthates with sulphide minerals are formed. The use of radioactive kerosene, and also of kerosene in conjunction with other flotation reagents, made it possible to determine certain features of fixation on molybdenite depending on the kerosene concentration. Contrast and track microautoradiography were used to study the distribution of sulphydryl collector reagents on different particles of galenite in the flotation pulp. The combined effect of these reagents was also studied. Combinations of xanthates of various alcohols produce a more even distribution on the galenite particles, and permit a more efficient use of reagents. C14-labelled tridecylamine was used to study the interaction of a cationic collector with hlibnerite and wolframite. The investigation showed that tridecylamine, when introduced into the flotation process, is substantially absorbed by foaming products. Non-foaming products (quartz, fluorite, calcite) absorb insignificant quantities of reagent. (author)

  3. Carbonated Eclogite Solidus Between 14 and 20 GPa: Results from the Model CMAS-CO2 System and Contrasting Solidus Behavior to Carbonated Peridotite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshav, S.; Gudfinnsson, G. H.

    2007-12-01

    The carbonate ledge at ~2.0 GPa is a pronounced feature of the carbonated peridotite solidus. At the ledge, where the CO2-bearing phase changes from vapour to carbonate, the melt composition becomes carbonatitic. After this drop, the solidus of carbonated peridotite gradually rises in P-T space, up to at least 12 GPa. Between 14 and 16 GPa, Keshav et al. (2007) reported another drop in the solidus of carbonated peridotite in the model CMS-CO2 system. Similar to the lower-pressure topology, the solidus at higher pressure resumes a positive slope between 16-20 GPa, and seems to flatten between 22 and 26 GPa. Concomitant with this second drop, the melts become extremely calcic (Ca/Ca+Mg, Ca no.-0.62) at 16 and 20 GPa, but attain more magnesio-carbonatitic (Ca no.-0.40) character both at shallower or greater depths than the transition zone. Clearly, the second drop in the carbonated peridotite solidus has tremendous consequences for geological processes in the deep mantle. The other major rock-type presumed to be present in the mantle is eclogite of broadly basaltic composition. Clarifying the solidus topology of carbonated eclogite in model systems over a similar pressure range is also an important task, because the solidus topology affects the fate of subducted carbonate in the deeper mantle. The position of the solidus of carbonated eclogite will address its impact on local or extensive melting (if it occurs), the possible relationship between the carbonated peridotite and carbonated eclogite solidi at these depths (400-600 km), their respective incipient melts, and ultimately the possibility of carbonate survival at these and greater depths. With these issues in mind, we have determined the solidus of model carbonated eclogite in model CMAS- CO2 system between 14 and 20 GPa. At 14 and 16 GPa, the melts are in equilibrium with cpx, majoritic garnet, stishovite, and magnesite. At 20 GPa, the melts are in equilibrium with calcium-perovskite (capv), garnet, stishovite

  4. Mountain scale modeling of transient, coupled gas flow, heat transfer and carbon-14 migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We simulate mountain-scale coupled heat transfer and gas flow at Yucca Mountain. A coupled rock-gas flow and heat transfer model, TGIF2, is used to simulate mountain-scale two-dimensional transient heat transfer and gas flow. The model is first verified against an analytical solution for the problem of an infinite horizontal layer of fluid heated from below. Our numerical results match very well with the analytical solution. Then, we obtain transient temperature and gas flow distributions inside the mountain. These distributions are used by a transient semianalytical particle tracker to obtain carbon-14 travel times for particles starting at different locations within the repository. Assuming that the repository is filled with 30-year-old waste at an initial areal power density of 57 kw/acre, we find that repository temperatures remain above 60 degrees C for more than 10,000 years. Carbon-14 travel times to the surface are mostly less than 1000 years, for particles starting at any time within the first 10,000 years

  5. Radioisotope spectrometric method to determine diffusion coefficients in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of the spectrometric installation to study diffusion in metals using #betta#-decay radio-isotopes is presented. Diffusion coefficients of nickel in 70% Co-5% Fe-15% Si-10% B amorphous alloy are determined according to #betta#-radiation absorption in diffusion zone. Plate samples of 10x10 mm size and about 300 μm in thickness are used. Diffusion annealing is conducted during 100 hrs. The calculation of the diffusion coefficients has been carried out by the formula I/I0= esup(μsup(2)Dtau)erfc μ √ Dtau, where I0, I is an initial and a final radiation intensity; μ- an absorption coefficient of 63Ni #betta#-ray in the given material (at calculation μ=1.3x106 m-1 was taken); tau- duration of diffusion annealing; D- diffusion coefficient at the designed temperature. The value of the diffusion coefficient of nickel in 70% Co-5% Fe-15% S-10% B amorphous alloy at the temperature of 200 deg C is turned out to be equal to 4x10-21 m2/s. It should be noted that the self-diffusion coefficient of cobalt in Co-Fe alloy, found by extrapolation from high-temperature region, is equal to 10-35 m2/s, i.e. in 14 orders lower than that of the same basis in amorphous alloy

  6. Overview of radioisotope production and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are in widespread and increasing daily use throughout the world. Applications include medical diagnosis, treatment of cancer, sterilization of medical disposables, the perservation of food, and the hygienization of waste products. The unique production capabilities of Canadian research reactors and CANDU electrical generating stations have enabled Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to make an important contribution to the growth of this industry. The paper describes the production, processing, transportation and applications of the major radioisotopes in use today. The equipment required for the efficient use of these radioisotopes is described and the potential for growth is discussed

  7. Reconciling Change in Oi-Horizon Carbon-14 with Mass Loss for an Oak Forest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Swanston, Christopher W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine

    2005-01-01

    First-year litter decomposition was estimated for an upland-oak forest ecosystem using enrichment or dilution of the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon. These isotopically-based mass-loss estimates were contrasted with measured mass-loss rates from past litterbag studies. Mass-loss derived from changes in the 14C-signature of the Oi-horizon suggested mean mass loss over 9 months of 45% which was higher than the corresponding 9-month rate extrapolated from litterbag studies (~35%). Greater mass loss was expected from the isotopic approach because litterbags are known to limit mass loss processes driven by soil macrofauna (e.g., fragmentation and comminution). Although the 14C-isotope approach offers the advantage of being a non-invasive method, it exhibited high variability that undermined its utility as an alternative to routine litterbag mass loss methods. However, the 14C approach measures the residence time of C in the leaf litter, rather than the time it takes for leaves to disappear; hence radiocarbon measures reflect C immobilization and recycling in the microbial pool, and do not necessarily replicate results from litterbag mass loss. The commonly applied two-compartment isotopic mixing model was appropriate for estimating decomposition from isotopic enrichment of near-background soils, but it produced divergent results for isotopic dilution of a multi-layered system with litter cohorts having independent 14C-signatures. This discrepancy suggests that cohort-based models are needed to adequately capture the complex processes involved in carbon transport associated with litter mass-loss. Such models will be crucial for predicting intra- and interannual differences in organic horizon decomposition driven by scenarios of climatic change.

  8. Abstracts of the third conference on radioisotopes and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Third Uzbekistan Conference on radioisotopes and their applications was held on 8-10 October, 2002 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of radiochemistry, radioisotope production, technology of radioisotopes and compounds, activations analysis applications, radionuclides, radioimmunoassays, application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture. More than 80 talks were presented in the meeting

  9. Abstracts of the second conference on radioisotopes and their applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Second Uzbekistan Conference on radioisotopes and their applications was held on 3-5 October, 2000 in Tashkent, Uzbekistan. The specialists discussed various aspects of modern problems of radiochemistry, radioisotope production, technology of radioisotopes and compounds, activations analysis applications, radionuclides, radioimmunoassays, application of radioisotopes in industry, medicine, biology and agriculture. More than 80 talks were presented in the meeting. (A.A.D.)

  10. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1)isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1986

  11. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Plant; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; lists of customers, suppliers and isotopes purchased; list of isotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer codes; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1983

  12. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamar, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1)isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1986.

  13. Assessment of adequacy of pancreatic enzyme replacement with the multiple-phase carbon-14-triolein test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon-14-triolein absorption test was used to investigate fat absorption and its response to pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy in 10 men with pancreatic steatorrhoea. Absorption was increased in all, from 1,14 plus minus 1,2% of the dose per hour (group mean plus minus SD) to 2,85 plus minus 2,33% (P less than 0,01) by the simultaneous administration of 8 tablets of enteric-coated pancreatic enzymes (Nutrizym; Merck). In patients with normal or high gastric acid secretion, neutralization of gastric acid with 30 ml magnesium trisilicate had no effect on absorption while the addition of an extract of gastric secretions (Enzynorm; Noristan) to the therapy of the 1 achlorhydric patient improved absorption from 2,2% to 3,81%. The 14C fat test offers a rapid and more acceptable alternative method for determining individual response to pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy than the conventional 72-hour faecal fat excretion measurement. The enteric-coated pancreatin preparation used in this study appears to be optimally effective under conditions of normal gastric acid secretion

  14. Research reactor production of radioisotopes for medical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 70% of all radioisotopes applied in medical diagnosis and research are currently produced in research reactors. Research reactors are also an important source of certain radioisotopes, such as 60Co, 90Y, 137Cs and 198Au, which are employed in teletherapy and brachytherapy. For regular medical applications, mainly 29 radionuclides produced in research reactors are used. These are now produced on an 'industrial scale' by many leading commercial manufacturers in industrialized countries as well as by national atomic energy establishments in developing countries. Five main neutron-induced reactions have been employed for the regular production of these radionuclides, namely: (n,γ), (n,p), (n,α), (n,γ) followed by decay, and (n, fission). In addition, the Szilard-Chalmers process has been used in low- and medium-flux research reactors to enrich the specific activity of a few radionuclides (mainly 51Cr) produced by the (n,γ) reaction. Extensive work done over the last three decades has resulted in the development of reliable and economic large-scale production methods for most of these radioisotopes and in the establishment of rigorous specifications and purity criteria for their manifold applications in medicine. A useful spectrum of other radionuclides with suitable half-lives and low to medium toxicity can be produced in research reactors, with the requisite purity and specific activity and at a reasonable cost, to be used as tracers. Thanks to the systematic work done in recent years by many radiopharmaceutical scientists, the radionuclides of several elements, such as arsenic, selenium, rhenium, ruthenium, palladium, cadmium, tellurium, antimony, platinum, lead and the rare earth elements, which until recently were considered 'exotic' in the biomedical field, are now gaining attention. (author)

  15. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1984

  16. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamar, D.A.; Van Houten, N.C.

    1988-08-01

    This edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, US Department of Energy (DOE). This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms, including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: 1) isotope suppliers, facility contact, and isotopes or services supplied; 2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; 3) isotopes purchased cross- referenced with customer numbers; 4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and 5) radioisotope sales and transfers for fiscal year 1987.

  17. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1985-08-01

    This edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (ER-73), Office of Energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document describes radioisotope distribution from DOE facilities to private firms including foreign and other DOE facilities. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; (2) customers, suppliers, and isotopes purchased; (3) isotopes purchased cross-referenced with customer numbers; (4) geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1984.

  18. Radioisotope Power Systems Technology Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) is a multicenter, multiagency (with the Department of Energy (DOE)) program whose purpose is to manage the Science Mission...

  19. Radioisotopes: problems of responsibility arising from medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes have brought about great progress in the battle against illnesses of mainly tumoral origin, whether in diagnosis (nuclear medicine) or in treatment (medical radiotherapy). They are important enough therefore to warrant investigation. Such a study is attempted here, with special emphasis, at a time when medical responsibility proceedings are being taken more and more often on the medicolegal problems arising from their medical use. It is hoped that this study on medical responsibility in the use of radioisotopes will have shown: that the use of radioisotopes for either diagnosis or therapy constitutes a major banch of medicine; that this importance implies an awareness by the practitioner of a vast responsibility, especially in law where legislation to ensure protection as strict as in the field of ionizing radiations is lacking. The civil responsibility of doctors who use radioisotopes remains to be defined, since for want of adequate jurisprudence we are reduced to hypotheses based on general principles

  20. Radioisotope production at PUSPATI - five year programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the basic laboratory facilities for radioisotopes production at PUSPATI will be commissioned by September 1983. Work on setting up of production and dispensing facilities is in progress as the nuclides being worked on are those that are commonly used in medical applications, such as Tc-99m, I-131, P-32 and other nuclides such as Na-24 and K-42. Kits for compounds labelled with Tc-99m such as Stannous Pyrophosphate, Sulfur Colloid and Stannous Glucoheptonate are being prepared. The irradiation facilities available now for radioisotope production at the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor include a central thimble (flux density 1 x 10 13 n.cm-2S-1) and a rotary specimen rack (flux density 0.2 x 1013 n.cm-1S-1). Irradiation schedules and target handling techniqes are discussed. Plans for radioisotope production at PUSPATI over the period of 1983-1987, based on present demand for radioisotope, are also explained. (author)

  1. Radioisotopic splenoportography in patients with portal hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samejima, Natsuki; Ikeda, Koichiro; Yokoyama, Yasuhiro; Hirata, Satoru

    1989-05-01

    Radio-isotopic splenoportography was performed by injecting /sup 99m/TcO/sub 4//sup -/into the spleens of 46 patients with portal hypertension and 14 patients with various disorders not having portal hypertension. No collateral circulation was demonstrated in the 14 patients without portal hypertension whereas some RI-images of portosystemic collaterals were found in 40 (87.0 per cent) of the 46 patients with portal hypertension. Collaterals were divided into an ascending group and a descending group, the appearance rate of ascending collaterals being 80.4 per cent and that of descending collaterals, 41.3 per cent. There were 3 image patterns in the ascending group, namely, an AZ-pattern in which the azygos vein was demonstrated; a SC-pattern in which the RI-bolus ascended along the esophagus to the neck and the subclavian vein; and an EG-pattern which showed stagnation of the RI-bolus in the esophagogastric region. There were 4 patterns in the descending group, namely; a pattern of gastro-renal caval shunt (GR-pattern); reverse flow patterns into the umbilical or paraumbilical veins (UV-pattern); into the superior mesenteric vein (SMV-pattern); and into the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV-pattern). The appearance of the EG-pattern was seen most frequently (74.4 per cent). The usefulness of this method for surveying the collateral circulation in portal hypertension, estimating the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding and evaluating its treatments, was suggested by the results of this study. (author).

  2. Radioisotopic splenoportography in patients with portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samejima, N; Ikeda, K; Yokoyama, Y; Hirata, S

    1989-05-01

    Radio-isotopic splenoportography was performed by injecting 99mTcO4- into the spleens of 46 patients with portal hypertension and 14 patients with various disorders not having portal hypertension. No collateral circulation was demonstrated in the 14 patients without portal hypertension whereas some RI-images of portosystemic collaterals were found in 40 (87.0 per cent) of the 46 patients with portal hypertension. Collaterals were divided into an ascending group and a descending group, the appearance rate of ascending collaterals being 80.4 per cent and that of descending collaterals, 41.3 per cent. There were 3 image patterns in the ascending group, namely, an AZ-pattern in which the azygos vein was demonstrated; a SC-pattern in which the RI-bolus ascended along the esophagus to the neck and the subclavian vein; and an EG-pattern which showed stagnation of the RI-bolus in the esophagogastric region. There were 4 patterns in the descending group, namely; a pattern of gastro-renal caval shunt (GR-pattern); reverse flow patterns into the umbilical or paraumbilical veins (UV-pattern); into the superior mesenteric vein (SMV-pattern); and into the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV-pattern). The appearance of the EG-pattern was seen most frequently (74.4 per cent). The usefulness of this method for surveying the collateral circulation in portal hypertension, estimating the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding and evaluating its treatments, was suggested by the results of this study. PMID:2674500

  3. Radioisotopic splenoportography in patients with portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-isotopic splenoportography was performed by injecting 99mTcO4-into the spleens of 46 patients with portal hypertension and 14 patients with various disorders not having portal hypertension. No collateral circulation was demonstrated in the 14 patients without portal hypertension whereas some RI-images of portosystemic collaterals were found in 40 (87.0 per cent) of the 46 patients with portal hypertension. Collaterals were divided into an ascending group and a descending group, the appearance rate of ascending collaterals being 80.4 per cent and that of descending collaterals, 41.3 per cent. There were 3 image patterns in the ascending group, namely, an AZ-pattern in which the azygos vein was demonstrated; a SC-pattern in which the RI-bolus ascended along the esophagus to the neck and the subclavian vein; and an EG-pattern which showed stagnation of the RI-bolus in the esophagogastric region. There were 4 patterns in the descending group, namely; a pattern of gastro-renal caval shunt (GR-pattern); reverse flow patterns into the umbilical or paraumbilical veins (UV-pattern); into the superior mesenteric vein (SMV-pattern); and into the inferior mesenteric vein (IMV-pattern). The appearance of the EG-pattern was seen most frequently (74.4 per cent). The usefulness of this method for surveying the collateral circulation in portal hypertension, estimating the risk of esophageal variceal bleeding and evaluating its treatments, was suggested by the results of this study. (author)

  4. Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the completion of construction of KMRR, the facility and technology of radiation application will be greatly improved. This study was performed as follows; (1) Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes. (2) The development of radiation processing technology. (3) The application of Irradiation techniques for food preservation and process improvement. (4) Studies on the radiation application for the development of genetic resources (5) Development of the radioisotope (RI) production facilities for Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR)

  5. Studies on application of radiation and radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Rok; Lee, Ji Bok; Lee, Yeong Iil; Jin, Joon Ha; Beon, Myeong Uh; Park, Kyeong Bae; Han, Heon Soo; Jeong, Yong Sam; Uh, Jong Seop; Kang, Kyeong Cheol; Cho, Han Ok; Song, Hui Seop; Yoon, Byeong Mok; Jeon, Byeong Jin; Park, Hong Sik; Kim, Jae Seong; Jeong, Un Soo; Baek, Sam Tae; Cho, Seong Won; Jeon, Yeong Keon; Kim, Joon Yeon; Kwon, Joong Ho; Kim, Ki Yeop; Yang, Jae Seung; No, Yeong Chang; Lee, Yeong Keun; Shin, Byeong Cheol; Park, Sang Joon; Hong, Kwang Pyo; Cho, Seung Yeon; Kang, Iil Joon; Cho, Seong Ki; Jeong, Yeong Joo; Park, Chun Deuk; Lee, Yeong Koo; Seo, Chun Ha; Han, Kwang Hui; Shin, Hyeon Young; Kim, Jong Kuk; Park, Soon Chul; Shin, In Cheol; Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Ki Un; Lim, Yong Taek; Park, Eung Uh; Kim, Dong Soo; Jeon, Sang Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-05-01

    With the completion of construction of KMRR, the facility and technology of radiation application will be greatly improved. This study was performed as follows; (1) Studies on the production and application of radioisotopes. (2) The development of radiation processing technology. (3) The application of Irradiation techniques for food preservation and process improvement. (4) Studies on the radiation application for the development of genetic resources (5) Development of the radioisotope (RI) production facilities for Korea Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR).

  6. Dietary carbon sources of mussels and tubeworms from Galapagos hydrothermal vents determined from tissue 14C activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an investigation of the dietary carbon sources of mussels and tubeworms from Galapagos hydrothermal vents, using data from 14C and 13C/12C ratio measurements in tissues, are reported. It is shown that: (1) filter-feeding organisms in the vent system are directly or indirectly incorporating 'dead' carbon of magmatic origin into their tissues; (2) approximately 25% or less of the dietary carbon available to the mussels is from sedimenting particulate organic carbon fixed photosynthetically at the surface; and (3) mussel tissue is incorporating relatively more 'dead' dissolved inorganic carbon than is mussel shell carbonate in specimens collected at the same location near the vent. (U.K.)

  7. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-03: Dosimetric Comparison of the Hypoxia Agent Iodoazomycin Arabinoside (IAZA) Labeled with the Radioisotopes I-123, I-131 and I-124

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jans, H-S [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Dept. of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Stypinski, D [Celerion Inc., Lincoln, NE (United States); Mcquarrie, S; Kumar, P; Mercer, J; McEwan, S [Dept. of Oncology, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Wiebe, L [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose to normal organs from the radio-iodinated, hypoxia-binding radiosensitizer iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) for three different isotopes of iodine. Methods: Dosimety studies with normal volunteers had been carried out with [{sup 123}I]IAZA, a drug binding selectively to hypoxic sites. Two other isotopes of iodine, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, offer the opportunity to use IAZA as an agent for radioisotope therapy and as an imaging tracer for Positron Emission Tomography. Radioisotope dosimetry for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I was performed by first deriving from the [{sup 123}I]IAZA studies biological uptake and excretion data. The cumulated activities for {sup 131}I or {sup 124}I where obtained by including their half-lives when integrating the biological data and then extrapolating to infinite time points considering a) physical decay only or b) physical and biological excretion. Doses were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema (OLINDA1.1 code, Vanderbilt 2007). Results: Compared to {sup 123}I, organ doses were elevated on average by a factor 6 and 9 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if both physical decay and biological excretion were modeled. If only physical decay is considered, doses increase by a factor 18 ({sup 131}I) and 19 ({sup 124}I). Highest organ doses were observed in intestinal walls, urinary bladder and thyroid. Effective doses increased by a factor 11 and 14 for {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I, respectively, if biological and physical decay are present. Purely physical decay yields a 23-fold increase over {sup 123}I for both, {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I. Conclusion: Owing to the significant dose increase, caused by their longer half life and the approximately 10 times larger electronic dose deposited in tissue per nuclear decay, normal tissue doses of IAZA labeled with {sup 131}I and {sup 124}I need to be carefully considered when designing imaging and therapy protocols for clinical

  8. SU-E-CAMPUS-I-03: Dosimetric Comparison of the Hypoxia Agent Iodoazomycin Arabinoside (IAZA) Labeled with the Radioisotopes I-123, I-131 and I-124

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare the radiation dose to normal organs from the radio-iodinated, hypoxia-binding radiosensitizer iodoazomycin arabinoside (IAZA) for three different isotopes of iodine. Methods: Dosimety studies with normal volunteers had been carried out with [123I]IAZA, a drug binding selectively to hypoxic sites. Two other isotopes of iodine, 131I and 124I, offer the opportunity to use IAZA as an agent for radioisotope therapy and as an imaging tracer for Positron Emission Tomography. Radioisotope dosimetry for 131I and 124I was performed by first deriving from the [123I]IAZA studies biological uptake and excretion data. The cumulated activities for 131I or 124I where obtained by including their half-lives when integrating the biological data and then extrapolating to infinite time points considering a) physical decay only or b) physical and biological excretion. Doses were calculated using the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema (OLINDA1.1 code, Vanderbilt 2007). Results: Compared to 123I, organ doses were elevated on average by a factor 6 and 9 for 131I and 124I, respectively, if both physical decay and biological excretion were modeled. If only physical decay is considered, doses increase by a factor 18 (131I) and 19 (124I). Highest organ doses were observed in intestinal walls, urinary bladder and thyroid. Effective doses increased by a factor 11 and 14 for 131I and 124I, respectively, if biological and physical decay are present. Purely physical decay yields a 23-fold increase over 123I for both, 131I and 124I. Conclusion: Owing to the significant dose increase, caused by their longer half life and the approximately 10 times larger electronic dose deposited in tissue per nuclear decay, normal tissue doses of IAZA labeled with 131I and 124I need to be carefully considered when designing imaging and therapy protocols for clinical trials. Effective blocking of iodine uptake in the thyroid is essential. Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions (AIHS) and

  9. Medical Radioisotopes Production Without A Nuclear Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Keur, H.

    2010-05-15

    This report is answering the key question: Is it possible to ban the use of research reactors for the production of medical radioisotopes? Chapter 2 offers a summarized overview on the history of nuclear medicine. Chapter 3 gives an overview of the basic principles and understandings of nuclear medicine. The production of radioisotopes and its use in radiopharmaceuticals as a tracer for imaging particular parts of the inside of the human body (diagnosis) or as an agent in radiotherapy. Chapter 4 lists the use of popular medical radioisotopes used in nuclear imaging techniques and radiotherapy. Chapter 5 analyses reactor-based radioisotopes that can be produced by particle accelerators on commercial scale, other alternatives and the advantages of the cyclotron. Chapter 6 gives an overview of recent developments and prospects in worldwide radioisotopes production. Chapter 7 presents discussion, conclusions and recommendations, and is answering the abovementioned key question of this report: Is it possible to ban the use of a nuclear reactor for the production of radiopharmaceuticals? Is a safe and secure production of radioisotopes possible?.

  10. Thirty years history of Japan Radioisotope Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The import of radioisotopes into Japan under occupation was permitted and their utilization was reopened in 1950. The Japan Radioisotope Association was established in May, 1951. At that time, the radioisotope committee in the science and technology administration council handled the import, the spread of utilization and the safety of radioisotopes as the administration authority. In the management of the Association, most attention has been paid to secure the autonomy. The Association is responsible to develop correctly the utilization of radioisotopes, and the autonomy of the Association is indispensable to accomplish it. The first import of isotopes was nine nuclides amounting to $3905, which were used in 25 organizations. In 1980, the Association handled the isotopes totaling 28 billion yen, and about 4500 business establishments used isotopes as of March, 1981. The development of the utilization of radioisotopes during 30 years has been really conspicuous. However, one of the important problems is the treatment of wastes. In order to solve this problem, the understanding of people is a key point. The knowledge of whole nation on atomic energy must be increased. (Kako, I.)

  11. RTD program development for RTD analysis using radioisotope tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CFD(Computational Fluid Dynamics) and the RTD(Residence Time Distribution) models have been investigated to analysis the flow behavior in the reactor. The RTD analysis can be done by the parameters of RTD model which represent the flow behavior and the mixing characteristics of a reactor and the parameters of RTD model can be obtained by fitting the RTD model response to the RTD response obtained from the radioisotope tracer experiment. The numerical approach allows the implementation of time domain-based parameter estimation for the evaluation of RTD model parameters. This project used the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm which was a good convergence and stability in order to determine the parameters of RTD model and this project developed the RTD program to analysis the flow behavior and mixing characteristics by comparing the theoretical MRT(Mean Residence Time). The developed RTD program can utilize the perfect mixer in series model, the perfect mixer in parallel model, and the perfect mixer with dead volume model which are used frequently in the industrial fields. The developed RTD program was made by Visual Basic 6.0 and can be operated in Windows 95/98/me. This developed program enable users to use it easily and analysis precisely by correcting the background radiation and the spontaneous decay of the radioisotope

  12. Development of radioisotope tracer technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Joon Ha; Lee, Myun Joo; Jung, Sung Hee; Park, Soon Chul; Lim, Dong Soon; Kim, Jae Ho; Lee, Jae Choon; Lee, Doo Sung; Cho, Yong Suk; Shin, Sung Kuan

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology in 1999, experiments to estimate the efficiencies of a sludge digester of a waste water treatment plant and a submerged biological reactor of a dye industry were conducted. As a result, the tracer technology for optimization of facilities related to wastewater treatment has been developed and is believed to contribute to improve their operation efficiency. The quantification of the experimental result was attempted to improve the confidence of tracer technology by ECRIN program which basically uses the MCNP simulation principle. Using thin layer activation technique, wear of tappet shim was estimated. Thin layer surface of a tappet shim was irradiated by proton beam and the correlation between the measured activity loss and the amount of wear was established. The equipment was developed to adjust the energy of proton which collides with the surface of tappet. The tracer project team has participated into the tracer test for estimating the efficiency of RFCC system in SK cooperation. From the experiment the tracer team has obtained the primary elements to be considered for judging the efficiency of RFCC unit. By developing the tracer techniques to test huge industrial units like RFCC, the tracer team will be able to support the local industries that require technical services to solve any urgent trouble. (author)

  13. Development of radioisotope tracer technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop the radioisotope tracer technology, which can be used in solving industrial and environmental problems and to build a strong tracer group to support the local industries. In relation to the tracer technology in 1999, experiments to estimate the efficiencies of a sludge digester of a waste water treatment plant and a submerged biological reactor of a dye industry were conducted. As a result, the tracer technology for optimization of facilities related to wastewater treatment has been developed and is believed to contribute to improve their operation efficiency. The quantification of the experimental result was attempted to improve the confidence of tracer technology by ECRIN program which basically uses the MCNP simulation principle. Using thin layer activation technique, wear of tappet shim was estimated. Thin layer surface of a tappet shim was irradiated by proton beam and the correlation between the measured activity loss and the amount of wear was established. The equipment was developed to adjust the energy of proton which collides with the surface of tappet. The tracer project team has participated into the tracer test for estimating the efficiency of RFCC system in SK cooperation. From the experiment the tracer team has obtained the primary elements to be considered for judging the efficiency of RFCC unit. By developing the tracer techniques to test huge industrial units like RFCC, the tracer team will be able to support the local industries that require technical services to solve any urgent trouble. (author)

  14. Early radioisotope uses in Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segovia, N.; Tejera, A.; Bulbulian, S.; Palma, F

    1991-10-15

    Mexico is traditionally a mining country and the first information about the presence of uranium is related to mine exploitation. Around 1945 when uranium became economically important, a rumor had spread that large amounts of black ceramics from Oaxaca were being purchased and sent abroad because of its assumed high uranium content. It was only in 1949 when minerals containing thorium and uranium were declared by law as 'National Reserves'. In those years a radium emanation plant was installed at the 'Hospital General' in Mexico City with the main purpose of carrying out radon seed implantation in tumors. In the fifties a radium dial painting facility was operating in the city of Toluca some 70 km from Mexico City. In 1955, when the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) was founded by a government decree, two main activities were in sight: a training program on 'Radioisotope Techniques and Nuclear Instrumentation' and the creation of specialized laboratories. In this paper a general description of these events and undertakings spanning the decades 1940 to 1970 is given. (Author)

  15. Radioisotopes In Animal Production Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Animal productivity may be measured among others, in terms of two important physiological processes of reproduction and growth each of which involves a number of integrated disciplines. Both physiological processes are controlled by interactions of genotype and environment. Reproduction essentially involves complex physiological processes controlled by secretions of endocrine glands known as hormones. On the other hand growth is determined largely by availabilty of essential nutrients. In order to achieve good reproductive and growth rates adequate and constant nutrition for livestock include pasture, cereals, tubers and their by-products as well as industrial by-products. While reproduction is essential to provide the required number and replacement of livestock, growth guarantees availability of meat. Another aspect of livestock production is disease control. An animal needs a good health to adequately express its genetic make up and utilize available nutrition. Research in animal production is aimed at improving all aspects of productivity of livestock which include reproduction, growth, milk production, egg production, good semen etc. of livestock. In order to achieve this an understanding of the biochemical and physiological processes occurring in the animal itself, and in the feedstuff fed to the animal as well as the aetiology and control of diseases affecting the animal among other factors, is desirable. A number of methods of investigation have evolved with time. These include colorimetry, spectrophotometry, chromatography, microscopy and raidoisotopic tracer methods. While most of these methods are cumbersome and use equipment with low precision, radioisotopic tracer methods utilize equipment with relatively high precision

  16. Early radioisotope uses in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mexico is traditionally a mining country and the first information about the presence of uranium is related to mine exploitation. Around 1945 when uranium became economically important, a rumor had spread that large amounts of black ceramics from Oaxaca were being purchased and sent abroad because of its assumed high uranium content. It was only in 1949 when minerals containing thorium and uranium were declared by law as 'National Reserves'. In those years a radium emanation plant was installed at the 'Hospital General' in Mexico City with the main purpose of carrying out radon seed implantation in tumors. In the fifties a radium dial painting facility was operating in the city of Toluca some 70 km from Mexico City. In 1955, when the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN) was founded by a government decree, two main activities were in sight: a training program on 'Radioisotope Techniques and Nuclear Instrumentation' and the creation of specialized laboratories. In this paper a general description of these events and undertakings spanning the decades 1940 to 1970 is given. (Author)

  17. Artificial radioisotopes in food chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of uranium for nuclear fission involves the risk of environmental contamination by radiation during the processes of mining, concentration, peaceful and military application and storage, reprocessing and waste disposal. Three of the most dangerous radioisotopes have been followed here as they move through four different food chains. The main bottlenecks for fast and massive transfer are for 131I its rather short half life, for 137Cs the defective plant uptake from soil (and much less so also the pathway through the animal body), and for 90Sr its discrimination relative to calcium in several transport processes in the animal body, and its preference for the bone mass. Hence it is often of advantage for man to use animals as an additional food chain. Known exceptions are discussed: the reindeer and karibou living entirely on lichens during the winter and thereby acquiring for 137Cs nearly identical specific activity as plant food, and cow's milk for iodine during a short period after contamination. 15 refs.; 1 figure; 4 tabs

  18. 10 CFR 30.21 - Radioactive drug: Capsules containing carbon-14 urea for “in vivo” diagnostic use for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Radioactive drug: Capsules containing carbon-14 urea for...: Capsules containing carbon-14 urea for “in vivo” diagnostic use for humans. (a) Except as provided in...-14 urea (allowing for nominal variation that may occur during the manufacturing process) each,...

  19. Hofmann elimination of p-nitrophenylethyl-1-C-14-trimethylammonium bromide: a carbon-14 isotope effect study (Preprint no. AR-24)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The alpha carbon isotope effects in the Hofmann elimination of p-nitrophenylethyl-1-C-14-trimethylammonium bromide compound have been measured under changing buffer concentrations with a view to correlate mechanistic change. Since there are alpha-carbon isotope effects and the effects are small it is quite likely that the reaction is of the ElcB type, predominately irreversible, with the incursion of slightly increasing fractions of reaction by the reversible mechanism as the buffer concentration is increased. (author). 4 refs., 2 tab

  20. 14CO2-assimilation, translocation of 14C, and 14C-carbonate uptake in different organs of spring barley plants in relation to adult-plant resistance to powdery mildew

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cultivar Peruvian of spring barley, which is susceptible at all growth stages, and Asse, which exhibits adult-plant resistance to powdery mildew, were compared in 14CO2 assimilation, distribution of 14C, and 14C-carbonate uptake in different organs of healthy and infected plants. The reduction of 14CO2 assimilation in infected plants at the first and fourth leaf stages was greater in Peruvian than in Asse. In Peruvian, the 14C which was fixed by the infected third leaf of plants with mildew on the lower 3 leaves remained in the third leaves with very little translocation to other parts of the plant. Infection of the lower three leaves at the fourth leaf stage reduced 14CO2 assimilation in noninfected fourth leaves of Asse less than that of Peruvian, but the flow of 14C from the healthy fourth leaves into other plant parts such as leaf sheaths was markedly stimulated in Peruvian compared to Asse. Infection also reduced the uptake of 14C-carbonate by seedling roots, the reduction being greater in Peruvian than Asse. A greater proportion of the 14C absorbed by roots of Asse was translocated to the infected leaves than that of Peruvian. It was concluded that powdery mildew disrupted the normal pattern of photosynthesis and translocation of metabolites in a susceptible cultivar more markedly than in an adult-plant-resistant cultivar of spring barley. (author)

  1. A small low energy cyclotron for radioisotope measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Direct detection of 14C by accelerator mass spectrometry has proved to be a much more sensitive method for radiocarbon dating than the decay counting method invented earlier by Libby. A small cyclotron (the ''cyclotrino'') was proposed for direct detection of radiocarbon in 1980. This combined the suppression of background through the use of negative ions, which had been used effectively in tandem accelerators, with the high intrinsic mass resolution of a cyclotron. Development of a small electrostatically-focused cyclotron for use as a mass spectrometer was previously reported but the sensitivity needed for detection of 14C at natural abundance was not achieved. The major contributions of this work are the integration of a high current external ion source with a small flat-field, electrostatically-focused cyclotron to comprise a system capable of measuring 14C at natural levels, and the analysis of ion motion in such a cyclotron, including a detailed analysis of phase bunching and its effect on mass resolution. A high current cesium sputter negative ion source generates a beam of carbon ions which is pre-separated with a Wien filter and is transported to the cyclotron via a series of electrostatic lenses. Beam is injected radially into the cyclotron using electrostatic deflectors and an electrostatic mirror. Axial focusing is entirely electrostatic. A microchannel plate detector is used with a phase-grated output. In its present form the system is capable of improving the sensitivity of detecting 14C in some biomedical experiments by a factor of 104. Modifications are discussed which could bring about an additional factor of 100 in sensitivity, which is important for archaeological and geological applications. Possibilities for measurements of other isotopes, such as 3H, and 10Be, and 26Al, are discussed. 70 refs

  2. Radioisotopes production for applications on the health; Produccion de radioisotopos para aplicaciones en la salud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monroy G, F.; Alanis M, J., E-mail: fabiola.monroy@inin.gob.m [ININ, Departamento de Materiales Radiactivos, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    In the Radioactive Materials Department of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) processes have been studied and developed for the radioisotopes production of interest in the medicine, research, industry and agriculture. In particular five new processes have been developed in the last 10 years by the group of the Radioactive Materials Research Laboratory to produce: {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators, the radio lanthanides: {sup 151}Pm, {sup 147}Pm, {sup 161}Tb, {sup 166}Ho, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 131}I and the {sup 32}P. All these radioisotopes are artificial and they can be produced in nuclear reactors and some of them in particle accelerators. The radioisotope generators are of particular interest, as those of {sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re presented in this work, because they are systems that allow to produce an artificial radioisotope of interest continually, in these cases the {sup 99m}Tc and the {sup 188}Re, without the necessity of having a nuclear reactor or an particle accelerator. They are compact systems armored and sure perfectly of manipulating that, once the radioactive material has decayed, they do not present radiological risk some for the environment and the population. These systems are therefore of supreme utility in places where it is not had nuclear reactors or with a continuous radioisotope supply, due to their time of decaying, for its cost or for logistical problems in their supply, like it is the case of many hospital centers, of research or industries in our country. (Author)

  3. Carbon-14, tritium, stable isotope and chemical measurements on thermal waters from the Tauranga region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical compositions of groundwater from the Tauranga region are affected to varying degrees by reducing conditions due to buried organic matter. The levels of some dissolved constituents are also affected by mixing with sea water contained within the rocks and by rock-water interaction. Dissolved gas compositions range from oxygen-bearing to methane-bearing reflecting the varying redox conditions. Excess air may be present but further experiments are necessary to confirm this. Apparent ages deduced from carbon-14 measurements (corrected using 12C dilution and 13C fractionation methods) range from 2-25,000 years, suggesting that some of the waters were recharged during late Pleistocene or early Holocene time. ΔD and Δ18 O values of the oldest waters are slightly more negative than those of younger samples; this may indicate recharge during a cooler climate, in agreement with the 14C ages. Very low but significantly non-zero tritium contents (TR=(0.007-0.059)+-0.007) were measured using the high tritium-enrichment facilities at INS and the very low-background counters at the University of Bern. The tritium is thought to derive from contamination or nuclear reactions in the aquifer rocks rather than from recharge water

  4. Radioisotope Production for Medical and Physics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mausner, Leonard

    2012-10-01

    Radioisotopes are critical to the science and technology base of the US. Discoveries and applications made as a result of the availability of radioisotopes span widely from medicine, biology, physics, chemistry and homeland security. The clinical use of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis is the largest sector of use, with about 16 million procedures a year in the US. The use of ^99Mo/^99mTc generator and ^18F make up the majority, but ^201Tl, ^123I, ^111In, and ^67Ga are also used routinely to perform imaging of organ function. Application of radioisotopes for therapy is dominated by use of ^131I for thyroid malignancies, ^90Y for some solid tumors, and ^89Sr for bone cancer, but production of several more exotic species such as ^225Ac and ^211At are of significant current research interest. In physics ^225Ra is of interest for CP violation studies, and the actinides ^242Am, ^249Bk, and ^254Es are needed as targets for experiments to create superheavy elements. Large amounts of ^252Cf are needed as a fission source for the CARIBU experiment at ANL. The process of radioisotope production is multidisciplinary. Nuclear physics input based on nuclear reaction excitation function data is needed to choose an optimum target/projectile in order to maximize desired isotope production and minimize unwanted byproducts. Mechanical engineering is needed to address issues of target heating, induced mechanical stress and material compatibility of target and claddings. Radiochemists are involved as well since chemical separation to purify the desired final radioisotope product from the bulk target and impurities is also usually necessary. Most neutron rich species are produced at a few government and university reactors. Other radioisotopes are produced in cyclotrons in the commercial sector, university/hospital based facilities, and larger devices at the DOE labs. The landscape of US facilities, the techniques involved, and current supply challenges will be reviewed.

  5. In vivo uptake of carbon-14-colchicine for identification of tumor multidrug resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehta, B.M.; Rosa, E.; Biedler, J.L. [Nuclear Medicine Research Lab., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-07-01

    A major limitation in the treatment of cancer with natural product chemotherapeutic agents is the development of multidrug resistance (MDR). Multidrug resistance is attributed to enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance gene MDR1. Colchicine (CHC) is known to be one of the MDR drugs. The authors have previously demonstrated that it is possible to distinguish multidrug resistant tumors from the multidrug-sensitive tumors in vivo on the basis of tritium ({sup 3}H) uptake following injection of {sup 3}H-CHC. The present studies were carried out in xenografted animals using {sup 14}C-CHC which may be more indicative of {sup 11}C-labeled CHC distribution with regard to circulating metabolites, since metabolic processes following injection of (ring C, methoxy-{sup 11}C)-CHC may produce significant amounts of circulating 1l-carbon fragments (i.e., methanol and/or formaldehyde). Experiments were carried out at a dose of 2 mg/kg. Activity concentration per injected dose was approximately twice as great in sensitive as in resistant tumors (p < 0.05) at 60 min following intravenous injection of {sup 14}C-CHC. About 75% of total activity was CHC in the sensitive tumors. The findings are further confirmed by the quantitative autoradiographic evaluation of resistant and sensitive tumors. These studies confirm our previous observations that it is possible to noninvasively distinguish multidrug-resistant tumors from sensitive tumors in vivo based on uptake of an injected MDR drug using a{sup 14}C-labeled CHC at the same position and of comparable specific activity to a {sup 11}C-CHC tracer used for PET imaging. 16 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Nuclear Data for Medical Radioisotope Production by Means of Accelerator Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of the features outlined, JAEA staff will produce the medical radioisotopes of 99Mo, 90Y, 64Cu, and 67Cu from a neutron beam generated by the natC(d,n) reaction. One of the unique features of the proposal is the capability to produce all of the above-mentioned medical radioisotopes by means of accelerator neutrons. Thus, the natC(d,n) reaction produces fast neutrons possessing an energy spectrum up to 40 MeV with a most probable energy of 14 MeV that can be used to measure the production yields of 99Mo, 90Y,

  7. Recent BES results on charmonium decays

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Chang-Zheng

    2007-01-01

    In this talk, we present the recent results on charmonium decays from the BES experiment at the BEPC collider. The analyses are based on a 14 million psi(2S) events data sample. We report results on leptonic decays, hadronic decays, and radiative decays of psi(2S), as well as hadronic decays of chi_cJ states and rare or forbidden decays of J/psi.

  8. Visualization of Uptake of Mineral Elements and the Dynamics of Photosynthates in Arabidopsis by a Newly Developed Real-Time Radioisotope Imaging System (RRIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugita, Ryohei; Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Hirose, Atsushi; Saito, Takayuki; Iwata, Ren; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2016-04-01

    Minerals and photosynthates are essential for many plant processes, but their imaging in live plants is difficult. We have developed a method for their live imaging in Arabidopsis using a real-time radioisotope imaging system. When each radioisotope,(22)Na,(28)Mg,(32)P-phosphate,(35)S-sulfate,(42)K,(45)Ca,(54)Mn and(137)Cs, was employed as an ion tracer, ion movement from root to shoot over 24 h was clearly observed. The movements of(22)Na,(42)K,(32)P,(35)S and(137)Cs were fast so that they spread to the tip of stems. In contrast, high accumulation of(28)Mg,(45)Ca and(54)Mn was found in the basal part of the main stem. Based on this time-course analysis, the velocity of ion movement in the main stem was calculated, and found to be fastest for S and K among the ions we tested in this study. Furthermore, application of a heat-girdling treatment allowed determination of individual ion movement via xylem flow alone, excluding phloem flow, within the main stem of 43-day-old Arabidopsis inflorescences. We also successfully developed a new system for visualizing photosynthates using labeled carbon dioxide,(14)CO2 Using this system, the switching of source/sink organs and phloem flow direction could be monitored in parts of whole shoots and over time. In roots,(14)C photosynthates accumulated intensively in the growing root tip area, 200-800 µm behind the meristem. These results show that this real-time radioisotope imaging system allows visualization of many nuclides over a long time-course and thus constitutes a powerful tool for the analysis of various physiological phenomena. PMID:27016100

  9. Diffusion-type model of the global carbon cycle for the estimation of dose to the world population from releases of carbon-14 to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nonlinear dynamic model of the exchange of carbon among the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere, and ocean is described and applied to estimating the radiation dose to the world's population from the release of 14C to the atmosphere from the nuclear power industry. A computer implementation of the model, written in the IBM Continuous System Modeling Program III (CSMP III) simulation language, is presented. The model treats the ocean as a diffusive medium with respect to vertical transport of carbon, and the nonlinear variation of CO2 partial pressure with the total inorganic carbon concentration in surface waters is taken into account in calculating the transfer rate from ocean to atmosphere. Transfers between the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere are represented by nonlinear equations which consider CO2 fertilization and impose a constraint on the ultimate total carbon mass in the biosphere

  10. Diagnostic value of radioisotopic cystography in evaluation of VUR in children with urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope scanning is very important in evaluation, diagnosis and proper treatment of urinary tract infection and vesico ureteral reflux because of high sensitivity of this technique and less radiation dose delivered to the patients. This is a descriptive cross-sectional study to determine the frequency vesico ureteral reflux in a group of children aged 28 days to 14 years referred to our department with diagnosis of urinary tract infection .The radioisotope scanning was conducted for all of patients (30 patients) and the results were analyzed. The results showed that urinary tract infection is seen in wide age group and is usually associated with vesico ureteral reflux . The above findings revealed the important role of radioisotope scanning in early diagnosis and subsequent treatment of urinary tract infection to detect vesico ureteral reflux and prevent subsequent side effects in these patients

  11. Carbon-14 dating of a mummy from 'Caverna da Babilonia', Rio Novo Country, south of Minas Gerais (MG, Brazil)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vegetable fibers of a cloth wrapping a mummy of a woman, found in 'Caverna da Babilonia' (MG, Brazil), were dated with carbon-14. There is strong evidence that it is a pre-colombian mummym since the age of the sample is 600 + - 80 years (1σ). (C.L.B.)

  12. RADIOISOTOPE INVENTORY FOR TSPA-SR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Leigh; R. Rechard

    2001-01-30

    The total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR), on Yucca Mountain, as a site (if suitable) for disposal of radioactive waste, consists of several models. The Waste Form Degradation Model (i.e, source term) of the TSPA-SR, in turn, consists of several components. The Inventory Component, discussed here, defines the inventory of 26 radioisotopes for three representative waste categories: (1) commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), (2) US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and (3) high-level waste (HLW). These three categories are contained and disposed of in two types of waste packages (WPs)--CSNF WPs and co-disposal WPs, with the latter containing both DSNF and HLW. Three topics are summarized in this paper: first, the transport of radioisotopes evaluated in the past; second, the development of the inventory for the two WP types; and third, the selection of the most important radioisotopes to track in TSPA-SR.

  13. RADIOISOTOPE INVENTORY FOR TSPA-SR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total system performance assessment for site recommendation (TSPA-SR), on Yucca Mountain, as a site (if suitable) for disposal of radioactive waste, consists of several models. The Waste Form Degradation Model (i.e, source term) of the TSPA-SR, in turn, consists of several components. The Inventory Component, discussed here, defines the inventory of 26 radioisotopes for three representative waste categories: (1) commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), (2) US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and (3) high-level waste (HLW). These three categories are contained and disposed of in two types of waste packages (WPs)--CSNF WPs and co-disposal WPs, with the latter containing both DSNF and HLW. Three topics are summarized in this paper: first, the transport of radioisotopes evaluated in the past; second, the development of the inventory for the two WP types; and third, the selection of the most important radioisotopes to track in TSPA-SR

  14. Release of (14)C-labelled carbon nanotubes from polycarbonate composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhiem, Stefan; Barthel, Anne-Kathrin; Meyer-Plath, Asmus; Hennig, Michael P; Wachtendorf, Volker; Sturm, Heinz; Schäffer, Andreas; Maes, Hanna M

    2016-08-01

    Waste disposal of carbon nanotube (CNT) containing products is expected to be the most important pathway for release of CNTs into the environment. In the present work, the use of radiolabelled CNTs ((14)C-CNT) for polycarbonate polymer nanocomposites with 1 wt% (14)C-CNT content allowed for the first time to quantify and differentiate the CNT release according to the type of impact along the materials' ageing history. After an initial exposure of the nanocomposite by solar-like irradiation, further environmental impacts were applied to composite material. They aimed at mimicking disposal site conditions that may induce further ageing effects and CNT release. This study included shaking in water, rapid temperature changes, soaking in humic acid solution as well as waste water effluent, and, finally, gentle mechanical abrasion. All ageing impacts were applied sequentially, both on pristine (control) and on solar-irradiated nanocomposites. All experiments were accompanied by absolute quantification of radioactive release as well as chemical and morphological analyses of the nanocomposite surfaces using infra-red (IR) spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The morphological analysis showed that spectral irradiation can uncover CNT networks on the outer nanocomposite surface layers by polymer degradation. After having subjected the solar-irradiated nanocomposite to all studied disposal site effect, the total radioactive release was quantified to amount to 64 mg CNT/m(2), whereas only 0.8 mg CNT/m(2) were found for the un-irradiated control sample. Solar degradation of polymers was thus found to significantly increase the propensity of the studied polymer nanocomposites to release CNTs during ageing effects at the product's end-of-life typical for disposal sites. PMID:27194367

  15. Distribution of {delta}{sup 14}C in western North Pacific and tracing carbons of human origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aramaki, Takafumi; Mizushima, Toshihiko; Togawa, Orihiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Mutsu, Aomori (Japan). Mutsu Establishment; Watanabe, Shuichi; Tsunogai, Shizuo [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Kuji, Tomoyuki [Japan marine Sience Fundation, Mutsu, Aomori (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Seawater were collected at six points, 0deg to 48degN around 165degE. Dissolved inorganic carbonates was reduced into graphite. The ratio C-11/C-12 was measured by the accelerator mass analyzer. {sup 14}C concentration was calculated from {delta}{sup 13}C value calculated from the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio. {sup 14}C resulting from the nuclear weapon test was calculated by comparing estimated {sup 14}C and real {sup 14}C concentration. It was compared with that in 1970s. {sup 14}Cbomb has dissolved into North Pacific Intermediate Water in Arctic latitude, which has moved to Mid-latitude. (A. Yamamoto)

  16. Carbon and Oxygen Isotopic Stratigraphy of Mesoproterozoic Carbonate Sequences (1.6–1.4 Ga from Yanshan in North China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuang Hongwei

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In Yanshan, located in the northern part of North China, Mesoproterozoic carbonate sequences (1.6–1.4 Ga form a 10, 000 m thick succession in an aulacogen basin. Carbon and oxygen isotope (δ13O and δ18O, resp. data were obtained from 110 carbonate samples across three sections of these Mesoproterozoic deposits. From the early to late Mesoproterozoic, low negative values of δ13O appear, followed by low positive variation and then a stable increase. An abrupt decrease in δ13O values, with subsequent rapid increase, is found at the end of the Mesoproterozoic. During the whole Mesoproterozoic, δ18O shows a mainly negative trend and occasional highly negative isotopic shifts (from lower to upper deposits. Whole-rock carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions and profiles must be studied to provide a paleogeochemical record that can be associated with paleocean sedimentary environments, temperature, biological productivity, and sea-level fluctuations. Results of the present study correlate well with other international carbon and oxygen isotope profiles, suggesting that a global marine geochemical system existed during the interval of 1.6–1.4 Ga under a globally united tectonic, sedimentary, and geochemical background.

  17. Industrial applications of radioisotope techniques in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general review of applications of radioisotope techniques in the Polish industry for about 25 years is given. The radiotracer methods used in metallurgy, hydrometallurgy, glass industry, oil and petroleum industries, in material testing and in other industries are described. Neutron activation analysis methods as well as nuclear gauges for industry (thickness meters, density meters, conveyer belt weigher, acid concentration meters and others) are also presented. The economic advantages of industrial applications of radioisotope techniques are described too. 42 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs. (author)

  18. Radioisotope producer reactor: technical report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes activities in the year of 1991 related the Project of a New Conception for the Radioisotope Producer reactor (RPR). Results as well as proposals for future studies are presented. Chapter 1 describes investigations performed for the conception of the reactor core. Chapters 2 and 3 contain preliminary results of thermal-hydraulic calculations and accident analysis respectively. Chapter 4 describes the aspects of production of 99 Mo in the RPR, concluding the body of the paper. This initial effort will continue with the Radioisotope Producer Reactor Conceptual Project, to be carried out during the year of 92. (author)

  19. Radioisotopes in non-destructive testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After defining nondestructive testing (NDT) and comparing this concept with destructive testing, a short description is given of NDT methods other than radiologic. The basic concepts of radiologic methods are discussed and the principles of radiography are explained. Radiation sources and gamma radiography machines are next reviewed and radiographic inspection of weldings and castings is described. A brief description is given of the radiographic darkroom and accessories. Other radioisotope methods, such as neutron radiography, are shortly reviewed. Cost estimations for radioisotopic equipment conclude the report. (author)

  20. Multimolecular tracers of terrestrial carbon transfer across the pan-Arctic: 14C characteristics of sedimentary carbon components and their environmental controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaojuan; Gustafsson, Örjan; Holmes, R. Max; Vonk, Jorien E.; Dongen, Bart E.; Semiletov, Igor P.; Dudarev, Oleg V.; Yunker, Mark B.; Macdonald, Robie W.; Wacker, Lukas; Montluçon, Daniel B.; Eglinton, Timothy I.

    2015-11-01

    Distinguishing the sources, ages, and fate of various terrestrial organic carbon (OC) pools mobilized from heterogeneous Arctic landscapes is key to assessing climatic impacts on the fluvial release of carbon from permafrost. Through molecular 14C measurements, including novel analyses of suberin- and/or cutin-derived diacids (DAs) and hydroxy fatty acids (FAs), we compared the radiocarbon characteristics of a comprehensive suite of terrestrial markers (including plant wax lipids, cutin, suberin, lignin, and hydroxy phenols) in the sedimentary particles from nine major arctic and subarctic rivers in order to establish a benchmark assessment of the mobilization patterns of terrestrial OC pools across the pan-Arctic. Terrestrial lipids, including suberin-derived longer-chain DAs (C24,26,28), plant wax FAs (C24,26,28), and n-alkanes (C27,29,31), incorporated significant inputs of aged carbon, presumably from deeper soil horizons. Mobilization and translocation of these "old" terrestrial carbon components was dependent on nonlinear processes associated with permafrost distributions. By contrast, shorter-chain (C16,18) DAs and lignin phenols (as well as hydroxy phenols in rivers outside eastern Eurasian Arctic) were much more enriched in 14C, suggesting incorporation of relatively young carbon supplied by runoff processes from recent vegetation debris and surface layers. Furthermore, the radiocarbon content of terrestrial markers is heavily influenced by specific OC sources and degradation status. Overall, multitracer molecular 14C analysis sheds new light on the mobilization of terrestrial OC from arctic watersheds. Our findings of distinct ages for various terrestrial carbon components may aid in elucidating fate of different terrestrial OC pools in the face of increasing arctic permafrost thaw.

  1. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope production and distribution activities by facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Idaho Operations Office, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Savannah River Laboratory, and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. are listed. The information is divided into five sections: isotope suppliers, facility, contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customs numbers; geographical location of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1982

  2. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.

    1984-08-01

    This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Plant; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: isotope suppliers, facility contacts, and isotopes or services supplied; lists of customers, suppliers and isotopes purchased; list of isotopes purchased cross-referenced to customer codes; geographic locations of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers - FY 1983.

  3. The progress of radioisotope technology and application in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jinrong; Luo Zhifu

    2008-01-01

    The inception of radioisotope and its application in China are introduced. The research, development, produc-tion, application progress and the future development prospect of radioisotope and its products are described.

  4. Optimization of liquid scintillation counting techniques for the determination of carbon-14 in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this work was to optimize the liquid scintillation counting techniques for the determination of 14C in stack effluent gases and in environmental samples such as biological and air samples. Carbon-14 activities in most environmental samples were measured with the direct CO2 absorption method. The highest figures of merit were found through the variation of Carbosorb E and Permafluor V ratio, and measurement windows. The best condition was an 1:1 volume ratio. Average 2.35 g of CO2 was reproducibly absorbed in the 20 ml mixture within 40 minutes. The counting efficiency determined by repeated analysis of NIST oxalic acid standard and the background count rate were measured to be 58.8±1.4% and 1.88±0.06 cpm, respectively, in case of saturated solution. The correction curves of counting efficiency for partially saturated solutions and for saturated solutions with quenching were prepared, respectively. The overall uncertainty of the sample specific activity for near background levels was estimated to be about 7% for 4 hours counting at 95% confidence level. Stack effluent gas samples were measured by a gel suspension counting method. After precipitation of CO2 in the form of BaCO3, 140 mg of which was mixed with 6 ml H2O and 12 ml of Instagel XF. The counting efficiency was measured to be 71.5±1.7% and the typical sensitivity of this technique was about 510 mBq/m3 for a 100 min count at a background count rate of 4.7 cpm. For the benzene counting method measurements were performed with a mixture of 3 ml benzene and 1 ml of scintillation cocktail (5 g of butyl-PBD in 100 ml of scintillation-grade toluene) in a low potassium 7 ml borosilicate glass vial. The counting efficiency and the background count rate were measured to be 64.3±1.0% and 0.51±0.05 cpm, respectively. The long-term stability of samples has been checked for all the counting techniques over a two week period, during which no apparent change in counting efficiency and background level was

  5. The history of ironware in Japan revealed by the AMS-carbon 14 age method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper focuses on the influence what the AMS-carbon 14 age method attains to the history of the iron in the Japanese Islands. The research team in National Museum of Japanese History makes a clear that the Yayoi period began in 10 Cen. cal BC. However, there was a problem in this. It is iron. If the Yayoi period has started in the 10th Cen. BC, it means that the ironware in Japanese Islands had spread early rather than it spreads in China. The research team reexamined the ironware excavated from Magarita site in the Fukuoka Pref. considered to be the oldest ironware in Japan. Consequently, the excavation situation was indefinite and it turned out that we cannot specify the time to belong. Furthermore, 36 ironwares in the initial and early Yayoi were also already found by that time cannot be specified except for two points. Therefore, it turned out that Japanese ironware appeared in the 3rd century of B.C. What does this mean? Although it had been thought that the beginning of agriculture in Japan and the appearance of ironware were simultaneous, it turned out that agriculture has appeared early about in 700 years. Therefore, it became clear that agriculture of Japan started at the Stone Age. (author)

  6. Automatic counting and recording unit used for dating by the carbon 14 method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the unit used by the 'Centre Scientifique de Monaco' for low-level beta counting and fitted for radioactive dating by the Carbon 14 method. Built entirely by the laboratory in 1964, on the basis of electronic techniques then recent, it has worked without failure since that time. The proportional counter, its high-voltage negative supply, and the counting chains with visual and printing records are detailed by means of 38 figures which reproduce the counter and the electronic circuits. These are contained in two standard 5 U.I structures. The low-voltage power supply of the whole unit is carried out by plus 12 volts and minus 12 volts storage batteries, buffered on a charger connected on the 110 V alternative line. The proportional counter described is filled with CO2 under one atmosphere pressure and permits the dating of carbonaceous samples with a maximum of 30.000 + 1.000 years (background 3.96 c.p.m. ) within a moderate time (72 hours). (authors)

  7. radioisotopes production in the ETRR-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the present work was carried out to study the production of a variety of reactor produced radioisotopes via neutrons interactions with specified targets in the 22 MW ETRR-2 research reactor, egypt, compared with the 2 MW IRI, netherlands, and 2 MW ETRR-1, egypt, research reactors. no carrier added radionuclides of 131 Cs (T1/2=9,69 d), 166 Ho (T1/2=26.7 h), 67 Cu(T1/2=2.5 7 d) and 47Sc(T1/2=3.34 d) were produced by thermal neutrons interactions via 130 Ba(n,γ ) 131 Ba (β decay) 131 Cs and 164Dy(2 n,γ ) 166 Dy (βdecay) 166 Ho and fast neutrons interactions via 47 Ti(n,p) 47Sc and 67Zn(n,p) 67 Cu nuclear reactions , respectively. chemical processing was conducted using the sulfate precipitation method and dowex 2 x 8 (cl-). anion exchange, Dowex AGW 50 x 8 (H+), cation exchange and dowex AGW 50 x 8 (H+) reversed phase hplc chromatographic methods for separation of 131cs, 67cu, 47sc and 166 Ho from the barium , zinc, titanium, and dysprosium targets, respectively. the percent yields of 131 Cs, 67Cu, 47Sc and 166 Ho were found to be ∼ 91,90,98 and 42.7% respectively

  8. Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, 3H, 14C, 60Co, 79Se, 90Sr, 99Tc as pertechnetate, 106Ru/Rh, 125Sb, 134Cs, 137Cs, 152Eu, 154Eu, 155Eu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu, 241Am, 242Cm, and 243+244Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for 237Np, 239Pu, 240Pu, 99Tc, 126Sn, 129I, 231Pa, 233U, 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, 241AMU, 242AMU, 243AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO2, NO3, PO4, SO4, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all contract limits (molar ratio of analyte to sodium or ratio of becquerels of analyte to moles of sodium) defined in Specification 7 for Envelope A. Except for a few cases, the characterization results met or surpassed the

  9. Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SK Fiskum; PR Bredt; JA Campbell; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; GJ Lumetta; GM Mong; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist; RG Swoboda; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

    2000-06-28

    Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 79}Se, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc as pertechnetate, {sup 106}Ru/Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, and {sup 243+244}Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}AMU, {sup 242}AMU, {sup 243}AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all

  10. Validation of a simplified carbon-14-urea breath test for routine use for detecting Helicobacter pylori noninvasively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A carbon-14 (14C) urea breath test for detecting Helicobacter pylori with multiple breath sampling was developed. Carbon-14-urea (110 kBq) administered orally to 18 normal subjects and to 82 patients with Helicobacter infection. The exhaled 14C-labeled CO2 was trapped at 10-min intervals for 90 min. The total 14C activity exhaled over 90 min was integrated and expressed in %activity of the total dose given. In normals, a mean of 0.59% +/- 0.24% was measured, resulting in an upper limit of normal of 1.07%. In 82 patients, a sensitivity of 90.2%, a specificity of 83.8%, and a positive predictive value of 90.2% was found. The single probes at intervals of 40-60 min correlated best with the integrated result, with r ranging from 0.986 to 0.990. The test's diagnostic accuracy did not change at all when reevaluated with the 40-, 50-, or 60-min sample data alone. Thus, the 14C-urea breath test can be applied routinely as a noninvasive, low-cost and one-sample test with high diagnostic accuracy in detecting Helicobacter pylori colonization

  11. Structure and manual of radioisotope-production data base, ISOP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We planned on collecting the information of radioisotope production which was obtained from research works and tasks at the Department of Radioisotopes in JAERI, and constructed a proto-type data base ISOP after discussion of the kinds and properties of the information available for radioisotope production. In this report the structure and the manual of ISOP are described. (author)

  12. Carbon transfer between 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo alloy and austenitic steels (experiments in anisothermal loops)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies on carbon transfer between the ferritic steel 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo and the austenitic steels 316L and 321H have shown that there is not any measurable carbon transfer in the operating conditions of the secondary circuit of PHENIX (475 deg C was the maximal temperature of the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel). A significant carbon transfer has been observed between the ferritic steel and the 316L steel when the 321H was replaced by the 2 1/4 Cr 1 Mo steel in the same thermohydraulic conditions (the ferritic steel was then used up to 545 deg C). This experiment has demonstrated the importance of the temperature and the initial carbon content of the ferritic steel as parameters in the decarburization process. It appears that decarburization may not be sensitive to the thermohydraulic conditions at least in the range investigated in those experiments. In the other hand the 316L steel is observed to have been carburized, the degree of carburization remaining appreciably constant and independent on the temperature between 400 deg C and 550 deg C

  13. Evaluation of two decomposition schemes in Earth System Models against LIDET, C14 observations and global soil carbon maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciuto, D. M.; Yang, X.; Thornton, P. E.

    2015-12-01

    Soils contain the largest pool of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. Soil carbon dynamics and associated nutrient dynamics play significant roles in regulating global carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Our capability to predict future climate change depends to a large extent on a well-constrained representation of soil carbon dynamics in ESMs. Here we evaluate two decomposition schemes - converging trophic cascade (CTC) and Century - in CLM4.5/ACME V0 using data from the long-term intersite decomposition experiment team (LIDET), radiocarbon (14C) observations, and Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD). For the evaluation against LIDET, We exercise the full CLM4.5/ ACME V0 land model, including seasonal variability in nitrogen limitation and environmental scalars (temperature, moisture, O2), in order to represent LIDET experiment in a realistic way. We show that the proper design of model experiments is crucial to model evaluation using data from field experiments such as LIDET. We also use 14C profile data at 10 sites to evaluate the performance of CTC and CENTURY decomposition scheme. We find that the 14C profiles at these sites are most sensitive to the depth dependent decomposition parameters, consistent with previous studies.

  14. Measurement of Carbon Fixation Rates in Leaf Samples — Use of carbon-14 labeled sodium bicarbonate to estimate photosynthetic rates

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Author: David R. Caprette ### Generation of a Light Curve To address the hypothesis concerning photosynthetic efficiency it is necessary to expose sun and shade leaves to a range of light intensities long enough for them to fix significant amounts of carbon. It is necessary to expose identical surface areas under favorable conditions which are identical for all leaves except for light intensity (the experimental variable). A means of measuring the rate of carbon fixation is also neces...

  15. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sixteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboraory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; (2) alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; (3) alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; (4) geographical location of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1980

  16. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fifteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Division of Financial Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rocky Flats Area Office; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: Isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographical location of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1979

  17. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlison, J.S. (comp.)

    1980-06-01

    The fifteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Division of Financial Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Rocky Flats Area Office; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: Isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; geographical location of radioisotope customers; and radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1979.

  18. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlison, J.S. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    The sixteenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboraory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; (2) alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; (3) alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; (4) geographical location of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1980.

  19. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seventeenth edition of the radioisotope customer list was prepared at the request of the Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, Department of Energy (DOE). This document lists DOE's radioisotope production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory: Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc. The information is divided into five sections: (1) isotope suppliers, facility, contracts and isotopes or services supplied; (2) alphabetical list of customers, and isotopes purchased; (3) alphabetical list of isotopes cross-referenced to customer numbers; (4) geographical location of radioisotope customers; and (5) radioisotope sales and transfers-FY 1980

  20. How to find out in radioisotope methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is dealt with in sections entitled: tracing books by topic; radioisotope methodology cross reference structure; finding a review; journals and how to trace journal articles; abstract; theses and dissertations; research and development reports; critical reviews and information summaries; data books; dictionaries and encyclopedias; guides to the literature; whom to contact; expert advice, research in progress, institutions. (U.K.)

  1. Fuel selection for radioisotope thermoelectric generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The availability of Radioisotope Thermoeletric Generator fuels is evaluated based on the amount of fuel discharged from selected power reactors. In general, the best alternatives are either to use Plutonium-238 produced by irradiation of Neptunium-237 generated in typical thermal reactors or to use Curium-244 directly separated from the discharged fuels of fast or thermal reactors. (author)

  2. Radioisotope methods for cardio-rehabilitation diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-cardiography, radio-cyclography, and radioisotopic examinations of the pulmonary and coronary circulation are reviewed, including the instruments and labelled compounds applied to the measurements. The indications, the normal values and the information provided by the different methods are reported with special emphasis on ischaemic diseases, myocardial infarction and valve disorders. (L.E.)

  3. Application of artificial radioisotopes in hydrological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article, various applications of the artificial radioisotopes in surface water and groundwater investigations are briefly reviewed with a few recent case studies. They are found to be extremely useful in understanding the hydrological processes and obtaining pertinent parameters such as dilution factors, dispersion coefficients, rate of sediment transport in surface waters and recharge rate, velocity and flow direction in groundwater systems. (author)

  4. Radioisotopes and food preservation against insects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book describes how to preserve food from harmful insects by using radioisotopes. It focusses on the impact of ionized radiation on the different stages of insect growth and on its metabolism and immunity. It also discusses the relationship between radiation doses and insect reproduction. It explains the various methods to detect the irradiated foods

  5. The industrial application of radioisotopes in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 10 years, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission has conducted a wide-ranging program of radioisotope applications to solve industrial problems of local, regional or national importance. Most of the investigations have been concerned with the behaviour of large complex systems. Broadly, the work covers such economically important fields as flow studies, environmental studies and coastal engineering studies. (author)

  6. Development of radioisotope production in the Philippines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabalfin, E.G. [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon (Philippines)

    1998-10-01

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) started its activities on radioisotope production more than three decades ago, when the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) started operating at its full rated power of 1 MW. Since then, several radionuclides in different chemical forms, were routinely produced and supplied for use in nuclear medicine, industry, agriculture, research and training, until the conversion of the PRR-1 to a 3 MW TRIGA type reactor. After the criticality test of the upgraded reactor, a leak was discovered in the pool liner. With the repair of the reactor still ongoing, routine radioisotope production activities have been reduced to dispensing of imported bulk {sup 131}I. In the Philippines, radioisotopes are widely used in nuclear medicine, with {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc as the major radionuclides of interest. Thus the present radioisotope production program of PNRI is directed to meet this demand. With the technical assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), PNRI is setting up a new {sup 131}I production facility. The in-cell equipment have been installed and tested using both inactive and active target, obtained from BATAN, Indonesia. In order to meet the need of producing {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc generators, based on low specific activity reactor-produced {sup 99}Mo, research and development work on the preparation of {sup 99m}Tc gel generators is ongoing. (author)

  7. Development of radioisotope production in the Philippines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) started its activities on radioisotope production more than three decades ago, when the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) started operating at its full rated power of 1 MW. Since then, several radionuclides in different chemical forms, were routinely produced and supplied for use in nuclear medicine, industry, agriculture, research and training, until the conversion of the PRR-1 to a 3 MW TRIGA type reactor. After the criticality test of the upgraded reactor, a leak was discovered in the pool liner. With the repair of the reactor still ongoing, routine radioisotope production activities have been reduced to dispensing of imported bulk 131I. In the Philippines, radioisotopes are widely used in nuclear medicine, with 131I and 99mTc as the major radionuclides of interest. Thus the present radioisotope production program of PNRI is directed to meet this demand. With the technical assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), PNRI is setting up a new 131I production facility. The in-cell equipment have been installed and tested using both inactive and active target, obtained from BATAN, Indonesia. In order to meet the need of producing 99Mo-99mTc generators, based on low specific activity reactor-produced 99Mo, research and development work on the preparation of 99mTc gel generators is ongoing. (author)

  8. Radioisotopes and ionizing radiations in biological research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book deals with the use of radioisotopes and ionizing radiations in the various aspects of biological research. The following topics were presented: labelled compounds; conformation-function relationships of hormonal polypeptides and their spectroscopic study; neutron scattering and neutron diffraction for biological studies; high resolution autoradiography; radioimmunoassay; nuclear medicine; transfer of excitation energy in photosynthesis; radioagronomy; radiation preservation of food

  9. Radioisotope licence application: Fixed nuclear gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guide will assist you in completing and filing an application for a new licence or licence renewal for fixed nuclear gauges in accordance with the Atomic Energy Control Regulations and radioisotope licensing policies. It also provides some of the background information that you will require in order to safely use radioactive materials

  10. Production of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals. Pt. G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioisotope products such as P-32, I-131, Tc-99m, Cr-51 and others are being in the Nuclear Research Institute (Dalat) for medical uses. Additionally, the development of the chromatographic gel-type Tc-99m generator, new method for I-131 production, inorganic ion exchanger is introduced. (N.H.A). 3 refs, 5 figs, 1 tab

  11. The control of radioisotopes in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Regulations applicable to the control of radioisotopes in Canada are reviewed. The administrative procedures are described, the definition of atomic radiation workers clarified and the means for inspections and compliance indicated. An outline is provided of the main revisions currently under consideration. (author)

  12. Evaluation of carbon-14 (C14) levels of terrestrial and marine food products of the environment of the site of Cogema La Hague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This evaluation has for object to inform about the levels in carbon 14 in the environment of the factories of La Hague. Two sectors were differentiated on one hand the terrestrial environment, and on the other hand the marine environment. The investigations concerned first and foremost food products stemming as the vegetable culture (vegetables) or individual breeding (milk, eggs) but also foodstuffs stemming from the local agriculture (cereal). In touch with the second sector, the marine environment, the sampling concerned the accessible products of the sea by all and those locally marketed (fishes, molluscs, shellfishes). The different results are presented in tables. (N.C.)

  13. Radioisotopic techniques in the study of in vivo parasite metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A characteristic of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis infections in the rat is the sudden expulsion of the parasites from the intestine of the host at about day 11 of infection, essentially as a result of the immune response of the host. A method is described where the uptake of radioisotopically labelled substances by N. brasiliensis from the tissue fluids of the host is measured during the course of an adult infection. The test substances used were 32P-sodium phosphate, 75Se-selenomethionine and 14C-glucose. Measurements were made in a normal infection, in a second infection and in an infection where the immune response of the host to N. brasiliensis was suppressed by a concurrent trypanosome infection. The results showed that a dramatic reduction in uptake of the radioisotopic markers consistently occurred before worm expulsion. It is concluded that the technique gives a useful index of the impairment in worm metabolic activity sustained as a result of the immune response of the host. The in vivo technique described could usefully be adapted to study other host parasite systems. (author)

  14. List of ERDA radioisotope (customers with summary of radioisotope shipments FY 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The twelfth edition of the ERDA radioisotope customer list has been prepared at the request of the Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research. The purpose of this document is to list the FY 1975 commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities of USERDA facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Brookhaven National Laboratory, United Nuclear Inc., Idaho Operations Office, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Savannah River Plant

  15. List of ERDA radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thirteenth edition of the ERDA radioisotope customer list has been prepared at the request of the Office of Program Coordination, Office of the Assistant Administrator. The purpose of the document is to list the FY 1976 commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities of ERDA facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Idaho Operations Office, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Savannah River Laboratory, and United Nuclear Industries, Inc

  16. List of ERDA radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments, FY 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, J.L.

    1977-03-01

    The thirteenth edition of the ERDA radioisotope customer list has been prepared at the request of the Office of Program Coordination, Office of the Assistant Administrator. The purpose of the document is to list the FY 1976 commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities of ERDA facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Idaho Operations Office, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Savannah River Laboratory, and United Nuclear Industries, Inc.

  17. List of ERDA radioisotope (customers with summary of radioisotope shipments FY 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, J.L.; Gano, S.R. (comp.)

    1976-01-01

    The twelfth edition of the ERDA radioisotope customer list has been prepared at the request of the Division of Biomedical and Environmental Research. The purpose of this document is to list the FY 1975 commercial radioisotope production and distribution activities of USERDA facilities at Argonne National Laboratory, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Brookhaven National Laboratory, United Nuclear Inc., Idaho Operations Office, Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory, Mound Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Savannah River Plant. (TFD)

  18. Carbon-rich presolar grains from massive stars. Subsolar 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios and the mystery of 15N

    CERN Document Server

    Pignatari, M; Hoppe, P; Jordan, C J; Gibson, B K; Trappitsch, R; Herwig, F; Fryer, C; Hirschi, R; Timmes, F X

    2015-01-01

    Carbon-rich grains with isotopic anomalies compared to the Sun are found in primitive meteorites. They were made by stars, and carry the original stellar nucleosynthesis signature. Silicon carbide grains of Type X and C, and low-density graphites condensed in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. We present a new set of models for the explosive He shell and compare them with the grains showing 12C/13C and 14N/15N ratios lower than solar. In the stellar progenitor H was ingested into the He shell and not fully destroyed before the explosion. Different explosion energies and H concentrations are considered. If the SN shock hits the He-shell region with some H still present, the models can reproduce the C and N isotopic signatures in C-rich grains. Hot-CNO cycle isotopic signatures are obtained, including a large production of 13C and 15N. The short-lived radionuclides 22Na and 26Al are increased by orders of magnitude. The production of radiogenic 22Ne from the decay of 22Na in the He shell might solve the pu...

  19. Novel radioisotope applications in industry promoted by the IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presently, there is a lively activity in further development and use of radioisotope technology. Novel radioisotope applications in industry are promoted by the IAEA. Radioisotope technology is contributing significantly to improving and optimising process performance bringing an annual economic benefit to industry of several billion US$. Probably, an average benefit to cost ratio of 40: 1 is reasonably representative of radioisotope applications in industry. There are few short-term investments, which will give a return of this magnitude. The cost effectiveness of radioisotope applications should be widely promulgated to encourage industrialists to take full advantage of the technology. (author)

  20. Biochar, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes have different effects on fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Jun; Ji, Rong; Yu, Yongjie; Xie, Zubin; Yan, Xiaoyuan

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of biochar, activated carbon (AC)-, and single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs and MWCNTs) in various concentrations (0, 0.2, 20, and 2,000 mg/kg dry soil) on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil. The results showed that biochar had no effect on the mineralization of 14C-catechol, whereas AC at all amendment rates and SWCNTs at 2,000 mg/kg significantly reduced mineralization. Particularly, MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg significantly stimulated mineralization compared with the control soil. The inhibitory effects of AC and SWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the inhibited soil microbial activities and the shifts in microbial communities, as suggested by the reduced microbial biomass C and the separated phylogenetic distance. In contrast, the stimulatory effects of MWCNTs on the mineralization were attributed to the selective stimulation of specific catechol-degraders by MWCNTs at 0.2 mg/kg. Only MWCNTs amendments and AC at 2,000 mg/kg significantly changed the distribution of 14C residues within the fractions of humic substances. Our findings suggest biochar, AC, SWCNTs and MWCNTs have different effects on the fate of 14C-catechol and microbial community in soil.

  1. The present status of carbon 14 analysis and projects for beryllium 10 analysis at the Tandetron 1 accelerator, Nagoya University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Oda, Hirotaka; Ikeda, Akiko; Niu, Etsuko [Nagoya Univ. (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    The operation experience in 1999 of the Tandetron accelerator age estimation system, Nagoya University, is reported, after the overview and the history of the accelerator is briefly described. Total number of carbon 14 environmental samples analyzed was 8567. The project of introducing new HVEE Tandetron for C-14 analysis, and modifying the present GIC Tandetron for Be-10 analysis is presented. Ion source shall be replaced, and the heavy ion detector shall be installed. Projected geological and archaeological studies using Be-10 are enumerated. (A. Yamamoto)

  2. Bayesian calibration of a soil organic carbon model using Δ14C measurements of soil organic carbon and heterotrophic respiration as joint constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, B.; Reichstein, M.; Borken, W.; Muhr, J.; Trumbore, S. E.; Wutzler, T.

    2014-04-01

    Soils of temperate forests store significant amounts of organic matter and are considered to be net sinks of atmospheric CO2. Soil organic carbon (SOC) turnover has been studied using the Δ14C values of bulk SOC or different SOC fractions as observational constraints in SOC models. Further, the Δ14C values of CO2 that evolved during the incubation of soil and roots have been widely used together with Δ14C of total soil respiration to partition soil respiration into heterotrophic respiration (HR) and rhizosphere respiration. However, these data have not been used as joint observational constraints to determine SOC turnover times. Thus, we focus on (1) how different combinations of observational constraints help to narrow estimates of turnover times and other parameters of a simple two-pool model, the Introductory Carbon Balance Model (ICBM); (2) whether relaxing the steady-state assumption in a multiple constraints approach allows the source/sink strength of the soil to be determined while estimating turnover times at the same time. To this end ICBM was adapted to model SOC and SO14C in parallel with litterfall and the Δ14C of litterfall as driving variables. The Δ14C of the atmosphere with its prominent bomb peak was used as a proxy for the Δ14C of litterfall. Data from three spruce-dominated temperate forests in Germany and the USA (Coulissenhieb II, Solling D0 and Howland Tower site) were used to estimate the parameters of ICBM via Bayesian calibration. Key findings are as follows: (1) the joint use of all four observational constraints (SOC stock and its Δ14C, HR flux and its Δ14C) helped to considerably narrow turnover times of the young pool (primarily by Δ14C of HR) and the old pool (primarily by Δ14C of SOC). Furthermore, the joint use of all observational constraints made it possible to constrain the humification factor in ICBM, which describes the fraction of the annual outflux from the young pool that enters the old pool. The Bayesian parameter

  3. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabakaran, K.; Fernandes, V.; McDonald, J. [Illawarra Regional Hospital, Wollongong, NSW (Australia). Depts of Nuclear Medicine and Gastroenterology

    1996-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  4. Validation of ten-minute single sample carbon-14 urea breath test for diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection is traditionally diagnosed by endoscopy followed by gastric biopsy and histologic demonstration of organisms, rapid urease test and culture. The non-invasive carbon-14-urea breath test has been widely accepted now for the diagnosis of this bacterium. This study was aimed to establish and validate normal and abnormal values for an Australian population, for a single sample carbon-14-urea breath test at ten minutes. A dose of 185 kBq was used in order to achieve reasonable counting statistics. The derived values were validated with the results of the rapid urease test. This method has a high sensitivity, specificity and greater patient acceptance, and could be used in many clinical settings as the first modality for the diagnosis of H. pylori infection and for documenting response or cure after antibiotic therapy for eradication. 11 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  5. The use of C-14 as tracer in the carbon flow assimilated by the plants (maize, sugar cane, bean)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flow of carbon in three different crops (maize, beans and sugar cane) was studied by use of C-14. The plants were exposed to an atmosphere with a constant concentration of the tracer for 12 hours in a biosynthesis chamber. The detection of the isotope permitted the distribution and concentration of the photosynthetates in the various organs of the plants to be followed. (M.A.C.)

  6. Study of carbon-isotope exchange reactions between potassium cyanide and some carbonates, and their use for obtaining C14-labelled potassium cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors examine the results of a study on the isotope exchange of potassium cyanide with compounds differing greatly from it both in composition and structure, such as carbonates of alkaline and alkali-earth metals. The carbon-isotope exchange reaction in the KC12N-BaC14O3 system was studied at 600-800oC. The ratio between the components of this system and those given below agreed with the equimolecular ratio. The authors show that at high temperatures complete exchange between these compounds can be secured. The exchange reaction begins when the cyanide melt is formed; later it occurs between the liquid and the solid phases, and its speed increases with temperature; at 800oC it is completed in 2 h. With carbonates of alkali metals the exchange reaction occurs in the melt and is completed at lower temperatures. The authors obtained cyanide-labelled potassium by the following method : (1) The isotope exchange reaction KC12N-BaC14O3 is produced at 800oC in 2 h. (2) The mixture KCN+BaCO3 is separated by extracting the KCN with liquid ammonia in a circulating extractor. By exchanging the equimolecular quantities KCN and BaCO3, potassium cyanide is obtained with a chemical yield of more than 90% and a basic-substance content of 96-97%. By using BaCO3 with a high specific activity (60-70 mc/g), a KCN specific activity of over 80 mc/g may be obtained. The barium carbonate depleted of isotope C14 regenerates after the ammonia extraction without appreciable loss. (author)

  7. Simulation of Carbon-14 Migration Through a Thick Unsaturated Alluvial Basin Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martian, P.; Larentzos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Yucca Flat is one of several areas on the Nevada Test Site that was used for underground nuclear testing. Extensive testing performed in the unsaturated and saturated zones have resulted in groundwater contamination and surface subsidence craters in the vicinity of the underground test areas. Simulation of multiphase 14C transport through the thick Yucca Flat alluvial basin was performed to estimate the magnitude of radionuclide attenuation occurring within the unsaturated zone. Parameterization of the 14C transport in the multiphase flow and transport simulator (FEHM) was verified with experimental data collected from a large unsaturated soil column experiment. The experimental data included 14C as a radio-labeled bicarbonate solution, SF6 gas, and lithium bromide solution breakthroughs. Two representative simulation cases with working points located at shallow and deep depths relative to the water table were created to investigate the impact of subsidence crater-enhanced recharge, crater-playa areal extent, gas-phase partitioning, solid-phase partitioning, and a reduced permeability/porosity compressed zone created during the explosion on 14C transport. The representative shallow test had a detonation point located 175 m below land surface, and the deep test had a working point 435 m below land surface in a 500 m deep unsaturated zone. Carbon-14 transport is influenced by gas-phase diffusion and sorption within the alluvium. Gas-phase diffusion is an attenuation mechanism that transports 14C gas as 14CO2 throughout the unsaturated zone and exposes it to a large amount of soil moisture, resulting in dilute concentrations. The simulations indicated that the majority of the 14C inventory remains in the unsaturated zone over a 1,000-year time period after detonation because gas-phase diffusion moves the bulk of the 14C away from the higher recharge occurring in crater playas. Retardation also plays a role in slowing advective aqueous phase transport to the water

  8. Sup(14)C activity of dissolved organic carbon fractions in the north-central Pacific and Sargasso Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiocarbon measurements of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) oxidizable by ultraviolet irradiation (DOCuv) yielded apparent ages of ∼6,000 yr in the deep waters of the oligotrophic north-central Pacific gyre. Recent reports of a potentially larger pool of DOC as measured by high-temperature catalytic combustion (DOChtc) using discrete injections of sea water have led to speculation that 'younger', more recently produced DOC could contribute significantly to overall oceanic organic carbon fluxes, owing to its suspected greater biological lability. Here we present a comparison of Δ14C (the deviation in parts per thousand from the 14C activity of nineteenth-century wood) of the DOChtc, DOCuv and humic substances in profiles from the oligotrophic north-central Pacific and Sargasso Sea. For each ocean, the Δ14C values of all three fractions are remarkably similar, yielding no evidence for a component of DOC that is cycled through the system on timescales shorter than several thousands of years. We observe an age difference between the two oceans of ∼2,000 yr for the deepest DOC, which can largely be accounted for by differences in the Δ14C of the DOC sources to the deep basins, and by the different deep-water circulation patterns and transit times in the two oceans. (author)

  9. A survey of methods to immobilize tritium and carbon-14 arising from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the literature on methods to separate and immobilize tritium (3H) and carbon-14 (14C) released from U02 fuel in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. It was prepared as part of a broader review of fuel reprocessing waste management methods that might find future application in Canada. The calculated inventories of both 3H and 14C in used fuel are low; special measures to limit releases of these radionuclides from reprocessing plants are not currently in place, and may not be necessary in future. If required, however, several possible approaches to the concentration and immobilization of both radionuclides are available for development. Technology to control these radionuclides in reactor process streams is in general more highly developed than for reprocessing plant effluent, and some control methods may be adaptable to reprocessing applications

  10. Radioisotope scanning for the spinal cord tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope scanning with sup(99m)Tc-pertechnetate or 67Ga-citrate for the spinal cord tumors are reported. Six patients with spinal cord tumors including 2 ependymomas, 1 neurinoma, 1 metastatic medulloblastoma, 1 metastatic astrocytoma, and 1 metastatic pinealoma as well as 6 patients with non-neoplastic lesions were examined by this method. Two out of 6 cases with tumors showed positive scans, and two showed equivocal scans. This new method is different from myeloscintigraphy or radioisotope angiography as already reported. It directly demonstrates the tumor itself like brain scanning does and is very useful as a nontraumatic method for screening spinal cord lesions, especially in poor risk patients. Both the usefulness and the limitations of this method are discussed. (auth.)

  11. The future of medical radioisotope supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NEA and its High-level Group on the Security of Supply of Medical Radioisotopes (HLG-MR) have been actively examining the causes of supply shortages of the most widely used isotope in medical diagnostic imaging, technetium-99m (99mTc), and its parent isotope molybdenum-99 (99Mo). As a result of this examination, the HLG-MR has developed a policy approach that includes principles and supporting recommendations to address the causes of these supply shortages. Six policy principles were agreed by the HLG-MR in March 2011. These are implementation of full-cost recovery and outage reserve capacity (ORC) for 99Mo production, a government role in the market, conversion to low-enriched uranium targets, international collaboration and periodic reviews of the supply chain. This article describes progress made in the implementation of the six principles and examines the projected global capacity for medical radioisotope production in the near future. (author)

  12. Radioisotopes development and production in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of radioisotopes for use in medical, industrial and agriculture sector was began in 1982 after the commissioning the 1MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor. Production of Tc-99m using Methyl Ethyl Ketone (MEK) extraction began in 1985 with the capacity about 1.2 Ci of Mo-99. By 1994, we produced Tc-99m generator using fission Molybdenum imported from Indonesia. Early 1990's, we assemble I-131 plant from Hungary for production of I-131 using TeO2 irradiated inour reactor but the yield are low. We have imported I-131 to meet the demand about 10 Ci/month. Development of Sm-153 EDTMP was began in 1994 and the trial production began in 1998. We also established the procedure for production of industrial and agriculture radioisotopes such as P-32, Na-24 and Au-198. (author)

  13. Use of carbon-14 for the study of elementary carbon exchange between methane and its chemisorption residues on metallic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After giving the results of the most recent work done with a view to providing a rational account of the exchanges between two gases in contact with a catalyst, the authors, using C14, proceed to study elementary exchange between methane and its chemisorption residues on molybdenum films. The surface is labelled in two ways: by chemisorption of C14H4 at different temperatures; or by exchange between C14H4 with a high specific activity and a metallic film previously treated with inactive methane. The C14 is counted in the form of CO2 in the Geiger region. The results show that the exchange rate is measurable from about 100o C onwards and that it reaches a maximum at about 250o C. Furthermore, the exchange is governed by laws which vary according to the prior treatment of the surface. On the basis of the results discussed, the authors suggest a methane displacement pattern which they compare with the CH4 and D2 exchange mechanisms suggested by Kemball. (author)

  14. Research and development for the application of radioisotope technology in SINR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief systematic account on the research and development for the application of radioisotope technology in Shanghai Institute of Nuclear Research (SINR) is presented. It comprehensively covers the following categories: 1. Radioisotopes produced by cyclotron; 2. Radioisotope-labelled compounds; 3. Radioisotope as source of energy converter; 4. Induced-radioisotope generation as a means for elemental analysis--the activation analysis; 5. Radioisotope equipped with electronic instrument for various application; and 6. Special usage of some radioisotopes

  15. Characterization of carbon-14 generated by the nuclear power industry. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an evaluation of C-14 production rates in light-water reactors (LWRs) and characterization of its chemical speciation and environmental behavior. The study estimated the total production rate of the nuclide in operating PWRs and BWRs along with the assessment of the C-14 content of solid radwaste. The major source of production of C-14 in both PWR's and BWRs was the activation of 0-17 in the water molecule and of N-14 dissolved in reactor coolant. The production of C-14 was estimated to range from 7 Ci/GW(e)-year to 11 Ci/GW(e)-year. The estimated range of the quantity of C-14 in LLW was 1-2 Ci/ reactor-year which compares favorably with data obtained from shipping manifests. The environmental behavior of C-14 associated with low-level waste (LLW) disposal is greatly dependent upon its chemical speciation. This scoping study was performed to help identify the occurrence of inorganic and organic forms of C-14 in reactor coolant water and in primary coolant demineralization resins. These represent the major source for C-14 in LLW from nuclear power stations. Also, the behavior of inorganic and two of the organic forms of C-14 on soil uptake was determined by measuring distribution coefficients (Kd's) on two soil types and a cement, using two different groundwater types. This study confirms that C-14 concentrations are significantly higher in the primary coolant from PWR stations compared to BWR stations. The C-14 followed trends of Co-60 generation during primary coolant demineralization at all but one of the stations examined. However, the C-14/Co-60 activity ratios measured by this study in resin samples through which samples of coolant were drawn were about 8 to 42 times higher than those reported for waste samples in the industry data base for PWR stations, and 15 to 730 times lower for the BWR stations

  16. Micro-battery Development using beta radioisotope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear battery which use the beta radiation sources emitting the low penetration radiation energy from radioisotope can be applied as the long term (more than 10 years) micro power source in MEMS and nano components. This report describes the basic concept and principles of nuclear micro-battery and its fabrication in space and military field. In particular direct conversion method is described by investigating the electron-hole generation and recombination in p-n junction of silicon betavoltaics with beta radiation

  17. Radiation protection at radioisotope processing facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Inc. is Canada's largest diversified health and life sciences company and provides health care services and products to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. MDS Nordion Inc. is a subsidiary of MDS Inc. and is located in Ottawa, Ontario. It provides much of the world's supply of radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine primarily to diagnose, but also to treat disease. MDS Nordion is composed of three major production divisions at its Ottawa location and serves customers in three major markets. These are primarily: radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine (Nuclear Medicine Division), radiation processing for sterilization of medical equipment and supplies, and food (Ion Technologies Division), and teletherapy equipment used in cancer treatment (Therapy Systems Division). MDS Nordion supplies customers in over 100 countries, exporting more than 95 percent of its product processed in Canada. Every year, 15 to 20 million diagnostic imaging tests are carried out in hospitals around the world, using radioisotopes supplied by MDS Nordion. In addition, 150 to 200 million cubic feet (that's enough to cover an entire CFL field - including the end zones - stacked over half a kilometer high) of single use medical products are sterilized using MDS Nordion supplied equipment. MDS Nordion receives medical isotopes from AECL, Chalk River Laboratories and processes the material to purify and quantify the radioisotope product. Sealed sources, comprised of cobalt 60, are supplied from CANDU reactors. Production processes include ventilated shielded cells with remote manipulators, gloveboxes and fumehoods, to effectively control the safety of the workplace and the environment, and to prevent contamination of the products. The facilities are highly regulated by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) for safety and environmental protection. Products are also regulated by Health Canada and the US-Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (author)

  18. Beneficial uses of radioisotopic waste program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities include efforts to: (1) develop a cost-effective radioisotope separation technology based on column separation techniques associated with the Sandia Solidification Process and (2) develop a broader technology for beneficial applications of the separated isotopes, including engineered radioactive sources and applications facilities and/or devices, and studies related to cost-effectiveness, safety, and security of these sources, facilities, and devices. (LK)

  19. Alternate methods for the production of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radioisotopes for diagnostic and therapeutic clinical applications has increased in the past decade. The growth has been in two areas: the use of 99mTc for gamma-ray imaging and the use of 18F in positron emission tomography (PET). The 99mTc (6.01 h) is a daughter of the longer-lived precursor 99Mo (65.9 h), which is produced in nuclear reactors. Conversely, the isotopes for PET have been produced using cyclotrons at centralized hospital complexes. The economic potential of the radioisotope market has been demonstrated by the major producers of 99Mo this past year when they announced their plans to purchase two MAPLE reactors for the dedicated production of 99Mo. This market potential, coupled with the efforts by the U.S. Department of Energy to encourage the private, commercial production of radioisotopes that the government currently supplies, has provided motivation to investigate innovative technologies to produce both 99Mo and PET isotopes. Incentives for looking at alternate production methods include life-cycle cost and source portability for short-lived radioisotopes. This paper presents alternative production methods that could provide unique advantages for the production of 99Mo and tremendously higher availability of PET isotopes. We have examined the use of an existing high-current, linear accelerator for the production of 99Mo from the fission of depleted uranium and the production of short-lived isotopes used in PET using a portable source of low-energy antiprotons

  20. The efficient importation and distribution of radioisotopes. Suggestions for the most economic importation of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of their work in many Member States, IAEA technical assistance experts have sometimes encountered difficulties in connection with the importation of radioactive isotopes. In some countries they have been consulted as to the possible improvement of import procedures. The purpose of this publication is to summarize the experience that has been gained in the hope that it may be useful both to scientists who wish to import radioisotopes for their work and to public officials who are concerned with the administrative and financial aspects of the problem. This question is of considerable importance because many countries have only limited resources of scientific man-power and foreign exchange and hence it is essential, if these resources are to be utilized fully, that efficient importing procedures be established. Furthermore, the success or failure of technical assistance activities may depend on whether radioisotopes needed for the project can be efficiently imported. Although the data summarized in this publication are based mainly on the experience of medical users of radioisotopes, they are equally applicable to their uses in other fields such as agriculture and hydrology. This publication covers the subject of importation and distribution of radioisotopes, and concludes with a brief section on the domestic production of short-lived radioisotopes in research reactors

  1. Steps of radioisotope separation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Extraordinary Specialist Committee on Radioisotope Separation of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan has supported various actions on foundation, application and industrialization of the radioisotope separation over past 30 years to continue wide range of actions at a standpoint of specialist, since established in Showa 44 (1969). On June 1993 (Heisei 5), a memorial lecture meeting, as the 100th committee was held at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) of Wako-city in Saitama prefecture. At that time, a planning to publish an impressive memorial issue, to prepare orbits and episodes of actions, painful stories and fault examples of developments, and so forth like novels and to use for a future foundation, was determined. For its writing principle, it was settled to the base not to use mathematical equation as possible, to collect the essence like a tale, to collect actual and historical reports, and so on. And, for its writing content, it was determined to report on actual, painful and fault experiences in research and development, on data, topics and human relation, and on what to be remained for references. This book can be used not only for data collected on traces from fundamental to applied studies, technical development for industrialization, and so forth on radioisotope concentration, but also for a knowledge bag to give some hints to a man aiming to overcome a new problem. (G.K.)

  2. Quantitation of renal function using radioisotopic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, J P; Ziessman, H A

    1993-03-01

    Radioisotopic methods are practical for clinical use because they do not require continuous intravenous infusion or urine collection. This obviously is of great advantage in infants and small children, in whom accurate urine collection is difficult, but the techniques apply to adults as well. The ability to determine individual kidney function is a major benefit. Accuracies of the radioisotopic techniques vary but generally are within clinically acceptable ranges. The need for accuracy and reproducibility can be balanced with the desire for speed and convenience when choosing among the different techniques. Methods that use plasma sampling provide greater accuracy and are recommended in cases of severe dysfunction, whereas methods such as Gates' camera method, which eliminates plasma samples, can be completed in minutes. Radioisotopic techniques are most useful in the ranges of mild to moderately decreased function, in which serum creatinine concentration is nondiagnostic, and although they are much less accurate at markedly low renal function levels, so is 24-hour creatinine clearance. In conclusion, radiopharmaceutical agents offer a wide array of possible techniques for simple, accurate, and noninvasive measurement of global as well as individual GFR and ERPF. PMID:8462269

  3. Radioisotope applications on fluidized catalytic cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are used to trace the flow of all the phases of Fluidized Catalytic Cracking process in oil refineries. The gaseous phases, steam, hydrocarbon vapour and air, are generally traced using a noble-gas isotope, 41Ar, 79Kr or 85Kr. An appropriate tracer for the catalyst is produced by irradiating a catalyst sample in a nuclear reactor. The activation products,140La and 24Na provide appropriate radioactive 'labels' for the catalyst, which is reinjected into the FCC. An advantage of this approach is that it facilitates the study of the behaviour of different particle size fractions. Radioisotopes as sealed sources of gamma radiation are used to measure catalyst density variations and density distributions in critical parts of the unit. An important trend in radioisotope applications is the increasing use of the information they produce as inputs to or as validation of, mathematical process models. In line with the increasing sophistication of the models, the technology is undergoing continuous refinement. Developments include the investigation of more efficient, more convenient tracers, the introduction of systems to facilitate more rapid and comprehensive data acquisition and software refinements for enhanced data analysis

  4. Analysis of mathematical models of radioisotope gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotope gauges as industrial sensors were briefly reviewed. Regression models of instruments based on various principles developed in Institute of Nuclear Research and Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology were analysed and their mathematical models assessed. It was found that for one - dimensional models the lowest value of standard error of estimate was achieved when calibration procedure was modelled by logarithmic function. Mathematical expressions for variance and mean value of intrinsic error for linear and non - linear one - as well as for multi - dimensional models of radioisotope gauges were derived. A conclusion was drawn that optimal model of calibration procedure determined by regression analysis method not always corresponds to the minimum value of the intrinsic error variance. Influence of cutting off of probability distribution function of measured quantity and its error at the lower upper limit of measurement range on variance and mean value of intrinsic error was evaluated. Feasibility study for application of some aspects of Shannon's information theory for evaluation of mathematical models of radioisotope gauges was accomplished. Its usefulness for complex evaluation of multidimensional models was confirmed. 105 refs. (author)

  5. Medical Radioisotope Scanning. Proceedings of a Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the many and varied uses of radioactive isotopes which have been developed in the past twenty years, their applications in medicine are among the most important. All over the world medical scientists have added radioisotopes to their armament in clinical research, diagnosis and radiotherapy. It is significant that the first scientific meeting organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency was devoted to a medical subject. It is not less significant as a symbol of the close co-operation which has been established between the Agency and other agencies of the United Nations family, that this first seminar was a joint undertaking with the World Health Organization. The determination of the distribution of a radioisotope within the human body - radioisotope scanning - is a technique which has made very rapid progress in the last few years in various medical centres throughout the world, and the necessity of providing an opportunity for an organized exchange of results, experience and opinions was clearly recognised. The value of such an exchange is demonstrated by the extensive discussions which took place and which are recorded in this volume, together with the original papers presented by those who have made such noteworthy contributions to progress in this field.

  6. NEW DIRECTIONS IN RADIOISOTOPE SPECTRUM IDENTIFICATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17

    Recent studies have found the performance of commercial handheld detectors with automatic RIID software to be less than acceptable. Previously, we have explored approaches rooted in speech processing such as cepstral features and information-theoretic measures. Scientific advances are often made when researchers identify mathematical or physical commonalities between different fields and are able to apply mature techniques or algorithms developed in one field to another field which shares some of the same challenges. The authors of this paper have identified similarities between the unsolved problems faced in gamma-spectroscopy for automated radioisotope identification and the challenges of the much larger body of research in speech processing. Our research has led to a probabilistic framework for describing and solving radioisotope identification problems. Many heuristic approaches to classification in current use, including for radioisotope classification, make implicit probabilistic assumptions which are not clear to the users and, if stated explicitly, might not be considered desirable. Our framework leads to a classification approach with demonstrable improvements using standard feature sets on proof-of-concept simulated and field-collected data.

  7. Separation of radioisotopes from fuel reprocessing waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology development of radioisotope production from fuel reprocessing high level wastes in Radioisotope Production Division is described. To develop the separation method for partitioning as the waste management and production of useful radioisotopes, the separation of 90Sr, 137Cs and rare earth elements by solvent extraction and ion-exchange has been mainly studied. Ion-exchange resin and HDEHP as the extracting agents were irradiated with a 60Co radiation source to examine their radiation resistances; Both are satisfactory in this respect. Strontium-90 and 137Cs could be separated in 99% purity from a 10l waste solution (about 2 Ci) by ion-exchange using nitric acid as the only eluant. A system of solvent extraction and ion-exchange to treat large volume of the waste was constructed in trial, and its cold test was carried out. The results were satisfactory, with a few points for further improvement. The scheme as it is can be scaled up for an experiment with about 1 KCi of the waste. (auth.)

  8. Tau decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most recent experimental results of τ physics are reviewed. The covered topics include precision measurements of semihadronic τ decay and their impact on tau branching ratio budget, the current status of the tau consistency test, a determination of Michel parameters and τ neutrino helicity, and upper limits on lepton-number violating τ decays. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear and Radioisotope Propulsion and Power in the Atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdicombe, T.

    A brief history of the use of nuclear fuelled powerplant in space is given along with some working principles of the technology, and recent proposals for spacecraft for the exploration of Titan utilising radioisotope generators are surveyed. Nuclear reaction engines are studied with specific consideration given to their use in Titan's atmosphere, and speculative modifications to one particular spacecraft concept originally conceived of for the exploration of Mars are proposed. A hybrid device producing mechanical power from nuclear decay heat is also suggested for future investigation.

  10. Oxygène-18, carbone-13, carbone-14 et diatomées dans les quatre carottes du lac Huynamarca (Bolivie) : premiers résultats

    OpenAIRE

    Wirrmann, Denis; Servant Vildary, Simone; Fontes, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    L'étude de géochimie isotopique des carbonates coquilliers de quatre carottes du lac Huynamarca (Bolivie), ainsi que les datations au carbone-14 de quelques échantillons montrent qu'au cours des dix derniers millénaires le bilan hydrologique du lac Titicaca a considérablement varié. Une phase sèche, située entre 3650 et 5325 ans B.P. se traduit par une baisse du niveau du lac d'au moins dix mètres par rapport à l'actuel, avec comme corrolaire l'augmentation de la teneur en sels dissous dans l...

  11. Determination of solubility product of lead carbonate using 14C radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the obtained experimental data on lead carbonate solubility in bidistilled water at 25 deg C, the value of lead carbonate solubility product, which constituted (3.6+-0.1)x10sup(-11) at confidence level 0.95, is determined. The use of radioactive indicators permitted to eliminate the negative effect of carbonate-ion excess concentration and pH and to specify similar literature data. A high stability of leadcarbonate supersaturated solutions is shown, which can be explained by a slow rate of the process PbCO3 (aq) → PbCO3 (cr)

  12. Determination of solubility product of lead carbonate, using 14C radionuclide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the basis of experimental data on the solubility of lead carbonate in double distilled water at 25 C, the solubility product of lead carbonate has been found to be (3.6 + or - 0.1) .10-11 with a 0.95 confidence probability. Use of radioactive indicators in these experiments made it possible to eliminate the adverse effects from excess concentration of carbonate ions and from pH, and to refine the analogous literature data. It has been shown that supersaturated solutions of lead carbonate are highly stable; this can be explained by the slow course of the process PbCO3 (ag)→ PbCO3 (cr)

  13. Labeling of Pest Insects Using Radioisotopes to Study Dispersal Pattern, Migration and Estimation of Population Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study insects behaviour in their habitat such as dispersal, migration and flight range, insects are needed to be labelled to trace their movement. One of the most promising labeling methodology for internal labeling is the use of radioisotopes. Radioisotopes that have been used for labeling insects are 3H, 32P, 14Ca, 45K, 35S, 59Fe, 60Co, and 14C. Insect labeling with isotopes has more advantages as compared to dyes due to isotopes used for labeling is bonded to the tissue such as 3H, 32P, 14Ca, K, 131I. Several consideration have to be taken to determine isotopes that will be used in line with the time consuming for experiments. This have to be carried out due to the phenomenon that several isotopes are toxic to insects such as 45Ca, 59Fe, 86Rb, 110Ag, 115Cd, and 131J. Precautions have to be fulfilled for insect radiolabeling which are save to insects, environment, easy to apply, materials are available and acceptable to the public. Radioisotope 32P with a correct dose is very convenience to be used in such experiments due to its relatively short half live, which is only 14.3 days. If it is an stable isotope it can be kept for a long time so the sample analyzed can be conducted convenience for long periods of time. Stable elements such as Rb can be changed to be radioisotopes by bombardment of neutrons in a nuclear reactor or accelerator. Then the element that has been activated can be identified using solid scintillation counter, multichannel analyzer or can be detected using autoradiography. (author)

  14. Some interesting and exotic applications of carbon-14 dating by accelerator mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are many applications of 14C dating and other measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). In particular, applications to dating of archaeological samples and interesting artifacts are discussed. Other applications, such as to extraterrestrial materials such as lunar samples and meteorites show the broad range of topics that can be addressed with 14C studies.

  15. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  16. Integration of Radioisotope Heat Source with Stirling Engine and Cooler for Venus Internal-Structure Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1993-10-01

    The primary mission goal is to perform long-term seismic measurements on Venus, to study its largely unknown internal structure. The principal problem is that most payload components cannot long survive Venus's harsh environment, 90 bars at 500 degrees C. To meet the mission life goal, such components must be protected by a refrigerated payload bay. JPL Investigators have proposed a mission concept employing a lander with a spherical payload bay cooled to 25 degrees C by a Stirling cooler powered by a radioisotope-heated Sitrling engine. To support JPL's mission study, NASA/Lewis and MTI have proposed a conceptual design for a hydraulically coupled Stirling engine and cooler, and Fairchild Space - with support of the Department of Energy - has proposed a design and integration scheme for a suitable radioisotope heat source. The key integration problem is to devise a simple, light-weight, and reliable scheme for forcing the radioisotope decay heat to flow through the Stirling engine during operation on Venus, but to reject that heat to the external environment when the Stirling engine and cooler are not operating (e.g., during the cruise phase, when the landers are surrounded by heat shields needed for protection during subsequent entry into the Venusian atmosphere.) A design and integration scheme for achieving these goals, together with results of detailed thermal analyses, are described in this paper. There are 7 copies in the file.

  17. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debongnie, J.C.; Pauwels, S.; Raat, A.; de Meeus, Y.; Haot, J.; Mainguet, P. (Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Louvain Medical School, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-06-01

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration.

  18. Quantification of Helicobacter pylori infection in gastritis and ulcer disease using a simple and rapid carbon-14-urea breath test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastric urease was studied isotopically in 230 patients with biopsy-proven normal mucosa or chronic gastritis, including 59 patients with ulcer disease. Carbon-14-urea was given in 25 ml of water without substrate carrier or nutrient-dense meal, and breath samples were collected over a 60-min period. The amount of 14CO2 excreted at 10 min was independent of the rate of gastric emptying and was not quantitatively influenced by the buccal urease activity. The 10-min 14CO2 values discriminated well between Helicobacter pylori positive and negative patients (94% sensitivity, 89% specificity) and correlated with the number of organisms assessed by histology. The test was a good predictor of chronic gastritis (95% sensitivity and 96% specificity), and a quantitative relationship was observed between 14CO2 values and the severity and activity of the gastritis. In H. pylori positive patients, breath 14CO2 was found to be similar in patients with and without ulcer disease, suggesting that the number of bacteria is not a determining factor for the onset of ulceration

  19. Preliminary study of the impact of tritium and carbon 14 releases from the Saint-Alban nuclear power plant. CRIIRAD N.04-20 V1 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having recalled the results of previous studies on the radioactivity in surface water and land environments, and outlined the need of an investigation of the tritium and carbon 14 contamination, this report defines the objectives of this investigation, the adopted methodology (choice of plants, tritium and carbon 14 dose measurements, and sampling to study time variations). It recalls some aspects of tritium and carbon 14 releases (production of radionuclides, origins of emissions in the environment, assessments by EDF). It reports the investigation and the assessment of tritium activity in a land environment and in rain waters about the investigated site, and the investigation and the assessment of carbon 14 activity within the same environment. It reports preliminary results concerning the aquatic environment

  20. Is Radioactive Decay Really Exponential?

    OpenAIRE

    Aston, PJ

    2012-01-01

    Radioactive decay of an unstable isotope is widely believed to be exponential. This view is supported by experiments on rapidly decaying isotopes but is more difficult to verify for slowly decaying isotopes. The decay of 14C can be calibrated over a period of 12,550 years by comparing radiocarbon dates with dates obtained from dendrochronology. It is well known that this approach shows that radiocarbon dates of over 3,000 years are in error, which is generally attributed to past variation in ...

  1. Spatial analysis of Carbon-14 dynamics in a wetland ecosystem (Duke Swamp, Chalk River Laboratories, Canada)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed survey was conducted to quantify the spatial distribution of 14C in Sphagnum moss and underlying soil collected in Duke Swamp. This wetland environment receives 14C via groundwater pathways from a historic radioactive Waste Management Area (WMA) on Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site. Trends in 14C specific activities were evaluated with distance from the sampling location with the maximum 14C specific activity (DSS-35), which was situated adjacent to the WMA and close to an area of groundwater discharge. Based on a spatial evaluation of the data, an east-to-west 14C gradient was found, due to the influence of the WMA on 14C specific activities in the swamp. In addition, it was possible to identify two groups of sites, each showing significant exponential declines with distance from the groundwater source area. One of the groups showed relatively more elevated 14C specific activities at a given distance from source, likely due to their proximity to the WMA, the location of the sub-surface plume originating from the WMA, the presence of marsh and swamp habitat types, which facilitated 14C transport to the atmosphere, and possibly, 14C air dispersion patterns along the eastern edge of the swamp. The other group, which had lower 14C specific activities at a given distance from the groundwater source area, included locations that were more distant from the WMA and the sub-surface plume, and contained fen habitat, which is known to act as barrier to groundwater flow. The findings suggest that proximity to source, groundwater flow patterns and habitat physical characteristics can play an important role in the dynamics of 14C being carried by discharging groundwater into terrestrial and wetland environments. - Highlights: • Groundwater represents an important source of volatile radionuclides to wetlands. • Habitat type influenced 14C transport from sub-surface to surface environments. • C-14 specific activity

  2. Studies of Powder Mixing with Short-Lived Radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many industrial processes involve the mixing of powders to form homogenous products. If the mixing conditions are not well established the mixing units will not be used to their best advantage. Many mixing problems can be studied by means of chemical analysis, but a series of such analyses is expensive in comparison with the fast and cheap measurement of radioactivity. For this reason radioisotopes are often used in determining optimum mixing conditions. The statistical nature of radioactive decay also simplifies the treatment of the data obtained. The theory and application of some useful statistical methods are described. As an example, the mixing of light concrete from cement powder, aluminium powder, sand and water is described. This is a severe mixing problem as mixing must occur before the reaction between water and aluminium, which gives the typical light-concrete structure, takes place to any considerable extent. Samples of aluminium powder and cement powder are activated in a reactor and are then used as radioactive tracers for the 5 m3 batches of mixture. The behaviour of the aluminium powder is studied using the nuclide Mn56 which is produced from manganese impurities in the aluminium. If certain precautions are taken it is possible to use this nuclide in spite of its short half-life (2.6 h). In the case of cement powder, use is made of the nuclides Na24 and K42 which are formed in this material. (author)

  3. Temperature effects on the behavior of carbon 14 in nuclear graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbermann, G. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); EDF/DIN/CIDEN/DIE, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, Lyon 69458 (France); Moncoffre, N., E-mail: n.moncoffre@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Commissariat à l’énergie atomique CEA/DEN, Centre de Saclay, Gif sur Yvette 91191 (France); Bérerd, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie, Université Lyon 1, 94 Bd. Niels Bohr, Villeurbanne 69622 (France); Perrat-Mabilon, A. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR 5822, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, Université de Lyon, 4 Rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Laurent, G. [EDF/DIN/CIDEN/DIE, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, Lyon 69458 (France); and others

    2014-08-01

    The dismantling of the 1st French generation UNGG (Uranium Naturel Graphite Gas) nuclear reactors operated by the French utility, EDF (Electricité de France) will generate around 17,000 tons of irradiated graphite wastes that have to be disposed of. {sup 14}C is one of the main radioactive dose contributors over 10,000 years. For the management of this waste, it is mandatory to get an accurate estimation of {sup 14}C. The general aim of our work is therefore to simulate the behavior of {sup 14}C in nuclear graphite and to elucidate the coupled and decoupled effects of temperature, irradiation and radiolytic corrosion that mainly influence {sup 14}C behavior in graphite during reactor operation. This paper focuses on the behavior of {sup 13}C implanted into nuclear graphite and used to simulate the presence of {sup 14}C displaced from its original structural site through recoil during neutron irradiation. It aims at evaluating both the temperature and the disorder level of the implanted graphite structure effects on {sup 13}C migration using two complementary techniques, NRA and SIMS, to evaluate the {sup 13}C distribution at the millimeter and micrometer lateral scales respectively. Raman micro-spectroscopy is used to check the graphite structure evolution. The results show that {sup 13}C is not released up to 1600 °C whatever the initial structural disorder level of the implanted graphite. This might be due to the fact that {sup 13}C might be trapped into interstitial clusters. The extrapolation of our results to the behavior of {sup 14}C shows that reactor temperatures (200–500 °C) did not induce any {sup 14}C release. Moreover, as long as there is no gasification of the graphite matrix, high temperatures tend to stabilize {sup 14}C into the remaining graphite structure. This fact has to be considered in case of high temperature purification of {sup 14}C from irradiated graphite.

  4. A report on the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A market survey was carried out to study the extent of radioisotope usage in Malaysia. From the survey, the radioisotopes and their activities/quantities that are used in Industry, Medicine and Research were identified. The radioisotopes that are frequently needed or routinely used were also determined and this formed the basis of the recommendations put forward in this report. It is proposed that PUSPATI adopt the concept of a Distribution Centre in order to provide a service to the Malaysian community. (author)

  5. Radioisotope techniques for problem-solving on refineries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasingly, refineries worldwide are recognizing the value of radioisotope technology in studying the operation of on-line plant. Using case studies, this paper illustrates the versatility of radioisotope techniques in a wide range of investigations: the density-profiling of distillation columns; the investigation of leaks on feed/effluent exchangers; on-line flowrate measurement; underground leakage detection. The economic benefits deriving from radioisotope applications are indicated

  6. Agreement for the Establishment in Cairo of a Middle Eastern Regional Radioisotope Centre for the Arab Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 14 September 1962 the Board of Governors approved an Agreement for the establishment in Cairo of a Middle Eastern regional radioisotope centre for the Arab countries. The text of this Agreement is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members

  7. Efficient, Long-Lived Radioisotope Power Generator Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc., (RMD) proposes to develop an alternative very long term, radioisotope power source with thermoelectric power conversion with...

  8. Technical and economical availability of radioisotopes production in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical and economical availability of radioisotopes production in Brazil by a low power research reactor, are done. The importance of radioisotope utilization and controled radiations, in areas such as medicine, industry and cost evaluation for the production in nuclear reactors. In the cost evaluation of a radioisotope production reactor, the studies developed by the Department of Nuclear Engineering of Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais - DEN/UFMG were used. The information analysis justify the technical and economical availability and the necessity of the radioisotopes production in Brazil. (E.G.)

  9. Markets for reactor-produced non-fission radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current market segments for reactor produced radioisotopes are developed and reported from a review of current literature. Specific radioisotopes studied in is report are the primarily selected from those with major medical or industrial markets, or those expected to have strongly emerging markets. Relative market sizes are indicated. Special emphasis is given to those radioisotopes that are best matched to production in high flux reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A general bibliography of medical and industrial radioisotope applications, trends, and historical notes is included

  10. Vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramics for immobilization of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagh, Arun S.

    2016-04-05

    A method of immobilizing a radioisotope and vitrified chemically bonded phosphate ceramic (CBPC) articles formed by the method are described. The method comprises combining a radioisotope-containing material, MgO, a source of phosphate, and optionally, a reducing agent, in water at a temperature of less than 100.degree. C. to form a slurry; curing the slurry to form a solid intermediate CBPC article comprising the radioisotope therefrom; comminuting the intermediate CBPC article, mixing the comminuted material with glass frits, and heating the mixture at a temperature in the range of about 900 to about 1500.degree. C. to form a vitrified CBPC article comprising the radioisotope immobilized therein.

  11. The law concerning prevention from radiation hazards due to radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The law regulates uses, sales and disposal of radioisotopes, uses of radiation generating apparatuses, disposal of materials contaminated with radioisotopes, and so on, in accordance with the Atomic Energy Fundamental Act, for public safety. Covered are the following: permission for and notification of the uses and permission for businesses selling and disposing of radioisotopes, and approval of designs concerning radiation hazard prevention mechanisms, obligations of the users and business enterprises selling and disposing of radioisotopes, the licensed engineers of radiation, organs, etc. for confirmation of the mechanisms, punitive provisions, and so on. (Mori, K.)

  12. Production and application of radioisotopes in Asian Countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production and application of radioisotopes in some Asian countries including Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand, Uzbekistan, and Viet Nam are introduced

  13. Advanced Radiative Emitters for Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic Power Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are critical for future flagship exploration missions in space and on planetary surfaces. Small improvements in the RPS...

  14. All-Carbon [3+3] Oxidative Annulations of 1,3-Enynes by Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalization and 1,4-Migration**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David J; Best, Daniel; Wieczysty, Martin D; Lam, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    1,3-Enynes containing allylic hydrogens cis to the alkyne function as three-carbon components in rhodium(III)-catalyzed, all-carbon [3+3] oxidative annulations to produce spirodialins. The proposed mechanism of these reactions involves the alkenyl-to-allyl 1,4-rhodium(III) migration. PMID:26224377

  15. Determination of the radiological impact of radioisotope waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECB commissioned this study to determine the doses to individuals working in municipal waste management systems and to populations of cities where small amounts of radioisotopes are disposed of through the municipal waste management systems. To carry out this study, it was necessary to select a city having: (1) a population size representative of many cities in Canada, (2) many different types of radioisotope users, (3) all the possible municipal waste management systems, (4) a well established data base on its waste management systems. Using this criteria, the Hamilton-Burlington area surrounding Hamilton Harbour was selected. The pathways and dosimetry models were put into a computer spread sheet, to give the model flexibility so that it could be easily modified to model other cities. The model was developed using conservative assumptions and conservative estimates for some parameter values so that the doses calculated by the model are over estimates. Within the occupational critical group, the maximum doses were calculated for the Hamilton sewage treatment plant sludge worker at 1.4E-6 Sv/a. If this individual were also a member of the critical group in the general population the maximum dose would be 2.2E-6 Sv/a. Individual doses to the critical group within the general population were calculated as 7.7E-7 Sv/a for adults and 6.8E-8 Sv/a for infants. These compare to AECB regulatory limits of 5.0E-2 Sv/a per person for atomic radiation workers and 5.0E-3 Sv/a per person for the general public. The collective population dose for the study area was 1.37E-1 person-Sv/a for the 525,000 population

  16. Spatial Distribution and Dynamics of Carbon-14 in a Wetland Ecosystem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is significant interest in assessing the impact of 14C releases from nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management areas, and geologic disposal facilities. As a result, there is a general need to gain understanding of 14C dynamics, especially in complex interface ecosystems, such as wetlands. This paper summarizes the key findings of two studies undertaken in Duke Swamp, a circa 0.1 km2 area of wetland consisting of marsh, fen and swamp habitats, on the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL)'s Chalk River Laboratories Site. The swamp receives radionuclides, such as 14C and tritium, from an up-gradient waste management area. The first study was an extensive field sampling campaign, involving collection of surface vegetation at 69 locations on a 50 m x 50 m grid, to evaluate the spatial distribution of 14C in Duke Swamp. Representative receptor plants and animals, and corresponding environmental media (including air, soil, and plant) samples were then collected, as part of a second study, at a subset of six locations with 14C specific activities that spanned the range present in Duke Swamp and also represented the different wetland habitats occurring there. The highest specific activity concentrations in surface vegetation were highly localized, representing a surface area of only about 150 m2. The spatial distribution of 14C in the swamp seemed to be at least partly accounted for by the physical attributes of the Duke Swamp habitat. In general, it was found that specific activities of 14C in biota tissues reflected those measured in surface vegetation collected from the same sampling location. Such information provides needed insight for biosphere assessments, as well as for the development of monitoring programs that demonstrate protection of biota in areas where exposure to 14C is elevated. (authors)

  17. Medical Radioisotope Production in a Power-Flattened ADS Fuelled with Uranium and Plutonium Dioxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gizem Bakır

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the medical radioisotope production performance of a conceptual accelerator driven system (ADS. Lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE is selected as target material. The subcritical fuel core is conceptually divided into ten equidistant subzones. The ceramic (natural U, PuO2 fuel mixture and the materials used for radioisotope production (copper, gold, cobalt, holmium, rhenium, thulium, mercury, palladium, thallium, molybdenum, and yttrium are separately prepared as cylindrical rods cladded with carbon/carbon composite (C/C and these rods are located in the subzones. In order to obtain the flattened power density, percentages of PuO2 in the mixture of UO2 and PuO2 in the subzones are adjusted in radial direction of the fuel zone. Time-dependent calculations are performed at 1000 MW thermal fission power (Pth for one hour using the BURN card. The neutronic results show that the investigated ADS has a high neutronic capability, in terms of medical radioisotope productions, spent fuel transmutation and energy multiplication. Moreover, a good quasiuniform power density is achieved in each material case. The peak-to-average fission power density ratio is in the range of 1.02–1.28.

  18. Proton Decay

    OpenAIRE

    Raby, Stuart

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the status of supersymmetric grand unified theories [SUSY GUTs] with regards to the observation of proton decay. In this talk we focus on SUSY GUTs in 4 dimensions. We outline the major theoretical uncertainties present in the calculation of the proton lifetime and then present our best estimate of an absolute upper bound on the predicted proton lifetime. Towards the end, we consider some new results in higher dimensional GUTs and the ramifications for proton decay.

  19. U.S. Space Radioisotope Power Systems and Applications: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Robert L.; Bennett, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    Radioisotope power systems (RPS) have been essential to the U.S. exploration of outer space. RPS have two primary uses: electrical power and thermal power. To provide electrical power, the RPS uses the heat produced by the natural decay of a radioisotope (e.g., plutonium-238 in U.S. RPS) to drive a converter (e.g., thermoelectric elements or Stirling linear alternator). As a thermal power source the heat is conducted to whatever component on the spacecraft needs to be kept warm; this heat can be produced by a radioisotope heater unit (RHU) or by using the excess heat of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). As of 2010, the U.S. has launched 41 RTGs on 26 space systems. These space systems have ranged from navigational satellites to challenging outer planet missions such as Pioneer 10/11, Voyager 1/2, Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini and the New Horizons mission to Pluto. In the fall of 2011, NASA plans to launch the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) that will employ the new Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) as the principal power source. Hundreds of radioisotope heater units (RHUs) have been launched to provide warmth to Apollo 11, used to provide heating of critical components in a seismic experiment package, Pioneer 10/11, Voyager 1/2, Galileo, Cassini, Mars Pathfinder, MER rovers, etc. to provide temperature control to critical spacecraft electronics and other mechanical devices such as propulsion system propellant valves. A radioisotope (electrical) power source or system (RPS) consists of three basic elements: (1) the radioisotope heat source that provides the thermal power, (2) the converter that transforms the thermal power into electrical power and (3) the heat rejection radiator. Figure 1 illustrates the basic features of an RPS. The idea of a radioisotope power source follows closely after the early investigations of radioactivity by researchers such as Henri Becquerel (1852-1908), Marie Curie (1867-1935), Pierre Curie (1859

  20. Decay of Hoyle state

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Bhattacharya; T K Rana; C Bhattacharya; S Kundu; K Banerjee; T K Ghosh; G Mukherjee; R Pandey; P Roy

    2014-11-01

    The prediction of Hoyle state was necessitated to explain the abundance of carbon, which is crucial for the existence of life on Earth and is the stepping stone for understanding the abundance of other heavier elements. After the experimental confirmation of its existence, soon it was realized that the Hoyle state was `different’ from other excited states of carbon, which led to intense theoretical and experimental activities over the past few decades to understand its structure. In recent times, precision, high statistics experiments on the decay of Hoyle state have been performed at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, to determine the quantitative contributions of various direct 3 decay mechanisms of the Hoyle state. The present results have been critically compared with those obtained in other recent experiments and their implications have been discussed.

  1. Development of radioisotope preparation and application technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this project is to develop RI production technology utility 'HANARO' and to construct a sound infra-structure for mass production and supply to domestic users. The developed contents and results are as follows: two types of rig for irradiation in reactor core were designed and manufactured. The safety of OR rig during irradiation was identified through various test and it is used for RI production. The prepared IR rig will be used to performance tests for safety. We prepared two welders and welding jigs for production of sealed sources, and equipments for quality control of the welded materials. Production processes and apparatus Cr-51, P-32, I-125 and Sr-89, were developed. Developed results would be used for routine production and supply of radioisotopes. The automatic Tc-99m extraction apparatus was supplied to Libya under IAEA support. For approval on special form radioactive material of the developed Ir-192 source assembly and projector documents were prepared and submitted to MOST. The high dose rate Ir-192 source(diameter 1.1 mm, length 5.2 mm) for RALS and the laser welding system for its fabrication were developed. Production technologies of Ir-192 sources for destructive test and medical therapy were transferred to private company for commercial supply. The chemical immobilization method based on the self-assemble monolayer of ω-functionalized thiol and the sensing scheme based on the beta-emitter labeling method were developed for the fabrication radioimmuno-sensors. Results of this study will be applied to mass production of radioisotopes 'HANARO' and are to contribute the advance of domestic medicine and industry related to radioisotopes

  2. Development of radioisotope preparation and application technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Hyon Soo; Park, K. B.; Bang, H. S. [and others

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop RI production technology utility 'HANARO' and to construct a sound infra-structure for mass production and supply to domestic users. The developed contents and results are as follows: two types of rig for irradiation in reactor core were designed and manufactured. The safety of OR rig during irradiation was identified through various test and it is used for RI production. The prepared IR rig will be used to performance tests for safety. We prepared two welders and welding jigs for production of sealed sources, and equipments for quality control of the welded materials. Production processes and apparatus Cr-51, P-32, I-125 and Sr-89, were developed. Developed results would be used for routine production and supply of radioisotopes. The automatic Tc-99m extraction apparatus was supplied to Libya under IAEA support. For approval on special form radioactive material of the developed Ir-192 source assembly and projector documents were prepared and submitted to MOST. The high dose rate Ir-192 source(diameter 1.1 mm, length 5.2 mm) for RALS and the laser welding system for its fabrication were developed. Production technologies of Ir-192 sources for destructive test and medical therapy were transferred to private company for commercial supply. The chemical immobilization method based on the self-assemble monolayer of {omega}-functionalized thiol and the sensing scheme based on the beta-emitter labeling method were developed for the fabrication radioimmuno-sensors. Results of this study will be applied to mass production of radioisotopes 'HANARO' and are to contribute the advance of domestic medicine and industry related to radioisotopes.

  3. Recent progress in radioisotope production in Vietnam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Van So [Radioisotope Dept., Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    1998-10-01

    This is a report on the recent progress in radioisotope production in Vietnam. Using a nuclear research reactor of 500 KW with continuous operation cycles of 100 hours a month, the production of some important radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine and research was routinely carried out. More than 80 per cent of irradiation capacity of reactor for radioisotope production were exploited. The radioactivity of more than 150 Ci of {sup 131}I, {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc, {sup 32}P, {sup 51}Cr, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 46}Sc, {sup 192}Ir was produced annually. Radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 131}I-Hippuran and in-vivo Kits for {sup 99m}Tc labelling were also prepared routinely and regularly. More than 10 in-vivo Kits including modern radiopharmaceuticals such as HmPAO kit were supplied to hospitals in Vietnam. The research on the improvement of dry distillation technology for production of {sup 131}I was carried out. As a result obtained a new distillation apparatus made from glass was successfully put to routine use in place of expensive quartz distillation furnace. We have also continued the research programme on the development of {sup 99m}Tc generators using low power research reactors. Gel technology using Zr- and Ti- molybdate gel columns for {sup 99m}Tc generator production was developed and improved continually. Portable {sup 99m}Tc generator using Zr-({sup 99}Mo) molybdate gel column and ZISORB adsorbent column for {sup 99m}Tc concentration were developed. The ZISORB adsorbent of high adsorption capacity for {sup 99}Mo and other parent radionuclides was also studied for the development purpose of alternative technology of {sup 99m}Tc and other different radionuclide generator systems. The studies on the preparation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals labelling with {sup 153}Sm and {sup 131}I such as {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP, {sup 131}I-MIBG were carried out. (author)

  4. The uses of radioisotope gauges in industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radioisotope gauge consists basically of a sealed radioisotope source of radiation, a detector, and an electronic indicating unit for visually displaying the detector output. The degree of absorption or scattering of the radiation by a material, as measured with the detector, is used to measure properties such as thickness, density, composition and level; the different instruments being named after the property being determined, e.g. thickness gauge or level gauge. Depending on whether the source and detector are on the same or opposite sides of the material, the instruments are known as backscatter or transmission instruments respectively. They are further classified according to the type of radiation used, e. g. beta transmission thickness gauge or gamma backscattering density gauge. The physical properties which can be determined are: (a) Thickness, or mass per unit area, of homogeneous sheet materials such as aluminium or steel or of heterogeneous materials of constant composition such as paper or plastic; (b) Coating thickness, such as paper or textiles coated with rubber, plastic or abrasives; (c) Plating thickness, such as tin on steel; (d) Density of materials of constant thickness, such as liquids or slurries in a pipe, or of tobacco, in cigarettes; (e) Levels of solids or fluids in containers; (f) Elemental composition of certain materials; (g) Density of materials in large bulk, such as concrete, soil or rock strata. In addition to the above, the instruments are also used for such varied purposes as pressure gauges, flowmeters, torquemeters and as position indicators. Radioisotopes became available in quantity around 1947 from nuclear reactors and the first beta transmission thickness gauges were installed on paper mills about 1949

  5. Recent progress in radioisotope production in Vietnam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a report on the recent progress in radioisotope production in Vietnam. Using a nuclear research reactor of 500 KW with continuous operation cycles of 100 hours a month, the production of some important radioisotopes used in nuclear medicine and research was routinely carried out. More than 80 per cent of irradiation capacity of reactor for radioisotope production were exploited. The radioactivity of more than 150 Ci of 131I, 99Mo-99mTc, 32P, 51Cr, 153Sm, 46Sc, 192Ir was produced annually. Radiopharmaceuticals such as 131I-Hippuran and in-vivo Kits for 99mTc labelling were also prepared routinely and regularly. More than 10 in-vivo Kits including modern radiopharmaceuticals such as HmPAO kit were supplied to hospitals in Vietnam. The research on the improvement of dry distillation technology for production of 131I was carried out. As a result obtained a new distillation apparatus made from glass was successfully put to routine use in place of expensive quartz distillation furnace. We have also continued the research programme on the development of 99mTc generators using low power research reactors. Gel technology using Zr- and Ti- molybdate gel columns for 99mTc generator production was developed and improved continually. Portable 99mTc generator using Zr-(99Mo) molybdate gel column and ZISORB adsorbent column for 99mTc concentration were developed. The ZISORB adsorbent of high adsorption capacity for 99Mo and other parent radionuclides was also studied for the development purpose of alternative technology of 99mTc and other different radionuclide generator systems. The studies on the preparation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals labelling with 153Sm and 131I such as 153Sm-EDTMP, 131I-MIBG were carried out. (author)

  6. A new radioisotope facility for Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Thai Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) is planning a new Nuclear Research Centre which will be located at Ongkharak, a greenfield site some 100 km North of Bangkok. General Atomics (GA) has submitted a bid for a turnkey contract for the core facilities comprising a Reactor to be supplied by GA, an Isotope Production Facility supplied by ANSTO and a Waste Processing and Storage Facility to be supplied by Hitachi through Marubeni. The buildings for these facilities will be provided by Raytheon, the largest constructor of nuclear facilities in the USA. The proposed Isotope Facility will consist of a 3000 m2 building adjacent to the reactor with a pneumatic radioisotope transfer system. Hot cells, process equipment and clean rooms will be provided, as well as the usual maintenance and support services required for processing radiopharmaceutical and industrial products. To ensure the highest standards of product purity the processing areas will be supplied with clean air and operated at slightly positive pressure. The radioisotopes to be manufactured include Phosphorus 32 (S-32 [n,p]P-32), I-131(Te-130 [n,g]Te-131[p]I-131) for bulk, diagnostic capsules and therapeutic capsules, Iridium 192 (Ir-191[n,g]Ir-192) wire for radiotherapy and discs for industrial radiography sources and bulk Iodine 125 (Xe-124[n,g]Xe-125[β]I-125 for radioimmunoassay. The bid includes proposals for training OAEP staff during design and development at ANSTO's radioisotope facilities, and during construction and commissioning in Thailand. The entire project is planned to take four years with commencement anticipated in early 1997. The paper will describe the development of the design of the hot-cells, process equipment, building layout and ventilation and other services

  7. Self-reliance politics in radioisotopes production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Energetic and Nuclear Research Institute (IPEN), owned by National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), is a non-profit government institution that produces on a national scale more than 18 radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear medicine. These radiopharmaceuticals are used in the diagnosis and treatment of more than 1.5 million people in Brazil. This level of production was achieved through the creation of new technologies and automation solutions, because of the difficulty and cost on importation of raw materials and labeling compounds ready for use. In Brazil, only CNEN has authorization to import, manipulate and distribute radiopharmaceuticals. Therefore, the quality of those radioisotopes must comply with international specifications and regulations. Much research and 40 years of improvements has won IPEN international approval for the radiopharmaceuticals that it produces, and quality standards and specifications are today as good as in any other developed country. IPEN has even developed a few solutions in radioisotope production for others countries, such as Cuba and soon Peru. The first step towards self-production was the acquisition of a cyclotron (Cyclone-30) and the improvement of the reactor power from 2 MW to 5 MW. Many technical visits were made to radiopharmaceutical institutions around the world with the purpose of bringing self-reliance and self-development solutions to IPEN. The international radiopharmaceutical community has always contributed to this effort, and only with their help our self-development and self-reliance could be possible. IPEN has ISO 9001-2000 certification and has made efforts to improve the installations in order to achieve Good Manufacturing Practice. Every effort we make today has the goal of making radiopharmaceuticals available for therapy at the most competitive price possible for our institution. (author)

  8. Short-lived radioisotopes scaling with energy in plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakavandi, Javad A.; Roshan, Mahmood V.; Habibi, Morteza

    2016-03-01

    The computational investigation of the correlation between the achievable reaction yield and discharge energy for a plasma focus device (PFD) is presented. Radioisotope production in PFDs with applicable activities is highly dependent on establishing the related scaling law. Carbon target is bombarded by high energy deuterons and short-lived radioisotope of 13N is produced through 12C(d,n)13N in which the threshold energy is not very high. Both computed and measured ion energy spectra are used to estimate and optimize the scaling law. It is shown that the number of ions emitted from the pinch region for a device operating under optimized conditions is linearly proportional to the discharge energy of the PFD.

  9. List of DOE radioisotope customers with summary of radioisotope shipments FY 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the document is to list DOE's radioisotopes production and distribution activities by its facilities at Argonne National Laboratory; Pacific Northwest Laboratory; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory; Idaho Operations Office; Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory; Mound Facility; Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Savannah River Laboratory; and UNC Nuclear Industries, Inc

  10. Carbon 14 transfer from seawater to the atmosphere through degassing processes in the Bay of Seine (Northwest France)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COGEMA La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant is located in the North West of Cotentin peninsula near Cherbourg (France). This nuclear plant releases radioelements in atmosphere and in the English Channel. About 8.5 TBq.year-1 of radiocarbon are released as the liquid wastes through a pipe a few kilometres off sea shore, West of the reprocessing plant (COGEMA data). Recent studies in the peninsula show anomalous higher radiocarbon contents in vegetation near the coast that have suggested a supplementary marine contribution through the degassing of the 14C excess supplied by liquid releases of the nuclear plant. Carbon dioxide partial pressure, 14C activities were measured in air and sea water in the Bay of Seine and around the COGEMA-La Hague nuclear reprocessing plant during three cruises in 2000 and 2002. Results show clearly that sea is a source of CO2 and 14C to the atmosphere. Higher 14C concentrations in air and water related to the La Hague liquid wastes are clearly recorded. The aim of this paper is to show results of these oceanographic campaigns. Flux between seawater and atmosphere are calculated in the northwest Cotentin and in Bay of Seine. (author)

  11. Gas-phase noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a Ni(II) tetraaza[14]annulene complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with aromatic polyazamacrocyclic compounds, based on π–π-interactions, keeps the intrinsic electronic structure of CNTs totally intact and allows for combining unique properties of the two interacting components. In addition to porphyrins and phthalocyanines, there are other, simpler compounds exhibiting similar properties, potentially useful for photovoltaic, catalytic and electrochemical applications: for example, tetraaza[14]annulenes. Many of them are highly thermally stable, which makes it possible to employ physical vapor deposition for the preparation of macrocycle–nanotube hybrids. One of such compounds is Ni(II) complex of 5,7,12,14-tetramethyldibenzo-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-3,5,7,10,12, 14-hexaene (also called Ni(II)-tetramethyldibenzotetraaza[14]annulene, or NiTMTAA for simplicity). In the present work, we attempted the noncovalent functionalization of both single-walled and multi-walled CNTs with NiTMTAA in the gas phase at two selected temperatures of 220 and 270 °C, which does not require the use of organic solvents and therefore can be considered as ecologically friendly. The nanohybrids obtained were characterized by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray, Fourier-transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. An additional insight into the structure of adsorption complexes of NiTMTAA on CNTs was provided from density functional theory and molecular mechanics calculations.

  12. Experience on radioisotope waste management in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kil Jeong; Ju, Jun Sik; Kim, Chong Hyun; Lee, Byung Jik; Park, Hun Hwee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-07-01

    The number of institutions using radioisotopes (RI) is almost 800 in total and among them RI waste is generated from 496 institutions, mainly hospitals. The amount of waste to be collected is estimated to be about 800 drums per year. Waste storage and treatment facility are scheduled to be constructed within 1991 through the licensing procedure. Treatment equipment for compaction and solidification are designed and manufactured by the domestic technology. Other related equipment such as drums for collection and transportation vehicle are prepared. RI wastes from hospitals and research institutions have been collected on a trial basis since Aug. 28, 1990.

  13. Medical Radioisotope Data Survey: 2002 Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siciliano, Edward R.

    2004-06-23

    A limited, but accurate amount of detailed information about the radioactive isotopes used in the U.S. for medical procedures was collected from a local hospital and from a recent report on the U.S. Radiopharmaceutical Markets. These data included the total number of procedures, the specific types of procedures, the specific radioisotopes used in these procedures, and the dosage administered per procedure. The information from these sources was compiled, assessed, pruned, and then merged into a single, comprehensive and consistent set of results presented in this report. (PIET-43471-TM-197)

  14. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transport Trailer System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System, designated as System 100, comprises four major systems. The four major systems are designated as the Packaging System (System 120), Trailer System (System 140), Operations and Ancillary Equipment System system 160), and Shipping and Receiving Facility Transport System (System 180). Packaging System (System 120), including the RTG packaging is licensed (regulatory) hardware; it is certified by the US Department of Energy to be in accordance with Title 10, Code of federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). System 140, System 160, and System 180 are nonlicensed (nonregulatory) hardware

  15. Experience on radioisotope waste management in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of institutions using radioisotopes (RI) is almost 800 in total and among them RI waste is generated from 496 institutions, mainly hospitals. The amount of waste to be collected is estimated to be about 800 drums per year. Waste storage and treatment facility are scheduled to be constructed within 1991 through the licensing procedure. Treatment equipment for compaction and solidification are designed and manufactured by the domestic technology. Other related equipment such as drums for collection and transportation vehicle are prepared. RI wastes from hospitals and research institutions have been collected on a trial basis since Aug. 28, 1990

  16. Radioisotope hepatography in patients with chronic bronchitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Examination carried out by means of radioisotope hepatography with bengal-rose-iodine 131 in 69 patients with chronic obstructive bronchitis associated with respiratory insufficiency of grades 1, 2, 3 at the phase of remission revealed disturbances of the absorptive-excretory function of the liver. A direct dependence was found between the intensity of disorder of the functionsl state of parenchymatous cells and degree of resperatory insufficiency in this category of patients. The disorders of the absorptive-excretory function of the liver were most pronounced in respiratory insufficiency of grade 3

  17. Evaluation of carbon-14 (C{sup 14}) levels of terrestrial and marine food products of the environment of the site of Cogema La Hague; Evaluation des niveaux de carbone-14 ({sup 14}C) des denrees alimentaires terrestres et marines de l'environnement du site de COGEMA - La Hague

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-04-15

    This evaluation has for object to inform about the levels in carbon 14 in the environment of the factories of La Hague. Two sectors were differentiated on one hand the terrestrial environment, and on the other hand the marine environment. The investigations concerned first and foremost food products stemming as the vegetable culture (vegetables) or individual breeding (milk, eggs) but also foodstuffs stemming from the local agriculture (cereal). In touch with the second sector, the marine environment, the sampling concerned the accessible products of the sea by all and those locally marketed (fishes, molluscs, shellfishes). The different results are presented in tables. (N.C.)

  18. Carbon and 14C distribution in tropical and subtropical agricultural soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prastowo, Erwin; Grootes, Pieter; Nadeau, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Paddy soil management affects, through the alternating anoxic and oxic conditions it creates, the transport and stabilisation of soil organic matter (SOM). Irrigation water may percolate more organic materials - dissolved (DOM) and colloidal - into the subsoil during anoxic conditions. Yet a developed ploughpan tends to prevent C from going deeper in the subsoil and partly decouple C distribution in top and sub soil. We investigate the influence of different soil type and environment. We observed the C and 14C distribution in paddy and non-paddy soil profiles in three different soil types from four different climatic regions of tropical Indonesia, and subtropical China. Locations were Sukabumi (Andosol, ca. 850 m a.s.l), Bogor (clayey Alisol, ca. 240 m a.s.l), and Ngawi (Vertisol, ca. 70 m a.s.l) in Jawa, Indonesia, and Cixi (Alisol(sandy), ca. 4 - 6 m a.s.l) in Zhejiang Province, China. We compared rice paddies with selected neighbouring non-paddy fields and employed AMS 14C as a tool to study C dynamics from bulk, alkali soluble-humic, and insoluble humin samples, and macrofossils (plant remains, charcoal). Our data suggest that vegetation type determines the quantity and quality of biomass introduced as litter and root material in top and subsoil, and thus contributes to the soil C content and profile, which fits the 14C signal distribution, as well as 13C in Ngawi with C4 sugar cane as upland crop. 14C concentrations for the mobile humic acid fraction were generally higher than for bulk samples from the same depth, except when recent plant and root debris led to high 14C levels in near-surface samples. The difference in sampling, - averaged layer for bulk sample and 1-cm layer thickness for point sample - shows gradients in C and 14C across the layers, which could be a reason for discrepancies between the two. High 14C concentrations - in Andosol Sukabumi up to 111 pMC - exceed the atmospheric 14CO2concentration in the sampling year in 2012 (˜ 103 pMC) and

  19. Decay of reactor neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the decay of massive neutrinos which couple to electrons and are, therefore, produced in nuclear reactors. Lifetime limits for the γ and electron-positron decay modes of these neutrinos are deduced from the experimental limit on the singles count rate in the detector used to study neutrino oscillations at the Goesgen reactor. The dominantly coupled neutrinos are light, and their invariant-lifetime limit t/sup c.m.//m/sub ν/ is 1--3 sec/eV. The subdominantly coupled heavy neutrinos with mass 1--4 MeV could decay into electron-positron pairs. These pairs were not observed, and from the absence of such a signal we deduce restrictions on the corresponding mixing parameters

  20. The long-term trend of carbon-14 level in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term trend of the specific activity of 14C in terms of dpm/gC from 1942 to 1991 in the natural environment in Japan was obtained as baseline data by analyzing plant components so as to evaluate the collective effective dose. It was deduced that the specific activity of 14C in plants reflected well that of atmospheric 14CO2. Uniform distribution of the specific activity in plant among species as well as the production places was confirmed. The Suess effect was observed clearly for a period of 10 years from the late 1960's. The 14C level was at about 13.7 dpm/gC due to cosmic ray production in 1940's, and reached a peak of about 24.5 dpm/gC in 1963 due to nuclear weapons testing and decreased to 15.6 dpm/gC in 1991. Fermented alcohol proved to be a convenient indicator for measuring the annual mean specific activity of 14C in the atmosphere. (3 figs.)