WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbon 13 beams

  1. Fragmentation in Carbon Therapy Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Charara, Y M

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art Monte Carlo code HETC-HEDS was used to simulate spallation products, secondary neutron, and secondary proton production in A-150 Tissue Equivalent Plastic phantoms to investigate fragmentation of carbon therapy beams. For a 356 MeV/Nucleon carbon ion beam, production of charged particles heavier than protons was 0.24 spallation products per incident carbon ion with atomic numbers ranging from 1 through 5 (hydrogen to boron). In addition, there were 4.73 neutrons and 2.95 protons produced per incident carbon ion. Furthermore, as the incident energy increases, the neutron production rate increases at a rate of 20% per 10 MeV/nucleon. Secondary protons were created at a rate between 2.62-2.87 per carbon ion, while spallation products were created at a rate between 0.20-0.24 per carbon ion.

  2. Carbon beams, production and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Installation, test and working conditions of a new negative-ion facility of the Salazar EN tandem are briefly described. Carbon is the material used for the test and the heavy ion stripping phenomenon is reviewed. (author)

  3. Plasma beam discharge in carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the dissociation of carbon dioxide in nonequilibrium plasma of a stationary plasma-beam discharge. Experimental results of spectroscopic and probe measurements of plasma parameters are given. Moreover, a mass-spectrometric analysis of gaseous products of the chemical reactions is presented. In addition the measurement of the deposition rate of solid products by means of a quartz oscillator is described. The results show that plasma beam discharge is an effective tool for inducing plasma-chemical reactions. (author)

  4. Carbon Fiber Damage in Particle Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Dehning, B; Kroyer, T; Meyer, M; Sapinski, M

    2011-01-01

    Carbon fibers are commonly used as moving targets in beam wire scanners. The heating of the fiber due to energy loss of the particles travelling through is simulated with Geant4. The heating induced by the beam electromagnetic field is estimated with ANSYS. The heat transfer and sublimation processes are modelled. Due to the model nonlinearity, a numerical approach based on discretization of the wire movement is used to solve it for particular beams. Radiation damage to the fiber is estimated with SRIM. The model is tested with available SPS and LEP data and a dedicated damage test on the SPS beam is performed followed by a post-mortem analysis of the wire remnants. Predictions for the LHC beams are made.

  5. Biological effect of carbon beams on cultured human cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was performed to determine the biological effect of carbon beams on 13 human tumor cells, in comparison with 200 KVp X-rays. Carbon beams were generated by the Riken Ring Cyclotron. The RBE (relative biological effectiveness) values were distributed from 1.46 to 2.20 for LET of 20 keV/μm, and 2.29-3.54 for 80 keV/μm. The RBEs were increased in all cell lines as the LET of carbon beams was increased from 20 to 80 keV/μm. There was no significant difference in radiosensitivity between cells from adenocarcinoma and those from squamous cell carcinoma. The relationship between the radiosensitivity of cells to X-rays and RBE was analyzed, but no significant correlation was suggested. Several survival curves of 20-40 keV/μm carbon beam irradiation showed the initial shoulders and the recovery ratios between two split doses were determined. Recovery was observed for LET of 2O keV/μm but not for that of 40 keV/μm. Furthermore, recovery ratios were 1.0-1.8, smaller than those for X-rays (1.5-2.4). (author)

  6. Synthesis of carbon-13-labeled tetradecanoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, J T; Patel, K M; Morrisett, J D

    1983-07-01

    The synthesis of tetradecanoic acid enriched with 13C at carbons 1, 3, or 6 is described. The label at the carbonyl carbon was introduced by treating 1-bromotridecane with K13CN (90% enriched) to form the 13C-labeled nitrile, which upon hydrolysis yielded the desired acid. The [3-13C]tetradecanoic acid was synthesized by alkylation of diethyl sodio-malonate with [1-13C]1-bromododecane; the acid was obtained upon saponification and decarboxylation. The label at the 6 position was introduced by coupling the appropriately labeled alkylcadmium chloride with the half acid chloride methyl ester of the appropriate dioic acid, giving the corresponding oxo fatty acid ester. Formation of the tosylhydrazone of the oxo-ester followed by reduction with sodium cyanoborohydride gave the labeled methyl tetradecanoate which, upon hydrolysis, yielded the desired tetradecanoic acid. All tetradecanoic acids were identical to unlabeled analogs as evaluated by gas-liquid chromatography and infrared or NMR spectroscopy. These labeled fatty acids were used subsequently to prepare the correspondingly labeled diacyl phosphatidylcholines. PMID:6631228

  7. Geometric effects on carbon-13 chemical shifts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of our investigations on carbon-13 chemical shifts of tetracyclic dodecanes, we managed to show that a large number of chemical shift differences between members of the series and models provided by bicyclic analogs could be attributed to steric effects. There are examples, however, where this is clearly not the case. In order to investigate apparent anomalies we calculated structures of interest and looked into the relationships between molecular geometry and chemical shifts. As the assignment of some of the key structures in these analysis were made by comparison with model compounds and crucial experiments that could remove ambiguities were missing, we prepared and interpreted two spectra which are presented

  8. Electron beam processing of carbon fibre reinforced braided composites beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In this paper the possibility of producing a new type carbon fiber reinforced composite is examined by applying braiding, a well-known process of textile technology. The appearance of the new Hungarian carbon fiber with excellent mechanical properties in the market enables the development of newer type carbon fiber reinforced composites in the continuously widening range of engineering applications. Advanced hollow profiles, pipes and other composite products can be manufactured in continuous operation. A new way of composite production of this kind is the manufacturing of reinforcing structure by braiding technology producing a composite with sufficient mechanical properties from this cross directional fabric-like textile structure by impregnation. This manufacturing process can complete the variety of hollow products serving the same purpose as pultrusion or filament winding. This way a profile type framework element with a hollow cross section is manufactured having favorable mechanical properties. Owing to its small mass and high specific strength this product can be applied in dynamically loaded structures e.g. in the automotive industry. For crosslinking of the matrix the method of high-speed electron beam curing has been examined in order to reach continuous operation. The field of use and application of carbon fiber braided structures has a great chance especially in machine engineering and in the automotive industry. The main reason for this is that braiding processes are capable of producing structures having good mechanical properties at a low processing price. The mass of the composite load-bearing structure produced this way is one fifth of the steel product having similar geometry, and its specific mechanical properties are nearly as good as that of the most commonly applied semiproduct and structural component, the welded steel profile

  9. Selective carbon 13 enrichment of side chain carbons of ginkgo lignin traced by carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-NMR) is widely used in lignin structural studies, serious difficulties are encountered in the assignments of 13C signals because of their extensive overlaps resulting from the complex structure of lignin and of delicate detection of minor structures. To overcome these difficulties, specifically 13C-enriched precursors of lignin biosynthesis, coniferin-[side chain-β-13C] and coniferin-[side chain-γ-13C], were administered to growing stems of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). The NMR analysis of the milled wood lignins isolated from the newly formed xylem showed that selective enrichment of specific carbons of protolignin in the cell wall was achieved without seriously disturbing the lignin biosynthesis. The presence of saturated methylene side chains in the protolignin was shown for the first time by this selective enrichment technique in combination with NMR analysis. (authors). 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  10. Selective carbon 13 enrichment of side chain carbons of ginkgo lignin traced by carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Y. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture); Robert, D.R. (CEA Centre d' Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Dept. de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee); Terashima, N. (Forest Products Lab., Madison, WI (United States))

    Although carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([sup 13]C-NMR) is widely used in lignin structural studies, serious difficulties are encountered in the assignments of [sup 13]C signals because of their extensive overlaps resulting from the complex structure of lignin and of delicate detection of minor structures. To overcome these difficulties, specifically [sup 13]C-enriched precursors of lignin biosynthesis, coniferin-[side chain-[beta]-[sup 13]C] and coniferin-[side chain-[gamma]-[sup 13]C], were administered to growing stems of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba). The NMR analysis of the milled wood lignins isolated from the newly formed xylem showed that selective enrichment of specific carbons of protolignin in the cell wall was achieved without seriously disturbing the lignin biosynthesis. The presence of saturated methylene side chains in the protolignin was shown for the first time by this selective enrichment technique in combination with NMR analysis. (authors). 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Intensive irradiation of carbon nanotubes by Si ion beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Zhichun; LI Qintao; YAN Long; GONG Jinlong; ZHU Dezhang; ZHU Zhiyuan

    2007-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were irradiated with 40 keV Si ion beam to a dose of 1×1017 cm-2. The multiple-way carbon nanowire junctions and the Si doping in carbon nanowires were realized. Moreover, the formation processes of carbon nanowire junctions and the corresponding mechanism were studied.

  12. Coastal climate reflected in carbon-13/carbon-12 ratio of organic carbon in varved sediment from Santa Barbara basin

    OpenAIRE

    Schimmelmann, Arndt; Tegner, Mia J.

    1991-01-01

    A 1844-1987 time-series of carbon stable isotope ratios from dated sedimentary total organic carbon from the center of the Santa Barbara basin is compared with historical climate and oceanographic records. Carbon derived from carbon-13-depleted phytoplankton and carbon-13-enriched kelp appear responsible for a large part of the isotopic variance in sedimentary total organic carbon. El Niño/Southern Oscillation events are recorded by the isotopic response of marine organic carbon in sediments.

  13. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koguchi, H.; Sakakita, H.; Kiyama, S.; Shimada, T.; Sato, Y.; Hirano, Y. [Energy Technology Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA/mm{sup 2} at the peak of the pulse.

  14. Shunting arc plasma source for pure carbon ion beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2012-02-01

    A plasma source is developed using a coaxial shunting arc plasma gun to extract a pure carbon ion beam. The pure carbon ion beam is a new type of deposition system for diamond and other carbon materials. Our plasma device generates pure carbon plasma from solid-state carbon material without using a hydrocarbon gas such as methane gas, and the plasma does not contain any hydrogen. The ion saturation current of the discharge measured by a double probe is about 0.2 mA∕mm(2) at the peak of the pulse. PMID:22380206

  15. ATLAS 13 TeV Stable Beam Collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Display of a proton-proton collision event recorded by ATLAS on 3 June 2015, with the first LHC stable beams at a collision energy of 13 TeV. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the liquid argon and scintillating-tile calorimeters, clustered in a structure typical of a di-jet event. The transverse momentum of the jets are about 200 GeV and 170 GeV.

  16. Determination of the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon in water; RSIL lab code 1710

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Glenda L.; Revesz, Kinga; Coplen, Tyler B.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab code 1710 is to present a method to determine the δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) of water. The DIC of water is precipitated using ammoniacal strontium chloride (SrCl2) solution to form strontium carbonate (SrCO3). The δ13C is analyzed by reacting SrCO3 with 100-percent phosphoric acid (H3PO4) to liberate carbon quantitatively as carbon dioxide (CO2), which is collected, purified by vacuum sublimation, and analyzed by dual inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (DI-IRMS). The DI-IRMS is a DuPont double-focusing mass spectrometer. One ion beam passes through a slit in a forward collector and is collected in the rear collector. The other measurable ion beams are collected in the front collector. By changing the ion-accelerating voltage under computer control, the instrument is capable of measuring mass/charge (m/z) 45 or 46 in the rear collector and m/z 44 and 46 or 44 and 45, respectively, in the front collector. The ion beams from these m/z values are as follows: m/z 44 = CO2 = 12C16O16O, m/z 45 = CO2 = 13C16O16O primarily, and m/z 46 = CO2 = 12C16O18O primarily. The data acquisition and control software calculates δ13C values.

  17. PREFACE: 13th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques and Applications (SLOPOS13)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    These proceedings originate from the 13th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques and Applications SLOPOS13 which was held at the campus of the Technische Universität München in Garching between 15th-20th September, 2013. This event is part of a series of triennial SLOPOS conferences. In total 123 delegates from 21 countries participated in the SLOPOS13. The excellent scientific program comprised 50 talks and 58 posters presented during two poster sessions. It was very impressive to learn about novel technical developments on positron beam facilities and the wide range of their applications all over the world. The workshop reflected the large variety of positron beam experiments covering fundamental studies, e.g., for efficient production of anti-hydrogen as well as applied research on defects in bulk materials, thin films, surfaces, and interfaces. The topics comprised: . Positron transport and beam technology . Pulsed beams and positron traps . Defect profiling in bulk and layered structures . Nanostructures, porous materials, thin films . Surfaces and interfaces . Positronium formation and emission . Positron interactions with atoms and molecules . Many positrons and anti-hydrogen . Novel experimental techniques The international advisory committee of SLOPOS awarded student prizes for the best presented scientific contributions to a team of students from Finland, France, and the NEPOMUC team at TUM. The conference was overshadowed by the sudden death of Professor Klaus Schreckenbach immediately before the workshop. In commemoration of him as a spiritus rectus of the neutron induced positron source a minutes' silence was hold. We are most grateful for the hard work of the Local Organising Committee, the help of the International Advisory Committee, and all the students for their friendly and efficient support during the meeting. The workshop could not have occurred without the generous support of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), Deutsche

  18. Suitable activated carbon-13 tracer techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feasibility and applicability studies of the proton induced gamma ray emission (PIGE) have been performed. The graphite was firstly bombarded at various proton energies to determine gamma ray yield (and, thus, sensitivities) for the reaction of interest. The accuracy for the determination of 13C abundance was checked, and the precision with which this value and ratios 13C/12C may be obtained was established by repetitive analysis samples. The performance of different standards in this determination was assessed. The mathematical treatment was developed for the determination of 13C abundance in tracer studies, and to derive the equations that govern this method of analysis from first principles, to arrive finally at a simple expression by virtue of the observed regularities. The system was calibrated by measuring the gamma ray yield form the 12C (p, γ)13N and 13C(p,γ)14N reaction as a function of known 13C enrichment. Using this experimentally determined calibration curve, unknown materials can be assayed. This technique is applicable to the analysis of samples with 13C enrichments between 0.1% and 90%. The samples of human breath natural samples were analyzed against graphite and Cylinder CO2 standards. Relative standard deviations were 13C abundance, an increase in 13C per cent isotopic abundance from the natural 1.11% (average) to only 1.39% may be ascertained. Finally, PIGE is compared with more classical techniques for analysis of 13C tracer experiments. Ease and speed are important advantages of this technique over mass spectrometry, and its error is compatible with the natural variation of biological results. (9 refs., 11 figs., 9 tabs.)

  19. Carbon beam dosimetry using VIP polymer gel and MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantemiris, I; Petrokokkinos, L; Angelopoulos, A;

    2009-01-01

    VIP polymer gel dosimeter was used for Carbon ion beam dosimetry using a 150 MeV/n beam with 10 Gy plateau dose and a SOBP irradiation scheme with 5 Gy Bragg peak dose. The results show a decrease by 8 mm in the expected from Monte Carlo simulation range in water, suggesting that the dosimeter is...

  20. Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy of biological systems

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, Nicolau

    1995-01-01

    This book is intended to provide an in-depth understanding of 13C NMR as a tool in biological research. 13C NMR has provided unique information concerning complex biological systems, from proteins and nucleic acids to animals and humans. The subjects addressed include multidimensional heteronuclear techniques for structural studies of molecules in the liquid and solid states, the investigation of interactions in model membranes, the elucidation of metabolic pathwaysin vitro and in vivo on animals, and noninvasive metabolic studies performed on humans. The book is a unique mix of NMR methods and biological applications which makes it a convenient reference for those interested in research in this interdisciplinary area of physics, chemistry, biology, and medicine.Key Features* An interdisciplinary text with emphasis on both 13C NMR methodology and the relevant biological and biomedical issues* State-of-the-art 13C NMR techniques are described; Whenever possible, their advantages over other approaches are empha...

  1. Improvement of carbon fiber surface properties using electron beam irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced advance composites have been used for struetural applications, mainly on account of their mechanical properties. The main factor for a good mechanical performance of carbon fiber-reinforced composite is the interfacial interaction between its components, which are carbon fiber and polymeric matrix. The aim of this study is to improve the surface properties of the carbon fiber using ionizing radiation from an electron beam to obtain better adhesion properties in the resultant composite. EB radiation was applied on the carbon fiber itself before preparing test specimens for the mechanical tests. Experimental results showed that EB irradiation improved the tensile strength of carbon fiber samples. The maximum value in tensile strength was reached using doses of about 250kGy. After breakage, the morphology aspect of the tensile specimens prepared with irradiated and non-irradiated carbon fibers were evaluated. SEM micrographs showed modifications on the carbon fiber surface.

  2. Carbon Beam Radio-Therapy and Research Activities at HIMAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-therapy with carbon ion beam has been carried out since 1994 at HIMAC (Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba) in NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences). Now, many types of tumors can be treated with carbon beam with excellent local controls of the tumors. Stimulated with good clinical results, requirement of the dedicated compact facility for carbon beam radio-therapy is increased. To realize this requirement, design study of the facility and the R and D's of the key components in this design are promoted by NIRS. According successful results of these activities, the dedicated compact facility will be realized in Gunma University. In this facility, the established irradiation method is expected to use, which is passive irradiation method with wobbler magnets and ridge filter. In this presentation, above R and D's will be presented together with clinical results and basic research activities at HIMAC

  3. Carbon-13 NMR studies of liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution, proton decoupled 13C nmr are observed for a series of neat nematic liquid crystals, the p-alkoxyazoxybenzenes, and a smectic-A liquid crystal, diethylazoxydibenzoate in a magnetic field of 23 kG. The (uniaxial) order parameters S = less than P2(costheta) greater than are found to be about 0.4 and 0.9 for the nematic and smectic-A phase respectively at the clearing points. The order parameter increases with decreasing temperature in the nematic phase but is constant, or nearly so, with temperature in the smectic-A phase. In the nematic series studied, the ordering exhibits an even-odd alternation along the series and qualitative agreement with a recent theory due to Marcelja is found. In both phases, the spectra show that the molecule rotates rapidly about its long axis. Tentative conclusions about molecular conformational motion and 14N spin relaxation are presented for both nematic and smectic-A phases. In the smectic-A phase, the sample is rotated about an axis perpendicular to H0 and the resulting spectra are dicusssed. The theory of observed chemical shifts in liquid crystals is discussed and equations are derived which relate the nmr spectra of liquid-crystals to the order parameters. A model for the smectic-C phase due to Luz and Meiboom and Doane is described and lineshapes are determined on the basis of this model for special cases. The dependence of the order parameters on the molecular potential which give rise to the various degrees of order in the different liquid crystalline phases is examined. To a good approximation the functional dependence of the order parameters on the molecular potential is shown to be a simple one in the limit of small tilt angle in the smectic-C phase

  4. Anomalous 13C enrichment in modern marine organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, M.A.; Dean, W.E.; Claypool, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Marine organic carbon is heavier isotopically (13C enriched) than most land-plant or terrestrial organic C1. Accordingly, ??13C values of organic C in modern marine sediments are routinely interpreted in terms of the relative proportions of marine and terrestrial sources of the preserved organic matter2,3. When independent geochemical techniques are used to evaluate the source of organic matter in Cretaceous or older rocks, those rocks containing mostly marine organic C are found typically to have lighter (more-negative) ??13C values than rocks containing mostly terrestrial organic C. Here we conclude that marine photosynthesis in mid-Cretaceous and earlier oceans generally resulted in a greater fractionation of C isotopes and produced organic C having lighter ??13C values. Modern marine photosynthesis may be occurring under unusual geological conditions (higher oceanic primary production rates, lower PCO2) that limit dissolved CO2 availability and minimize carbon isotope fractionation4. ?? 1985 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. FIDDLING CARBON STRINGS WITH POLARIZED PROTON BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUANG, H.; KURITA, K.

    2006-05-01

    An innovative polarimeter based on proton carbon elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region was first tested in the Brookhaven AGS successfully. CNI Polarimeters were then installed in the AGS and both RHIC rings. The polarimeter consists of ultra-thin carbon targets and silicon strip detectors. The waveform digitizers are used for signal readout, which allows deadtime-less data processing on the fly. Polarimeters are crucial instrumentation for the RHIC spin physics program. This paper summarizes the polarimeter design issues and operation results.

  6. Design for a 1.3 MW, 13 MeV Beam Dump for an Energy Recovery Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Sinclair, Charles K; Smith, Colin H

    2005-01-01

    The electron beam exiting an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is dumped close to the injection energy. This energy is chosen as low as possible while allowing the beam quality specifications to be met. As ERLs are designed for high average beam current, beam dumps are required to handle high beam power at low energy. Low energy electrons have a short range in practical dump materials, requiring the beam size at the dump face be enlarged to give acceptable power densities and heat fluxes. Cornell University is developing a 100 mA average current ERL as a synchrotron radiation source. The 13 MeV optimum injection energy requires a 1.3 MW beam dump. We present a mature design for this dump, using an array of water-cooled extruded copper tubes. This array is mounted in the accelerator vacuum normal to the beam. Fatigue failure resulting from abrupt thermal cycles associated with beam trips is a potential failure mechanism. We report on designs for a 75 kW, 750 keV tube-cooled beryllium plate dump for electron gun test...

  7. Dose Response of Alanine Detectors Irradiated with Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo;

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The dose response of the alanine detector shows a dependence on particle energy and type, when irradiated with ion beams. The purpose of this study is to investigate the response behaviour of the alanine detector in clinical carbon ion beams and compare the results with model predictions....... Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated with carbon ions with an energy range of 89-400 MeV/u. The relative effectiveness of alanine has been measured in this regime. Pristine and spread out Bragg peak depth-dose curves have been measured with alanine dosimeters. The track-structure based alanine...... response model developed by J. Hansen and K. Olsen has been implemented in the Monte Carlo code FLUKA, and calculations were compared with experimental results. Results: Calculations of the relative effectiveness deviate less than 5% from the measured values for mono energetic beams. Measured depth...

  8. Design Study of a Superconducting Gantry for Carbon Beam Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design study of a gantry for a carbon beam. The designed gantry is compact such that its size is comparable to the size of the proton gantry. This is possible by introducing superconducting double helical coils for dipole magnets. The gantry optics is designed in such a way that it provides rotation-invariant optics and variable beam size as well as point-to-parallel scanning of a beam. For large-aperture magnet, three-dimensional magnetic field distribution is obtained by invoking a computer code, and a number of particles are tracked by integrating equations of motion numerically together with three-dimensional interpolation. The beam-shape distortion due to the fringe field is reduced to an acceptable level by optimizing the coil windings with the help of genetic algorithm. Higher-order transfer coefficients are calculated and shown to be reduced greatly with appropriate optimization of the coil windings.

  9. Dosimetric characterization of a microDiamond detector in clinical scanned carbon ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinelli, Marco; Prestopino, G., E-mail: giuseppe.prestopino@uniroma2.it; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [INFN—Dipartimento di Ingegneria Industriale, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, Roma 00133 (Italy); Ciocca, M.; Mirandola, A.; Mairani, A. [Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Raffaele, L. [INFN—Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, Catania 95123, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy); Magro, G. [INFN—Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Pavia, Via U. Bassi 6, Pavia 27100, Italy and Fondazione CNAO, Strada Campeggi 53, Pavia 27100 (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To investigate for the first time the dosimetric properties of a new commercial synthetic diamond detector (PTW microDiamond) in high-energy scanned clinical carbon ion beams generated by a synchrotron at the CNAO facility. Methods: The detector response was evaluated in a water phantom with actively scanned carbon ion beams ranging from 115 to 380 MeV/u (30–250 mm Bragg peak depth in water). Homogeneous square fields of 3 × 3 and 6 × 6 cm{sup 2} were used. Short- and medium-term (2 months) detector response stability, dependence on beam energy as well as ion type (carbon ions and protons), linearity with dose, and directional and dose-rate dependence were investigated. The depth dose curve of a 280 MeV/u carbon ion beam, scanned over a 3 × 3 cm{sup 2} area, was measured with the microDiamond detector and compared to that measured using a PTW Advanced Markus ionization chamber, and also simulated using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The detector response in two spread-out-Bragg-peaks (SOBPs), respectively, centered at 9 and 21 cm depths in water and calculated using the treatment planning system (TPS) used at CNAO, was measured. Results: A negligible drift of detector sensitivity within the experimental session was seen, indicating that no detector preirradiation was needed. Short-term response reproducibility around 1% (1 standard deviation) was found. Only 2% maximum variation of microDiamond sensitivity was observed among all the evaluated proton and carbon ion beam energies. The detector response showed a good linear behavior. Detector sensitivity was found to be dose-rate independent, with a variation below 1.3% in the evaluated dose-rate range. A very good agreement between measured and simulated Bragg curves with both microDiamond and Advanced Markus chamber was found, showing a negligible LET dependence of the tested detector. A depth dose curve was also measured by positioning the microDiamond with its main axis oriented orthogonally to the beam

  10. Soil carbon inventories and carbon-13 on a latitude transect in Siberia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bird, M. I.; Šantrůčková, Hana; Arneth, A.; Grigoriev, S.; Gleixner, G.; Kalaschnikov, Y. N.; Lloyd, J.; Schulze, E. D.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 5, 54B (2002), s. 631-641. ISSN 0280-6509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : soil carbon inventories * carbon-13 * Siberia Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.196, year: 2002

  11. PEDOGENIC CARBONATE δ13C AND ENVIRONMENTAL PRECIPITATION CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Catoni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon isotopic analysis is a useful tool for investigating paleoenvironments, as the pedogenic carbonate δ13C is related to δ13CSOM and to the proportions of C3/C4 plants. In this work we interpreted the paleoenvironmental conditions at the time of carbonate precipitation in soils formed under different climates and during different geological ages. Samples were taken from a Bk (PR1, Holocene and from two Bkm horizons (PR2 and PR3, Pleistocene. When the mean δ13C plant values and the most plausible paleotemperatures were used in the evaluation, PR1 showed a lower percentage of C4 plants (48% than Pleistocene soils (~53%, in agreement with paleoclimate changes. When instead the δ13C values of current plants were used for PR1, C4 plants ranged from 59 (12°C to 66% (18°C, suggesting two possible interpretations: either plant species changed during the Holocene, or the plant mean values normally used in the literature are not suitable for Pleistocene reconstructions

  12. Carbon-13 NMR characterization of actinyl(VI) carbonate complexes in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, D.L.; Hobart, D.E.; Palmer, P.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Sullivan, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stout, B.E. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1992-07-01

    The uranyl(VI) carbonate system has been re-examined using {sup 13}C NMR of 99.9% {sup 13}C-enriched U{sup VI}O{sub 2} ({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} in millimolar concentrations. By careful control of carbonate ion concentration, we have confirmed the existence of the trimer, and observed dynamic equilibrium between the monomer and the timer. In addition, the ligand exchange reaction between free and coordinated carbonate on Pu{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} and Am{sup VI}O{sub 2}({sup 13}CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 4{minus}} systems has been examined by variable temperature {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques {sup 13}C NMR line-broadening techniques. A modified Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR pulse sequence was written to allow for experimental determination of ligand exchange parameters for paramagnetic actinide complexes. Preliminary Eyring analysis has provided activation parameters of {Delta}G{sup {double_dagger}}{sub 295} = 56 kJ/M, {Delta}H{sup {double_dagger}} = 38 kJ/M, and {Delta}S{sup {double_dagger}} = {minus}60 J/M-K for the plutonyl triscarbonate system, suggesting an associative transition state for the plutonyl (VI) carbonate complex self-exchange reaction. Experiments for determination of the activation parameters for the americium (VI) carbonate system are in progress.

  13. Production of carbon-13-labeled cadaverine by engineered Corynebacterium glutamicum using carbon-13-labeled methanol as co-substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leßmeier, Lennart; Pfeifenschneider, Johannes; Carnicer, Marc; Heux, Stephanie; Portais, Jean-Charles; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-12-01

    Methanol, a one-carbon compound, can be utilized by a variety of bacteria and other organisms as carbon and energy source and is regarded as a promising substrate for biotechnological production. In this study, a strain of non-methylotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum, which was able to produce the polyamide building block cadaverine as non-native product, was engineered for co-utilization of methanol. Expression of the gene encoding NAD+-dependent methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh) from the natural methylotroph Bacillus methanolicus increased methanol oxidation. Deletion of the endogenous aldehyde dehydrogenase genes ald and fadH prevented methanol oxidation to carbon dioxide and formaldehyde detoxification via the linear formaldehyde dissimilation pathway. Heterologous expression of genes for the key enzymes hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway in this strain restored growth in the presence of methanol or formaldehyde, which suggested efficient formaldehyde detoxification involving RuMP key enzymes. While growth with methanol as sole carbon source was not observed, the fate of 13C-methanol added as co-substrate to sugars was followed and the isotopologue distribution indicated incorporation into central metabolites and in vivo activity of the RuMP pathway. In addition, 13C-label from methanol was traced to the secreted product cadaverine. Thus, this synthetic biology approach led to a C. glutamicum strain that converted the non-natural carbon substrate methanol at least partially to the non-native product cadaverine. PMID:26276544

  14. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C+5 n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with Ip = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Zeff and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of ne, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with Ip and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of Ip and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  15. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Position and Intensity Measurements (1/3)

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  16. A simulation study of a C-shaped in-beam PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of hadrons such as carbon ions is being developed for the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of such a technique is due to the eligibility of charged particles in delivering most of their energy near the end of the range, called the Bragg peak. However, accurate verification of dose delivery is required since misalignment of the hadron beam can cause serious damage to normal tissue. PET scanners can be utilized to track the carbon beam to the tumor by imaging the trail of the hadron-induced positron emitters in the irradiated volume. In this study, we designed and evaluated (through Monte Carlo simulations) an in-beam PET scanner for monitoring patient dose in carbon beam therapy. A C-shaped PET and a partial-ring PET were designed to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the therapeutic carbon beam delivery. Their performance was compared with that of a full-ring PET scanner. The C-shaped, partial-ring, and full-ring scanners consisted of 14, 12, and 16 detector modules, respectively, with a 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module was composed of a 13×13 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals and four round 25.4 mm diameter PMTs. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters such as 10C, 11C, and 15O, a cylindrical PMMA phantom (diameter, 20 cm; thickness, 20 cm) was irradiated with 170, 290, and 350 AMeV 12C beams using the GATE code. Phantom images of the three types of scanner were evaluated by comparing the longitudinal profile of the positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam as it passed a simulated positron emitter distribution. The results demonstrated that the development of a C-shaped PET scanner to characterize carbon dose distribution for therapy planning is feasible.

  17. Practical biological spread-out Bragg peak design of carbon beam

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Lee, Hwa-Ryun; Chang, Seduk; Jang, Hong Suk; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Park, Dong Wook; Hwang, Won Taek; Yang, Tea-Keun

    2015-01-01

    The carbon beams show more advantages on the biological properties compared with proton beams in radiation therapy. The carbon beam shows high linear energy transfer (LET) to medium and it increases the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To design spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of biological dose using carbon beam, a practical method was purposed by using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation code. The various Bragg peak profiles and LET was calculated fo...

  18. Response of SOI image sensor to therapeutic carbon ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Matsumura, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Carbon ion radiotherapy is known as a less invasive cancer treatment. The radiation quality is an important parameter to evaluate the biological effect and the clinical dose from the measured physical dose. The performance of SOPHIAS detector, which is the SOI image sensor having a wide dynamic range and large active area, was tested by using therapeutic carbon ion beam at Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center (GHMC). It was shown that the primary carbon and secondary particles can be distinguishable by SOPHIAS detector. On the other hand, a LET dependence was observed especially at the high LET region. This phenomenon will be studied by using the device simulator together with Monte Carlo simulation.

  19. Photopromoted carbonylation of olefins with carbon dioxide and labelling studies with 13CO2 and 13CH3OH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Jingmei; GAO Dabin; HU Jiehan; ZHOU Guangyun; JIA Yingping; WANG Xiangsheng

    2003-01-01

    Photopromoted carbonylation of olefins with carbon dioxide can be completed in ambient conditions (room temperatures and atmospheric pressure) by Co(OAc)2 catalysis. It was found that in carbonyl carbons of methyl ester of aliphatic acid 50% is from CO2 and the other 50% from CH3OH by labelling experimental with 13CO2 and 13CH3OH.

  20. Reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer by friction hybrid bond technique: Experimental investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Friction Hybrid Bonded FRP Technique is conducted to strengthen RC beams. • Six specimens with different reinforced methods were tested. • The strengthened effects of different strengthening methods were discussed. • The results obtained from the FEA and experiments are agreed very well. - Abstract: Carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) can be used to strengthen the reinforced concrete (RC) beams. But premature debonding is the main failure model in ordinary bond technique, and the strengthening effect is limited. In order to improve bonding and restricting sliding displacement, Friction Hybrid Bonded FRP Technique (FHB-FRP) is developed. Six simple-span RC specimen beams with different strengthened methods were tested in four-point bending. The experiment results indicate that FRP debonding can be effectively prevented by the FHB-FRP strengthened beam. The ultimate load-carrying capacity of the specimen strengthened by FHB-FRP technique is able to increase by a factor of 2.13 times compared with the beam strengthened with ordinary bond technique (U-jacketing technique). In addition, the cracking and yielding loads are improved more significantly by FHB-FRP technique than U-jacketing technique. Specimens strengthened with FHB-FRP technique have cracks with a more limited distribution and width. Finally, the finite element method (FEM) is conducted to simulate the behavior of the test specimens. The results obtained from the finite element method are compared with experiment. Excellent agreements have been achieved in the comparison of results

  1. Electron beam processing of carbon fibre reinforced braided composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of producing a new type carbon fibre reinforced composite profile has been examined by applying braiding, a well-known process of textile technology. Pipe and hollow profile composite products can be manufactured this way by applying Electron Beam curing. The fabric-like braided reinforcing structure was manufactured out of Hungarian-made carbon fibre roving of 48,000 elementary fibres. The mutual irradiation of the system impregnated with epoxy-acrylate oligomer by 8 MeV EB resulted in better mechanical properties then conventional chemical curing. Owing to its low density and high specific strength this new composite product can possibly be applied in dynamically loaded structures e.g. in the automotive industry

  2. Synthesis of colchicine and isocolchicine labelled with carbon-11 or carbon-13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothari, P.J.; Finn, R.D.; Larson, S.M. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The syntheses of isotopically labelled (-)-10-[{sup 11}C/{sup 13}C]-colchicine and (-)-9-[{sup 11}C/{sup 13}C]-isocolchicine have been achieved from the reaction of (-)desmethylcolchicine with [{sup 11}C/{sup 13}C]-iodomethane. The radiolabelled compounds, (-)-10-[{sup 11}C]-colchicine ({sup 11}C-n-colchicine) and (-)-9-[{sup 11}C]-isocolchicine ({sup 11}C-i-colchicine), were isolated by reversed phase HPLC. The total synthesis time was approximately 60 minutes for both radiolabelled compounds with an average specific activity of 240 mCi/{mu}mol calculated to EOB. Utilizing a similar synthetic strategy, we also reported the synthesis of milligram quantities of the carbon-13 enriched compounds and the magnetic resonance signal assignment for (-)-9-[{sup 13}C] isocolchicine. (Author).

  3. Measurement of carbon-13:carbon-12 ratios by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to the measurement of 13C:12C ratios in isotopically enriched samples is described. The carbon in samples is converted into CO2 gas by either combustion of organic material or acidification of carbonate. The gas is then measured by FTIR spectrometry. When spectra are recorded at 0.25 cm-1 resolution the magnitude of the isotopic shift is such that the areas of 12C and 13C rotational lines of the ν3 vibrational band for CO2 can be measured and the isotopic composition determined by reference to a standard calibration graph. The relative standard deviation at natural abundance is 1.2%, which gives an absolute limit of detection of 0.026 atom-% 13C. Details of the decomposition procedures and a comparison of the results with those obtained by mass spectrometry are also presented. (author)

  4. Electron beam influence on the carbon contamination of electron irradiated hydroxyapatite thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G.; Tranca, Denis E.; Stanciu, George A., E-mail: stanciu@physics.pub.ro

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Carbon contamination mechanisms of electron-beam-irradiated hydroxyapatite. • Atomic force microscopy phase imaging used to detect carbon contamination. • Carbon contamination dependence on electron energy, irradiation time, beam current. • Simulation of backscattered electrons confirms the experimental results. - Abstract: Electron beam irradiation which is considered a reliable method for tailoring the surface charge of hydroxyapatite is hindered by carbon contamination. Separating the effects of the carbon contamination from those of irradiation-induced trapped charge is important for a wide range of biological applications. In this work we focus on the understanding of the electron-beam-induced carbon contamination with special emphasis on the influence of the electron irradiation parameters on this phenomenon. Phase imaging in atomic force microscopy is used to evaluate the influence of electron energy, beam current and irradiation time on the shape and size of the resulted contamination patterns. Different processes involved in the carbon contamination of hydroxyapatite are discussed.

  5. Electron beam influence on the carbon contamination of electron irradiated hydroxyapatite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbon contamination mechanisms of electron-beam-irradiated hydroxyapatite. • Atomic force microscopy phase imaging used to detect carbon contamination. • Carbon contamination dependence on electron energy, irradiation time, beam current. • Simulation of backscattered electrons confirms the experimental results. - Abstract: Electron beam irradiation which is considered a reliable method for tailoring the surface charge of hydroxyapatite is hindered by carbon contamination. Separating the effects of the carbon contamination from those of irradiation-induced trapped charge is important for a wide range of biological applications. In this work we focus on the understanding of the electron-beam-induced carbon contamination with special emphasis on the influence of the electron irradiation parameters on this phenomenon. Phase imaging in atomic force microscopy is used to evaluate the influence of electron energy, beam current and irradiation time on the shape and size of the resulted contamination patterns. Different processes involved in the carbon contamination of hydroxyapatite are discussed

  6. Dual ion beam deposition of carbon films with diamondlike properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamondlike films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  7. High dynamic orientation of protons, deuterons and carbon-13 nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of hydrogen, deuterium, and carbon-13 nuclear spin systems have been studied in partially deuterated diols, doped with paramagnetic Crsup(V) complexes, between 0.1 and 0.5 K. Experimental evidence is given that the dynamic polarization in such samples comes from a cooling of the electron spin-spin interaction reservoir by off-resonance microwave irradiation; a strong thermal coupling between this reservoir and the nuclear Zeeman reservoirs cools these too, thus changing the polarizations. In a 25 kG magnetic field at a lattice temperature of 0.37 K we reached a common spin temperature for the nuclear Zeeman reservoirs of 1.1 mK in 1,2-propanediol-D6, which corresponds to a proton polarization of 98%, a deuteron polarization of 44%, and a carbon-13 polarization of 52%. A new way of dynamic orientation of the deuteron spin system was found. It allows one to vary the deuteron tensor polarization or alignment independently of its vector polarization. This can be done by slightly off-resonance RF irradiation of the polarized proton system, which cools the proton spin-spin interaction reservoir. It appeared that at the same time the RF field provides a thermal contract between this reservoir and the deuteron quadrupole interaction reservoir, which caused the observed alignment. Values around 60% were reached for some parts of the deuteron spin system, corresponding to a deuteron quadrupole spin temperature of 7 uK. The dependence of the alignment on RF frequency and initial proton polarization as well as thermal mixing rates are in good agreement with quantitative estimates from spin temperature theory. (author)

  8. Blister formation on tungsten surface by irradiating hydrogen and carbon mixed ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mixed carbon and hydrogen beam was irradiated on to tungsten materials. In the case in which the carbon concentration and sample temperature were 0.95% and 653 K, respectively, large numbers and blisters of various sizes were formed. But in a low carbon concentration or high temperature case, no significant blisters were formed. It was found that carbon impurities in the beam play an important role in blister formation. (author)

  9. Time course of reoxygenation in experimental murine tumors after carbon-beam and X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compared the tumor reoxygenation patterns in three different murine tumor cell lines after X-irradiation with those after carbon-beam irradiation using a heavy-ion medical accelerator (HIMAC) system. The tumors of the cell lines SCCVII, SCCVII-variant-1 and EMT6 on the hind legs of mice received local priming irradiation with a carbon-beam (8 Gy, 73 keV/μm in LET, 290 MeV/u, 6 cm SOBP) or X-rays (13 Gy, 250 kVp). After various intervals, the mice were given whole-body test irradiation (16 Gy, 250 kVp X-ray) either in air or after they were killed. The hypoxic fractions were estimated as the proportions of the surviving fractions of the tumors in killed mice to those in air-breathing mice. In the SCCVII tumors, the hypoxic fractions at 0.5 h were 50% and 21% (p<0.05) after the priming x-irradiation and carbon-beam irradiation, respectively. In the SCCVII-variant-1 tumors, the hypoxic fractions were 85% and 82% at 0.5 h, 84% and 20% at 12 h (p<0.01), and 21% and 31% at 24 h after X-ray and after carbon-beam irradiation, respectively. In the EMT6 tumors, the reoxygenation patterns after X-irradiation and carbon-beam irradiation were quite similar. We concluded that the reoxygenation pattern differed among the three tumor cell lines, and that reoxygenation tended to occur more rapidly after carbon-beam irradiation than after X-irradiation for SCCVII and SCCVII-variant-1 tumors. (author)

  10. Structural properties of carbon nanotubes derived from 13C NMR

    KAUST Repository

    Abou-Hamad, E.

    2011-10-10

    We present a detailed experimental and theoretical study on how structural properties of carbon nanotubes can be derived from 13C NMR investigations. Magic angle spinning solid state NMR experiments have been performed on single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters in the range from 0.7 to 100 nm and with number of walls from 1 to 90. We provide models on how diameter and the number of nanotube walls influence NMR linewidth and line position. Both models are supported by theoretical calculations. Increasing the diameter D, from the smallest investigated nanotube, which in our study corresponds to the inner nanotube of a double-walled tube to the largest studied diameter, corresponding to large multiwalled nanotubes, leads to a 23.5 ppm diamagnetic shift of the isotropic NMR line position δ. We show that the isotropic line follows the relation δ = 18.3/D + 102.5 ppm, where D is the diameter of the tube and NMR line position δ is relative to tetramethylsilane. The relation asymptotically tends to approach the line position expected in graphene. A characteristic broadening of the line shape is observed with the increasing number of walls. This feature can be rationalized by an isotropic shift distribution originating from different diamagnetic shielding of the encapsulated nanotubes together with a heterogeneity of the samples. Based on our results, NMR is shown to be a nondestructive spectroscopic method that can be used as a complementary method to, for example, transmission electron microscopy to obtain structural information for carbon nanotubes, especially bulk samples.

  11. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in CO oxidation by Ag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over silver wool the 13C kinetic isotope effects in the 343--453 K temperature range were experimentally determined and the following temperature dependence was found: 100 ln(k12/k13) = (3.398--630/T) ± 0.083. A reaction CO/O2gas mixture of 1:2 ratio was used in a static system with initial pressures ranging from 20 to 40 kPa. Under these conditions the reaction is of order 1 with respect to CO and order 0 with respect to O2 and CO2 pressure. The apparent activation energy is 59.3 ± 1.7 kJ/mol. In the authors theoretical interpretation of the experimental data various geometries of (CO2)* and (CO3)* transition states were applied, and only a (CO2)* with an interbond angle of 110degree and CO stretching force constants of 1,700 and 1,000--1,400 N/m, respectively, with an asymmetric reaction coordinate was found to be acceptable

  12. Water, hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, carbon-13, and oxygen-18 content of selected lunar material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, I.; O'Neil, J.R.; Adami, L.H.; Gleason, J.D.; Hardcastle, K.

    1970-01-01

    The water content of the breccia is 150 to 455 ppm, with a ??D from -580 to -870 per mil. Hydrogen gas content is 40 to 53 ppm with a ??D of -830 to -970 per mil. The CO2 is 290 to 418 ppm with S 13C = + 2.3 to + 5.1 per mil and ??18O = 14.2 to 19.1 per mil. Non-CO2 carbon is 22 to 100 ppm, ??18C = -6.4 to -23.2 per mil. Lunar dust is 810 ppm H2O (D = 80 ppm) and 188 ppm total carbon (??13C = -17.6 per mil). The 18O analyses of whole rocks range from 5.8 to 6.2 per mil. The temperature of crystallization of type B rocks is 1100?? to 1300??C, based on the oxygen isotope fractionation between coexisting plagioclase and ilmenite.

  13. First stable beams of run2 at 13TeV - Live webcast part 2

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN; Paola Catapano

    2015-01-01

    Second part of the live webcast from the CCC on June 3rd 2015, the day of first 13 TeV collisions with Stable Beams started at the LHC. Running comment moderated by Paola Catapano of CERN Communications and Steve Goldfarb, ATLAS, with Mirko Pojer. Stand ups by directors. Live connections with the 4 LHC experiments' control rooms.

  14. Carbon dynamics in corn-soybean sequences as estimated from natural carbon-13 abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon flow in terrestrial ecosystems regulates partitioning between soil organic C (SOC) and atmospheric CO2. Our objectives were to assess SOC dynamics using natural 13C abundance in corn (Zea mays L., a C4 species)-soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr., a C3 species] sequences. Fifteen treatments of continuous corn, continuous soybean, various sequences of corn and soybean, and fallow were initiated in 1981 at Lamberton, MN, on a Webster clay loam (fine-loamy, mixed, mesic Typic Haplaquoll). In 1991, soil and aboveground shoot samples from all treatments were analyzed for total organic C and delta 13C. Carbon inputs, delta 13C, and SOC were integrated into a two-pool model to evaluate C dynamics of corn and soybean. Total SOC was similar across all treatments after 10 yr; however, differences in soil delta 13C occurred between continuous corn (delta 13C = -17.2 per thous and) and continuous soybean (delta 13C = -18.2 per thousand). Modeled C dynamics showed SOC decay rates of 0.011 yr-1 for C4-derived C and 0.007 yr-1 for C3-derived C, and humification rates of 0.16 yr-1 for corn and 0.11 yr-1 for soybean. Decay and humification rates were slightly lower than those found in other Corn Belt studies. Levels of SOC were predicted to decline an additional 7 to 18% with current C inputs from either corn or soybean, respectively. Annual C additions required for SOC maintenance averaged 5.6 Mg C ha-1, 1.4 to 2.1 times greater than previously reported estimates. Controlled variation in natural 13C abundance in corn-soybean rotations during a 10-yr period adequately traced C dynamics

  15. Kinetics of ion beam deposition of carbon at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth rates of carbon films grown by ion beam deposition using methane gas were measured in situ as a function of deposition conditions. The methane pressure dependence of the growth rate was used to measure the cross-section for charge exchange. Variations in deposition rate per incident energetic particle found for each ion energy were related to ion current density. It was found that rates of growth per incident energetic specie were (i) largest for the smallest current densities, (ii) decreased monotonically with increasing current density, and (iii) were consistently larger than can be explained by deposition directly from the energetic flux alone. These observations were interpreted in terms of irradiation-induced surface interactions which promote chemisorption of methane physisorbed from the ambient atmosphere. (orig.)

  16. Deflection of carbon dioxide laser and helium-neon laser beams in a long-pulse relativistic electron beam diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deflection of carbon dioxide and helium-neon laser beams has been used to measure plasma and neutral density gradients during the operating mode and after the shorting time of a long-pulse field-emission electron beam diode. Plasma density gradients of (1014--1015) cm-4 were observed throughout the diode during the final microsecond of the 2--3 μs electron beam pulse. The neutral density gradient was less than 1x1018 cm-4 during the electron beam pulse. Upon diode shorting, neutral density gradients increased to (1018--1019) cm-4 over ∼1 μs, and decayed over many microseconds. Plasma density gradients of ∼1015 cm-4 were also observed after shorting. These experiments demonstrate the value of carbon-dioxide laser and helium-neon laser deflection for diagnosing plasma and neutral particles in long-pulse electron beam diodes

  17. The proliferative response of mouse intestinal crypts during fractionated irradiation of carbon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clonogenic assay of jejunal crypt during carbon beam and X-ray irradiations was performed. Fractionation with top-up dose assay revealed carbon beam irradiations caused more damage than X-ray did. To clarify this problem is urgent. (author)

  18. Enhancement of neutral beam deposition in hydrogen discharge using carbon pellet injection in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The central ion temperature in the large helical device (LHD), as measured by charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy, has been improved to a record 5.6 keV by combining 21 MW of neutral beam heating with the injection of a carbon pellet. The intensity of the neutral beam emission of the hydrogen Balmer line (Hα: n=3 → 2) was observed to weaken along the beam injection axis following the carbon pellet injection due to the increased beam attenuation. The beam-emission intensity was reconstructed by calculating the density distribution, and the beam-stopping coefficients, along a beam injection axis and was found to fit well to the measured beam-emission for a mixed hydrogen and carbon target plasma. The dynamics of the neutral beam deposition power and the carbon fraction were estimated from the beam-emission measurements using data from ADAS. We conclude that the beam deposition power in a carbon pellet discharge is enhanced over that of a pure hydrogen discharge. (author)

  19. Adherence of ion beam sputter deposited metal films on H-13 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    An electron bombardment argon ion source was used to sputter deposit 17 different metal and metal oxide films ranging in thickness from 1 to 8 micrometers on H-13 steel substrates. The film adherence to the substrate surface was measured using a tensile test apparatus. Comparisons in bond strength were made between ion beam, ion plating, and RF deposited films. A protective coating to prevent heat checking in H-13 steel dies used for aluminum die casting was studied. The results of exposing the coated substrates to temperatures up to 700 degrees are presented.

  20. First stable beams of run2 at 13TeV - Live debate after collisions

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Debate live from the CCC with physicists and engineers after the LHC milestone of 13 TeV collisions with stable beams was reached on June 3rd, 2015. Paola Catapano of CERN communcations and Steve Goldfarb moderrate questions from twitter followers to Director for accelerator Frederic Bordry, EIC Giulia Papotti, machine coordinator Jan Uythoven, theoretical physicist Massimo Giovannozzi, ATLAS spokesperson Dave Charlton and CMS spokesperson Tiziano Camporesi and live connections from the 4 LHC experiments control rooms

  1. First stable beams of run2 at 13TeV - Part 1

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Video Production; Paola Catapano

    2015-01-01

    Live webcast from the CERN control Center (CCC) and the 4 LHC experiments control room covering the first attempt at LHC collisions with stable beams at 13 TeV, marking the beginning of physics for LHC run 2. Commentators: Paola Catapano, Steve Goldfarb, Mirko Pojer and Philippe Baudrenghien. Stand ups and intervoews by CERN directors, BE department leader, EIG and LHC Ops and LHC experiments spokespersons and physicists.

  2. ATLAS event at 13 TeV - First stable beam, 3 June 2015 - run: 266904

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Display of proton-proton collision events recorded by ATLAS on 3 June 2015, with the first LHC stable beams at a collision energy of 13 TeV. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the liquid argon and scintillating-tile calorimeters.

  3. Primary result of application of carbon ion beam and gamma ray for rice breeding improvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Carbon ion beam have been recently attracted as mutagens. A characteristic feature of ion beams is their ability to deposit high energy on a target, densely and locally, as opposed to low linear energy transfer radiation such as gamma rays and X rays. In Vietnam, application of carbon ion beam just starting through cooperation FNCA between Japan and ASEAN countries from 2009. In this report, we want to report primary result of application carbon ion beam and gamma ray for rice breeding improvement of Khang dan 18. Through primary experimental for optimum dose for carbon ion beam we found that the dose of 40 and 60 Gy was suitable for Khang dan variety treatment. Based on optimum dose 40 and 60 Gy of carbon ion beam and 150 and 200 Gy of gamma ray we irradiated for Khang dan variety. The higher dose, the lower seed set ratio were determined both ion beam and gamma ray. Especial in carbon ion beam experiment at the dose of 60 Gy was 39.18% in small experiment and more than 20% seed set ratio at the real experiment. At M4 generation, in the experiment with carbon ion beam at the dose of 60 Gy we received mutant which increase the weight of 1000 seeds (23.0 g) compare to the control 19.7 g meanwhile experiment with gamma ray at the dose of 200 Gy we received some mutant not much change in the seed weight. This may show that carbon ion beam more effective than gamma ray in term of change some characteristics of rice. (author)

  4. Analysis of mutagenic effects induced by carbon beams at different LET in a red yeast strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate inactive and mutagenic effects of carbon beam at different LET, the inactivation cross section and mutation cross section induced by carbon beams of different LET values were investigated in a red yeast strain Rhodotorula glutinis AY 91015. It was found that the maximum inactivation cross section of 4.37μm2, which was very close to the average nucleus cross section, was at LET of 120.0 keV/μm. The maximum mutation cross section was at LET of 96.0 keV/μm. Meanwhile, the highest mutagenicity of carbon ion was found around 58.2 keV/μm. It implied that the most efficient LET to induce mutation in survival yeasts was 58.2 keV/μm, which corresponded to energy of 35 MeV/u carbon beam. The most effective carbon beam to induce inactivation and mutation located at different energy region. (authors)

  5. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance as a probe of side chain orientation and mobility in carboxymethylated human carbonic anhydrase B

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoot Uiterkamp, Antonius J.M.; Armitage, Ian M.; Prestegard, James H.; Slomski, John; Coleman, Joseph E.

    1978-01-01

    13C NMR spectra of [1-13C]- and [2-13C]carboxymethyl His-200 human carbonic anhydrase B have been obtained as a function of pH and in the presence and absence of the active site Zn(II) or Cd(II) ion. Chemical shifts of the 1-13C show that the carboxyl is sensitive to two ionization processes, with a

  6. Ion beam deposition of amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, John C.; Mirtich, Michael J.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon films were deposited on silicon, quartz, and potassium bromide substrates from an ion beam. Growth rates were approximately 0.3 micron/hour. The films were featureless and amorphous and contained only carbon and hydrogen in significant amounts. The density and carbon/hydrogen ratio indicate the film is a hydrogen deficient polymer. One possible structure, consistent with the data, is a random network of methylene linkages and tetrahedrally coordinated carbon atoms.

  7. Proposal to realize a cost breakthrough in carbon-13 production by photochemical separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cost breakthrough can now be made in photochemical production of the rare stable isotope carbon-13. This cost breakthrough is achieved by CO2 laser infrared multiple-photon dissociation of any of several halocarbons (Freon derivatives) such as CF3Cl, CF3Br, or CF2Cl2. The single-step carbon-13 enrichment factor for this process is approximately 50, yielding 30% pure C-13 in one step, or up to 97% pure C-13 in two steps. A three-fold carbon-13 cost reduction to below $20/gram is expected to be achieved in a small laboratory-scale demonstration facility capable of producing 4 to 8 kg/year of carbon-13, using presently available pulsed CO2 TEA lasers at an average power level of 50 watts. Personnel costs dominate the attainable C-13 production costs in a small photochemical enrichment facility. A price reduction to $2/gm carbon-13 is feasible at carbon-13 production levels of 100 to 1000 kg/year, dominated by the Freon raw material costs

  8. Identification of excitonic phonon sideband by photoluminescence spectroscopy of single-walled carbon-13 nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Miyauchi, Yuhei; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2005-01-01

    We have studied photoluminescence (PL) and resonant Raman scatterings of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) consisting of carbon-13 (SW13CNTs) synthesized from a small amount of isotopically modified ethanol. There was almost no change in the Raman spectra shape for SW13CNTs except for a downshift of the Raman shift frequency by the square-root of the mass ratio 12/13. By comparing photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra of SW13CNTs and normal SWNTs, the excitonic phonon sideband due t...

  9. Improved cycling and high rate performance of core-shell LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/carbon nanocomposites for lithium-ion batteries: Effect of the carbon source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We report a fast microwave heating way to prepare LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/C. • The effects of different carbon sources were discussed in detail. • LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/BP2000 shows a discharge capacity of 160 mA h g−1 at 0.1 C. • LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/BP2000 elucidates excellent cyclic stability. • LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/BP2000 exhibits attractive rate capability. - Abstract: Core-shell type olivine solid solutions, LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/C, are synthesized via a very simple and rapid microwave heating route with different carbon sources. The obatined LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/C materials are characterized thoroughly by various analytical techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectroscopy instrument. The particle sizes and distribution of the carbon layer of BP2000 carbon black coated LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4 (LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/BP) are more uniform than that obtained from acetylene black (LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/AB) and Super P (LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/SP). Moreover, the LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/BP nanocomposite shows superior electrochemical properties such as high discharge capacity of 160 mA h g−1 at 0.1 C, excellent cyclic stability (143 mA h g−1 at 0.1 C after 30 cycles) and rate capability (76 mAh g−1 at 20 C), which are better than other two samples. Cyclic voltammetric and electrical tests disclose that the Li-ion diffusion, the reversibility of lithium extraction/insertion and electrical conductivity are significantly improved in LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/BP composite. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy illustrates that LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4/BP composite electrode possesses low contact and charge-transfer impedances, which can lead to rapid electron transport during the electrochemical lithium insertion/extraction reaction. It is believed that olivine solid solution LiFe1/3Mn1/3Co1/3PO4 decorated with carbon from appropriate carbon source is a promising cathode for

  10. A secondary emission type beam profile monitor with carbon graphite ribbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a secondary emission type beam profile monitor with carbon graphite ribbons as a beam target. The carbon graphite is excellent in endurance against heat load, and that they are thin as 1.6-3.0 micron and low z (=6) are advantage for reducing beam loss. Furthermore, since ribbons emits larger amount of electrons than ordinal metal wires because of larger surface, the monitor has higher sensitivity. The monitors were installed in the end of 3-50 BT and injection point of MR in J-PARC, in order to measure injection beam profiles by single passing. Normal size target has 32ch ribbons with 2 or 3 mm in width and their length is 200 mm each. In this paper, basic characteristics of the carbon graphite target and results of beam measurement are reported. (author)

  11. Staphylococcus aureus Peptidoglycan Tertiary Structure from Carbon-13 Spin Diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Sharif, Shasad; Singh, Manmilan; Kim, Sung Joon; Schaefer,Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The cell-wall peptidoglycan of Staphylococcus aureus is a heterogeneous, highly cross-linked polymer of unknown tertiary structure. We have partially characterized this structure by measuring spin diffusion from 13C labels in pentaglycyl cross-linking segments to natural-abundance 13C in the surrounding intact cell walls. The measurements were performed using a version of centerband-only detection of exchange (CODEX). The cell walls were isolated from S. aureus grown in media containing [1-13...

  12. Emulsion Cloud Chamber technique to measure the fragmentation of a high-energy carbon beam

    OpenAIRE

    De Lellis, G.; Buontempo., S; Di Capua, F.; Marotta, A; Migliozzi, P.; Petukhov, Y.; Pistillo, C; Russo, A; Lavina, L. Scotto; Strolin, P.(Dipartimento di Fisica dell’Università Federico II di Napoli, 80125 , Naples, Italy); Tioukov, V.; Ariga, A.(Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, CH-3012, Bern, Switzerland); Naganawa, N.; Toshito, T.; Furusawa, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Beams of Carbon nuclei are used or planned to be used in various centers for cancer treatment around the world because of their therapeutic advantages over proton beams. The knowledge of the fragmentation of Carbon nuclei when they interact with the human body is important to evaluate the spatial profile of their energy deposition in the tissues, hence the damage to the tissues neighboring the tumor. In this respect, the identification of the fragmentation products is a key element. We presen...

  13. Carbon-13 magnetic resonance of hydrocarbons. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grant, D.M.; Pugmire, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Several tetralins, tetrahydrophenanthrenes, and dihydroanthracenes were synthesized, /sup 13/C spin-lattice relaxation measurements were carried out on aromatic and hydroaromatic compounds. /sup 13/C chemical shift studies were also conducted on methylated 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalenes, 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrophenanthrenes, and 9,10-dihydroanthracenes. (DLC)

  14. Sc3CH@C80: selective (13)C enrichment of the central carbon atom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junghans, Katrin; Rosenkranz, Marco; Popov, Alexey A

    2016-05-01

    Sc3CH@C80 is synthesized and characterized by (1)H, (13)C, and (45)Sc NMR. A large negative chemical shift of the proton, -11.73 ppm in the Ih and -8.79 ppm in the D5h C80 cage isomers, is found. (13)C satellites in the (1)H NMR spectrum enabled indirect determination of the (13)C chemical shift for the central carbon at 173 ± 1 ppm. Intensity of the satellites allowed determination of the (13)C content for the central carbon atom. This unique possibility is applied to analyze the cluster/cage (13)C distribution in mechanistic studies employing either (13)CH4 or (13)C powder to enrich Sc3CH@C80 with (13)C. PMID:27109443

  15. Volumetric strengthening of polycrystals of steel 110G13 with high-current electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and phase states as well as mechanical properties are studied in manganese steel 110G13 irradiated by a low-energy (30-40 keV) high-current electron beam. The quantity of pulses with 2.5 μs duration and 10 s intervals constitutes from 1 to 10 s. Using metallographic, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopical methods it is shown that the irradiation results in bulk quasi-periodical hardening of specimens. Hardening effect increases with pulse amount. The zones of increased microhardness are characterized by high dislocation density and by occurrence of γ-ε transformation products

  16. ATLAS event at 13 TeV - First stable beam, 3 June 2015 - run: 266904

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Display of a proton-proton collision event recorded by ATLAS on 3 June 2015, with the first LHC stable beams at a collision energy of 13 TeV. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The yellow rectangles along with the red and green bars indicate energy deposits in the liquid argon and scintillating-tile calorimeters. Tracks originate from several vertices, indicating multiple proton-proton interactions (also known as pile-up ) recorded in one event.

  17. ATLAS event at 13 TeV - First stable beam, 3 June 2015 - run: 266904

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Display of a proton-proton collision event recorded by ATLAS on 3 June 2015, with the first LHC stable beams at a collision energy of 13 TeV. Tracks reconstructed from hits in the inner tracking detector are shown as arcs curving in the solenoidal magnetic field. The green and yellow bars indicate energy deposits in the liquid argon and scintillating-tile calorimeters, clustered in a structure typical of a di-jet event. The transverse momentum of the jets are about 200 GeV and 170 GeV.

  18. Drought indicated in carbon-13/carbon-12 ratios of Southwestern tree rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stomatal closure during periods of moisture deficiency should theoretically lead to elevated 13C/12C ratios as reduction of available CO2 leads to diminished photosynthetic discrimination against 13C in favor of 12C. Stable-carbon isotope ratio chronologies developed from 5-yr tree-ring groups at 17 sites in six southwestern states were tested for a drought relationship by first fitting a spline curve to each chronology to remove the long-term trend and calculating indices as the ratio of actual to spline curve value. The time series of “Del Indices” so developed are significantly correlated with 5-yr mean Palmer Hydrological Drought Indices (post-1930 period) and reconstructed July Palmer Drought Severity Indices from respective areas. Overall, in the period since 1790, the driest pentads were 1900–04 and 1960–64, whereas the wettest were 1980–84 and 1915–19. Maps of drought represented for two pentads seem to be reasonable representations, although spatial correlations of Del Indices with PHDI were generally not significant. These Del Index drought reconstructions may provide a useful measure of past physiological response to drought (stomatal closure), although the present cost of analysis would prevent this from being a routine method. (author)

  19. Multi-pulsed intense electron beam emission from velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes and dispenser cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lian-Sheng; Yang, An-Min; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Huang; Liu, Xing-Guang; Li, Jin; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Zhang, Kai-Zhi; Shi, Jin-Shui; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhang, Lin-Wen

    2010-11-01

    The experimental results of studies of four kinds of cathode emitting intense electron beams are demonstrated under multi-pulsed mode based on an experimental setup including two multi-pulse high voltage sources. The tested cathodes include velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) and dispenser cathodes. The results indicate that all four are able to emit multi-pulsed beams. For velvet, carbon fiber and CNTs, the electron induced cathode plasma emission may be the main process and this means that there are differences in beam parameters from pulse to pulse. For dispenser cathodes tested in the experiment, although there is a little difference from pulse to pulse for some reason, thermal-electric field emission may be the main process.

  20. Multi-pulsed intense electron beam emission from velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes and dispenser cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental results of studies of four kinds of cathode emitting intense electron beams are demonstrated under multi-pulsed mode based on an experimental setup including two multi-pulse high voltage sources. The tested cathodes include velvet, carbon fibers, carbon nano-tubes (CNTs) and dispenser cathodes. The results indicate that all four are able to emit multi-pulsed beams. For velvet, carbon fiber and CNTs, the electron induced cathode plasma emission may be the main process and this means that there are differences in beam parameters from pulse to pulse. For dispenser cathodes tested in the experiment, although there is a little difference from pulse to pulse for some reason, thermal-electric field emission may be the main process. (authors)

  1. The $^{13}$Carbon footprint of B[e] supergiants

    CERN Document Server

    Liermann, A; Schnurr, O; Fernandes, M Borges

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first detection of $^{13}$C enhancement in two B[e] supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Stellar evolution models predict the surface abundance in $^{13}$C to strongly increase during main-sequence and post-main sequence evolution of massive stars. However, direct identification of chemically processed material on the surface of B[e] supergiants is hampered by their dense, disk-forming winds, hiding the stars. Recent theoretical computations predict the detectability of enhanced $^{13}$C via the molecular emission in $^{13}$CO arising in the circumstellar disks of B[e] supergiants. To test this potential method and to unambiguously identify a post-main sequence B[e]SG by its $^{13}$CO emission, we have obtained high-quality $K$-band spectra of two known B[e] supergiants in the Large Magellanic Cloud, using the Very Large Telescope's Spectrograph for INtegral Field Observation in the Near-Infrared (VLT/SINFONI). Both stars clearly show the $^{13}$CO band emission, whose strength implies ...

  2. Numerical simulation of polarization beam splitter with triangular lattice of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xingxing; Yun, Maojin; Wang, Mei; Liu, Chao; Li, Kai; Qin, Xiheng; Kong, Weijin; Dong, Lifeng

    2015-12-01

    A kind of polarization beam splitter with triangular lattice of multi-walled carbon nanotube arrays is designed and simulated. In the employed structure transverse-electric (TE) light is confined in the line defect with photonic band gap effect, while transverse-magnetic (TM) light is guided through it with extremely low diffraction. The performance of the designed polarization beam splitter is evaluated by utilizing optical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, finite element modeling of wave propagation and transmission through periodic arrays. Simulation results indicate that the designed polarization beam splitter has low loss and less cross talk, and thereby may have practical applications in the integrated optical field.

  3. Bending of metal-filled carbon nanotube under electron beam irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abha Misra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Electron beam irradiation induced, bending of Iron filled, multiwalled carbon nanotubes is reported. Bending of both the carbon nanotube and the Iron contained within the core was achieved using two approaches with the aid of a high resolution electron microscope (HRTEM. In the first approach, bending of the nanotube structure results in response to the irradiation of a pristine kink defect site, while in the second approach, disordered sites induce bending by focusing the electron beam on the graphite walls. The HRTEM based in situ observations demonstrate the potential for using electron beam irradiation to investigate and manipulate the physical properties of confined nanoscale structures.

  4. Numerical Investigation Of The Bombardment Of A Graphene Sheet By A Beam Of Carbon Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Khomenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Classical molecular dynamics simulations of the bombardment of a graphene sheet by a beam of carbon atoms are carried out. Covalent bonds in the irradiated sample are described by the Brenner potential. The approximation of elastic balls interacting with graphene via the Lennard-Jones potential is used for particles in a beam. The influence of the energy and density of irradiating carbon atoms and of the presence of a thermostat on physical processes occurring during the collisions with the sample is investigated. Energy values of the particles in a beam, which are enough for the sample destruction, are defined.

  5. Using Pyrolysis Molecular Beam Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Soil Organic Carbon in Native Prairie Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to characterize soil organic carbon (SOC) with pyrolysis molecular beam mass spectrometry (py-MBMS) and then to determine correlations between the mass spectra and associated soil characterization data. Both soil carbon chemistry and the organic forms in which SOC is...

  6. Enhancement of Charpy impact value by electron beam irradiation of carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influences of electron beam irradiation on Charpy impact value of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) have been investigated. The irradiation, which is one of short-time treatments, enhanced the Charpy impact value of CFRP. Furthermore, strengthening of carbon fiber, ductility enhancement of polymer and interface effects on impact test explains the impact value enhancement of CFRP. (author)

  7. Shear strengthening of pre-damaged reinforced concrete beams with carbon fiber reinforced polymer sheet strips

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feras ALZOUBI; ZHANG Qi; LI Zheng-liang

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental investigation on the response of pre-damaged reinforced concrete (RC) beam strengthened in shear using applied-epoxy unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheet. The reasearch included four test rectangular simply supported RC beams in shear capacity. One is the control beam, two RC beams are damaged to a predetermined degree from ultimate shear capacity of the control beam, and the last beam is left without pre-damaged and then strengthened with using externally bonded carbon fiber reinforced polymer to upgrade their shear capacity. We focused on the damage degree to beams during strengthening, therefore, only the beams with side-bonded CFRPs strips and horizontal anchored strips were used. The results show the feasibility of using CFRPs to restore or increase the load-carrying capacity in the shear of damaged RC beams. The failure mode of all the CFRP-strengthened beams is debonding of CFRP vertical strips. Two prediction available models in ACI-440 and fib European code were compared with the experimental results.

  8. Natural abundance measurements of 13C indicate increased deep soil carbon mineralization after forest disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diochon, Amanda; Kellman, Lisa

    2008-07-01

    Northern forest soils represent globally important stores of carbon (C), yet there is no consensus about how they are altered by the widespread practice of harvesting that dominates many forested landscapes. Here we present the first study to systematically investigate the utility of δ 13C and C content depth profiles to infer temporal changes in belowground carbon cycling processes following disturbance in a pure C3 ecosystem. We document carbon concentration and δ 13C depth profile enrichment trends consistent with a kinetic fractionation arising from soil organic carbon (SOC) humification across a northern forest chronosequence (1, 15, 45, 80 and 125+ yrs). Reduced soil C storage that coincided with observed soil profile δ 13C-enrichment patterns which intensified following clearcut harvesting, pointed to losses of SOC in the deeper (>20 cm) mineral soil. This study suggests the δ 13C approach may assist in identifying mechanisms responsible for soil C storage changes in disturbed C3 forest ecosystems.

  9. Carbon-13 spin lattice relaxation and photoelectron spectroscopy of some aromatic sulphides and sulphones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy have been used to study the electronic structure of symmetric dithienothiophenes and corresponding sulphones. The physical data obtained from both spectroscopic techniques have been interpreted with the aid of quantum mechanical calculations. (Auth.)

  10. Stress corrosion cracking tests on electron beam welded carbon steel specimens in carbonate-bicarbonate solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stress corrosion cracking tests have been performed on tapered carbon steel test pieces containing electron beam welds with a view to defining susceptibility to such cracking in a carbonate-bicarbonate solution at 90 C and an appropriate electrode potential. The tests involved applying cyclic loads to the specimens and it is shown that the threshold stress for cracking reduces linearly with increase in the magnitude of the cyclic load component. Extrapolation of these trends to zero fluctuating stress indicates static load threshold stresses in the vicinity of the yield stress (i.e. about 300 N/mm2 for parent plate without a weld, 400 N/mm2 for specimens with welds on one side only and 600 N/mm2 for specimens having welds penetrating through the thickness of the specimen). The averages of the maximum crack velocities observed were least for parent plate material and greatest for weld metal, the former being essentially intergranular in morphology and the latter mostly transgranular, with heat affected zone material being intermediate between these extremes. (author)

  11. Effect of electron beam irradiation on the properties of carbon fiber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement material in an epoxy matrix in advanced composites due to their high mechanical strength, rigidity and low specific density. An important aspect of the mechanical properties of composites is associated to the adhesion between the surface of the carbon fiber and the epoxy matrix. This paper aimed to evaluate the effects of electron beam irradiation on the physicochemical properties of carbon fibers to obtain better adhesion properties in resultant composite. Chemical structure and surface of carbon fiber were determined by FT-IR, elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which indicated that the oxygen content increased significantly with increasing the radiation dose. Thermal stability of the carbon fibers was studied via the thermal gravimetric analysis. Surface morphology of carbon fiber was analyzed by scanning electron microscope. It was found that the degree of surface roughness was increased by electron beam irradiation

  12. Modeling the Biophysical Effects in a Carbon Beam Delivery Line using Monte Carlo Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Ilsung; Cho, Sungho; Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Yongkeun; Shin, Jae-ik; Jung, Won-Gyun

    2016-01-01

    Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) plays an important role in designing a uniform dose response for ion beam therapy. In this study the biological effectiveness of a carbon ion beam delivery system was investigated using Monte Carlo simulation. A carbon ion beam delivery line was designed for the Korea Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator (KHIMA) project. The GEANT4 simulation tool kit was used to simulate carbon beam transporting into media. An incident energy carbon ion beam in the range between 220 MeV/u and 290 MeV/u was chosen to generate secondary particles. The microdosimetric-kinetic (MK) model is applied to describe the RBE of 10% survival in human salivary gland (HSG) cells. The RBE weighted dose was estimated as a function of the penetrating depth of the water phantom along the incident beam direction. A biologically photon-equivalent Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) was designed using the RBE weighted absorbed dose. Finally, the RBE of mixed beams was predicted as a function of the water phantom depth.

  13. Practical biological spread-out Bragg peak design of carbon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chang Hyeuk; Chang, Seduk; Jang, Hong Suk; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Park, Dong Wook; Hwang, Won Taek; Yang, Tea-Keun

    2015-01-01

    The carbon beams show more advantages on the biological properties compared with proton beams in radiation therapy. The carbon beam shows high linear energy transfer (LET) to medium and it increases the relative biological effectiveness (RBE). To design spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of biological dose using carbon beam, a practical method was purposed by using the linear-quadratic (LQ) model and Geant4 based Monte Carlo simulation code. The various Bragg peak profiles and LET was calculated for each slice at the target region. To generate appropriate biological SOBP, a set of weighting factor, which is a power function in terms of energy step, was applied to the obtained each physical dose. The designed biological SOBP showed 1.34 % of uniformity.

  14. Spectrally edited 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR spectra without diagonal ridge for characterizing 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert L.; Anderson, Jason M.; Shanks, Brent H.; Fang, Xiaowen; Hong, Mei; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Two robust combinations of spectral editing techniques with 2D 13Csbnd 13C NMR have been developed for characterizing the aromatic components of 13C-enriched low-temperature carbon materials. One method (exchange with protonated and nonprotonated spectral editing, EXPANSE) selects cross peaks of protonated and nearby nonprotonated carbons, while the other technique, dipolar-dephased double-quantum/single-quantum (DQ/SQ) NMR, selects signals of bonded nonprotonated carbons. Both spectra are free of a diagonal ridge, which has many advantages: Cross peaks on the diagonal or of small intensity can be detected, and residual spinning sidebands or truncation artifacts associated with the diagonal ridge are avoided. In the DQ/SQ experiment, dipolar dephasing of the double-quantum coherence removes protonated-carbon signals; this approach also eliminates the need for high-power proton decoupling. The initial magnetization is generated with minimal fluctuation by combining direct polarization, cross polarization, and equilibration by 13C spin diffusion. The dipolar dephased DQ/SQ spectrum shows signals from all linkages between aromatic rings, including a distinctive peak from polycondensed aromatics. In EXPANSE NMR, signals of protonated carbons are selected in the first spectral dimension by short cross polarization combined with dipolar dephasing difference. This removes ambiguities of peak assignment to overlapping signals of nonprotonated and protonated aromatic carbons, e.g. near 125 ppm. Spin diffusion is enhanced by dipolar-assisted rotational resonance. Before detection, Csbnd H dipolar dephasing by gated decoupling is applied, which selects signals of nonprotonated carbons. Thus, only cross peaks due to magnetization originating from protonated C and ending on nearby nonprotonated C are retained. Combined with the chemical shifts deduced from the cross-peak position, this double spectral editing defines the bonding environment of aromatic, COO, and Cdbnd O carbons

  15. Computational design of organometallic oligomers featuring 1,3-metal-carbon bonding and planar tetracoordinate carbon atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue-Feng; Yuan, Cai-Xia; Wang, Xiang; Li, Jia-Jia; Wu, Yan-Bo; Wang, Xiaotai

    2016-01-15

    Density functional theory computations (B3LYP) have been used to explore the chemistry of titanium-aromatic carbon "edge complexes" with 1,3-metal-carbon (1,3-MC) bonding between Ti and planar tetracoordinate Cβ . The titanium-coordinated, end-capping chlorides are replaced with OH or SH groups to afford two series of difunctional monomers that can undergo condensation to form oxide- and sulfide-bridged oligomers. The sulfide-linked oligomers have less molecular strain and are more exergonic than the corresponding oxide-linked oligomers. The HOMO-LUMO gap of the oligomers varies with their composition and decreases with growing oligomer chain. This theoretical study is intended to enrich 1,3-MC bonding and planar tetracoordinate carbon chemistry and provide interesting ideas to experimentalists. Organometallic complexes with the TiE2 (E = OH and SH) decoration on the edge of aromatic hydrocarbons have been computationally designed, which feature 1,3-metal-carbon (1,3-MC) bonding between titanium and planar tetracoordinate β-carbon. Condensation of these difunctional monomers by eliminating small molecules (H2O and H2S) produce chain-like oligomers. The HOMO-LUMO gaps of the oligomers decreases with growing oligomer chain, a trend that suggests possible semiconductor properties for oligomers with longer chains. PMID:26399226

  16. A large metabolic carbon contribution to the δ 13C record in marine aragonitic bivalve shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillikin, David P.; Lorrain, Anne; Meng, Li; Dehairs, Frank

    2007-06-01

    It is well known that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (C M) significantly affects the stable carbon isotope (δ 13C) signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. This can obscure the record of δ 13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon13C DIC) potentially archived in the shell carbonate. To assess the C M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ 13C DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ 13C. All shells showed an ontogenic decrease in shell δ 13C, with as much as a 4‰ decrease over the lifespan of the clam. There was no apparent ontogenic change in food source indicated by soft tissue δ 13C values, therefore a change in the respired δ 13C value cannot be the cause of this decrease. Hemolymph δ 13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with shell height indicating that respired CO 2 does influence the δ 13C value of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO 2 is related to the size or age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%C M) was significantly higher (up to 37%, with a range from 5% to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10%C M. Interestingly, the hemolymph did contain less than 10%C M, suggesting that complex fractionation might occur between hemolymph and calcifying fluids. Simple shell biometrics explained nearly 60% of the observed variability in %C M, however, this is not robust enough to predict %C M for fossil shells. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ 13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ 13C DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %C M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  17. Allotropic conversion of carbon-related films by using energy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy beams such as ion and laser beams are employed to convert of C60 molecules into another carbon allotropes. The ion beam deposition (IBD) technique is effective to study the nucleation process by changing several growth parameters (beam energy, substrate temperature and ion species). The 12CHx+ (x = 0-4) ions with different energies (50-200 eV) are incident on two kinds of substrates (Si(111) and Ir(100)/MgO(100)) at room temperature and 700 deg C. Immersed nanosize diamonds are found in amorphous films in all cases. The topological features obtained in IBD are compared with laser processing experiments

  18. Quantitative analysis of carbon--carbon coupling in the 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of molecules biosynthesized from 13C enriched precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantitative dependence of the intensities of the various multiplet lines arising from 13C-13C nuclear spin coupling as a function of 13C enrichment is considered. Two cases are distinguished, depending on whether or not the enrichment of the interacting carbons is statistically independent. For statistically independent labeling, the splitting is simply related to the enrichment of the various carbons. For cases in which this condition does not hold, the splitting provides a measure of the correlation in the enrichment of interacting carbons. The quantitative analysis of 13C-13C coupling is shown to provide additional information in biosynthetic experiments in which a correlation in the labeling of the substrates is introduced. In contrast to the information which is obtained by looking for the incorporation of a label into a specific position of a biosynthesized molecule, a quantitative analysis of the correlation in the labeling of the product can give information about the direct incorporation of more complex structural units. Three examples are discussed: the glycolysis of glucose to lactate, the biosynthesis of galactosylglycerol by species of red algae, and the use of doubly labeled acetate to study the biosynthetic incorporation of acetate units into more complex molecules. (U.S.)

  19. Carbon-13 magnetic resonance chemical shift additivity relationships of clinically used furocoumarins and furchromones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural abundance carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of various clinically used furocoumarins and furochromones have been studied. The assignments of carbon chemical shift values were based on the theory of chemical shift, additivity rules, SFORD spectra and model compounds. (author)

  20. In vivo 13 carbon metabolic imaging at 3T with hyperpolarized 13C-1-pyruvate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, S J; Yen, Y; Wolber, J; Chen, A P; Albers, M J; Bok, R; Zhang, V; Tropp, J; Nelson, S; Vigneron, D B; Kurhanewicz, J; Hurd, R E

    2007-07-01

    We present for the first time dynamic spectra and spectroscopic images acquired in normal rats at 3T following the injection of (13)C-1-pyruvate that was hyperpolarized by the dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) method. Spectroscopic sampling was optimized for signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and for spectral resolution of (13)C-1-pyruvate and its metabolic products (13)C-1-alanine, (13)C-1-lactate, and (13)C-bicarbonate. Dynamic spectra in rats were collected with a temporal resolution of 3 s from a 90-mm axial slab using a dual (1)H-(13)C quadrature birdcage coil to observe the combined effects of metabolism, flow, and T(1) relaxation. In separate experiments, spectroscopic imaging data were obtained during a 17-s acquisition of a 20-mm axial slice centered on the rat kidney region to provide information on the spatial distribution of the metabolites. Conversion of pyruvate to lactate, alanine, and bicarbonate occurred within a minute of injection. Alanine was observed primarily in skeletal muscle and liver, while pyruvate, lactate, and bicarbonate concentrations were relatively high in the vasculature and kidneys. In contrast to earlier work at 1.5 T, bicarbonate was routinely observed in skeletal muscle as well as the kidney and vasculature. PMID:17659629

  1. Autotrophic carbon budget in coral tissue: a new 13C-based model of photosynthate translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Pascale; Grover, Renaud; Maguer, Jean François; Legendre, Louis; Ferrier-Pagès, Christine

    2012-04-15

    Corals live in symbiosis with dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinum. These dinoflagellates translocate a large part of the photosynthetically fixed carbon to the host, which in turn uses it for its own needs. Assessing the carbon budget in coral tissue is a central question in reef studies that still vexes ecophysiologists. The amount of carbon fixed by the symbiotic association can be determined by measuring the rate of photosynthesis, but the amount of carbon translocated by the symbionts to the host and the fate of this carbon are more difficult to assess. In the present study, we propose a novel approach to calculate the budget of autotrophic carbon in the tissue of scleractinian corals, based on a new model and measurements made with the stable isotope (13)C. Colonies of the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata were incubated in H(13)CO (-)(3)-enriched seawater, after which the fate of (13)C was followed in the symbionts, the coral tissue and the released particulate organic carbon (i.e. mucus). Results obtained showed that after 15 min, ca. 60% of the carbon fixed was already translocated to the host, and after 48 h, this value reached 78%. However, ca. 48% of the photosynthetically fixed carbon was respired by the symbiotic association, and 28% was released as dissolved organic carbon. This is different from other coral species, where coral tissue after 48 h. Results show that our (13)C-based model could successfully trace the carbon flow from the symbionts to the host, and the photosynthetically acquired carbon lost from the symbiotic association. PMID:22442377

  2. Nano-carbon black and carbon fiber as conductive materials for the diagnosing of the damage of concrete beam

    OpenAIRE

    Yining Ding; Zhipei Chen; Zhibo Han; Yulin Zhang; Torgal, Fernando Pacheco

    2013-01-01

    The nano-carbon black (NCB) and carbon fiber (CF) as electric conductive materials were added into the concrete. The effect of the NCB and CF on the mechanical properties and on the fractional change in resistance (FCR) of concrete was investigated. The relationships among the FCR, the strain of initial geometrical neutral axis (IGNA) and the beam damage degree were developed. The results showed that the relationship between the FCR and IGNA strain can be described by the First Or...

  3. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J; Fitzek, Markus M; Newhauser, Wayne D

    2010-05-01

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient's body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several simple analytical formulas previously developed for proton beams for their ability to calculate WET values for materials exposed to beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions. Experimentally measured heavy charged particle beam ranges and WET values from an iterative numerical method were compared with the WET values calculated by the analytical formulas. In most cases, the deviations were within 1 mm. We conclude that the analytical formulas originally developed for proton beams can also be used to calculate WET values for helium, carbon and iron ion beams with good accuracy. PMID:20371908

  4. Calculation of Lifetime of Charge-Exchanging Carbon Targets in Intense Heavy Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gikal, B N; Kazacha, V I; Kamanin, D V

    2005-01-01

    Influence of the radiation damage and sublimation effects on the lifetime of carbon targets used for the accelerated ion beam extraction from cyclotrons by the charge-exchanging method is considered. The theoretical models permitting evaluation of the carbon target lifetime depending on their and ion beam parameters are presented both for the radiation damage and sublimation effects. It is shown that for the U-400 cyclotron carbon targets 50 $\\mu$g/cm$^{2}$ thick and for the ion beam flux density up to 100 p$\\mu$A/cm$^{2}$ the main effect defining the carbon target lifetime is the radiation damage. If the carbon target thickness and the ion beam flux density are greater, the target lifetime is defined already by the sublimation effect. In this connection "casting pipes" can be formed in the target, affecting on the mean energy and the energy distribution dispersion of the ion beam flied through the target. Comparison of measured and calculated target lifetimes is carried out

  5. Geant4 Simulation Study of Dose Distribution and Energy Straggling for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams in Water

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao Qiang; Zhang Zheng; Li Yang

    2016-01-01

    Dose distribution and energy straggling for proton and carbon ion beams in water are investigated by using a hadrontherapy model based on the Geant4 toolkit. By gridding water phantom in N×N×N voxels along X, Y and Z axes, irradiation dose distribution in all the voxels is calculated. Results indicate that carbon ion beams have more advantages than proton beams. Proton beams have bigger width of the Bragg peak and broader lateral dose distribution than carbon ion beams for the same position o...

  6. Determination of total organic carbon content and delta(13)C in carbonate-rich detrital sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Galy, V; Julien Bouchez; C. France-Lanord;  ,

    2007-01-01

    The determination of total organic carbon content and composition in detrital sediments requires careful removal of their carbonate minerals. In detrital sediments containing large amounts of carbonates, including dolomite, this can only be achieved by liquid acid leaching that may solubilise a significant proportion of the organic carbon. For a set of detrital sediments from the Himalayan system and the Amazon River as well as five geological reference materials, we determined the proportion...

  7. Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its δ13C in the Ganga (Hooghly) River estuary, India: Evidence of DIC generation via organic carbon degradation and carbonate dissolution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Samanta, S.; Dalai, T.K.; Pattanaik, J.K.; Rai, S.K.; Mazumdar, A.

    In this study, we present comprehensive data on dissolved Ca, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and its carbon isotope composition (δ13CDIC) of (i) the Ganga (Hooghly) River estuary water sampled during six seasons...

  8. Fabrication of carbon nanorod from the irradiation of proton beam on carbon nanotube and characterization of its resistance variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabrication method of the transparent carbon nanotubes film on the glass with the transparency of 50 ∼ 80 % and the sheet resistance of 500 ∼ 2000 Ω/sq is developed based on the established study of the enhancement of the conductivity. Deformation of the bundle-type single-walled carbon nanotubes are analyzed with the variation of the energy transfer in the carbon nanotubes by the variation of the dose of the 10 MeV proton beam. Construction of the variation of the conductivity of the carbon nanotube network and the variation of the transparency of the glass are used for the feasibility of the fabrication of the transparent electrode using carbon nanotubes network. Transparent carbon nanotubes film are fabricated using spray method and the sheet resistance and transparency are controlled by the control of the quantity of the dispersion. Accumulated energy on the carbon nanotubes are controlled by the dose of the 10 MeV proton. Proton irradiation creates defects on the carbon nanotubes by particle collision and the recombination of the defects generates the decrease of the diameter of the carbon nanotubes. Ejection of the carbon from the carbon nanotubes generates not only the formation of the connection between carbon nanotubes but also between carbon nanotube bundles. These connections decrease the resistance between carbon nanotube networks and 2.5 times increase is measured. Although the electrical conductivity is increased by the proton irradiation, sulfuration of the glass is increased. Variation of the transparency is caused by the positive ion irradiation and the transparency is decreased with the dose due to the increase of the energy transfer on the glass

  9. Strong Metal-Support Interaction: Growth of Individual Carbon Nanofibers from Amorphous Carbon Interacting with an Electron Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Wei; Kuhn, Luise Theil

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO/Ni nanopar......The article discusses the growth behavior of carbon nanofibers (CNFs). It mentions that CNFs can be synthesized using methods such as arc-discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition. It further states that CNFs can be grown from a physical mixing of amorphous carbon and CGO....../Ni nanoparticles, devoid of any gaseous carbon source and external heating and stimulated by an electron beam in a 300 kilo volt transmission electron microscope....

  10. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of [1-13C] enriched monosaccharides. Signal assignments and orientational dependence of geminal and vicinal carbon--carbon and carbon--hydrogen spin--spin coupling constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early assignments of the 13C resonances in the natural abundance 13C NMR spectra of monosaccharides have been reevaluated in light of recent coupling data from the spectra of 13C-1 labeled sugars. The technique of specific 13C enrichment not only identifies the labeled carbon unambiguously but can be used to assign more remote carbon resonances due to scalar carbon-carbon coupling. The pattern of carbon-carbon coupling observed in all of the sugars thus far studied is remarkably constant. In addition to the large (approximately 46 Hz) one-bond coupling between C-1 and C-2, C-3 exhibits a coupling to C-1 only in the β anomer (approximately 4 Hz) while C-5 is coupled to C-1 only in the α anomer (approximately 2 Hz). In addition, C-6 is coupled to C-1 in both anomers and C-4 shows no evidence of coupling to C-1 in any of the sugars examined. These couplings have been used to reassign several resonances and the original assignments are discussed in terms of the predictive rules used for resonance assignments in carbohydrates. The vicinal couplings of C-6 and C-4 to C-1 appear to obey a Karplus-type relationship. The geminal 2J/sub CCC/ and 2J/sub COC/ couplings are discussed in terms of a dihedral angle dependence where the angle is defined by the relative orientations of C-3 or C-5 and the electronegative oxygen substituents on C-1. Additional data on 2J/sub CCH/ couplings involving C-1 and H-2 are also readily obtained with the C-1 labeled sugars

  11. Analysis of the strength and stiffness of timber beams reinforced with carbon fiber and glass fiber

    OpenAIRE

    Juliano Fiorelli; Antonio Alves Dias

    2003-01-01

    An experimental analysis of pinewood beams (Pinus caribea var hondurensis) reinforced with glass and/or carbon fibers is discussed. The theoretical model employed to calculate the beam's bending strength takes into account the timber's ultimate limit states of tensile strength and failure by compression, considering a model of fragile elastic tension and plastic elastic compression. The validity of the theoretical model is confirmed by a comparison of the theoretical and experimental results,...

  12. Simulation of soil organic carbon in different soil size fractions using 13Carbon measurement data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, P.; Bellarby, J.; Chenu, C.; Foereid, B.; Wattenbach, M.; Zingore, S.; Smith, J.

    2009-04-01

    We simulate the soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics at a chronoseqeunce site in France, using the Rothamsted Carbon model. The site exhibits a transition from C3 plants, dominated by pine forest, to a conventional C4 maize rotation. The different 13C signatures of the forest plants and maize are used to distinguish between the woodland derived carbon (C) and the maize derived C. The model is evaluated against total SOC and C derived from forest and maize, respectively. The SOC dynamics of the five SOC pools of the model, decomposable plant material (DPM), resistant plant material (RPM), biomass, humus and inert C, are also compared to the SOC dynamics measured in different soil size fractions. These fractions are > 50 μm (particulate organic matter), 2-50 μm (silt associated SOC) and 50 μm and the sum of the other pools corresponds well to the SOC measured in the soil size fraction stocks in the first 20 years after land-use change and overestimates the C accumulation of maize C. Several hypotheses were tested to evaluate the simulations. Input data and internal model parameter uncertainties had minor effects on the simulations results. Accounting for erosion and implementing a simple tillage routine did not improve the simulation fit to the data. We therefore hypothesize that a generic process that is not yet explicitly accounted for in the ROTHC model could explain the loss in soil C after land use change. Such a process could be the loss of the physical protection of soil organic matter as would be observed following cultivation of a previously uncultivated soil. Under native conditions a fraction of organic matter is protected in stable soil aggregates. These aggregates are physically disrupted by continuous and repeated cultivation of the soil. The underestimation of SOC loss by the model can be mainly attributed to the slow turnover of the humus pool. This pool was shown to represent mainly the SOC associated with the silt and clay soil fraction. Here, the

  13. Geant4 Simulation Study of Dose Distribution and Energy Straggling for Proton and Carbon Ion Beams in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dose distribution and energy straggling for proton and carbon ion beams in water are investigated by using a hadrontherapy model based on the Geant4 toolkit. By gridding water phantom in N×N×N voxels along X, Y and Z axes, irradiation dose distribution in all the voxels is calculated. Results indicate that carbon ion beams have more advantages than proton beams. Proton beams have bigger width of the Bragg peak and broader lateral dose distribution than carbon ion beams for the same position of Bragg peaks. Carbon ion has a higher local ionization density and produces more secondary electrons than proton, so carbon ion beams can achieve a higher value of relative biological effectiveness.

  14. Analysis of the carbon-13 and proton NMR spectra of bovine chromaffin granules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, R R; Richards, E P

    1977-03-29

    Natural abundance carbon-13 and proton NMR spectra of bovine chromaffin granules have been obtained and analyzed using computer simulation techniques. High resolution spectra show the presence of a fluid aqueous phase containing epinephrine, ATP and a random coil protein. The protein spectrum contains unusually intense resonances due to glutamic acid and proline and has been simulated satisfactorily using the known amino acid composition of chromogranin A. The lipid phase of chromaffin granules gives rise to intense, but very broad, resonances in the carbon-13 spectrum. Protons in the lipid phase are also observable as a very rapid component of the proton-free induction decay (T2 approximately equal to 15 microns). Linewidths of the carbon-13 spectra have been used to set upper limits on rotational correlation times and on the motional anisotropy in the aqueous phase. These limits show that the aqueous phase is a simple solution (not a gel) that is isotropic over regions much larger than solute dimensions. No gel transition is observed between -3 and 25 degrees C. The carbon-13 spectra are definitely inconsistent with a lipoprotein matrix model and chromaffin granules previously proposed by Helle and Serck-Hanssen ((1975) Mol. Cell, Biochem. 6, 127-146). Relative carbon-13 intensities of ATP and epinephrine are not consistent with the known 1 : 4 mol ratio of these components. This fact suggests that epinephrine and ATP are not directly complexed in intact chromaffin granules. PMID:849474

  15. Cancer stem cells: The potential of carbon ion beam radiation and new radiosensitizers (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Sung-Jae; Ishii, Hideshi; Tamari, Keisuke; Hayashi, Kazuhiko; Nishida, Naohiro; Konno, Masamitsu; Kawamoto, Koichi; Koseki, Jun; Fukusumi, Takahito; Hasegawa, Shinichiro; Ogawa, Hisataka; Hamabe, Atsushi; Miyo, Masaaki; Noguchi, Kozo; Seo, Yuji; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small population of cells in cancer with stem-like properties such as cell proliferation, multiple differentiation and tumor initiation capacities. CSCs are therapy-resistant and cause cancer metastasis and recurrence. One key issue in cancer therapy is how to target and eliminate CSCs, in order to cure cancer completely without relapse and metastasis. To target CSCs, many cell surface markers, DNAs and microRNAs are considered as CSC markers. To date, the majority of the reported markers are not very specific to CSCs and are also present in non-CSCs. However, the combination of several markers is quite valuable for identifying and targeting CSCs, although more specific identification methods are needed. While CSCs are considered as critical therapeutic targets, useful treatment methods remain to be established. Epigenetic gene regulators, microRNAs, are associated with tumor initiation and progression. MicroRNAs have been recently considered as promising therapeutic targets, which can alter the therapeutic resistance of CSCs through epigenetic modification. Moreover, carbon ion beam radiotherapy is a promising treatment for CSCs. Evidence indicates that the carbon ion beam is more effective against CSCs than the conventional X-ray beam. Combination therapies of radiosensitizing microRNAs and carbon ion beam radiotherapy may be a promising cancer strategy. This review focuses on the identification and treatment resistance of CSCs and the potential of microRNAs as new radiosensitizers and carbon ion beam radiotherapy as a promising therapeutic strategy against CSCs. PMID:26330103

  16. Particle beam radiation therapy using carbon ions and protons for oligometastatic lung tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was undertaken to analyze the efficacy and feasibility of particle beam radiation therapy (PBRT) using carbon ions and protons for the treatment of patients with oligometastatic lung tumors. A total of 47 patients with 59 lesions who underwent PBRT for oligometastatic lung tumors between 2003 and 2011 were included in this study. Patient median age was 66 (range, 39–84) years. The primary tumor site was the colorectum in 11 patients (23.4%), lung in 10 patients (21.3%) and a variety of other sites in 26 patients (55.3%). Thirty-one patients (66%) received chemotherapy prior to PBRT. Thirty-three lesions were treated with 320-MeV carbon ions and 26 were treated with 150- or 210-Mev protons in 1–4 portals. A median total dose of 60 (range, 52.8–70.2) GyE was delivered at the isocenter in 8 (range, 4–26) fractions. The median follow-up time was 17 months. The local control, overall survival and progression-free survival rates at 2 years were 79%, 54 and 27% respectively. PBRT-related toxicities were observed; six patients (13%) had grade 2 toxicity (including grade 2 radiation pneumonitis in 2) and six patients (13%) had grade 3 toxicity. Univariate analysis indicated that patients treated with a biologically equivalent dose of 10 (BED10) <110 GyE10, had a significantly higher local recurrence rate. Local control rates were relatively lower in the subsets of patients with the colorectum as the primary tumor site. No local progression was observed in metastases from colorectal cancer irradiated with a BED10 ≥ 110 GyE10. There was no difference in treatment results between proton and carbon ion therapy. PRBT is well tolerated and effective in the treatment of oligometastatic lung tumors. To further improve local control, high-dose PBRT with a BED10 ≥ 110 GyE10 may be promising. Further investigation of PBRT for lung oligometastases is warranted

  17. Depletion of 13C in lignin and its implications for stable carbon isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable carbon isotope compositions of organic matter are now widely used to trace carbon flow in ecosystems, and have been instrumental in shaping current perceptions of the importance of terrestrial vegetation to estuarine and coastal marine environments. A general assumption in these and other studies relying on carbon isotope compositions for source identification of organic matter has been that the major biochemical components of plant tissues are isotopically invariant. We report here large differences between the carbon isotope compositions of the polysaccharide and lignin components of a variety of vascular plants, including the salt-marsh grass Spartina alterniflora, and demonstrate that the carbon isotope composition of Spartina detritus gradually changes during biogeochemical processing as polysaccharides are preferentially removed, leaving a material that is relatively enriched in lignin-derived carbon and depleted in 13C. (author)

  18. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development

  19. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shornikov, A.; Wenander, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  20. Analysis of the strength and stiffness of timber beams reinforced with carbon fiber and glass fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fiorelli

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available An experimental analysis of pinewood beams (Pinus caribea var hondurensis reinforced with glass and/or carbon fibers is discussed. The theoretical model employed to calculate the beam's bending strength takes into account the timber's ultimate limit states of tensile strength and failure by compression, considering a model of fragile elastic tension and plastic elastic compression. The validity of the theoretical model is confirmed by a comparison of the theoretical and experimental results, while the efficiency of the fiber reinforcement is corroborated by the increased strength and stiffness of the reinforced timber beams.

  1. Beam asymmetry Σ in π0 photoproduction off protons bound in carbon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the dynamics of the inner components of the nucleon, its excitation spectrum is investigated through meson-photoproduction. Due to the strong overlap of the nucleon's excited states, it is insufficient to determine the cross section only. To identify all resonance contributions unambiguously, single and double polarization observables have to be measured. At the Crystal Barrel experiment at ELSA in Bonn, this is achieved utilizing linearly or circularly polarized photons and longitudinally or transversely polarized nucleons. Polarized protons are realized in a butanol target, which consists of hydrogen, oxygen and carbon. A pure carbon target was used to perform a background measurement. The results for the beam asymmetry Σ in π0 photoproduction, obtained with a carbon target and a linearly polarized photon beam, are presented. Furthermore, the influence of carbon background on the measured polarization observables is discussed.

  2. Reinforced concrete T-beams externally prestressed with unbonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennitz, Anders; Nilimaa, Jonny; Ravn, Dorthe Lund; Schmidt, Jacob W.; Täljsten, Björn; Goltermann, Per

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a series of experiments examining the behavior of seven beams prestressed with unbonded external carbon fiberreinforced polymer (CFRP) tendons anchored using a newly developed anchorage and post-tensioning system. The effects of varying the initial tendon depth, prestressing...... force, and the presence of a deviator were investigated. The results were compared to those observed with analogous beams prestressed with steel tendons, common beam theory, and predictions made using an analytical model adapted from the literature. It was found that steel and CFRP tendons had very...... similar effects on the structural behavior of the strengthened beams; the minor differences that were observed are attributed to the difference between the modulus of elasticity of the CFRP and the steel used in the tests. The models predicted the beams' load-bearing behavior accurately but were less...

  3. Average Frequency – RA Value for Reinforced Concrete Beam Strengthened with Carbon Fibre Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad M. Z.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Emission (AE is one of the tools that can be used to detect the crack and to classify the type of the crack of reinforced concrete (RC structure. Dislocation or movement of the material inside the RC may release the transient elastic wave. In this situation, AE plays important role whereby it can be used to capture the transient elastic wave and convert it into AE parameters such as amplitude, count, rise time and duration. Certain parameter can be used directly to evaluate the crack behavior. But in certain cases, the AE parameter needs to add and calculate by using related formula in order to observe the behavior of the crack. Using analysis of average frequency and RA value, the crack can be classified into tensile or shear cracks. In this study, seven phases of increasing static load were used to observe the crack behavior. The beams were tested in two conditions. For the first condition, the beams were tested in original stated without strengthened with carbon fibre sheet (CFS at the bottom of the beam or called as tension part of the beam. For the second condition, the beams were strengthened with CFS at the tension part of the beam. It was found that, beam wrapped with CFS enhanced the strength of the beams in term of maximum ultimate load. Based on the relationship between average frequency (AF and RA value, the cracks of the beams can be classified.

  4. Beam test of compact ECR ion source for carbon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion source for medical facilities should have characteristics of easy maintenance, low electric power, good stability and long operation time without maintenance (one year or more). Based on the proto type compact source, a 10 GHz compact ECR ion source with all permanent magnets has been developed. Peaks of the mirror magnetic field along the beam axis are 0.59 T at the extraction side and 0.87 T at the gas injection side, respectively, while the minimum B strength is 0.25 T. The source has a diameter of 320 mm and a length of 295 mm. The result of beam tests shows that a C4+ intensity of 530 μA was obtained under an extraction voltage of 45 kV. This paper describes the design detail and the experimental results for the new source. (author)

  5. Determination of site-specific carbon isotope ratios at natural abundance by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caer, V; Trierweiler, M; Martin, G J; Martin, M L

    1991-10-15

    Site-specific natural isotope fractionation of hydrogen studied by deuterium NMR (SNIF-NMR) spectroscopy is a powerful source of information on hydrogen pathways occurring in biosyntheses in natural conditions. The potential of the carbon counterpart of this method has been investigated and compared. Three typical molecular species, ethanol, acetic acid, and vanillin, have been considered. Taking into account the requirements of quantitative 13C NMR, appropriate experimental procedures have been defined and the repeatability and reproducibility of the isotope ratio determinations have been checked in different conditions. It is shown that the carbon version of the SNIF-NMR method is capable of detecting small differences in the carbon-13 content of the ethyl fragment of ethanols from different botanical or synthetic origins. These results are in agreement with mass spectrometry determinations of the overall carbon isotope ratios. Deviations with respect to a statistical distribution of 13C have been detected in the case of acetic acid and vanillin. However, since the method is very sensitive to several kinds of systematic error, only a relative significance can be attached at present to the internal parameters directly accessible. Isotope dilution experiments have also been carried out in order to check the consistency of the results. In the present state of experimental accuracy, the 13C NMR method is of more limited potential than 2H SNIF-NMR spectroscopy. However it may provide complementary information. Moreover it is particularly efficient for detecting and quantifying adulterations that aim to mimic the overall carbon-13 content of a natural compound by adding a selectivity enriched species to a less expensive substrate from a different origin. PMID:1759714

  6. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration

  7. Experiments with the newly available carbon beams at ISOLDE

    CERN Multimedia

    Garcia borge, M J; Koester, U H; Koldste, G T

    2002-01-01

    Recent target-ions-source developments at ISOLDE providing significantly increased yields for carbon isotopes, open up for new and intriguing experiments. We propose to exploit this in two different ways. In particular we wish to do an elastic resonance scattering experiment of $^{9}$C on a proton target to gain information on the particle unbound system $^{10}$N. Furthermore we wish to perform decay experiments of the neutron-rich carbon isotopes, with special focus on $^{17-19}$C but also including a test to see whether the even more neutron-rich isotopes $^{20,22}$C are accessible at ISOLDE.

  8. Quasi-steady carbon plasma source for neutral beam injector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, H; Sakakita, H; Kiyama, S; Shimada, T; Sato, Y; Hirano, Y

    2014-02-01

    Carbon plasma is successfully sustained during 1000 s without any carrier gas in the bucket type ionization chamber with cusp magnetic field. Every several seconds, seed plasmas having ∼3 ms duration time are injected into the ionization chamber by a shunting arch plasma gun. The weakly ionized carbon plasma ejected from the shunting arch is also ionized by 2.45 GHz microwave at the electron cyclotron resonance surface and the plasma can be sustained even in the interval of gun discharges. Control of the gun discharge interval allows to keep high pressure and to sustain the plasma for long duration. PMID:24593646

  9. ELECTRO-THERMAL EFFECTS AND DEFORMATION RESPONSE OF CARBON FIBER MAT CEMENT BEAMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhuSirong; LiZhuoqiu; SongXianhui

    2003-01-01

    A carbon fiber mat is a sheet composed of intercrossing short carbon fibers, which has more stable and lower electrical resistivity compared with dispersed short carbon fiber mixed in cement. Thereby carbon fiber mat cement could exhibit obvious electro-thermal effect. When electrified, the temperature of composite structures made up of cement mortar and carbon fiber mat will rise rapidly. If the temperature field is not uniform, temperature difference will cause structures to deform, which can be used to adjust the deformation of structures. The temperature field and deformation response driven by the electro-thermal effects of a type of carbon fiber mat cement beams are studied. Firstly, the temperature and deformation responses are studied using theories of thermal conduction and elasticity. Secondly, experimental results are given to verify the theoretical solution. These two parts lay the foundation for temperature and deformation adjustment.

  10. A Large Metabolic Carbon Ccontribution to the δ13C Record in Marine Aragonitic Bivalve Shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillikin, D. P.; Lorrain, A.; Dehairs, F.

    2006-12-01

    The stable carbon isotopic signature archived in bivalve shells was originally thought to record the δ13C of seawater dissolved inorganic carbon13C-DIC). However, more recent studies have shown that the incorporation of isotopically light metabolic carbon (M) significantly affects the δ13C signal recorded in biogenic carbonates. To assess the M contribution to Mercenaria mercenaria shells collected in North Carolina, USA, we sampled seawater δ13C-DIC, tissue, hemolymph and shell δ13C. We found up to a 4‰ decrease through ontogeny in shell δ13C in a 23 year old individual. There was no correlation between shell height or age and tissue δ13C. Thus, the ontogenic decrease observed in the shell δ13C could not be attributed to changes in food sources as the animal ages leading to more negative metabolic CO2, since this would require a negative relationship between tissue δ13C and shell height. Hemolymph δ13C, on the other hand, did exhibit a negative relationship with height, but the δ13C values were more positive than expected, indicating that hemolymph may not be a good proxy of extrapallial fluid δ13C. Nevertheless, the hemolymph data indicate that respired CO2 does influence the δ13C of internal fluids and that the amount of respired CO2 is related to the age of the bivalve. The percent metabolic C incorporated into the shell (%M) was significantly higher (up to 37%) than has been found in other bivalve shells, which usually contain less than 10 %M. Attempts to use shell biometrics to predict %M could not explain more than ~60% of the observed variability. Moreover, there were large differences in the %M between different sites. Thus, the metabolic effect on shell δ13C cannot easily be accounted for to allow reliable δ13C-DIC reconstructions. However, there does seem to be a common effect of size, as all sites had indistinguishable slopes between the %M and shell height (+0.19% per mm of shell height).

  11. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  12. Experimental control of the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, Munib

    2008-12-15

    The laser generation of energetic high quality beams of protons and heavier ions has opened up the door to a plethora of applications. These beams are usually generated by the interaction of a short pulse high power laser with a thin metal foil target. They could already be applied to probe transient phenomena in plasmas and to produce warm dense matter by isochoric heating. Other applications such as the production of radioisotopes and tumour radiotherapy need further research to be put into practice. To meet the requirements of each application, the properties of the laser-accelerated particle beams have to be controlled precisely. In this thesis, experimental means to control the beam properties of laser-accelerated protons and carbon ions are investigated. The production and control of proton and carbon ion beams is studied using advanced ion source designs: Experiments concerning mass-limited (i.e. small and isolated) targets are conducted. These targets have the potential to increase both the number and the energy of laser-accelerated protons. Therefore, the influence of the size of a plane foil target on proton beam properties is measured. Furthermore, carbon ion sources are investigated. Carbon ions are of particular interest in the production of warm dense matter and in cancer radiotherapy. The possibility to focus carbon ion beams is investigated and a simple method for the production of quasi-monoenergetic carbon ion beams is presented. This thesis also provides an insight into the physical processes connected to the production and the control of laser-accelerated ions. For this purpose, laser-accelerated protons are employed to probe plasma phenomena on laser-irradiated targets. Electric fields evolving on the surface of laser-irradiated metal foils and hollow metal foil cylinders are investigated. Since these fields can be used to displace, collimate or focus proton beams, understanding their temporal and spatial evolution is crucial for the design of

  13. Future carbon beams at SPIRAL1 facility: Which method is the most efficient?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compared to in-flight facilities, Isotope Separator On-Line ones can in principle produce significantly higher radioactive ion beam intensities. On the other hand, they have to cope with delays for the release and ionization which make the production of short-lived isotopes ion beams of reactive and refractory elements particularly difficult. Many efforts are focused on extending the capabilities of ISOL facilities to those challenging beams. In this context, the development of carbon beams is triggering interest [H. Frånberg, M. Ammann, H. W. Gäggeler, and U. Köster, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 03A708 (2006); M. Kronberger, A. Gottberg, T. M. Mendonca, J. P. Ramos, C. Seiffert, P. Suominen, and T. Stora, in Proceedings of the EMIS 2012 [Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B Production of molecular sideband radioisotope beams at CERN-ISOLDE using a Helicon-type plasma ion source (to be published)]: despite its refractory nature, radioactive carbon beams can be produced from molecules (CO or CO2), which can subsequently be broken up and multi-ionized to the required charge state in charge breeders or ECR sources. This contribution will present results of experiments conducted at LPSC with the Phoenix charge breeder and at GANIL with the Nanogan ECR ion source for the ionization of carbon beams in the frame of the ENSAR and EMILIE projects. Carbon is to date the lightest condensable element charge bred with an ECR ion source. Charge breeding efficiencies will be compared with those obtained using Nanogan ECRIS and charge breeding times will be presented as well

  14. Blister formation in tungsten by hydrogen and carbon mixed ion beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blister formation in tungsten has been studied by mixed carbon and hydrogen ion beam irradiation. The beam ion energies were 1.0 keV and 300 eV, and the fluence was in the range of 1024-1025 ions m-2. It was found that a little amount of carbon impurity in the beam affected blister formation. A large number of blisters with various sizes were observed on the surface of tungsten at 653 K when the carbon concentration was more than 0.35%. When the carbon concentration was 0.11%, no blisters larger than 1.0 μm were observed. When the carbon concentration was 2.35%, a carbon layer developed on the tungsten surface, and again, no blisters were observed. The effect of target temperature on blister formation was also investigated: the sizes and numbers of the blisters were the largest when the tungsten was irradiated at 653 K; when the sample was irradiated at 388 or 873 K, no blisters larger than 1.0 μm were observed

  15. Reactions of carbon atoms in pulsed molecular beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reisler, H. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research program consists of a broad scope of experiments designed to unravel the chemistry of atomic carbon in its two spin states, P and D, by using well-controlled initial conditions and state-resolved detection of products. Prerequisite to the proposed studies (and the reason why so little is known about carbon atom reactions), is the development of clean sources of carbon atoms. Therefore, in parallel with the studies of its chemistry and reaction dynamics, the authors continuously explore new, state-specific and efficient ways of producing atomic carbon. In the current program, C({sup 3}P) is produced via laser ablation of graphite, and three areas of study are being pursued: (i) exothermic reactions with small inorganic molecules (e.g., O{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, NO{sub 2}) that can proceed via multiple pathways; (ii) the influence of vibrational and translational energy on endothermic reactions involving H-containing reactants that yield CH products (e.g., H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}CO); (iii) reactions of C({sup 3}P) with free radicals (e.g., HCO, CH{sub 3}O). In addition, the authors plan to develop a source of C({sup 1}D) atoms by exploiting the pyrolysis of diazotetrazole and its salts in the ablation source. Another important goal involves collaboration with theoreticians in order to obtain relevant potential energy surfaces, rationalize the experimental results and predict the roles of translational and vibrational energies.

  16. Characterization of laser beam interaction with carbon materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents simulation and experimental results for the exposure of some carbon-based materials to alexandrite and Nd3+:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser radiation. Simulation of the heating effects was carried out using the COMSOL Multiphysics 3.5 package for samples of carbon-based P7295-2 fiber irradiated using an alexandrite laser and carbon-based P4396-2 fiber irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser, as well as by applying finite element modeling for P7295-2 samples irradiated using an Nd3+:YAG laser. In the experimental part, P7295-2 samples were exposed to alexandrite laser radiation while samples of carbon-based composite 3D C/C were exposed to Nd3+:YAG laser radiation. Micrographs of the laser induced craters were obtained by light and scanning electron microscopy, and the images analyzed using the ImageJ software. The results obtained enable identification of the laser–material interaction spots, and characterization of the laser induced changes in the materials investigated. (paper)

  17. DNA damage response signaling in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells following gamma and carbon beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Somnath [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Narang, Himanshi, E-mail: himinarang@gmail.com [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sarma, Asitikantha [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Krishna, Malini [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-11-01

    Carbon beams (5.16 MeV/u, LET = 290 keV/{mu}m) are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by higher relative biological effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the signaling differences between {gamma}-rays and carbon ion-irradiation. A549 cells were irradiated with 1 Gy carbon or {gamma}-rays. Carbon beam was found to be three times more cytotoxic than {gamma}-rays despite the fact that the numbers of {gamma}-H2AX foci were same. Percentage of cells showing ATM/ATR foci were more with {gamma}-rays however number of foci per cell were more in case of carbon irradiation. Large BRCA1 foci were found in all carbon irradiated cells unlike {gamma}-rays irradiated cells and prosurvival ERK pathway was activated after {gamma}-rays irradiation but not carbon. The noteworthy finding of this study is the early phase apoptosis induction by carbon ions. In the present study in A549 lung adenocarcinoma, authors conclude that despite activation of same repair molecules such as ATM and BRCA1, differences in low and high LET damage responses might be due to their distinct macromolecular complexes rather than their individual activation and the activation of cytoplasmic pathways such as ERK, whether it applies to all the cell lines need to be further explored.

  18. The Range of 1-3 keV Electrons in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than that in...... nitrogen whereas the range in carbon monoxide is about 20% larger than that in the nitrogen....

  19. The range of 1-3 keV electrons in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror-substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements on solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than that in nitrogen whereas the range in carbon monoxide is about 20% larger than that in the nitrogen. (orig.)

  20. The Range of 1-3 keV Electrons in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, Jørgen;

    1985-01-01

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than that in...... nitrogen whereas the range in carbon monoxide is about 20% larger than that in the nitrogen....

  1. Preliminary studies of PQS PET detector module for dose verification of carbon beam therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.-I.; An, S. Jung; Lee, C. Y.; Jo, W. J.; Min, E.; Lee, K.; Kim, Y.; Joung, J.; Chung, Y. H.

    2014-05-01

    PET imaging can be used to verify dose distributions of therapeutic particle beams such as carbon ion beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a PET detector module which was designed for an in-beam PET scanner geometry integrated into a carbon beam therapy system, and to evaluate its feasibility as a monitoring system of patient dose distribution. A C-shaped PET geometry was proposed to avoid blockage of the carbon beam by the detector modules. The proposed PET system consisted of 14 detector modules forming a bore with 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module is composed of a 9 × 9 array of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm × 20.0 mm LYSO crystal module optically coupled with four 29 mm diameter PMTs using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. Because the crystal pixel was identified based upon the distribution of scintillation lights of four PMTs, the design of the reflector between crystal elements should be well optimized. The optical design of reflectors was optimized using DETECT2000, a Monte Carlo code for light photon transport. A laser-cut reflector set was developed using the Enhanced Specular Reflector (ESR, 3M Co.) mirror-film with a high reflectance of 98% and a thickness of 0.064 mm. All 81 crystal elements of detector module were identified. Our result demonstrates that the C-shaped PET system is under development and we present the first reconstructed image.

  2. Preliminary studies of PQS PET detector module for dose verification of carbon beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PET imaging can be used to verify dose distributions of therapeutic particle beams such as carbon ion beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a PET detector module which was designed for an in-beam PET scanner geometry integrated into a carbon beam therapy system, and to evaluate its feasibility as a monitoring system of patient dose distribution. A C-shaped PET geometry was proposed to avoid blockage of the carbon beam by the detector modules. The proposed PET system consisted of 14 detector modules forming a bore with 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module is composed of a 9 × 9 array of 4.0 mm × 4.0 mm × 20.0 mm LYSO crystal module optically coupled with four 29 mm diameter PMTs using Photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. Because the crystal pixel was identified based upon the distribution of scintillation lights of four PMTs, the design of the reflector between crystal elements should be well optimized. The optical design of reflectors was optimized using DETECT2000, a Monte Carlo code for light photon transport. A laser-cut reflector set was developed using the Enhanced Specular Reflector (ESR, 3M Co.) mirror-film with a high reflectance of 98% and a thickness of 0.064 mm. All 81 crystal elements of detector module were identified. Our result demonstrates that the C-shaped PET system is under development and we present the first reconstructed image

  3. Optical transition radiation from a thin carbon foil: a beam profile monitor for the SLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This memo considers placement of an ultra thin carbon foil into the SLC beam. Transition radiation light would be emitted from the surface of the foil. The optical spot from the foil could be viewed with a microscope objective lens and registered with an image detector. Multiple scattering for the foil thicknesses necessary will not affect the beam emittance. Calculations show that a thin carbon foil can withstand the electron beam if the electron beam is larger than 10 μm in size. There are many possible radiation mechanisms from a foil - bremsstrahlung, black body temperature radiation, Cerenkov light, scintillation light, and transition radiation. Transition radiation is apparently dominant. It is proposed to use thin carbon foils, 75 to 150 A thick. Calculations indicate that 5 x 1010 beam electrons will radiate a useable number of optical photons. Specifically with 150 A foils the fractional yield of useful optical photons is 10-3 photons per incident electron 5 x 10+7 optical photons imaged upon an image plane. Spread these photons over a 32 x 32 pixel CCD and one has the readout system of a monitor

  4. Interfacial electrical properties of ion-beam sputter deposited amorphous carbon on silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A. A.; Woollam, J. A.; Chung, Y.; Banks, B.

    1983-01-01

    Amorphous, 'diamond-like' carbon films have been deposited on Si substrates, using ion-beam sputtering. The interfacial properties are studied using capacitance and conductance measurements. Data are analyzed using existing theories for interfacial electrical properties. The density of electronic states at the interface, along with corresponding time constants are determined.

  5. Reinforced concrete T-beams externally prestressed with unbonded carbon fiber-reinforced polymer tendons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennitz, Anders; Nilimaa, Jonny; Ravn, Dorthe Lund;

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a series of experiments examining the behavior of seven beams prestressed with unbonded external carbon fiberreinforced polymer (CFRP) tendons anchored using a newly developed anchorage and post-tensioning system. The effects of varying the initial tendon depth, prestressing ...

  6. Influence of electron beam irradiation on physicochemical properties of poly(trimethylene carbonate)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jozwiakowska, Joanna; Wach, Radoslaw A.; Rokita, Bozena; Ulanski, Piotr; Nalawade, Sameer P.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan; Rosiak, Janusz M.

    2011-01-01

    Electron beam (EB) irradiation of poly(trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC), an amorphous, biodegradable polymer used in the field of biomaterials, results in predominant cross-linking and finally in the formation of gel fraction, thus enabling modification of physicochemical properties of this material w

  7. Rationale for carbon ion therapy in high-grade glioma based on a review and a meta-analysis of neutron beam trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The standard treatment of high-grade glioma is still unsatisfactory: the 2-year survival after radiotherapy being only 10-25%. A high linear energy transfer (Let) ionising radiotherapy has been used to overcome tumour radioresistance. An overview of the field is needed to justify future prospective controlled studies on carbon ion therapy. Materials and methods: A meta-analysis of clinical trials on neutron beam therapy and a literature review of clinical investigations on light ion use in high-grade glioma were carried out. Results: Four randomized controlled trials on neutron beam therapy were retained. The meta-analysis showed a non-significant 6% increase of two-year mortality (Relative risk [R.R.] 1.06 [0.97-1.15]) in comparison with photon therapy. Two phase I/II trials on carbon and neon ion therapy reported for glioblastoma 10% and 31% two-year overall survivals and 13.9 and 19.0 months median survivals, respectively. Conclusion: This meta-analysis suggests that neutron beam therapy does not improve the survival of high-grade glioma patients while there is no definitive conclusion yet regarding carbon therapy. The ballistic accuracy and the improved biological efficacy of carbon ions renew the interest in prospective clinical trials on particle beam radiotherapy of glioma and let us expect favourable effects of dose escalation on patients survival. (author)

  8. Characteristics of 14C and 13C of carbonate aerosols in dust storm events in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing; Jie, Dongmei; Shi, Meinan; Gao, Pan; Shen, Zhenxing; Uchida, Masao; Zhou, Liping; Liu, Kexin; Hu, Ke; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-10-01

    In contrast with its decrease in western China deserts, the dust storm event in eastern China, Korea, and Japan shows an increase in frequency. Although the drylands in northeastern China have been recognized as an important dust source, the relative contributions of dust transport from the drylands and deserts are inconclusive, thus the quantification of dust storm sources in downwind area remains a challenge. We measured the 14C and 13C contents in carbonates of dust samples from six sites in China, which were collected for the duration of dust storm events in drylands, deserts, and urban areas. The δ13C of the dryland dust samples considerably varied in a range of - 9.7 to - 5.0‰, which partly overlapped the desert dust carbonate δ13C ranges. The 14C content of the dryland dust carbonates showed a narrow range of 60.9 ± 4.0 (as an average and 1 SD of five samples) percent modern carbon (pMC), indicating the enrichment of modern carbonate. Dust samples in desert regions contained relatively aged carbonates with the depleting 14C showing of 28.8 ± 3.3 pMC. After the long-range transport of the western China desert dust plume, the carbonates collected at the southern China remained the depletion of 14C (33.5 ± 5.3 pMC) as in the desert regions. On the other hand, the samples of dust storm events at the urban areas of eastern China showed an enrichment of 14C contents (46.2 ± 5.0 pMC, n = 7), which might be explained by the stronger contribution of modern-carbonate-rich dryland dust.

  9. Analysis of carbon in SrTiO3 grown by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to investigate carbon impurity concentrations in stoichiometric SrTiO3 films grown by a hybrid molecular beam epitaxy approach that uses an effusion cell to supply strontium, a rf plasma source for oxygen and a metal organic titanium source (titanium tetra isopropoxide). The carbon concentration in the films was measured as a function of growth parameters. At sufficiently high growth temperatures (>800 degree sign C), the films contain a few ppm of carbon. The challenges in accurately quantifying low carbon concentrations are discussed. A carbon-containing contamination layer is detected on the surfaces of SrTiO3 substrates and air-exposed films by SIMS and in scanning transmission electron microscopy. The contamination layer could be removed by high-temperature predeposition oxygen plasma cleaning.

  10. Intense heavy ion beam-induced temperature effects in carbon-based stripper foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the future FAIR facility, reliably working solid carbon stripper foils are desired for providing intermediate charge states to SIS18. With the expected high beam intensities, the foils experience enhanced degradation and limited lifetime due to severe radiation damage, stress waves, and thermal effects. This work presents systematic measurements of the temperature of different carbon-based stripper foils (amorphous, diamond-like, and carbon-nanotube based) exposed to 4.8 MeV/u U, Bi, and Au beams of different pulse intensities. Thermal and spectroscopic analyses were performed by means of infrared thermography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting temperature depends on the foil thickness and strongly increases with increasing pulse intensity and repetition rate. (author)

  11. Alanine Radiation Detectors in Therapeutic Carbon Ion Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Jäkel, Oliver; Palmans, Hugo;

        Radiotherapy with particles is getting more attention in Europe. New facilities for protons and heavier ions are finished, or near to the final status, some more are planed. Particle therapy with heavy ions is a challenge to dosimetry, since mixed particle fields occur in the peak region...... of the depth dose curves. Solid state detectors, such as diamond detectors, radiochromic films, TLDs and the amino acid alanine are used due to there good spatial resolution. If used in particle beams their response often exhibits a dependence on particle energy and type, so the acquired signal is not always...... proportional to absorbed dose. A model by Hansen and Olsen, based on the Track Structure Theory is available, which can predict the relative efficiency of some detectors, when the particle spectrum is known. For alanine detectors the model was successfully validated by Hansen and Olsen for several ion species...

  12. The RHIC p-Carbon CNI Polarimeter Upgrade For The Beam Polarization And Intensity Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton polarization measurements in the AGS and RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at the beam energies 24-250 GeV) are based on proton-carbon and proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region. Polarimeter operation in the scanning mode also gives polarization profile and beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. Bunch by bunch emittance measurement is a very powerful tool for machine setup. Presently, the polarization and beam intensity profile measurements (in both vertical and horizontal planes) are restricted by the long target switching time and possible target destruction during this complicated motion. The RHIC polarimeters were operated near the limit of the counting rate for present silicon strip detectors. The ongoing polarimeter upgrade for the 2009 run will address all these problems. The upgrade should allow significant reduction of the polarization measurement errors by making feasible the complete polarization measurements, which includes polarization profiles in both the horizontal and vertical planes.

  13. Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation on the Tensile Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Sheets and Yarns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tiffany S.; Miller, Sandi G.; Baker, James S.; McCorkle, Linda S.; Meador, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube sheets and yarns were irradiated using electron beam (e-beam) energy to determine the effect of irradiation dose on the tensile properties. Results showed that a slight change in tensile strength occurred after irradiating as-received CNT sheets for 20 minutes, and a slight decrease in tensile strength as the irradiation time approached 90 minutes. On the other hand, the addition of small molecules to the CNT sheet surface had a greater effect on the tensile properties of e-beam irradiated CNT sheets. Some functionalized CNT sheets displayed up to a 57% increase in tensile strength following 90 minutes of e-beam exposure. In addition, as-received CNT yarns showed a significant increase in tensile strength as the irradiation time increased.

  14. Experimental study on fatigue crack propagation rate of RC beam strengthened with carbon fiber laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peiyan; Liu, Guangwan; Guo, Xinyan; Huang, Man

    2008-11-01

    The experimental research on fatigue crack propagation rate of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminate (CFL) is carried out by MTS system in this paper. The experimental results show that, the main crack propagation on strengthened beam can be summarized into three phases: 1) fast propagation phase; 2) steady propagation and rest phase; 3) unsteady propagation phase. The phase 2-i.e. steady propagation and rest stage makes up about 95% of fatigue life of the strengthened beam. The propagation rate of the main crack, da/dN, in phase 2 can be described by Paris formula, and the constant C and m can be confirmed by the fatigue crack propagation experiments of the RC beams strengthened with CFL under three-point bending loads.

  15. Triblock Copolymers Based on 1,3-Trimethylene Carbonate and Lactide as Biodegradable Thermoplastic Elastomers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zheng; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Biodegradable triblock copolymers based on 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and different lactides (i.e. D,L-lactide(DLLA), L-lactide (LLA), D-lactide (DLA)) designated as poly(DLLA-TMC-DLLA), poly(LLA-TMC-LLA) and poly(DLA-TMC-DLA) were prepared and their mechanical and thermal properties were comp

  16. Soil carbon inventories and d 13C along a moisture gradient in Botswana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bird, M.I.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Lloyd, J.

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of soil organic carbon (SOC) inventories and d 13C values for 625 soil cores collected from well-drained, coarse-textured soils in eight areas along a 1000 km moisture gradient from Southern Botswana, north into southern Zambia. The spatial distribution of trees and grass in the d

  17. Application of carbon-13 and phosphorous-31 NMR to follow phosphinites and rhodium catalysts synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphinites and thiophosphites derived from bicyclic and polycyclic strained molecules like norbonanes, endo-endo and endo-exo tetracyclic dodecanes compounds, and their respective cationic Rhodium catalysts, were prepared. Carbon-13 and Phosphorus-31 NMR were used to identify the synthesized compounds. (author)

  18. Neoproterozoic diamictite-cap carbonate succession and δ13C chemostratigraphy from eastern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsetti, Frank A.; Stewart, John H.; Hagadorn, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Despite the occurrence of Neoproterozoic strata throughout the southwestern U.S. and Sonora, Mexico, glacial units overlain by enigmatic cap carbonates have not been well-documented south of Death Valley, California. Here, we describe in detail the first glaciogenic diamictite and cap carbonate succession from Mexico, found in the Cerro Las Bolas Group. The diamictite is exposed near Sahuaripa, Sonora, and is overlain by a 5 m thick very finely-laminated dolostone with soft sediment folds. Carbon isotopic chemostratigraphy of the finely-laminated dolostone reveals a negative δ13C anomaly (down to − 3.2‰ PDB) characteristic of cap carbonates worldwide. Carbon isotopic values rise to + 10‰ across ∼ 400 m of section in overlying carbonates of the Mina el Mezquite and Monteso Formations. The pattern recorded here is mostly characteristic of post-Sturtian (ca. ≤ 700 Ma), but pre-Marinoan (ca. ≥ 635 Ma) time. However, the Cerro Las Bolas Group shares ambiguity common to most Neoproterozoic successions: it lacks useful radiometric age constraints and biostratigraphically useful fossils, and its δ13C signature is oscillatory and therefore somewhat equivocal.

  19. Kinetic isotope effect of carbon-13 in decarboxylation of phenylpropiolic acid in anhydrous formic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarboxylation of phenylpropiolic acid (carboxyl-13C) in formic acid medium and in the decarbonylation of liquid formic acid assisted with phenylpropiolic acid (PPA) and acetophenone (AP) have been studied in the 70-100oC temperature interval. The carboxyl-13C KIEs are in the range 1.0034 at 71.6oC and 1.0047 at 101.2oC respectively. The C-13C KIE, k-12/k-13, in the decarbonylation of liquid formic acid assisted with PPA were found to be of 1.0419 at 71.6oC and 1.0383 at 101.2oC. The C-13 KIE in the decarbonylation of pure formic acid are 1.0464 at 70.2oC and 1.0411 at 98oC respectively. The above experimental results have been discussed and interpreted as indicating that the formation of Cα-H bond preceded by the protonation of triple acetylenic bond of PPA is the rate determining step followed by carbon dioxide splitting. The 13-CO-KIE in the carbon monooxide generation assisted with PPA is much larger than the 13-CO-KIE generated in the presence of phenylacetylene. This shows that the decarboxylation of PPA and decarboxylation of FA are interrelated processes proceeding in the reaction cage. The formic acid involved in the formation of TS is decarbonylating directly avoiding probably largely the formic acid anhydride intermediate formation. (author)

  20. The thermal effect on vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes using nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is concerned with the use of the nonlocal Timoshenko beam model for free vibration analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including the thermal effect. Unlike the Euler beam model, the Timoshenko beam model allows for the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia. These effects become significant for CNTs with small length-to-diameter ratios that are normally encountered in applications such as nanoprobes. The elastic Timoshenko beam model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen (1972 Int. J. Eng. Sci. 10 1-16). The study focuses on the wave dispersion caused not only by the rotary inertia and the shear deformation in the traditional Timoshenko beam model but also by the nonlocal elasticity characterizing the microstructure of CNTs in a wide frequency range up to terahertz. Numerical results are presented using the nonlocal beam theory to bring out the effect of both the nonlocal parameter and the temperature change on the properties of transverse vibrations of CNTs. The exact nonlocal Timoshenko beam solution presented here should be useful to engineers who are designing microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices.

  1. The thermal effect on vibration of single-walled carbon nanotubes using nonlocal Timoshenko beam theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzair, A; Tounsi, A; Besseghier, A [Laboratoire des Materiaux et Hydrologie, Universite de Sidi Bel Abbes, BP 89 Cite Ben M' hidi, 22000 Sidi Bel Abbes (Algeria); Heireche, H; Moulay, N; Boumia, L [Universite de Sidi Bel Abbes, Departement de Physique, BP 89 Cite Ben M ' hidi, 22000 Sidi Bel Abbes (Algeria)], E-mail: tou_abdel@yahoo.com

    2008-11-21

    This paper is concerned with the use of the nonlocal Timoshenko beam model for free vibration analysis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) including the thermal effect. Unlike the Euler beam model, the Timoshenko beam model allows for the effects of transverse shear deformation and rotary inertia. These effects become significant for CNTs with small length-to-diameter ratios that are normally encountered in applications such as nanoprobes. The elastic Timoshenko beam model is reformulated using the nonlocal differential constitutive relations of Eringen (1972 Int. J. Eng. Sci. 10 1-16). The study focuses on the wave dispersion caused not only by the rotary inertia and the shear deformation in the traditional Timoshenko beam model but also by the nonlocal elasticity characterizing the microstructure of CNTs in a wide frequency range up to terahertz. Numerical results are presented using the nonlocal beam theory to bring out the effect of both the nonlocal parameter and the temperature change on the properties of transverse vibrations of CNTs. The exact nonlocal Timoshenko beam solution presented here should be useful to engineers who are designing microelectromechanical and nanoelectromechanical devices.

  2. Quantifying the chemical composition of soil organic carbon with solid-state 13C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldock, J. A.; Sanderman, J.

    2011-12-01

    The vulnerability of soil organic carbon (SOC) to biological decomposition and mineralisation to CO2 is defined at least partially by its chemical composition. Highly aromatic charcoal-like SOC components are more stable to biological decomposition than other forms of carbon including cellulose. Solid-state 13C NMR has gained wide acceptance as a method capable of defining SOC chemical composition and mathematical fitting processes have been developed to estimate biochemical composition. Obtaining accurate estimates depends on an ability to quantitatively detect all carbon present in a sample. Often little attention has been paid to defining the proportion of organic carbon present in a soil that is observable in solid-state 13C NMR analyses of soil samples. However, if such data is to be used to inform carbon cycling studies, it is critical that quantitative assessments of SOC observability be undertaken. For example, it is now well established that a significant discrimination exists against the detection of the low proton content polyaromatic structures typical of charcoal using cross polarisation 13C NMR analyses. Such discrimination does not exist where direct polarisation analyses are completed. In this study, the chemical composition of SOC as defined by cross polarisation and direct polarisation13C NMR analyses will be compared for Australian soils collected from under a diverse range of agricultural managements and climatic conditions. Results indicate that where significant charcoal C contents exist, it is highly under-represented in the acquired CP spectra. For some soils, a discrimination against alkyl carbon was also evident. The ability to derive correction factors to compensate for such discriminations will be assessed and presented.

  3. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1981-01-01

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of /sup 11/C, /sup 18/F and /sup 13/N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume.

  4. Synthesis of carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13 labeled radiotracers for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of reviews, many of them recent, have appeared on various aspects of 11C, 18F and 13N-labeled radiotracers. This monograph treats the topic principally from the standpoint of synthetic organic chemistry while keeping in perspective the necessity of integrating the organic chemistry with the design and ultimate application of the radiotracer. Where possible, recent examples from the literature of organic synthesis are introduced to suggest potentially new routes which may be applied to problems in labeling organic molecules with the short-lived positron emitters, carbon-11, fluorine-18, and nitrogen-13. The literature survey of carbon-11, fluorine-18 and nitrogen-13 labeled compounds presented are of particular value to scientists working in this field. Two appendices are also included to provide supplementary general references. A subject index concludes this volume

  5. Changes of stable isotopes carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 in different tissues of cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable isotope analysis is a potential tool for tracing food origin. The stable carbon and nitrogen isotope composition in different tissues of two varieties of cattle under the same culture condition were investigated. δ 13C and δ15N values of different defatted muscle and crude fat, cattle tail hair, blood, liver and feed were determined by isotope ratio mass spectrometry, and statistical analysis was carried out. The results showed that stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen composition was not affected by cattle variety; the δ 13C values between different defatted muscle, blood, liver and cattle hair were not significantly different, but δ 15N value in the liver was much higher than other muscle and the δ 13C values didn't show difference among all the crude fat samples. So these results indicated that isotope fractionation in the various tissue was discrepant. (authors)

  6. Clinical output factors for carbon-ion beams passing through polyethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Ogata, Risa; Himukai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: A recent study suggested that polyethylene (PE) range compensators would cause extra carbon-ion attenuation by 0.45%/cm due to limitations in water equivalence. The present study aims to assess its influence on tumor dose in carbon-ion radiotherapy. Methods: Carbon-ion radiation was modeled to be composed of primary carbon ions and secondary particles. For these components, tumor dose fraction and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) were estimated at a reference depth in the middle of spread-out Bragg peak. The PE effect was estimated for clinical carbon-ion beams and was partially tested by experiment. The two-component model was integrated into a treatment-planning system, with which the PE effect on tumor dose was investigated in two clinical cases. Results: The fluence and clinical attenuation coefficients for dose decrease per polyethylene thickness were estimated to be 0.1%-0.3%/cm and 0.2%-0.4%/cm, depending on energy and modulation of clinical carbon-ion beams. In the treatment-planning s...

  7. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EijiIwamura; MasanoriYamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process, graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  8. Nano-structural Modification of Amorphous Carbon Thin Films by Low-energy Electron Beam Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eiji Iwamura; Masanori Yamaguchi

    2004-01-01

    A new approach using a low-energy electron beam radiation system was investigated to synthesize carbon hybrid structures in amorphous carbon thin films. Two types of amorphous carbon films, which were 15at% iron containing film and with column/inter-column structures, were deposited onto Si substrates by a sputtering technique and subsequently exposed to an electron shower of which the energy and dose rate were much smaller compared to an intense electron beam used in a transmission electron microscopy. As a result of the low-energy and low-dose electron irradiation process,graphitic structures formed in amorphous matrix at a relatively low temperature up to 450 K. Hybrid carbon thin films containing onion-like structures in an amorphous carbon matrix were synthesized by dynamic structural modification of iron containing amorphous carbon thin films. It was found that the graphitization progressed more in the electron irradiation than in annealing at 773K, and it was attributed to thermal and catalytic effects which are strongly related to grain growth of metal clusters. On the other hand, a reversal of TEM image contrast was observed in a-C films with column/inter-column structures. It is presumed that preferable graphitization occurred in the inter-column regions induced by electron irradiation.

  9. Restorative effect of (5E, 13E)-5,13-Docosadienoic acid on carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anand Thiru; Gokulakrishnan Kannan; Kalaiselvan Ashokan; Velavan Sivanandam

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the restorative effect of (5E, 13E)-5,13-Docosadienoic acid on carbon tetrachloride induced oxidative stress in rats. Methods: Wistar strain male albino rats, weighing 180-200 g/bw were selected for the study. Rats were divided into four groups. Group I animals were served as normal control. Group II was administered with corn oil (3 ml/kg, i.p.) as vehicle control. Group III was given single dose (29th day) of CCl4 in corn oil (1:1 v/v, 3 ml/kg, i.p.). Groups IV was treated with (5E, 13E)-5,13-Docosadienoic acid (DA) (6 mg/kg body weight) for 28 days and given single dose of (29th day) CCl4 in corn oil (1:1 v/v, 3 ml/kg, i.p.). Six hours after CCl4 intoxication, the experimental animals were sacrificed. The blood samples were collected. Liver was excised immediately and immersed in physiological saline. Results: The lipid peroxidation was initiated in CCl4 intoxicated rats which is evidenced by thiobarbituric acid (TBARS) and diminution of GSH content in liver. Super oxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), vitamin C and E in CCl4 intoxicated rats retrieved towards near normalcy. After treating with DA which significantly altered (P<0.001) serum marker enzyme level and antioxidant level near normal against CCl4 treated rats. Conclusions: It was observed that the entire variable tested i.e., SOD, CAT, GPx, reduced glutathione, vitamin C and E recorded a significant decline on CCl4 treatment. However, treatment with DA restored the levels to near normal value, suggesting the therapeutic effect of DA to counter the oxidative stress.

  10. Radiological characteristics of MRI-based VIP polymer gel under carbon beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the radiological characteristics of VIP polymer gel dosimeters under carbon beam irradiation with energy of 135 and 290 AMeV. To evaluate dose response of VIP polymer gels, the transverse (or spin–spin) relaxation rate R2 of the dosimeters measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a function of linear energy transfer (LET), rather than penetration depth, as is usually done in previous reports. LET is evaluated by use of the particle transport simulation code PHITS. Our results reveal that the dose response decreases with increasing dose-averaged LET and that the dose response–LET relation also varies with incident carbon beam energy. The latter can be explained by taking into account the contribution from fragmentation products. - Highlights: • We study the radiological characteristics of VIP gel dosimeters under carbon beam irradiation. • Linear energy transfer dependence was evaluated and discussed with simulation code PHITS. • Contribution from secondly ion can explain results with different incident beam energy

  11. Establishment of the method for profile evaluation in matter using the therapeutic carbon pencil beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scanning irradiation of the pencil beam is superior in comparison to the conventional extended-field irradiation in dose concentration. The carbon pencil beam spreads its profile in matter. The factors that cause the profile change are the nuclear fragmentation reactions and the multiple Coulomb scatterings. The fragmentation reaction is a type of nuclear reactions, where the high-energy incident particles interact with target nuclei and fragment the incident particles themselves or the target nucleus. In order to improve the accuracy of the treatment planning for the carbon beam, it is necessary to evaluate quantitatively the effect of the nuclear fragmentation reactions. The objective of this study is to establish the evaluation method for the carbon pencil beam profile in matter by selectively acquiring the nuclear fragmentation reactions and the multiple Coulomb scattering. This experiment was proposed to carry out in three years. Events with the nuclear fragmentation reactions and the multiple Coulomb scatterings were separately identified by a dedicated detector devised by our group. Profiles of these events were successfully measured. (author)

  12. Distribution of hydrogen peroxide-dependent reaction in a gelatin sample irradiated by carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated the amount and distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated in a solid gelatin sample irradiated by heavy ion (carbon) beam. We irradiated the gelatin sample, which contained a nitroxyl radical (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl, TEMPOL), with a 290-MeV/nucleon carbon beam (-128 Gy). To verify the distribution of H2O2 generation in the irradiated sample, we employed both electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopic and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging methods based on H2O2-dependent paramagnetic loss of TEMPOL. We obtained a distribution profile of the H2O2-dependent reaction in the gelatin sample when we irradiated gelatin samples with carbon beams with several different linear energy transfer (LET) values. Because the profiles of oxygen consumption in the gelatin sample measured by L-band EPR oxymetry and of the H2O2-dependent reaction have almost the same shape, the profile of the H2O2-dependent reaction can be used as an estimation of the profile of the generation of H2O2. The H2O2 profile in one intact gelatin sample scanned by 7-tesla MR imaging showed a similar shape as a result of the EPR experiment. We obtained several hundreds of micromolars of H2O2 generated in a gelatin sample irradiated by carbon beam when 200 Gy was given at the surface of the sample. H2O2 distribution was almost flat, with only a slight peak just before the end of the beam. (author)

  13. 13C NMR spectroscopy of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the 13C NMR spectrum of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and boron carbide. The amorphous hydrogenated carbon spectra consist primarily of an sp3 line at 40 ppm and an sp2 line at 140 ppm and are in reasonable agreement with the recent theoretical calculations of Mauri, Pfrommer, and Louie, but there are some notable discrepancies. The amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide spectra are very different from those of amorphous hydrogenated carbon, being dominated by one line at 15 ppm. We interpret this line as due to carbon bound in boron carbide icosahedra, because polycrystalline boron carbide with boron carbide icosahedra as the unit cell gives very similar NMR spectra. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  14. Carbon ion beam focusing using laser irradiated heated diamond hemispherical shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Offermann, Dustin T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Experiments preformed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident Laser Facility were conducted to observe the acceleration and focusing of carbon ions via the TNSA mechanism using hemispherical diamond targets. Trident is a 200TW class laser system with 80J of 1 {micro}m, short-pulse light delivered in 0.5ps, with a peak intensity of 5 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Targets where Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamonds formed into hemispheres with a radius of curvature of 400{micro}m and a thickness of 5{micro}m. The accelerated ions from the hemisphere were diagnosed by imaging the shadow of a witness copper mesh grid located 2mm behind the target onto a film pack located 5cm behind the target. Ray tracing was used to determine the location of the ion focal spot. The TNSA mechanism favorably accelerates hydrogen found in and on the targets. To make the carbon beam detectable, targets were first heated to several hundred degrees Celsius using a CW, 532nm, 8W laser. Imaging of the carbon beam was accomplished via an auto-radiograph of a nuclear activated lithium fluoride window in the first layer of the film pack. The focus of the carbon ion beam was determined to be located 630 {+-} 110 {micro}m from the vertex of the hemisphere.

  15. Deposition of diamond like carbon films by using a single ion gun with varying beam source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Jin-qiu; Chen Zhu-ping

    2001-01-01

    Diamond like carbon films have been successfully deposited on the steel substrate, by using a single ion gun with varying beam source. The films may appear blue, yellow and transparent in color, which was found related to contaminants from the sample holder and could be avoided. The thickness of the films ranges from tens up to 200 nanometers, and the hardness is in the range 20 to 30 GPa. Raman analytical results reveal the films are in amorphous structure. The effects of different beam source on the films structure are further discussed.

  16. Raman shift on n-doped amorphous carbon thin films grown by electron beam evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebollo P., B. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Freire L., F. Jr. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Lozada M., R.; Palomino M., R. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico); Jimenez S., S. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Laboratorio de Investigacion en Materiales, Queretaro (Mexico); Zelaya A., O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV-IPN, P.O. Box 14-740, Mexico 07360 D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-04-15

    The structural properties of carbon thin films synthesized under an atmosphere of nitrogen by means of electron beam evaporation were studied by Raman scattering spectroscopy. The electron beam evaporation technique is an important alternative to grown layers of this material with interesting structural properties. The observed shift of the Raman G band shows that the structure of the films tends to become more graphitic upon the increase of the deposition time. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  17. Optical and Scratch Resistant Properties of Diamondlike Carbon Films Deposited with Single and Dual Ion Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kussmaul, Michael T.; Bogdanski, Michael S.; Banks, Bruce A.; Mirtich, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Amorphous diamond-like carbon (DLC) films were deposited using both single and dual ion beam techniques utilizing filament and hollow cathode ion sources. Continuous DLC films up to 3000 A thick were deposited on fused quartz plates. Ion beam process parameters were varied in an effort to create hard, clear films. Total DLC film absorption over visible wavelengths was obtained using a Perkin-Elmer spectrophotometer. An ellipsometer, with an Ar-He laser (wavelength 6328 A) was used to determine index of refraction for the DLC films. Scratch resistance, frictional, and adherence properties were determined for select films. Applications for these films range from military to the ophthalmic industries.

  18. Electron-beam heat treatment of thin band of low-carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the methods of raster electron microscopy, X-ray structural and chemical analysis and also X-ray microanalysis, the change was studied in the mechanical properies of a band made of low-carbon steel 08 kp that takes place after electron-beam heat treatment. It has been shown that the above change is due to a specific character of the α reversible γ phase transition. After electron-beam treatment under optimum conditions, the properties of the band made of steel 08 kp and 0.15 mm thick (plasticity, ultimate strength, etc.) are similar to those obtained using the conventional procedures (annealing and skin pass rolling)

  19. Comparison of infrared and mass-spectrometric measurements of carbon-13/carbon-12 ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The delta13C values of 20 breath samples and 10 tank-CO2 samples (delta13C values ranged from -31.3 to +148.9per mille vs PDB) and the CO2 concentrations of three breath samples and 10 tank-CO2 samples were measured with a commercial prototype of a diode-laser i.r. spectrophotometer, MAT I. The results were compared with those obtained by gas-isotope-ratio mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography. Precisions (ssub(x), n=10) of 0.2per mille and 0.6% were calculated for 13C/12C ratios and CO2 concentrations, respectively, using the MAT I system. (author)

  20. Stable Carbon Isotope Ratios for Giant Stars in the Globular Cluster M13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jaehyon; Pilachowski, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, our paradigm for the formation and evolution of globular clusters has shifted. We now understand that the majority of present-day stars in globular clusters formed as second-generation stars, primarily from the ejecta of first-generation AGB stars, while the majority of first generation, less centrally concentrated stars, have been dynamically lost to the cluster (D'Ercole et al. 2011). This paradigm explains the observed star-to-star variations in the abundances of light element observed in globular clusters, and suggests that the carbon isotope ratio should be similarly differentiated between first and second generation stars. In an effort to verify this scenario, we have recently utilized the Gemini/NIFS to determine carbon isotope abundances (12C and 13C) for 18 giant stars in the globular clusters M13 through medium-resolution (R ˜ 5300) infrared spectroscopy of the first-overtone CO bands near 2.3 μm. Our program stars are distributed from the tip of the RGB to the BLF (the bump in the luminosity function) of M13, and their Na, Mg, and Al abundances are already known from homogeneous data set analysis. Therefore, adding reliable abundances of the stable carbon isotopes to this homogeneous spectroscopic sample permits systematic tests of cluster chemical evolution models. We report preliminary results of the carbon abundance analysis for our NIFS K-band spectra and present an overview of our ongoing effort with other globular clusters.

  1. The influence of lateral beam profile modifications in scanned proton and carbon ion therapy: a Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Parodi, K; Kraemer, M; Sommerer, F; Naumann, J; Mairani, A; Brons, S

    2010-01-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery promises superior flexibility and accuracy for highly conformal tumour therapy in comparison to the usage of passive beam shaping systems. The attainable precision demands correct overlapping of the pencil-like beams which build up the entire dose distribution in the treatment field. In particular, improper dose application due to deviations of the lateral beam profiles from the nominal planning conditions must be prevented via appropriate beam monitoring in the beamline, prior to the entrance in the patient. To assess the necessary tolerance thresholds of the beam monitoring system at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center, Germany, this study has investigated several worst-case scenarios for a sensitive treatment plan, namely scanned proton and carbon ion delivery to a small target volume at a shallow depth. Deviations from the nominal lateral beam profiles were simulated, which may occur because of misaligned elements or changes of the beam optic in the beamline. Data have been an...

  2. Nanoscale Soldering of Positioned Carbon Nanotubes using Highly Conductive Electron Beam Induced Gold Deposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Dorte Nørgaard; Mølhave, Kristian; Mateiu, Ramona Valentina; Bøggild, Peter; Rasmussen, A.M.; Appel, C.C.; Brorson, M; Jacobsen, C.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    We have developed an in-situ method for controlled positioning of carbon nanotubes followed by highly conductive contacting of the nanotubes, using electron beam assisted deposition of gold. The positioning and soldering process takes place inside an Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope (E...... embedded in a carbon matrix. Nanoscale soldering of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) onto microelectrodes was achieved by deposition of a conducting gold line across a contact point between nanotube and electrode. The solderings were found to be mechanically stronger than the carbon nanotubes. We have......-SEM) in the presence of a source of gold-organic precursor gas. Bridges deposited between suspended microelectrodes show resistivities down to 10-4 Ωcm and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) of the deposits reveals a dense core of gold particles surrounded by a crust of small gold nanoparticles...

  3. Stoichiometric carbon nitride synthesized by ion beam sputtering and post nitrogen ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Carbon nitride films have been deposited on Si (100) by ion beam sputtering a vitreous graphite target with nitrogen and argon ions with and without concurrent N2 ion bombardment at room temperature. The sputtering beam energy was 1000 eV and the assisted beam energy was 300 eV with ion / atom arrival ratio ranging from 0.5 to 5. The carbon nitride films were deposited both as single layer directly on silicon substrate and as multilayer between two layers of stoichiometric amorphous silicon nitride and polycrystalline titanium nitride. The deposited films were implanted ex-situ with 30 keV nitrogen ions with various doses ranging from 1E17 to 4E17 ions.cm-2 and 2 GeV xenon ion with a dose of 1E12 ions.cm-2 . The nitrogen concentration of the films was measured with Rutherford Backscattering (RBS), Secondary Neutral Mass Spectrometry (SNMS) and Parallel Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (PEELS). The nitrogen concentration for as deposited sample was 34 at% and stoichiometric carbon nitride C3N4 was achieved by post nitrogen implantation of the multi-layered films. Post bombardment of single layer carbon nitride films lead to reduction in the total nitrogen concentration. Carbon K edge structure obtained from PEELS analysis suggested that the amorphous C3N4 matrix was predominantly sp2 bonded. This was confirmed by Fourier Transforrn Infra-Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the single CN layer which showed the nitrogen was mostly bonded with carbon in nitrile (C≡N) and imine (C=N) groups. The microstructure of the film was determined by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) which indicated that the films were amorphous

  4. Measurement of pion double charge exchange on carbon-13, carbon-14, magnesium-26, and iron-56

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections for the /sup 13,14/C,26Mg,56Fe(π+,π-)/sup 13,14/O,26Si,56Ni reactions were measured with the Energetic Pion Channel and Spectrometer at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility for 120 less than or equal to T/sub π/ less than or equal to 292 MeV and 0 less than or equal to theta less than or equal to 50. The double isobaric analog states (DIAS) are of primary interest. In addition, cross sections for transitions to 14O(0+, 5.92 MeV), 14O(2+, 7.77 MeV), 56Ni(gs), 13O(gs), and 13O(4.21 MeV) are presented. The 13O(4.21 MeV) state is postulated to have J/sup π/ = 1/2-. The data are compared to previously measured double-charge-exchange cross sections on other nuclei, and the systematics of double charge exchange on T greater than or equal to 1 target nuclei leading to the DIAS are studied. Near the Δ33 resonance, cross sections for the DIAS transitions are in disagreement with calculations in which the reaction is treated as sequential charge exchange through the free pion-nucleon amplitude, while for T/sub π/ > 200 MeV the anomalous features of the 164 MeV data are not apparent. This is evidence for significant higher order contributions to the double-charge-exchange amplitude near the reasonable energy. Two theoretical approaches that include two nucleon processes are applied to the DIAS data. 64 references

  5. Charge equilibrium of a laser-generated carbon-ion beam in warm dense matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using ion carbon beams generated by high intensity short pulse lasers we perform measurements of single shot mean charge equilibration in cold or isochorically heated solid density aluminum matter. We demonstrate that plasma effects in such matter heated up to 1 eV do not significantly impact the equilibration of carbon ions with energies 0.045-0.5 MeV/nucleon. Furthermore, these measurements allow for a first evaluation of semiempirical formulas or ab initio models that are being used to predict the mean of the equilibrium charge state distribution for light ions passing through warm dense matter. (authors)

  6. Tribological properties of ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon film on silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present article reports on the physical characterization and tribological properties of diamond-like carbon (DLC) films deposited on structural Si3N4 substrates. The films were deposited by the direct ion beam deposition technique. The ion beam was produced by plasma discharge of pre-mixed methane and hydrogen gas in a Kaufman-type ion source. The deposited films were found to be amorphous and contained about 70% carbon and 30% hydrogen. The friction coefficient of an uncoated Si3N4 ball on a DLC coated Si3N4 disc starts at about 0.2, then decreases rapidly to 0.1-0.15 with increasing sliding distance. Increasing humidity results in a slight increase in friction coefficient, but a significant decrease in wear factor. The wear factor for the tests at ≅60% rh (relative humidity) are about an order of magnitude smaller than the tests at 3% rh. (orig.)

  7. Radiological characteristics of MRI-based VIP polymer gel under carbon beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeyama, T.; Fukunishi, N.; Ishikawa, K. L.; Furuta, T.; Fukasaku, K.; Takagi, S.; Noda, S.; Himeno, R.; Fukuda, S.

    2015-02-01

    We study the radiological characteristics of VIP polymer gel dosimeters under carbon beam irradiation with energy of 135 and 290 AMeV. To evaluate dose response of VIP polymer gels, the transverse (or spin-spin) relaxation rate R2 of the dosimeters measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a function of linear energy transfer (LET), rather than penetration depth, as is usually done in previous reports. LET is evaluated by use of the particle transport simulation code PHITS. Our results reveal that the dose response decreases with increasing dose-averaged LET and that the dose response-LET relation also varies with incident carbon beam energy. The latter can be explained by taking into account the contribution from fragmentation products.

  8. Routes And Rates Of Carbon Input In A Temperate Forest Demonstrated By A Large Scale 13C Tracer Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fate of recently assimilated carbon in mature deciduous trees, which are exposed to elevated and 13C depleted CO2, was traced within the Swiss Canopy Crane (SCC) project. Our findings suggest that substantial amounts of carbon are allocated into short living pools. Therefore, increased carbon storage under rising atmospheric CO2 is unlikely. (author)

  9. Consumption of carbon fiber plates in the reinforced concrete beams strengthened with CFPs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Liangtao; SONG Li; SHI Chuxian

    2007-01-01

    Four-point bending flexural tests were conducted to one full-size reinforced concrete (RC) beam and three full-size RC beams strengthened with carbon fiber plates (CFPs).The experimental results showed that the consumption of CFP had significant effects on failure modes and the flexural capacity.An analytical procedure,based on the limit failure ode and ductility,was presented to predict the applied area of CFP.An analytical program,based on Smith-Teng model and Cheng-Teng model,was provided to calculate the bonding length of CFP.The test results are used to validate the proposed procedure.The results are also applied to the design and construction of RC beam strengthened with CFP.

  10. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy on nanostructured carbon electrodes grown by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettini, Luca Giacomo; Bardizza, Giorgio; Podesta, Alessandro; Milani, Paolo; Piseri, Paolo, E-mail: piseri@mi.infn.it [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica and CIMaINa (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Nanostructured porous films of carbon with density of about 0.5 g/cm{sup 3} and 200 nm thickness were deposited at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from carbon clusters formed in the gas phase. Carbon film surface topography, determined by atomic force microscopy, reveals a surface roughness of 16 nm and a granular morphology arising from the low kinetic energy ballistic deposition regime. The material is characterized by a highly disordered carbon structure with predominant sp2 hybridization as evidenced by Raman spectroscopy. The interface properties of nanostructured carbon electrodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy employing KOH 1 M solution as aqueous electrolyte. An increase of the double layer capacitance is observed when the electrodes are heat treated in air or when a nanostructured nickel layer deposited by SCBD on top of a sputter deposited film of the same metal is employed as a current collector instead of a plain metallic film. This enhancement is consistent with an improved charge injection in the active material and is ascribed to the modification of the electrical contact at the interface between the carbon and the metal current collector. Specific capacitance values up to 120 F/g have been measured for the electrodes with nanostructured metal/carbon interface.

  11. Monitoring of liver glycogen synthesis in diabetic patients using carbon-13 MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the relationship between liver glucose, glycogen, and plasma glucose in diabetic patients, in vivo liver carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C MRS) with a clinical 3.0 T MR system was performed. Subjects were healthy male volunteers (n = 5) and male type-2 diabetic patients (n = 5). Pre- and during oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT), 13C MR spectra without proton decoupling were acquired in a monitoring period of over 6 h, and in total seven spectra were obtained from each subject. For OGTT, 75 g of glucose, including 5 g of [1-13C]glucose, was administered. The MR signals of liver [1-13C]glucose and glycogen were detected and their time-course changes were assessed in comparison with the plasma data obtained at screening. The correlations between the fasting plasma glucose level and liver glycogen/glucose rate (Spearman: ρ = -0.68, p 13C MRS can perform noninvasive measurement of glycogen storage/degradation ability in the liver individually and can assist in tailor-made therapy for diabetes. In conclusion, 13C MRS has a potential to become a powerful tool in diagnosing diabetes multilaterally.

  12. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Ramezani

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric control, heat treatment with stainless steel foil wrapping, pack carburization heat treatment and vacuum heat treatment. The results showed that stainless steel foil wrapping could restrict decarburization process, resulting in a constant hardness profile as vacuum heat treatment does. However, the tempering characteristic between these two heat treatment methods is different. Results from the gas nitrided samples showed that the thickness and the hardness of the nitrided layer is independent of the carbon content in H13 steel.

  13. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance studies of trans-diacido(tetraamine)cobalt(III)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, G.R.; Johnson, D.W.

    1982-06-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of a series of trans-diacido(1,10-diamino-4,7-diazadecane)cobalt(III) complexes (trans-Co(3,2,3-tet)X/sub 2/, X = Br/sup -/, Cl/sup -/, N/sub 3//sup -/, NO/sub 2//sup -/, OAc) and trans-diacido(1,9-diamino-3,7-diazononane)cobalt(III) complexes (trans-Co(2,3,2-tet)X/sub 2/, X = Cl/sup -/, GlyH, /sup -/OAc, NH/sub 3/, NO/sub 2//sup -/) will be discussed. The /sup 13/C chemical shift is found to be linearly dependent on the ligand field strength (estimated from the electronic spectrum) of the axial ligands (X). The shielding of selected carbon atoms within the tetraamine ligand, which has been attributed to the central metal ion, increases with increasing axial ligand field strength.

  14. Nuclear interaction study around beam pipe region in the Tracker system at CMS with 13 TeV data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Analysis is presented to study the material in the Tracker system with nuclear interactions from proton-proton collisions recorded by the CMS experiment at the CERN LHC. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 pb$^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of 13 TeV collected at 3.8 Tesla magnetic field. With reconstructed nuclear interactions we observe the structure of the material, including beam pipe, in the Tracker system.

  15. Mutagenic effects of carbon ion beam irradiations on dry Lotus japonicus seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shanwei; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Du, Yan; Yu, Lixia; Feng, Hui; Mu, Jinhu; Chen, Yuze

    2016-09-01

    Carbon ion beam irradiation is a powerful method for creating mutants and has been used in crop breeding more and more. To investigate the effects of carbon ion beams on Lotus japonicus, dry seeds were irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam at dosages of 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 600 Gy. The germination rate, survival rate and root length of M1 populations were explored and the dose of 400 Gy was selected as the median lethal dose (LD50) for a large-scale mutant screening. Among 2472 M2 plants, 127 morphological mutants including leaf, stem, flower and fruit phenotypic variation were found, and the mutation frequency was approximately 5.14%. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) assays were utilized to investigate the DNA polymorphism between seven mutants and eight plants without phenotypic variation from M2 populations. No remarkable differences were detected between these two groups, and the total polymorphic rate was 0.567%.

  16. Evaluation of carbon diffusion in heat treatment of H13 tool steel under different atmospheric conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Maziar Ramezani; Timotius Pasang; Zhan Chen; Thomas Neitzert; Dominique Au

    2015-01-01

    Although the cost of the heat treatment process is only a minor portion of the total production cost, it is arguably the most important and crucial stage on the determination of material quality. In the study of the carbon diffusion in H13 steel during austenitization, a series of heat treatment experiments had been conducted under different atmospheric conditions and length of treatment. Four austenitization atmospheric conditions were studied, i.e., heat treatment without atmospheric contro...

  17. Tilting of carbon encapsulated metallic nanocolumns in carbon-nickel nanocomposite films by ion beam assisted deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Matthias [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Muecklich, Arndt; Zschornak, Matthias; Wintz, Sebastian; Gemming, Sibylle; Abrasonis, Gintautas [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Oates, Thomas W. H. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Analytische Wissenschaft, ISAS e.V., Albert-Einstein-Str. 9, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Luis Endrino, Jose [Surfaces and Coatings Department, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Baehtz, Carsten; Shalimov, Artem [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, PF-510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Rossendorf Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2012-07-30

    The influence of assisting low-energy ({approx}50-100 eV) ion irradiation effects on the morphology of C:Ni ({approx}15 at. %) nanocomposite films during ion beam assisted deposition (IBAD) is investigated. It is shown that IBAD promotes the columnar growth of carbon encapsulated metallic nanoparticles. The momentum transfer from assisting ions results in tilting of the columns in relation to the growing film surface. Complex secondary structures are obtained, in which a significant part of the columns grows under local epitaxy via the junction of sequentially deposited thin film fractions. The influence of such anisotropic film morphology on the optical properties is highlighted.

  18. Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP) for emerging applications in carbon nanoelectronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focused-electron-beam-induced processing (FEBIP), a resist-free additive nanomanufacturing technique, is an actively researched method for ''direct-write'' processing of a wide range of structural and functional nanomaterials, with high degree of spatial and time-domain control. This article attempts to critically assess the FEBIP capabilities and unique value proposition in the context of processing of electronics materials, with a particular emphasis on emerging carbon (i.e., based on graphene and carbon nanotubes) devices and interconnect structures. One of the major hurdles in advancing the carbon-based electronic materials and device fabrication is a disjoint nature of various processing steps involved in making a functional device from the precursor graphene/CNT materials. Not only this multi-step sequence severely limits the throughput and increases the cost, but also dramatically reduces the processing reproducibility and negatively impacts the quality because of possible between-the-step contamination, especially for impurity-susceptible materials such as graphene. The FEBIP provides a unique opportunity to address many challenges of carbon nanoelectronics, especially when it is employed as part of an integrated processing environment based on multiple ''beams'' of energetic particles, including electrons, photons, and molecules. This avenue is promising from the applications' prospective, as such a multi-functional (electron/photon/molecule beam) enables one to define shapes (patterning), form structures (deposition/etching), and modify (cleaning/doping/annealing) properties with locally resolved control on nanoscale using the same tool without ever changing the processing environment. It thus will have a direct positive impact on enhancing functionality, improving quality and reducing fabrication costs for electronic devices, based on both conventional CMOS and emerging carbon (CNT/graphene) materials. (orig.)

  19. Hydrothermal carbon from biomass: structural differences between hydrothermal and pyrolyzed carbons via 13C solid state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Camillo; Perez Caballero, Fernando; Babonneau, Florence; Gervais, Christel; Laurent, Guillaume; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena; Baccile, Niki

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to better describe the structure of the hydrothermal carbon (HTC) process and put it in relationship with the more classical pyrolytic carbons. Indeed, despite the low energetic impact and the number of applications described so far for HTC, very little is known about the structure, reaction mechanism, and the way these materials relate to coals. Are HTC and calcination processes equivalent? Are the structures of the processed materials related to each other in any way? Which is the extent of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) inside HTC? In this work, the effect of hydrothermal treatment and pyrolysis are compared on glucose, a good model carbohydrate; a detailed single-quantum double-quantum (SQ-DQ) solid state (13)C NMR study of the HTC and calcined HTC is used to interpret the spectral region corresponding to the signal of furanic and arene groups. These data are compared to the spectroscopic signatures of calcined glucose, starch, and xylose. A semiquantitative analysis of the (13)C NMR spectra provides an estimation of the furanic-to-arene ratio which varies from 1:1 to 4:1 according to the processing conditions and carbohydrate employed. In addition, we formulate some hypothesis, validated by DFT (density functional theory) modeling associated with (13)C NMR chemical shifts calculations, about the possible furan-rich structural intermediates that occur in the coalification process leading to condensed polyaromatic structures. In combination with a broad parallel study on the HTC processing conditions effect on glucose, cellulose, and raw biomass (Falco, C.; Baccile, N.; Titirici, M.-M. Green Chem., 2011, DOI: 10.1039/C1GC15742F), we propose a broad reaction scheme and in which we show that, through HTC, it is possible to tune the furan-to-arene ratio composing the aromatic core of the produced HTC carbons, which is not possible if calcination is used alone, in the temperature range below 350 °C. PMID:22050004

  20. Short-term carbon and nitrogen cycling in urine patches assessed by combined carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, Per; Petersen, S.O.; Soussana, J.F.

    2007-01-01

    ) fuel denitrification activity and N2O production. The study took advantage of carbon-13 pulse labelling the plant tissue combined with application of nitrogen-15 labelled synthetic urine as an attempt to identify the sources of N2O. Over a 6 weeks course, the CO2 evolved in response to urine...... indicating that root death was not a significant source to available C. Nitrous oxide emissions accumulated to 7, 59, 142 and 77 mg N2O-N m(-2), respectively, for control (0N), low urine N (LUN), high urine N (HUN) and high mineral N (HMN) treatments. Pair-wise comparisons indicated that HUN > LUN (P < 0...

  1. Mechanical and tribological properties of carbon thin film with tungsten interlayer prepared by Ion beam assisted deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vlčák, P.; Černý, F.; Tolde, Z.; Sepitka, J.; Gregora, Ivan; Daniš, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2013, FEB (2013). ISSN 2314-4874 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : carbon coatings * ion beam deposition * XRD * nanoindentation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/630156

  2. Acceleration of carbon-13 spin-lattice relaxation times in amino acids by electrolytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Jinping; Yin Yingwu

    2004-01-01

    A series of amino acids and carboxylic acids were determined by 13C NMR spectroscopy.The results showed that addition of 3M MgCl2 led to the 13C NMR integral area of samples being well proportional to number of carbon atoms that produce the particular signal with reliability over 95%. Measurements of 13C spin-lattice relaxation times (T1's) are reported for a number of amino acids. T1's of all the carbons in amino acids generally tend to decrease with the increase of the concentration of electrolytes, and the presence of magnesium slats is of significant. Carboxylic carbons in amino acids are the most sensitive "acceptor" of the 13C spin-lattice relaxation accelerating effects in electrolytes, and the 13C spin-lattice relaxation accelerating ability of electrolytes is Mg(ClO4)2 >MgCl2 >CaCl2 >NaCl >KCl >LiClO4 >NaOH. In general, T1's of C1 carbons in nonpolar a-amino acids are higher than those in polar and basic a-amino acids both in aqueous and 3M MgCl2 medium. In aliphatic straight-chain amino acids, a-, a-, a-, ai- and a- amino acids, T1's of C1 carbons tend to reduce with the increase of inserted carbon numbers between amino and carboxylic groups compared with Gly. T1's can be decreased even more when amino acids are mixed in 3M MgCl2, but T1's of carbons in amino acids decrease slightly with increase of the concentration of amino acids in 3M MgCl2. The mechanisms of the observed phenomena are discussed in terms of intermolecular interaction and paramagnetic impurity in electrolytes, large contributions of intermolecular interaction which is enhanced in electrolytes concentrate on the incoming "unsaturation" of the primary solvation shell of cations with the increase of electrolytes concentration and complexes formation of amino acids with metal ions. In electrolytes, amino acids are "anchored" to cations and molecule tumbling is slowed down, molecular rigidity is increased and molecular size is "enlarged", all of these are helpful to accelerate

  3. Study of carbon nitride compounds synthesised by co-implantation of 13C and 14N in copper at different temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Simultaneous implantation of 13C and 14N in copper were performed to synthesise CNx compounds. → The formation of fullerene-like CNx compounds was highlighted by XPS and TEM. → Only about 20% of the implanted 14N atoms are contained in the FL CxNy structures. → The exceeding of implanted nitrogen precipitates in large N2 gas bubbles. → A growth model for the FL CxNy structures is proposed. - Abstract: Carbon nitride compounds have been synthesised in copper by simultaneous high fluence (1018 at. cm-2) implantation of 13C and 14N ions. During the implantation process, the substrate temperature was maintained at 25, 250, 350 or 450 deg. C. Depth profiles of 13C and 14N were determined using the non-resonant nuclear reactions (NRA) induced by a 1.05 MeV deuteron beam. The retained doses were deduced from NRA measurements and compared to the implanted fluence. The chemical bonds between carbon and nitrogen were studied as a function of depth and temperature by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The curve fitting of C 1s and N 1s core level photoelectron spectra reveal different types of C-N bonds and show the signature of N2 molecules. The presence of nitrogen gas bubbles in copper was highlighted by mass spectroscopy. The structure of carbon nitride compounds was characterised by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For that purpose, cross-sectional samples were prepared using a focused ion beam (FIB) system. TEM observations showed the presence of small amorphous carbon nitride 'nano-capsules' and large gas bubbles in copper. Based on our observations, we propose a model for the growth of these nano-objects. Finally, the mechanical properties of the implanted samples were investigated by nano-indentation.

  4. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmeier, C. A.; Ballantyne, F., IV; Min, K.; Billings, S. A.

    2015-10-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from soils feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert soil organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of soil organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in soils fundamentally limit our ability to project soil, and thus ecosystem, C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan soil microorganism growing at a constant rate. Specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future soil C fluxes.

  5. Temperature-mediated changes in microbial carbon use efficiency and 13C discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmeier, Christoph A.; Ballantyne, Ford, IV; Min, Kyungjin; Billings, Sharon A.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding how carbon dioxide (CO2) flux from ecosystems feeds back to climate warming depends in part on our ability to quantify the efficiency with which microorganisms convert organic carbon (C) into either biomass or CO2. Quantifying ecosystem-level respiratory CO2 losses often also requires assumptions about stable C isotope fractionations associated with the microbial transformation of organic substrates. However, the diversity of organic substrates' δ13C and the challenges of measuring microbial C use efficiency (CUE) in their natural environment fundamentally limit our ability to project ecosystem C budgets in a warming climate. Here, we quantify the effect of temperature on C fluxes during metabolic transformations of cellobiose, a common microbial substrate, by a cosmopolitan microorganism growing at a constant rate. Biomass C specific respiration rate increased by 250 % between 13 and 26.5 °C, decreasing CUE from 77 to 56 %. Biomass C specific respiration rate was positively correlated with an increase in respiratory 13C discrimination from 4.4 to 6.7 ‰ across the same temperature range. This first demonstration of a direct link between temperature, microbial CUE, and associated isotope fluxes provides a critical step towards understanding δ13C of respired CO2 at multiple scales, and towards a framework for predicting future ecosystem C fluxes.

  6. 微波热解法制备的炭涂层对LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2性能的影响%Influence of carbon coating prepared by microwave pyrolysis on properties of LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩亚梅; 张正富; 张利波; 彭金辉; 傅梦笔; C.SRINIVASAKANNAN; 杜江

    2013-01-01

    A novel synthesis method of carbon-coated LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathode material for lithium-ion battery was reported. The carbon coating was produced from a precursor, glucose, by microwave-pyrolysis method. The prepared powders were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and charge/discharge tests. XRD results indicate that the carbon coating does not change the phase structure of LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 material. SEM results show that the surface of spherical carbon-coated material becomes rough. Electrochemical performance results show that the carbon coating can improve the cycling performance of LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2. The specific discharge capacity retention of the carbon-coated LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 reached 85.0%−96.0%at the 50th cycle at 0.2C rate, and the specific discharge capacity retention is improved at a high rate.%报道了炭包覆锂离子电池正极材料 LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2的新工艺。炭涂层由前驱体葡萄糖通过微波热解而形成。采用X射线粉末衍射(XRD)、扫描电镜、X射线荧光测试和恒流充放电测试来表征所制备的材料。XRD结果表明,炭包覆没有改变LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2材料的相结构。SEM结果表明,炭包覆的LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2颗粒表面变得粗糙。充放电测试结果显示,炭包覆的 LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2的循环性能与未包覆的相比得到提高。炭包覆的LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2在0.2C倍率下循环50次的容量保持率由84.8%提升到95.5%,且高倍率下材料的容量保持率得到提高。

  7. Carbon doping in molecular beam epitaxy of GaAs from a heated graphite filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, R. J.; Nottenberg, R. N.; Schubert, E. F.; Walker, J. F.; Ryan, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon doping of GaAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy has been obtained for the first time by use of a heated graphite filament. Controlled carbon acceptor concentrations over the range of 10 to the 17th-10 to the 20th/cu cm were achieved by resistively heating a graphite filament with a direct current power supply. Capacitance-voltage, p/n junction and secondary-ion mass spectrometry measurements indicate that there is negligible diffusion of carbon during growth and with postgrowth rapid thermal annealing. Carbon was used for p-type doping in the base of Npn AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors. Current gains greater than 100 and near-ideal emitter heterojunctions were obtained in transistors with a carbon base doping of 1 x 10 to the 19th/cu cm. These preliminary results indicate that carbon doping from a solid graphite source may be an attractive substitute for beryllium, which is known to have a relatively high diffusion coefficient in GaAs.

  8. Finite Element Modeling and Free Vibration Analysis of Functionally Graded Nanocomposite Beams Reinforced by Randomly Oriented Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedict Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the finite element modeling and free vibration analysis of functionally graded nanocomposite beams reinforced by randomly oriented straight single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs. Nanostructural materials can be used to alter mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of polymer-based composite materials, because of their superior properties and perfect atom arrangement. Timoshenko beam theory is used to evaluate dynamic characteristics of the beam. The Eshelby–Mori–Tanaka approach based on an equivalent fiber is used to investigate the material properties of the beam. The equations of motion are derived by using Hamilton’s principle. The finite element method is employed to discretize the model and obtain a numerical approximation of the motion equation. Different SWCNTs distributions in the thickness direction are introduced to improve fundamental natural frequency and dynamic behavior of uniform functionally graded nanocomposite beam. Results are presented in tabular and graphical forms to show the effects of various material distributions, carbon nanotube orientations, shear deformation, slenderness ratios and boundary conditions on the dynamic behavior of the beam. The first five normalized mode shapes for functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite (FG-CNTRC beams with different boundary conditions and different carbon nanotubes (CNTs orientation are presented. The results show that the above mentioned effects play very important role on the dynamic behavior of the beam.

  9. A 1-3 Piezoelectric Fiber Reinforced Carbon Nanotube Composite Sensor for Crack Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makireddi, Sai; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2016-02-01

    A method for the detection of location and size of a crack in simple structures using a nanocomposite sensor is discussed. In the present study, a piezoelectric/single walled carbon nanotube composite sensor is modeled on piezoelectric principle. The effective piezoelectric and dielectric properties of the composite at 0.2 volume fraction loading of single walled carbon nanotubes is determined by micromechanical analysis. By means of these effective properties a piezoelectric sensor has been modeled. The transfer function and bode response of this sensor is investigated. The sensor is fixed at a location on a cantilever beam and the response of the sensor with respect to the size and location of the crack is modeled. The analytical values are compared with ANSYS. It is assumed that there is no slippage between the sensor and the beam surface. The sensor behavior with respect to dynamic loading conditions is also studied. It is ascertained that the relative position of the sensor with respect to crack is crucial and determines the sensitivity of the sensor to detect a crack. Results are presented in the form of voltage output from the sensor at different crack locations and at varying lengths of the crack.

  10. Kepler KOI-13.01 - Detection of beaming and ellipsoidal modulations pointing to a massive hot Jupiter

    CERN Document Server

    Mazeh, T; Sokol, G; Faigler, S; Zucker, S

    2011-01-01

    KOI-13 was presented by the Kepler team as a candidate for having a giant planet - KOI-13.01, with orbital period of 1.7 d and transit depth of ~0.8%. We have analyzed the Kepler Q2 data of KOI-13, which was publicly available at the time of the submission of this paper, and derived the amplitudes of the beaming, ellipsoidal and reflection modulations: 8.6 +/- 1.1, 66.8 +/- 1.6 and 72.0 +/- 1.5 ppm (parts per million), respectively. After the paper was submitted, Q3 data were released, so we repeated the analysis with the newly available light curve. The results of the two quarters were quite similar. From the amplitudes of the beaming and the ellipsoidal modulations we derived two independent estimates of the mass of the secondary. Both estimates, 6 +/- 3 M_Jup and 4 +/- 2 M_Jup, suggested that KOI-13.01 was a massive planet, with one of the largest known radii. We also found in the data a periodicity of unknown origin with a period of 1.0595 d and a peak-to-peak modulation of ~60 ppm. The light curve of Q3 ...

  11. Estimation of glucose carbon recycling in children with glycogen storage disease: A 13C NMR study using [U-13C]glucose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A stable isotope procedure to estimate hepatic glucose carbon recycling and thereby elucidate the mechanism by which glucose is produced in patients lacking glucose 6-phosphatase is described. A total of 10 studies was performed in children with glycogen storage disease type I (GSD-I) and type III (GSD-III) and control subjects. A primed dose-constant nasogastric infusion of D-[U-13C]glucose or an infusion diluted with nonlabeled glucose solution was administered following different periods of fasting. Hepatic glucose carbon recycling was estimated from 13C NMR spectra. The values obtained for GSD-I patients coincided with the standard [U-13C]glucose dilution curve. These results indicate that the plasma glucose of GSD-I subjects comprises only a mixture of 99% 13C-enriched D-[U-13C]glucose and unlabeled glucose but lacks any recycled glucose. Significantly different glucose carbon recycling values were obtained for two GSD-III patients in comparison to GSD-I patients. The results eliminate a mechanism for glucose production in GSD-I children involving gluconeogenesis. However, glucose release by amylo-1,6-glucosidase activity would result in endogenous glucose production of non-13C-labeled and nonrecycled glucose carbon, as was found in this study. In GSD-III patients gluconeogenesis is suggested as the major route for endogenous glucose synthesis. The contribution of the triose-phosphate pathway in these patients has been determined

  12. Carbon transfer from the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps followed using a 13C pulse-labeling technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Le Tacon

    Full Text Available Truffles ascocarps need carbon to grow, but it is not known whether this carbon comes directly from the tree (heterotrophy or from soil organic matter (saprotrophy. The objective of this work was to investigate the heterotrophic side of the ascocarp nutrition by assessing the allocation of carbon by the host to Tuber melanosporum mycorrhizas and ascocarps. In 2010, a single hazel tree selected for its high truffle (Tuber melanosporum production and situated in the west part of the Vosges, France, was labeled with (13CO2. The transfer of (13C from the leaves to the fine roots and T. melanosporum mycorrhizas was very slow compared with the results found in the literature for herbaceous plants or other tree species. The fine roots primarily acted as a carbon conduit; they accumulated little (13C and transferred it slowly to the mycorrhizas. The mycorrhizas first formed a carbon sink and accumulated (13C prior to ascocarp development. Then, the mycorrhizas transferred (13C to the ascocarps to provide constitutive carbon (1.7 mg of (13C per day. The ascocarps accumulated host carbon until reaching complete maturity, 200 days after the first labeling and 150 days after the second labeling event. This role of the Tuber ascocarps as a carbon sink occurred several months after the end of carbon assimilation by the host and at low temperature. This finding suggests that carbon allocated to the ascocarps during winter was provided by reserve compounds stored in the wood and hydrolyzed during a period of frost. Almost all of the constitutive carbon allocated to the truffles (1% of the total carbon assimilated by the tree during the growing season came from the host.

  13. Inferring phytoplankton carbon and eco-physiological rates from diel cycles of spectral particulate beam-attenuation coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dall'Olmo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal fluctuations in solar irradiance impose a fundamental frequency on ocean biogeochemistry. Observations of the ocean carbon cycle at these frequencies are rare, but could be considerably expanded by measuring and interpreting the inherent optical properties. A method is presented to analyze diel cycles in particulate beam-attenuation coefficient (cp measured at multiple wavelengths. The method is based on fitting observations with a size-structured population and optical model to infer the particle size distribution and physiologically relevant parameters of the cells responsible for the measured diel cycle in cp. Results show that the information related to size and contained in the spectral data can be exploited to independently estimate growth and loss rates during the day and night. In addition, the model can characterize the population of particles affecting the cp diel variability. Application of this method to spectral cp measured at a station in the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea suggests that most of the observed variations in cp can be ascribed to a synchronized population of cells with an equivalent spherical diameter between 1 and 4 μm. The inferred carbon biomass of these cells was about 8–13 mg m−3 and accounted for approximately 20% of the total particulate organic carbon. If successfully validated and implemented on autonomous platforms, this method could improve our understanding of the ocean carbon cycle.

  14. Localized surface grafting reactions on carbon nanofibers induced by gamma and e-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evora, M.C., E-mail: cecilia@ieav.cta.br [Institute for Advanced Studies-IEAV/DCTA, Av. Cel Jose Alberto Albano do Amarante, 1-Putim, 12228-001 São Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Araujo, J.R., E-mail: jraraujo@inmetro.gov.br [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Ferreira, E.H.M. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil); Strohmeier, B.R. [Thermo Fisher Scientific, 5225 Verona Road, Madison, WI 53711 (United States); Silva, L.G.A., E-mail: lgasilva@ipen.br [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Research- IPEN, Av. Prof lineu Prestes, 2242- Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 SP (Brazil); Achete, C.A. [Instituto Nacional de Metrologia, Qualidade e Tecnologia, Av. Nossa Sra. das Graças, 50, 25250-020 Duque de Caxias, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Methodology for the functionalization of carbon nanofibers was investigated. • Two radiation sources were used to promote grafting reactions: gamma and electron beam. • We report the optimum inhibitor concentration to achieve the functionalization. • Surface of carbon nanofibers showed an increase of oxygen content after irradiation. • The radiation-induced graphitization did not damage the overall sp{sup 2} structure. - Abstract: Electron beam and gamma-ray irradiation have potential application to modify the carbon fiber nanostructures in order to produce useful defects in the graphitic structure and create reactive sites. In this study, the methodology to functionalize carbon nanofiber (CNF), via a radiation process and using acrylic acid as a source of oxygen functional groups, was investigated. The samples were submitted to a direct grafting radiation process with electron beam and gamma-ray source. Several parameters were changed such as: acrylic acid concentration, radiation dose and percentage of inhibitor necessary to achieve functionalization, with higher percentage of oxygen functional groups on CNF surface, and better dispersion. The better results achieved were when mixing CNF in a solution of acrylic acid with 6% of inhibitor (FeSO{sub 4}·7H{sub 2}O) and irradiated at 100 kGy. The samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the surface composition (atomic%) showed a significant increase of oxygen content for the samples after irradiation. Also, the dispersion of the functionalized CNF in water was stable during months which may be a good indication that the functionalization process of CNF via ionizing radiation was successful.

  15. Biological intercomparison using gut crypt survivals for proton and carbon-ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charged particle therapy depends on biological information for the dose prescription. Relative biological effectiveness or RBE for this requirement could basically be provided by experimental data. As RBE values of protons and carbon ions depend on several factors such as cell/tissue type, biological endpoint, dose and fractionation schedule, a single RBE value could not deal with all different radiosensitivities. However, any biological model with accurate reproducibility is useful for comparing biological effectiveness between different facilities. We used mouse gut crypt survivals as endpoint, and compared the cell killing efficiency of proton beams at three Japanese facilities. Three Linac X-ray machines with 4 and 6 MeV were used as reference beams, and there was only a small variation (coefficient of variance<2%) in biological effectiveness among them. The RBE values of protons relative to Linac X-rays ranged from 1.0 to 1.11 at the middle of a 6-cm SOBP (spread-out Bragg peak) and from 0.96 to 1.01 at the entrance plateau. The coefficient of variance for protons ranged between 4.0 and 5.1%. The biological comparison of carbon ions showed fairly good agreement in that the difference in biological effectiveness between National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS)/ Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) and Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI)/Heavy Ion Synchrotron (SIS) was 1% for three positions within the 6-cm SOBP. The coefficient of variance was <1.7, <0.6 and <1.6% for proximal, middle and distal SOBP, respectively. We conclude that the inter-institutional variation of biological effectiveness is smaller for carbon ions than protons, and that beam-spreading methods of carbon ions do not critically influence gut crypt survival. (author)

  16. 13C-enrichment at carbons 8 and 2 of uric acid after 13C-labeled folate dose in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate folate-dependent carbon incorporation into the purine ring, we measured 13C-enrichment independently at C2 and C8 of urinary uric acid (the final catabolite of purines) in a healthy male after an independent oral dose of [6RS]-5-[13C]-formyltetrahydrofolate ([6RS]-5-H13CO-H4folate) or 10-H13CO-7,8-dihydrofolate (10-H13CO-H2folate). The C2 position was 13C-enriched more than C8 after [6RS]-5-H13CO-H4folate, and C2 was exclusively enriched after 10-H13CO-H2folate. The enrichment of C2 was greater from [6RS]-5-H13CO-H4folate than 10-H13CO-H2folate using equimolar bioactive doses. Our data suggest that formyl C of [6RS]-10-H13CO-H4folate was not equally utilized by glycinamide ribotide transformylase (enriches C8) and aminoimidazolecarboxamide ribotide (AICAR) transformylase (enriches C2), and the formyl C of 10-H13CO-H2folate was exclusively used by AICAR transformylase. 10-HCO-H2folate may function in vivo as the predominant substrate for AICAR transformylase in humans

  17. Soil carbon cycle 13C responses in the decade following bark beetle and girdling disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, G. E.; Chan, A. M.; Trahan, N. A.; Moore, D. J.; Bowling, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Recent bark beetle outbreaks in western North America have impacted millions of hectares of conifer forests leading to uncertainty about whether these forests will become new sources of atmospheric CO2. In large part, this depends on whether enhanced respiration from the decomposition of newly dead organic matter will outpace the recovery of ecosystem carbon uptake by the ecosystems. To understand how rapidly conifer forest carbon pools turn over following these disturbances, we examined changes in the isotopic composition of soil respiration (δ13Cresp) following beetle and girdling mortality in two subalpine forests in Colorado, U.S.A. At the beetle-impacted forest δ13Cresp declined by ~1‰ between 3 and 8 years post-disturbance, but recovered in years 9-10. In the girdled forest, deep (<10 cm depth) soil respiration from plots at <1 to 2 years post-girdling was depleted by ~1‰ relative to ungirdled plots, but then gradually increased until there was a significant spike in δ13Cresp at 8-9 years post-girdling. Based on our understanding of isotopic composition in carbon pools and fluxes at these forests, we attribute these changes to removal of recently assimilated C in rhizosphere respiration (1-2 years) followed by the decomposition of litterfall (needles and roots) 8-10 years post-disturbance. Relative to ungirdled plots, there was also a transient enrichment in surface δ13Cresp from plots at <1 to 2 years post-girdling (~0.5‰, not statistically significant) and significant declines in microbial carbon in surface soils in 2-4 year post-girdling plots. Again, based on current understanding, we interpret these to signify the rapid turnover of mycorrhizal and rhizosphere microbial biomass in the 2 years following girdling. A potential confounding factor in this study is that seasonal variation in δ13Cresp was similar in magnitude to changes with time since disturbance and was significantly related to variation in soil temperature and water content.

  18. Isotope separation of carbon-13 by counter-current column with exchange reaction between carbon dioxide and carbamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope separation performance of carbon-13 with exchange reaction between CO2 and carbamic acid was studied and some factors for the counter-current column were studied for improving the overall performance. The working fluid for the experiments was a solution of DNBA, (C4H9)2NH, and n-octane mixture. The rate-controlling step of 13C transfer at temperatures higher than 10 deg C was the exchange reaction between carbamic acid and CO2 dissolved by physical absorption. The capacity coefficient of 13C transfer between gas and liquid in the counter-current column was successfully related to the product of three factors: the concentration of carbamic acid, the concentration of CO2 dissolved by physical absorption and the liquid holdup of the column. The liquid holdup was also an important factor. As the holdup increased, the isotope exchange rate and the overall separation factor of the column increased. However, the transient time to equilibrium was much longer. (author)

  19. Composition of Carbon-13 and Nitrogen-15 in Sediments of the Ha Long Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ha Long Bay with beautiful landscape and rich ecosystems is being used by human to develop the economy. The Ha Long Bay is currently affected by human activities causing the sedimentary environment to be much changed. The change of the environment in the Bay was studied using the composition of carbon-13, nitrogen-15 (δ13C, δ15N) and the C/N ratio in sediment of seven cores collected within the Ha Long Bay. In the Ha Long Bay, sedimentary environment receives many source sediment supplies. The north-east of Ha Long bay receives sources from sea, it is characterized by δ13C in sediment from -8.79 to -18.01‰, value δ15N in sediment from 4.36 to 4.73 ‰ and ratio of C/N from 13 to 41, the source organic matter in sediment shows that affected by C4 plant. The centre of Ha Long Bay receives organic source from sea, it is characterized by δ13C in sediment from -16.72 to -21.58 ‰, value δ15N in sediment ranges 4.15 - 5.20 ‰, ratio of C/N in sediment from 7 to 23. The north-west of Ha Long Bay is affected by rivers, it is characterized by δ13C in sediment range from -13.64 to -25.77 ‰, value δ15N in sediment from 2.50 to 4.38 ‰, and ratio C/N from 9 to 19. (author)

  20. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, C; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Di Domenico, A; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements done with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90$\\degree$ with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight has been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time of flight in...

  1. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry for carbon-ion beams

    CERN Document Server

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Ogata, Risa

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. Ideally, such material should be water equivalent as well as that for dosimetry. In this study, we evaluated dosimetric water equivalency of four common plastics, HDPE, PMMA, PET, and POM, by uniformity of effective densities for carbon-ion-beam interactions. Methods: Using the Bethe formula for stopping, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, we calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. We tested HDPE, PMMA, and POM in carbon-ion-beam experiment and measured attenuations of carbon ions, which were compared with empirical linear-attenuation-model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculations resulted in reduced multiple scattering and increased nuclear interactions for HDPE compared to water, which ...

  2. ATLAS event at 13 TeV - First stable beam, 3 June 2015 - run: 266904, evt: 25884805

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Display of a proton-proton collision event recorded by ATLAS on 3 June 2015, with the first LHC stable beams at a collision energy of 13 TeV. Tracks reconstructed by the tracking detector are shown as light blue lines, and hits in the layers of the silicon tracking detector are shown as colored filled circles. The four inner layers are part of the silicon pixel detector and the four outer layers are part of the silicon strip detector. The layer closest to the beam, called IBL, is new for Run 2. In the view in the bottom right it is seen that this event has multiple pp collisions. The total number of reconstructed collision vertices is 17 but they are not all resolvable on the scale of this picture

  3. In silico carbon molecular beam epitaxial growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate: carbon source effect on van der Waals epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonghoon; Varshney, Vikas; Park, Jeongho; Farmer, Barry L.; Roy, Ajit K.

    2016-05-01

    Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon molecular beam epitaxy (CMBE) techniques using solid carbon sublimation have reported relatively poor quality of the graphene. In this article, the CMBE growth of graphene on the h-BN substrate is numerically studied in order to identify the effect of the carbon source on the quality of the graphene film. The carbon molecular beam generated by the sublimation of solid carbon source materials such as graphite and glassy carbon is mostly composed of atomic carbon, carbon dimers and carbon trimers. Therefore, the graphene film growth becomes a complex process involving various deposition characteristics of a multitude of carbon entities. Based on the study of surface adsorption and film growth characteristics of these three major carbon entities comprising graphite vapour, we report that carbon trimers convey strong traits of vdW epitaxy prone to high quality graphene growth, while atomic carbon deposition is a surface-reaction limited process accompanied by strong chemisorption. The vdW epitaxial behaviour of carbon trimers is found to be substantial enough to nucleate and develop into graphene like planar films within a nanosecond of high flux growth simulation, while reactive atomic carbons tend to impair the structural integrity of the crystalline h-BN substrate upon deposition to form an amorphous interface between the substrate and the growing carbon film. The content of reactive atomic carbons in the molecular beam is suspected to be the primary cause of low quality graphene reported in the literature. A possible optimization of the molecular beam composition towards the synthesis of better quality graphene films is suggested.Against the presumption that hexagonal boron-nitride (h-BN) should provide an ideal substrate for van der Waals (vdW) epitaxy to grow high quality graphene films, carbon

  4. Laser transformation hardening on rod-shaped carbon steel byGaussian beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jong-Do KIM; Myeong-Hoon LEE; Su-Jin LEE; Woon-Ju KANG

    2009-01-01

    Laser transformation hardening(LTH) is one of the laser surface modification processes. The surface hardening of rod-shaped carbon steel (SM45C) was performed by lathe-based laser composite processor with Gaussian-beam optical head. The LTH characteristics by dominant processes, longitudinal and depth directional hardness distributions and behaviors of phase transformation in hardened zones were examined. Especially, two concepts of circumferential speed and theoretical overlap rate were applied. When laser power increased or circumferential speed decreased, the surface hardening depth gradually increases due to the increased heat input. Moreover, the longitudinal hardness distribution particularly shows periodicity of repetitive increase and decrease, which results from tempering effect by overlap. Finally, the feasibility of laser transformation hardening is verified by using the beam with Gaussian intensity distribution.

  5. One-carbon 13C-labeled synthetic intermediates. Comparison and evaluation of preparative methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frequently the biggest stumbling block to the synthesis of a structurally complex labeled compound is obtaining the required low molecular weight, structurally simple, isotopic intermediates. Selection of a particular scheme from various alternatives depends on the available capabilities and quantity of product desired, as well as on anticipated future requirements and need for related compounds. Many of the newer reagents for organic synthesis can be applied effectively to isotopic preparations with improvements of yields and simplification of procedures compared to established classical methods. New routes developed for higher molecular weight compounds are sometimes not directly adaptable to the one-carbon analogs, either because of isolation difficulties occasioned by physical properties or by chemical reactivities peculiar to their being first members of homologous series. Various routes for preparation of carbon-13 labeled methanol, formaldehyde, and cyanide are compared

  6. Enhancing the Accuracy of Carbonate δ18O and δ13C Measurements by SIMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orland, I. J.; Kozdon, R.; Linzmeier, B.; Wycech, J.; Sliwinski, M.; Kitajima, K.; Kita, N.; Valley, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    The precision and accuracy of carbonate δ18O & δ13C analysis by multicollector SIMS is well established if standards match samples in structure and major/minor element chemistry. However, low-T- and bio-carbonates used to construct paleoclimate archives can include complex internal structures and some samples analyzed at WiscSIMS (and other SIMS labs) have a consistent, sample-dependent offset between average SIMS δ18O measurements and bulk δ18O analyses by phosphoric-acid digestion. The offset is typically hydrogen peroxide), for which there is no agreed procedure in conventional bulk analyses. For SIMS analyses, pre-treatments had varied influence on the δ18O value, [16O1H], the concentration of "organic markers" like 12C14N and 31P, and mineralogy (of aragonite samples).

  7. Carbon doping of GaN with CBr4 in radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    OpenAIRE

    Green, D S; Mishra, U. K.; Speck, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon tetrabromide (CBr4) was studied as an intentional dopant during rf plasma molecular beam epitaxy of GaN. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy was used to quantify incorporation behavior. Carbon was found to readily incorporate under Ga-rich and N-rich growth conditions with no detectable bromine incorporation. The carbon incorporation [C] was found to be linearly related to the incident CBr4 flux. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy and x-ray diffraction wer...

  8. Relative biological effects of carbon ion beams on mouse intestinal crypts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basaki, Kiyoshi; Abe, Yoshinao [Hirosaki Univ., Aomori (Japan). School of Medicine; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Akaizawa, Takashi; Ando, Soichiro; Ando, Koichi

    1998-03-01

    The relative biological effect (RBE) of carbon ion beams on mouse intestinal crypt cells were studied. Survival fractions of apoptotic sensitive cells, mitotic delay and colony assay were used for endpoints. Female C3H mice were total body irradiated using a carbon ion beam (290 MeV/u, 6 cm SOBP) at the National Institute of Radiological Science. For counting apoptosis and mitosis, the animals were irradiated either at LET of 70 keV/mm or 40 keV/mm. Fifteen minutes after irradiation, the mice received vincristine sulfate (0.8 mg/kg) and were sacrificed 2 hours and 45 minutes later. For colony assay, the animals were irradiated at an LET of 70 keV/mm and were sacrificed 3.5 days later. Jejunum were excised, fixed and cut into slices. The slides were stained with Hematoxylin and Eosin. Apoptosis-pyknotic cell- and mitosis were counted and survival fractions of apoptotic sensitive cells and mitotic delay time were obtained. The number of colonies were counted and survival fractions per circumference were obtained. Using these endpoints, RBEs were obtained. For survival fractions of apoptotic sensitive cells, no LET difference was observed and RBE was 1.7. For mitotic delay time, RBE was 2.3 and 1.7 at an LET of 70 keV/mm and 40 keV/mm, respectively. For colony assay, the RBE was 2.0-2.1. The different RBEs from three endpoints of the jejunal crypt may reflect each nature of the radiosensitivity to the carbon ion beam. In summary that mitotic delay time exhibited the same RBE as colony assay and RBE regarding apoptosis was less than those RBEs. (author)

  9. Carbon-13 solid state NMR studies in the aromatization of residual coals from hydropyrolised cellulose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure cellulose was pyrolyzed is a fixed-bed reactor under hydrogen pressure (hydropyrolysis). Residual chars were collected and analysed by solid state nmr 13 C (CP-MAS) and elemental. Hydrophyrolysis parameters such as final temperature in the range of 300 to 520 deg C and hydrogen pressure from 5 to 100 atm gave different char samples. CP-MAS spectra were obtained in a BRUKER MSL-100 spectrometer. The results showed that the aromatic and aliphatic fractions had strong dependence with temperature and no influence with pressure. Elemental analysis indicated the carbon content increased more with temperature than the pressure increasing. (author)

  10. Influence of manganese and nickel on properties of low-carbon steels with 13% Cr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studied is the influence of manganese and nickel on mechanical properties and resistance-to-corrosion of the 13% content chromium steels containing 0.1-0.2%C. It is shown that manganese introduction results is the increase of strength characteristics of hardened steels because of delta-ferrite formation suppresion and solid solution strengthening. The delayed cooling during hardening permits to increase ductility and impact strength. Low-carbon 13% content chromium steels alloyed with nickel, molybdenum and aluminium have high heat resistance at temperatures up to 500 deg C due to the precipitation of intermetallics atlading. Chrome-manganese and chrome-nickel steels have a high resistance-to-corrosion in the hardened state in the neutral and weak-acid media

  11. Experimental study on fire protection methods of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Kexu; HE Guisheng; LU Fan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,two reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP)and attached with thick-painted fire resistant coating were tested for fire resistance following the standard fire testing procedures.The experimental results show that the specimen pasted with the insulated layer of 50 mm in thickness could resist fire for 2.5 h.It is also demonstrated that the steel wire mesh embedded in the insulated layer can effectively prevent it from cracking and eroding under firing.

  12. Mutational effects of γ-rays and carbon ion beams on Arabidopsis seedlings

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihara, Ryouhei; Nozawa, Shigeki; Hase, Yoshihiro; Narumi, Issay; Hidema, Jun; Sakamoto, Ayako N

    2013-01-01

    To assess the mutational effects of radiation on vigorously proliferating plant tissue, the mutation spectrum was analyzed with Arabidopsis seedlings using the plasmid-rescue method. Transgenic plants containing the Escherichia coli rpsL gene were irradiated with γ-rays and carbon ion beams (320-MeV 12C6+), and mutations in the rpsL gene were analyzed. Mutant frequency increased significantly following irradiation by γ-rays, but not by 320-MeV 12C6+. Mutation spectra showed that both radiatio...

  13. Measurement of soil carbon oxidation state and oxidative ratio by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockaday, W.C.; Masiello, C.A.; Randerson, J.T.; Smernik, R.J.; Baldock, J.A.; Chadwick, O.A.; Harden, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative ratio (OR) of the net ecosystem carbon balance is the ratio of net O2 and CO2 fluxes resulting from photosynthesis, respiration, decomposition, and other lateral and vertical carbon flows. The OR of the terrestrial biosphere must be well characterized to accurately estimate the terrestrial CO2 sink using atmospheric measurements of changing O2 and CO2 levels. To estimate the OR of the terrestrial biosphere, measurements are needed of changes in the OR of aboveground and belowground carbon pools associated with decadal timescale disturbances (e.g., land use change and fire). The OR of aboveground pools can be measured using conventional approaches including elemental analysis. However, measuring the OR of soil carbon pools is technically challenging, and few soil OR data are available. In this paper we test three solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques for measuring soil OR, all based on measurements of the closely related parameter, organic carbon oxidation state (Cox). Two of the three techniques make use of a molecular mixing model which converts NMR spectra into concentrations of a standard suite of biological molecules of known C ox. The third technique assigns Cox values to each peak in the NMR spectrum. We assess error associated with each technique using pure chemical compounds and plant biomass standards whose Cox and OR values can be directly measured by elemental analyses. The most accurate technique, direct polarization solid-state 13C NMR with the molecular mixing model, agrees with elemental analyses to ??0.036 Cox units (??0.009 OR units). Using this technique, we show a large natural variability in soil Cox and OR values. Soil Cox values have a mean of -0.26 and a range from -0.45 to 0.30, corresponding to OR values of 1.08 ?? 0.06 and a range from 0.96 to 1.22. We also estimate the OR of the carbon flux from a boreal forest fire. Analysis of soils from nearby intact soil profiles imply that soil carbon losses associated

  14. Preparation and physico-chemical study of nitroxide radicals. Isotopic marking with carbon 13 and deuterium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-t-butyl-N-phenyl nitroxide is obtained by: a) action of t-butyl-magnesium chloride on nitrobenzene, or of phenyl-magnesium bromide on nitro-t-butane, b) oxidation of N-t-butyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine, c) oxidation of N-t-butylaniline. In these latter two cases, it has been possible to isolate the pure radical and to study it using UV, IR and EPR. It decomposes to give N-t-butylaniline and the N-oxide of N-t-butyl-p-quinon-imine. The action of peracids such as p-nitro-perbenzoic or m-chloro-perbenzoic acids on amines or hydroxylamines leads to the formation of stable or unstable nitroxide radicals easily observable by EPR. Finally, with a view to obtaining definite values for the coupling between the free electron of a nitroxide and carbon 13, the preparation of such radicals marked with 13C in the α or β position of the nitroxide function has been carried out. The coupling with an α carbon 13 is negative and does not appear to vary with the spin density on the nitrogen. The interaction with the p nuclei of the nitrogen depends on the nature of the substituents: the two benzyl protons have a hyperfine splitting aH which is always less than that of the ethyl. On the other hand, the 13C coupling is greater in the first case. The usually adopted conformations for the compounds having the carbonyl group cannot account for the observed values of the β couplings. (author)

  15. Treatment of industrial effluents using electron beam accelerator and adsorption with activated carbon. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods are used In the pollutant removal from Industrial and domestic wastewater. However when the degradation of toxic organic pollutants, mainly the recalcitrant is objectified, the conventional treatments usually do not meet the desirable performance in the elimination or decrease the impact when the effluent are released to the environment what takes to the research of alternative methods that seek the improvement of the efficiency of the wastewater treatment systems jointly employees or separately. This work presents a study of degradation/removal of pollutants organic compounds comparing two methods using radiation from industrial electron beam and granular activated carbon (GAC). The removal efficiency of the pollutants was evaluated and it was verified that the efficiency of adsorption with activated carbon is similar to the radiation method. The obtained results allowed to evaluated the relative costs of these methods. (author)

  16. Low carbon content NiTi shape memory alloy produced by electron beam melting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otubo Jorge

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Earlier works showed that the use of electron beam melting is a viable process to produce NiTi shape memory alloy. In those works a static and a semi-dynamic processes were used producing small shell-shaped and cylindrical ingots respectively. The main characteristics of those samples were low carbon concentration and good composition homogeneity throughout the samples. This paper presents the results of scaling up the ingot size and processing procedure using continuous charge feeding and continuous casting. The composition homogeneity was very good demonstrated by small variation in martensitic transformation temperatures with carbon content around 0.013wt% compared to 0.04 to 0.06wt% of commercial products.

  17. Transplantation of ES cells to Parkinson model rat irradiated with carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was designed to make a new Parkinson disease model using carbon ion beam. We irradiated right medial forebrain bundle of adult SD rats with charged carbon particles (290 MeV/nucleon, Mono peak, 150 Gy) and damaged right dopaminergic neurons pathway. To irradiate precisely, rats were set in the stereotactic frame with ear bars. Four weeks after the irradiation, behavioral test and in vitro autoradiography showed hemi-Parkinson model as well as 6-OHDA lesioned rats. Pathological examinations showed cell death, gliosis and inflammations at the irradiated area. However, no obvious alteration was observed at the surrounding normal tissue. These results indicated utility and validity of this method. (author)

  18. 电子束再生粉状活性炭的研究%Study on Regeneration of Powdered Activated Carbon by Electron Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴明红; 包伯荣; 陈捷; 陆丽蓉

    2000-01-01

    The powdered activated carbon which had adsorbed phenylglycine solution from pharmaceutics factory can be regenerated by mean of irradiation of high-energy electron beams in oxygen, nitrogen and water vapor respectively. The effects of radiation dose and beam current on regeneration of activated carbon in different atmosphere were studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the iodine number of activated carbon were used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption. The results show that the powder activated carbon polluted with phenlglycine could be regenerated effectively by irradiation of high energy electron beams in nitrogen stream. The generation did not need high temperature, and the weight loss of carbon and energy consumption were minimum.

  19. Study on Regeneration of Powdered Activated Carbon by Electron Beam%电子束再生粉状活性炭的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴明红; 包伯荣; 陈捷; 陆丽蓉

    2001-01-01

    The powdered activated carbon which had adsorbed phenylglycine solution from pharmaceutics factory can be regenerated by mean of irradiation of high-energy electron beams in oxygen, nitrogen and water vapor respectively. The effects of radiation dose and beam current on regeneration of activated carbon in different atmosphere were studied. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and the iodine number of activated carbon were used to monitor the change of carbon adsorption. The results show that the powder activated carbon polluted with phenlglycine could be regenerated effectively by irradiation of high energy electron beams in nitrogen stream. The generation did not need high temperature, and the weight loss of carbon and energy consumption were minimum.

  20. A low energy optimization of the CERN-NGS neutrino beam for a $\\theta_{13}$ driven neutrino oscillation search

    CERN Document Server

    Rubbia, André

    2002-01-01

    The possibility to improve the CERN to Gran Sasso neutrino beam performances for $\\theta_{13}$ searches is investigated. We show that by an appropriate optimization of the target and focusing optics of the present CNGS design, we can increase the flux of low energy neutrinos by about a factor 5 compared to the current $\\tau$ optimized focalisation. With the ICARUS 2.35 kton detector at LNGS and in case of negative result, this would allow to improve the limit to $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ by an order of magnitude better than the current limit of CHOOZ at $\\Delta m^2\\approx 3\\times 10^{-3} \\rm eV^2$ within 5 years of nominal CNGS running. This is by far the most sensitive setup of the currently approved long-baseline experiments and is competitive with the proposed JHF superbeam.

  1. Manufacturing composite beams reinforced with three-dimensionally patterned-oriented carbon nanotubes through microfluidic infiltration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Composite beams reinforced with 3D patterned-oriented nanotubes are manufactured. ► Process-induced orientation of nanotubes in 3D microfluidic networks is studied. ► The stiffness is compared with the values obtained from a micromechanical model. ► The model predictions give a close estimation at different processing conditions. ► The present manufacturing method opens new prospects for the design of composites. -- Abstract: Functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/epoxy nanocomposite suspensions were prepared and injected into three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microfluidic networks in order to fabricate composite beams reinforced with patterned-oriented nanotubes. The microfluidic networks were fabricated by the robotized direct deposition of fugitive ink filaments in a layer-by-layer sequence onto substrates, followed by their epoxy encapsulation and the ink removal. Then, the nanocomposite suspensions prepared by ultrasonication and three-roll mill mixing methods were injected into the empty networks under two different controlled and constant pressures in order to subject the suspensions to different shear conditions in the microchannels. Morphological studies revealed that the SWCNTs were preferentially aligned in the microchannels along the flow direction at the higher injection pressure. The improvement of Young’s modulus of the manufactured 3D-reinforced rectangular beams prepared at the high injection pressure was almost doubled when compared to that of beams prepared at the low injection pressure. Finally, the stiffness of the 3D-reinforced beams was compared with the theoretically predicted values obtained from a micromechanical model. The analytical predictions give a close estimation of the stiffness at different micro-injection conditions. Based on the experimental and theoretical results, the present manufacturing technique enables the spatial orientation of nanotube in the final product by taking

  2. The CBS-The Most Cost Effective and High Performance Carbon Beam Source Dedicated for a New Generation Cancer Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Kumada, Masayuki; Leivichev, E B; Parkhomchuk, Vasily; Podgorny, Fedor; Rastigeev, Sergey; Reva, Vladimir B; Skrinsky, Aleksander Nikolayevich; Vostrikov, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    A Carbon ion beam is a superior tool to x-rays or a proton beam in both physical and biological doses in treating a cancer. A Carbon beam has an advantage in treating radiation resistant and deep-seated tumors. Its radiological effect is of a mitotic independent nature. These features improve hypofractionation, typically reducing the number of irradiations per patient from 35 to a few. It has been shown that a superior QOL(Quality Of Life) therapy is possible by a carbon beam.The only drawback is its high cost. Nevertheless, tens of Prefectures and organizations are eagerly considering the possibility of having a carbon ion therapy facility in Japan. Germany, Austria, Italy, China, Taiwan and Korea also desire to have one.A carbon beam accelerator of moderate cost is about 100 Million USD. With the "CBS" design philosophy, which will be described in this paper, the cost could be factor of 2 or 3 less, while improving its performance more than standard designs. Novel extraction techniques, a new approach to a ...

  3. Dual-ion-beam deposition of carbon films with diamond-like properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Swec, D. M.; Angus, J. C.

    1985-01-01

    A single and dual ion beam system was used to generate amorphous carbon films with diamond like properties. A methane/argon mixture at a molar ratio of 0.28 was ionized in the low pressure discharge chamber of a 30-cm-diameter ion source. A second ion source, 8 cm in diameter was used to direct a beam of 600 eV Argon ions on the substrates (fused silica or silicon) while the deposition from the 30-cm ion source was taking place. Nuclear reaction and combustion analysis indicate H/C ratios for the films to be 1.00. This high value of H/C, it is felt, allowed the films to have good transmittance. The films were impervious to reagents which dissolve graphitic and polymeric carbon structures. Although the measured density of the films was approximately 1.8 gm/cu cm, a value lower than diamond, the films exhibited other properties that were relatively close to diamond. These films were compared with diamond like films generated by sputtering a graphite target.

  4. Tool steel ion beam assisted nitrocarburization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagonel, L.F. [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)], E-mail: zagonel@ifi.unicamp.br; Alvarez, F. [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Unicamp, 13083-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2007-09-15

    The nitrocarburization of the AISI-H13 tool steel by ion beam assisted deposition is reported. In this technique, a carbon film is continuously deposited over the sample by the ion beam sputtering of a carbon target while a second ion source is used to bombard the sample with low energy nitrogen ions. The results show that the presence of carbon has an important impact on the crystalline and microstructural properties of the material without modification of the case depth.

  5. Tool steel ion beam assisted nitrocarburization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrocarburization of the AISI-H13 tool steel by ion beam assisted deposition is reported. In this technique, a carbon film is continuously deposited over the sample by the ion beam sputtering of a carbon target while a second ion source is used to bombard the sample with low energy nitrogen ions. The results show that the presence of carbon has an important impact on the crystalline and microstructural properties of the material without modification of the case depth

  6. Effects of evolving surface morphology on yield during focused ion beam milling of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate evolving surface morphology during focused ion beam bombardment of C and determine its effects on sputter yield over a large range of ion dose (1017-1019 ions/cm2) and incidence angles (Θ = 0-80o). Carbon bombarded by 20 keV Ga+ either retains a smooth sputtered surface or develops one of two rough surface morphologies (sinusoidal ripples or steps/terraces) depending on the angle of ion incidence. For conditions that lead to smooth sputter-eroded surfaces there is no change in yield with ion dose after erosion of the solid commences. However, for all conditions that lead to surface roughening we observe coarsening of morphology with increased ion dose and a concomitant decrease in yield. A decrease in yield occurs as surface ripples increase wavelength and, for large Θ, as step/terrace morphologies evolve. The yield also decreases with dose as rippled surfaces transition to have steps and terraces at Θ = 75o. Similar trends of decreasing yield are found for H2O-assisted focused ion beam milling. The effects of changing surface morphology on yield are explained by the varying incidence angles exposed to the high-energy beam.

  7. Biomass Accumulation and Carbon Stocks in 13 Different Clones of Teak (Tectona Grandis Linn. F.) in Odisha, India

    OpenAIRE

    Manoj Kumar Behera; Nilima Priyadarshini Mohapatra

    2015-01-01

    The rate of biomass accumulation and carbon stocks of 13 different clones of Teak in Odisha were studied to identify the promising genotypes suitable for massive clonal plantations in Odisha. ORANP2 produced highest biomass among the 13 clones of teak i.e. 223.72m3/ha, while ORANP1 registered lowest value of 64.05m3/ha in regards to biomass accumulation. The total carbon stock values were found in the range of 32.02-111.86t/ha for 13 different clones of teak. The Mean Annual Increment (MAI) v...

  8. Effects of carbon ion beam irradiation on the shoot regeneration from in vitro axillary bud explants of the Impatiens hawkeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Libin; Zhou, Libin; Li, Wenjian; Li, Ping; Dong, Xicun; Qu, Ying; Ma, Shuang; Li, Qiang

    Accelerated ion beams is an excellent mutagen in plant breeding which can induce higher mutation frequencies and wider mutation spectrum than those of low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiations, such as X-rays (Okamura et al. 2003, Yamaguchi et al. 2003). Mutation breeding operation of two Saintpaulia ionahta cultivars using the method combining plant tissue culture technique and carbon ion beam irradiations were set out at Institute of Modern Physics from 2005 (Zhou et al. 2006). The effects of 960 MeV carbon ion beam and 8 MeV X-ray irradiations on regenerated shoots of Impatiens hawkeri from another kind of explants named in vitro axillary buds explants were studied recently. The biology endpoints in this study included relative number of roots (RNR), relative length of roots (RLR), relative height of shoots (RHS), relative number of nodes (RNN), survival fraction (SF) and morphology changes in the regenerated shoots. The experimental results showed that carbon ion beams inhibited the root and stem developments of axillary bud explants more severely than X-rays did. And the 50% lethal dose (LD50 ) is about 23.3 Gy for the carbon ion beam and 49.1 Gy for the X-rays, respectively. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of Impatiens hawkeri with respect to X-rays according to 50% SF was about two. Secondly, the percentage of shoots regenerated with malformed shoots including curliness, carnification, nicks in all Impatiens hawkeri axillary bud explants irradiated with carbon ion beam at 20 Gy accounted for 55.6%, while the highest number for the 40 Gy X-ray irradiation was 40%. Last, many regenerated shoots whose vascular bundle fused together were obtained only from explants irradiated with carbon ion beams. Based on the results above, it can be concluded that the effect of mutation induction by carbon ion beam irradiation on the axillary explants of Impatiens hawkeri is better than that by X-ray irradiation; and the optimal mutagenic dose varies from 20 Gy

  9. Flexural rigidity evolvement laws of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIU Peng-zhi; HUANG Pei-yan; DENG Jun; HAN Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that externally bonded carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates are particularly suitable for improving the fatigue behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams. This paper presents the research on flexural rigidity evolvement laws by testing 14 simple-supported RC beams strengthened with carbon fiber laminates (CFL) under cyclic load, and 2 under monotone load as a reference. The cyclic load tests revealed the peak load applied onto the surface of a supported RC beam strengthened with CFL is linear to the logarithm of its fatigue life, and the flexural rigidity evolvement undergoes three distinct phases: a rapid decrease from the start to about 5% of the fatigue life; an even development from 5% to about 99% of the fatigue life; and a succedent rapid decrease to failure. When the ratio of fatigue cycles to the fatigue life is within 0.05 to 0.99, the flexural rigidity varies linearly with the ratio. The peak load does not affect the flexural rigidity evolvement if it is not high enough to make the main reinforcements yield. The dependences of the flexural rigidity of specimens formed in the same group upon their fatigue cycles normalized by fatigue life are almost coincident. This implies the flexural rigidity may be a material parameter independent of the stress level. These relationships of flexural rigidity to fatigue cycles, and fatigue life may be able to provide some hints for fatigue design and fatigue life evaluation of RC member strengthened with CFL; nevertheless the findings still need verifying by more experiments.

  10. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylations of lactic acid containing 13C at the natural abundance level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C kinetic isotope fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition by sulfuric acid has been studied in the temperature range of 20-80 deg C. The 13C(1) isotope separation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid depends strongly on the temperature above 40 deg C. Below this temperature the 13C isotope effect in the decarbonylation of lactic acid by concentrated sulfuric acid is normal similarly as has been found in the decarbonylation of lactic [1-14C] acid. The experimental values of k(12C)/k(13C) ratios of isotopic rate constants for 12C and 13C are close to, but slightly higher than theoretical 13C-kinetic isotope effects calculated (neglecting tunneling) under the asumption that the C(1)-OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of the dehydration reaction. Dilution of concentrated sulfuric acid with water up to 1.4 molar (H2O)/(H2SO4) ratio caused the increase of the 13C isotope fractionation from 1.0273 found in concentrated sulfuric acid at 80.5 deg C to 1.0536±0.0008 (at 80.6 deg C). A discussion of the abnormally high temperature dependence of 14C and 13C isotope fractionation in this reaction and the discussion of the problem of relative 14C/13C kinetic isotope effects is given. (author) 18 refs.; 2 tabs

  11. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  12. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-01

    We have determined "effective" Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  13. Radiation biophysical studies with mammalian cells and a modulated carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinese hamster (V-79) and human kidney (T-1) cells were irradiated in stirred suspensions placed at various positions in the plateau and extended Bragg peak of a 400-MeV/amu carbon ion beam. The range of the ions was modulated by a lead (translational) ridge filter and a brass (spiral) ridge filter designed to produce extended peaks of approximately 4 and 10 cm, respectively. Stationary-phase and G1-phase populations of Chinese hamster cells were found to have different absolute radiosensitivities which, in turn, were different from that of asynchronous human kidney cells. The increase in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) observed as carbon ions were slowed down and stopped in water was similar for the three cell populations at doses greater than 400 rad. At lower doses the RBE was greater for the hamster cell populations than for the human kidney cells. The gain in RBE (at the 50% survival level) between the plateaus and the middle region of the extended peaks was approximately 2.0 and 1.7 for the 4- and 10-cm extended peaks, respectively. Oxygen enhancement ratios (OER) were determined at the 10% survival levels with stationary-phase populations of hamster cells. Values of 2.8, 2.65, and 1.65 were obtained for the OER of 220-kV x rays, plateau carbon, and the middle region of the 4-cm carbon peak, respectively. Across the 10-cm carbon peak the OER was found to vary between values of 2.4 to 1.55 from the proximal to distal positions

  14. 13 C enrichment by cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide on experimental pilot plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotope 13 C is used in many scientific fields such as: biology, medicine, chemistry and environmental studies. The recent advances in analytical techniques have determined an important demand for this isotope. The most used method for 13 C separation in large quantities is the cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide at 81 K. The single stage separation factor (α) for 13 C is 1.01 - 1.007 at 70 - 81 K. A 13 C separation plant by cryogenic distillation of CO was built in the Separation Laboratory of ITIM Cluj-Napoca.The carbon monoxide used as a feed gas for the 13 C separation plant was produced by reaction of CO2 with charcoal at 1300 K. CO was purified in a plant which has a reactor filled with Pd/Al2O3 and adsorbers with 5 mA molecular sieve. The purity of the carbon monoxide thus obtained was 99.9%. A cryogenic distillation column was used for high purification and the resulting CO, with less of 10 vol. ppm H2O and CO2, was stored in tanks. The main components of the experimental plant for the distillation of carbon monoxide at 81 K are: the condenser, a cascade with two distillation columns, boilers and thermal insulation. The condenser provides the reflux at the top of the first column by total liquefaction of CO vapours at 81 K. The used refrigerant is liquid nitrogen. The first column is 2.5 m high and 26 mm inside diameter. It is filled with Helipack type packing 2 x 2 x 0.2 mm. The reflux at the bottom of the first column is provided by an electrically heated boiler. The second column, 4.25 m high and 16 mm inside diameter, is filled with Helipack type packing 1.8 x 1.8 x 0.2 mm and has also an electrically heated boiler at the bottom. The columns have several locations for feed lines, sampling lines, pressure and temperature control. Inside the vacuum jacket, the low temperature components were wrapped in multi-layers of aluminized plastic foils, as radiation shields. A vacuum of 10-5 mm Hg was obtained. The purpose of these experiments was to

  15. Assessment of adhesive setting time in reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► This study investigated the effect of adhesive setting time on the modal parameters. ► Modal parameters recommend the 18th day as the maturity age of the adhesive. ► Static data recommend 7th day as the maturity age of the adhesive. ► Setting time affects the modal parameters as tool for assessment repaired structures. ► Carrying the modal parameters after 1st day results in 55% loss of the actual improvement. -- Abstract: The strengthened effectiveness and the performance capacity of repaired Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures with Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) sheets is dependent on the properties of the adhesive interface layer. Adhesive material requires a specific setting time to achieve the maximum design capacity. Adhesive producer provides technical data which demonstrates the increase with time of the capacity, up to the maximum. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the adhesive setting time on the modal parameters as an indication of the effectiveness of CFRP on repaired RC beams. Firstly, datum modal parameters were determined on the undamaged beam and subsequently the parameters were obtained when damaged was induced on the RC beam by application of load until the appearance of the first crack. Finally, the RC beam is repaired with externally bonded CFRP sheets, and modal parameters are once again applied after 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 11, 15 and 18 days. The comparison is made with the data based on half day results in order to monitor the change in the modal parameters corresponding to the adhesive setting time. The modal parameters where used as indicators for the effectiveness of CFRP are affected by the adhesive time as shown in this study. Results are compared with the adhesive technical data provided by the adhesive producer.

  16. Carbon-ion beam irradiation kills X-ray-resistant p53-null cancer cells by inducing mitotic catastrophe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Napapat Amornwichet

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To understand the mechanisms involved in the strong killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation on cancer cells with TP53 tumor suppressor gene deficiencies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: DNA damage responses after carbon-ion beam or X-ray irradiation in isogenic HCT116 colorectal cancer cell lines with and without TP53 (p53+/+ and p53-/-, respectively were analyzed as follows: cell survival by clonogenic assay, cell death modes by morphologic observation of DAPI-stained nuclei, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs by immunostaining of phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX, and cell cycle by flow cytometry and immunostaining of Ser10-phosphorylated histone H3. RESULTS: The p53-/- cells were more resistant than the p53+/+ cells to X-ray irradiation, while the sensitivities of the p53+/+ and p53-/- cells to carbon-ion beam irradiation were comparable. X-ray and carbon-ion beam irradiations predominantly induced apoptosis of the p53+/+ cells but not the p53-/- cells. In the p53-/- cells, carbon-ion beam irradiation, but not X-ray irradiation, markedly induced mitotic catastrophe that was associated with premature mitotic entry with harboring long-retained DSBs at 24 h post-irradiation. CONCLUSIONS: Efficient induction of mitotic catastrophe in apoptosis-resistant p53-deficient cells implies a strong cancer cell-killing effect of carbon-ion beam irradiation that is independent of the p53 status, suggesting its biological advantage over X-ray treatment.

  17. Characterization of carbon-doped InSb diode grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-doped p-type InSb layers grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy are characterized using a p+-n diode structure. Based on the combination of current-voltage, secondary ion mass spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction measurements, carbon is proven to be an effective p-type dopant for InSb with hole concentration reaching the range of 1019 cm-3. It is also proven that the use of the Hall effect to determine the hole concentration in the p-type InSb layer may be unreliable in cases where the leakage current in the p+-n junction is high. A thermal trap-assisted tunnelling model with two trap levels successfully explains the origin of leakage current mechanisms in the carbon-doped InSb samples. Good agreement between measured and calculated dc characteristics of the diodes at reverse bias up to -3 V from 30 to 120 K supports the validity of the current transport model

  18. Emulsion Cloud Chamber technique to measure the fragmentation of a high-energy carbon beam

    CERN Document Server

    De Lellis, G; Buontempo, S; Capua, F D; Furusawa, Y; Lavina, L S; Marotta, A; Migliozzi, P; Naganawa, N; Petukhov, Yu P; Pistillo, C; Russo, A; Strolin, P; Tioukov, V; Toshito, T; Yasuda, N

    2007-01-01

    Beams of Carbon nuclei are now in use or planned to be used in various centers for cancer treatment around the world. The knowledge of the fragmentation of Carbon nuclei when they interact with the human body is important for evaluating of the spatial profile of their energy deposition in the tissues, hence the damage to tissues neighbouring the tumor. To this purpose, the identification of the fragmentation products is a key element. We present in this paper the charge measurement of about 3000 fragments produced by the interaction of $^{12}$C nuclei with an energy of 400 MeV/nucleon in a detector simulating the density of the human body. The nuclear emulsion technique is used, by means of the so-called Emulsion Cloud Chamber. The nuclear emulsions are inspected using fast automated microscopes recently developed. A charge assignment efficiency of more than 99% is achieved. The separation of Hydrogen, Helium, Lithium, Berillium, Boron and Carbon can be achieved at two standard deviations or considerably more...

  19. Study of the time and space distribution of $\\beta^+$ emitters from $80\\ \\mega\\electronvolt/$u carbon ion beam irradiation on PMMA

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, C; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Di Domenico, A; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Voena, C

    2012-01-01

    Proton and carbon ion therapy is an emerging technique used for the treatment of solid cancers. The monitoring of the dose delivered during such treatments and the on-line knowledge of the Bragg peak position is still a matter of research. A possible technique exploits the collinear $511\\ \\kilo\\electronvolt$ photons produced by positrons annihilation from $\\beta^+$ emitters created by the beam. This paper reports rate measurements of the $511\\ \\kilo\\electronvolt$ photons emitted after the interactions of a $80\\ \\mega\\electronvolt / u$ fully stripped carbon ion beam at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) of INFN, with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. The time evolution of the $\\beta^+$ rate was parametrized and the dominance of $^{11}C$ emitters over the other species ($^{13}N$, $^{15}O$, $^{14}O$) was observed, measuring the fraction of carbon ions activating $\\beta^+$ emitters $A_0=(10.3\\pm0.7)\\cdot10^{-3}$. The average depth in the PMMA of the positron annihilation from $\\beta^+$ emitters was also meas...

  20. Study of the time and space distribution of {beta}{sup +} emitters from 80MeV/u carbon ion beam irradiation on PMMA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agodi, C. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud dell' INFN, Catania (Italy); Bellini, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud dell' INFN, Catania (Italy); Collamati, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Cuttone, G. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud dell' INFN, Catania (Italy); De Lucia, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); De Napoli, M. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud dell' INFN, Catania (Italy); Di Domenico, A.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Fiore, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy); Gauzzi, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy); INFN Sezione di Roma, Roma (Italy); Iarocci, E. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di Base e Applicate per l' Ingegneria, Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy); Marafini, M., E-mail: michela.marafini@roma1.infn.it [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche ' E. Fermi' , Roma (Italy); Mattei, I. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Roma Tre Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); Paoloni, A. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati dell' INFN, Frascati (Italy); and others

    2012-07-15

    Proton and carbon ion therapy is an emerging technique used for the treatment of solid cancers. The monitoring of the dose delivered during such treatments and the on-line knowledge of the Bragg peak position is still a matter of research. A possible technique exploits the collinear 511keV photons produced by positrons annihilation from {beta}{sup +} emitters created by the beam. This paper reports rate measurements of the 511keV photons emitted after the interactions of a 80MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) of INFN, with a poly-methyl methacrylate target. The time evolution of the {beta}{sup +} rate was parametrized and the dominance of {sup 11}C emitters over the other species ({sup 13}N, {sup 15}O, {sup 14}O) was observed, measuring the fraction of carbon ions activating {beta}{sup +} emitters to be (10.3{+-}0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}. The average depth in the PMMA of the positron annihilation from {beta}{sup +} emitters was also measured, D{sub {beta}{sup +}}=5.3{+-}1.1mm, to be compared to the expected Bragg peak depth D{sub Bragg}=11.0{+-}0.5mm obtained from simulations.

  1. Experimental cascade for the separation of 13C by cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The stable isotope 13C has multiple applications as compounds labeled for studies in the fields of biology, chemistry, medicine, environment, agro-chemistry, etc. The progress in isotope analysis methodologies increased the interest in producing and using this isotope. The most used method for production of large amounts of 13C is cryogenic distillation of carbon monoxide in a cascade of several stages containing columns of different diameters with packing. Cryogenic distillation uses the differences between vapor pressures of different isotopic species, 12C16O and 13C16O, at temperatures lower than 85 K. This ratio, that is regularly named relative volatility or separation factor α equals 1.01 at 70 K and 1.007 at 81 K. The experiments were performed on experimental device in which columns as high as 7 m are used with inner diameters of 16 and 26 mm, respectively. A cascade consists of two vertical sections, the inner column 26 mm and 2.5 m height and the lower one of 16 mm inner diameter and 4.5 m length, both of them containing Helipack packing. The cooling agent used in the condenser was liquid nitrogen boiling at atmospheric pressure. The boilers were electrically heated at variable power supply. The plant is an automated system controlled by a PC. On this plant a values of HETP between 18.5 and 23 mm were obtained. After a productive experiment of the plant a product of 7.5 at. % of 13C were obtained. The obtained results fit fairly with theoretical calculations. (authors)

  2. Trends of 13C/12C ratios in pinyon tree rings of the American Southwest and the global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate atmospheric 13C/12C chronology can provide important constraints to models of the global carbon cycle. Trees accumulate carbon from atmospheric CO2 into growth rings and offer potential for 13C/12C reconstructions, but results have not been reproducible. This paper presents δ13C curves from 5 sites, representing 20 pinyon (Pinus edulis) trees, where cores of 4 trees from each site have been pooled into a composite sample. Isotopic analysis of cellulose in 5-yr ring groups produces curves with a general trend of decreasing δ13C after 1800, but with pronounced short-term fluctuations superimposed upon the trend. Evidence indicates the fluctuations are strongly related to moisture availability (drought). A mean curve of the 5 δ13C chronologies from which the fossil-fuel component is subtracted suggests a substantial biospheric CO2 contribution to the atmosphere since 1800

  3. Use of laser spectroscopy to measure the 13C/12C and 18O/16O compositions of carbonate minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Shaun L L; Dipple, Gregory M; Dong, Feng; Baer, Douglas S

    2011-03-15

    The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of carbonate minerals are utilized throughout the earth and environmental sciences for various purposes. Here, we demonstrate the first application of a prototype instrument, based on off-axis integrated cavity output laser spectroscopy, to measure the carbon and oxygen isotope composition of CO(2) gas evolved from the acidification of carbonate minerals. The carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were recorded from absorption spectra of (12)C(16)O(16)O, (13)C(16)O(16)O, and (12)C(16)O(18)O in the near-infrared wavelength region. The instrument was calibrated using CaCO(3) minerals with known δ(13)C(VPDB) and δ(18)O(VSMOW) values, which had been previously calibrated by isotope ratio mass spectrometry relative to the international isotopic standards NBS 18 and NBS 19. Individual analyses are demonstrated to have internal precision (1 SE) of better than 0.15‰ for δ(13)C and 0.6‰ for δ(18)O. Analysis of four carbonate standards of known isotopic composition over 2 months, determined using the original instrumental calibration, indicates that analyses are accurate to better than 0.5‰ for both δ(13)C and δ(18)O without application of standard-sample-standard corrections. PMID:21341717

  4. Deflection analysis of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymer under long-term load action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mykolas DAUGEVI(C)IUS; Juozas VALIVONIS; Gediminas MAR(C)IUKAITIS

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an experimental research on reinforced concrete beams strengthened with an external carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) layer under long-term load action that lasted for 330 d.We describe the characteristics of deflection development of the beams strengthened with different additional anchorages of the external carbon fibre composite layer during the period of interest.The conducted experiments showed that the additional anchorage influences the slip of the extemal layer with respect to the strengthened element.Thus,concrete and carbon fibre composite interface stiffness decreases with a long-term load action.Therefore,the proposed method of analysis based on the built-up-bars theory can be used to estimate concrete and carbon fibre composite interface stiffness in the case of long-term load.

  5. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of heterocyclic salts and its precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The synthesis of 1,2,3,6 - tetrahydro - 1, 1 dimethyl - 3 - oxo - 5 phenylpyridinium bromides containing the substituents: H, Me, Cl, Br, OMe and NO2 is described. The phenacyl bromides (8a-f) were characterized by their melting points and by their I.r. and 1H n.m.r. spectra. Some studies on 13C n.m.r. spectra of the phenacyl bromides (8a-f), the quartenary ammonium salts (7a-f) and the cyclic salts(6a-f) are shown. The effect of substituents on the eletronic structure of these compounds and on the chemical shifts of the different carbon atoms in terms of electronic and steric effects are discussed. (M.J.C.)

  6. Carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of cobalt(III) complexes with flexible tetraamine ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brubaker, G.R.; Johnson, D.W.

    1983-10-01

    Carbon 13 NMR was found to be an extremely sensitive probe of the stereochemistry of this series of diamagnetic ''Werner'' complexes. Our interpretation is based upon two parameters, the donation of electron density to the metal and the steric perturbation required for coordination. The different symmetry of the complexes often permits determination of stereochemistry from the electronic spectrum. In addition, other methods including vibrational spectroscopy and proton NMR, have been used with some success to determine stereochemistry. These methods suffer, however, from a lack of sensitivity, especially in complexes with unsymmetrical ligands. In the course of continuing study of the stereochemistry of six coordinate transition metal complexes, we have investigated a large variety of cobalt(III) complexes with various tetraamine ligands.

  7. Investigation on biological properties of tacrolimus-loaded poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixia; Wu, Leigang; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2010-06-01

    The drug-eluting stents have been regarded as a milestone in inhibiting the restenosis of coronary arteries. However, adverse reactions caused by bare-metal stents and non-biodegradable polymer coatings may result in some clinical problems. In this study, a new tacrolimus-eluting stent coated with biodegradable poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) is developed. The structures are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the wettability is measured by contact angle assay. The biological behaviors are evaluated by the in vitro platelets adhesion test, APTT test, the human umbilical cord artery smooth muscle cells (HUCASMCs), 4',6-diamidine-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and actin immunofluorescence staining, MTT colorimetric assay. These results show that after blending tacrolimus into PTMC, the anticoagulant behavior is improved, and the adhesion and proliferation of HUCASMCs on samples are inhibited. This work aims to find one kind of surface erosion biodegradable polymers that can be applied as drug-eluting stent coatings.

  8. Investigation on biological properties of tacrolimus-loaded poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The drug-eluting stents have been regarded as a milestone in inhibiting the restenosis of coronary arteries. However, adverse reactions caused by bare-metal stents and non-biodegradable polymer coatings may result in some clinical problems. In this study, a new tacrolimus-eluting stent coated with biodegradable poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) is developed. The structures are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the wettability is measured by contact angle assay. The biological behaviors are evaluated by the in vitro platelets adhesion test, APTT test, the human umbilical cord artery smooth muscle cells (HUCASMCs), 4',6-diamidine-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and actin immunofluorescence staining, MTT colorimetric assay. These results show that after blending tacrolimus into PTMC, the anticoagulant behavior is improved, and the adhesion and proliferation of HUCASMCs on samples are inhibited. This work aims to find one kind of surface erosion biodegradable polymers that can be applied as drug-eluting stent coatings.

  9. An Empirical Assessment of the Risk of Carbon Leakage in Poland - Working Paper No. 08/13,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poland is a particularly carbon intensive economy. This has created concern that it may be particularly exposed to carbon leakage. However, there is an absence of robust and transparent empirical research on carbon leakage risks in Poland. This study aims at filling this gap by assessing the impact of EU climate policy, in particular the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, on Polish industry. With no mitigating measures, a small number of Polish industrial sectors would face significant carbon costs. However, with free allocation, banked surplus allowances and a carbon price of euros 30/ton, only one sector would face direct carbon costs in excess of 5% of operating profits. Three sectors face direct carbon costs in the order of 1-3% of operating profits; three face no direct carbon costs. With direct compensation for indirect carbon costs (electricity price increases), the two most affected sectors would face indirect costs of 3.5 to 5.5% of gross value added with a carbon price of euros 30/ ton. The vast majority of Poland's trade in energy intensive sectors occurs within the EU. It is important to maintain a harmonized climate policy to avoid internal market distortions. There is thus a negligible risk of carbon leakage in Poland under current policy. The mitigating measures in the EU Directive remove the vast majority of direct and indirect carbon costs for Polish industry. EU climate policy can be made more stringent without inducing risks of significant carbon leakage. The current benchmarking system appears to be reasonably effective at not structurally disadvantaging less carbon efficient Member States like Poland. And it is vital to maintaining a harmonized climate policy. Finding a harmonized way to address indirect carbon costs may unlock Polish support for future policy. (authors)

  10. Phenotyping hepatocellular metabolism using uniformly labeled carbon-13 molecular probes and LC-HRMS stable isotope tracing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissen, John K; Pirman, David A; Wan, Min; Miller, Emily; Jatkar, Aditi; Miller, Russell; Steenwyk, Rick C; Blatnik, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Metabolite stable isotope tracing is a powerful bioanalytical strategy that has the potential to unravel phenotypic markers of early pharmaceutical efficacy by monitoring enzymatic incorporation of carbon-13 atoms into targeted pathways over time. The practice of probing biological systems with carbon-13 labeled molecules using broad MS-based screens has been utilized for many years in academic laboratories but has had limited application in the pharmaceutical R&D environment. The goal of this work was to establish a LCMS analytical workflow that was capable of monitoring carbon-13 isotope changes in glycolysis, the TCA and urea cycles, and non-essential amino acid metabolism. This work applies a standardized protein precipitation with 80% cold methanol and two distinct reverse-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography methods coupled to either a positive- or negative-ion mode high-resolution accurate mass spectrometry screening method. The data herein combines thousands of single-point peak integrations into a novel metabolite network map as a visualization aid to probe and monitor stable isotope incorporation in murine hepatocytes using uniformly labeled (13)C6 glucose, (13)C3 lactate, and (13)C5 glutamine. This work also demonstrates that nitrogen metabolism may have a large influence on the TCA cycle and gluconeogenic carbon fluxes in hepatocyte cell culture. PMID:27343766

  11. Electron-beam assisted selective growth of graphenic carbon thin films on SiO2/Si and quartz substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Knyazev, Maxim; Sedlovets, Daria; Trofimov, Oleg; Redkin, Arkady

    2015-01-01

    The first selective growth of graphenic carbon thin films on silicon dioxide is reported. A preliminary e-beam exposure of the substrate is found to strongly affect the process of such films growth. The emphasis is placed on the influence of substrate exposure on the rate of carbon deposition. The explanation of this effect is proposed. The data of electrical and optical measurements and the results of atomic force and scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy studies are reported. ...

  12. Integration and evaluation of automated Monte Carlo simulations in the clinical practice of scanned proton and carbon ion beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of beam interaction and transport in matter are increasingly considered as essential tools to support several aspects of radiation therapy. Despite the vast application of MC to photon therapy and scattered proton therapy, clinical experience in scanned ion beam therapy is still scarce. This is especially the case for ions heavier than protons, which pose additional issues like nuclear fragmentation and varying biological effectiveness. In this work, we present the evaluation of a dedicated framework which has been developed at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center to provide automated FLUKA MC simulations of clinical patient treatments with scanned proton and carbon ion beams. Investigations on the number of transported primaries and the dimension of the geometry and scoring grids have been performed for a representative class of patient cases in order to provide recommendations on the simulation settings, showing that recommendations derived from the experience in proton therapy cannot be directly translated to the case of carbon ion beams. The MC results with the optimized settings have been compared to the calculations of the analytical treatment planning system (TPS), showing that regardless of the consistency of the two systems (in terms of beam model in water and range calculation in different materials) relevant differences can be found in dosimetric quantities and range, especially in the case of heterogeneous and deep seated treatment sites depending on the ion beam species and energies, homogeneity of the traversed tissue and size of the treated volume. The analysis of typical TPS speed-up approximations highlighted effects which deserve accurate treatment, in contrast to adequate beam model simplifications for scanned ion beam therapy. In terms of biological dose calculations, the investigation of the mixed field components in realistic anatomical situations confirmed the findings of previous groups so far reported only in

  13. Fractional enrichment of proteins using [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source facilitates measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts with improved sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlner, Alexandra; Andresen, Cecilia; Khan, Shahid N. [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden); Kay, Lewis E. [The University of Toronto, Departments of Molecular Genetics, Biochemistry and Chemistry, One King’s College Circle (Canada); Lundström, Patrik, E-mail: patlu@ifm.liu.se [Linköping University, Division of Chemistry, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (Sweden)

    2015-07-15

    A selective isotope labeling scheme based on the utilization of [2-{sup 13}C]-glycerol as the carbon source during protein overexpression has been evaluated for the measurement of excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts using Carr–Purcell–Meiboom–Gill (CPMG) relaxation dispersion (RD) experiments. As expected, the fractional incorporation of label at the Cα positions is increased two-fold relative to labeling schemes based on [2-{sup 13}C]-glucose, effectively doubling the sensitivity of NMR experiments. Applications to a binding reaction involving an SH3 domain from the protein Abp1p and a peptide from the protein Ark1p establish that accurate excited state {sup 13}Cα chemical shifts can be obtained from RD experiments, with errors on the order of 0.06 ppm for exchange rates ranging from 100 to 1000 s{sup −1}, despite the small fraction of {sup 13}Cα–{sup 13}Cβ spin-pairs that are present for many residue types. The labeling approach described here should thus be attractive for studies of exchanging systems using {sup 13}Cα spin probes.

  14. Electron Cloud in Steel Beam Pipe vs Titanium Nitride Coated and Amorphous Carbon Coated Beam Pipes in Fermilab's Main Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backfish, Michael

    2013-04-01

    This paper documents the use of four retarding field analyzers (RFAs) to measure electron cloud signals created in Fermilab’s Main Injector during 120 GeV operations. The first data set was taken from September 11, 2009 to July 4, 2010. This data set is used to compare two different types of beam pipe that were installed in the accelerator. Two RFAs were installed in a normal steel beam pipe like the rest of the Main Injector while another two were installed in a one meter section of beam pipe that was coated on the inside with titanium nitride (TiN). A second data run started on August 23, 2010 and ended on January 10, 2011 when Main Injector beam intensities were reduced thus eliminating the electron cloud. This second run uses the same RFA setup but the TiN coated beam pipe was replaced by a one meter section coated with amorphous carbon (aC). This section of beam pipe was provided by CERN in an effort to better understand how an aC coating will perform over time in an accelerator. The research consists of three basic parts: (a) continuously monitoring the conditioning of the three different types of beam pipe over both time and absorbed electrons (b) measurement of the characteristics of the surrounding magnetic fields in the Main Injector in order to better relate actual data observed in the Main Injector with that of simulations (c) measurement of the energy spectrum of the electron cloud signals using retarding field analyzers in all three types of beam pipe.

  15. Multi-elemental characterization of organic liquid samples by use of a 13 MeV 6Li3+ beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaporated amniotic fluid (AF) targets have been bombarded with a 13 MeV 6Li3+ beam. Forward angle data have served to identify the 1H(6Li,1H)6Li reaction as an alternative for hydrogen characterization of such organic samples. Detected 6Li ions elastically scattered from C, N, O, Na and Cl can also be used to determine the concentrations of these elements in AF. The analyzed AF samples have been diluted with distilled water. The effect of sample dilution on the improvement of spectrum energy resolution has been observed, confirming previous reports. The hydrogen concentration determined in the studied AF targets is shown to vary linearly with sample dilution. Two detector arrangements have been used to find out which detection scheme is the most convenient. The combination of a counter telescope and a single detector, set up at the same polar angle on the opposite side of the beam, seems to be the best choice to have a reliable particle identification and an adequate energy resolution simultaneously.

  16. Initial work on electron beam welding of 1.3 GHz single cell prototype cavity and their process validation efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RRCAT has initiated the development of 1.3 GHz (TESLA shape) Superconducting (SC) single cell cavity. In this paper we present the development effort in electron beam (EB) welding and process validation efforts done during prototype development. Niobium being expensive material, initial efforts have been made to go through the complete manufacturing cycle using dummy (aluminum) material. We will present manufacturing of rolled beam pipe with the help of dedicated precision tube rolling machine, development of welding fixtures and EB welding of prototype single cell aluminium cavity using industry support. Development of various welding parameters and weld shrinkage estimation is also described. In order to prepare qualification procedure, frequency of half-cell was measured before and after EB welding to know the frequency shift associated with weld shrinkage. We will also report the frequency simulation done using ANSYS for different stages of single cell cavity manufacturing. Further our plans to manufacture and test single cell cavity in Niobium (Nb) in association with Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi are also presented. (author)

  17. Irradiation of 135 MeV/u carbon and neon beams for studies of radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A heavy ion irradiation system was designed and constructed at RIKEN ring cyclotron facility for studies of radiation physics and radiation biology. Carbon and neon beams of 135 MeV/u were firstly used for the experiments. A pair of wobbler magnets and a scatterer were used for obtaining the uniform radiation field of about 10 cm in diameter. A parallel plate ionization chamber was used for dose monitoring. A range shifter was used for degrading the initial energy of the heavy ions. Precise depth dose distributions were measured by a small parallel plate ionization chamber and a variable length water column. LET (linear energy transfer) of the heavy ion radiation fields were measured by a parallel plate proportional chamber. From these basic measurements, biological experiments using these heavy ions are now carried out at this facility. (author)

  18. Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greilich, Steffen; Grzanka, Leszek; Bassler, Niels;

    be seriously hampered by variations in detector efficiency (light output per energy imparted) due to high-LET effects and gradients along the physical size (~mm) of the detector crystals. Amorphous track models (ATMs) such as the Ion-Gamma-Kill (IGK) approach by Katz and co-workers or the ECLaT code by Geiß et...... assumptions in a variety of detectors. The library also includes simple particle transportation or can be interfaced to external transport codes. We applied our code to RL and OSL data from fiber-coupled Al2O3:C-detectors in a proton (nominal energies 10 MeV to 60 MeV) and a carbon beam (270 MeV/u). Results...

  19. Precise measurement of single carbon nanocoils using focused ion beam technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Suda, Yoshiyuki; Kunimoto, Ryuji; Iida, Tamio; Takikawa, Hirofumi; Ue, Hitoshi; Shima, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a precise resistivity measurement system for quasi-one-dimensional nanomaterials using a focused ion beam. The system enables the resistivity of carbon nanocoils (CNCs) to be measured and its dependence on coil geometry to be elucidated. At room temperature, the resistivity of CNCs tended to increase with coil diameter, while that of artificially graphitized CNCs remained constant. These contrasting behaviors indicate coil-diameter-induced enhancement in structural disorder internal to CNCs. Low-temperature resistivity measurements performed on the CNCs revealed that electron transport through the helical axis is governed by the variable range hopping mechanism. The characteristic temperature in variable range hopping theory was found to systematically increase with coil diameter, which supports our theory that the population of sp2-domains in CNCs decreases considerably with coil diameter.

  20. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by (13)C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Etelvino H; Hayes, Michael H B; Deazevedo, Eduardo R; Bonagamba, Tito J

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Indio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. (13)C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, (1)H-(13)C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the pi pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp--variable amplitude CP (VACP)--VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite pi pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins. PMID:16688435

  1. Characterisation of black carbon-rich samples by 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotny, Etelvino H.; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Deazevedo, Eduardo R.; Bonagamba, Tito J.

    2006-09-01

    There are difficulties in quantifying and characterising the organic matter (OM) in soils that contain significant amounts of partially oxidised char or charcoal materials. The anthropogenic black carbon (BC), such as that found in the Terra Preta de Índio soils of the Amazon region, is a good example of the OM that is difficult to analyse in such soils. 13C direct polarisation/magic angle spinning (DP/MAS) at high MAS frequency, 1H-13C cross polarisation (CP)/MAS with total suppression of spinning sidebands (TOSS), and chemical shift anisotropy (CSA) filter nuclear magnetic resonance techniques have been applied successfully for quantifying the different components of OM. However, because pyrogenic materials present strong local magnetic susceptibility heterogeneities, the use of CSA-filter and TOSS make the pulse sequences very sensitive to imperfections in the π pulses. In this study, the DP/MAS pulse sequence was replaced by a CP with a radio frequency ramp—variable amplitude CP (VACP)—VACP/MAS pulse sequence, and composite π pulses were used in the CSA-filter and TOSS pulse sequences. In that way, the component functionalities in a humic acid from a BC soil were successfully determined. The spectrometer time needed was greatly decreased by employing this VACP/MAS technique. This development provides an accurate method for characterising BC-rich samples from different origins.

  2. 13C/12C and 18O/16O in calcium carbonate-cemented beach sands ('beach rocks')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the stable isotope composition (C13/C12 and O18/O16) of the cement and the local groundwater in Itaparica Island (Salvador-Brazil) is carried out to determine the origin of the carbonate cement. For area A, the cement has Δ13C = 9% showing that CO2 in groundwater charged by decay of organic material is the source of carbonate in the cement. Probably comentation occurs during loss of excess CO2 from groundwater as comes into an environment where loss of CO2 is possible . In area B, where the cements contain, on the average Δ18O v=1,3%, the cement is formed from carbonate typical of sea water or a mixture of sea water and fresh water. (Autor)

  3. The use of natural abundance carbon-13 to identify and quantify sources of emitted carbon dioxide in a calcareous southern Ontario Luvisolic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilton, Meaghan

    Three studies Were conducted at the Elora Research Station (ERS) on a Luvisolic soil to investigate the soil inorganic carbon (SIC) and soil organic carbon (SOC) components contributing to the CO2 flux (FC) using natural 13C abundance. SIC contributed to the FC in intact soil incubations. Soil disruption exacerbated the release of CO2 from both pedogenic and lithogenic carbonates. Field and laboratory techniques to obtain the delta13C of respired CO2 (delta13CR) were compared. Short-term deployment of non flow-through non steady-state chambers and the use of the simple two-ended mass balance approach to derive delta 13CR were found acceptable to apply to the ERS site. The delta13CR from a corn field at ERS with a history of multiple C4 and C3 crop rotations was partitioned into SIC and SOC components using two approaches. Root respiration contributed 2% - 64% and carbonates contribute up to 20% to the FC.

  4. Transformation behavior in low carbon 13% chromium-3% copper stainless steel; Tei C-13%Cr-3%Cu ko no hentai kyodo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, T.; Uemori, R.; Miyasaka, A. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Martensitic transformation and {gamma} {yields} {alpha} transformation behavior were investigated in low carbon 13% chromium stainless steels containing 2% nickel or 3% copper. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) Hardness of 2% nickel added low carbon 13% chromium steel was independent of cooling rate after hot working at large reduction. Structure of the steel was martensitic even after being subjected to such large reduction of 75%. This result suggests that ferritic transformation was hard to occur under an usual cooling rate because austenite phase was sufficiently stablized by the addition of chromium and nickel. (2) Austenite to ferrite transformation occurred only for the low carbon 13% chromium 3% copper steel without nickel even at the small cooling rate, such as 0.01K/s. This result was mainly attributed to the unstabilization of austenite phase which caused by the precipitation of {epsilon}-Cu. Furthermore, austenite of the steel becomes easy to transform to ferrite due to heavy hot working. This phenomenon was seemed to be caused by the increase in the area of austenite grain boundary owing to recrystallization. Thus, it was considered that the nucleation of {epsilon}-Cu at the grain boundaries promoted ferrite formation. (author)

  5. Carbon-13 and deuterium isotope effects on the catalytic reactions of biotin carboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C and 2H kinetic isotope effects have been used to investigate the mechanism of enzymic biotin carboxylation. /sup D/(V/K) is 0.50 in 80% D2O at pD 8.0 for the forward reaction and 0.57 at pD 8.5 for the phosphorylation of ADP by carbamoyl phosphate. These values approach the theoretical maximum limit for a reaction in which a proton is transferred from a sulfhydryl to a nitrogen or oxygen base. Therefore, it appears that this portion of the reaction is at or near equilibrium. 13(V/K) at pH 8 is 1.007; the small magnitude of this number suggests that the reaction is almost fully committed by the time the carbon-sensitive steps are reached. There does not appear to be a reverse commitment to the reaction under the conditions in which 13(V/K) was determined. A large forward commitment is consistent with the failure to observe positional isotope exchange from the βγ-bridge position to the β-nonbridge position in [18O4]ATP or washout of 18O from the γ-nonbridge positions. Transfer of 18O from bicarbonate to inorganic phosphate in the forward reaction was clearly observed, however. These observations suggest that biotin carboxylase exists in two distinct forms which differ in the protonation states of the two active-site bases, one of which is a sulfhydryl. Only when the sulfhydryl is ionized and the second base protonated can catalysis take place. Carboxylation of biotin is postulated to occur via a pathway in which carboxyphosphate is formed by nucleophilic attack of bicarbonate on ATP. Decarboxylation of carboxyphosphate in the active site generates CO2, which serves to carboxylate the isourea tautomer of biotin that is generated by the removal of the proton on N1' by the ionized sulfhydryl

  6. Surface treatment of 0.20% C carbon steel by high-current pulsed electron beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Guo-cheng; FU Shi-you; GUAN Qing-feng

    2006-01-01

    A high-current pulsed electron beam(HCPEB) generated on the system of Nadezhda-2 was applied to improve the microstructure and performance of 0.20% C low carbon steel. Surface layers of the samples bombarded by explosive electron beam at different pulses was observed by using electron microscopy. The physical model of the thermal-stress process and related modification mechanism as a result of HCPEB irradiation was also investigated. After HCPEB post treatments, obvious changes in microstructure and significant hardening occur in the depth of 200-250 μm from the surface after HCPEB irradiation. Rapid heating and subsequent rapid solidification induce heavy plastic deformation, which results in that the laminated structure of pearlite is substituted by dispersive rounded-like cementites in the near-surface. The effect of HCPEB treatment can reach more than 500 m depth from the surface. The original crystalline structure is changed to a different degree that grows with the numbers of bombardment, and in the surface layer amorphous states and nanocrystaline structures consisting of grains of γ-phase and cementite are found. The violent stress induced by HCPEB irradiation is the origin of the nanostructured and amorphous structure formation.

  7. GPU-accelerated automatic identification of robust beam setups for proton and carbon-ion radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate acceleration on graphic processing units (GPU) of automatic identification of robust particle therapy beam setups, minimizing negative dosimetric effects of Bragg peak displacement caused by treatment-time patient positioning errors. Our particle therapy research toolkit, RobuR, was extended with OpenCL support and used to implement calculation on GPU of the Port Homogeneity Index, a metric scoring irradiation port robustness through analysis of tissue density patterns prior to dose optimization and computation. Results were benchmarked against an independent native CPU implementation. Numerical results were in agreement between the GPU implementation and native CPU implementation. For 10 skull base cases, the GPU-accelerated implementation was employed to select beam setups for proton and carbon ion treatment plans, which proved to be dosimetrically robust, when recomputed in presence of various simulated positioning errors. From the point of view of performance, average running time on the GPU decreased by at least one order of magnitude compared to the CPU, rendering the GPU-accelerated analysis a feasible step in a clinical treatment planning interactive session. In conclusion, selection of robust particle therapy beam setups can be effectively accelerated on a GPU and become an unintrusive part of the particle therapy treatment planning workflow. Additionally, the speed gain opens new usage scenarios, like interactive analysis manipulation (e.g. constraining of some setup) and re-execution. Finally, through OpenCL portable parallelism, the new implementation is suitable also for CPU-only use, taking advantage of multiple cores, and can potentially exploit types of accelerators other than GPUs.

  8. Integration of carbon nanotubes with semiconductor technology: fabrication of hybrid devices by III–V molecular beam epitaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Lindelof, P. E.; Nygård, J.

    2006-01-01

    incorporation of singlewall nanotubes in III–V semiconductor heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). We demonstrate that singlewall carbon nanotubes can be overgrown using MBE; electrical contacts to the nanotubes are obtained by GaMnAs grown at 250 °C. The resulting devices can exhibit field...

  9. Investigations on the quality of treatment plans for carbon ion radiotherapy. Beam delivery systems and radiobiological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillmann, Clarissa

    2014-07-01

    In a worldwide effort in research and development, radiation therapy with carbon ions has evolved to a technologically challenging but clinically very promising treatment option for cancer patients. To further improve patient benefit, optimal use of the physical and biological characteristics of carbon ions as well as of the available technologies should be made. The present thesis investigates the impact of different beam delivery systems and radiobiological models on the quality of treatment plans in carbon ion radiotherapy. The results of the study may provide pointers as to the role and the possible future implementation of the different techniques and radiobiological models in existing and upcoming particle therapy centers.

  10. Measurement of contact resistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes by electrical contact using a focused ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have found many potential applications but using CNTs as building blocks for nanoelectronics is still challenging. Various micro- and nanofabrication techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) are therefore being developed for combining CNTs into a nanodevice or to help assess the electrical properties of integrated CNTs. In this paper, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are assembled between a pair of gold (Au) electrodes by dielectrophoresis (DEP). Contact resistances of MWNT-Au and, in particular, MWNT-MWNT are measured with the help of making electrical connections between a MWNT and electrodes by FIB induced tungsten deposition. A method for resistance calculation is presented which considers the contact length of MWNTs. Under the conditions of this research, measured conducting resistances of MWNTs were from 1–10 kΩ/μm and the contact resistance of MWNTs with Au was around 100 kΩ μm. The contact resistance between MWNTs varied depending on contact configurations and could be as low as 50 KΩ. The effect of FIB parameters on the measurement results is discussed.

  11. Measurement of contact resistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes by electrical contact using a focused ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An Libao, E-mail: lan@heut.edu.cn [College of Mechanical Engineering, Hebei United University, Tangshan, Hebei, 063009 (China); Friedrich, Craig R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering - Engineering Mechanics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have found many potential applications but using CNTs as building blocks for nanoelectronics is still challenging. Various micro- and nanofabrication techniques including focused ion beam (FIB) are therefore being developed for combining CNTs into a nanodevice or to help assess the electrical properties of integrated CNTs. In this paper, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are assembled between a pair of gold (Au) electrodes by dielectrophoresis (DEP). Contact resistances of MWNT-Au and, in particular, MWNT-MWNT are measured with the help of making electrical connections between a MWNT and electrodes by FIB induced tungsten deposition. A method for resistance calculation is presented which considers the contact length of MWNTs. Under the conditions of this research, measured conducting resistances of MWNTs were from 1-10 k{Omega}/{mu}m and the contact resistance of MWNTs with Au was around 100 k{Omega} {mu}m. The contact resistance between MWNTs varied depending on contact configurations and could be as low as 50 K{Omega}. The effect of FIB parameters on the measurement results is discussed.

  12. One-dimensional carbon nanostructures for terahertz electron-beam radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantiwanichapan, Khwanchai; Swan, Anna K.; Paiella, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    One-dimensional carbon nanostructures such as nanotubes and nanoribbons can feature near-ballistic electronic transport over micron-scale distances even at room temperature. As a result, these materials provide a uniquely suited solid-state platform for radiation mechanisms that so far have been the exclusive domain of electron beams in vacuum. Here we consider the generation of terahertz light based on two such mechanisms, namely, the emission of cyclotronlike radiation in a sinusoidally corrugated nanowire (where periodic angular motion is produced by the mechanical corrugation rather than an externally applied magnetic field), and the Smith-Purcell effect in a rectilinear nanowire over a dielectric grating. In both cases, the radiation properties of the individual charge carriers are investigated via full-wave electrodynamic simulations, including dephasing effects caused by carrier collisions. The overall light output is then computed with a standard model of charge transport for two particularly suitable types of carbon nanostructures, i.e., zigzag graphene nanoribbons and armchair single-wall nanotubes. Relatively sharp emission peaks at geometrically tunable terahertz frequencies are obtained in each case. The corresponding output powers are experimentally accessible even with individual nanowires, and can be scaled to technologically significant levels using array configurations. These radiation mechanisms therefore represent a promising paradigm for light emission in condensed matter, which may find important applications in nanoelectronics and terahertz photonics.

  13. Increased Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotube Yarns and Sheets through Chemical Modification and Electron Beam Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Williams, Tiffany S.; Baker, James S.; Sola, Francisco; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; McCorkle, Linda S.; Wilmoth, Nathan G.; Gaier, James; Chen, Michelle; Meador, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The inherent strength of individual carbon nanotubes offers considerable opportunity for the development of advanced, lightweight composite structures. Recent work in the fabrication and application of carbon nanotube (CNT) forms such as yarns and sheets has addressed early nanocomposite limitations with respect to nanotube dispersion and loading; and has pushed the technology toward structural composite applications. However, the high tensile strength of an individual CNT has not directly translated to macro-scale CNT forms where bulk material strength is limited by inter-tube electrostatic attraction and slippage. The focus of this work was to assess post processing of CNT sheet and yarn to improve the macro-scale strength of these material forms. Both small molecule functionalization and e-beam irradiation was evaluated as a means to enhance tensile strength and Youngs modulus of the bulk CNT material. Mechanical testing results revealed a tensile strength increase in CNT sheets by 57 when functionalized, while an additional 48 increase in tensile strength was observed when functionalized sheets were irradiated; compared to unfunctionalized sheets. Similarly, small molecule functionalization increased yarn tensile strength up to 25, whereas irradiation of the functionalized yarns pushed the tensile strength to 88 beyond that of the baseline yarn.

  14. Monte Carlo Calculations of Dose to Medium and Dose to Water for Carbon Ion Beams in Various Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Rochus; Petersen, Jørgen B.B.; Jäkel, Oliver;

    materials exposed to carbon ion beams. The scored track-length fluence spectrum Φi for a given particle i at the energy E, is multiplied with the mass stopping power for target material for calculating Dm . Similarly, Dw is calculated by multiplying the same fluence spectrum with the mass stopping power...... the PSTAR, ASTAR stopping power routines available at NIST1 and MSTAR2 provided by H. Paul et al. 3     Results For a pristine carbon ion beam we encountered a maximum deviation between Dw and Dm up to 8% for bone. In addition we investigate spread out Bragg peak configurations which dilutes the effect......1     Background In clinical practice the quantity dose to water (Dw ) is used as a reference standard for dosimeters and treatment planning systems. Treatment planning systems usually rely on analytical representation of the particle beam, which are normally expressed as dose with respect to water...

  15. Radiosensitivity of pimonidazole-unlabelled intratumour quiescent cell population to γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams and boron neutron capture reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Masunaga, S; Sakurai, Y.; Tanaka, H.; Hirayama, R; Matsumoto, Y; Uzawa, A; Suzuki, M.; Kondo, N; Narabayashi, M.; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K.

    2013-01-01

    [Objectives] To detect the radiosensitivity of intratumour quiescent (Q) cells unlabelled with pimonidazole to accelerated carbon ion beams and the boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR). [Methods] EL4 tumour-bearing C57BL/J mice received 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) continuously to label all intratumour proliferating (P) cells. After the administration of pimonidazole, tumours were irradiated with γ-rays, accelerated carbon ion beams or reactor neutron beams with the prior administration of...

  16. Measurement of large angle fragments induced by 400 MeV n-1 carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrov, Andrey; Consiglio, Lucia; De Lellis, Giovanni; Di Crescenzo, Antonia; Lauria, Adele; Montesi, Maria Cristina; Patera, Vincenzo; Sirignano, Chiara; Tioukov, Valeri

    2015-09-01

    The use of carbon ion beams in radiotherapy presents significant advantages when compared to traditional x-ray. In fact, carbon ions deposit their energy inside the human body at the end of their range, the Bragg peak. Unlike x-ray beams, where the energy deposition decreases exponentially inside the irradiated volume, the shape of carbon beams is sharp and focused. Advantages are an increased energy released in the cancer volume while minimizing the irradiation to healthy tissues. Currently, the use of carbon beams is limited by the poor knowledge we have about the effects of the secondary fragments on the irradiated tissues. The secondary particles produced and their angular distribution is crucial to determine the global dose deposition. The knowledge of the flux of secondary particles plays a key role in the real time monitoring of the dose profile in hadron therapy. We present a detector based on nuclear emulsions for fragmentation measurements that performs a sub-micrometric tridimensional spatial resolution, excellent multi-particle separation and large angle track recognition. Nuclear emulsions are assembled in order to realize a hybrid detector (emulsion cloud chamber (ECC)) made of 300 μm nuclear emulsion films alternated with lead as passive material. Data reported here have been obtained by exposing two ECC detectors to the fragments produced by a 400 MeV n-1 12C beam on a composite target at the GSI laboratory in Germany. The ECC was exposed inside a more complex detector, named FIRST, in order to collect fragments with a continuous angular distribution in the range 47°-81° with respect to the beam axis. Results on the angular distribution of fragments as well as their momentum estimations are reported here.

  17. Measurement of large angle fragments induced by 400 MeV n−1 carbon ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of carbon ion beams in radiotherapy presents significant advantages when compared to traditional x-ray. In fact, carbon ions deposit their energy inside the human body at the end of their range, the Bragg peak. Unlike x-ray beams, where the energy deposition decreases exponentially inside the irradiated volume, the shape of carbon beams is sharp and focused. Advantages are an increased energy released in the cancer volume while minimizing the irradiation to healthy tissues. Currently, the use of carbon beams is limited by the poor knowledge we have about the effects of the secondary fragments on the irradiated tissues. The secondary particles produced and their angular distribution is crucial to determine the global dose deposition. The knowledge of the flux of secondary particles plays a key role in the real time monitoring of the dose profile in hadron therapy.We present a detector based on nuclear emulsions for fragmentation measurements that performs a sub-micrometric tridimensional spatial resolution, excellent multi-particle separation and large angle track recognition. Nuclear emulsions are assembled in order to realize a hybrid detector (emulsion cloud chamber (ECC)) made of 300 μm nuclear emulsion films alternated with lead as passive material.Data reported here have been obtained by exposing two ECC detectors to the fragments produced by a 400 MeV n−1 12C beam on a composite target at the GSI laboratory in Germany. The ECC was exposed inside a more complex detector, named FIRST, in order to collect fragments with a continuous angular distribution in the range 47°–81° with respect to the beam axis. Results on the angular distribution of fragments as well as their momentum estimations are reported here. (paper)

  18. Development and characterization of a 2D scintillation detector for quality assurance in scanned carbon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, A.; Raffaele, L.; Mirandola, A.; Molinelli, S.; Viviani, C.; Spampinato, S.; Ciocca, M.

    2016-04-01

    At the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO Foundation), a two-dimensional high resolution scintillating dosimetry system has been developed and tested for daily Quality Assurance measurements (QA) in carbon ion radiotherapy with active scanning technique, for both single pencil beams and scanned fields produced by a synchrotron accelerator. The detector consists of a thin plane organic scintillator (25×25 cm2, 2 mm thick) coupled with a high spatial resolution CCD camera (0.25 mm) in a light-tight box. A dedicated Labview software was developed for image acquisition triggered with the beam extraction, data post-processing and analysis. The scintillator system was preliminary characterized in terms of short-term reproducibility (found to be within±0.5%), linearity with the number of particles (linear fit χ2 = 0.996) and dependence on particle flux (measured to be < 1.5 %). The detector was then tested for single beam spot measurements (Full Width at Half Maximum and position) and for 6×6 cm2 reference scanned field (determination of homogeneity) for carbon ions with energy from 115 MeV/u up to 400 MeV/u. No major differences in the investigated beam parameters measured with scintillator system and the radiochromic EBT3 reference films were observed. The system allows therefore real-time monitoring of the carbon ion beam relevant parameters, with a significant daily time saving with respect to films currently used. The results of this study show the suitability of the scintillation detector for daily QA in a carbon ion facility with an active beam delivery system.

  19. Do-Fluoride "Cryolite By- product Carbon White" Awarded the 13th China Excellent Patent Award%Do-Fluoride "Cryolite By- product Carbon White" Awarded the 13th China Excellent Patent Award

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On November 4, the results of the 13th China Patent Awards were publicized by the State Intellectual Property Office of the People's Republic of China. The patent of "production method of cryolite by-product carbon white" declared by Henan Province Jiaozuo Do-Fluoride Company was awarded China Excellent Patent Award.

  20. Differentiation of Pigment in Eggs Using Carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and Nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) Stable Isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Feng M; Shi, Guang Y; Wang, Hui W

    2016-07-01

    Consumers prefer natural and healthy food, but artificial pigments are often abused in egg products. The study aimed at differentiating the origin of pigments in eggs by applying the technique of carbon ((13)C/(12)C) and nitrogen ((15)N/(14)N) stable isotope analysis. Five hundred sixty laying hens were randomly distributed into 14 treatments, which were divided into four groups: maize, carophyll red pigment, carophyll yellow pigment, and a mixture of carophyll red and yellow pigments. Eggs were collected and pretreated to determe the values of the Roche Yolk Color Fan (RCF), δ(13)C, and δ(15)N. With increasing maize content, the RCF and δ(13)C values of yolks increased. Moreover, the RCF values in the three pigment groups were significantly influenced by the artificial colors, but δ(13)C values were not significantly different, regardless of the existence of pigment. The δ(15)N values in all treatments did not vary as regularly as the carbon stable isotope. A strong positive correlation was found between RCF and δ(13)C in the maize group, but no such correlation was be observed in the pigment groups. It is concluded that carbon stable isotope ratio analysis (δ(13)C) of the yolk can be used to differentiate the origin of the pigment added to eggs. PMID:27302905

  1. Investigation of the dosimetric impact of a Ni-Ti fiducial marker in carbon ion and proton beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction. Fiducial markers based on a removable stent are currently used in image guided radiotherapy. Here it is investigated what the possible dosimetric impact of such a marker could be, if used in proton or carbon ion treatment. Material and methods. The simulations have been done using the Monte Carlo particle transport code FLUKA with its default hadron therapy settings. A 3 cm long stent is approximated in FLUKA by stacking hollow tori. To simulate realistic clinical conditions a field 5 x 5 cm has been used, delivering a 5 cm wide spread out Bragg peak located 5 cm deep for protons and carbon ions. For protons fields mimicking active and passive beam delivery have been investigated. The stent has been arranged perpendicular, turned 45 degrees, and parallel to the beam axis. Results. The position of the 95% dose level shifts for carbon ions 7 mm in proximal direction for the marker perpendicular to the beam and 8 mm if the stent is turned 45 degree for a 1 x 1 cm dose binning on the centre beam axis. For the case where the stent was parallel to beam direction the 95% dose level shifts 26 mm. For active delivered protons, the shift of the 95% dose level is less. The shift for a perpendicular arranged marker is 6 mm, for 45 degrees turned it is 7 mm. For the case where the stent was oriented parallel to the beam, the observed shift is 21 mm. Dose inhomogeneities caused by straggling effects occur only near the distal edge of the field. Conclusions. The results of our investigations show that the Ni-Ti marker has a non negligible impact on the dose distributions for the used radiation types. However if the treatment plan rules out narrow angles between symmetry axis of the stent and the beam direction, this may be compensated.

  2. Chemical effects of 100 keV primary electrons in an e-beam sustained carbon dioxide laser discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissociation of carbon dioxide and the reaction of carbon monoxide with oxygen caused by a high-energy (approx 100 kev) electron beam in a typical carbon dioxide laser gas mixture has been observed. The variation of reaction rates with electron energy and current, interelectrode spacing, and gas composition has been studied. The rates of both processes suggest that the reactions are caused by unthermalized secondary electrons. The conditions were investigated under which the carbon monoxide oxidation reaction could be used to offset dissociation in a laser and thus prolong its sealed life. For a secondary to primary current ratio of one hundred this condition should be satisfied for any practical device. A sealed run was carried out which demonstrated that dissociation by secondary electrons could be offset by the oxidation of carbon monoxide by the primary electrons. (author)

  3. Robust, easily shaped, and epoxy-free carbon-fiber-aluminum cathodes for generating high-current electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Wen, Jianchun; Wan, Hong

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents the construction of carbon-fiber-aluminum (CFA) cathode by squeezing casting and its applications for generating high-current electron beams to drive high-power microwave sources. The fabrication process avoided using epoxy, a volatile deteriorating the vacuum system. These cathodes had a higher hardness than conventional aluminum, facilitating machining. After surface treatment, carbon fibers became the dominator determining emission property. A multineedle CFA cathode was utilized in a triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), powered by a ˜450 kV, ˜400 ns pulse. It was found that 300-400 MW, ˜250 ns microwave was radiated at a dominant frequency of 2.6 GHz. Further, this cathode can endure high-current-density emission without detectable degradation in performance as the pulse shot proceeded, showing the robust nature of carbon fibers as explosive emitters. Overall, this new class of cold cathodes offers a potential prospect of developing high-current electron beam sources.

  4. Proceedings of the 13th biennial conference on carbon. Extended abstracts and program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Properties of carbon are covered including: mechanical and frictional properties; chemical reactivity and surfaces; aerospace applications; carbonization and graphitization; industrial applications; electrical and thermal properties; biomaterials applications; fibers and composites; nuclear applications; activated carbon and adsorption; advances in carbon characterization; and micromechanics and modeling

  5. Proceedings of the 13th biennial conference on carbon. Extended abstracts and program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-01-01

    Properties of carbon are covered including: mechanical and frictional properties; chemical reactivity and surfaces; aerospace applications; carbonization and graphitization; industrial applications; electrical and thermal properties; biomaterials applications; fibers and composites; nuclear applications; activated carbon and adsorption; advances in carbon characterization; and micromechanics and modeling. (GHT)

  6. Dynamic response of RC beams strengthened with near surface mounted Carbon-FRP rods subjected to damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capozucca, R.; Blasi, M. G.; Corina, V.

    2015-07-01

    Near surface mounted (NSM) technique with fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) is becoming a common method in the strengthening of concrete beams. The availability of NSM FRP technique depends on many factors linked to materials and geometry - dimensions of the rods used, type of FRP material employed, rods’ surface configuration, groove size - and to adhesion between concrete and FRP rods. In this paper detection of damage is investigated measuring the natural frequency values of beam in the case of free-free ends. Damage was due both to reduction of adhesion between concrete and carbon-FRP rectangular and circular rods and cracking of concrete under static bending tests on beams. Comparison between experimental and theoretical frequency values evaluating frequency changes due to damage permits to monitor actual behaviour of RC beams strengthened by NSM CFRP rods.

  7. Carbon sequestration in soil beneath long-term Miscanthus plantations as determined by 13C abundance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miscanthus is a perennial rhizomatous warm-season grass with C4-photosynthesis. It shows considerable production potentials (10-20 t dry matter ha-1) under NW European growth conditions and plantations of Miscanthus are established to provide biomass for energy. The plant senesces in the autumn in response to adverse climatic conditions, but harvest is normally postponed until spring when the biomass is more suitable for combustion. Total pre-harvest and harvest losses may account for as much as two-thirds of autumn standing biomass and these losses provide a significant carbon input to the soil. In this study, we examine soil organic carbon (SOC) storage and turnovers beneath 9 and 16 year old Miscanthus plantations established at Hornum, Denmark (56 deg. 50'N, 09 deg. 26'E). The soil is a loamy sand (Typic Haplumbrept, coarse loamy, mixed, mesic) with a C3 vegetation history. Soil was sampled at 0-20, 20-50 and 50-100 cm depth in the Miscanthus plantations and in two reference sites under C3-plants. The 0-20 cm samples were divided into fine soil (13C/12C ratio. Rhizomes/stubbles accounted for 10.9-12.6 t DM ha-1 and coarse roots for 3.2-3.7 t DM ha-1 at 0-20 cm depth. No rhizomes and coarse roots were observed in the deeper soil layers. Concentrations of SOC were higher at all soil depths under the 16 year old Miscanthus whereas 9 years of Miscanthus and reference sites showed similar SOC concentrations. δ13C in 0-20 cm reference soil averaged -27.6 per mille while soil beneath 9 and 16 year Miscanthus showed -25.6 per mille and -22.8 per mille, respectively. Difference in δ13C between reference and Miscanthus soils was smaller at greater soil depths. SOC inventories at 0-100 cm ranged from 91-92 t C ha-1 in reference and 9 year Miscanthus to 106 t C ha-1 under 16 years of Miscanthus growing. The main part of the SOC was at 0-20 and 20-50 cm soil with 30-40 t C ha-1 in each layer. Although changes in the overall SOC storage were less significant, 13% and 31

  8. Improved characterization of the botanical origin of sugar by carbon-13 SNIF-NMR applied to ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Freddy; Randet, Celia; Gilbert, Alexis; Silvestre, Virginie; Jamin, Eric; Akoka, Serge; Remaud, Gerald; Segebarth, Nicolas; Guillou, Claude

    2010-11-24

    Until now, no analytical method, not even isotopic ones, had been able to differentiate between sugars coming from C4-metabolism plants (cane, maize, etc.) and some crassulacean acid metabolism plants (e.g., pineapple, agave) because in both cases the isotope distributions of the overall carbon-13/carbon-12 and site-specific deuterium/hydrogen isotope ratios are very similar. Following recent advances in the field of quantitative isotopic carbon-13 NMR measurements, a procedure for the analysis of the positional carbon-13/carbon-12 isotope ratios of ethanol derived from the sugars of pineapples and agave using the site-specific natural isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) method is presented. It is shown that reproducible results can be obtained when appropriate analytical conditions are used. When applied to pineapple juice, this new method demonstrates a unique ability to detect cane and maize sugar, which are major potential adulterants, with a detection limit in the order of 15% of the total sugars, which provides an efficient mean of controlling the authenticity of juices made from this specific fruit. When applied to tequila products, this new method demonstrates a unique ability to unambiguously differentiate authentic 100% agave tequila, as well as misto tequila (made from at least 51% agave), from products made from a larger proportion of cane or maize sugar and therefore not complying with the legal definition of tequila. PMID:21028824

  9. Characterization of the recycled EVA copolymer/silica microcomposites by mechanical properties, SEM and solid state carbon-13 NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposal of this work was to characterize the ethylene-co-vinyl acetate reject of the foot wears industry/silica (micrometer scale) composite by Tension Test, Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) in solid state carbon-13. (author)

  10. Influence of Catalyst and Polymerization Conditions on the Properties of 1,3-Trimethylene Carbonate and ε-Caprolactone Copolymers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pego, Ana Paula; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Dijkstra, Pieter J.; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the catalyst/initiator system and polymerization conditions on the microstructure and physical properties of copolymers of equimolar amounts of 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and -caprolactone (CL) was studied. Statistical copolymers were prepared in the presence of stannous octoa

  11. Synthesis of methyl N-phenyl carbamate from dimethyl carbonate and 1,3-diphenyl urea under mild conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Jie Gao; Hui Quan Li; Yi Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Synthesis of methyl N-phenyl carbamate from dimethyl carbonate and 1,3-diphenyl urea was investigated under atmospheric pressure. The results showed that homogenous catalyst sodium methoxide had the excellent activity to efficiently catalyze the synthesis of methyl N-phenyl carbamate under atmospheric pressure.

  12. STUDY ON THE SEQUENCE STRUCTURE OF SBR BY 13C- NMR METHOD Ⅰ. ASSIGNMENT FOR UNSATURATED CARBONS SPECTRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Shuke; CHEN Xiaonong; HU Liping; YAN Baozhen

    1990-01-01

    The sequence structures of emulsion- processed SBR and solution- processed ( by lithium catalyst )SBR were investigated by 13C- NMR spectroscopy. Seventeen peaks within unsaturated carbon region were recorded under the adopted experimental conditions. Assignments for these peaks were made by empirical- parameter- evaluation method.

  13. STUDY ON THE SEQUENCE STRUCTURE OF SBR BY 13C- NMR METHOD Ⅱ . PEAK ASSIGNMENT FOR ALIPHATIC CARBONS SPECTRA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Shuke; CHEN Xiaonong; HU Liping; YAN Baozhen

    1990-01-01

    The study on 13C-NMR spectra of aliphatic carbon region of emulsion-processed and solution-processed ( by lithium catalyst ) SBR was carried out. The assignments for more than thirty odd peaks observed experimentally were made by using " corresponding analysis " method, combined with the empirical parameters reported in literature. The peak intensities were calculated based on Bernoullian statistic assumption.

  14. Developing high-resolution carbon-13 and silicon-29 MRI of solids in sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Robert; Barrett, Sean; Viswanathan, Ravinath; Song, Yi-Qiao

    2014-03-01

    Mapping pore structure and flow properties of sedimentary rock is directly relevant to current challenges in geophysics like carbon sequestration and oil/gas exploration. Such applications require detailed information about both structure and composition of porous rocks. However, existing scanning methods tend to be limited to gathering one or the other type of information. MRI could be used to measure both composition and structure simultaneously, but conventional MRI in such systems, which targets the proton signal of interstitial fluid, is severely limited by signal losses due to magnetic susceptibility inhomogeneity. Our lab has recently made advances in obtaining high spatial resolution (sub-400 μm)3 three-dimensional 31P MRI of bone through use of the quadratic echo line-narrowing sequence (1). In this talk, we describe our current work applying these methods to sedimentary rock, targeting the isotopes 13C and 29Si. We describe the results of characterization of limestone and shale samples, and we discuss our progress with producing MRI of these systems. (1) M. Frey, et al. PNAS 109: 5190 (2012)

  15. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    A. Schmittner; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R.M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate the processes that control the distribution of δ13C in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation dominates the distribution of δ13CDIC of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) due to the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean. This process leads to low δ13CDI...

  16. Metabolic flux determination using carbon 13 NMR. Application to normal and tumoral cells from central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon 13 NMR constitutes a potent tool to study cellular metabolism by the use of 13C enriched substrates. Analyzes of 13C NMR spectra recorded from acidic cell extracts lead to the evaluation of specific enrichment of various metabolites. On the other hand, the measure of homonuclear 13C-13C spin coupling gives information on the different isotopomers for a given molecule. Mathematical models were different isotopomers for a given molecule. Mathematical models were developed to interpret the NMR data in terms of metabolic fluxes through the metabolic network of interest. Various models established in our laboratory are presented. These models were applied to metabolic studies of cultured central nervous system cells as rat cerebellar astrocytes and granule cells, and the C6 glioma cell line. (authors). 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Beam pen lithography based on arrayed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) micro-pyramids spin-coated with carbon black photo-resist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a new method for preparing a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mold which can be used in beam pen lithography for patterning a photo-resist (PR) layer in a maskless and direct-write manner. The PDMS mold contains an array of micro-pyramids on its surface and is spin-coated with a layer of carbon black PR which is an opaque material. Because of the arrayed pyramidal surface profile, the spin-coated carbon black PR layer is either thinner at the pyramid tips or does not cover the tips at all, which allows ultraviolet (UV) light to pass through the PDMS mold and forms an array of UV beams. The aperture size of the UV beams can be controlled at a sub-micrometer scale and hence can be used for micro/nano-patterning. Applying this carbon black-PR-coated PDMS mold in beam pen lithography along with a metal lift-off process, various metal dot patterns with a dot-size around 400 to 500 nm are successfully obtained. Both experimental results and theoretical analysis are given along with possible improvements and applications in the future. (paper)

  18. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Priault

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objectives of our study were to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. Seasonal patterns of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak.

  19. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    KAUST Repository

    Batra, Nitin M

    2015-10-09

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode–interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode–nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  20. Structural changes of electron and ion beam-deposited contacts in annealed carbon-based electrical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Nitin M.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Abdelkader, Ahmed; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Deepak, Francis L.; Costa, Pedro M. F. J.

    2015-11-01

    The use of electron and ion beam deposition to make devices containing discrete nanostructures as interconnectors is a well-known nanofabrication process. Classically, one-dimensional materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been electrically characterized by resorting to these beam deposition methods. While much attention has been given to the interconnectors, less is known about the contacting electrodes (or leads). In particular, the structure and chemistry of the electrode-interconnector interface is a topic that deserves more attention, as it is critical to understand the device behavior. Here, the structure and chemistry of Pt electrodes, deposited either with electron or ion beams and contacted to a CNT, are analyzed before and after thermally annealing the device in a vacuum. Free-standing Pt nanorods, acting as beam-deposited electrode models, are also characterized pre- and post-annealing. Overall, the as-deposited leads contain a non-negligible amount of amorphous carbon that is consolidated, upon heating, as a partially graphitized outer shell enveloping a Pt core. This observation raises pertinent questions regarding the definition of electrode-nanostructure interfaces in electrical devices, in particular long-standing assumptions of metal-CNT contacts fabricated by direct beam deposition methods.

  1. Seasonal variations of belowground carbon transfer assessed by in situ 13CO2 pulse labelling of trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Barthes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil CO2 efflux is the main source of CO2 from forest ecosystems and it is tightly coupled to the transfer of recent photosynthetic assimilates belowground and their metabolism in roots, mycorrhiza and rhizosphere microorganisms feeding on root-derived exudates. The objective of our study was to assess patterns of belowground carbon allocation among tree species and along seasons. Pure 13CO2 pulse labelling of the entire crown of three different tree species (beech, oak and pine was carried out at distinct phenological stages. Excess 13C in soil CO2 efflux was tracked using tuneable diode laser absorption spectrometry to determine time lags between the start of the labelling and the appearance of 13C in soil CO2 efflux and the amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux. Isotope composition (δ13C of CO2 respired by fine roots and soil microbes was measured at several occasions after labelling, together with δ13C of bulk root tissue and microbial carbon. Time lags ranged from 0.5 to 1.3 days in beech and oak and were longer in pine (1.6–2.7 days during the active growing season, more than 4 days during the resting season, and the transfer of C to the microbial biomass was as fast as to the fine roots. The amount of 13C allocated to soil CO2 efflux was estimated from a compartment model. It varied between 1 and 21 % of the amount of 13CO2 taken up by the crown, depending on the species and the season. While rainfall exclusion that moderately decreased soil water content did not affect the pattern of carbon allocation to soil CO2 efflux in beech, seasonal patterns of carbon allocation belowground differed markedly between species, with pronounced seasonal variations in pine and beech. In beech, it may reflect competition with the strength of other sinks (aboveground growth in late spring and storage in late summer that were not observed in oak. We report a fast transfer of recent photosynthates to the mycorhizosphere and we conclude that the

  2. Use of carbon-13 as a population marker for Anopheles arabiensis in a sterile insect technique (SIT context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knols Bart GJ

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monitoring of sterile to wild insect ratios in field populations can be useful to follow the progress in genetic control programmes such as the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT. Of the numerous methods for marking insects most are not suitable for use in mass rearing and mass release. Suitable ones include dye marking, genetic marking and chemical marking. Methods The feasibility of using the stable isotope of carbon, 13C, as a potential chemical marker for Anopheles arabiensis was evaluated in the laboratory. Labeled-13C glucose was incorporated into the larval diet in a powder or liquid form. The contribution of adult sugar feeding to the total mosquito carbon pool and the metabolically active carbon pool was determined by tracing the decline of the enrichment of the adult male mosquito as it switched from a labeled larval diet to an unlabeled adult diet. This decline in the adult was monitored by destructive sampling of the whole mosquito and analyzed using isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Results A two-pool model was used to describe the decline of the 13C-enrichment of adult mosquitoes. The proportion of the total adult carbon pool derived from the adult sugar diet over the life span of mosquitoes was determined and the ratio of structural carbon, with a low turnover rate to metabolically active non-structural carbon was assessed. The uptake and turnover of sugar in the metabolically active fraction suggests that after 3 days >70% of the active fraction carbon is derived from sugar feeding (increasing to >90% by day 7, indicating the high resource demand of male mosquitoes. Conclusion It was possible to "fix" the isotopic label in adult An. arabiensis and to detect the label at an appropriate concentration up to 21 days post-emergence. The optimum labeling treatment would cost around 250 US$ per million mosquitoes. Stable isotope marking may thus aid research on the fate of released insects besides other population

  3. Preferential formation of 13C- 18O bonds in carbonate minerals, estimated using first-principles lattice dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauble, Edwin A.; Ghosh, Prosenjit; Eiler, John M.

    2006-05-01

    Equilibrium constants for internal isotopic exchange reactions of the type: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca13C16O3↔Ca13C18O16O2+Ca12C16O3 for individual CO 32- groups in the carbonate minerals calcite (CaCO 3), aragonite (CaCO 3), dolomite (CaMg(CO 3) 2), magnesite (MgCO 3), witherite (BaCO 3), and nahcolite (NaHCO 3) are calculated using first-principles lattice dynamics. Calculations rely on density functional perturbation theory (DFPT) with norm-conserving planewave pseudopotentials to determine the vibrational frequencies of isotopically substituted crystals. Our results predict an ˜0.4‰ excess of 13C18O16O22- groups in all studied carbonate minerals at room-temperature equilibrium, relative to what would be expected in a stochastic mixture of carbonate isotopologues with the same bulk 13C/ 12C, 18O/ 16O, and 17O/ 16O ratios. The amount of excess 13C18O16O22- decreases with increasing temperature of equilibration, from 0.5‰ at 0 °C to <0.1‰ at 300 °C, suggesting that measurements of multiply substituted isotopologues of carbonate could be used to infer temperatures of ancient carbonate mineral precipitation and alteration events, even where the δ 18O of coexisting fluids is uncertain. The predicted temperature sensitivity of the equilibrium constant is ˜0.003‰/°C at 25 °C. Estimated equilibrium constants for the formation of 13C18O16O22- are remarkably uniform for the variety of minerals studied, suggesting that temperature calibrations will also be applicable to carbonate minerals not studied here without greatly compromising accuracy. A related equilibrium constant for the reaction: Ca12C18O16O2+Ca12C17O16O2↔Ca12C18O17O16O+Ca12C16O3 in calcite indicates formation of 0.1‰ excess 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- at 25 °C. In a conventional phosphoric acid reaction of carbonate to form CO 2 for mass-spectrometric analysis, molecules derived from 13C18O16O22- dominate (˜96%) the mass 47 signal, and 12C 18O 17O 16O 2- contributes most of the remainder (3%). This suggests

  4. Development of long-lived cluster and hybrid carbon stripper foils for high energy, high intensity ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed thin and thick long-lived carbon stripper foils for high energy, high intensity ion beams. The foil thicknesses are about 10 μg/cm2 (cluster foil) and 200 μg/cm2 (hybrid foil) for thin and thick, respectively. The thin foil is made by a controlled DC-arc discharge (CDAD) method, by using the size effect of the carbon particles. The size effect was the difference between the carbon particle sizes emitted from the cathode and the anode electrodes in the DC arc discharge, in which the particle size from the cathode is large (0.3 μmφ) and the other is small (0.003 μmφ). The thin foils composed of large particle size are not mechanically strong, but long-lived under low energy ion bombardment with a 3.2 MeV, 2-3 μA Ne+ beam. The mean lifetime is 900 mC/cm2 in average which corresponds to 25 times longer than that of commercially available standard foils. In this method, the key point in producing long-lived foils is to control the amount of carbon particles ablated from the cathode by adjusting temperature at the cathode emission spot. The thick hybrid carbon foils (multi-layer thickness about 200 μg/cm2) have been developed for use in 800 MeV, H+ ion beam at the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The thick foils are prepared by means of the controlled ACDC arc discharge (CADAD) method, and are mechanically strong. The lifetime measurements of thick foils made by various methods were carried out using 800 MeV, 85-100 μA proton beams in the PSR. The foils made by the CADAD method showed very long lifetime, compared to other foils tested. (author)

  5. Tension in the LEP/SPS Control Room as the first beams circulate in LEP after the fire in BA3 on 13 May 1997

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1997-01-01

    There is an atmosphre of calm in the LEP control room, monitors signalling stable beams at 45.625 GeV and the quantity of Z0 data requested by the experiments to calibrate their detectors steadily building up. It is all too easy to forget the difficulties which have been overcome since the fire in BA3 on 13 May 1997.

  6. 13C chemical shift anisotropies for carbonate ions in cement minerals and the use of 13C, 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR in studies of Portland cement including limestone additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13C isotropic chemical shifts and chemical shift anisotropy parameters have been determined for a number of inorganic carbonates relevant in cement chemistry from slow-speed 13C MAS or 13C(1H) CP/MAS NMR spectra (9.4 T or 14.1 T) for 13C in natural abundance. The variation in the 13C chemical shift parameters is relatively small, raising some doubts that different carbonate species in Portland cement-based materials may not be sufficiently resolved in 13C MAS NMR spectra. However, it is shown that by combining 13C MAS and 13C(1H) CP/MAS NMR carbonate anions in anhydrous and hydrated phases can be distinguished, thereby providing valuable information about the reactivity of limestone in cement blends. This is illustrated for three cement pastes prepared from an ordinary Portland cement, including 0, 16, and 25 wt.% limestone, and following the hydration for up to one year. For these blends 29Si MAS NMR reveals that the limestone filler accelerates the hydration for alite and also results in a smaller fraction of tetrahedrally coordinated Al incorporated in the C-S-H phase. The latter result is more clearly observed in 27Al MAS NMR spectra of the cement–limestone blends and suggests that dissolved aluminate species in the cement–limestone blends readily react with carbonate ions from the limestone filler, forming calcium monocarboaluminate hydrate. -- Highlights: •13C chemical shift anisotropies for inorganic carbonates from 13C MAS NMR. •Narrow 13C NMR chemical shift range (163–171 ppm) for inorganic carbonates. •Anhydrous and hydrated carbonate species by 13C MAS and 13C(1H) CP/MAS NMR. •Limestone accelerates the hydration for alite in Portland – limestone cements. •Limestone reduces the amount of aluminium incorporated in the C-S-H phase

  7. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in phosphoric acid medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 13C kinetic isotope effect fractionation in the decarbonylation of lactic acid (LA) of natural isotopic composition by concentrated phosphoric acids (PA) and by 85% H3PO4 has been studied in the temperature interval of 60-150 deg C. The values of the 13C(1) isotope effects in the decarbonylation of lactic acid in 100% H3PO4, in pyrophosphoric acid and in more concentrated phosphoric acids are intermediate between the values calculated assuming that the C(1)-OH bond is broken in the rate-controlling step of dehydration and those calculated for rupture of the carbon-carbon bond in the transition state. In the temperature interval of 90-130 deg C the experimental 13C fractionation factors determined in concentrated PA approach quite closely the 13C fractionation corresponding to C(2)-C(1) bond scission. The 13C(1) kinetic isotope effects in the decarbonylation of LA in 85% orthophosphoric acid in the temperature range of 110-150 deg C coincide with the 13C isotope effects calculated assuming that the frequency corresponding to the C(1)-OH vibration is lost in the transition state of decarbonylation. A change of the mechanism of decarbonylation of LA in going from concentrated PA medium to 85% H3PO4 has been suggested. A possible secondary 18O and a primary18O kinetic isotope effect in decarbonylation of lactic acid in phosphoric acids media have been discussed, too. (author) 21 refs.; 3 tabs

  8. Characterization of nanometer-scale porosity in reservoir carbonate rock by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bijoyendra; Gunda, Naga Siva Kumar; Mitra, Sushanta K; Vick, Douglas

    2012-02-01

    Sedimentary carbonate rocks are one of the principal porous structures in natural reservoirs of hydrocarbons such as crude oil and natural gas. Efficient hydrocarbon recovery requires an understanding of the carbonate pore structure, but the nature of sedimentary carbonate rock formation and the toughness of the material make proper analysis difficult. In this study, a novel preparation method was used on a dolomitic carbonate sample, and selected regions were then serially sectioned and imaged by focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy. The resulting series of images were used to construct detailed three-dimensional representations of the microscopic pore spaces and analyze them quantitatively. We show for the first time the presence of nanometer-scale pores (50-300 nm) inside the solid dolomite matrix. We also show the degree of connectivity of these pores with micron-scale pores (2-5 μm) that were observed to further link with bulk pores outside the matrix. PMID:22214656

  9. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.;

    Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under i....... Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams. 4.Tsuruoka C, Suzuki M, Kanai T, et al. LET and ion species dependence for cell killing in normal human skin fibroblasts. Radiat Res. 2005;163:494-500.......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion...... factors is the normalization of the energy distribution around the particle tracks to the actual LET value. Later on we check what is the effect of radial dose distribution choice on kappa parameter for different types and energy of ions. Outline References 1.Katz R, Sharma SC.Response of cells to fast...

  10. Optical properties of ion-beam-deposited ion-modified diamondlike (a-C:H) carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) is a hard, semitransparent material usually containing varying amounts of hydrogen. These materials have numerous potential applications, including use as coatings for infrared optics, and as such, the effects of damaging irradiation is of practical interest. In this paper we present results of variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometric (VASE) studies of ion-beam-deposited DLC films. These films have been further modified by directing 1-MeV gold ions, as well as 6.4-MeV fluorine ions, through the DLC and into the underlying silicon substrates, and the percentage of hydrogen in the film was measured versus fluence using proton recoil analysis. Optical analysis was performed assuming the Lorentz oscillator model. Three versions were used: one oscillator, two oscillator (with one fixed in energy), and two oscillator with all parameter variable. The latter model fits the VASE data extremely well, and the two oscillators can be interpreted as involving π to π* and σ to σ* band transitions. With ion modification the oscillators shift to lower photon energy, consistent with reduction in hydrogen concentration and possible increased graphitization

  11. Spatial fragment distribution from a therapeutic pencil-like carbon beam in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The latest heavy ion therapy tends to require information about the spatial distribution of the quality of radiation in a patient's body in order to make the best use of any potential advantage of swift heavy ions for the therapeutic treatment of a tumour. The deflection of incident particles is described well by Moliere's multiple-scattering theory of primary particles; however, the deflection of projectile fragments is not yet thoroughly understood. This paper reports on our investigation of the spatial distribution of fragments produced from a therapeutic carbon beam through nuclear reactions in thick water. A ΔE-E counter telescope system, composed of a plastic scintillator, a gas-flow proportional counter and a BGO scintillator, was rotated around a water target in order to measure the spatial distribution of the radiation quality. The results revealed that the observed deflection of fragment particles exceeded the multiple scattering effect estimated by Moliere's theory. However, the difference can be sufficiently accounted for by considering one term involved in the multiple-scattering formula; this term corresponds to a lateral 'kick' at the point of production of the fragment. This kick is successfully explained as a transfer of the intra-nucleus Fermi momentum of a projectile to the fragment; the extent of the kick obeys the expectation derived from the Goldhaber model

  12. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/μm and the emission field at 1 mA/cm2 decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/μm. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters

  13. Flexural behaviour of partially bonded carbon fibre reinforced polymers strengthened concrete beams: Application to fire protection systems design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The mechanical behaviour of partially bonded CFRP strengthened beams was modelled. • Two dimensional non-linear finite element models were developed. • Partially bonded beams can present similar flexural strength to fully bonded ones. • Relations between the bonded length and the strength reduction were proposed. • The proposed relations were used for the design of fire protection systems. - Abstract: Recent fire resistance tests on reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon fibre reinforced polymers (CFRP) laminates showed that it is possible to attain considerable fire endurance provided that thermal insulation is applied at the anchorage zones of the strengthening system. With such protection, although the CFRP laminate prematurely debonds in the central part of the beam, it transforms into a cable fixed at the extremities until one of the anchorage zones loses its bond strength. The main objective of this paper is to propose a simplified methodology for the design of fire protection systems for CFRP strengthened-RC beams, which is based on applying thicker insulation at the anchorage zones (promoting the above mentioned “cable behaviour”) and a thinner one at the current zone (avoiding tensile rupture of the carbon fibres). As a first step towards the validation of this methodology, finite element (FE) models were developed to simulate the flexural behaviour at ambient temperature of full-scale RC beams strengthened with CFRP laminates according to the externally bonded reinforcement (EBR) and near surface mounted (NSM) techniques, in both cases fully or partially bonded (the latter simulating the cable). The FE models were calibrated with results of 4-point bending tests on small-scale beams and then extended for different beam geometries, with spans (L) varying from 2 m to 5 m, in which the influence of the CFRP bonded length (lb) and the loading type (point or uniformly distributed) on the strength reduction was

  14. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic studies of 13CO adsorbed on platinum particles in L-zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    13CO chemisorbed on platinum particles in L-zeolite has been investigated by static and magic angles spinning NMR spectroscopy. The representative spectra ate composed of a broad asymmetric peak with a center of gravity at 230±30 ppm and a sharp symmetric peak at 124±2 ppm which is tentatively assigned to physisorbed CO2 on inner walls of L-zeolite. Overall, the broad resonance component is similar to our previous results of highly dispersed (80-96%) CO/Pt/silica or CO/Pt/alumina samples, still showing metallic characters. The principal difference is in the first moment value. The broad peak in the spectra is assigned to CO linearly bound to Pt particles in the L-zeolites, and indicates a distribution of isotropic shifts from bonding site to bonding site. The NMR results reported here manifest that the Pt particles inside of the L-zeolites channels are not collectively the same with the ones supported on silica or alumina with similar dispersion in terms of Pt particle shape and/or ordering of Pt atoms in a particle. As a result, Pt particles of CO/Pt/L-zeolite were agglomerated accompanying CO desorption upon annealing. There were no definite changes in the NMR spectra due to differences of exchanged cations. Comparison of our observation on CO/Pt/L-zeolite with Sharma et al.'s reveals that even when the first moment, the linewidth, and the relaxation times of the static spectra and the dispersion measured by chemisorption are similar, the properties of Pt particles can be dramatically different. Therefore, it is essential to take advantage of the strengths of several techniques together in order to interpret data reliably, especially for the highly dispersed samples

  15. Water equivalent thickness values of materials used in beams of protons, helium, carbon and iron ions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Rui; Taddei, Phillip J.; Fitzek, Markus M.; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2010-01-01

    Heavy charged particle beam radiotherapy for cancer is of increasing interest because it delivers a highly conformal radiation dose to the target volume. Accurate knowledge of the range of a heavy charged particle beam after it penetrates a patient’s body or other materials in the beam line is very important and is usually stated in terms of the water equivalent thickness (WET). However, methods of calculating WET for heavy charged particle beams are lacking. Our objective was to test several...

  16. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 microseconds

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, Jessica; Softley, Tim

    2015-01-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 microseconds. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of greater or equal to 200 microseconds were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3,000 rpm to 80,000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 microseconds to 13 microseconds, and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  17. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 μs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature

  18. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br{sub 2} down to 13 μs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Chemistry Research Laboratory, 12 Mansfield Rd, Oxford OX1 3TA (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-15

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br{sub 2} and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br{sub 2}. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  19. A chopper system for shortening the duration of pulsed supersonic beams seeded with NO or Br2 down to 13 μs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Jessica; Rennick, Christopher J.; Softley, Timothy P.

    2015-05-01

    A chopper wheel construct is used to shorten the duration of a molecular beam to 13 μs. Molecular beams seeded with NO or with Br2 and an initial pulse width of ≥200 μs were passed through a spinning chopper wheel, which was driven by a brushless DC in vacuo motor at a range of speeds, from 3000 rpm to 80 000 rpm. The resulting duration of the molecular-beam pulses measured at the laser detection volume ranged from 80 μs to 13 μs and was the same for both NO and Br2. The duration is consistent with a simple analytical model, and the minimum pulse width measured is limited by the spreading of the beam between the chopper and the detection point as a consequence of the longitudinal velocity distribution of the beam. The setup adopted here effectively eliminates buildup of background gas without the use of a differential pumping stage, and a clean narrow pulse is obtained with low rotational temperature.

  20. Optimizing the e-beam profile of a single carbon nanotube field emission device for electric propulsion systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Fujioka Mologni

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Preliminary studies on field emission (FE arrays comprised of carbon nanotubes (CNT as an electron source for electric propulsion system show remarkably promising results. Design parameters for a carbon nanotube (CNT field-emission device operating on triode configuration were numerically simulated and optimized in order to enhance the e-beam focusing quality. An additional focus gate (FG was integrated to the device to control the profile of the emitted e-beam. An axisymmetric finite element model was developed to calculate the electric field distribution on the vacuum region and a modified Fowler-Nordheim (FN equation was used to evaluate the current density emission and the effective emitter area. Afterward, a FE simulation was employed in order to calculate the trajectory of the emitted electrons and define the electron-optical properties of the e-beam. The integration of the FG was fully investigated via computational intelligence techniques. The best performance device according to our simulations presents a collimated e-beam profile that suits well for field emission displays, magnetic field detection and electron microscopy. The automated computational design tool presented in this study strongly benefits the robust design of integrated electron-optical systems for vacuum field emission applications, including electrodynamic tethering and electric propulsion systems.

  1. Carbon beam extraction with 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheol Ho; Oh, Byung-Hoon; Chang, Dae-Sik; Jeong, Sun-Chan

    2014-02-01

    A 14.5 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source (ECRIS) has been made to produce C(4+) beam for using a carbon therapy facility and recently tested at KAERI. Highly charged carbon ions have been successfully extracted. When using only CO2 gas, the beam current of C(4+) was almost 14 μA at 15 kV extraction voltage. To get higher current of the C(4+) beam, while optimizing confinement magnetic field configuration (e.g., axial strengths at minimum and extraction side), gas-mixing (CO2/He), and biased disk were introduced. When the gas mixing ratio of the CO2/He gas is 1:8 at an operational pressure of 5 × 10(-7) mbar and the disk was biased to -150 V relative to the ion source body, the highest current of the C(4+) beam was achieved to be 50 μA, more than three times higher than previously observed only with CO2 gas. Some details on the operating conditions of the ECRIS were discussed. PMID:24593482

  2. Direct uptake of organic carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, A.; Balesdent, J.; Cazevieille, P.; Chevassus-Rosset, C.; Signoret, P.; Mazur, J.-C.; Harutyunyan, A.; Doelsch, E.; Basile-Doelsch, I.; Miche, H.; Santos, G. M.

    2015-12-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low molecular weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relatively to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relatively to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and in which extent organic C absorbed by grass roots, under the form of either intact amino acids (AAs) or microbial metabolites, can feed the organic C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled AAs to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C-excess and 15N-excess) in the roots, stems and leaves, and phytoliths, as well as the 13C-excess in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves, were quantified relatively to a control experiment in which no labelled AAs were added. The net uptake of 13C derived from the labeled AAs supplied to the nutritive solution (AA-13C) by Festuca arundinacea represented 4.5 % of the total AA-13C supply. AA-13C fixed in the plant represented only 0.13 % of total C. However, the experimental conditions may have underestimated the extent of the process under natural and field conditions. Previous studies showed that 15N and 13C can be absorbed by the roots in several organic and inorganic forms. In the present experiment, the fact that phenylalanine and methionine, that were supplied in high amount to the nutritive solution, were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the roots and stems and leaves strongly suggested that part of AA-13C was absorbed and translocated in its original AA form. The concentration of AA-13C represented only 0.15 % of the

  3. Seasonal and interannual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    OpenAIRE

    Torn, Margaret S.; Sebastien C. Biraud; Still, Christopher J.; Riley, William J; Berry, Joe A.

    2011-01-01

    The δ13C value of terrestrial CO2 fluxes (δbio) provides important information for inverse models of CO2 sources and sinks as well as for studies of vegetation physiology, C3 and C4 vegetation fluxes, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002–2009, we measured atmospheric CO2 concentration and δ13C–CO2 at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed δbio weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C3 winter wheat) and C4 pasture grasses....

  4. Carbon sequestration and estimated carbon credit values as measured using 13C labeling and analysis by an optical breath test analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in optical systems for breath testing have provided a robust, low cost option for undertaking 13C analysis. Although these systems were initially developed for breath testing for Helicobacter pylori, they have potential as a research tool in soil science and agronomy. The relatively low cost of the equipment at US$ 15000-25000 is within the research budgets of most institutes or universities. The operational simplicity of the optical system means that relatively low maintenance and minimal training are required. Thus methods were developed to prepare soil and plant materials for 13C isotope-ratio analysis using the breath test analyser, and results were compared with conventional isotope-ratio analysis by mass spectrometry. In combination with simple 13C plant labeling techniques it is possible to devise methods for estimating carbon sequestration under different agronomic management practices within a short time frame. This allows an assessment of the carbon credit value of a particular agronomic practice, which can in turn be used by policy makers for decision-making purposes. For a global understanding of the effect of agricultural practices on the carbon cycle data is required from a range of cropping systems and agro-ecological zones. The method and the approach described will allow collection of data within a reasonable time frame. (author)

  5. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grevillot, L.; Stock, M.; Vatnitsky, S.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular. A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design. A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients.

  6. Evaluation of beam delivery and ripple filter design for non-isocentric proton and carbon ion therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims at selecting and evaluating a ripple filter design compatible with non-isocentric proton and carbon ion scanning beam treatment delivery for a compact nozzle. The use of non-isocentric treatments when the patient is shifted as close as possible towards the nozzle exit allows for a reduction in the air gap and thus an improvement in the quality of scanning proton beam treatment delivery. Reducing the air gap is less important for scanning carbon ions, but ripple filters are still necessary for scanning carbon ion beams to reduce the number of energy steps required to deliver homogeneous SOBP. The proper selection of ripple filters also allows a reduction in the possible transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities that could appear in non-isocentric conditions in particular.A thorough review of existing ripple filter designs over the past 16 years is performed and a design for non-isocentric treatment delivery is presented. A unique ripple filter quality index (QIRiFi) independent of the particle type and energy and representative of the ratio between energy modulation and induced scattering is proposed. The Bragg peak width evaluated at the 80% dose level (BPW80) is proposed to relate the energy modulation of the delivered Bragg peaks and the energy layer step size allowing the production of homogeneous SOBP. Gate/Geant4 Monte Carlo simulations have been validated for carbon ion and ripple filter simulations based on measurements performed at CNAO and subsequently used for a detailed analysis of the proposed ripple filter design.A combination of two ripple filters in a series has been validated for non-isocentric delivery and did not show significant transverse and depth-dose inhomogeneities. Non-isocentric conditions allow a significant reduction in the spot size at the patient entrance (up to 350% and 200% for protons and carbon ions with range shifter, respectively), and therefore in the lateral penumbra in the patients. (paper)

  7. Carbon ion beam treatment in patients with primary and recurrent sacrococcygeal chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhl, Matthias; Jensen, Alexandra; Herfarth, Klaus [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Welzel, Thomas [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Ellerbrock, Malte; Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [University of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT), Heidelberg (Germany); German Cancer Research Center (dkfz), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg Institute of Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Deutsches Konsortium fuer Translationale Krebsforschung (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the results of high-dose radiation treatment using carbon ion therapy, alone or combined with intensity-modulated radiation treatment (IMRT), in patients with sacral chordoma. Between 2009 and 2012, 56 patients with sacral chordoma were treated in our center. The tumor was located above S3 in 33 patients and in S3 or below in 23 patients. In all, 41 patients received radiation therapy for the primary tumor, while 15 patients were treated for the recurrent tumor. Toxicity was measured using NCI CTCAE v.4.03. Local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were evaluated with the Kaplan-Meier method. A total of 23 patients were irradiated with carbon ions in combination with photon IMRT, while 33 received carbon ion therapy only. Forty-three patients had a macroscopic tumor at treatment start with a median tumor size (GTV) of 244 ml (range 5-1188 ml). The median total dose was 66 Gy (range 60-74 Gy; RBE). After a median follow-up time of 25 months, the 2- and 3-year local control probability was 76 % and 53 %, respectively. The overall survival rate was 100 %. Treatment for primary tumor and male patients resulted in significant better local control. No higher toxicity occurred within the follow-up time. High-dose photon/carbon ion beam radiation therapy is safe and, especially for primary sacral chordomas, highly effective. A randomized trial is required to evaluate the role of primary definitive hypofractionated particle therapy compared with surgery with or without adjuvant radiotherapy. (orig.) [German] Evaluierung der Ergebnisse nach hochdosierter Kohlenstoffionentherapie, allein oder in Kombination mit einer intensitaetsmodulierten Photonenbestrahlung (IMRT), bei Patienten mit einem sakralen Chordom. Zwischen 2009 und 2012 wurden 56 Patienten mit sakralen Chordomen in unserem Zentrum behandelt. Der Tumor war bei 33 Patienten oberhalb von S3 und bei 23 Patienten auf Hoehe von S3 oder unterhalb davon lokalisiert. Insgesamt

  8. Foliar Carbon Isotope Composition (δ13C) and Water Use Efficiency of Different Populus deltoids Clones Under Water Stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Fengjun; Gao Rongfu; Shen Yingbai; Su Xiaohua; Zhang Bingyu

    2006-01-01

    Foliar carbon isotope composition (δ13C),total dry biomass,and long-term water use efficiency (WUEL)of 12 Populus deltoids clones were studied under water stress in a greenhouse.Total dry biomass of clones decreased greatly,while δ13C increased.Single-element variance analysis in the same water treatment indicated that WUEL difference among clones was significant.Clones J2,J6,J7,J8,and J9 were excellent with high WUEL.Extremely significant δ13C differences among water treatments and clones were revealed by two-element variance analysis.Water proved to be the primary factor affecting δ13C under water stress.It showed that there was a good positive correlation between δ13C and WUEL in the same water treatment,and that a high WUEL always coincided with a high δ13C.δ13C might be a reliable indirect index to estimate WUEL among P.deltoids clones.

  9. The Effect of Mesoporous Carbon Nitride Modification by Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles on Photocatalytic Degradation of 1,3-Dinitrobenzene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Ershad Moradi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, well ordered, mesoporous carbon nitride (MCN sorbent with uniform mesoporous wall, high surface area and pore volume has been fabricated using the simple polymerization reaction between ethylene diamine and carbon tetrachloride in mesoporous silica media, and then modified by TiO2 nanoparticles (Ti-MCN. The structural order and textural properties of the nanoporous materials were studied by XRD, elemental analysis, and nitrogen adsorption–desorption experiments. Photodegradation experiments for 1,3-dinitrobenzene were conducted in batch mode, the Ti-MCN catalysts were found to be more active compared to the free TiO2 nanoparticles for 1,3-dinitrobenzene degradation.

  10. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    OpenAIRE

    A. Schmittner; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R.M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high...

  11. Use of carbon-13 as a population marker for Anopheles arabiensis in a sterile insect technique (SIT) context

    OpenAIRE

    Knols Bart GJ; Mayr Leo; Hood-Nowotny Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Monitoring of sterile to wild insect ratios in field populations can be useful to follow the progress in genetic control programmes such as the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT). Of the numerous methods for marking insects most are not suitable for use in mass rearing and mass release. Suitable ones include dye marking, genetic marking and chemical marking. Methods The feasibility of using the stable isotope of carbon, 13C, as a potential chemical marker for Anopheles arabien...

  12. High-resolution solid-state carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance study of acetaminophen: a common analgesic drug

    OpenAIRE

    Jagannathan, NR

    1987-01-01

    Solid-state 13C-NMR spectra of acetaminophen were obtained by using proton enhancement combined with high-power decoupling and magic angle spinning. The contact time was detd. to obtain a max. signal to noise ratio. The chem. shifts obsd. were assigned to different carbons based on both conventional and nonquaternary suppression NMR spectra. In addn. there were no differences in the solid-state NMR spectra of Crocin and Tylenol tablets (com. brands of acetaminophen), except for the differe...

  13. Coupled transformation of inorganic stable carbon-13 and nitrogen-15 isotopes into higher trophic levels in a eutrophic shallow lake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enclosure and bag experiments were done in a eutrophic shallow lake with simultaneous use of inorganic 13C and 15N isotopes. It was demonstrated that coupled transformation of inorganic carbon and nitrogen can occur into herbivorous zooplankton through phytoplankton. Direct evidence is provided that there is an apparent coupling between photosynthesis and organic nitrogen uptake by phytoplankton during daytime under natural conditions and that the coupling occurs at a constant ratio

  14. Tracing carbon fixation in phytoplankton—compound specific and total 13C incorporation rates

    OpenAIRE

    Grosse, J; van Breugel, P; Boschker, H.T.S.

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of total primary production using 13C incorporation is a widely established tool. However, these bulk measurements lack information about the fate of fixed carbon: the production of major cellular compounds (carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, and DNA/RNA) is affected by for instance nutrient availability as their C:N:P requirements differ. Here, we describe an approach to combine established methods in gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C-IRMS) and recent...

  15. Tracing carbon assimilation in endosymbiotic deep-sea hydrothermal vent Mytilid fatty acids by 13C-fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dehairs

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels thrive at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents, where part of their energy requirements are met via an endosymbiotic association with chemolithotrophic and methanotrophic bacteria. In an effort to describe phenotypic characteristics of the two bacterial endosymbionts and to assess their ability to assimilate CO2, CH4 and multi-carbon compounds, we performed experiments in aquaria using 13C-labeled NaHCO3 (in the presence of H2S, CH4 or amino-acids and traced the incorporation of 13C into total and phospholipid fatty acids (tFA and PLFA, respectively. 14:0, 15:0, 16:1(n-7c+t and 18:1(n-7c+t PLFA were labeled in the presence of H13CO3- (+H2S and 13CH4, while the 12:0 compound became labeled only in the presence of H13CO3− (+H2S. In contrast, the 16:1(n-9, 16:1(n-8 and (n-6, 18:1(n-8c and (n-7, 20:1(n-7 and 18:2(n-7 PLFA were only labeled in the presence of 13CH4. Some of these symbiont-specific fatty acids also appeared to be labeled in mussel gill tFA when incubated with 13C-enriched amino acids, and so were mussel-specific fatty acids such as 22:2(n-7,15. Our results provide experimental evidence for the potential of specific fatty acid markers to distinguish between the two endosymbiotic bacteria, shedding new light on C1 and multi-carbon compound metabolic pathways in B. azoricus and its symbionts.

  16. Very high temperature chemical vapor deposition of new carbon thin films using organic semiconductor molecular beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noguchi, Takuya [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Shimada, Toshihiro, E-mail: shimada@chem.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan); Hanzawa, Akinori; Hasegawa, Tetsuya [Department of Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    We carried out the preparation and characterization of new carbon films deposited using an organic molecular beam deposition apparatus with very high substrate temperature (from room temperature to 2670 K), which we newly developed. When we irradiated molecular beam of organic semiconductor perylene tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) on Y{sub 0.07}Zr{sub 0.93}O{sub 2} (111) at 2170 K, a new carbon material was formed via decomposition and fusing of the molecules. The films were characterized with an atomic force microscope (AFM), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Zirconium carbide (ZrC) films were identified beneath the topmost carbon layer by XRD and XPS analyses, which results from chemical reactions of the substrate and the molecules. Partially graphitized aromatic rings of PTCDA were observed from Raman spectroscopy. The present technique - very high temperature chemical vapor deposition using organic semiconductor sources - will be useful to study a vast unexplored field of covalent carbon solids.

  17. Scanned carbon beam irradiation of moving films: comparison of measured and calculated response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of moving target volumes with scanned particle beams benefits from treatment planning that includes the time domain (4D). Part of 4D treatment planning is calculation of the expected result. These calculation codes should be verified against suitable measurements. We performed simulations and measurements to validate calculation of the film response in the presence of target motion. All calculations were performed with GSI's treatment planning system TRiP. Interplay patterns between scanned particle beams and moving film detectors are very sensitive to slight deviations of the assumed motion parameters and therefore ideally suited to validate 4D calculations. In total, 14 film motion parameter combinations with lateral motion amplitudes of 8, 15, and 20 mm and 4 combinations for lateral motion including range changes were used. Experimental and calculated film responses were compared by relative difference, mean deviation in two regions-of-interest, as well as line profiles. Irradiations of stationary films resulted in a mean relative difference of -1.52% ± 2.06% of measured and calculated responses. In comparison to this reference result, measurements with translational film motion resulted in a mean difference of -0.92% ± 1.30%. In case of irradiations incorporating range changes with a stack of 5 films as detector the deviations increased to -6.4 ± 2.6% (-10.3 ± 9.0% if film in distal fall-off is included) in comparison to -3.6% ± 2.5% (-13.5% ± 19.9% including the distal film) for the stationary irradiation. Furthermore, the comparison of line profiles of 4D calculations and experimental data showed only slight deviations at the borders of the irradiated area. The comparisons of pure lateral motion were used to determine the number of motion states that are required for 4D calculations depending on the motion amplitude. 6 motion states per 10 mm motion amplitude are sufficient to calculate the film response in the presence of motion. By

  18. MODIFICATION OF CARBON STEEL BY LASER SURFACE MELTING: PART I: EFFECT OF LASER BEAM TRAVELLING SPEED ON MICROSTRUCTURAL FEATURES AND SURFACE HARDNESS

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem F. El-Labban; Abdelaziz, M.; Essam R.I. Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to improve the surface hardness of carbon steel by application of laser surface melting of effective conditions. The travelling speed of laser beam during this treatment is one of the important treatment conditions. This study aims to investigate the effect of laser surface melting with different beam speeds on macro and microstructure as well as the hardness distribution through the thickness of carbon steel. To achieve this target, three different travelling speeds (1...

  19. Effects of porous carbon additives and induced fluorine on low dielectric constant polyimide synthesized with an e-beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the synthesis of a polyimide matrix with a low dielectric constant for application as an intercalation material between metal interconnections in electronic devices. Porous activated carbon was embedded in the polyimide to reduce the dielectric constant, and a thin film of the complex was obtained using the spin-coating and e-beam irradiation methods. The surface of the thin film was modified with fluorine functional groups to impart water resistance and reduce the dielectric constant further. The water resistance was significantly improved by the modification with hydrophobic fluorine groups. The dielectric constant was effectively decreased by porous activated carbon. The fluorine modification also resulted in a low dielectric constant on the polyimide surface by reducing the polar surface free energy. The dielectric constant of polyimide film decreased from 2.98 to 1.9 by effects of porous activated carbon additive and fluorine surface modification.

  20. 13C-metabolic flux ratio and novel carbon path analyses confirmed that Trichoderma reesei uses primarily the respirative pathway also on the preferred carbon source glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloheimo Markku

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is an important host organism for industrial enzyme production. It is adapted to nutrient poor environments where it is capable of producing large amounts of hydrolytic enzymes. In its natural environment T. reesei is expected to benefit from high energy yield from utilization of respirative metabolic pathway. However, T. reesei lacks metabolic pathway reconstructions and the utilization of the respirative pathway has not been investigated on the level of in vivo fluxes. Results The biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei supported by genome-level evidence were reconstructed with computational carbon path analysis. The pathway reconstructions were a prerequisite for analysis of in vivo fluxes. The distribution of in vivo fluxes in both wild type strain and cre1, a key regulator of carbon catabolite repression, deletion strain were quantitatively studied by performing 13C-labeling on both repressive carbon source glucose and non-repressive carbon source sorbitol. In addition, the 13C-labeling on sorbitol was performed both in the presence and absence of sophorose that induces the expression of cellulase genes. Carbon path analyses and the 13C-labeling patterns of proteinogenic amino acids indicated high similarity between biosynthetic pathways of amino acids in T. reesei and yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to S. cerevisiae, however, mitochondrial rather than cytosolic biosynthesis of Asp was observed under all studied conditions. The relative anaplerotic flux to the TCA cycle was low and thus characteristic to respiratory metabolism in both strains and independent of the carbon source. Only minor differences were observed in the flux distributions of the wild type and cre1 deletion strain. Furthermore, the induction of the hydrolytic gene expression did not show altered flux distributions and did not affect the relative amino acid requirements or relative anabolic

  1. Carbon-13 isotope composition of the mean CO2 source in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Jasek, Alina; Rozanski, Kazimierz

    2014-05-01

    Quantification of carbon emissions in urbanized areas constitutes an important part of the current research on the global carbon cycle. As the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide can serve as a fingerprint of its origin, systematic observations of δ13CO2 and/or Δ14CO2, combined with atmospheric CO2mixing ratio measurements can be used to better constrain the urban sources of this gas. Nowadays, high precision optical analysers based on absorption of laser radiation in the cavity allow a real-time monitoring of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its 13CO2/12CO2 ratio, thus enabling better quantification of the contribution of different anthropogenic and natural sources of this gas to the local atmospheric CO2load. Here we present results of a 2-year study aimed at quantifying carbon isotopic signature of the mean CO2 source and its seasonal variability in the urban atmosphere of Krakow, southern Poland. The Picarro G2101-i CRDS isotopic analyser system for CO2and 13CO2/12CO2 mixing ratio measurements has been installed at the AGH University of Science and Technology campus in July 2011. Air inlet was located at the top of a 20m tower mounted on the roof of the faculty building (ca. 42m a.g.l.), close to the city centre. While temporal resolution of the analyser is equal 1s, a 2-minute moving average was used for calculations of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratio to reduce measurement uncertainty. The measurements were calibrated against 2 NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) primary standard tanks for CO2 mixing ratio and 1 JRAC (Jena Reference Air Cylinder) isotope primary standard for δ13C. A Keeling approach based on two-component mass and isotope balance was used to derive daily mean isotopic signatures of local CO2 from individual measurements of δ13CO2 and CO2 mixing ratios. The record covers a 2-year period, from July 2011 to July 2013. It shows a clear seasonal pattern, with less negative and less variable δ13CO2 values

  2. Friction and Wear of Ion-Beam-Deposited Diamondlike Carbon on Chemical-Vapor-Deposited, Fine-Grain Diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Wu, Richard L. C.; Lanter, William C.

    1996-01-01

    Friction and wear behavior of ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) films coated on chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD), fine-grain diamond coatings were examined in ultrahigh vacuum, dry nitrogen, and humid air environments. The DLC films were produced by the direct impact of an ion beam (composed of a 3:17 mixture of Ar and CH4) at ion energies of 1500 and 700 eV and an RF power of 99 W. Sliding friction experiments were conducted with hemispherical CVD diamond pins sliding on four different carbon-base coating systems: DLC films on CVD diamond; DLC films on silicon; as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond; and carbon-ion-implanted, fine-grain CVD diamond on silicon. Results indicate that in ultrahigh vacuum the ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond (similar to the ion-implanted CVD diamond) greatly decrease both the friction and wear of fine-grain CVD diamond films and provide solid lubrication. In dry nitrogen and in humid air, ion-beam-deposited DLC films on fine-grain CVD diamond films also had a low steady-state coefficient of friction and a low wear rate. These tribological performance benefits, coupled with a wider range of coating thicknesses, led to longer endurance life and improved wear resistance for the DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond in comparison to the ion-implanted diamond films. Thus, DLC deposited on fine-grain CVD diamond films can be an effective wear-resistant, lubricating coating regardless of environment.

  3. Geochemistry of dissolved inorganic carbon in a Coastal Plain aquifer. 2. Modeling carbon sources, sinks, and δ13C evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Peter B.; Chapelle, Francis H.

    1991-01-01

    Stable isotope data for dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), carbonate shell material and cements, and microbial CO2 were combined with organic and inorganic chemical data from aquifer and confining-bed pore waters to construct geochemical reaction models along a flowpath in the Black Creek aquifer of South Carolina. Carbon-isotope fractionation between DIC and precipitating cements was treated as a Rayleigh distillation process. Organic matter oxidation was coupled to microbial fermentation and sulfate reduction. All reaction models reproduced the observed chemical and isotopic compositions of final waters. However, model 1, in which all sources of carbon and electron-acceptors were assumed to be internal to the aquifer, was invalidated owing to the large ratio of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 predicted by the model (5–49) compared with measured ratios (two or less). In model 2, this ratio was reduced by assuming that confining beds adjacent to the aquifer act as sources of dissolved organic carbon and sulfate. This assumption was based on measured high concentrations of dissolved organic acids and sulfate in confining-bed pore waters (60–100 μM and 100–380 μM, respectively) relative to aquifer pore waters (from less than 30 μM and 2–80 μM, respectively). Sodium was chosen as the companion ion to organic-acid and sulfate transport from confining beds because it is the predominant cation in confining-bed pore waters. As a result, excessive amounts of Na-for-Ca ion exchange and calcite precipitation (three to four times more cement than observed in the aquifer) were required by model 2 to achieve mass and isotope balance of final water. For this reason, model 2 was invalidated. Agreement between model-predicted and measured amounts of carbonate cement and ratios of fermentation CO2 to respiration CO2 were obtained in a reaction model that assumed confining beds act as sources of DIC, as well as organic acids and sulfate. This assumption was

  4. Specific carbon-13 labelling of leucine residues in human growth hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biosynthetic human growth hormone specifically 13C-labelled in the carbonyl positions of all 26 leucine residues has been obtained by recombiant DNA techniques using 13C-labelled leucine and an E. coli strain that requires leucine. It is shown that, on the whole, the labelling is specific with no significant mislabelling as would have been the case had the 13C-labelled leucine been metabolized. (au)

  5. Analysis of dissolved organic carbon concentration and 13C isotopic signature by TOC-IRMS - assessment of analytical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cerli, Chiara; Federherr, Eugen; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2013-04-01

    Stable carbon isotopes provide a powerful tool to assess carbon pools and their dynamics. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) has been recognized to play an important role in ecosystem functioning and carbon cycling and has therefore gained increased research interest. However, direct measurement of 13C isotopic signature of carbon in the dissolved phase is technically challenging particularly using high temperature combustion. Until recently, mainly custom-made systems existed which were modified for coupling of TOC instruments with IRMS for simultaneous assessment of C content and isotopic signature. The variety of coupled systems showed differences in their analytical performances. For analysis of DOC high temperature combustion is recognized as best performing method, owing to its high efficiency of conversion to CO2 also for highly refractory components (e.g. humic, fulvic acids) present in DOC and soil extracts. Therefore, we tested high temperature combustion TOC coupled to IRMS (developed by Elementar Group) for bulk measurements of DOC concentration and 13C signature. The instruments are coupled via an Interface to exchange the carrier gas from O2 to He and to concentrate the derived CO2 for the isotope measurement. Analytical performance of the system was assessed for a variety of organic compounds characterized by different stability and complexity, including humic acid and DOM. We tested injection volumes between 0.2-3 ml, thereby enabling measurement of broad concentration ranges. With an injection volume of 0.5 ml (n=3, preceded by 1 discarded injection), DOC and 13C signatures for concentrations between 5-150 mg C/L were analyzed with high precision (standard deviation (SD) predominantly <0.1‰), good accuracy and linearity (overall SD <0.9‰). For the same settings, slightly higher variation in precision was observed among the lower concentration range and depending upon specific system conditions. Differences in 13C signatures of about 50‰ among

  6. Complementary constraints from carbon (13C) and nitrogen (15N) isotopes on the glacial ocean's soft-tissue biological pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Somes, C. J.

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional, process-based model of the ocean's carbon and nitrogen cycles, including 13C and 15N isotopes, is used to explore effects of idealized changes in the soft-tissue biological pump. Results are presented from one preindustrial control run (piCtrl) and six simulations of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) with increasing values of the spatially constant maximum phytoplankton growth rate μmax, which accelerates biological nutrient utilization mimicking iron fertilization. The default LGM simulation, without increasing μmax and with a shallower and weaker Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation and increased sea ice cover, leads to 280 Pg more respired organic carbon (Corg) storage in the deep ocean with respect to piCtrl. Dissolved oxygen concentrations in the colder glacial thermocline increase, which reduces water column denitrification and, with delay, nitrogen fixation, thus increasing the ocean's fixed nitrogen inventory and decreasing δ15NNO3 almost everywhere. This simulation already fits sediment reconstructions of carbon and nitrogen isotopes relatively well, but it overestimates deep ocean δ13CDIC and underestimates δ15NNO3 at high latitudes. Increasing μmax enhances Corg and lowers deep ocean δ13CDIC, improving the agreement with sediment data. In the model's Antarctic and North Pacific Oceans modest increases in μmax result in higher δ15NNO3 due to enhanced local nutrient utilization, improving the agreement with reconstructions there. Models with moderately increased μmax fit both isotope data best, whereas large increases in nutrient utilization are inconsistent with nitrogen isotopes although they still fit the carbon isotopes reasonably well. The best fitting models reproduce major features of the glacial δ13CDIC, δ15N, and oxygen reconstructions while simulating increased Corg by 510-670 Pg compared with the preindustrial ocean. These results are consistent with the idea that the soft-tissue pump was more efficient

  7. Combining sap flow meas- urement-based canopy stomatal conductance and 13C discrimination to estimate forest carbon assimilation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Ping; LU Ping; MA Ling; SUN Guchou; RAO Xingquan; CAI Xian; ZENG Xiaoping

    2005-01-01

    The available methods for studying C uptake of forest and their problems in practices are reviewed, and a new approach to combining sap flow and 13C techniques is proposed in this paper. This approach, obtained through strict mathematic derivation, combines sap flow measurement-based canopy stomatal conductance and 13C discrimination to estimate instantaneous carbon assimilation rate of a forest. Namely the mean canopy stomatal conductance (gc) acquired from accurate measurement of sap flux density is integrated with the relationship between 13C discrimination (() and Ci/Ca (intercellular/ambient CO2 concentrations) and with that between Anet (net photosynthetic rate) and gCO2 (stomatal conductance for CO2) so that a new relation between forest C uptake and ( as well as gc is established. It is a new method of such kind for studying the C exchange between forest and atmosphere based on experimental ecology.

  8. A double-quadrature radiofrequency coil design for proton-decoupled carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy in humans at 7T

    OpenAIRE

    Serés Roig, Eulalia; Magill, Arthur W.; Donati, Guillaume; Meyerspeer, Martin; Xin, Lijing; Ipek, Ozlem; Gruetter, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Carbon-13 magnetic resonance spectroscopy (13C-MRS) is challenging because of the inherent low sensitivity of 13C detection and the need for radiofrequency transmission at the 1H frequency while receiving the 13C signal, the latter requiring electrical decoupling of the 13C and 1H radiofrequency channels. In this study, we added traps to the 13C coil to construct a quadrature-13C/quadrature-1H surface coil, with sufficient isolation between channels to allow simultaneous operation at...

  9. Automated determination of the stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in aqueous samples: RSIL lab codes 1851 and 1852

    Science.gov (United States)

    Révész, Kinga M.; Doctor, Daniel H.

    2014-01-01

    The purposes of the Reston Stable Isotope Laboratory (RSIL) lab codes 1851 and 1852 are to determine the total carbon mass and the ratio of the stable isotopes of carbon13C) for total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, lab code 1851) and total nonpurgeable dissolved organic carbon (DOC, lab code 1852) in aqueous samples. The analysis procedure is automated according to a method that utilizes a total carbon analyzer as a peripheral sample preparation device for analysis of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas by a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (CF-IRMS). The carbon analyzer produces CO2 and determines the carbon mass in parts per million (ppm) of DIC and DOC in each sample separately, and the CF-IRMS determines the carbon isotope ratio of the produced CO2. This configuration provides a fully automated analysis of total carbon mass and δ13C with no operator intervention, additional sample preparation, or other manual analysis. To determine the DIC, the carbon analyzer transfers a specified sample volume to a heated (70 °C) reaction vessel with a preprogrammed volume of 10% phosphoric acid (H3PO4), which allows the carbonate and bicarbonate species in the sample to dissociate to CO2. The CO2 from the reacted sample is subsequently purged with a flow of helium gas that sweeps the CO2 through an infrared CO2 detector and quantifies the CO2. The CO2 is then carried through a high-temperature (650 °C) scrubber reactor, a series of water traps, and ultimately to the inlet of the mass spectrometer. For the analysis of total dissolved organic carbon, the carbon analyzer performs a second step on the sample in the heated reaction vessel during which a preprogrammed volume of sodium persulfate (Na2S2O8) is added, and the hydroxyl radicals oxidize the organics to CO2. Samples containing 2 ppm to 30,000 ppm of carbon are analyzed. The precision of the carbon isotope analysis is within 0.3 per mill for DIC, and within 0.5 per mill for DOC.

  10. Carbon sequestration and estimated carbon credit values as measured using 13C labeling and analysis by an optical breath test analyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Recent developments in optical systems for breath testing have provided a robust, low-cost option for undertaking 13C analysis. Although these systems were initially developed for breath testing for Helicobacter pylori, they have an enormous potential as a soil science research tool. The relatively low cost of the equipment at US$ 15000-25000 is within the research budgets of most institutes or universities. The simplicity of the mechanisms and optical nature mean that the equipment requires relatively low maintenance and minimal training. Thus methods were developed to prepare soil and plant materials for analysis using the breath test analyser. Results that compare the conventional mass spectrometry methods with the breath test analyser will be presented. In combination with simple 13C-plant-labeling techniques it is possible to devise methods for estimating carbon sequestration under different agronomic management practices within a short time frame. This allows an assessment of the carbon credit value of a particular agronomic practice, which can in turn be used by policy makers for decision-making purposes. For a global understanding of the effect of agricultural practices on the carbon cycle data is required from a range of cropping systems and agro-ecological zones. The method and the approach described will allow collection of hard data within a reasonable time frame. (author)

  11. Carbon sequestration and estimated carbon credit values as measured using 13C labelling and analysis by means of an optical breath test analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, R C; Khan, M; Haque, A; Khadir, M; Bonetto, J P; Syamsul, R; Mayr, L; Heiling, M

    2004-05-01

    Recent developments in optical systems (isotope-selective non-dispersive infrared spectrometry) for breath testing have provided a robust, low-cost option for undertaking (13)C analysis. Although these systems were initially developed for breath testing for Helicobacter pylori, they have an enormous potential as a soil science research tool. The relatively low cost of the equipment, US$15,000-25,000, is within the research budgets of most institutes or universities. The simplicity of the mechanisms and optical nature mean that the equipment requires relatively low maintenance and minimal training. Thus methods were developed to prepare soil and plant materials for analysis using the breath test analyser. Results that compare conventional mass spectrometric methods with the breath test analyser will be presented. In combination with simple (13)C-plant-labeling techniques it is possible to devise methods for estimating carbon sequestration under different agronomic management practices within a short time frame. This enables assessment of the carbon credit value of a particular agronomic practice, which can in turn be used by policy makers for decision-making purposes. For global understanding of the effect of agricultural practices on the carbon cycle, data are required from a range of cropping systems and agro-ecological zones. The method and the approach described will enable collection of hard data within a reasonable time. PMID:14963630

  12. Experimental study of the water-to-air stopping power ratio of monoenergetic carbon ion beams for particle therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Parcerisa, D.; Gemmel, A.; Jäkel, O.; Parodi, K.; Rietzel, E.

    2012-06-01

    Reference dosimetry with ionization chambers requires a number of chamber-specific and beam-specific calibration factors. For carbon ion beams, IAEA report TRS-398 yields a total uncertainty of 3% in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, for which the biggest contribution arises from the water-to-air stopping power ratio (sw, air), with an uncertainty of 2%. The variation of (sw, air) along the treatment field has been studied in several Monte Carlo works presented over the last few years. Their results were, in all cases, strongly dependent on the choice of mean ionization potentials (I-values) for air and water. A smaller dependence of (sw, air) with penetration depth was observed. Since a consensus on Iw, air and Iair has not yet been reached, the validity of such studies for clinical use cannot be assessed independently. Our approach is based on a direct experimental measurement of water-equivalent thicknesses of different air gaps at different beam energies. A theoretical expression describing the variation of the stopping power ratio with kinetic energy, sw,air(E), was derived from the Bethe-Bloch formula and fit to the measured data, yielding a coherent pair of Iw and Iair values with Iair/Iw = 1.157 ± 0.023. Additionally, the data from five different beam energies were combined in an average value of sw,air = 1.132 ± 0.003 (statistical) ± 0.003 (variation over energy range), valid for monoenergetic carbon ion beams at the plateau area of the depth dose distribution. A detailed uncertainty analysis was performed on the data, in order to assess the limitations of the method, yielding an overall standard uncertainty below 1% in sw,air(E). Therefore, when properly combined with the appropriate models for the fragment spectra, our experimental work can contribute to narrow the uncertainty margins currently in use in absorbed dose to water determination for dosimetry of carbon ion beam radiotherapy.

  13. Epidemiology of carbon monoxide gas poisoning deaths in Ardabil city, 2008-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmaeil Farzaneh

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carbon monoxide gas is odorless, colorless and toxic which are the most abundant pollutants in the lower atmosphere. Carbon monoxide poisoning is considered as one of the most common causes of mortality in Iran and Ardabil province. This study aimed to investigate the epidemiology of carbon monoxide gas poisoning died patients during 2008 to 2013. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, with referral to the Ardabil coroner center and poisoning ward of Imam Khomeini hospital, the statistics related to carbon monoxide poisoning died patients have been extracted and entered into the Checklists then analyzed by statistical methods in SPSS.19. Results: The number of deceased in this study was 35 people with a mean age of 33.66 +/- 21.38. Of them, 19 (54.3% were male and 16 (45.7% were female. 85.7 percent of the deceased had been poisoned at home which from them 71.4% died before transaction to hospital. The season winter with 48.6% include the most of cases and the most common vehicle of intoxication was water heater with 48.6%. Conclusion: Carbon monoxide gas poisoning is one of the cases that causes to death of people in Ardabil every year and so promoting public awareness about risks due to Carbon monoxide could have a considerable role in the prevention of poisoning. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(4.000: 929-932

  14. Extended high order sandwich panel theory for bending analysis of sandwich beams with carbon nanotube reinforced face sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jedari Salami, S.

    2016-02-01

    Bending analysis of a sandwich beam with soft core and carbon nanotube reinforced composite (CNTRC) face sheets in the literature is presented based on Extended High order Sandwich Panel Theory (EHSAPT). Distribution of fibers through the thickness of the face sheets could be uniform or functionally graded (FG). In this theory the face sheets follow the first order shear deformation theory (FSDT). Besides, the two dimensional elasticity is used for the core. The field equations are derived via the Ritz based solution which is suitable for any essential boundary condition. The influences of boundary conditions on bending response of the sandwich panel with soft core and CNTRC face sheet are investigated. In each type of boundary condition the effect of distribution pattern of CNTRCs on many essential involved parameters of the sandwich beam with functionally graded carbon nanotube reinforced composite (FG- CNTRC) face sheets are studied in detail. Finally, experimental result have been compared with those obtained based on developed solution method. It is concluded that, the sandwich beam with X distribution figure of face sheets is the strongest with the smallest transverse displacement, and followed by the UD, O and ∧-ones, respectively.

  15. Atmospheric CO2 level affects plants' carbon use efficiency: insights from a 13C labeling experiment on sunflower stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiaoying; Schäufele, Rudi; Schnyder, Hans

    2015-04-01

    The increase of atmospheric CO2 concentration has been shown to stimulate plant photosynthesis and (to a lesser extent) growth, thereby acting as a possible sink for the additional atmospheric CO2. However, this effect is dependent on the efficiency with which plants convert atmospheric carbon into biomass carbon, since a considerable proportion of assimilated carbon is returned to the atmosphere via plant respiration. As a core parameter for carbon cycling, carbon use efficiency of plants (CUE, the ratio of net primary production to gross primary production) quantifies the proportion of assimilated carbon that is incorporated into plant biomass. CUE has rarely been assessed based on measurements of complete carbon balance, due to methodological difficulties in measuring respiration rate of plants in light. Moreover, foliar respiration is known to be inhibited in light, thus foliar respiration rate is generally lower in light than in dark. However, this phenomenon, termed as inhibition of respiration in light (IRL), has rarely been assessed at the stand-scale and been incorporated into the calculation of CUE. Therefore, how CUE responses to atmospheric CO2 levels is still not clear. We studied CUE of sunflower stands grown at sub-ambient CO2 level (200 μmol mol-1) and elevated CO2 level (1000 μmol mol-1) using mesocosm-scale gas exchange facilities which enabled continuous measurements of 13CO2/12CO2 exchange. Appling steady-state 13C labeling, fluxes of respiration and photosynthesis in light were separated, and tracer kinetic in respiration was analyzed. This study provides the first data on CUE at a mesocosm-level including respiration in light in different CO2 environments. We found that CUE of sunflower was lower at an elevated CO2 level than at a sub-ambient CO2 level; and the ignorance of IRL lead to erroneous estimations of CUE. Variation in CUE at atmospheric CO2 levels was attributed to several mechanisms. In this study, CO2 enrichment i) affected the

  16. A study on the effect of neighboring protons in proton-coupled spin-lattice relaxation of methylene carbon-13 in n-undecane

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C

    2002-01-01

    Proton coupled carbon-13 relaxation experiment was performed to investigate the effect of vicinal protons on spin-lattice relaxation of methylene carbon-13 in n-nudecane. A BIRD type pulse sequence was employed as a way to check the validity of describing sup 1 sup 3 CH sub 2 moiety as an isolated AX sub 2 spin system. The results show that the presence of vicinal protons exerts substantial influence on the relaxation of methylene carbon-13, indicating that it is not a very good approximation to treat a methylene moiety as an isolated AX sub 2 spin system.

  17. Tracing carbon assimilation in endosymbiotic deep-sea hydrothermal vent Mytilid fatty acids by 13C-fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Dehairs

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Bathymodiolus azoricus mussels thrive at Mid-Atlantic Ridge hydrothermal vents, where part of their energy requirements are met via an endosymbiotic association with chemolithotrophic and methanotrophic bacteria. In an effort to describe phenotypic characteristics of the two bacterial endosymbionts and to assess their ability to assimilate CO2, CH4 and multi-carbon compounds, we performed experiments in aquaria using 13C-labeled NaHCO3 (in the presence of H2S, CH4 or amino-acids and traced the incorporation of 13C into total and phospholipid fatty acids (tFA and PLFA, respectively. 14:0; 15:0; 16:0; 16:1(n − 7c+t; 18:1(n − 13c+t and (n − 7c+t; 20:1(n − 7; 20:2(n − 9,15; 18:3(n − 7 and (n − 5,10,13 PLFA were labeled in the presence of H13CO3− (+H2S and 13CH4, while the 12:0 compound became labeled only in the presence of H13CO3− (+H2S. In contrast, the 17:0; 18:0; 16:1(n − 9; 16:1(n − 8 and (n − 6; 18:1(n − 8; and 18:2(n − 7 PLFA were only labeled in the presence of 13CH4. Some of these symbiont-specific fatty acids also appeared to be labeled in mussel gill tFA when incubated with 13C-enriched amino acids, and so were mussel-specific fatty acids such as 22:2(n − 7,15. Our results provide experimental evidence for the potential of specific fatty acid markers to distinguish between the two endosymbiotic bacteria, shedding new light on C1 and multi-carbon compound metabolic pathways in B. azoricus and its symbionts.

  18. Ion-beam and microwave-stimulated functionalization and derivatization of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makala, Raghuveer S.

    Derivatizing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with other low-dimensional nanostructures is of widespread interest for creating CNT-based nanocomposites and devices. Conventional routes based on wet-chemical oxidation or hydrophobic adsorption do not allow premeditated control over the location or spatial extent of functionalization. Moreover, aggressive oxidative treatments and agitation in corrosive environments lead to CNT shortening, damage, and incorporation of excess impurity concentrations. Thus, it is imperative to explore and develop alternative functionalization methods to overcome these shortcomings. The work presented in this thesis outlines two such methodologies: one based on focused ion irradiation for siteselective functionalization and the other that employs microwave-stimulation for mild, yet rapid and homogenous CNT functionalization. The utility of 10 and 30 kcV Ga+ focused ion beams (FIB) to thin, slice, weld, and alter the structure and composition at precise locations along the CNT axis is presented. This strategy of harnessing ion-beam-induced defect generation and doping is attractive for modulating chemical and electrical properties along the CNT length, and fabricate CNT-based heterostructures and networks. A novel approach that utilizes focused ion irradiation to site-selectively derivatize preselected segments of CNTs with controlled micro-/nano-scale lateral spatial resolution is demonstrated. Irradiation followed by air-exposure results in functionalized CNT segments ranging from the nanoscopic to the macroscopic scale. The functional moieties are utilized to site-selectively anchor Au nanoparticles, fluorescent nanospheres, an amino acid---lysine, a charge-transfer metalloprotein---azurin, and a photoactive protein---bacteriorhodopsin by means of electrostatic or covalent interactions. This approach is versatile and can be extended to obtaining other molecular moieties and derivatives opening up possibilities for building new types of nano

  19. Proton, Helium and Carbon Radiation Beam Targeting Reactive Oxygen, Nitrogen and Halogenated Species in TRIM-SRIM Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays proton beam radiation therapy is considered in few centers for management of malignancies. This study is aimed to explore the effect of proton, helium or carbon irradiation on free radicals. This study was conducted in department of Physiology/Medical physics, College of Medicine, Al-Mustansiriya University in Baghdad, Iraq during October 2009. TRIM-SRIM software version 1998 and2003 were used for computed Bragg peak and for calculated the effect of proton, helium and carbon ions against free radicals related to oxygen, nitrogen and halogen species. The lowest stopping power near Bragg's peak of proton targeting free radicals was against superoxide anion and its curve (the stopping power against energy) was shifted down while that of peroxynitrite(ONOO-) was shifted up. The stopping powers of helium targeting all studied free radicals were lower than corresponding proton irradiation but it required higher energy. Lower stopping power of carbon irradiation targeted hydroxyl(OH-) and halogenated radicals than the other reactive species were observed. It concludes that such from of external beam irradiation is associated with direct scavenging effect on free radicals of whatever sources.

  20. Concentration and delta13C variation of atmospheric carbon dioxide near car traffic routes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of CO2 concentration and delta13C measurements in the atmospheric air sampled in Cracow and neighbourhood at the points of different influence of automobil exhaust gases are presented. Observed maximum the CO2 concentration at heavy traffic cross-road reached value 419 ppm while delta13C = -9.2%o. The CO2 concentration and delta13C values show correlation for either four sampling points. In the case of domination natural daily fluctuation of CO2 simple mixing model fits very well. Fluctuations determined by anthropogenic CO2 cannot be described by this model indicating different type of correlation. (author)

  1. Study on reinforced concrete beams strengthened using shape memory alloy wires in combination with carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Zhi-qiang; Ou, Jin-ping

    2007-12-01

    It has been proven that carbon-fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) sheets or plates are capable of improving the strength of reinforced concrete (RC) structures. However, residual deformation of RC structures in service reduces the effect of CFRP strengthening. SMA can be applied to potentially decrease residual deformation and even close concrete cracks because of its recovery forces imposed on the concrete when heated. Therefore, a method of a RC structure strengthened by CFRP plates in combination with SMA wires is proposed in this paper. The strengthening effect of this method is investigated through experiments and numerical study based on the nonlinear finite element software ABAQUS in simple RC beams. Parametric analysis and assessment of damage by defining a damage index are carried out. The results indicate that recovery forces of SMA wires can decrease deflections and even close cracks in the concrete. The recovery rate of deflection of the beam increases with increasing the ratio of SMA wires. The specimen strengthened with CFRP plates has a relatively large stiffness and smaller damage index value when the residual deformation of the beam is first reduced by activation of the SMA wires. The effectiveness of this strengthening method for RC beams is verified by experimental and numerical results.

  2. Generation of intense pulsed ion beam by a Br type magnetically insulated ion diode with carbon plasma gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To apply the pulsed heavy ion beam (PHIB) to an implantation process of semiconductor, purity of the ion beam is very important. To obtain a pure PHIB we have proposed a new type of accelerator using bipolar pulse. To develop the accelerator we are developing a new type of Br ion diode using a carbon plasma gun. By using the plasma gun, ion source plasma of ion current density approx. = 30 A/cm2 was obtained. The Br ion diode was successfully operated with plasma gun at diode voltage approx. = 100 kV, diode current approx. = 1 kA, pulse duration approx. = 200 ns and 3 A/cm2 of ion current density was obtained. (author)

  3. Formation of nanoscale carbon structures in the surface layer of metals under the impact of high intensity ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remnev, G.E., E-mail: remnev@hvd.tpu.ru [High-Voltage Research Institute at Tomsk Polytechnic University, 2a Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Uglov, V.V., E-mail: uglov@bsu.by [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Shymanski, V.I. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220030 (Belarus); Pavlov, S.K. [High-Voltage Research Institute at Tomsk Polytechnic University, 2a Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634028 (Russian Federation); Kuleshov, A.K. [Belarusian State University, 4 Nezavisimosti Ave., Minsk 220030 (Belarus)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Carbide phases in metals were formed by high-intense pulsed ion beam (HPIB) impact. • Tungsten and titanium carbides are characterized by nanoscale dimensions. • Carbides formation in surface layer provides its hardening. - Abstract: This work represents the results of phase composition and the mechanical properties of tungsten and titanium after high-intensity pulsed ion beam (HPIB) treatment. It was shown that nanoscale carbide particles are formed under the HPIB influence in the surface layers of metals. Raising the pulse number results in increase of volume fraction of the carbide phases. The microhardness is 1.5–2 times more than the initial value and wear resistance of the metals improves in response to alloying of tungsten and titanium with carbon atoms accompanied by the formation of carbides.

  4. 31P and 13C-NMR studies of the phosphorus and carbon metabolites in the halotolerant alga, Dunaliella salina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intracellular phosphorus and carbon metabolites in the halotolerant alga Dunaliella salina adapted to different salinities were monitored in living cells by 31P- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The 13C-NMR studies showed that the composition of the visible intracellular carbon metabolites other than glycerol is not significantly affected by the salinity of the growth medium. The T1 relaxation rates of the 13C-glycerol signals in intact cells were enhanced with increasing salinity of the growth medium, in parallel to the expected increase in the intracellular viscosity due to the increase in intracellular glycerol. The 31P-NMR studies showed that cells adapted to the various salinities contained inorganic phosphate, phosphomonoesters, high energy phosphate compounds, and long chain polyphosphates. In addition, cells grown in media containing up to 1 molar NaCl contained tripolyphosphates. The tripolyphosphate content was also controlled by the availability of inorganic phosphate during cell growth. Phosphate-depleted D. salina contained no detectable tripolyphosphate signal. Excess phosphate, however, did not result in the appearance of tripolyphosphate in 31P-NMR spectra of cells adapted to high (>1.5 molar NaCl) salinities

  5. Pathway analysis using (13) C-glycerol and other carbon tracers reveals a bipartite metabolism of Legionella pneumophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häuslein, Ina; Manske, Christian; Goebel, Werner; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Hilbi, Hubert

    2016-04-01

    Amino acids represent the prime carbon and energy source for Legionella pneumophila, a facultative intracellular pathogen, which can cause a life-threatening pneumonia termed Legionnaires' disease. Genome, transcriptome and proteome studies indicate that L. pneumophila also utilizes carbon substrates other than amino acids. We show here that glycerol promotes intracellular replication of L. pneumophila in amoeba or macrophages (but not extracellular growth) dependent on glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GlpD. An L. pneumophila mutant strain lacking glpD was outcompeted by wild-type bacteria upon co-infection of amoeba, indicating an important role of glycerol during infection. Isotopologue profiling studies using (13) C-labelled substrates were performed in a novel minimal defined medium, MDM, comprising essential amino acids, proline and phenylalanine. In MDM, L. pneumophila utilized (13) C-labelled glycerol or glucose predominantly for gluconeogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway, while the amino acid serine was used for energy generation via the citrate cycle. Similar results were obtained for L. pneumophila growing intracellularly in amoeba fed with (13) C-labelled glycerol, glucose or serine. Collectively, these results reveal a bipartite metabolism of L. pneumophila, where glycerol and carbohydrates like glucose are mainly fed into anabolic processes, while serine serves as major energy supply. PMID:26691313

  6. Preparation and physico-chemical study of nitroxide radicals. Isotopic marking with carbon 13 and deuterium; Preparations et etudes physico-chimiques de radicaux nitroxydes. Marquage isotopique au carbone 13 et au deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapelet-Letourneux, G. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-07-01

    N-t-butyl-N-phenyl nitroxide is obtained by: a) action of t-butyl-magnesium chloride on nitrobenzene, or of phenyl-magnesium bromide on nitro-t-butane, b) oxidation of N-t-butyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine, c) oxidation of N-t-butylaniline. In these latter two cases, it has been possible to isolate the pure radical and to study it using UV, IR and EPR. It decomposes to give N-t-butylaniline and the N-oxide of N-t-butyl-p-quinon-imine. The action of peracids such as p-nitro-perbenzoic or m-chloro-perbenzoic acids on amines or hydroxylamines leads to the formation of stable or unstable nitroxide radicals easily observable by EPR. Finally, with a view to obtaining definite values for the coupling between the free electron of a nitroxide and carbon 13, the preparation of such radicals marked with {sup 13}C in the {alpha} or {beta} position of the nitroxide function has been carried out. The coupling with an {alpha} carbon 13 is negative and does not appear to vary with the spin density on the nitrogen. The interaction with the p nuclei of the nitrogen depends on the nature of the substituents: the two benzyl protons have a hyperfine splitting a{sub H} which is always less than that of the ethyl. On the other hand, the {sup 13}C coupling is greater in the first case. The usually adopted conformations for the compounds having the carbonyl group cannot account for the observed values of the {beta} couplings. (author) [French] Le N-t-butyl-N-phenyl nitroxyde est obtenu par: a) action du chlorure de t-butylmagnesium sur le nitrobenzene, ou du bromure de phenylmagnesium sur le nitro-t-butane, b) oxydation de la N-t-butyl-N-phenylhydroxylamine, c) oxydation de la N-t-butylaniline. Dans ces deux derniers cas, le radical a pu etre isole pur et etudie par UV, IR et RPE. Il se decompose en N-t-butylaniline et N-oxyde de N-t-butyl-p-quinonimine. L'action de peracides (p-nitroperbenzoique ou m-chloroperbenzoique) sur des amines ou des hydroxylamines conduit a des radicaux nitroxydes

  7. Direct uptake of organically derived carbon by grass roots and allocation in leaves and phytoliths: 13C labeling evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, Anne; Balesdent, Jérôme; Cazevieille, Patrick; Chevassus-Rosset, Claire; Signoret, Patrick; Mazur, Jean-Charles; Harutyunyan, Araks; Doelsch, Emmanuel; Basile-Doelsch, Isabelle; Miche, Hélène; Santos, Guaciara M.

    2016-03-01

    In the rhizosphere, the uptake of low-molecular-weight carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) by plant roots has been well documented. While organic N uptake relative to total uptake is important, organic C uptake is supposed to be low relative to the plant's C budget. Recently, radiocarbon analyses demonstrated that a fraction of C from the soil was occluded in amorphous silica micrometric particles that precipitate in plant cells (phytoliths). Here, we investigated whether and to what extent organically derived C absorbed by grass roots can feed the C occluded in phytoliths. For this purpose we added 13C- and 15N-labeled amino acids (AAs) to the silicon-rich hydroponic solution of the grass Festuca arundinacea. The experiment was designed to prevent C leakage from the labeled nutritive solution to the chamber atmosphere. After 14 days of growth, the 13C and 15N enrichments (13C excess and 15N excess) in the roots, stems and leaves as well as phytoliths were measured relative to a control experiment in which no labeled AAs were added. Additionally, the 13C excess was measured at the molecular level, in AAs extracted from roots and stems and leaves. The net uptake of labeled AA-derived 13C reached 4.5 % of the total AA 13C supply. The amount of AA-derived 13C fixed in the plant was minor but not nil (0.28 and 0.10 % of total C in roots and stems/leaves, respectively). Phenylalanine and methionine that were supplied in high amounts to the nutritive solution were more 13C-enriched than other AAs in the plant. This strongly suggested that part of AA-derived 13C was absorbed and translocated into the plant in its original AA form. In phytoliths, AA-derived 13C was detected. Its concentration was on the same order of magnitude as in bulk stems and leaves (0.15 % of the phytolith C). This finding strengthens the body of evidences showing that part of organic compounds occluded in phytoliths can be fed by C entering the plant through the roots. Although this experiment was done in

  8. Measurement of the analyzing power for proton-carbon elastic scattering in the CNI region with a 22 GeV/c polarized proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out the experiment BNL-AGS E950 to measure the analyzing power for proton-carbon elastic scattering in the Coulomb-Nuclear Interference (CNI) region with a 22 GeV/c polarized proton beam. Recoil carbons from 300 keV to a few MeV in the CNI region, were detected inside the AGS ring to identify proton-carbon elastic scattering. The preliminary results of the analyzing power measurement are presented

  9. Direct analysis of δ13C and concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in environmental samples by TOC-IRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cerli, Chiara; Federherr, Eugen; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays an important role in carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Stable isotope analysis (delta 13C) of DOC could provide valuable insights in its origin, fluxes and environmental fate. Precise and routine analysis of delta 13C and DOC concentration are therefore highly desirable. A promising, new system has been developed for this purpose, linking a high-temperature combustion TOC analyzer trough an interface with a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Elementar group, Hanau, Germany). This TOC-IRMS system enables simultaneous stable isotope (bulk delta 13C) and concentration analysis of DOC, with high oxidation efficiency by high-temperature combustion for complex mixtures as natural DOC. To give delta 13C analysis by TOC-IRMS the necessary impulse for broad-scale application, we present a detailed evaluation of its analytical performance for realistic and challenging conditions inclusive low DOC concentrations and environmental samples. High precision (standard deviation, SD predominantly < 0.15 permil) and accuracy (R2 = 0.9997, i.e. comparison TOC-IRMS and conventional EA-IRMS) were achieved by TOC-IRMS for a broad diversity of DOC solutions. This precision is comparable or even slightly better than that typically reported for EA-IRMS systems, and improves previous techniques for δ13C analysis of DOC. Simultaneously, very good precision was obtained for DOC concentration measurements. Assessment of natural abundance and slightly 13C enriched DOC, a wide range of concentrations (0.2-150 mgC/L) and injection volumes (0.05-3 ml), demonstrated good analytical performance with negligible memory effects, no concentration/volume effects and a wide linearity. Low DOC concentrations (< 2 mgC/L), were correctly analyzed without any pre-concentration. Moreover, TOC-IRMS was successfully applied to analyze DOC from diverse terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments (SD < 0.23 permil). In summary, the TOC

  10. Measurement of forest ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of delta-carbon-13--carbon dioxide using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and disjunct eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambaliza, Maria Obiminda L.

    The measurement of the stable isotopic content and isotopic flux of atmospheric carbon dioxide is important for understanding the carbon budget on ecosystem, regional, and global spatial scales. Conventional measurements of the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2 involve laboratory mass spectrometry analysis of grab samples from the field, which limits the location, collection frequency and throughput of samples. More technologically advanced methods (e.g. tunable diode laser spectroscopy) suffer from interferences with other chemical species. We have developed a new measurement method based on Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and disjunct eddy covariance (DEC) for fast, continuous, real-time measurement of the carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2. Molecular absorption is measured in the 2100 to 2500 cm -1 spectral region of the 13CO2 and 12CO2 vibration-rotation bands with concentrations of both isotopologues used to determine delta13C. We demonstrate the capability of this new technique in a managed poplar forest near Boardman, Oregon with measurements during the summers of 2005 and 2006 from a 22-meter tower in a 16-m forest canopy. Long-term calibration using reference gas cylinders yielded field accuracy and precision for the forest measurements of 0.5‰ and 0.8‰, respectively, for the 45-second cycle time between samples. The signature of ecosystem respiration derived from the nighttime vertical profile measurements of CO2-delta13C was --26.6‰, about 2‰ more enriched than the isotopic composition of measured bulk leaf samples from the forest. Ecosystem respired CO 2 was ˜1.6‰ more enriched than soil-respired CO2. A comparison of the FTIR -- DEC total CO2 fluxes against standard eddy covariance measurements showed excellent (10%) agreement. FTIR-DEC measurement of the CO2 isoflux enabled the estimation of the mean carbon isotope ratio of the photosynthetic flux (deltaP). The average deltaP (-24.9‰) was 13C

  11. Effects of E-Beam Irradiation on the Chemical, Physical, and Electrochemical Properties of Activated Carbons for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors

    OpenAIRE

    Min-Jung Jung; Mi-Seon Park; Young-Seak Lee

    2015-01-01

    Activated carbons (ACs) were modified via e-beam irradiation at various doses for use as an electrode material in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs). The chemical compositions of the AC surfaces were largely unchanged by the e-beam irradiation. The ACs treated with the e-beam at radiation doses of 200 kGy exhibited higher nanocrystallinity than the untreated ACs. The specific surface areas and pore volumes of the e-beam irradiated ACs were also higher than those of the untreated ACs. Th...

  12. Generation of oxygen, carbon and metallic ion beams by a compact microwave source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small microwave ion source fabricated from a quartz tube and enclosed externally by a cavity has been operated with different geometries and for various gases in a cw mode. This source has been used to generate oxygen ion beams with energy as low as 5.5 eV. Beam energy spread has been measured to be less than 1 eV. By installing different metal plates on the front extraction electrode, metallic ion beams such as (Be, Cu, Al, etc.) can be produced

  13. δ13C chemostratigraphy in the upper Tremadocian through lower Katian (Ordovician carbonate succession of the Siljan district, central Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Lehnert

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on δ13C data from two drillcores recovered from the Siljan district, we present a first continuous carbon isotope record of the upper Tremadocian–lower Katian limestone succession of central Sweden. New names for some isotopic carbon excursions from the Cambrian–Ordovician boundary through the basal Darriwilian are introduced. The Mora 001 core from the western part of the Siljan impact structure ranges through the Lower–Middle Ordovician, whereas the Solberga 1 core from its eastern part ranges through the Middle–lower Upper Ordovician. Upper Tremadocian and Floian units are extremely condensed and include extensive stratigraphic gaps. Multiple hardgrounds, sometimes with minor karstic overprint, imply recurrent periods of erosion and/or non-deposition. Like in other parts of Sweden, the Dapingian and Darriwilian succession is characterized by a relatively complete sedimentary record and low sedimentation rates.

  14. Radiocarbon, 13C and tritium in water samples from basaltic aquifers and carbonate aquifers on the island of Oahu, Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Principal fresh water aquifers on the subtropical island of Oahu consist of basaltic rocks that are devoid of fossil carbonate minerals. In southern Oahu fresh water occurs as semi-independent basal lenses which float on salt water and are bounded by sedimentary formations along the coast and in valley bottoms. The latter formations contain carbonate aquifers. Fresh water also occurs in dike compartments located in the central parts of the mountains. The radiocarbon content of groundwater recharge on Oahu is between 96 and 100% modern. The 13C concentration associated with fresh groundwater is between -17 and -19 δ per mille PDB and remains constant while such waters reside in, or travel through, basaltic rock aquifers. Radiocarbon and tritium data on basal waters withdrawn by major pumping stations show these waters to have ages between a few decades and several hundred years. Differences in these ages relate systematically to individual pumping rates of the stations, well depths and local lens thickness. (author)

  15. Measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon in a few-GeV neutrino beam

    OpenAIRE

    Kurimoto, Y; Alcaraz-Aunion, J. L.; Brice, S J; Bugel, L.; Catala-Perez, J.; Cheng, G.; Conrad, J.M.; Djurcic, Z.; Dore, U.; Finley, D. A.; Franke, A. J.; C. Giganti; Gomez-Cadenas, J. J.; Guzowski, P.; Hanson, A.

    2010-01-01

    The SciBooNE Collaboration reports a measurement of neutral current coherent neutral pion production on carbon by a muon neutrino beam with average energy 0.8 GeV. The separation of coherent from inclusive neutral pion production has been improved by detecting recoil protons from resonant neutral pion production. We measure the ratio of the neutral current coherent neutral pion production to total charged current cross sections to be (1.16 +/- 0.24) x 10-2. The ratio of charged current cohere...

  16. Carbon fiber composite targets for nuclear fusion technology: a focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, F; Magni, S; Milani, M; Tatti, F

    2007-01-01

    Carbon fiber composite (CFC) targets are investigated by a focused ion beam/scanning electron microscope (FIB/SEM) in a joint project aiming at the development of robust divertors in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). These mockups are exposed to a plasma that simulates the off-normal thermal loads foreseen for ITER and display a rich, puzzling impact scenario. Morphological elements are identified at the exposed surface and beneath it, and are examined in order to point out the relevant processes involved. Each technique adopted is discussed and evaluated. PMID:18200678

  17. Different effects of carbon ion beams and X-rays on clonogenic survival and DNA repair in human pancreatic cancer stem-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The effects of a carbon ion beam and X-rays on human pancreatic cancer stem-like cells were examined from the point of view of clonogenic survival and DNA repair. Materials and methods: Human pancreatic cancer stem-like cells were treated with and without carbon ion and X-ray irradiation, and then colony, spheroid and tumor formation assays as well as γH2AX foci formation assay were performed. Results: The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values of a carbon ion beam relative to X-ray for the MIA PaCa-2 and BxPc-3 cells at the D10 values were 1.85–2.10. The ability for colony, spheroid formation, and tumorigenicity from cancer stem-like CD44+/CD24+ cells is significantly higher than that from non-cancer stem-like CD44−/CD24−cells. FACS data showed that CD44+/CD24+ cells were more highly enriched after X-rays compared to carbon ion irradiation at isoeffective doses. The RBE values for the carbon ion beam relative to X-ray at the D10 levels for CD44+/CD24+ cells were 2.0–2.19. The number of γH2AX foci in CD44−/CD24− cells was higher than that of CD44+/CD24+ cells after irradiation with either X-ray or carbon ion beam. The number of γH2AX foci in CD44+/CD24+ cells was almost the same in the early time, but it persists significantly longer in carbon ion beam irradiated cells compared to X-rays. Conclusions: Carbon ion beam has superior potential to kill pancreatic cancer stem cell-like cells, and prolonged induction of DNA damage might be one of the pivotal mechanisms of its high radiobiological effects compared to X-rays.

  18. In situ Raman spectroelectrochemical study of 13C labeled fullerene peapods and double walled carbon nanotubes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalbáč, Martin; Kavan, Ladislav; Zukalová, Markéta; Dunsch, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 10 (2007), s. 1746-1752. ISSN 1613-6810 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB400400601; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Raman spectroscopy * spectroelectrochemistry * carbon nanotube Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 6.408, year: 2007

  19. Characterization of alkyl carbon in forest soils by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy and dipolar dephasing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogel-Knabner, I.; Hatcher, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Samples obtained from forest soils at different stages of decomposition were treated sequentially with chloroform/methanol (extraction of lipids), sulfuric acid (hydrolysis), and sodium chlorite (delignification) to enrich them in refractory alkyl carbon. As revealed by NMR spectroscopy, this treatment yielded residues with high contents of alkyl carbon. In the NMR spectra of residues obtained from litter samples, resonances for carbohydrates are also present, indicating that these carbohydrates are tightly bound to the alkyl carbon structures. During decomposition in the soils this resistant carbohydrate fraction is lost almost completely. In the litter samples the alkyl carbon shows a dipolar dephasing behavior indicative of two structural components, a rigid and a more mobile component. As depth and decomposition increase, only the rigid component is observed. This fact could be due to selective degradation of the mobile component or to changes in molecular mobility during decomposition, e.g., because of an increase in cross linking or contact with the mineral matter of the soil.

  20. Identification of aquatically available carbon from algae through solution-state NMR of whole (13)C-labelled cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Mohammad; Dutta Majumdar, Rudraksha; Fortier-McGill, Blythe; Soong, Ronald; Liaghati-Mobarhan, Yalda; Simpson, Myrna; Arhonditsis, George; Schmidt, Sebastian; Heumann, Hermann; Simpson, André J

    2016-06-01

    Green algae and cyanobacteria are primary producers with profound impact on food web functioning. Both represent key carbon sources and sinks in the aquatic environment, helping modulate the dissolved organic matter balance and representing a potential biofuel source. Underlying the impact of algae and cyanobacteria on an ecosystem level is their molecular composition. Herein, intact (13)C-labelled whole cell suspensions of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Chlorella vulgaris and Synechocystis were studied using a variety of 1D and 2D (1)H/(13)C solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic experiments. Solution-state NMR spectroscopy of whole cell suspensions is particularly relevant as it identifies species that are mobile (dissolved or dynamic gels), 'aquatically available' and directly contribute to the aquatic carbon pool upon lysis, death or become a readily available food source on consumption. In this study, a wide range of metabolites and structural components were identified within the whole cell suspensions. In addition, significant differences in the lipid/triacylglyceride (TAG) content of green algae and cyanobacteria were confirmed. Mobile species in algae are quite different from those in abundance in 'classic' dissolved organic matter (DOM) indicating that if algae are major contributors to DOM, considerable selective preservation of minor components (e.g. sterols) or biotransformation would have to occur. Identifying the metabolites and dissolved components within algal cells by NMR permits future studies of carbon transfer between species and through the food chain, whilst providing a foundation to better understand the role of algae in the formation of DOM and the sequestration/transformation of carbon in aquatic environments. PMID:27074782

  1. Vacuum Electron-Beam Evaporation of Fe Nanocrystals on Si3N4 Buffer Layer for carbon Nanotube Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万青; 王太宏; 林成鲁

    2003-01-01

    Vacuum electron-beam evaporated iron nanocrystal is used for the growth of carbon nanotubes. Atomic force microscopy and Raman scattering studies reveal the formation of beta-iron silicide islands on bare silicon substrate after annealing at 700°C in N2 ambient. In order to eliminate the influence of iron-silicon interaction, Si3N4 buffer layer with the thickness of 80 nm is used. This technical route prevents effectively the formation of iron silicide and improves the quality of the iron nanocrystals. Using these iron nanocrystals with high density (about 7 × 1010/cm2) as catalyst, high-density multiwall carbon nanotubes are synthesized on Si3N4/Si substrate.

  2. Synthesis of carbon-supported PtRh random alloy nanoparticles using electron beam irradiation reduction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yoshiyuki; Seino, Satoshi; Okazaki, Tomohisa; Akita, Tomoki; Nakagawa, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2016-05-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticle catalysts of PtRh supported on carbon were synthesized using an electron beam irradiation reduction method. The PtRh nanoparticle catalysts were composed of particles 2-3 nm in size, which were well dispersed on the surface of the carbon support nanoparticles. Analyses of X-ray diffraction and scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the PtRh nanoparticles have a randomly alloyed structure. The lattice constant of the PtRh nanoparticles showed good correlation with Vegard's law. These results are explained by the radiochemical formation process of the PtRh nanoparticles. Catalytic activities of PtRh/C nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation reaction were found to be higher than those obtained with Pt/C.

  3. Effect of properties of carbon fiber surface modified by anodic treatment and a coupling agent on electron beam cured epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double modification method of carbon fiber surface physical and chemical properties was presented by which the carbon fibers were electrochemically oxidized and subsequently coated with an electron beam compatible coupling agent. The treated and untreated carbon fiber surface chemical properties and morphology were analyzed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). And the carbon fiber surface energy was calculated through Kaelble method using contract angle measurement. The results show that the roughness and reactive groups of carbon fiber surface increase after anodic oxidization, moreover, polar composition of surface energy increase obviously. During EB curing the nitrogen-containing groups and basic species chemisorbed by carbon fiber surface restrain the initiators in the interface of composites, resulting in the weaker adhesion between the carbon fiber and the matrix. The coupling agent, acting as chemical bridge between the carbon fibers and the matrix, improves the interfacial properties of EB cured composites

  4. Carbon-13 isotopic selectivity in the infrared multiphoton photolysis of CF2Cl2-O2 mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The infrared multiphoton chemistry of CF2Cl2-O2 mixtures has been studied at laser frequencies where the product CF2O is highly enriched in carbon-13 yield. Yield enhancements with no loss of isotopic selectivity are attributed to suppression of radical-atom recombination reactions. It is demonstrated that addition of up to 60 Torr of either excess O2 or N2 suppresses a thermal, non-selective channel important at higher fluences. A selectivity factor greater than 30 is observed for 4 Torr CF2Cl2 in the presence of 80 Torr of oxygen

  5. Carbon-13 magnetic relaxation rates or iron (III) complexes of some biogenic amines and parent compounds in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin-lattice relaxation rates (R1) from naturally occuring C-13 F.T. N.M.R. spectra of some catecholamines and parent compounds with Iron(III) at pD = 4 were determined in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying their association in aqueous solutions. Complexation was observed only for catecholic ligands. The R1 values were used to calculate iron-carbon scaled distances, and two complexation models were proposed where the catecholic function binds Fe(III) in the first and second coordination spheres respectively. The latter case was shown to be the consistent with the molecular geometries. (orig.)

  6. Temporal δ13C records from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) reflect variation in foraging location and global carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossman, S. L.; Barros, N. B.; Ostrom, P. H.; Gandhi, H.; Wells, R. S.

    2010-12-01

    With four decades of data on a population of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) resident to Sarasota Bay (SB), The Sarasota Dolphin Research Program offers an unparalleled platform for ground-truthing stable isotope data and exploring bottlenose dolphin ecology in a natural setting. We explored carbon isotope value fidelity to habitat utilization by comparing δ13C data from whole teeth and muscle to the individual dolphin's proclivity towards foraging in seagrass beds based on observational data. We then examined variation in habitat use based on temporal isotope records. Whole tooth protein isotope values do not show a significant correlation with the observed percentage of foraging in seagrass habitat. In contrast, δ13C values from muscle showed a significant positive relationship with the observational data. Differences in the degree of tissue turn over may account for this distinction between tooth and muscle. Dolphin teeth consist of annually deposited layers that are inert once formed. Thus, the isotopic composition of protein in annuli reflect foraging at the time of deposition. In addition to incorporating variation associated with differences in foraging over the lifetime of the individual, whole tooth isotope values are confounded because a disproportionate amount of tooth protein derives from the first few years of life. Given the turnover time of muscle tissue, isotope values reflect diet over the past several months. From 1991 to 2008, muscle δ13C values showed a significant decline, -13.5‰ to -15.1‰.This time period encompasses a state wide net fishing ban (1995) however other factors such as a series of red tide harmful algal blooms, a decline in predators, increases in shallow water boat traffic and an increase in string ray abundance may also contribute to the temporal isotope trend. To examine changes in dolphin foraging habitat further back in time we analyzed the tip of crown of the tooth which records the isotopic signal from the

  7. Application of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of organic matter fractions sequentially separated from adjacent arable and forest soils to identify carbon stabilization mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Kayler, Z.E.; Kaiser, M; Gessler, A.; Ellerbrock, R. H.; M. Sommer

    2011-01-01

    Identifying the chemical mechanisms behind soil carbon bound in organo-mineral complexes is necessary to determine the degree to which soil organic carbon is stabilized belowground. Analysis of δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures of stabilized OM fractions along with soil mineral characteristics may yield important information about OM-mineral associations and their processing history. We anlayzed the δ13C and δ15N isotopic signatures from two organic matter (OM) fractio...

  8. Interactions of 13.6-GeV/nucleon 16O and 28Si with carbon, aluminum, and copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross sections for forming 24Na and 18F by the interactions of 13.6-GeV/nucleon 16O and 28Si ions with Al and for forming 24Na in 16O interactions with Cu have been measured relative to the cross section for forming 11C from carbon. The results are generally consistent with energy-independent inclusive cross sections (limiting fragmentation) for heavy ions between ∼2 and 13.6 GeV/nucleon. However, comparison of the heavy-ion data with those for high-energy protons indicates a significantly weaker dependence on projectile size than that predicted by the factorization hypothesis for σC(11C), σAl(18F), and σAl(24Na). The dependence is slightly stronger in the case of σCu(24Na)

  9. Investigation on carbon dioxide corrosion behaviour of HP13Cr110 stainless steel in simulated stratum water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, L.J. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)], E-mail: mulijunxjtu@126.com; Zhao, W.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2010-01-15

    The carbon dioxide corrosion behaviour of HP13Cr110 stainless steel in simulated stratum water is studied by potentiodynamic curve and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS); the micro-structure and composition of the corrosion scale formed at high-temperature and high-pressure are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that 13Cr stainless steel is in passive state in the stratum water, the passive current density increases and the passive potential region decreases with increasing temperature. The corrosion scale formed at high-temperature and high-pressure is mainly composed of iron/chromium oxides and a little amount of FeCO{sub 3}.

  10. Application of Al2O3:C+fibre dosimeters for 290 MeV/n carbon therapeutic beam dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of radioluminescence (RL) dosimeters composed of carbon-doped aluminium oxide (Al2O3:C) detectors+optical fibre has been verified for absorbed dose-rate measurements during carbon radiotherapy. The RL signals from two separate Al2O3:C detectors (single crystal 'CG' and droplet 'P1') have been systematically measured and compared along the Bragg-curve and Spread-Out Bragg-Peak of 290 MeV/n carbon beams in the water. The absorbed dose response was assessed for the range of 0.5–10 Gy. For doses up to 6 Gy, we observed a linear response for both types of detectors, while for higher doses CG presented a more prominent supraliearity than P1. The RL response for low-LET protons in the entrance from the curve was found to closely resemble that observed for a clinical 6 MV X-ray beam, while it was found that P1 has a better agreement with the reference data from standard ionization chamber than CG. We observed a significant decrease in luminescence efficiency with LET in the Bragg peak region. The Al2O3:C RL luminescence efficiency differs from Al2O3:C OSL results, which implies that the signal can be corrected for LET dependency to match the correct SOBP and Bragg Peak. - Highlights: • Radioluminescence (RL) real time signal from Al2O3:C+fibre probes. • Irradiations with 290 MeV/n Carbon. • Two types of detectors were tested: droplet and single crystal. • Luminescence efficiencies for each probe were compared with 6 MV photons. • Bragg Peak and SOBP are obtained. • Luminescence efficiencies for Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) and RL are compared for Al2O3:C

  11. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen adsorption on cation-exchanged SSZ-13 zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Trong D; Liu, Qingling; Lobo, Raul F

    2013-01-15

    Samples of high-silica SSZ-13, ion exchanged with protons and alkali-metal cations Li(+), Na(+), and K(+), were investigated using adsorption isotherms of CO(2) and N(2). The results show that Li-, Na-SSZ-13 have excellent CO(2) capacity at ambient temperature and pressure; in general, Li-SSZ-13 shows the highest capacity for N(2), CO(2) particularly in the low-pressure region. The effect of cation type and Si/Al ratio (6 and 12) on the adsorption properties was investigated through analysis of adsorption isotherms and heats of adsorption. The separation of CO(2) in a flue gas mixture was evaluated for these adsorbents in the pressure swing adsorption and vacuum pressure adsorption processes. PMID:23249267

  12. In vivo studies of pyridine nucleotide metabolism in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyridine nucleotide metabolism has been studied in vivo in a prokaryotic (Escherichia coli) and a eukaryotic (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) system cultured in a medium containing carbon-13-labeled nicotinic acid, followed by NMR detection of the labeled organisms. Chemical exchange between oxidized and reduced nucleotides is found to be sufficiently slow on the NMR time scale to permit the observation of separate resonances corresponding to each redox state. The possibility of significant exchange broadening of reduced pyridine nucleotide resonances under some conditions was further evaluated based on comparative NMR studies utilizing organisms cultured in the presence of either [2-13C]nicotinate or [5-13C]nicotinate. Based on these experiments, it was concluded that broadening as a consequence of intermediate exchange is not significant. Although it was initially anticipated that the carbon-13 resonances arising from the di- and triphosphopyridine nucleotide pools could not be distinguished, the absence of observable resonances corresponding to reduced nucleotides in oxygenated yeast and E. coli cells suggests that the NMR method is fairly specific for determining the redox status of the diphosphopyridine nucleotide pool. Studies of the effects of a variety of perturbations including variation of the oxygen supply, addition of ethanol, and addition of the oxidative phosphorylation uncoupler dinitrophenol have been carried out. Dramatic differences in the response of the catabolic reduction charge, CRC = [NADH]/[NADH] + [NAD+], between the yeast and E. coli cells are observed. The CRC values for the yeast undergo large changes in response to these perturbations which are not observed for the bacterial cells. 52 references, 9 figures, 2 tables

  13. Seasonal and interannual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torn, Margaret S. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and UC Berkeley, Berkeley (United States)), e-mail: mstorn@lbl.gov; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Riley, William J. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Earth Sciences Division (United States)); Still, Christopher J. (Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, Geography Dept. (United States)); Berry, Joe A. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Dept. of Global Ecology (United States))

    2011-04-15

    The delta13C value of terrestrial CO{sub 2} fluxes (delta{sub bio}) provides important information for inverse models of CO{sub 2} sources and sinks as well as for studies of vegetation physiology, C3 and C4 vegetation fluxes, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and delta13C-CO{sub 2} at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed delta{sub bio} weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C3 winter wheat) and C4 pasture grasses. delta{sub bio} had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6.8 per mille. Ensemble monthly mean delta{sub bio} ranged from -25.8 +- 0.4 per mille (+-SE) in March to -20.1 +- 0.4 per mille in July. Thus, C{sub 3} vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil delta13{sub C} values were about -15 indicating that historically the region was dominated by C{sub 4} vegetation and had more positive deltabio values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes (deltabio x NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because deltabio and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in deltabio and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved 13CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes

  14. Seasonal and interannual variability in 13C composition of ecosystem carbon fluxes in the U.S. Southern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torn, Margaret S.; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Still, Christopher J.; Riley, William J.; Berry, Joe A.

    2011-04-01

    The δ13C value of terrestrial CO2 fluxes (δbio) provides important information for inverse models of CO2 sources and sinks as well as for studies of vegetation physiology, C3 and C4 vegetation fluxes, and ecosystem carbon residence times. From 2002-2009, we measured atmospheric CO2 concentration and δ13C-CO2 at four heights (2 to 60 m) in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP) and computed δbio weekly. This region has a fine-scale mix of crops (primarily C3 winter wheat) and C4 pasture grasses. δbio had a large and consistent seasonal cycle of 6-8‰. Ensemble monthly mean δbio ranged from -25.8 ± 0.4‰ (±SE) in March to -20.1 ± 0.4‰ in July. Thus, C3 vegetation contributed about 80% of ecosystem fluxes in winter-spring and 50% in summer-fall. In contrast, prairie-soil δ13C values were about -15‰, indicating that historically the region was dominated by C4 vegetation and had more positive δbio values. Based on a land-surface model, isofluxes (δbio× NEE) in this region have large seasonal amplitude because δbio and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) covary. Interannual variability in isoflux was driven by variability in NEE. The large seasonal amplitude in δbio and isoflux imply that carbon inverse analyses require accurate estimates of land cover and temporally resolved 13CO2 and CO2 fluxes.

  15. Study on suppression mechanism of electron emission from Mo grid coated with carbon film by dual ion beam deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is problematic that electrons are emitted from the Mo grid of pulsed-controlled grid traveling wave tubes, caused by the contamination of cathode evaporation material, i.e. BaO. Some studies show that a Mo grid coated with carbon can greatly suppress grid electron emission. However, the reason for the electron emission suppression is not completely clear. To understand the mechanism of electron emission suppression of a BaO/C/Mo system, carbon films were prepared on Mo substrates at room temperature by means of DIBSD (dual ion beam sputtering deposition), and BaO layers were coated by using a chemical method. Post-annealing was conducted under a flowing nitrogen ambient at 700 .deg. C for 1.5 hours. The structure of the as-deposited carbon films was evaluated by TEM, AES and Raman spectroscopy. The annealed samples, the BaO/ Mo and BaO/C/Mo systems, were analyzed by XPS. The results suggest that the chemical reaction between BaO and C at high temperature eliminates the concentrations of Ba or BaO on the surface of the C/Mo system. It can be believed that the high work function material used as the grid surface coating and elimination of BaO on its surface have a critical effect on grid electron emission suppression. Moreover, the carbon film was characterized by density, homogeneity and high adhesion, owing to the features of DIBSD.

  16. All-Carbon [3+3] Oxidative Annulations of 1,3-Enynes by Rhodium(III)-Catalyzed C–H Functionalization and 1,4-Migration**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, David J; Best, Daniel; Wieczysty, Martin D; Lam, Hon Wai

    2015-01-01

    1,3-Enynes containing allylic hydrogens cis to the alkyne function as three-carbon components in rhodium(III)-catalyzed, all-carbon [3+3] oxidative annulations to produce spirodialins. The proposed mechanism of these reactions involves the alkenyl-to-allyl 1,4-rhodium(III) migration. PMID:26224377

  17. A TPS kernel for calculating survival vs. depth: distributions in a carbon radiotherapy beam, based on Katz's cellular track structure theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An algorithm was developed of a treatment planning system (TPS) kernel for carbon radiotherapy in which Katz's Track Structure Theory of cellular survival (TST) is applied as its radiobiology component. The physical beam model is based on available tabularised data, prepared by Monte Carlo simulations of a set of pristine carbon beams of different input energies. An optimisation tool developed for this purpose is used to find the composition of pristine carbon beams of input energies and fluences which delivers a pre-selected depth-dose distribution profile over the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) region. Using an extrapolation algorithm, energy-fluence spectra of the primary carbon ions and of all their secondary fragments are obtained over regular steps of beam depths. To obtain survival vs. depth distributions, the TST calculation is applied to the energy-fluence spectra of the mixed field of primary ions and of their secondary products at the given beam depths. Katz's TST offers a unique analytical and quantitative prediction of cell survival in such mixed ion fields. By optimising the pristine beam composition to a published depth-dose profile over the SOBP region of a carbon beam and using TST model parameters representing the survival of CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary) cells in vitro, it was possible to satisfactorily reproduce a published data set of CHO cell survival vs. depth measurements after carbon ion irradiation. The authors also show by a TST calculation that 'biological dose' is neither linear nor additive. (authors)

  18. Electron spin resonance investigations on ion beam irradiated single-wall carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ESR investigations on single-wall carbon nanotubes irradiated with accelerated protons, helium ions, and neon ions are reported. All spectra were accurately simulated assuming that the resonance line is a convolution of up to 4 lines originating from catalyst residues, amorphous carbon, and electrons delocalized over the conducting domains of nanotubes. The faint line observed in irradiated nanotubes at g > 2.25 was assigned to magnetic impurities. However, there are no sufficient data to confirm that this line is connected to radiation-induced magnetism in carbon nanotubes. The generation of paramagnetic defects due to the bombardment of single-wall carbon nanotubes by accelerated ions is reported. These data correlate with previous Raman and thermal investigations on the same single-wall carbon nanotubes and reveals their sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The temperature dependence of ESR spectra in the range 25-250 K was used to identify the components of the ESR spectra

  19. Cationic concentration effects on electron beam cured of carbon-epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron beam (e-beam) curing is a technology that offers advantages over the thermal curing process, that usually requires high temperature and are time-consuming. E-beam curing is faster and occurs at low temperatures that help reduce residual mechanical stresses in a thermoset composite. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of cationic initiator (diaryliodonium hexafluoroantimonate) ranged from 1 to 3 wt% in DGEBA (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) epoxy resin when cured by a 1.5 MeV electron beam. The specimens were cured to a total dose of 200.4 kGy for 40 min. Analyses by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that the e-beam irradiated samples with 2 wt% cationic initiator were 96% cured obtained a glass transition temperature (tan δ) of 167 deg. C. The same epoxy resin, thermally cured for 16 h with an anhydride hardener, reached a Tg (tan δ) of 136 deg. C. So, the irradiated sample had its Tg increased approximately 20% and the curing process was much less time consuming.

  20. Cationic concentration effects on electron beam cured of carbon-epoxy composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishitsuji, D.A., E-mail: delmo_amari@yahoo.com.b [Brazilian Navy Technological Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Marinucci, G. [Brazilian Navy Technological Center, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Energetic and Nuclear Research Institute-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil); Evora, M.C. [Institute of Advanced Studies/CTA, Sao Jose dos Campos/SP (Brazil); Silva, L.G.A. [Energetic and Nuclear Research Institute-IPEN-CNEN/SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo/SP (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Electron beam (e-beam) curing is a technology that offers advantages over the thermal curing process, that usually requires high temperature and are time-consuming. E-beam curing is faster and occurs at low temperatures that help reduce residual mechanical stresses in a thermoset composite. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effects of cationic initiator (diaryliodonium hexafluoroantimonate) ranged from 1 to 3 wt% in DGEBA (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) epoxy resin when cured by a 1.5 MeV electron beam. The specimens were cured to a total dose of 200.4 kGy for 40 min. Analyses by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) show that the e-beam irradiated samples with 2 wt% cationic initiator were 96% cured obtained a glass transition temperature (tan delta) of 167 deg. C. The same epoxy resin, thermally cured for 16 h with an anhydride hardener, reached a T{sub g} (tan delta) of 136 deg. C. So, the irradiated sample had its T{sub g} increased approximately 20% and the curing process was much less time consuming.

  1. Using Atmospheric δ13C of CO2 observations to link the water and carbon cycles with climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alden, C. B.; Miller, J. B.; White, J. W.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.; Andrews, A. E.; Huang, L.

    2013-12-01

    The ratio of stable carbon isotopes, 13C:12C in atmospheric CO2 (expressed as δ13C) offers unique insights into atmosphere-land CO2 fluxes and the modulating effects of stomatal conductance on this exchange. Photosynthesis discriminates against 13CO2 during uptake. The magnitude of this fractionation is strongly dependent upon ambient CO2 concentrations and water availability, as well as on the mix of C3 and C4 vegetation types. C3 and C4 plants have very different discrimination because of carboxylation pathways, and C3 stomatal conductance varies with water availability because stomata close to reduce transpiration when plants are water stressed. Further, plant stomata respond to ambient CO2 concentrations in order to optimize leaf internal [CO2] while reducing transpirative water loss. Atmospheric δ13C therefore carries information about local and upwind drought conditions and the consequent likelihood of ground-to-atmosphere water transfer via transpiration, and the balance of latent and sensible heat fluxes, as well as about local and upwind distributions of C3 and C4 vegetation and variability therein. δ13C offers a unique lens through which to identify key thresholds and relationships between climate anomalies/change and the modulating climate impacts of plant biosphere response. By unraveling this relationship at local to continental scales, we stand to gain crucial understanding of the drivers of land CO2 uptake variability as well as knowledge of how to predict future climate impacts on the carbon cycle and vice versa. We use a two-step Bayesian inversion model to optimize 1x1 degree and 3-hourly (interpreted at regional and weekly to monthly scales) fields of δ13C of assimilated biomass over North America for the year 2010, using influence functions generated with FLEXPART, driven by National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Forecast System meteorology. Prior fluxes and fossil fuel, ocean and fire fluxes are from CarbonTracker 2011, and

  2. Formation and atomic structure of tetrahedral carbon onion produced by electron-beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Various fullerene structures has been designed and produced after the discovery of C60. These fullerene materials are good candidates as nanoscale devises such as single-electron devices, nano-diode, nano-transistor, nano-ball bearing and insulator lubricant. The onion structures, which generally consist of some quasi-spherical fullerene group, are also discovered and studied in detail. The tetrahedral carbon onions had been calculated to be unstable compared to the spherical onions due to the rigidity. The purpose of the present work is to produce new carbon onion by high-energy electron-irradiation on amorphous carbon at 1250 kV, and to investigate atomic structures and stability of the new carbon onion cluster by high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) and molecular orbital/mechanics calculations. To confirm the structure model from HREM data, HREM image simulation were carried out. The tetrahedral carbon onion was successfully produced by high-energy electron-irradiation. A HREM image of tetrahedral carbon onion would consist of pentagonal and hexagonal rings. The HREM result indicates that new fullerene structures formed into the carbon onion. Molecular mechanics calculations (MM2), semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations (PM3), and density functional theory (DFT) were used to get structure optimization about first and second internal shell. The energy levels and density of states were also calculated by the first principles method (DV-Xα). The smallest tetrahedral onion in the HREM image agreed well with the proposed structure model of C84atC276. Each vertex consists of a hexagonal ring, and three pentagonal rings exist around the vertex along the edge. In summary, the tetrahedral carbon cluster was produced by energy transfer of electron-irradiation, and the new atomic structure model of tetrahedral carbon onion was proposed. The electronic structures were also calculated theoretically. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron

  3. Chemical investigations of isotope separation on line target units for carbon and nitrogen beams

    CERN Document Server

    Franberg, H; Gäggeler, H W; Köster, U

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive ion beams (RIBs) are of significant interest in a number of applications. Isotope separation on line (ISOL) facilities provide RIB with high beam intensities and good beam quality. An atom that is produced within the ISOL target will first diffuse out from the target material. During the effusion towards the transfer line and into the ion source the many contacts with the surrounding surfaces may cause unacceptable delays in the transport and, hence, losses of the shorter-lived isotopes. We performed systematic chemical investigations of adsorption in a temperature and concentration regime relevant for ISOL targets and ion source units, with regard to CO/sub x/ and NOmaterials are potential construction materials for the above-mentioned areas. Off-line and on-line tests have been performed using a gas thermochromatography setup with radioactive tracers. The experiments were performed at the production of tracers for atmospheric chemistry (PROTRAC) facility at the Paul Schener Institute in Villigen...

  4. Ribbon target assembly using carbon graphite for secondary emission type beam profile monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a secondary emission type beam profile monitor with graphite ribbons as a beam target. The graphite is excellent in endurance against heat load, and that they are thin as 1.6-2.0 micron and low z (=6) is advantage for reducing beam loss. Furthermore, since ribbons emits larger amount of electrons than ordinal metal wires because of larger surface, the monitor has higher sensitivity. On the other hands, in case of multi-ribbon type, uniformity of secondary electron emission is required for accurate measurement. For the uniform emission, not only surface homogeneity, but also evenness for each ribbon width is needed. A suitable manufacturing method to make ribbon target from graphite-foil, and emission uniformity has been studied. (author)

  5. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies

  6. A scintillating gas detector for 2D dose measurements in clinical carbon beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seravalli, E.; de Boer, M.; Geurink, F.; Huizenga, J.; Kreuger, R.; Schippers, J. M.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Voss, B.

    2008-09-01

    A two-dimensional position sensitive dosimetry system based on a scintillating gas detector has been developed for pre-treatment verification of dose distributions in hadron therapy. The dosimetry system consists of a chamber filled with an Ar/CF4 scintillating gas mixture, inside which two cascaded gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are mounted. A GEM is a thin kapton foil with copper cladding structured with a regular pattern of sub-mm holes. The primary electrons, created in the detector's sensitive volume by the incoming beam, drift in an electric field towards the GEMs and undergo gas multiplication in the GEM holes. During this process, photons are emitted by the excited Ar/CF4 gas molecules and detected by a mirror-lens-CCD camera system. Since the amount of emitted light is proportional to the dose deposited in the sensitive volume of the detector by the incoming beam, the intensity distribution of the measured light spot is proportional to the 2D hadron dose distribution. For a measurement of a 3D dose distribution, the scintillating gas detector is mounted at the beam exit side of a water-bellows phantom, whose thickness can be varied in steps. In this work, the energy dependence of the output signal of the scintillating gas detector has been verified in a 250 MeV/u clinical 12C ion beam by means of a depth-dose curve measurement. The underestimation of the measured signal at the Bragg peak depth is only 9% with respect to an air-filled ionization chamber. This is much smaller than the underestimation found for a scintillating Gd2O2S:Tb ('Lanex') screen under the same measurement conditions (43%). Consequently, the scintillating gas detector is a promising device for verifying dose distributions in high LET beams, for example to check hadron therapy treatment plans which comprise beams with different energies.

  7. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have measured the 13C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D2O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D2O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The 13C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the 13C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier

  8. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-03-26

    The authors have measured the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier.

  9. Hydrological budget, carbon sources and biogeochemical processes in Lac Pavin (France): Constraints from δ18O of water and δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lac Pavin (French Massif Central) is a permanently stratified lake: the upper water layers (mixolimnion, from 0 to 60 m depth) are affected by seasonal overturns, whereas the bottom water layers (monimolimnion, from 60 to 90 m depth) remain isolated and are never mixed. Hence, they are capable of storing important quantities of dissolved gases, mainly CO2. With the aim of better constraining the water balance and of gaining new insights into the carbon cycle of Lac Pavin, an isotopic approach is used. The δ18OH2O profiles lead the authors to give a new evaluation of the evaporation flow rate (8 L s-1), and to propose and characterize two sub-surface springs. The sub-surface spring located at the bottom of the lake can be deduced from the 1% isotopic difference between the upper water layers (mean δ18OH2O value: -7.3 per mille ) and the bottom water layers (δ18OH2O=-8.4 per mille ). It is argued that this sub-surface spring has isotopic and chemical characteristics similar to those of the magmatic CO2-rich spring (i.e. Fontaine Goyon, δ18OH2O=-9.4 per mille ), and we calculate its flow rate of 1.6 L s-1. The second sub-surface spring is located around 45 m depth, with a composition close to those of the water surface streams (δ18OH2O13CDIC ∼ +7 per mille ) and 2/3 from the magmatic CO2-rich spring (δ13CDIC ∼ -5 per mille ). Above 80 m depth, the variations in DIC concentrations (ranging from 0.5 to 10 mM) and δ13CDIC values (ranging from -6.5 per mille to 4.4 per mille ) are partly explained by the usual methanotrophy, organic matter oxidation, photosynthesis and CO2 equilibrium with atmosphere. The unusually high δ13CDIC values in the upper water layers (ranging from -6 per mille to 0 per mille ) compared to the expected δ13CDIC values assuming only organic matter oxidation, demonstrate the leakage of 13C-enriched DIC from the bottom water layers of Lac Pavin (δ13CDIC values ranging from -5 per mille to 3 per mille )

  10. Geant4 simulation for a study of a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams for the treatment of ocular melanomas with the active scanning system at CNAO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, E.; Piersimoni, P.; Riccardi, C.; Rimoldi, A.; Tamborini, A.; Ciocca, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study a possible use of carbon ion pencil beams (delivered with active scanning modality) for the treatment of ocular melanomas at the Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO). The promising aspect of carbon ions radiotherapy for the treatment of this disease lies in its superior relative radio-biological effectiveness (RBE). The Monte Carlo (MC) Geant4 10.00 toolkit was used to simulate the complete CNAO extraction beamline, with the active and passive components along it. A human eye modeled detector, including a realistic target tumor volume, was used as target. Cross check with previous studies at CNAO using protons allowed comparisons on possible benefits on using such a technique with respect to proton beams. Experimental data on proton and carbon ion beams transverse distributions were used to validate the simulation.

  11. Response of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and δ13CDIC to changes in climate and land cover in SW China karst catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Zaihua; Li, Hong-Chun; Zeng, Cheng; Yang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Yan, Hao

    2015-09-01

    Monthly hydrochemical data and δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in karst water samples from September 2007 to October 2012 were obtained to reveal the controlling mechanisms on DIC geochemistry and δ13CDIC under different conditions of climate and land cover in three karst catchments: Banzhai, Dengzhanhe and Chenqi, in Guizhou Province, SW China. DIC of karst water at the Banzhai site comes mainly from carbonate dissolution under open system conditions with soil CO2 produced by root respiration and organic carbon decomposition with lowest δ13C values under its dense virgin forest coverage. Weaker carbonate bedrock dissolution due to sparse and thin soil cover results in lower δ13CDIC, pCO2, DIC and EC, and lower cation and anion concentrations. At the Chenqi site, larger soil CO2 input from a thick layer of soil results in high pCO2 and DIC, and low pH, SIc and δ13CDIC in the karst water. At the Dengzhanhe site, a lesser soil CO2 input due to stronger karst rock desertification and strong gypsum dissolution contribute to higher δ13CDIC, high EC and high cation and anion concentrations. Soil CO2 inputs, controlled by biological activity and available soil moisture, carbonate bedrock dissolution, dilution and degassing effects, vary seasonally following rainfall and temperature changes. Consequently, there are seasonal cycles in hydrochemistry and δ13CDIC of the karst water, with high pCO2 and low pH, EC, SIc, and δ13CDIC values in the warm and rainy seasons, and vice versa during the cold and dry seasons. A strongly positive shift (>3‰) in δ13CDIC occurred in the drought year, 2011, indicating that δ13CDIC in groundwater systems can be an effective indicator of environmental and/or climate changes.

  12. Ion beam analysis of tungsten layers in EUROFER model systems and carbon plasma facing components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Primetzhofer, Daniel; Brezinsek, Sebastijan; Kreter, Arkadi; Unterberg, Bernhard; Sergienko, Gennady; Sugiyama, Kazuyoshi

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten enriched surface layers in two fusion-relevant EUROFER steel model samples, consisting of an iron-tungsten mixture exposed to sputtering by deuterium ions, were studied by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and medium energy ion scattering. Exposure conditions were the same for the two samples and the total amount of tungsten atoms per unit area in the enriched layers were similar (2 · 1015 and 2.4 · 1015 atoms/cm2 respectively), despite slightly different initial atomic compositions. A depth profile featuring exponential decrease in tungsten content towards higher depths with 10-20 at.% of tungsten at the surface and a decay constant between 0.05 and 0.08 Å-1 was indicated in one sample, whereas only the total areal density of tungsten atoms was measured in the other. In addition, two different beams, iodine and chlorine, were employed for elastic recoil detection analysis of the deposited layer on a polished graphite plate from a test limiter in the TEXTOR tokamak following experiments with tungsten hexafluoride injection. The chlorine beam was preferred for tungsten analysis, mainly because it (as opposed to the iodine beam) does not give rise to problems with overlap of forward scattered beam particles and recoiled tungsten in the spectrum.

  13. MODIFICATION OF CARBON STEEL BY LASER SURFACE MELTING: PART II: EFFECT OF LASER BEAM POWER ON MICROSTRUCTURAL FEATURES AND SURFACE HARDNESS

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem F. El-Labban; Abdelaziz, M.; Essam R.I. Mahmoud

    2013-01-01

    The surface hardness has an important effect on the wear resistance of different materials. The present study aims to improve the surface hardness of carbon steel through the application of laser surface melting with suitable conditions. The laser beam power and travelling speed are the main factors that affect the properties of the treated zone. In this study, three different conditions of laser beam power (1800, 1500 and 1200 W) at fixed travelling speed of 1000 mm min-1 were chosen to stud...

  14. Theoretical Proof and Empirical Confirmation of a Continuous Labeling Method Using Naturally 13C-Depleted Carbon Dioxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weixin Cheng; Feike A. Dijkstra

    2007-01-01

    Continuous isotope labeling and tracing is often needed to study the transformation, movement, and allocation of carbon in plant-soil systems. However, existing labeling methods have numerous limitations. The present study introduces a new continuous labeling method using naturally 13C-depleted CO2. We theoretically proved that a stable level of 13C-CO2 abundance In a labeling chamber can be maintained by controlling the rate of CO2-free air injection and the rate of ambient airflow with coupling of automatic control of CO2 concentration using a CO2 analyzer. The theoretical results were tested and confirmed in a 54 day experiment in a plant growth chamber. This new continuous labeling method avoids the use of radioactive 14C or expensive 13C-enriched CO2 required by existing methods and therefore eliminates issues of radiation safety or unaffordable isotope cost, as well as creating new opportunities for short- or long-term labeling experiments under a controlled environment.

  15. The influence of temperature and seawater carbonate saturation state on 13C–18O bond ordering in bivalve mollusks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Eagle

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The shells of marine mollusks are widely used archives of past climate and ocean chemistry. Whilst the measurement of mollusk δ18O to develop records of past climate change is a commonly used approach, it has proven challenging to develop reliable independent paleothermometers that can be used to deconvolve the contributions of temperature and fluid composition on molluscan oxygen isotope compositions. Here we investigate the temperature dependence of 13C–18O bond abundance, denoted by the measured parameter Δ47, in shell carbonates of bivalve mollusks and assess its potential to be a useful paleothermometer. We report measurements on cultured specimens spanning a range in water temperatures of 5 to 25 °C, and field collected specimens spanning a range of −1 to 29 °C. In addition we investigate the potential influence of carbonate saturation state on bivalve stable isotope compositions by making measurements on both calcitic and aragonitic specimens that have been cultured in seawater that is either supersaturated or undersaturated with respect to aragonite. We find a robust relationship between Δ47 and growth temperature. We also find that the slope of a linear regression through all the Δ47 data for bivalves plotted against seawater temperature is significantly shallower than previously published inorganic and biogenic carbonate calibration studies produced in our laboratory and go on to discuss the possible sources of this difference. We find that changing seawater saturation state does not have significant effect on the Δ47 of bivalve shell carbonate in two taxa that we examined, and we do not observe significant differences between Δ47-temperature relationships between calcitic and aragonitic taxa.

  16. Spatial variability in photosynthetic and heterotrophic activity drives localized δ13C org fluctuations and carbonate precipitation in hypersaline microbial mats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, J; Fike, D; Druschel, G; Orphan, V; Hoehler, T M; Des Marais, D J

    2014-11-01

    Modern laminated photosynthetic microbial mats are ideal environments to study how microbial activity creates and modifies carbon and sulfur isotopic signatures prior to lithification. Laminated microbial mats from a hypersaline lagoon (Guerrero Negro, Baja California, Mexico) maintained in a flume in a greenhouse at NASA Ames Research Center were sampled for δ(13) C of organic material and carbonate to assess the impact of carbon fixation (e.g., photosynthesis) and decomposition (e.g., bacterial respiration) on δ(13) C signatures. In the photic zone, the δ(13) C org signature records a complex relationship between the activities of cyanobacteria under variable conditions of CO2 limitation with a significant contribution from green sulfur bacteria using the reductive TCA cycle for carbon fixation. Carbonate is present in some layers of the mat, associated with high concentrations of bacteriochlorophyll e (characteristic of green sulfur bacteria) and exhibits δ(13) C signatures similar to DIC in the overlying water column (-2.0‰), with small but variable decreases consistent with localized heterotrophic activity from sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Model results indicate respiration rates in the upper 12 mm of the mat alter in situ pH and HCO3- concentrations to create both phototrophic CO2 limitation and carbonate supersaturation, leading to local precipitation of carbonate minerals. The measured activity of SRB with depth suggests they variably contribute to decomposition in the mat dependent on organic substrate concentrations. Millimeter-scale variability in the δ(13) C org signature beneath the photic zone in the mat is a result of shifting dominance between cyanobacteria and green sulfur bacteria with the aggregate signature overprinted by heterotrophic reworking by SRB and methanogens. These observations highlight the impact of sedimentary microbial processes on δ(13) C org signatures; these processes need to be considered when attempting to relate

  17. Processing of particulate organic carbon associated with secondary-treated pulp and paper mill effluent in intertidal sediments: a 13C pulse-chase experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakes, Joanne M; Ross, Donald J; Eyre, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    To determine the benthic transformation pathways and fate of carbon associated with secondary-treated pulp and paper mill (PPM) effluent, (13)C-labeled activated sludge biomass (ASB) and phytoplankton (PHY) were added, separately, to estuarine intertidal sediments. Over 28 days, (13)C was traced into sediment organic carbon, fauna, seagrass, bacteria, and microphytobenthos and into fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) from inundated sediments, and carbon dioxide (CO2(g)) from exposed sediments. There was greater removal of PHY carbon from sediments (~85% over 28 days) compared to ASB (~75%). Although there was similar (13)C loss from PHY and ASB plots via DIC (58% and 56%, respectively) and CO2(g) fluxes (<1%), DOC fluxes were more important for PHY (41%) than ASB (12%). Faster downward transport and loss suggest that fauna prefer PHY, due to its lability and/or toxins associated with ASB; this may account for different carbon pathways. Secondary-treated PPM effluent has lower oxygen demand than primary-treated effluent, but ASB accumulation may contribute to sediment anoxia, and respiration of ASB and PHY-derived DOC may make the water column more heterotrophic. This highlights the need to optimize secondary-treatment processes to control the quality and quantity of organic carbon associated with PPM effluent. PMID:24261917

  18. Mutation induction by gamma-rays and carbon ion beam irradiation in banana (Musa spp.): a study with an emphasis on the response to Black sigatoka disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-rays and carbon ion beam irradiation methods were applied to study critical doses, genetic variability and the response to Black sigatoka disease. 'Cavendish Enano', 'Williams', 'Orito' and 'FHIA-01' cultivars of banana were studied. Both gamma-rays and carbon ion beam irradiation methods had different biological effects when banana explants were exposed to them. In both methods, increased dose caused increased mortality. 'FHIA-01' tolerated high doses of gamma-rays but was susceptible to high doses of carbon ion beam irradiation. The results suggest that the response in 'FHIA-01' can be explored using other dose intervals between 150 and 300 Gy. Weight and height were also reduced drastically when high doses of gamma-rays and carbon ion beams were applied. The LD50 of cultivars 'FHIA-01' and 'Orito' revealed high sensitivity to both gamma-rays and carbon ion beams. DNA deletion in 'FHIA-01' occurred by using gamma-rays at doses of 200 and 300 Gy, suggesting that 'FHIA-01' is definitely a promising cultivar with a high sensitivity response to gamma-ray exposure, and that there is a high chance of improving its fruit quality by mutation induction. Sigmoid drooping leaf, a putative mutation of 'FHIA-01', was generated. This mutation is heritable as mother plant and sucker showed the same characteristics. Future research could be conducted on the relationship of leaf shape to fruit quality and production. Hexaploid cells were detected by flow cytometry (five plants in 'Cavendish Enano' and one in 'Williams'), signifying that chromosome duplication can be induced by carbon ion beams. Variation in the leaves such as being abnormal, double, long, rudimentary, spindled and yellow spotted leaf was visible, suggesting that long-term chronic irradiation (gamma-rays) directly affects active cell division at the meristem level, resulting in severe damage or even death of the meristems. During the juglone toxin experiment on gamma-ray-irradiated plants, 20 plants were

  19. Strong near-infrared carbon in the Type Ia supernova iPTF13ebh

    CERN Document Server

    Hsiao, E Y; Contreras, C; Höflich, P; Sand, D; Marion, G H; Phillips, M M; Stritzinger, M; González-Gaitán, S; Mason, R E; Folatelli, G; Parent, E; Gall, C; Amanullah, R; Anupama, G C; Arcavi, I; Banerjee, D P K; Beletsky, Y; Blanc, G A; Bloom, J S; Brown, P J; Campillay, A; Cao, Y; De Cia, A; Diamond, T; Freedman, W L; Gonzalez, C; Goobar, A; Holmbo, S; Howell, D A; Johansson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kirshner, R P; Krisciunas, K; Kulkarni, S R; Maguire, K; Milne, P A; Morrell, N; Nugent, P E; Ofek, E O; Osip, D; Palunas, P; Perley, D A; Persson, S E; Piro, A L; Rabus, M; Roth, M; Schiefelbein, J M; Srivastav, S; Sullivan, M; Suntzeff, N B; Surace, J; Woźnia, P R; Yaron, O

    2015-01-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\\lambda}1.0693 {\\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categ...

  20. Beam induced annealing of damage in carbon implanted silicon, ch. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annealing of damage introduced by 70 keV C implantation of Si is studied for impact of H+ and He+ beams in the energy interval 30 - 200 keV. For a good description of the annealing behaviour it is necessary to account for the damage introduction which occurs simultaneously. It turns out that the initial damage annealing rate is proportional to the amount of damage. The proportionality constant is related to the quantity fsub(a)sigmasub(a) introduced in an earlier paper in order to describe saturation effects in the damage production after H+ or He+ impact in unimplanted Si. This indicates that the same mechanism governs both processes: beam induced damage annealing and saturation of the damage introduction. (Auth.)

  1. Chemical Investigations of ISOL target units for carbon and nitrogen beams

    CERN Document Server

    Franberg, H; Gäggeler, H W; Köster, U

    2006-01-01

    Radioactive Ion Beams (RIB) are of significant interest in a number of applications. ISOL (Isotope Separation On Line) facilities provide RIB with high beam intensities and good beam quality. An atom that is produced within the ISOL target will first diffuse out from the target material. During the effusion towards the transfer line and into the ion source the many contacts with the surrounding surfaces may cause unacceptable delays in the transport and, hence, losses of the shorter-lived isotopes. We performed systematic chemical investigations of adsorption in a temperature and concentration regime relevant for ISOL targets and ion source units, with regard to COx and NOx on Al2O3 and SiO2. These materials are potential construction materials for the above mentioned areas. Off-line and on-line tests have been performed using a gas thermo-chromatography set-up with radioactive tracers. The experiments were performed at the PROTRAC facility at Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland.

  2. Insights Into Water-Soluble Organic Aerosol Sources From Carbon-13 Ratios of Size Exclusion Chromatography Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehl, C. R.; Chuang, P. Y.; McCarthy, M. D.

    2008-12-01

    Many sources of organic aerosols have been identified and quantified, and much of this work has used individual (mosty water-insoluble) compounds as tracers of primary sources. However, most organic aerosol cannot be molecularly characterized, and the water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in many aerosols is thought to originate from gaseous precursors (i.e., it is secondary in nature). It can therefore be difficult to infer aerosol sources, particularly of background (i.e., aged) aerosols, and of the relatively high-MW component of aerosols. The stable isotope ratios (δ13C) of organic aerosols have been used to distinguish between sources, with lighter values (-30‰ to -25‰) interpreted as having originated from fossil fuel combustion and C4 biogenic emission, and heavier values (-25‰ to - 20‰) indicating a marine or C3 biogenic source. Most published measurements were of either total suspended particulates or PM2.5, however, and it is unknown to what extent these fractions differ from submicron WSOC. We report δ13C for submicron WSOC collected at a variety of sites, ranging from marine to polluted to background continental. Bulk marine organic δ13C ranged from -30.4 to - 27.6‰, slightly lighter than previously published results. This could be due to the elimination of supermicron cellular material or other biogenic primary emissions from the sample. Continental WSOC δ13C ranged from -19.1 to -29.8‰, with heavier values (-19.8 ± 1.0‰) in Oklahoma and lighter values at Great Smoky Mountain National Park in Tennessee (-25.8 ± 2.6‰) and Illinois (-24.5 ± 1.0‰). This likely results from the greater proportional of C3 plant material in the Oklahoma samples. In addition to bulk samples, we used size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to report δ13C of organic aerosols as a function of hydrodynamic diameter. Variability and magnitude of hydrodynamic diameter was greatest at low SEC pH, indicative of the acidic character of submicron WSOC. Tennessee

  3. Orbital plasma keyhole welding of 12--13% Cr low carbon martensitic line pipe steels and weld joint corrosion properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmeister, H.; Dietrich, S. [Univ. der Bundeswehr Hamburg (Germany); Tystad, M.; Knagenhjelm, H.O.; Andersen, T.R. [Norsk Hydro A/S Porsgrunn (Norway). Forskningssenteret

    1995-10-01

    Based on requirements for more economical pipe laying procedures in the oil and gas industry, the potential of the orbital plasma keyhole process for welding of 12--13% Cr martensitic low carbon steels together with resulting hardness and corrosion properties is investigated. As a result, downhill orbital welding speeds up to 6--7 mm/s at 6--10 mm wall thickness are achieved. For hardness reduction, local postweld heating of 600--700 C at up to 10 min was required. Pitting corrosion resistance of the weld joints was reduced by welding but could be restored by postweld heating above 750--800 C, which, however, might produce hardness levels not satisfying NACE requirements due to formation of untempered martensite.

  4. Creation of hierarchical carbon nanotube assemblies through alternative packing of complementary semi-artificial beta-1,3-glucan/carbon nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Munenori; Sugikawa, Kouta; Kaneko, Kenji; Shinkai, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    Much attention has been focused on exploiting novel strategies for the creation of hierarchical polymer assemblies by the control of the assembling number or the relative location among neighboring polymers. We here propose a novel strategy toward the creation of "hierarchical" single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) architectures by utilizing SWNT composites with cationic or anionic complementary semi-artificial beta-1,3-glucans as "building blocks". These beta-1,3-glucans are known to wrap SWNTs helically, to create one-dimensional superstructural composites. If the cationic composite is neutralized by an anionic composite, a well ordered SWNT-based sheet structure was created. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation revealed that this sheet structure is composed of highly-ordered fibrous assemblies of SWNTs. This suggests that the cationic and anionic composites are tightly packed through electrostatic interactions. Moreover, both of the final assembly structures are readily tunable by adjusting the cation/anion ratio. The self-assembling modulation of functional polymers is associated with the progress in ultimate nanotechnologies, thus enabling us to create numerous functional nanomaterials. We believe, therefore, that the present system will extend the frontier of SWNT research to assembly chemistry including "hierarchical" superstructures. PMID:18200640

  5. Rapid phase-correlated rescanning irradiation improves treatment time in carbon-ion scanning beam treatment under irregular breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Shinichiro; Furukawa, Takuji

    2016-05-01

    To shorten treatment time in pencil beam scanning irradiation, we developed rapid phase-controlled rescanning (rPCR), which irradiates two or more isoenergy layers in a single gating window. Here, we evaluated carbon-ion beam dose distribution with rapid and conventional PCR (cPCR). 4 dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) imaging was performed on 12 subjects with lung or liver tumors. To compensate for intrafractional range variation, the field-specific target volume (FTV) was calculated using 4DCT within the gating window (T20–T80). We applied an amplitude-based gating strategy, in which the beam is on when the tumor is within the gating window defined by treatment planning. Dose distributions were calculated for layered phase-controlled rescanning under an irregular respiratory pattern, although a single 4DCT data set was used. The number of rescannings was eight times. The prescribed doses were 48 Gy(RBE)/1 fr (where RBE is relative biological effectiveness) delivered via four beam ports to the FTV for the lung cases and 45 Gy(RBE)/2 fr delivered via two beam ports to the FTV for the liver cases. In the liver cases, the accumulated dose distributions showed an increased magnitude of hot/cold spots with rPCR compared with cPCR. The results of the dose assessment metrics for the cPCR and rPCR were very similar. The D 95, D max, and D min values (cPCR/rPCR) averaged over all the patients were 96.3  ±  0.9%/96.0  ±  1.2%, 107.3  ±  3.6%/107.1  ±  2.9%, and 88.8  ±  3.2%/88.1  ±  3.1%, respectively. The treatment times in cPCR and rPCR were 110.7 s and 53.5 s, respectively. rPCR preserved dose conformation under irregular respiratory motion and reduced the total treatment time compared with cPCR.

  6. Two Types of Mass Abundance Distributions for Anionic Carbon Clusters Investigated by Laser Vaporization and Pulsed Molecular Beam Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAI Hua-Jin; LIU Bing-Chen; NI Guo-Quan; XUZhi-Zhan

    2000-01-01

    Two types of mass spectra for anionic carbon clusters Cn- have been revealed using laser vaporization and pulsed molecular beam techniques. The less structured mass spectrum characteristic of the magic-numbers at n = 5, 8,11, 15, and 17 is established at the early stage of the cluster formation process, namely, in the laser vaporization process. The more structured one is featured for a regular odd-even alternation and the magic numbers at n =10, 12, 16, 18, 22, and 28, and has been developed only after extensive clustering and qnenching processes, where low-energy electron attachment plays a vital role. Transition between these two types of mass spectra can be realized by controlling either the strength of the pulsed gas flow or the synchronism between the gas flow and the laser vaporization.

  7. Determination of the size distribution of carbon and trace elements in suspended particulate matter by ion beam analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution of carbon and trace elements in suspended particulate matter (SPM) collected by a low pressure impactor has been investigated. Sampling was carried out at Setagaya, a typical residential area located southwest of Tokyo, Japan. The low pressure impactor has a cascade design with 12-stage collection plates, allowing the collection of size-fractionated SPM. It operates at a flow rate of 20 l/min. Elemental composition was determined by ion beam analysis, particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS). PIXE provided data for elements from Al to U while RBS supplied information on elements lighter than Al such as C and O. The analysis is fast, non-destructive and requires no sample preparation. It is very suitable for determination of elements in SPM. In this paper we discuss size distribution and element concentrations in SPM together with their weekly and seasonal variations

  8. Compilation of erosion yields of metal-doped carbon materials by deuterium impact from ion beam and low temperature plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balden, M., E-mail: Martin.Balden@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Starke, P. [Lehrstuhl fuer Experimentelle Plasmaphysik, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, D-86135 Augsburg (Germany); Garcia-Rosales, C. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Adelhelm, C.; Sauter, P.A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, 85748 Garching (Germany); Lopez-Galilea, I.; Ordas, N. [CEIT and Tecnun (University of Navarra), E-20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Fernandez, J.M. Ramos; Escandell, M. Martinez [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, University of Alicante, E-03690 Alicante (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    The erosion yield by deuterium impact was determined for various doped carbon-based materials. Ion beam bombardment with 30 and 200 eV at elevated temperatures (600-850 K) and low temperature plasma exposure with 30 eV ion energy ({approx}7 x 10{sup 20} ions/m{sup 2}s) and about 170 times higher thermal atomic deuterium flux at 300 K and 630 K were performed. The total yield of fine-grain graphites doped with 4 at.% Ti and Zr is reduced by a factor of 4 for 30 and 200 eV D impact at elevated temperatures at D fluences above 10{sup 24} m{sup -2} compared to undoped graphite. Extensive carbide particle loss can be excluded up to fluences of {approx}10{sup 25} m{sup -2}.

  9. Preparation of diamond-like carbon and boron nitirde films by high-intensity pulsed ion beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rej, D.J.; Davis, H.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Remnev, G.E. [Tomsk Polytechnic Univ., Tomsk (Russian Federation). Nuclear Physics Institute.] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Intense ion beams (300-keV C{sup +}, O{sup +}, and H{sup +}, 20--30 kA, 50 to 400-ns pulsewidth, up to 0.3-Hz repetition rate) were used to prepare diamond-like carbon (DLC) and boron nitride (BN) films. Deposition rates of up to 25{plus_minus}5 nm/pulse were obtained with instantaneous rates exceeding 1 mm/s. Most films were uniform, light brown, translucent, and nonporous with some micron-size particulates. Raman and parallel electron energy loss spectroscopy indicated the presence of DLC. The films possessed favorable electron field-emission characteristics desirable for cold-cathode displays. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission electron diffraction (TED) revealed that the C films contained diamond crystals with 25 to 125-nm grain size. BN films were composed of hexagonal, cubic and wurtzite phases.

  10. Radiosensitivity of cancer cells against carbon-ion beams in an aspect of the p53 gene status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We can easily understand that radiation sensitivities of cancer cells are dependent on the status of cancer-related genes. It is important to clarify which genes affect radiation sensitivity and reflect the effectiveness of radiation therapy for cancer cells. We have studied about the function of a tumor suppressor gene of p53, because p53 controls apoptosis, cell cycle and DNA repair from an aspect of important roles in cell fate. By analysis of function of p53 gene, therefore, we aim to predict the therapeutic effectiveness and to select the modalities of cancer therapies such as radiotherapy, chemotherapy and hyperthermia. As a final goal, we want to accept the most effective therapy, namely tailor-made cancer therapy, for each patient. Here, we introduce that carbon-beam therapy induced the expression of p53-independent apoptosis-related genes and NO radicals in mutated p53 cancer cells. (author)

  11. Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic characterization of humic substances from municipal refuse decomposing in a landfill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Municipal refuse was disposed of in simulated landfills and left for periods of more than 20 months. Three different 40 m3 systems of disposals were studied, namely (i) where the refuse was compacted, (ii) where it was mixed with sewage sludge and left uncompacted, and (iii) where it was compacted with sewage sludge. At 2, 6, 12 and 20 months, the humic substances were extracted from each system, purified, and characterised by cross-polarisation 13C NMR spectroscopy with 'magic-angle' sample spinning. The areas under the various signals were related to carbon percentages in different structural categories. The aromaticity of the humic acids increased with time of decomposition; those from refuse mixed with sewage sludge were particularly high in phenolic content. A signal at 174 p.p.m., assigned primarily to secondary amide linkages, reached maximum strength after 6 to 12 months decomposition. The carbohydrate contents of the humic acids showed only small variations as decomposition progressed. Polymethylene chains in lipids, particularly for the uncompacted system, accounted for a diminishing fraction of total carbon as time of refuse disposal increased. The spectrum of a soil humic acid showed features similar to those observed in spectra of humic acids derived from refuse, but the signals were less well resolved. 19 refs.; 8 figs.; 3 tabs

  12. Radiosensitivity and Induction of Apoptosis by High LET Carbon Ion Beam and Low LET Gamma Radiation: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atanu Ghorai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer treatment with high LET heavy ion beam, especially, carbon ion beam (12C, is becoming very popular over conventional radiotherapy like low LET gamma or X-ray. Combination of Poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitor with xenotoxic drugs or conventional radiation (gamma or X-ray is the newer approach for cancer therapy. The aim of our study was to compare the radiosensitivity and induction of apoptosis by high LET 12C and low LET gamma radiation in HeLa and PARP-1 knocked down cells. We did comet assay to detect DNA breaks, clonogenic survival assay, and cell cycle analysis to measure recovery after DNA damage. We measured apoptotic parameters like nuclear fragmentation and caspase-3 activation. DNA damage, cell killing, and induction of apoptosis were significantly higher for 12C than gamma radiation in HeLa. Cell killing and apoptosis were further elevated upon knocking down of PARP-1. Both 12C and gamma induced G2/M arrest although the 12C had greater effect. Unlike the gamma, 12C irradiation affects DNA replication as detected by S-phase delay in cell cycle analysis. So, we conclude that high LET 12C has greater potential over low LET gamma radiation in killing cells and radiosensitization upon PARP-1 inhibition was several folds greater for 12C than gamma.

  13. The use of multi-gap resistive plate chambers for in-beam PET in proton and carbon ion therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, David; Sauli, Fabio; Amaldi, Ugo

    2013-01-01

    On-line verification of the delivered dose during proton and carbon ion radiotherapy is currently a very desirable goal for quality assurance of hadron therapy treatment plans. In-beam positron emission tomography (ibPET), which can provide an image of the β+ activity induced in the patient during irradiation, which in turn is correlated to the range of the ion beam, is one of the modalities for achieving this goal. Application to hadron therapy requires that the scanner geometry be modified from that which is used in nuclear medicine. In particular, PET detectors that allow a sub-nanosecond time-of-flight (TOF) registration of the collinear photons have been proposed. Inclusion of the TOF information in PET data leads to more effective PET sensitivity. Considering the challenges inherent in the ibPET technique, namely limited β+ activity and the effect of biological washout due to blood flow, TOF-PET technologies are very attractive. In this context, the TERA Foundation is investigating the use of resistiv...

  14. Fabrication and characterization of tunnel barriers in a multi-walled carbon nanotube formed by argon atom beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have evaluated tunnel barriers formed in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) by an Ar atom beam irradiation method and applied the technique to fabricate coupled double quantum dots. The two-terminal resistance of the individual MWNTs was increased owing to local damage caused by the Ar beam irradiation. The temperature dependence of the current through a single barrier suggested two different contributions to its Arrhenius plot, i.e., formed by direct tunneling through the barrier and by thermal activation over the barrier. The height of the formed barriers was estimated. The fabrication technique was used to produce coupled double quantum dots with serially formed triple barriers on a MWNT. The current measured at 1.5 K as a function of two side-gate voltages resulted in a honeycomb-like charge stability diagram, which confirmed the formation of the double dots. The characteristic parameters of the double quantum dots were calculated, and the feasibility of the technique is discussed

  15. Deep, noninvasive imaging and surgical guidance of submillimeter tumors using targeted M13-stabilized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Debadyuti; Bagley, Alexander F; Na, Young Jeong; Birrer, Michael J; Bhatia, Sangeeta N; Belcher, Angela M

    2014-09-23

    Highly sensitive detection of small, deep tumors for early diagnosis and surgical interventions remains a challenge for conventional imaging modalities. Second-window near-infrared light (NIR2, 950-1,400 nm) is promising for in vivo fluorescence imaging due to deep tissue penetration and low tissue autofluorescence. With their intrinsic fluorescence in the NIR2 regime and lack of photobleaching, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are potentially attractive contrast agents to detect tumors. Here, targeted M13 virus-stabilized SWNTs are used to visualize deep, disseminated tumors in vivo. This targeted nanoprobe, which uses M13 to stably display both tumor-targeting peptides and an SWNT imaging probe, demonstrates excellent tumor-to-background uptake and exhibits higher signal-to-noise performance compared with visible and near-infrared (NIR1) dyes for delineating tumor nodules. Detection and excision of tumors by a gynecological surgeon improved with SWNT image guidance and led to the identification of submillimeter tumors. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the promise of targeted SWNT nanoprobes for noninvasive disease monitoring and guided surgery. PMID:25214538

  16. Accumulation and δ 13C Composition of Soil Carbon Across a Chronosequence of Dune Complexes at Mono Lake, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanderud, Z. T.; Shuldman, M. I.; Richards, J. H.

    2004-12-01

    The amount of C sequestered and its permanence in some deserts could be higher than normally appreciated. Limited soil water availability and slow decomposition rates in desert soils may induce the long-term accumulation of soil organic C and coarse woody litter. We inventoried C in soils along a chronosequence of Sarcobatus vermiculatus shrub islands and interspaces at the Mono Basin Ecosystem Research Site, CA. Such shrub-island/interspace dune systems are widespread in basin habitats across the Great Basin Desert. We hypothesized that organic C stores would increase across the chronosequence (48, 84, ˜300, and 1800-3000 years since exposure by lake recession) and that δ 13C values of soil organic C (SOC) would become enriched over time due to isotopic fractionation associated with C mineralization of leaf and root litter. C stores quantified in 0-50 cm soils included: SOC, soil inorganic C (SIC; i.e. carbonates removed by 12 M HCl fumigation), and C in partially decomposed woody and fine litter. The youngest dune system contains at least 13.6 Mg C ha-1 and the oldest contains at least 37.9 Mg C ha-1. Our data suggest slow turnover rates of SOC (C:N ratios ˜10) and substantial accumulation of organic C (coarse litter, fine litter, and SOC) in shrub islands across the chronosequence (islands at the youngest site = 8.0 g kg-1 and islands at the oldest site = 24.0 g kg-1. Large pools of SOC and C in woody debris are potentially protected in this shrub-dominated desert, especially in shrub islands of "old-growth" dune systems. Most of the C in the soil is SIC (94% in youngest dunes to 83% at the oldest dunes). The decrease in SIC proportion as the dune systems age is correlated with a decrease in pH across the chronosequence (10.6 at the youngest site and 9.7 at the oldest site). As dunes age, total soil C isotopic composition shifts from positive δ 13C values (2.8 to 3.6 ‰ ), indicative inorganic processes, to slightly negative values (-1.2 to -3.7 ‰ ) as a

  17. Effects of carbon content and microstructure on corrosion rate of 13% chromium steel in wet CO2 environments; Shitsujun CO2 kankyochu deno 13%Cr ko no fushoku ni oyobosu C ryo to kinzoku soshiki no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, T.; Asahi, H. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-15

    Thirteen percent chromium steel is excellent in corrosion resistance of CO2. A large quantity of 13% chromium steel is used in oil and gas fields where CO2 is produced. Usually, AISI 420 13% chromium steel to which C was added 0.2% is used for an oil field tube. Since AISI 420 steel is tempered, chromium carbide is formed and the effective chromium amount in a parent phase is decreased to deteriorate the corrosion resistance of CO2. Therefore, it is desired to decrease the carbon content as far as possible for improvement of corrosion resistance of CO2. AISI 410 13% chromium steel with a carbon content of 0.1% is difficult to form {delta}-ferrite. It has a problem in manufacturing because the hot working performance is low. In this report, on the basis of AISI 420 13% chromium steel, the effects of composition on CO2 corrosion were investigated using the steel whose carbon content was changed. Ferrite, martensite, and tempered martensite differ in a corrosion rate. The corrosion rate increases in the order of martensite, ferrite, and tempered martensite. The corrosion rate of 13% chromium steel is represented by the product of the corrosion rate of each microstructure and the fraction of it. 11 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Current density profile and electron beam localization measurements using carbon pellets on T-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The letter presents experimental evidence and an analysis of two phenomena arising during carbon pellet ablation - a toroidal trajectory deflection and enhanced localized ablation in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) current drive regime. A model developed for describing the toroidal deflection of a carbon pellet in a tokamak shows that the trajectory curvature is sensitive to the current density. Photography of the pellet trajectory is used as a diagnostic for the determination of the local current density in an ohmically heated plasma. Directly measured current profiles using pellets are in reasonable agreement with that obtained using the Spitzer conductivity, and current density fluctuations have been observed that are probably associated with magnetic islands. It is shown that in the ECR current drive regime on T-10, energetic electrons probably stimulated by the microwave power are located in a narrow zone (2 cm thickness in the radial direction) with sharp boundaries. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 7 refs, 5 figs

  19. LETTER: Current density profile and electron beam localization measurements using carbon pellets on T-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, S. M.; Kuteev, B. V.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Mikhailenko, A. A.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Ushakov, S. N.; Bagdasarov, A. A.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Elizavetin, D. Yu.; Vasin, N. L.

    1992-11-01

    The authors present experimental evidence and an analysis of two phenomena arising during carbon pellet ablation-a toroidal trajectory deflection and enhanced localized ablation in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) current drive regime. A model developed for describing the toroidal deflection of a carbon pellet in a tokamak shows that the trajectory curvature is sensitive to the current density. Photography of the pellet trajectory is used as a diagnostic for the determination of the local current density in an ohmically heated plasma. Directly measured current profiles using pellets are in reasonable agreement with that obtained using the Spitzer conductivity, and current density fluctuations have been observed that are probably associated with magnetic islands. It is shown that in the ECR current drive regime on T-10, energetic electrons probably stimulated by the microwave power are located in a narrow zone (2 cm thickness in the radial direction) with sharp boundaries

  20. Land use Effects on Storage, Stability and Structure of Organic Carbon in Soil Density Fractions Revealed by 13C Natural Abundance and CPMAS 13C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flessa, H.; Helfrich, M.; John, B.; Yamashita, T.; Ludwig, B.

    2004-12-01

    The type of land use and soil cultivation are important factors controlling organic carbon storage (SOC) in soils and they can also influence the relative importance, the structure, and the stability of different SOC pools. The objectives of our study were: i) to quantify the SOC stocks in different density fractions (mineral-associated soil organic matter > 2 g cm-3 (Mineral-SOM), free particulate organic matter soils under different land use (spruce forest, grassland, maize, wheat), ii) to determine the structure of these SOC fractions by CPMAS 13C NMR spectroscopy, and iii) to analyse the stability of these SOC fractions in the maize soil on the basis of the stable isotope composition of SOC. The SOC concentration in the A horizon increased in the order wheat (12.7 g kg-1) soil, the particulate organic matter accounted for 52% of the total SOC content. The chemical structure of the soil organic matter (SOM) was influenced by litter quality, the intensity of litter decomposition and the related production and storage of microbially-derived substances. SOM of the acid forest soil was characterized by large amounts of POM with a high content of spruce litter-derived alkyl C. In the biologically more active grassland and maize soil, litter-derived POM was decomposed more rapidly and SOC stocks were dominated by mineral-associated SOM which contained greater proportions of aryl and carbonyl C. The cultivation of the grassland soil induced enhanced mineralization of POM and in particular of mineral-associated SOM. The faster SOC turnover was associated with a relative accumulation of aromatic and carbonyl C structures in the mineral-bound SOM. In all soils, the free particulate organic matter had a smaller proportion of alkyl C and a larger proportion of O-alkyl C than the particulate organic matter occluded in aggregates. The mean age of the SOM in the density fractions of the maize soil increased with increasing aromaticity in the order free POM (22 yr) humification

  1. Effects of E-Beam Irradiation on the Chemical, Physical, and Electrochemical Properties of Activated Carbons for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Jung Jung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbons (ACs were modified via e-beam irradiation at various doses for use as an electrode material in electric double-layer capacitors (EDLCs. The chemical compositions of the AC surfaces were largely unchanged by the e-beam irradiation. The ACs treated with the e-beam at radiation doses of 200 kGy exhibited higher nanocrystallinity than the untreated ACs. The specific surface areas and pore volumes of the e-beam irradiated ACs were also higher than those of the untreated ACs. These results were attributed to the transformation and degradation of the nanocrystallinity of the AC surfaces due to the e-beam irradiation. The specific capacitance of the ACs treated with the e-beam at radiation doses of 200 kGy increased by 24% compared with the untreated ACs, and the charge transfer resistance of the ACs was decreased by the e-beam irradiation. The enhancement of the electrochemical properties of the e-beam irradiated ACs can be attributed to an increase in their specific surface area and surface crystallinity.

  2. Cyanobacteria as a carbon source for zooplankton in eutrophic Lake Taihu, China, measured by 13C labeling and fatty acid biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    de Kluijver, A.; Yu, J.L.; Houtekamer, M.; Middelburg, J. J.; Liu, Z.W.

    2012-01-01

    Using a combined stable-isotope and fatty-acid approach, we examined carbon-transfer routes from the cyanobacterium Microcystis to zooplankton in eutrophic Lake Taihu, China. Microcystis is generally considered poor food for zooplankton, and we hypothesized that most Microcystis carbon flows to zooplankton via dissolved organic matter (DOM)-bacteria and detritus-bacteria pathways rather than via direct grazing. The hypothesis was tested by analyzing C-13 isotopes at natural abundance in field...

  3. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmittner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate the processes that control the distribution of δ13C in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation dominates the distribution of δ13CDIC of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC due to the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean. This process leads to low δ13CDIC values at dephs and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air–sea gas exchange provides an important secondary influence due to two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, air-sea gas exchange is slow, so biological effect dominate spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in constrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed (δ13Cpre and remineralized (δ13Crem contributions as well as the effects of biology (Δδ13Cbio and air–sea gas exchange (δ13C*. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC, δ13Cpre, δ13Crem, δ13C*, and Δδ13Cbio. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by details of the ecosystem model formulation. For example, inclusion of a simple parameterization of iron limitation of phytoplankton growth rates and temperature-dependent zooplankton grazing rates improves the agreement

  4. Carbon-ion beams induce production of an immune mediator protein, high mobility group box 1, at levels comparable with X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray radiotherapy activates tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses, and increases in the serum levels of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) induced by X-ray irradiation play a pivotal role in activating anti-tumor immunity. Here, we examined whether carbon-ion beams, as well as X-rays, can induce HMGB1 release from human cancer cell lines. The study examined five human cancer cell lines: TE2, KYSE70, A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr. The proportion of cells surviving X- or carbon-ion beam irradiation was assessed in a clonogenic assay. The D10, the dose at which 10% of cells survive, was calculated using a linear–quadratic model. HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants were assessed by an ELISA. The D10 dose for X-rays in TE2, KYSE70, A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr cells was 2.1, 6.7, 8.0, 4.8 and 7.1 Gy, respectively, whereas that for carbon-ion beams was 0.9, 2.5, 2.7, 1.8 and 3.5 Gy, respectively. X-rays and carbon-ion beams significantly increased HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants of A549, NCI-H460 and WiDr cells at 72 h post-irradiation with a D10 dose. Furthermore, irradiation with X-rays or carbon-ion beams significantly increased HMGB1 levels in the culture supernatants of all five cell lines at 96 h post-irradiation. There was no significant difference in the amount of HMGB1 induced by X-rays and carbon-ion beams at any time-point (except at 96 h for NCI-H460 cells); thus we conclude that comparable levels of HMGB1 were detected after irradiation with iso-survival doses of X-rays and carbon-ion beams. (author)

  5. Design and characterization of a multi-beam micro-CT scanner based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui

    In this dissertation, I will present the results for my Ph.D. research for the past five years. My project mainly focuses on advanced imaging applications with a multi-beam x-ray source array based on carbon nanotube field emission technology. In the past few years, research in carbon nanotubes gradually changed from the raw material science to its application. Field emission x-ray application is one of the hottest research areas for carbon nanotube. Compared to traditional thermionic x-ray sources, the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source has some natural advantages over traditional thermionic x-ray sources such as instantaneous x-ray generation, programmability and miniaturization. For the past few years, the research and development of carbon nanotube field emission x-ray has shifted from single x-ray beam applications to spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray sources. Previously in Zhou group, we have already built a gated micro-CT system with single beam micro-focus x-ray tube for higher spatial and temporal resolution as required in live animal imaging and a multi-beam tomosynthesis system targeting for faster and more stable breast imaging. Now my project mainly focused on the design, characterization and optimization of a multi-beam micro-CT imaging system. With the increase of gantry rotation speed approaching the mechanical limit, it is getting more and more difficult to further speed up the CT scanning. My new system promises a potential solution for the problem, and it serves as a great test platform for truly stationary micro-CT geometry. The potential capabilities it showed during the characterization and imaging measurements was promising. The dissertation is composed of five chapters. In Chapter 1, I will generally review the physics principles of x-ray generation and interaction with matter. Then the discovery of carbon nanotube and its great potential to serve as an excellent field emission electron source will be introduced in the second

  6. Crystal structures of 2-methoxyisoindoline-1,3-dione, 1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl methyl carbonate and 1,3-dioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-benzo[de]isoquinolin-2-yl methyl carbonate: three anticonvulsant compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fortune Ezemobi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compounds, C9H7NO3, (1, C10H7NO5, (2, and C14H9NO5, (3, are three potentially anticonvulsant compounds. Compounds (1 and (2 are isoindoline derivatives and (3 is an isoquinoline derivative. Compounds (2 and (3 crystallize with two independent molecules (A and B in their asymmetric units. In all three cases, the isoindoline and benzoisoquinoline moieties are planar [r.m.s. deviations are 0.021 Å for (1, 0.04 and 0.018 Å for (2, and 0.033 and 0.041 Å for (3]. The substituents attached to the N atom are almost perpendicular to the mean planes of the heterocycles, with dihedral angles of 89.7 (3° for the N—O—Cmethyl group in (1, 71.01 (4 and 80.00 (4° for the N—O—C(=OO—Cmethyl groups in (2, and 75.62 (14 and 74.13 (4° for the same groups in (3. In the crystal of (1, there are unusual intermolecular C=O...C contacts of 2.794 (1 and 2.873 (1 Å present in molecules A and B, respectively. There are also C—H...O hydrogen bonds and π–π interactions [inter-centroid distance = 3.407 (3 Å] present, forming slabs lying parallel to (001. In the crystal of (2, the A and B molecules are linked by C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming slabs parallel to (10-1, which are in turn linked via a number of π–π interactions [the most significant centroid–centroid distances are 3.4202 (7 and 3.5445 (7 Å], forming a three-dimensional structure. In the crystal of (3, the A and B molecules are linked via C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional structure, which is consolidated by π–π interactions [the most significant inter-centroid distances are 3.575 (3 and 3.578 (3 Å].

  7. Carbon flow and trophic structure of an Antarctic coastal benthic community as determined by δ 13C and δ 15N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, C. L.; Stark, J. S.; Johnstone, G. J.; Smith, S. D. A.

    2012-01-01

    Stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were used to determine the different carbon pathways and trophic assemblages amongst coastal benthic fauna of the Windmill Islands, East Antarctica. Macroalgae, pelagic POM, sediment POM and sea ice POM had well-separated δ 13C signatures, which ranged from -36.75‰ for the red alga Phyllophora antarctica, to -10.35‰ for sea ice POM. Consumers were also well separated by δ 13C, ranging from -21.42‰ for the holothurian Staurocucumis sp. up to -7.47‰ for the urchin Sterechinus neumayeri. Analysis of δ 13C and δ 15N revealed distinct groups for suspension feeders, grazer/herbivores and deposit feeders, whilst predators and predator/scavengers showed less grouping. Consumers spanned a δ 15N range of 8.71‰, equivalent to four trophic levels, although δ 15N ratios amongst consumers were continuous, rather than grouped into discrete trophic levels. The study has built a trophic model for the Windmill Islands and summarises three main carbon pathways utilised by the benthos: (1) pelagic POM; (2) macroalgae/epiphytic/benthic diatoms and (3) sediment POM/benthic diatoms. The movement of carbon within the coastal benthic community of the Windmill Islands is considered complex, and stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen were valuable tools in determining specific feeding guilds and in tracing carbon flow, particularly amongst lower-order consumers.

  8. Inferring phytoplankton carbon and eco-physiological rates from diel cycles of spectral particulate beam-attenuation coefficient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dall'Olmo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal fluctuations in solar irradiance impose a fundamental frequency on ocean biogeochemistry. Observations of the ocean carbon cycle at these frequencies are rare, but could be considerably expanded by measuring and interpreting the inherent optical properties. A method is presented to analyze diel cycles in particulate beam-attenuation coefficient (cp measured at multiple wavelengths. The method is based on fitting observations with a size-structured population model coupled to an optical model to infer the particle size distribution and physiologically relevant parameters of the cells responsible for the measured diel cycle in cp. Results show that the information related to size and contained in the spectral data can be exploited to independently estimate growth and loss rates during the day and night. In addition, the model can characterize the population of particles affecting the diel variability in cp. Application of this method to spectral cp measured at a station in the oligotrophic Mediterranean Sea suggests that most of the observed variations in cp can be ascribed to a synchronized population of cells with an equivalent spherical diameter around 4.6±1.5 μm. The inferred carbon biomass of these cells was about 5.2–6.0 mg m−3 and accounted for approximately 10% of the total particulate organic carbon. If successfully validated, this method may improve our in situ estimates of primary productivity.

  9. Single-walled carbon nanotubes and nanocrystalline graphene reduce beam-induced movements in high-resolution electron cryo-microscopy of ice-embedded biological samples

    CERN Document Server

    Rhinow, Daniel; Turchanin, Andrey; Gölzhäuser, Armin; Kühlbrandt, Werner; 10.1063/1.3645010

    2011-01-01

    For single particle electron cryo-microscopy (cryoEM), contrast loss due to beam-induced charging and specimen movement is a serious problem, as the thin films of vitreous ice spanning the holes of a holey carbon film are particularly susceptible to beam-induced movement. We demonstrate that the problem is at least partially solved by carbon nanotechnology. Doping ice-embedded samples with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) in aqueous suspension or adding nanocrystalline graphene supports, obtained by thermal conversion of cross-linked self-assembled biphenyl precursors, significantly reduces contrast loss in high-resolution cryoEM due to the excellent electrical and mechanical properties of SWNTs and graphene.

  10. Equilibrium thickness of carbon target interacting with nitrogen and neon ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkova, Yu. A.; Novikov, N. V.; Teplova, Ya. A.

    2016-04-01

    The method for calculation of the target thickness which is required for the formation of equilibrium charge distribution of ions is proposed. The description of nonequilibrium processes is based on empirical estimations of charge-exchange cross sections, taking the density effect for solids into account. The variation of the average charge and the width of the nonequilibrium charge distribution as a function of the target thickness is analyzed. The results of calculations for nitrogen and neon ions in carbon are compared with experimental data.

  11. Megavoltage photon beam attenuation by carbon fiber couch tops and its prediction using correction factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of megavoltage photon beam attenuation (PBA) by couch tops and to propose a method for correction of PBA. Four series of phantom measurements were carried out. First, PBA by the exact couch top (ECT, Varian) and Imaging Couch Top (ICT, BrainLAB) was evaluated using a water-equivalent phantom. Second, PBA by Type-S system (Med-Tec), ECT and ICT was compared with a spherical phantom. Third, percentage depth dose (PDD) after passing through ICT was measured to compare with control data of PDD. Forth, the gantry angle dependency of PBA by ICT was evaluated. Then, an equation for PBA correction was elaborated and correction factors for PBA at isocenter were obtained. Finally, this method was applied to a patient with hepatoma. PBA of perpendicular beams by ICT was 4.7% on average. With the increase in field size, the measured values became higher. PBA by ICT was greater than that by Type-S system and ECT. PBA increased significantly as the angle of incidence increased, ranging from 4.3% at 180 deg to 11.2% at 120 deg. Calculated doses obtained by the equation and correction factors agreed quite well with the measured doses between 120 deg and 180 deg of angles of incidence. Also in the patient, PBA by ICT was corrected quite well by the equation and correction factors. In conclusion, PBA and its gantry angle dependency by ICT were observed. This simple method using the equation and correction factors appeared useful to correct the isocenter dose when the PBA effect cannot be corrected by a treatment planning system. (author)

  12. Effects of Ontogeny on δ13C of Plant- and Soil-Respired CO2 and on Respiratory Carbon Fractionation in C3 Herbaceous Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Yann; Buchmann, Nina; Barnard, Romain L

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge gaps regarding potential ontogeny and plant species identity effects on carbon isotope fractionation might lead to misinterpretations of carbon isotope composition (δ13C) of respired CO2, a widely-used integrator of environmental conditions. In monospecific mesocosms grown under controlled conditions, the δ13C of C pools and fluxes and leaf ecophysiological parameters of seven herbaceous species belonging to three functional groups (crops, forage grasses and legumes) were investigated at three ontogenetic stages of their vegetative cycle (young foliage, maximum growth rate, early senescence). Ontogeny-related changes in δ13C of leaf- and soil-respired CO2 and 13C/12C fractionation in respiration (ΔR) were species-dependent and up to 7‰, a magnitude similar to that commonly measured in response to environmental factors. At plant and soil levels, changes in δ13C of respired CO2 and ΔR with ontogeny were related to changes in plant physiological status, likely through ontogeny-driven changes in the C sink to source strength ratio in the aboveground plant compartment. Our data further showed that lower ΔR values (i.e. respired CO2 relatively less depleted in 13C) were observed with decreasing net assimilation. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for ontogenetic stage and plant community composition in ecological studies using stable carbon isotopes. PMID:27010947

  13. Effects of Ontogeny on δ13C of Plant- and Soil-Respired CO2 and on Respiratory Carbon Fractionation in C3 Herbaceous Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Salmon

    Full Text Available Knowledge gaps regarding potential ontogeny and plant species identity effects on carbon isotope fractionation might lead to misinterpretations of carbon isotope composition (δ13C of respired CO2, a widely-used integrator of environmental conditions. In monospecific mesocosms grown under controlled conditions, the δ13C of C pools and fluxes and leaf ecophysiological parameters of seven herbaceous species belonging to three functional groups (crops, forage grasses and legumes were investigated at three ontogenetic stages of their vegetative cycle (young foliage, maximum growth rate, early senescence. Ontogeny-related changes in δ13C of leaf- and soil-respired CO2 and 13C/12C fractionation in respiration (ΔR were species-dependent and up to 7‰, a magnitude similar to that commonly measured in response to environmental factors. At plant and soil levels, changes in δ13C of respired CO2 and ΔR with ontogeny were related to changes in plant physiological status, likely through ontogeny-driven changes in the C sink to source strength ratio in the aboveground plant compartment. Our data further showed that lower ΔR values (i.e. respired CO2 relatively less depleted in 13C were observed with decreasing net assimilation. Our findings highlight the importance of accounting for ontogenetic stage and plant community composition in ecological studies using stable carbon isotopes.

  14. Multi-elemental characterization of organic liquid samples by use of a 13 MeV {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liendo, J.A., E-mail: jliendo@usb.v [Department of Physics, Simon Bolivar University, PO Box 89000, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Bernal, M.A., E-mail: mbernal@usb.v [Department of Physics, Simon Bolivar University, PO Box 89000, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Gonzalez, A.C. [Centro de Fisica, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Cientificas, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Caussyn, D.D.; Fletcher, N.R.; Momotyuk, O.A. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee (United States); Muruganathan, R.M. [Department of Chemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee (United States); Roeder, B.T.; Wiedenhoever, I. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee (United States); Fischer, T. [Department of Chemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee (United States); Kemper, K.W.; Barber, P. [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee (United States); Sajo-Bohus, L. [Department of Physics, Simon Bolivar University, PO Box 89000, Caracas 1080-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Evaporated amniotic fluid (AF) targets have been bombarded with a 13 MeV {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam. Forward angle data have served to identify the {sup 1}H({sup 6}Li,{sup 1}H){sup 6}Li reaction as an alternative for hydrogen characterization of such organic samples. Detected {sup 6}Li ions elastically scattered from C, N, O, Na and Cl can also be used to determine the concentrations of these elements in AF. The analyzed AF samples have been diluted with distilled water. The effect of sample dilution on the improvement of spectrum energy resolution has been observed, confirming previous reports. The hydrogen concentration determined in the studied AF targets is shown to vary linearly with sample dilution. Two detector arrangements have been used to find out which detection scheme is the most convenient. The combination of a counter telescope and a single detector, set up at the same polar angle on the opposite side of the beam, seems to be the best choice to have a reliable particle identification and an adequate energy resolution simultaneously.

  15. Biology and air-sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C) in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittner, A.; Gruber, N.; Mix, A. C.; Key, R. M.; Tagliabue, A.; Westberry, T. K.

    2013-09-01

    Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air-sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease) δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer) water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air-sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air-sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air-sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface δ13CDIC are influenced by

  16. Biology and air–sea gas exchange controls on the distribution of carbon isotope ratios (δ13C in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmittner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of observations and sensitivity experiments with a new three-dimensional global model of stable carbon isotope cycling elucidate processes that control the distribution of δ13C of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in the contemporary and preindustrial ocean. Biological fractionation and the sinking of isotopically light δ13C organic matter from the surface into the interior ocean leads to low δ13CDIC values at depths and in high latitude surface waters and high values in the upper ocean at low latitudes with maxima in the subtropics. Air–sea gas exchange has two effects. First, it acts to reduce the spatial gradients created by biology. Second, the associated temperature-dependent fractionation tends to increase (decrease δ13CDIC values of colder (warmer water, which generates gradients that oppose those arising from biology. Our model results suggest that both effects are similarly important in influencing surface and interior δ13CDIC distributions. However, since air–sea gas exchange is slow in the modern ocean, the biological effect dominates spatial δ13CDIC gradients both in the interior and at the surface, in contrast to conclusions from some previous studies. Calcium carbonate cycling, pH dependency of fractionation during air–sea gas exchange, and kinetic fractionation have minor effects on δ13CDIC. Accumulation of isotopically light carbon from anthropogenic fossil fuel burning has decreased the spatial variability of surface and deep δ13CDIC since the industrial revolution in our model simulations. Analysis of a new synthesis of δ13CDIC measurements from years 1990 to 2005 is used to quantify preformed and remineralized contributions as well as the effects of biology and air–sea gas exchange. The model reproduces major features of the observed large-scale distribution of δ13CDIC as well as the individual contributions and effects. Residual misfits are documented and analyzed. Simulated surface and subsurface

  17. Induction of apoptosis in murione spleen lymphocytes using carbon ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the capacity of heavy ions to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes, mice have been irradiated with accelerated carbon ions (95 MeV/nucleon) at doses ranging from 0.1 to 4 Gy. Their spleens were removed 24 h later and gently dissociated to prepare a single cell suspension. Mononuclear cells were then maintained in culture at 37oC, and the occurrence of apoptosis in these cells was analysed 24 h later. Lymphocytes were also irradiated in vitro, in the presence of Ac-DEVD-CHO, a potent caspase-3 and -7 inhibitor. Results from three experiments performed at the Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL, Caen, France) are reported here. They indicate that carbon ions induce a marked, dose-dependent, reduction of the spleen weight and cellularity. However, in sharp contrast with spleen cells prepared from X-ray irradiated mice, only a slight increase of apoptosis is evidenced in cultured lymphocytes from mice irradiated with heavy ions. The significance of such results is discussed. So far, few data exist concerning the biological effects of heavy ions, in particular their capacity to induce apoptosis in lymphocytes; the present study provides useful clues for further investigations. (author)

  18. Normal, high and ultra-high modulus carbon fiber-reinforced polymer laminates for bonded and un-bonded strengthening of steel beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Normal, high and ultra-high modulus CFRP laminates for strengthening of steel beams. • Bonded and un-bonded reinforcement systems for steel beams. • Comparisons between the static behavior of the bonded and un-bonded systems. - Abstract: This paper studies the elastic behavior of steel beams strengthened with normal, high and ultra-high modulus CFRP laminates using bonded and un-bonded systems. The elastic behavior of retrofitted beams provides useful information for design of fatigue strengthening systems. A total of seven steel beams including one control unstrengthened beam and six strengthened beams were tested statically until failure in a simply supported four-point bending set-up. The steel beams were retrofitted by normal modulus (NM), high modulus (HM) and ultra-high modulus (UHM) carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) laminates with nominal Young’s moduli, ranging from 165 to 440 GPa. Each type of laminate was attached to the steel beams using bonded reinforcement (BR) and un-bonded reinforcement (UR) systems. There is no direct comparison between the BR and the UR systems in the literature. The main goal of the paper is to provide a better understating about the stress distribution along the beam bottom flange when the BR and the UR systems are used for strengthening. All specimens failed due to lateral-torsional buckling (LTB). The effect of different strengthening methods on buckling capacity of the retrofitted specimens was also studied. Experimental results have shown that strengthening using bonded UHM laminates could increase the stiffness of the composite section so that the steel profile has yielded prior to buckling and a larger reinforcement efficacy was then achieved

  19. Charge equilibrium of a laser-generated carbon-ion beam in warm dense matter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gauthier, M.; Chen, S.N.; Lévy, A.; Audebert, P.; Blancard, C.; Ceccotti, T.; Cerchez, M.; Doria, D.; Floquet, V.; Lamour, E.; Peth, C.; Romagnani, L.; Rozet, J.-P.; Scheinder, M.; Shepherd, R.; Toncian, T.; Vernhet, D.; Willi, O.; Borghesi, Marco; Faussurier, G.; Fuchs, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 13 (2013), "135003-1"-"135003-5". ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061; GA MŠk EE2.3.20.0279 Grant ostatní: ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; LaserZdroj (OP VK 3)(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0279 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : fast heavy-ions * stopping powers * energy-loss * states * solids * distributions * surface * plasma * foil Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 7.728, year: 2013

  20. Stable carbon isotope ratio (delta /sup 13/C) of shallow marine bottom sediment as evidence of pollution in Manora channel, Karachi, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marine sediments are one of the endpoints for domestic /industrial contaminants from land based sources and provide an archive for tracing pollution record. Contaminated sediment is a significant environmental problem affecting many marine ecosystem. In the present study sediment samples from Manora Channel/Karachi harbour were analyzed for stable isotope composition of inorganic and organic carbon fractions (measured as (delta /sup 13/C) to estimate the land based terrestrial organic matter in the Manora Channel. The principle of this application lies in the fact that delta /sup 13/C values of inorganic carbon (mineral fractions such as calcite, aragonite, dolomite) differs vastly from that of the organic carbon fraction of domestic and/or industrial origin in the sediments. Relatively more depleted delta /sup 13/C (organic) values ranging between - 30.65 to -19.27 - PDB for the organic carbon fraction were found in the Layari river outfall zone. In Manora channel mains enriched values (delta /sup 13/C was found in sediment of Manora lighthouse (-5.0 - PDB) and Pakistan Naval Academy (-11.76 - PDB) while in same zones depleted values of (delta /sup 13/C was found in Bhabba island (-27.31 - PDB), Bhit Island (-26.13 PDB) and Boat Club area (-23.08 PDB) indicating impact of domestic sewage added to the Manora channel from surrounding Islands. (delta /sup 13/C (inorganic) fraction of sediment follow similar trend. In conclusion, this study indicates that the bottom sediments of Karachi Harbour and Layari river outfall zones are mainly polluted with organic waste of domestic origin derived from Layari river. (author)

  1. A spectral line survey in the 2 mm and 1.3 mm windows toward the carbon rich envelope of IRC +10216

    OpenAIRE

    He, J. H.; Dinh-V-Trung; Kwok, S.; Mueller, H. S. P.; Zhang, Y.; T. Hasegawa; Peng, T. C.; Huang, Y C

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of our spectral line surveys in the 2 mm and 1.3 mm windows toward the carbon rich envelope of IRC +10216. Totally 377 lines are detected, among which 360 lines are assigned to 57 known molecules (including 29 rare isotopomers and 2 cyclic isomers). Only 17 weak lines remain unidentified. Rotational lines of isotopomers 13CCH and HN13C are detected for the first time in IRC +10216. The detection of the formaldehyde lines in this star is also confirmed. Possible abundanc...

  2. Magic angle spinning carbon-13 NMR of tobacco mosaic virus. An application of the high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy to very large biological systems.

    OpenAIRE

    Hemminga, M A; Veeman, W.S.; Hilhorst, H.W.M.; Schaafsma, T J

    1981-01-01

    Magic angle spinning 13C NMR was used to study tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in solution. Well-resolved 13C NMR spectra were obtained, in which several carbon resonances of amino acids of the TMV coat protein subunits that are not observable by conventional high-resolution NMR spectroscopy can be designed. RNA resonance were absent, however, in the magic angle spinning 13C NMR spectra. Since three different binding sites are available for each nucleotide of the RNA, this is probably due to a lin...

  3. Microbially mediated carbon cycling as a control on the δ 13C of sedimentary carbon in eutrophic Lake Mendota (USA): new models for interpreting isotopic excursions in the sedimentary record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, David J.; Smith, Michael A.

    2001-12-01

    An isotopic study of various carbon phases in eutrophic Lake Mendota (Wisconsin, USA) indicates that the δ 13C composition of sedimentary organic and inorganic carbon has become more negative in response to increasing microbially mediated carbon cycling and processes associated with the intensification of seasonal and long-term eutrophication. Progressive increases in the contributions of isotopically depleted chemoautotrophic and methanotrophic biomass (reflected in the -40 to -90‰ values of hopanols and FAMES), attributed to seasonal and long-term increases in production and expansion of the anaerobic water mass, accounts for carbon isotopic trends towards depleted δ 13C values observed in both seasonal varves and over the past 100 years. Changes in the intensities of certain microbial processes are also evident in the sedimentary geochemical record. During the period of most intense cultural eutrophication, when the oxic-anoxic interface was located close to the surface, methanogenesis/methanotrophy and the oxidation of biogenic methane increased to the extent that significant quantities of 13C-depleted CO 2 were added into the epilimnion. This depleted CO 2 was subsequently utilized by phytoplankton and incorporated into CaCO 3 during biogenically induced calcite precipitation. A comparative study between eutrophic Lakes Mendota and Greifen, further indicate that the extent of nutrient loading in the epilimnion determines whether the δ 13C record of sedimentary organic carbon reflects intensification of microbial processes in the hypolimnion and sediments, or changes in the primary productivity in the photic zone. From this comparison, a series of eutrophication models are developed to describe progressive transitions through thresholds of microbial and eukaryotic productivity and their influence on the δ 13C record of sedimentary carbon. With increasing eutrophication, the models initially predict a negative and then a subsequent positive carbon isotopic

  4. Effects of a 2-step culture with cytokine combinations on megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis from carbon-ion beam-irradiated human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate whether the continuous treatment of two cytokine combinations is effective in megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells exposed to heavy ion beams, the effects of a 2-step culture by a combination of recombinant human interleukin-3 (IL-3)+stem cell factor (SCF)+thrombopoietin (TPO), which just slightly protected against carbon-ion beam-induced damages, and a combination of IL-3+TPO, which selectively stimulated the differentiation of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells to megakaryocytes and platelets, were examined. CD34+-hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells isolated from the human placental and umbilical cord blood were exposed to carbon-ion beams (linear energy transfer (LET)=50 keV/μm) at 2 Gy. These cells were cultured under three cytokine conditions. The number of megakaryocytes, platelets and hematopoietic progenitors were assessed using a flow cytometer and a clonogenic assay at 14 and 21 days after irradiation, respectively. However, the efficacy of each 2-step culture was equal or lower than that of using the IL-3+SCF+TPO combination alone and the 2-step culture could not induce megakaryocytes and platelets from hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells exposed to high LET-radiation such as carbon-ion beams. Therefore, additional cytokines and/or hematopoietic promoting compounds might be required to overcome damage to hematopoietic cells by high LET radiation. (author)

  5. Creep-resistant porous structures based on stereo-complex forming triblock copolymers of 1,3-trimethylene carbonate and lactides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Zheng; Grijpma, Dirk W.; Feijen, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Stereo-complexes (poly(ST–TMC–ST)) of enantiomeric triblock copolymers based on 1,3-trimethylene carbonate (TMC) and L- or D-lactide (poly(LLA–TMC–LLA) and poly(DLA–TMC–DLA)) were prepared. Films of poly(ST–TMC–ST) could be prepared by solvent casting mixtures of equal amounts of poly(LLA–TMC–LLA) a

  6. Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and its temperature dependence in the decarboxylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition with aqueous sulphuric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect in the decarboxylation of lactic acid of natural isotopic composition in sulphuric acid diluted with water in M(H2O)/M(H2SO4) molar ratio equal to 2.2 has been studied in the temperature range 80-130 C and found to be normal. The absolute values and the temperature dependence of the experimental 13C-K.I.E. are in agreement with the absolute values and the temperature dependence of the theoretical 13C-K.I.E. calculated under the assumption that one frequency corresponding to the carbon-oxygen bound broken in the decarboxylation reaction is lost in the course of activation of lactic acid molecules. The chemical side reactions leading to the abnormal temperature dependence of the carbon-13 and carbon-14 isotope fractionation, observed in the course of decarboxylation of lactic acid in concentrated sulphuric acid, have been suggested. (author). 11 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  7. Sulfonamide inhibition studies of the β-carbonic anhydrase from the newly discovered bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eminoğlu, Ayşenur; Vullo, Daniela; Aşık, Aycan; Çolak, Dilşat Nigar; Çanakçı, Sabriye; Beldüz, Ali Osman; Supuran, Claudiu T

    2016-04-01

    The genome of the newly identified bacterium Enterobacter sp. B13 encodes for a β-class carbonic anhydrases (CAs, EC 4.2.1.1), EspCA. This enzyme was recently cloned, and characterized kinetically by this group (J. Enzyme Inhib. Med. Chem. 2016, 31). Here we report an inhibition study with sulfonamides and sulfamates of this enzyme. The best EspCA inhibitors were some sulfanylated sulfonamides with elongated molecules, metanilamide, 4-aminoalkyl-benzenesulfonamides, acetazolamide, and deacetylated methazolamide (KIs in the range of 58.7-96.5nM). Clinically used agents such as methazolamide, ethoxzolamide, dorzolamide, brinzolamide, benzolamide, zonisamide, sulthiame, sulpiride, topiramate and valdecoxib were slightly less effective inhibitors (KIs in the range of 103-138nM). Saccharin, celecoxib, dichlorophenamide and many simple benzenesulfonamides were even less effective as EspCA inhibitors, with KIs in the range of 384-938nM. Identification of effective inhibitors of this bacterial enzyme may lead to pharmacological tools useful for understanding the physiological role(s) of the β-class CAs in bacterial pathogenicity/virulence. PMID:26920803

  8. Single-walled carbon nanotubes disturbed the immune and metabolic regulation function 13-weeks after a single intratracheal instillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Hong, Young-Shick; Lee, Byoung-Seok; Yoon, Cheolho; Jeong, Uiseok; Kim, Younghun

    2016-07-01

    Due to their unique physicochemical properties, the potential health effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attracted continuous attention together with their extensive application. In this study, we aimed to identify local and systemic health effects following pulmonary persistence of SWCNTs. As expected, SWCNTs remained in the lung for 13 weeks after a single intratracheal instillation (50, 100, and 200μg/kg). In the lung, the total number of cells and the percentages of lymphocytes and neutrophils significantly increased at 200μg/kg compared to the control, and the Th1-polarized immune response was induced accompanying enhanced expression of tissue damage-related genes and increased release of chemokines. Additionally, SWCNTs enhanced the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins on the surface of antigen-presenting cells, however, maturation of dendritic cells was inhibited by their persistence. As compared to the control, a significant increase in the percentage of neutrophils and a remarkable decrease of BUN and potassium level were observed in the blood of mice treated with the highest dose. This was accompanied by the down-regulation of the expression of antigen presentation-related proteins on splenocytes. Moreover, protein and glucose metabolism were disturbed with an up-regulation of fatty acid β-oxidation. Taken together, we conclude that SWCNTs may induce adverse health effects by disturbing immune and metabolic regulation functions in the body. Therefore, careful application of SWCNTs is necessary for the enforcement of safety in nano-industries. PMID:27078092

  9. Two diamictites, two cap carbonates, two δ13C excursions, two rifts: The Neoproterozoic Kingston Peak Formation, Death Valley, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prave, A. R.

    1999-04-01

    Stratigraphic mapping of the Neoproterozoic glaciogenic Kingston Peak Formation (Death Valley, California) provides evidence for two temporally discrete extensional deformation episodes. These episodes are bracketed by the Sourdough Limestone and Noonday Dolomite, the facies characteristics and δ13C data (ranging between 2.15 and -2.56‰ and -1.88 and -4.86‰, respectively) of which make them equivalent to Sturtian and Varangian age cap carbonates, respectively. This constrains the two extensional episodes along the southwestern margin of Laurentia to ca. 700 Ma and ca. 600 Ma. These observations and data show that the field evidence for mid-Neoproterozoic breakup and the predictions from tectonic subsidence curves for a latest Neoproterozoic breakup are both correct. Thus, Neoproterozoic plate reconstructions must account for two discrete rift episodes separated by 100 m.y. or more. Confining rifting to within the Kingston Peak Formation thereby places the younger Proterozoic rocks of the southwestern Great Basin in the rift to drift tectonic phase.

  10. Priming of soil carbon decomposition in two inner Mongolia grassland soils following sheep dung addition: A study using13C natural abundance approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Xiuzhi; Ambus, Per; Wang, Shiping;

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effect of sheep dung on soil carbon (C) sequestration, a 152 days incubation experiment was conducted with soils from two different Inner Mongolian grasslands, i.e. a Leymus chinensis dominated grassland representing the climax community (2.1% organic matter content) and a...... heavily degraded Artemisia frigida dominated community (1.3% organic matter content). Dung was collected from sheep either fed on L. chinensis (C3 plant with δ13C = -26.8‰; dung δ13C = -26.2‰) or Cleistogenes squarrosa (C4 plant with δ13C = -14.6‰; dung δ13C = -15.7‰). Fresh C3 and C4 sheep dung was mixed...

  11. Biosynthetic control of the natural abundance of carbon 13 at specific positions within fatty acids in Escherichia coli. Evidence regarding the coupling of fatty acid and phospholipid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stable carbon isotope ratios (13C/12C) at natural abundance levels have been determined for individual carbon atoms in each of the major phospholipid fatty acids of Escherichia coli grown on glucose as the sole carbon source. Two models were constructed for the isotope effects and carbon flow pathways which must be responsible for the observed isotopic fractionations. Both models incorporate a branch in the carbon flow at which fatty acyl-acyl carrier protein (acyl-ACP) is utilized either for complex lipid synthesis or for elongation by fatty acid synthetase. Depletion of carbon 13 in the carboxyl groups of myristic and palmitoleic acids (relative to carbonyl groups in precursor acyl-ACP's) was observed to occur at this branching site. Only one of the models was consistent both with this observation and with the observation that exogenous fatty acids are incorporated into phospholipids but are not elongated. The successful model has free fatty acid as the intermediate product coupling fatty acid biosynthesis to phospholipid synthesis. Essential to this pathway are those reactions catalyzed by thioesterases I and II as well as acyl-ACP synthetase, enzymes whose roles have previously been unknown in vivo

  12. Characterization of ion-beam-induced carbon deposition on WC-Co hard metal by microhardness, scratch and abrasive wear tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond-like ion-beam-deposited carbon (i-C) layers were obtained on WC-Co cemented carbide using a mass-separated 12C beam at an energy of 500 eV and a deposition rate of 3 A s-1. The mechanical properties of these layers were probed using microhardness and scratch tests and abrasive wear measurements. All these tests revealed that the depositions possess an extremely high hardness and good adhesion to the substrate. In particular, a hardness of 75 GPa was obtained, which is considerably higher than that found on i-C films involving hydrogen. (orig.)

  13. Assessing offsets between the δ13C of sedimentary components and the global exogenic carbon pool across early Paleogene carbon cycle perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluijs, A.; Dickens, G.R.

    2012-01-01

    Negative stable carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) across the Paleocene–Eocene thermal maximum (PETM; ∼56 Ma) range between 2‰ and 7‰, even after discounting sections with truncated records. Individual carbon isotope records differ in shape and magnitude from variations in the global exogenic carbon c

  14. Backbone dynamics of a model membrane protein: assignment of the carbonyl carbon 13C NMR resonances in detergent-solubilized M13 coat protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major coat protein of the filamentous bacteriophage M13 is a 50-residue amphiphilic polypeptide which is inserted, as an integral membrane-spanning protein, in the inner membrane of the Escherichia coli host during infection. 13C was incorporated biosynthetically into a total of 23 of the peptide carbonyls using labeled amino acids (alanine, glycine, lysine, phenylalanine, and proline). The structure and dynamics of carbonyl-labeled M13 coat protein were monitored by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Assignment of many resonances was achieved by using protease digestion, pH titration, or labeling of the peptide bond with both 13C and 15N. The carbonyl region of the natural-abundance 13C NMR spectrum of M13 coat protein in sodium dodecyl sulfate solution shows approximately eight backbone carbonyl resonances with line widths much narrower than the rest. Three of these more mobile residues correspond to assigned peaks (glycine-3, lysine-48, and alanine-49) in the individual amino acid spectra, and another almost certainly arises from glutamic acid-2. A ninth residue, alanine-1, also gives rise to a very narrow carbonyl resonance if the pH is well above or below the pK/sub a/ of the terminal amino group. These data suggest that only about four residues at either end of the protein experience large-amplitude spatial fluctuations; the rest of the molecule is essentially rigid on the time scale of the overall rotational tumbling of the protein-detergent complex. The relative exposure of different regions of detergent-bound protein was monitored by limited digestion with proteinase K. Comparable spectra and digestion patterns were obtained when the protein was solubilized in sodium deoxycholate, suggesting that the coat protein binds both amphiphiles in a similar fashion

  15. Two episodes of 13C-depletion in organic carbon in the latest Permian: Evidence from the terrestrial sequences in northern Xinjiang, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Changqun; Wang, Wei; Liu, Lujun; Shen, Shuzhong; Summons, Roger E.

    2008-06-01

    New analyses reveal two intervals of distinctly lower δ13C values in the terrestrial organic matter of Permian-Triassic sequences in northern Xinjiang, China. The younger negative δ13C org spike can be correlated to the conspicuous and sharp δ13C drops both in carbonate carbon and organic carbon near the Permian-Triassic event boundary (PTEB) in the marine section at Meishan. The geochemical correlation criteria are accompanied by a magnetic susceptibility pulse and higher abundances of distinctive, chain-like organic fossil remains of Reduviasporonites. The older negative δ13C org spike originates within a latest Permian regression. Significant changes in organic geochemical proxies are recorded in the equivalent interval of the marine section at Meishan. These include relatively higher concentrations of total organic carbon, isorenieratane, C 14-C 30 aryl isoprenoids and lower ratios of pristane/phytane that, together, indicate the onset of anoxic, euxinic and restricted environments within the photic zone. The massive and widespread oxidation of buried organic matter that induced these euxinic conditions in the ocean would also result in increased concentrations of 13C-depleted atmospheric CO 2. The latest Permian environmental stress marked by the older negative δ13C org episode can be correlated with the distinct changeover of ostracod assemblages and the occurrences of morphological abnormalities of pollen grains. These observations imply that biogeochemical disturbance was manifested on the land at the end of the Permian and that terrestrial organisms responded to it before the main extinction of the marine fauna.

  16. Test Measurements of a 20 ms-1 Carbon Wire Beam Scanner

    CERN Document Server

    De Freitas, J; Emery, J; Herranz Alvarez, J F; Koujili, M; Ramos, D; Sapinski, M; Ait-Amira, Y; Djerdir, A

    2011-01-01

    This paper pre­sents the de­sign of the ac­tu­a­tor for the fast and high ac­cu­ra­cy Wire Scan­ner sys­tem. The ac­tu­a­tor con­sists of a ro­tary brushless syn­chronous motor with the per­ma­nent mag­net rotor in­stalled in­side the vac­u­um cham­ber and the sta­tor in­stalled out­side. The fork, per­ma­nent mag­net rotor and two an­gu­lar po­si­tion sen­sors are mount­ed on the same axis and lo­cat­ed in­side the beam vac­u­um cham­ber. The system has to re­sist a bake-out tem­per­a­ture of 200 C and ion­iz­ing radi­a­tion up to tenths of kGy/year. Max­i­mum wire trav­el­ling speed of 20 m/s and a po­si­tion mea­sure­ment ac­cu­ra­cy of 4 um is re­quired. Therefore, the sys­tem must avoid gen­er­at­ing vi­bra­tion and electromagnet­ic in­ter­fer­ence. A dig­i­tal feed­back con­troller will allow max­i­mum flex­i­bil­i­ty for the loop pa­ram­e­ters and feeds the 3-phase lin­ear power driv­er. The per­for­mance of the pr...

  17. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  18. Electron beam generation and structure of defects in carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zobelli, A

    2007-10-15

    The nature and role of defects is of primary importance to understand the physical properties of C and BN (boron nitride) single walled nano-tubes (SWNTs). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a well known powerful tool to study the structure of defects in materials. However, in the case of SWNTs, the electron irradiation of the TEM may knock out atoms. This effect may alter the native structure of the tube, and has also been proposed as a potential tool for nano-engineering of nano-tubular structures. Here we develop a theoretical description of the irradiation mechanism. First, the anisotropy of the emission energy threshold is obtained via density functional based calculations. Then, we numerically derive the total Mott cross section for different emission sites of carbon and boron nitride nano-tubes with different chiralities. Using a dedicated STEM (Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope) microscope with experimental conditions optimised on the basis of derived cross-sections, we are able to control the generation of defects in nano-tubular systems. Either point or line defects can be obtained with a spatial resolution of a few nanometers. The structure, energetics and electronics of point and line defects in BN systems have been investigated. Stability of mono- and di- vacancy defects in hexagonal boron nitride layers is investigated, and their activation energies and reaction paths for diffusion have been derived using the nudged elastic band method (NEB) combined with density functional based techniques. We demonstrate that the appearance of extended linear defects under electron irradiation is more favorable than a random distribution of point defects and this is due to the existence of preferential sites for atom emission in the presence of pre-existing defects, rather than thermal vacancy nucleation and migration. (author)

  19. Effects of radioprotectors on mutation in cultured mammalian cells by carbon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project goal is understand genotoxic effects of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, e.g. carbon, 290 MeV/nucleon: LET=100 KeV/μm [C290], and to identify chemicals that can prevent or decrease such pathologies in cultured cells and in exposed humans. We have now quantified effects of C290-induced genotoxicity of several chemicals including WR-1065, cimetidine, lycopene, RibCys [(R, S)-D-ribo(1', 2', 3', 4'-Tetrahydroxybutyl)-thiazolidine-4(R)-ca riboxylic acid, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and vitamin C, and combinations of DMSO plus Vitamin C. In vitro, vitamin C showed the most promise. It significantly reduced mutant induction by C290 and also reduced the yield of mutants displaying the cancer-related property of genomic instability even when added after radiation. Unfortunately vitamin C was less effective at doses below 5 mM, which is too high for use in humans. So we are turning to using non-toxic levels of vitamin C in combination with other chemicals. Our recent preliminary results and those of Dr. J. Kumagai indicate that NAC, at doses well tolerated by humans and which scavenge classical hydroxyl radicals, also effectively scavenge mutagenic, long-lived radicals (LLR). We plan, therefore, to evaluate the combined effect of NAC + vitamin C on X-ray mutagenicity (but not initially at Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC)). If these experiments look promising we would like to propose experiments with high LET radiation at HIMAC in collaboration with Dr. Kumagai. (author)

  20. Synchronous negative carbon isotope shifts in marine and terrestrial biomarkers at the onset of the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event 1a: Evidence for the release of 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Breugel, Yvonne; Schouten, Stefan; Tsikos, Harilaos; Erba, Elisabetta; Price, Gregory D.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2007-03-01

    A common feature of records of the early Aptian oceanic anoxic event (OAE) 1a is the sharp negative δ13C excursion displayed in both carbonate and organic matter at the onset of this event. A synchronous negative δ13C excursion has also been noted for terrestrial organic matter. This negative excursion has been attributed to either an injection of 13C-depleted light carbon into the atmosphere or, in case of marine sediments, recycling of 13C-depleted CO2. However, most studies were done on separate cores, and no information on the relative timing of the negative spikes in terrestrial versus marine records has been obtained. Here we examine early Aptian core sections from two geographically distal sites (Italy and the mid-Pacific) to elucidate the causes and relative timing of this negative "spike." At both sites, increased organic carbon (Corg) and decreased bulk carbonate contents characterize the interval recording OAE 1a (variously referred to as the "Selli event"). The organic material within the "Selli level" is immature and of autochthonous origin. Measured δ13C values of marine and terrestrial biomarkers largely covary with those of bulk organic carbon, with lowest values recorded at the base of the organic-rich section. By contrast, sediments enveloping the "Selli level" exhibit very low Corg contents, and their extractable Corg is predominantly of allochthonous origin. Hydrous pyrolysis techniques used to obtain an autochthonous, pre-Selli δ13C value for algal-derived pristane from corresponding sample material yielded a negative δ13C shift of up to 4‰. A negative δ13C shift of similar magnitude was also measured for the terrigenous n-alkanes. The results are collectively best explained by means of a massive, syndepositional, rapid input of 13C-depleted carbon into the atmosphere and surface oceans, likely delivered either via methane produced from the dissociation of sedimentary clathrates or perhaps by widespread thermal metamorphism of Corg