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Sample records for carbohydrate epitopes preferentially

  1. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: Conservation of carbohydrate Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    for pseudotypes to escape neutralization by the immune system in vivo. Previous reports have suggested that carbohydrate structures may be conserved neutralization epitopes on retroviruses. In this study, the neutralizing capacity of lectins and anti-carbohydrate monoclonal antibodies was found to block infection...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  2. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: conservation of carbohydrate epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4......-negative cells, previously nonsusceptible to HIV infection. The infection of CD4-negative cells with pseudotypes could be blocked with anti-HTLV-I serum but failed to be significantly inhibited with anti-HIV serum or a V3-neutralizing anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody. This may represent a possibility...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  3. Neutralization epitopes on HIV pseudotyped with HTLV-I: Conservation of carbohydrate Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, A M; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1994-01-01

    One mechanism for expanding the cellular tropism of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vitro is through formation of phenotypically mixed particles (pseudotypes) with human T lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). In this study we found that pseudotypes allow penetration of HIV particles into CD4......-negative cells, previously nonsusceptible to HIV infection. The infection of CD4-negative cells with pseudotypes could be blocked with anti-HTLV-I serum but failed to be significantly inhibited with anti-HIV serum or a V3-neutralizing anti-gp120 monoclonal antibody. This may represent a possibility...... by cell-free pseudotypes in CD4-negative cells. We suggest that although viral cofactors might expand the tropism of HIV in vivo, HIV and HTLV-I seem to induce common carbohydrate neutralization epitopes....

  4. Characterization of protective and non-protective surface membrane carbohydrate epitopes of Schistosoma mansoni

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    Albert I. Ko

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available We have produced a number of monoclonal antibodies, protective and non-protective, which recognize a complex of schistosomula antigens, including the 38 kDa antigen. Eight different protective and non-protective monoclonal antibodies, varying in isotypes, were used in the binding assays. Lectin inhibition studies suggested that the monoclonal antibodies probably recognized carbohydrate epitopes on the antigen(s. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that at least two of the monoclonal antibodies recognized different epitopes on the same molecule. Additionally, we tested for monoclonal antibody binding after the antigens were treated with; 1 proteases, 2 periodate, 3 various exo- and endoglycosidases, 4 mild acid hydrolysis. We also tested for binding of the antibodies to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH. Using the 8 monoclonal antibodies as probes, we were able to define at least 4 different carbohydrate epitopes related to the protective monoclonal antibodies, and at least one epitope which is seen by the non-protective antibodies. The epitope seen by the non-protective antibodies was shown to be cross-reactive with epitopes on KLH. These results demonstrate the importance of epitope mapping studies for any defined vaccine.

  5. CELL WALL CARBOHYDRATE EPITOPES IN THE GREEN ALGA OEDOGONIUM BHARUCHAE F. MINOR (OEDOGONIALES, CHLOROPHYTA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, José M; Leonardi, Patricia I; Alberghina, Josefina S

    2008-10-01

    Cell wall changes in vegetative and suffultory cells (SCs) and in oogonial structures from Oedogonium bharuchae N. D. Kamat f. minor Vélez were characterized using monoclonal antibodies against several carbohydrate epitopes. Vegetative cells and SCs develop only a primary cell wall (PCW), whereas mature oogonial cells secrete a second wall, the oogonium cell wall (OCW). Based on histochemical and immunolabeling results, (1→4)-β-glucans in the form of crystalline cellulose together with a variable degree of Me-esterified homogalacturonans (HGs) and hydroxyproline-rich glycoprotein (HRGP) epitopes were detected in the PCW. The OCW showed arabinosides of the extensin type and low levels of arabinogalactan-protein (AGP) glycans but lacked cellulose, at least in its crystalline form. Surprisingly, strong colabeling in the cytoplasm of mature oogonia cells with three different antibodies (LM-5, LM-6, and CCRC-M2) was found, suggesting the presence of rhamnogalacturonan I (RG-I)-like structures. Our results are discussed relating the possible functions of these cell wall epitopes with polysaccharides and O-glycoproteins during oogonium differentiation. This study represents the first attempt to characterize these two types of cell walls in O. bharuchae, comparing their similarities and differences with those from other green algae and land plants. This work represents a contribution to the understanding of how cell walls have evolved from simple few-celled to complex multicelled organisms.

  6. Carbohydrate Microarrays Identify Blood Group Precursor Cryptic Epitopes as Potential Immunological Targets of Breast Cancer

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    Denong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Using carbohydrate microarrays, we explored potential natural ligands of antitumor monoclonal antibody HAE3. This antibody was raised against a murine mammary tumor antigen but was found to cross-react with a number of human epithelial tumors in tissues. Our carbohydrate microarray analysis reveals that HAE3 is specific for an O-glycan cryptic epitope that is normally hidden in the cores of blood group substances. Using HAE3 to screen tumor cell surface markers by flow cytometry, we found that the HAE3 glycoepitope, gpHAE3, was highly expressed by a number of human breast cancer cell lines, including some triple-negative cancers that lack the estrogen, progesterone, and Her2/neu receptors. Taken together, we demonstrate that HAE3 recognizes a conserved cryptic glycoepitope of blood group precursors, which is nevertheless selectively expressed and surface-exposed in certain breast tumor cells. The potential of this class of O-glycan cryptic antigens in breast cancer subtyping and targeted immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  7. Immunolocalization of cell wall carbohydrate epitopes in seaweeds: presence of land plant epitopes in Fucus vesiculosus L. (Phaeophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimundo, Sandra Cristina; Avci, Utku; Hopper, Christina; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Hahn, Michael G; Popper, Zoë A

    2016-02-01

    Land plant cell wall glycan epitopes are present in Fucus vesiculosus. RG-I/AG mAbs recognize distinct glycan epitopes in structurally different galactans, and 3-linked glucans are also present in the cell walls. Cell wall-directed monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have given increased knowledge of fundamental land plant processes but are not extensively used to study seaweeds. We profiled the brown seaweed Fucus vesiculosus glycome employing 155 mAbs that recognize predominantly vascular plant cell wall glycan components. The resulting profile was used to inform in situ labeling studies. Several of the mAbs recognized and bound to epitopes present in different thallus parts of Fucus vesiculosus. Antibodies recognizing arabinogalactan epitopes were divided into four groups based on their immunolocalization patterns. Group 1 bound to the stipe, blade, and receptacles. Group 2 bound to the antheridia, oogonia and paraphyses. Group 3 recognized antheridia cell walls and Group 4 localized on the antheridia inner wall and oogonia mesochite. This study reveals that epitopes present in vascular plant cell walls are also present in brown seaweeds. Furthermore, the diverse in situ localization patterns of the RG-I/AG clade mAbs suggest that these mAbs likely detect distinct epitopes present in structurally different galactans. In addition, 3-linked glucans were also detected throughout the cell walls of the algal tissues, using the β-glucan-directed LAMP mAb. Our results give insights into cell wall evolution, and diversify the available tools for the study of brown seaweed cell walls.

  8. Electro-optical study of the exposure of Azospirillum brasilense carbohydrate epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guliy, Olga I; Matora, Larisa Yu; Dykman, Lev A; Staroverov, Sergey A; Burygin, Gennady L; Bunin, Viktor D; Burov, Andrei M; Ignatov, Oleg V

    2015-01-01

    The exposure of Azospirillum brasilense carbohydrate epitopes was investigated by electro-optical analysis of bacterial cell suspensions. To study changes in the electro-optical (EO) properties of the suspensions, we used antibodies generated to the complete lipopolysaccharide of A. brasilense type strain Sp7 and also antibodies to the smooth and rough O polysaccharides of Sp7. After 18 hr of culture growth, the EO signal of the suspension treated with antibodies to smooth O polysaccharide was approximately 20% lower than that of the suspension treated with antibodies to complete lipopolysaccharide (control). After 72 hr of culture growth, the strongest EO signal was observed for the cells treated with antibodies to rough O polysaccharide (approximately 46% greater than the control), whereas for the cells treated with antibodies to smooth O polysaccharide, it was much lower (approximately 23% of the control). These data were confirmed by electron microscopy. The results of the study may have importance for the rapid evaluation of changes in lipopolysaccharide form in microbial biotechnology, when the antigenic composition of the bacterial surface requires close control.

  9. Intraspecific epitopic variation in a carbohydrate antigen exposed on the surface of Trichostrongylus colubriformis infective L3 larvae.

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    David R Maass

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The carbohydrate larval antigen, CarLA, is present on the exposed surface of all strongylid nematode infective L3 larvae tested, and antibodies against CarLA can promote rapid immune rejection of incoming Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae in sheep. A library of ovine recombinant single chain Fv (scFv antibody fragments, displayed on phage, was prepared from B cell mRNA of field-immune sheep. Phage displaying scFvs that bind to the surface of living exsheathed T. colubriformis L3 larvae were identified, and the majority of worm-binding scFvs recognized CarLA. Characterization of greater than 500 worm surface binding phage resulted in the identification of nine different anti-CarLA scFvs that recognized three distinct T. colubriformis CarLA epitopes based on blocking and additive ELISA. All anti-CarLA scFvs were specific to the T. colubriformis species of nematode. Each of the three scFv epitope classes displayed identical Western blot recognition patterns and recognized the exposed surface of living T. colubriformis exsheathed L3 larvae. Surprisingly, each of the anti-CarLA scFvs was able to bind to only a subset of worms. Double-labelling indirect immunofluorescence revealed that the three classes of anti-CarLA scFvs recognize distinct, non-overlapping, T. colubriformis sub-populations. These results demonstrate that individual T. colubriformis L3 larvae display only one of at least three distinct antigenic forms of CarLA on their surface at any given time, and suggest that antigenic variation within CarLA is likely a mechanism of immune evasion in strongylid nematodes.

  10. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M;

    1991-01-01

    . This inhibition was found in infection of both lymphocytic cells and monocytoid cells. Viruses tested included six HIV-1 and five HIV-2 isolates propagated in different cells, as well as infectious plasma from AIDS patients. The antiviral effect of anti-Tn MAbs occurred by specific binding of the MAb to the virus......The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells...

  11. Broadly neutralizing antibodies targeted to mucin-type carbohydrate epitopes of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Arendrup, M

    1991-01-01

    The cancer-related mucin-type carbohydrate neoantigen Tn was found on gp160 and gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Tn neutralized infection with cell-free virus and blocked fusion between HIV-infected and uninfected cells......; this binding was inhibitable by pure Tn antigen, and indications were found that this inhibition occurred at a pre-entry step. Boosting the naturally occurring low-titer anti-Tn activity may be of prophylactic value, as suggested by the in vitro neutralization found in this study....

  12. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  13. Sensitivity of HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies against O-linked carbohydrate epitopes despite deletion of O-glycosylation signals in the V3 loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Jansson, B; Gram, G J

    1996-01-01

    It has been suggested that threonine or serine residues in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 are glycosylated with the short-chain O-linked oligosaccharides Tn or sialosyl-Tn that function as epitopes for broadly neutralizing carbohydrate specific antibodies. In this study we examined whether mutation...... with deletions of O-glycosylation signals in the V3 loop displayed any decrease in sensitivity to anti-Tn or anti-sialosyl-Tn antibody. This indicates that these broadly specific neutralization epitopes are located outside the V3 loop of gp 120........ Additionally, one of these T-A mutants (T308A) also abrogated the signal for N-glycosylation at N306 inside the V3-loop. The mutant clones were compared with the wild type virus as to sensitivity to neutralization with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the tip of the V3 loop of BRU or for the O...

  14. Immune-driven adaptation of hepatitis B virus genotype D involves preferential alteration in B-cell epitopes and replicative attenuation--an insight from human immunodeficiency virus/hepatitis B virus coinfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, R K; Khatun, M; Ghosh, S; Banerjee, P; Datta, S; Sarkar, S; Saha, B; Santra, A; Banerjee, S; Chowdhury, A; Datta, S

    2015-07-01

    An important driving force behind the sequence diversity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) is viral adaptation to host immune responses. To gain an insight into the impact of host immunity on genetic diversification and properties of HBV, we characterized HBV of genotype D from treatment-naive hepatitis B e antigen-positive (EP) and hepatitis B e antigen-negative (EN) patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB), where HBV is under stronger immune pressure, with that of HBV derived from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/HBV-coinfected individuals, where HIV infection has significantly weakened the immune system. Full-length sequence analysis showed that HBV heterogeneity was most extensive in EN-CHB followed by EP-CHB and HIV/HBV coinfection. The relative magnitude of non-synonymous changes within B-cell epitopes was greater than that in T-cell epitopes of HBV open reading frames (ORFs) in both EP-CHB and EN-CHB. Nine amino acid substitutions were identified in B-cell epitopes and one in a T-cell epitope of HBV in EN-CHB, most of which resulted in altered hydrophobicities, as determined using the Kyte and Doolittle method, relative to wild-type residues found in HBV from the HIV-positive group. Additionally, 19 substitutions occurred at significantly higher frequencies in non-epitope regions of HBV ORF-P in EN-CHB than HIV/HBV-coinfected patients. In vitro replication assay demonstrated that the substitutions, particularly in reverse transcriptase and RNaseH domains of ORF-P, resulted in a decline in replication capacity of HBV. Hence, our results indicate that HBV adapts to increasing immune pressure through preferential mutations in B-cell epitopes and by replicative attenuation. The viral epitopes linked to immune response identified in this study bear important implications for future HBV vaccine studies.

  15. Carbohydrates as food allergens

    OpenAIRE

    SOH, Jian Yi; Huang, Chiung Hui; Lee, Bee Wah

    2015-01-01

    The literature supports the notion that carbohydrate epitopes, on their own, do not contribute significantly to the induction of allergic reactions. They bind weakly to IgE antibodies and have been termed as cross reactive carbohydrate determinants. These epitopes cause confusion in in vitro IgE testing through nonspecific cross-reactivity. Coincident with the rising trends in food allergy prevalence, there has recently been reports of anaphylaxis induced by carbohydrate epitopes. There are t...

  16. High-resolution mapping of a genetic locus regulating preferential carbohydrate intake, total kilocalories, and food volume on mouse chromosome 17.

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    Rodrigo Gularte-Mérida

    Full Text Available The specific genes regulating the quantitative variation in macronutrient preference and food intake are virtually unknown. We fine mapped a previously identified mouse chromosome 17 region harboring quantitative trait loci (QTL with large effects on preferential macronutrient intake-carbohydrate (Mnic1, total kilcalories (Kcal2, and total food volume (Tfv1 using interval-specific strains. These loci were isolated in the [C57BL/6J.CAST/EiJ-17.1-(D17Mit19-D17Mit50; B6.CAST-17.1] strain, possessing a ∼ 40.1 Mb region of CAST DNA on the B6 genome. In a macronutrient selection paradigm, the B6.CAST-17.1 subcongenic mice eat 30% more calories from the carbohydrate-rich diet, ∼ 10% more total calories, and ∼ 9% more total food volume per body weight. In the current study, a cross between carbohydrate-preferring B6.CAST-17.1 and fat-preferring, inbred B6 mice was used to generate a subcongenic-derived F2 mapping population; genotypes were determined using a high-density, custom SNP panel. Genetic linkage analysis substantially reduced the 95% confidence interval for Mnic1 (encompassing Kcal2 and Tfv1 from 40.1 to 29.5 Mb and more precisely established its boundaries. Notably, no genetic linkage for self-selected fat intake was detected, underscoring the carbohydrate-specific effect of this locus. A second key finding was the separation of two energy balance QTLs: Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 for food intake and a newly discovered locus regulating short term body weight gain. The Mnic1/Kcal2/Tfv1 QTL was further de-limited to 19.0 Mb, based on the absence of nutrient intake phenotypes in subcongenic HQ17IIa mice. Analyses of available sequence data and gene ontologies, along with comprehensive expression profiling in the hypothalamus of non-recombinant, cast/cast and b6/b6 F2 controls, focused our attention on candidates within the QTL interval. Zfp811, Zfp870, and Btnl6 showed differential expression and also contain stop codons, but have no known biology

  17. Muscle IGF-1-Induced Skeletal Muscle Hypertrophy Evokes Higher Insulin Sensitivity and Carbohydrate Use as Preferential Energy Substrate

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    Marcelo Augusto Christoffolete

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the metabolic profile of transgenic mice exhibiting enhanced muscle mass driven by increased mIGF-1 expression (MLC/mIGF-1. As expected, 6-month-old MLC/mIGF-1 mice were heavier than age-matched wild type (WT mice (37.4 ± 0.3 versus 31.8 ± 0.6 g, resp.. MLC/mIGF-1 mice had higher respiratory quotient when compared to WT (0.9 ± 0.03 versus 0.74 ± 0.02, resp. suggesting a preference for carbohydrate as the major fuel source. MLC/mIGF-1 mice had a higher rate of glucose disposal when compared to WT (3.25 ± 0.14 versus 2.39 ± 0.03%/min, resp.. The higher disposal rate correlated to ∼2-fold higher GLUT4 content in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL muscle. Analysis of mRNA content for the glycolysis-related gene PFK-1 showed ∼3-fold upregulation in MLC/mIGF-1 animals. We also found a 50% downregulation of PGC1α mRNA levels in MLC/mIGF-1 mouse EDL muscle, suggesting less abundant mitochondria in this tissue. We found no difference in the expression of PPARα and PPARβ/δ, suggesting no modulation of key elements in oxidative metabolism. These data together suggest a shift in metabolism towards higher carbohydrate utilization, and that could explain the increased insulin sensitivity of hypertrophied skeletal muscle in MLC/mIGF-1 mice.

  18. Sensitivity of HIV-1 to neutralization by antibodies against O-linked carbohydrate epitopes despite deletion of O-glycosylation signals in the V3 loop

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Jansson, B; Gram, G J

    1996-01-01

    . Additionally, one of these T-A mutants (T308A) also abrogated the signal for N-glycosylation at N306 inside the V3-loop. The mutant clones were compared with the wild type virus as to sensitivity to neutralization with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the tip of the V3 loop of BRU or for the O......It has been suggested that threonine or serine residues in the V3 loop of HIV-1 gp120 are glycosylated with the short-chain O-linked oligosaccharides Tn or sialosyl-Tn that function as epitopes for broadly neutralizing carbohydrate specific antibodies. In this study we examined whether mutation...... of such threonine or serine residues could decrease the sensitivity to infectivity inhibition by Tn or sialosyl-Tn specific antibodies. All potentially O-glycosylated threonine and serine residues in the V3 loop of cloned HIV-1 BRU were mutagenized to alanine thus abrogating any O-glycosylation at these sites...

  19. Novel O-linked glycans containing 6'-sulfo-Gal/GalNAc of MUC1 secreted from human breast cancer YMB-S cells: possible carbohydrate epitopes of KL-6(MUC1) monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seko, Akira; Ohkura, Takashi; Ideo, Hiroko; Yamashita, Katsuko

    2012-02-01

    Human serum Krebs von den Lugen-6 (KL-6) antigen is a MUC1 glycoprotein (KL-6/MUC1) recognized by anti-KL-6 monoclonal antibody (KL-6/mAb) and has been utilized as a diagnostic marker for interstitial pneumonia. KL-6/mAb is thought to recognize the specific glycopeptides sequence of MUC1, but the precise glycan structure of the epitope is unclear. In this study, we determined the carbohydrate structures of KL-6/MUC1 to search the carbohydrate epitopes for KL-6/mAb. KL-6/MUC1 was purified from the culture medium of human breast cancer YMB-S cells by KL-6/mAb-affinity chromatography; the O-linked glycan structures were determined in combination with paper electrophoresis, several lectin column chromatographies, sialidase digestion and methanolysis. KL-6/MUC1 contained core 1 and extended core 1 glycans modified with one or two sialic acid/sulfate residues. Based on these structures, several synthetic glycans binding to anti-KL-6/mAb were compared with one another by surface plasmon resonance. Sequentially, related radiolabeled oligosaccharides were enzymatically synthesized and analyzed for binding to a KL-6/mAb-conjugated affinity column. 3'-sialylated, 6'-sulfated LNnT [Neu5Acα2-3(SO(3)(-)-6)Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4Glc], 3'-sialylated, 6-sulfated core 1 [Neu5Acα2-3Galβ1-3(SO(3)(-)-6)GalNAc] and disulfated core 1 SO(3)(-)-3Galβ1-3(SO(3)(-)-6)GalNAc exhibited substantial affinity for KL-6/mAb, and 3'-sulfated core 1 derivatives [SO(3)(-)-3Galβ1-3(±Neu5Acα2-6)GalNAc] and 3'-sialylated core 1 weakly interacted with KL-6/mAb. These results indicated that the possible carbohydrate epitopes of KL-6/mAb involve not only 3'-sialylated core 1 but also novel core 1 and extended core 1 with sulfate and sialic acid residues. Epitope expressing changes with suppression or over-expression of the Gal6ST (Gal 6-O-sulfotransferase) gene, suggesting that Gal6ST is involved in the biosynthesis of the unique epitopes of KL-6/mAb.

  20. Carbohydrates as allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition.

  1. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    on a novel three-step procedure that identifies any reactive viral O-glycosyl peptide epitope with respect to (i) relevant peptide sequence, (ii) the reactive glycoform out of several possible glycopeptide isomers of that peptide sequence, and (iii) possibly tolerated carbohydrate or peptide structural...

  2. Switching of bacterial adhesion to a glycosylated surface by reversible reorientation of the carbohydrate ligand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Theresa; Chrasekaran, Vijayan; Stamer, Insa

    2014-01-01

    The surface recognition in many biological systems is guided by the interaction of carbohydrate-specific proteins (lectins) with carbohydrate epitopes (ligands) located within the unordered glycoconjugate layer (glycocalyx) of cells. Thus, for recognition, the respective ligand has to reorient...

  3. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... Many foods contain carbohydrates (carbs), including: Fruit and fruit juice Cereal, bread, pasta, and rice Milk and milk products, soy milk Beans, legumes, ...

  4. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Starchy Vegetables Fats Alcohol What Can I Drink? Fruit Dairy Food Tips Eating Out Quick Meal Ideas Snacks Nutrient Content Claims Understanding Carbohydrates Types of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate Counting Make Your Carbs Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & ...

  5. Vaccine Focusing to Cross-Subtype HIV-1 gp120 Variable Loop Epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Cardozo, Timothy; Wang, Shixia; Jiang, Xunqing; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Hioe, Catarina; Krachmarov, Chavdar

    2014-01-01

    We designed synthetic, epitope-focused immunogens that preferentially display individual neutralization epitopes targeted by cross-subtype anti-HIV V3 loop neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Vaccination of rabbits with these immunogens resulted in the elicitation of distinct polyclonal serum Abs that exhibit cross-subtype neutralization specificities mimicking the mAbs that guided the design. Our results prove the principle that a predictable range of epitope-specific polyclonal cross...

  6. Carbohydrate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  7. Effect of anti-carbohydrate antibodies on HIV infection in a monocytic cell line (U937)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against carbohydrate epitopes of gp120 have recently been found to inhibit HIV infection of lymphocytes in vitro thereby opening new possibilities for vaccine considerations. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection has however come increasingly into focus....... This study therefore investigated the neutralization of HIV in a monocytic cell line (U937) using mAbs against these carbohydrate gp120-epitopes. While antibodies against one of the epitopes (AI) neutralized infection of U937 cells despite binding to the Fc-receptor, one mAb against the sialosyl-Tn epitope...

  8. Carbohydrate Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  9. Carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sungjin; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Blixt, Klas Ola;

    2012-01-01

    In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray-based technol...

  10. Carbohydrate Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  11. What is preferential to preferential attachment?

    CERN Document Server

    Small, Michael; Stemler, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Preferential attachment --- where new nodes are added and attached to existing nodes with probability proportional to the existing nodes' degree --- has become the standard growth model for scale-free networks, where the asymptotic probability of a node having degree $k$ is proportional to $k^{-\\gamma}$. However, the motivation for this model is entirely {\\em ad hoc}. We use exact likelihood arguments and show that the optimal way to build a scale-free network is to preferentially attach to low degree nodes. Asymptotically, the optimal strategy is to attach the new node to one of the nodes of degree $k$ (in a network with $N$ nodes) with probability proportional to $\\frac{1}{N+\\zeta(\\gamma)(k+1)^\\gamma}$. The algorithm we propose to do this can be employed to generate optimally scale-free networks (maximum likelihood realisations) as well as a random sampling of the space of all scale-free networks with a given degree exponent $\\gamma$. While we focus on scale free networks, these methods can be applied to a ...

  12. Carbohydrate microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, Sungjin; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C; Blixt, Klas Ola

    2012-01-01

    -based technology has been widely employed for rapid analysis of the glycan binding properties of lectins and antibodies, the quantitative measurements of glycan-protein interactions, detection of cells and pathogens, identification of disease-related anti-glycan antibodies for diagnosis, and fast assessment...... of substrate specificities of glycosyltransferases. This review covers the construction of carbohydrate microarrays, detection methods of carbohydrate microarrays and their applications in biological and biomedical research.......In the last decade, carbohydrate microarrays have been core technologies for analyzing carbohydrate-mediated recognition events in a high-throughput fashion. A number of methods have been exploited for immobilizing glycans on the solid surface in a microarray format. This microarray...

  13. Repeated epitope in the recombinant epitope-peptide could enhance ELDKWA-epitope-specific antibody response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zuqiang; WANG Zuguang; CHEN Yinghua

    2005-01-01

    Based on the hypothesis suggested by us that epitope-vaccine may be a new strategy against HIV mutation, we have studied several neutralizing epitopes on HIV envelope proteins. However we do not know whether a repeated epitope in a recombinant epitope-peptide can enhance epitope-specific antibody response or not. ELDKWA-epitope (aa669-674) on the C-domain of HIV-1 gp41 is a neutralizing epitope defined by the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2F5 with broad neutralizing activity. In this study, we designed and prepared a series of the recombinant epitope-peptides bearing 1, 4 and 8 copies of ELDKWA-epitope respectively. In the comparison of the antisera induced by the three recombinant antigens, an obviously increased titre of ELDKWA-epitope-specific antibody was observed in the case of four and eight repeated epitopes. In flow cytometry analysis, the epitope-specific antibodies in both antisera showed stronger activity to bind the transfected CHO-WT cells that stably express HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein on the cell surfaces. These experimental results indicated that repeated epitope in the recombinant epitope-peptide could enhance ELDKWA-epitope-specific antibody response, which could contribute to designing an effective recombinant epitope-vaccine.

  14. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Muñoz, Maria Elisa; Joglekar, Payal; Shen, Yi-Ju; Shen, Yi-Ji; Chang, Kuan Y; Peterson, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states.

  15. HLA-A02:01-Restricted Epitopes Identified from the Herpes Simplex Virus Tegument Protein VP11/12 Preferentially Recall Polyfunctional Effector Memory CD8+ T Cells from Seropositive Asymptomatic Individuals and Protect “Humanized” HLA-A*02:01 Transgenic Mice Against Ocular Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Spencer, Doran; Vahed, Hawa; Lopes, Patricia P.; Thai, Nhi Thi Uyen; Wang, Christine; Pham, Thanh T.; Huang, Jiawei; Scarfone, Vanessa M.; Nesburn, Anthony B.; Wechsler, Steven L.; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2014-01-01

    The Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 virion tegument phosphoprotein 11/12 (HSV-1 VP11/12) is a major antigen targeted by CD8+ T cells from HSV-seropositive individuals. However, whether and which VP11/12-epitope-specific CD8+ T cells play a role in the “natural” protection seen in seropositive healthy asymptomatic (ASYMP) individuals (who have never had clinical herpes disease) remain to be determined. In this study, we used multiple prediction computer-assisted algorithms to identify 10 potential HLA-A*02:01-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes from the 716 amino acids sequence of VP11/12. Three out of ten epitopes exhibited high to moderate binding affinity to HLA-A*02:01 molecules. In ten sequentially studied HLA-A*02:01 positive and HSV-1-seropositive ASYMP individuals, the most frequent, robust and polyfunctional effector CD8+ T-cell responses, as assessed by a combination of tetramer frequency, granzyme B, granzyme K, perforin, CD107a/b cytotoxic degranulation, IFN-γ and multiplex cytokines assays, were predominantly directed against three epitopes: VP11/1266–74, VP11/12220–228 and VP11/12702–710. Interestingly, ASYMP individuals had significantly higher proportion of CD45RAlowCCR7lowCD44highCD62LlowCD27lowCD28lowCD8+ effector memory T cells (TEM) specific to the three epitopes, compared to symptomatic (SYMP) individuals (with a history of numerous episodes of recurrent ocular herpetic disease). Moreover, immunization of HLA-A*02:01 transgenic mice with the three ASYMP CD8+ TEM cell epitopes induced robust and polyfunctional epitope-specific CD8+ TEM cells that were associated with a strong protective immunity against ocular herpes infection and disease. Our findings outline phenotypic and functional features of protective HSV-specific CD8+ T cells that should guide the development of an effective T-cell-based herpes vaccine. PMID:25617474

  16. Against Preferential Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekes, John

    1997-01-01

    Argues that preferential treatment of women and minorities in the selection of college faculty elevates a form of corruption to standard administrative practice by including people in academic life on the basis of characteristics irrelevant to teaching and research; and previous unjust treatment is inadequate justification for preferential…

  17. Carbohydrate malabsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Nordgaard-Andersen, I; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies in small series of healthy adults have suggested that parallel measurement of hydrogen and methane resulting from gut fermentation may improve the precision of quantitative estimates of carbohydrate malabsorption. Systematic, controlled studies of the role of simultaneous hydroge...... and methane measurements using end-expiratory breath test techniques are not available....

  18. Carbohydrates and T cells: a sweet twosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, Fikri Y; Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Kasper, Dennis L

    2013-04-01

    Carbohydrates as T cell-activating antigens have been generating significant interest. For many years, carbohydrates were thought of as T-independent antigens, however, more recent research had demonstrated that mono- or oligosaccharides glycosidically linked to peptides can be recognized by T cells. T cell recognition of these glycopeptides depends on the structure of both peptide and glycan portions of the antigen. Subsequently, it was discovered that natural killer T cells recognized glycolipids when presented by the antigen presenting molecule CD1d. A transformative insight into glycan-recognition by T cells occurred when zwitterionic polysaccharides were discovered to bind to and be presented by MHCII to CD4+ T cells. Based on this latter observation, the role that carbohydrate epitopes generated from glycoconjugate vaccines had in activating helper T cells was explored and it was found that these epitopes are presented to specific carbohydrate recognizing T cells through a unique mechanism. Here we review the key interactions between carbohydrate antigens and the adaptive immune system at the molecular, cellular and systems levels exploring the significant biological implications in health and disease.

  19. New Preferential Policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    At the closing ceremony of the Boao Cross-Strait Agricultural Cooperation Forum on October 17, Chen Yunlin, Director of the Taiwan Work Office of the Communist Party of China Central Committee, stated the preferential package which consists 20 detailed measures to promote cross-strait agricultural cooperation with the goal of benefiting Taiwan farmers. The policies are divided into the following four major parts: The mainland welcomes Taiwan investors, farmers and agricultural

  20. Learning about Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or Too Short All About Puberty Learning About Carbohydrates KidsHealth > For Kids > Learning About Carbohydrates Print A ... source of energy for the body. What Are Carbohydrates? There are two major types of carbohydrates (or ...

  1. Effect of anti-carbohydrate antibodies on HIV infection in a monocytic cell line (U937)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H;

    1991-01-01

    . This study therefore investigated the neutralization of HIV in a monocytic cell line (U937) using mAbs against these carbohydrate gp120-epitopes. While antibodies against one of the epitopes (AI) neutralized infection of U937 cells despite binding to the Fc-receptor, one mAb against the sialosyl-Tn epitope...... enhanced infection. This enhancement was independent of complement and could be blocked by mAb Leu3a against the CD4-receptor. The study indicated that enhancement of infection in monocytic cells can occur by the same anti-carbohydrate antibodies that neutralize infection in lymphocytes, and that antibody...

  2. Preferential role restrictions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available is a generalisation of classical coherence as defined by Schlo¨bach, et al. [21]. 6 Britz, Casini, Meyer, Varzinczak time. Furthermore, it can be verified that T preferentially entails the statement CommunityLawyer v ∃hasClient.PayingClient. Informally.... Lehmann, D., Magidor, M.: What does a conditional knowledge base entail? Arti- ficial Intelligence 55, 1–60 (1992) 20. Quantz, J.: A preference semantics for defaults in terminological logics. In: Proc. KR. pp. 294–305 (1992) 21. Schlo¨bach, S., Cornet, R...

  3. A synthetic peptide derived from the animo acid sequence of canine parvovirus structural proteins which defines a B cell epitope and elicits antiviral antibody in BALB c mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. Carlson; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractSynthetic peptides, recombinant fusion proteins and mouse monoclonal antibodies were used to delineate a B cell epitope of the VP'2 structural protein of canine parvovirus (CPV). Although this epitope is not preferentially recognized in the normal antibody response to CPV, virus-specific

  4. Epitope prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita

    on machine learning techniques. Several MHC class I binding prediction algorithms have been developed and due to their high accuracy they are used by many immunologists to facilitate the conventional experimental process of epitope discovery. However, the accuracy of these methods depends on data defining...... the NetMHCIIpan-3.0 predictor based on artificial neural networks, which is capable of giving binding affinities to any human MHC class II molecule. Chapter 4 of this thesis gives an overview of bioinformatics tools developed by the Immunological Bioinformatics group at Center for Biological Sequence...

  5. Immune epitope database analysis resource

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Yohan; Ponomarenko, Julia; Zhu, Zhanyang

    2012-01-01

    The immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR: http://tools.iedb.org) is a collection of tools for prediction and analysis of molecular targets of T- and B-cell immune responses (i.e. epitopes). Since its last publication in the NAR webserver issue in 2008, a new generation of peptide:MH...

  6. Carbohydrates and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Teens > Carbohydrates and Diabetes A A A What's in this ... that you should keep track of how many carbohydrates (carbs) you eat. But what exactly are carbohydrates ...

  7. Differential Recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific Epitopes as a Function of Tuberculosis Disease History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scriba, Thomas J; Carpenter, Chelsea; Pro, Sebastian Carrasco; Sidney, John; Musvosvi, Munyaradzi; Rozot, Virginie; Seumois, Grégory; Rosales, Sandy L; Vijayanand, Pandurangan; Goletti, Delia; Makgotlho, Edward; Hanekom, Willem; Hatherill, Mark; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro; Arlehamn, Cecilia S Lindestam

    2017-09-15

    Individuals with a history of tuberculosis (TB) disease are at elevated risk of disease recurrence. The underlying cause is not known, but one explanation is that previous disease results in less-effective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We hypothesized that the repertoire of Mtb-derived epitopes recognized by T cells from individuals with latent Mtb infection differs as a function of previous diagnosis of active TB disease. T-cell responses to peptide pools in samples collected from an adult screening and an adolescent validation cohort were measured by IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay or intracellular cytokine staining. We identified a set of "type 2" T-cell epitopes that were recognized at 10-fold-lower levels in Mtb-infected individuals with a history of TB disease less than 6 years ago than in those without previous TB. By contrast, "type 1" epitopes were recognized equally well in individuals with or without previous TB. The differential epitope recognition was not due to differences in HLA class II binding, memory phenotypes, or gene expression in the responding T cells. Instead, "TB disease history-sensitive" type 2 epitopes were significantly (P < 0.0001) more homologous to sequences from bacteria found in the human microbiome than type 1 epitopes. Preferential loss of T-cell reactivity to Mtb epitopes that are homologous to bacteria in the microbiome in persons with previous TB disease may reflect long-term effects of antibiotic TB treatment on the microbiome.

  8. Preferential reasoning for modal logics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Modal logic is the foundation for a versatile and well-established class of knowledge representation formalisms in artificial intelligence. Enriching modal logics with non-monotonic reasoning capabilities such as preferential reasoning as developed...

  9. Intact Transition Epitope Mapping (ITEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yefremova, Yelena; Opuni, Kwabena F. M.; Danquah, Bright D.; Thiesen, Hans-Juergen; Glocker, Michael O.

    2017-08-01

    Intact transition epitope mapping (ITEM) enables rapid and accurate determination of protein antigen-derived epitopes by either epitope extraction or epitope excision. Upon formation of the antigen peptide-containing immune complex in solution, the entire mixture is electrosprayed to translate all constituents as protonated ions into the gas phase. There, ions from antibody-peptide complexes are separated from unbound peptide ions according to their masses, charges, and shapes either by ion mobility drift or by quadrupole ion filtering. Subsequently, immune complexes are dissociated by collision induced fragmentation and the ion signals of the "complex-released peptides," which in effect are the epitope peptides, are recorded in the time-of-flight analyzer of the mass spectrometer. Mixing of an antibody solution with a solution in which antigens or antigen-derived peptides are dissolved is, together with antigen proteolysis, the only required in-solution handling step. Simplicity of sample handling and speed of analysis together with very low sample consumption makes ITEM faster and easier to perform than other experimental epitope mapping methods.

  10. Effect of anti-carbohydrate antibodies on HIV infection in a monocytic cell line (U937)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against carbohydrate epitopes of gp120 have recently been found to inhibit HIV infection of lymphocytes in vitro thereby opening new possibilities for vaccine considerations. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection has however come increasingly into focus. This st......Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against carbohydrate epitopes of gp120 have recently been found to inhibit HIV infection of lymphocytes in vitro thereby opening new possibilities for vaccine considerations. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection has however come increasingly into focus...

  11. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  12. Hamiltonian Dynamics of Preferential Attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Zuev, Konstantin; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Prediction and control of network dynamics are grand-challenge problems in network science. The lack of understanding of fundamental laws driving the dynamics of networks is among the reasons why many practical problems of great significance remain unsolved for decades. Here we study the dynamics of networks evolving according to preferential attachment, known to approximate well the large-scale growth dynamics of a variety of real networks. We show that this dynamics is Hamiltonian, thus casting the study of complex networks dynamics to the powerful canonical formalism, in which the time evolution of a dynamical system is described by Hamilton's equations. We derive the explicit form of the Hamiltonian that governs network growth in preferential attachment. This Hamiltonian turns out to be nearly identical to graph energy in the configuration model, which shows that the ensemble of random graphs generated by preferential attachment is nearly identical to the ensemble of random graphs with scale-free degree d...

  13. Non-preferential Trading Clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the welfare implications of non-discriminatory tariff reforms by a subset of countries, which we term a non-preferential trading club. We show that there exist coordinated tariff reforms, accompanied by appropriate income transfers between the member countries, that unambiguou......This paper examines the welfare implications of non-discriminatory tariff reforms by a subset of countries, which we term a non-preferential trading club. We show that there exist coordinated tariff reforms, accompanied by appropriate income transfers between the member countries...

  14. Non-preferential Trading Clubs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raimondos-Møller, Pascalis; Woodland, Alan D.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the welfare implications of non-discriminatory tariff reforms by a subset of countries, which we term a non-preferential trading club. We show that there exist coordinated tariff reforms, accompanied by appropriate income transfers between the member countries, that unambiguou......This paper examines the welfare implications of non-discriminatory tariff reforms by a subset of countries, which we term a non-preferential trading club. We show that there exist coordinated tariff reforms, accompanied by appropriate income transfers between the member countries...

  15. Identification and Phylogeny of the First T Cell Epitope Identified from a Human Gut Bacteroides Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa Perez-Muñoz

    Full Text Available Host T cell reactivity toward gut bacterial epitopes has been recognized as part of disease pathogenesis. However, the specificity of T cells that recognize this vast number of epitopes has not yet been well described. After colonizing a C57BL/6J germ-free mouse with the human gut symbiotic bacteria Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, we isolated a T cell that recognized these bacteria in vitro. Using this T cell, we mapped the first known non-carbohydrate T cell epitope within the phylum Bacteroidetes. The T cell also reacted to two other additional Bacteroides species. We identified the peptide that stimulated the T cell by using a genetic approach. Genomic data from the epitope-positive and epitope-negative bacteria explain the cross-reactivity of the T cell to multiple species. This epitope degeneracy should shape our understanding of the T cell repertoire stimulated by the complex microbiome residing in the gastrointestinal tract in both healthy and disease states.

  16. Human L-selectin preferentially binds synthetic glycosulfopeptides modeled after endoglycan and containing tyrosine sulfate residues and sialyl Lewis x in core 2 O-glycans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Anne; Parviainen, Ville; Ahola-Iivarinen, Elina; Kalkkinen, Nisse; Cummings, Richard D

    2010-01-01

    Endoglycan is a mucin-like glycoprotein expressed by endothelial cells and some leukocytes and is recognized by L-selectin, a C-type lectin important in leukocyte trafficking and extravasation during inflammation. Here, we show that recombinant L-selectin and human T lymphocytes expressing L-selectin bind to synthetic glycosulfopeptides (GSPs). These synthetic glycosulfopeptides contain 37 amino acid residues modeled after the N-terminus of human endoglycan and contain one or two tyrosine sulfates (TyrSO3) along with a nearby core-2-based Thr-linked O-glycan with sialyl Lewis x (C2-SLex). TyrSO3 at position Y118 was more critical for binding than at Y97. C2-SLex at T124 was required for L-selectin recognition. Interestingly, under similar conditions, neither L-selectin nor T lymphocytes showed appreciable binding to the sulfated carbohydrate epitope 6-sulfo-SLex. P-selectin also bound to endoglycan-based GSPs but with lower affinity than toward GSPs modeled after PSGL-1, the physiological ligand for P- and L-selectin that is expressed on leukocytes. These results demonstrate that TyrSO3 residues in association with a C2-SLex moiety within endoglycan and PSGL-1 are preferentially recognized by L-selectin. PMID:20507883

  17. Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resource (IEDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This repository contains antibody/B cell and T cell epitope information and epitope prediction and analysis tools for use by the research community worldwide. Immune...

  18. Preferential Nucleation during Polymorphic Transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, H.; Sietsma, J.; Offerman, S. E.

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphism is the ability of a solid material to exist in more than one phase or crystal structure. Polymorphism may occur in metals, alloys, ceramics, minerals, polymers, and pharmaceutical substances. Unresolved are the conditions for preferential nucleation during polymorphic transformations in which structural relationships or special crystallographic orientation relationships (OR’s) form between the nucleus and surrounding matrix grains. We measured in-situ and simultaneously the nucleation rates of grains that have zero, one, two, three and four special OR’s with the surrounding parent grains. These experiments show a trend in which the activation energy for nucleation becomes smaller - and therefore nucleation more probable - with increasing number of special OR’s. These insights contribute to steering the processing of polymorphic materials with tailored properties, since preferential nucleation affects which crystal structure forms, the average grain size and texture of the material, and thereby - to a large extent - the final properties of the material.

  19. Periexercise coingestion of branched-chain amino acids and carbohydrate in men does not preferentially augment resistance exercise-induced increases in phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase/protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin pathway markers indicative of muscle protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Pontes; Li, Rui; Cooke, Matthew; Kreider, Richard B; Willoughby, Darryn S

    2014-03-01

    The effects of a single bout of resistance exercise (RE) in conjunction with periexercise branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) and carbohydrate (CHO) ingestion on skeletal muscle signaling markers indicative of muscle protein synthesis were determined. It was hypothesized that CHO + BCAA would elicit a more profound effect on these signaling markers compared with CHO. Twenty-seven males were randomly assigned to CHO, CHO + BCAA, or placebo (PLC) groups. Four sets of leg presses and leg extensions were performed at 80% 1 repetition maximum. Supplements were ingested 30 minutes and immediately before and after RE. Venous blood and muscle biopsy samples were obtained immediately before supplement ingestion and 0.5, 2, and 6 hours after RE. Serum insulin and glucose and phosphorylated levels of muscle insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1), protein kinase B, mammalian target of rapamycin, phosphorylated 70S6 kinase, and 4E binding protein 1 were assessed. Data were analyzed by 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. Significant group × time interactions were observed for glucose and insulin (P protein kinase B (P = .031), mammalian target of rapamycin (P = .003), and phosphorylated 70S6 kinase (P = .001). Carbohydrate and CHO + BCAA supplementation significantly increased IRS-1 compared with PLC (P = .002). However, periexercise coingestion of CHO and BCAA did not augment RE-induced increases in skeletal muscle signaling markers indicative of muscle protein synthesis when compared with CHO.

  20. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  1. Neoglycoproteins as carbohydrate antigens: synthesis, analysis, and polyclonal antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerékgyártó, Márta; Fekete, Anikó; Szurmai, Zoltán; Kerékgyártó, János; Takács, László; Kurucz, István; Guttman, András

    2013-08-01

    The analysis and polyclonal antibody response for newly synthesized maltose-BSA conjugate neoglycoproteins is described. In this first proof of concept study, a simple carbohydrate antigen, maltose, was linked to BSA by reductive amination. An aglycone spacer was utilized to conserve the intact annular maltose structure and to promote the accessibility of the carbohydrate immunogen hapten during immunization. The neoglycoproteins were investigated by CGE and the number of conjugated maltose residues was determined by MALDI-TOF MS. The neoglycoproteins were then evaluated by immunization of BALB/c mice and the polyclonal antibody response was tested by ELISA as evidence for the presence of sugar-containing epitope-specific antibodies. Selective antibody binding was demonstrated to the synthesized neoglycoproteins with different (low and high) glycosylation degrees suggesting the possible use of this approach to generate antibodies. Moreover, the polyclonal antibody response was not inhibited by maltose or other simple carbohydrates to confirm presence of the neoglycoprotein-specific antibodies.

  2. Semantic foundation for preferential description logics

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available that they refer to as concept models. They present representation results for the description logic ALC for both preferential and rational consequence relations. They argue that their semantics pave the way for extending preferential and rational consequence...

  3. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  4. Epitope predictions indicate the presence of two distinct types of epitope-antibody-reactivities determined by epitope profiling of intravenous immunoglobulins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Luštrek

    Full Text Available Epitope-antibody-reactivities (EAR of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIGs determined for 75,534 peptides by microarray analysis demonstrate that roughly 9% of peptides derived from 870 different human protein sequences react with antibodies present in IVIG. Computational prediction of linear B cell epitopes was conducted using machine learning with an ensemble of classifiers in combination with position weight matrix (PWM analysis. Machine learning slightly outperformed PWM with area under the curve (AUC of 0.884 vs. 0.849. Two different types of epitope-antibody recognition-modes (Type I EAR and Type II EAR were found. Peptides of Type I EAR are high in tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine, and low in asparagine, glutamine and glutamic acid residues, whereas for peptides of Type II EAR it is the other way around. Representative crystal structures present in the Protein Data Bank (PDB of Type I EAR are PDB 1TZI and PDB 2DD8, while PDB 2FD6 and 2J4W are typical for Type II EAR. Type I EAR peptides share predicted propensities for being presented by MHC class I and class II complexes. The latter interaction possibly favors T cell-dependent antibody responses including IgG class switching. Peptides of Type II EAR are predicted not to be preferentially presented by MHC complexes, thus implying the involvement of T cell-independent IgG class switch mechanisms. The high extent of IgG immunoglobulin reactivity with human peptides implies that circulating IgG molecules are prone to bind to human protein/peptide structures under non-pathological, non-inflammatory conditions. A webserver for predicting EAR of peptide sequences is available at www.sysmed-immun.eu/EAR.

  5. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Carbohydrates and Diabetes KidsHealth > For Parents > Carbohydrates and Diabetes ... many kids with diabetes take to stay healthy. Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar The two main forms of ...

  6. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  7. Harmonious Unifying Hybrid Preferential Supernetwork Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Qiang; FANG; Jin-qing; LI; Yong

    2015-01-01

    The basic concepts and methods for harmonious unifying hybrid preferential model(HUHPM)are based on random preferential attachment(RPA)mixed with deterministic preferential attachment(DPA),so there is only one unified hybrid ratio dr,which is defined as:

  8. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKnoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/ involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development.

  9. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Linyuan

    2011-01-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential to address information overload problem, namely to help users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlook the significance of diversity and novelty which indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark datasets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  10. Information filtering via preferential diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Weiping

    2011-06-01

    Recommender systems have shown great potential in addressing the information overload problem, namely helping users in finding interesting and relevant objects within a huge information space. Some physical dynamics, including the heat conduction process and mass or energy diffusion on networks, have recently found applications in personalized recommendation. Most of the previous studies focus overwhelmingly on recommendation accuracy as the only important factor, while overlooking the significance of diversity and novelty that indeed provide the vitality of the system. In this paper, we propose a recommendation algorithm based on the preferential diffusion process on a user-object bipartite network. Numerical analyses on two benchmark data sets, MovieLens and Netflix, indicate that our method outperforms the state-of-the-art methods. Specifically, it can not only provide more accurate recommendations, but also generate more diverse and novel recommendations by accurately recommending unpopular objects.

  11. CARBOHYDRATE-CONTAINING COMPOUNDS WHICH BIND TO CARBOHYDRATE BINDING RECEPTORS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1995-01-01

    Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases.......Carbohydrate-containing compounds which contain saccharides or derivatives thereof and which bind to carbohydrate binding receptors are useful in pharmaceutical products for treatment of inflammatory diseases and other diseases....

  12. The Immune Epitope Database 2.0

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoof, Ilka; Vita, R; Zarebski, L;

    2010-01-01

    The Immune Epitope Database (IEDB, www.iedb.org) provides a catalog of experimentally characterized B and T cell epitopes, as well as data on Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) binding and MHC ligand elution experiments. The database represents the molecular structures recognized by adaptive...... immune receptors and the experimental contexts in which these molecules were determined to be immune epitopes. Epitopes recognized in humans, nonhuman primates, rodents, pigs, cats and all other tested species are included. Both positive and negative experimental results are captured. Over the course...

  13. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  14. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  15. Carbohydrate terminology and classification

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cummings, J H; Stephen, A M

    2007-01-01

    ...) and polysaccharides (DP> or =10). Within this classification, a number of terms are used such as mono- and disaccharides, polyols, oligosaccharides, starch, modified starch, non-starch polysaccharides, total carbohydrate, sugars, etc...

  16. Promiscuity of the Euonymus Carbohydrate-Binding Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els J.M. Van Damme

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants synthesize small amounts of carbohydrate-binding proteins on exposure to stress. For example, on exposure to drought, high salt, wounding and by treatment with some plant hormones or by pathogen attack. In contrast to the ‘classical’ plant lectins that are mostly located in the vacuolar compartment, this new class of inducible lectins is present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Taking into account that any physiological role of plant lectins most likely relies on their specific carbohydrate-binding activity and specificity, the discovery of these stress-related lectins provides strong evidence for the importance of protein-carbohydrate-interactions in plant cells. Hitherto, six families of such nucleocytoplasmic lectins have been identified in plants. This review will focus on the nucleocytoplasmic lectins with one or more Euonymus lectin (EUL domain(s. The carbohydrate-binding specificity of EUL proteins from a monocot, a dicot and a lower plant has been compared. Furthermore, modeling of the different EUL domains revealed a similar ß-trefoil fold consisting of three bundles of ß-sheet organized around a pseudo three-fold symmetry axis. Despite the sequence similarity and the conserved amino acids in the binding site, glycan array analyses showed that the EUL domain has a promiscuous carbohydrate-binding site capable of accommodating high mannose N-glycans, blood group B related structures and galactosylated epitopes.

  17. The role of human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate in neuronal plasticity and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morise, Jyoji; Takematsu, Hiromu; Oka, Shogo

    2017-10-01

    The human natural killer-1 (HNK-1) carbohydrate, a unique trisaccharide possessing sulfated glucuronic acid in a non-reducing terminus (HSO3-3GlcAß1-3Galß1-4GlcNAc-), is highly expressed in the nervous system and its spatiotemporal expression is strictly regulated. Mice deficient in the gene encoding a key enzyme, GlcAT-P, of the HNK-1 biosynthetic pathway exhibit almost complete disappearance of the HNK-1 epitope in the brain, significant reduction of long-term potentiation, and aberration of spatial learning and memory formation. In addition to its physiological roles in higher brain function, the HNK-1 carbohydrate has attracted considerable attention as an autoantigen associated with peripheral demyelinative neuropathy, which relates to IgM paraproteinemia, because of high immunogenicity. It has been suggested, however, that serum autoantibodies in IgM anti-myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG) antibody-associated neuropathy patients show heterogeneous reactivity to the HNK-1 epitope. We have found that structurally distinct HNK-1 epitopes are expressed in specific proteins in the nervous system. Here, we overview the current knowledge of the involvement of these HNK-1 epitopes in the regulation of neural plasticity and discuss the impact of different HNK-1 antigens of anti-MAG neuropathy patients. We identified the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2 and aggrecan as HNK-1 carrier proteins. The HNK-1 epitope on GluA2 and aggrecan regulates neural plasticity in different ways. Furthermore, we found the clinical relationship between reactivity of autoantibodies to the different HNK-1 epitopes and progression of anti-MAG neuropathy. The HNK-1 epitope is indispensable for the acquisition of normal neuronal function and can be a good target for the establishment of diagnostic criteria for anti-MAG neuropathy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Coexistence in preferential attachment networks

    CERN Document Server

    Antunović, Tonći; Racz, Miklos Z

    2013-01-01

    Competition in markets is ubiquitous: cell-phone providers, computer manufacturers, and sport gear brands all vie for customers. Though several coexisting competitors are often observed in empirical data, many current theoretical models of competition on small-world networks predict a single winner taking over the majority of the network. We introduce a new model of product adoption that focuses on word-of-mouth recommendations to provide an explanation for this coexistence of competitors. The key property of our model is that customer choices evolve simultaneously with the network of customers. When a new node joins the network, it chooses neighbors according to preferential attachment, and then chooses its type based on the number of initial neighbors of each type. This can model a new cell-phone user choosing a cell-phone provider, a new student choosing a laptop, or a new athletic team member choosing a gear provider. We provide a detailed analysis of the new model; in particular, we determine the possibl...

  19. 15 CFR 700.14 - Preferential scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ...) BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND SECURITY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE NATIONAL SECURITY INDUSTRIAL BASE REGULATIONS DEFENSE PRIORITIES AND ALLOCATIONS SYSTEM Industrial Priorities § 700.14 Preferential scheduling. (a) A...

  20. Induction of multi-epitope specific antibodies against HIV-1 by multi-epitope vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Some neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 envelope proteins were highly effective to inhibit the infection of different strains in vitro, and existed in the infected individuals with very low levels. We suggested multi-epitope-vaccine as a new strategy to increase levels of neutralizing antibodies and the abilities against HIV mutation in vivo. Two candidate multi-epitope-vaccines induced antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity in rhesus macaque. These antibodies recognized corresponding neutralizing epitopes on epitope-peptides, gp41 peptides, V3 loop peptide, rsgp41 and rgp120. Besides, three candidate epitope-vaccines in combination (another kind of multi-epitopevaccines) showed similar potency to induce predefined multiple immune responses in rabbits. These results suggest that multi-epitope-vaccines may be a new strategy to induce multi-antiviral activities against HIV-1 infection and mutafions.

  1. Synchronizability Analysis of Harmonious Unification Hybrid Preferential Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The harmonious unification hybrid preferential model uses the dr ratio to adjust the proportion of deterministic preferential attachment and random preferential attachment, enriched the only deterministic preferential network model,

  2. Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors: Pattern Recognition and Involvement of Carbohydrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Porgador

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs, expressed by natural killer (NK cells, trigger NK lysis of tumor and virus-infected cells on interaction with cell-surface ligands of these target cells. We have determined that viral hemagglutinins expressed on the surface of virus-infected cells are involved in the recognition by the NCRs, NKp44 and NKp46. Recognition of tumor cells by the NCRs NKp30 and NKp46 involves heparan sulfate epitopes expressed on the tumor cell membrane. Our studies provide new evidence for the identity of the ligands for NCRs and indicate that a broader definition should be applied to pathological patterns recognized by innate immune receptors. Since nonmicrobial endogenous carbohydrate structures contribute significantly to this recognition, there is an imperative need to develop appropriate tools for the facile sequencing of carbohydrate moieties.

  3. Carbohydrates in therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilcoyne, Michelle; Joshi, Lokesh

    2007-07-01

    Awareness of the importance of carbohydrates in living systems and medicine is growing due to the increasing understanding of their biological and pharmacological relevance. Carbohydrates are ubiquitous and perform a wide array of biological roles. Carbohydrate-based or -modified therapeutics are used extensively in cardiovascular and hematological treatments ranging from inflammatory diseases and anti-thrombotic treatments to wound healing. Heparin is a well-known and widely used example of a carbohydrate-based drug but will not be discussed as it has been extensively reviewed. We will detail carbohydrate-based and -modified therapeutics, both those that are currently marketed or in various stages of clinical trials and those that are potential therapeutics based on promising preclinical investigations. Carbohydrate-based therapeutics include polysaccharide and oligosaccharide anti-inflammatory, anti-coagulant and anti-thrombotic agents from natural and synthetic sources, some as an alternative to heparin and others which were designed based on known structure-functional relationships. Some of these compounds have multiple biological effects, showing anti-adhesive, anti-HIV and anti-arthrithic activities. Small molecules, derivatives or mimetics of complement inhibitors, are detailed for use in limiting ischemia/ reperfusion injuries. Monosaccharides, both natural and synthetic, have been investigated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and cardioprotective properties. Modification by glycosylation of natural products, or glycosylation-mimicking modification, has a significant effect on the parent molecule including increased plasma half-life and refining or increasing desired functions. It is hoped that this review will highlight the vast therapeutic potential of these natural bioactive molecules.

  4. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marler, Thomas E; Lindström, Anders J

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology that would benefit from a greater understanding of the role of carbohydrate relations. PMID:26479502

  5. Functional characterization of a monoclonal antibody epitope using a lambda phage display-deep sequencing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domina, Maria; Lanza Cariccio, Veronica; Benfatto, Salvatore; Venza, Mario; Venza, Isabella; Borgogni, Erica; Castellino, Flora; Midiri, Angelina; Galbo, Roberta; Romeo, Letizia; Biondo, Carmelo; Masignani, Vega; Teti, Giuseppe; Felici, Franco; Beninati, Concetta

    2016-01-01

    We have recently described a method, named PROFILER, for the identification of antigenic regions preferentially targeted by polyclonal antibody responses after vaccination. To test the ability of the technique to provide insights into the functional properties of monoclonal antibody (mAb) epitopes, we used here a well-characterized epitope of meningococcal factor H binding protein (fHbp), which is recognized by mAb 12C1. An fHbp library, engineered on a lambda phage vector enabling surface expression of polypeptides of widely different length, was subjected to massive parallel sequencing of the phage inserts after affinity selection with the 12C1 mAb. We detected dozens of unique antibody-selected sequences, the most enriched of which (designated as FrC) could largely recapitulate the ability of fHbp to bind mAb 12C1. Computational analysis of the cumulative enrichment of single amino acids in the antibody-selected fragments identified two overrepresented stretches of residues (H248-K254 and S140-G154), whose presence was subsequently found to be required for binding of FrC to mAb 12C1. Collectively, these results suggest that the PROFILER technology can rapidly and reliably identify, in the context of complex conformational epitopes, discrete “hot spots” with a crucial role in antigen-antibody interactions, thereby providing useful clues for the functional characterization of the epitope. PMID:27530334

  6. Preferential urn model and nongrowing complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Jun; Yasuda, Muneki; Tanaka, Kazuyuki

    2005-12-01

    A preferential urn model, which is based on the concept "the rich get richer," is proposed. From a relationship between a nongrowing model for complex networks and the preferential urn model in regard to degree distributions, it is revealed that a fitness parameter in the nongrowing model is interpreted as an inverse local temperature in the preferential urn model. Furthermore, it is clarified that the preferential urn model with randomness generates a fat-tailed occupation distribution; the concept of the local temperature enables us to understand the fat-tailed occupation distribution intuitively. Since the preferential urn model is a simple stochastic model, it can be applied to research on not only the nongrowing complex networks, but also many other fields such as econophysics and social sciences.

  7. Characterization of the carbohydrate components of Taenia solium oncosphere proteins and their role in the antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, Yanina; Verastegui, Manuela; Tuero, Iskra; Grandjean, Louis; Garcia, Hector H; Gilman, Robert H

    2013-10-01

    This study examines the carbohydrate composition of Taenia solium whole oncosphere antigens (WOAs), in order to improve the understanding of the antigenicity of the T. solium. Better knowledge of oncosphere antigens is crucial to accurately diagnose previous exposure to T. solium eggs and thus predict the development of neurocysticercosis. A set of seven lectins conjugates with wide carbohydrate specificity were used on parasite fixations and somatic extracts. Lectin fluorescence revealed that D-mannose, D-glucose, D-galactose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine residues were the most abundant constituents of carbohydrate chains on the surface of T. solium oncosphere. Lectin blotting showed that posttranslational modification with N-glycosylation was abundant while little evidence of O-linked carbohydrates was observed. Chemical oxidation and enzymatic deglycosylation in situ were performed to investigate the immunoreactivity of the carbohydrate moieties. Linearizing or removing the carbohydrate moieties from the protein backbones did not diminish the immunoreactivity of these antigens, suggesting that a substantial part of the host immune response against T. solium oncosphere is directed against the peptide epitopes on the parasite antigens. Finally, using carbohydrate probes, we demonstrated for the first time that the presence of several lectins on the surface of the oncosphere was specific to carbohydrates found in intestinal mucus, suggesting a possible role in initial attachment of the parasite to host cells.

  8. Epitope discovery with phylogenetic hidden Markov models.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lacerda, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    Existing methods for the prediction of immunologically active T-cell epitopes are based on the amino acid sequence or structure of pathogen proteins. Additional information regarding the locations of epitopes may be acquired by considering the evolution of viruses in hosts with different immune backgrounds. In particular, immune-dependent evolutionary patterns at sites within or near T-cell epitopes can be used to enhance epitope identification. We have developed a mutation-selection model of T-cell epitope evolution that allows the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype of the host to influence the evolutionary process. This is one of the first examples of the incorporation of environmental parameters into a phylogenetic model and has many other potential applications where the selection pressures exerted on an organism can be related directly to environmental factors. We combine this novel evolutionary model with a hidden Markov model to identify contiguous amino acid positions that appear to evolve under immune pressure in the presence of specific host immune alleles and that therefore represent potential epitopes. This phylogenetic hidden Markov model provides a rigorous probabilistic framework that can be combined with sequence or structural information to improve epitope prediction. As a demonstration, we apply the model to a data set of HIV-1 protein-coding sequences and host HLA genotypes.

  9. Carbohydrates, Sugar, and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Part of a Healthy Diet? en español Los carbohidratos, el azúcar y su hijo What Are Carbohydrates? ... a person's risk of developing health problems like diabetes. Some carbohydrate-dense foods are healthier than others. ...

  10. BepiPred-2.0: improving sequence-based B-cell epitope prediction using conformational epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Martin Closter; Peters, Bjoern; Nielsen, Morten

    2017-01-01

    for predicting B-cell epitopes from antigen sequences. BepiPred-2.0 is based on a random forest algorithm trained on epitopes annotated from antibody-antigen protein structures. This new method was found to outperform other available tools for sequence-based epitope prediction both on epitope data derived from...

  11. Carbohydrates for training and competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; Hawley, John A; Wong, Stephen H S; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2011-01-01

    An athlete's carbohydrate intake can be judged by whether total daily intake and the timing of consumption in relation to exercise maintain adequate carbohydrate substrate for the muscle and central nervous system ("high carbohydrate availability") or whether carbohydrate fuel sources are limiting for the daily exercise programme ("low carbohydrate availability"). Carbohydrate availability is increased by consuming carbohydrate in the hours or days prior to the session, intake during exercise, and refuelling during recovery between sessions. This is important for the competition setting or for high-intensity training where optimal performance is desired. Carbohydrate intake during exercise should be scaled according to the characteristics of the event. During sustained high-intensity sports lasting ~1 h, small amounts of carbohydrate, including even mouth-rinsing, enhance performance via central nervous system effects. While 30-60 g · h(-1) is an appropriate target for sports of longer duration, events >2.5 h may benefit from higher intakes of up to 90 g · h(-1). Products containing special blends of different carbohydrates may maximize absorption of carbohydrate at such high rates. In real life, athletes undertake training sessions with varying carbohydrate availability. Whether implementing additional "train-low" strategies to increase the training adaptation leads to enhanced performance in well-trained individuals is unclear.

  12. Specific Carbohydrate Diet: Does It Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Go Back The Specific Carbohydrate Diet (SCD) Email Print + Share There is no ... diet that has received attention is the Specific Carbohydrate Diet. This diet limits poorly digestible carbohydrates to ...

  13. Preferential Education Policies for the Handicapped.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Warren T.

    1981-01-01

    The author examines the issue of preferential education for the handicapped from the perspectives of ethics, civil rights, and theories of justice. This article is part of a theme issue on disabled persons. (SJL)

  14. Concept model semantics for DL preferential reasoning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Britz, K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The preferential and rational consequence relations first studied by Lehmann and colleagues play a central role in non-monotonic reasoning, not least because they provide the foundation for the determination of the important notion of rational...

  15. Automatic Generation of Validated Specific Epitope Sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Carrasco Pro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of B and T cell responses is a valuable tool to study autoimmunity, allergies, immunity to pathogens, and host-pathogen interactions and assist in the design and evaluation of T cell vaccines and immunotherapies. In this context, it is desirable to elucidate a method to select validated reference sets of epitopes to allow detection of T and B cells. However, the ever-growing information contained in the Immune Epitope Database (IEDB and the differences in quality and subjects studied between epitope assays make this task complicated. In this study, we develop a novel method to automatically select reference epitope sets according to a categorization system employed by the IEDB. From the sets generated, three epitope sets (EBV, mycobacteria and dengue were experimentally validated by detection of T cell reactivity ex vivo from human donors. Furthermore, a web application that will potentially be implemented in the IEDB was created to allow users the capacity to generate customized epitope sets.

  16. Antigen epitope of Helicobacter pylorivacuolating cytotoxin A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Li Liu; Shu-Qin Li; Chun-Jie Liu; Hao-Xia Tao; Zhao-Shan Zhang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct and select antigen epitopes of vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA) for nontoxic VacA vaccine against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori) infection.METHODS: Eleven VacA epitopes were predicted according to VacA antigenic bioinformatics. Three candidates of VacA epitope were constructed through different combined epitopes. The candidate was linked with E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) by a linker of 7 amino acids, and cloned into plasmid pQE-60 in which fusion LTB-VacA epitope was efficiently expressed. To test the antigencity of the candidate, 6 BALB/c mice were treated with the fusion LTB-VacA epitope through intraperitoneal injection. To explore the ability of inhibiting the toxicity of VacA, cantiserum against the candidate was used to counteract VacA that induced HeLa cells to produce cell vacuoles in vitro.RESULTS: Serum IgG against the candidate was induced in the BALB/c mice. In vitro, the three antisera against the candidate efficiently counteracted the toxicity of VacA, and decreased the number of cell vacuoles by 14.17%, 20.20%and 30.41% respectively.CONCLUSION: Two of the three candidates, LZ-VacA1and LZ-VacA2, can be used to further study the mechanism of vacuolating toxicity of VacA, and to construct nontoxic VacA vaccine against H pylori infection.

  17. Subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes contribute to resistance against experimental infection with a human protozoan parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana R Dominguez

    Full Text Available During adaptive immune response, pathogen-specific CD8(+ T cells recognize preferentially a small number of epitopes, a phenomenon known as immunodominance. Its biological implications during natural or vaccine-induced immune responses are still unclear. Earlier, we have shown that during experimental infection, the human intracellular pathogen Trypanosoma cruzi restricts the repertoire of CD8(+ T cells generating strong immunodominance. We hypothesized that this phenomenon could be a mechanism used by the parasite to reduce the breath and magnitude of the immune response, favoring parasitism, and thus that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire could favor the host. Here, we confirmed our previous observation by showing that CD8(+ T cells of H-2(a infected mice recognized a single epitope of an immunodominant antigen of the trans-sialidase super-family. In sharp contrast, CD8(+ T cells from mice immunized with recombinant genetic vaccines (plasmid DNA and adenovirus expressing this same T. cruzi antigen recognized, in addition to the immunodominant epitope, two other subdominant epitopes. This unexpected observation allowed us to test the protective role of the immune response to subdominant epitopes. This was accomplished by genetic vaccination of mice with mutated genes that did not express a functional immunodominant epitope. We found that these mice developed immune responses directed solely to the subdominant/cryptic CD8 T cell epitopes and a significant degree of protective immunity against infection mediated by CD8(+ T cells. We concluded that artificially broadening the T cell repertoire contributes to host resistance against infection, a finding that has implications for the host-parasite relationship and vaccine development.

  18. Carbohydrates, pollinators, and cycads

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cycad biology, ecology, and horticulture decisions are not supported by adequate research, and experiments in cycad physiology in particular have been deficient. Our recent report on free sugar content in a range of cycad taxa and tissues sets the stage for developing continued carbohydrate research. Growth and development of cycad pollen, mediation of the herbivory traits of specialist pollinators, and support of expensive strobilus behavioral traits are areas of cycad pollination biology th...

  19. Combination of In Silico Methods in the Search for Potential CD4(+) and CD8(+) T Cell Epitopes in the Proteome of Leishmania braziliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    E Silva, Rafael de Freitas; Ferreira, Luiz Felipe Gomes Rebello; Hernandes, Marcelo Zaldini; de Brito, Maria Edileuza Felinto; de Oliveira, Beatriz Coutinho; da Silva, Ailton Alvaro; de-Melo-Neto, Osvaldo Pompílio; Rezende, Antônio Mauro; Pereira, Valéria Rêgo Alves

    2016-01-01

    The leishmaniases are neglected tropical diseases widespread throughout the globe, which are caused by protozoans from the genus Leishmania and are transmitted by infected phlebotomine flies. The development of a safe and effective vaccine against these diseases has been seen as the best alternative to control and reduce the number of cases. To support vaccine development, this work has applied an in silico approach to search for high potential peptide epitopes able to bind to different major histocompatibility complex Class I and Class II (MHC I and MHC II) molecules from different human populations. First, the predicted proteome of Leishmania braziliensis was compared and analyzed by modern linear programs to find epitopes with the capacity to trigger an immune response. This approach resulted in thousands of epitopes derived from 8,000 proteins conserved among different Leishmania species. Epitopes from proteins similar to those found in host species were excluded, and epitopes from proteins conserved between different Leishmania species and belonging to surface proteins were preferentially selected. The resulting epitopes were then clustered, to avoid redundancies, resulting in a total of 230 individual epitopes for MHC I and 2,319 for MHC II. These were used for molecular modeling and docking with MHC structures retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. Molecular docking then ranked epitopes based on their predicted binding affinity to both MHC I and II. Peptides corresponding to the top 10 ranked epitopes were synthesized and evaluated in vitro for their capacity to stimulate peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from post-treated cutaneous leishmaniasis patients, with PBMC from healthy donors used as control. From the 10 peptides tested, 50% showed to be immunogenic and capable to stimulate the proliferation of lymphocytes from recovered individuals.

  20. Carbohydrate determinants in ferret conjunctiva are affected by infection with influenza H1N1 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Martel, Cyril; Aasted, Bent

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates often accomplish as cell-surface receptors for microorganisms and influenza virus preferentially binds to sialic acid through the viral haemagglutinin. The virus may attach not only to the epithelium in the airways, but also to the surface ocular epithelium....

  1. Convergent synthetic methodology for the construction of self-adjuvanting lipopeptide vaccines using a novel carbohydrate scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Fagan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel convergent synthetic strategy for the construction of multicomponent self-adjuvanting lipopeptide vaccines was developed. A tetraalkyne-functionalized glucose derivative and lipidated Fmoc-lysine were prepared by novel efficient and convenient syntheses. The carbohydrate building block was coupled to the self-adjuvanting lipidic moiety (three lipidated Fmoc-lysines on solid support. Four copies of a group A streptococcal B cell epitope (J8 were then conjugated to the glyco-lipopeptide using a copper-catalyzed cycloaddition reaction. The approach was elaborated by the preparation of a second vaccine candidate which incorporated an additional promiscuous T-helper epitope.

  2. Preferential sampling in veterinary parasitological surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Lorenzo; Biggeri, Annibale; Grisotto, Laura; Berrocal, Veronica; Rinaldi, Laura; Musella, Vincenzo; Cringoli, Giuseppe; Catelan, Dolores

    2016-04-18

    In parasitological surveillance of livestock, prevalence surveys are conducted on a sample of farms using several sampling designs. For example, opportunistic surveys or informative sampling designs are very common. Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not independent. Most examples of preferential sampling in the spatial statistics literature are in environmental statistics with focus on pollutant monitors, and it has been shown that, if preferential sampling is present and is not accounted for in the statistical modelling and data analysis, statistical inference can be misleading. In this paper, working in the context of veterinary parasitology, we propose and use geostatistical models to predict the continuous and spatially-varying risk of a parasite infection. Specifically, breaking with the common practice in veterinary parasitological surveillance to ignore preferential sampling even though informative or opportunistic samples are very common, we specify a two-stage hierarchical Bayesian model that adjusts for preferential sampling and we apply it to data on Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep farms in Campania region (Southern Italy) in the years 2013-2014.

  3. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Isabella; Piccardi, Carlo; Tajoli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of "preferentiality" in countries' trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members' trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech "Textiles and Textile Articles" and the high-tech "Electronics" sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns.

  4. Preferential sampling in veterinary parasitological surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Cecconi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In parasitological surveillance of livestock, prevalence surveys are conducted on a sample of farms using several sampling designs. For example, opportunistic surveys or informative sampling designs are very common. Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not independent. Most examples of preferential sampling in the spatial statistics literature are in environmental statistics with focus on pollutant monitors, and it has been shown that, if preferential sampling is present and is not accounted for in the statistical modelling and data analysis, statistical inference can be misleading. In this paper, working in the context of veterinary parasitology, we propose and use geostatistical models to predict the continuous and spatially-varying risk of a parasite infection. Specifically, breaking with the common practice in veterinary parasitological surveillance to ignore preferential sampling even though informative or opportunistic samples are very common, we specify a two-stage hierarchical Bayesian model that adjusts for preferential sampling and we apply it to data on Fasciola hepatica infection in sheep farms in Campania region (Southern Italy in the years 2013-2014.

  5. A generalized theory of preferential linking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Haibo; Guo, Jinli; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Xiaofan

    2014-12-01

    There are diverse mechanisms driving the evolution of social networks. A key open question dealing with understanding their evolution is: How do various preferential linking mechanisms produce networks with different features? In this paper we first empirically study preferential linking phenomena in an evolving online social network, find and validate the linear preference. We propose an analyzable model which captures the real growth process of the network and reveals the underlying mechanism dominating its evolution. Furthermore based on preferential linking we propose a generalized model reproducing the evolution of online social networks, and present unified analytical results describing network characteristics for 27 preference scenarios. We study the mathematical structure of degree distributions and find that within the framework of preferential linking analytical degree distributions can only be the combinations of finite kinds of functions which are related to rational, logarithmic and inverse tangent functions, and extremely complex network structure will emerge even for very simple sublinear preferential linking. This work not only provides a verifiable origin for the emergence of various network characteristics in social networks, but bridges the micro individuals' behaviors and the global organization of social networks.

  6. Effects of Carbohydrate Consumption Case Study: carbohydrates in Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neacsu N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates perform numerous roles in living organisms; they are an important source of energy. The body uses carbohydrates to make glucose which is the fuel that gives it energy and helps keep everything going. However, excess carbohydrate consumption has negative health effects. Bread is a basic product in our nutrition and it also is a product with a high content of carbohydrates. So, it is important to find out more information on bread and on the recommended bread type best for consumption.

  7. Chemical Characterization of N-Linked Oligosaccharide As the Antigen Epitope Recognized by an Anti-Sperm Auto-Monoclonal Antibody, Ts4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Yoshitake

    Full Text Available Ts4, an anti-sperm auto-monoclonal antibody, possesses immunoreactivity to the acrosomal region of mouse epididymal spermatozoa. In addition, the mAb shows specific immunoreactivity to reproduction-related regions such as testicular germ cells and early embryo. Our qualitative study previously showed that the antigen epitope for Ts4 contained a N-linked common oligosaccharide (OS chain on testicular glycoproteins as determined by Western blotting for testicular glycoproteins after treatment with several glycohydrolases. Since the distribution of the Ts4-epitope is unique, the OS chain in Ts4-epitope may have role(s in the reproductive process. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular structure of the Ts4-epitope, particularly its OS moiety. Using Ts4 immunoprecipitation combined with liquid chromatography and multiple-stage mass spectrometry, the candidate carbohydrate structure in the Ts4-epitope is proposed to be N-linked fucosylated agalacto-biantennary with bisecting N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc or with N-acetylgalactosamine-GlcNAc motif. Further binding analyses using various lectins against the mouse testicular Ts4-immunoprecipitants revealed that Phaseolus vulgaris erythroagglutinin and Pisum sativum agglutinin showed positive staining of the bands corresponding to Ts4 reactive proteins. Moreover, the immunoreactivity of Ts4 against the testicular extract was completely abrogated after digestion with β-N-acetylglucosaminidase. These results show that the Ts4-epitope contains agalacto-biantennary N-glycan with bisecting GlcNAc carrying fucose residues.

  8. Intramolecular epitope spreading in Heymann nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pallavi; Tramontano, Alfonso; Makker, Sudesh P

    2007-12-01

    Immunization with megalin induces active Heymann nephritis, which reproduces features of human idiopathic membranous glomerulonephritis. Megalin is a complex immunological target with four discrete ligand-binding domains (LBDs) that may contain epitopes to which pathogenic autoantibodies are directed. Recently, a 236-residue N-terminal fragment, termed "L6," that spans the first LBD was shown to induce autoantibodies and severe disease. We used this model to examine epitope-specific contributions to pathogenesis. Sera obtained from rats 4 weeks after immunization with L6 demonstrated reactivity only with the L6 fragment on Western blot, whereas sera obtained after 8 weeks demonstrated reactivity with all four recombinant fragments of interest (L6 and LBDs II, III, and IV). We demonstrated that the L6 immunogen does not contain the epitopes responsible for the reactivity to the LBD fragments. Therefore, the appearance of antibodies directed at LBD fragments several weeks after the primary immune response suggests intramolecular epitope spreading. In vivo, we observed a temporal association between increased proteinuria and the appearance of antibodies to LBD fragments. These data implicate B cell epitope spreading in antibody-mediated pathogenesis of active Heymann nephritis, a model that should prove valuable for further study of autoimmune dysregulation.

  9. [Highly sensitive detection technology for biological toxins applying sugar epitopes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, Hirotaka

    2009-01-01

    The Shiga toxin is a highly poisonous protein produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157. This bacterial toxin causes the hemolytic uremic syndrome. Another plant toxin from castor beans, ricin, is also highly toxic. The toxin was used for assassination in London. Recently, there were several cases of postal matter containing ricin. Both toxins are categorized as biological warfare agents by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. Conventional detection methods based on the antigen-antibody reaction, PCR and other cell-free assays have been proposed. However, those approaches have drawbacks in terms of sensitivity, analytical time, or stability of the detection reagents. Therefore, development of a facile and sensitive detection method is essential. Here we describe new detection methods applying carbohydrate epitopes as the toxin ligands, which is based on the fact that the toxins bind cell-surface oligosaccharides. Namely, the Shiga toxin has an affinity for globobiosyl (Gb(2)) disaccharide, and ricin binds the beta-D-galactose residue. For Shiga toxin detection, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was applied. A polyanionic Gb(2)-glycopolymer was designed for this purpose, and it was used for the assembly of Gb(2)-chips using alternating layer-by-layer technology. The method allowed us to detect the toxin at a low concentration of LD(50). A synthetic carbohydrate ligand for ricin was designed and immobilized on the chips. SPR analysis with the chips allows us to detect ricin in a highly sensitive and facile manner (10 pg/ml, 5 min). Our present approaches provide a highly effective way to counter bioterrorism.

  10. Catalytic Conversion of Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmundsen, Christian Mårup

    . The synthesis of these by the cycloaddition of ethylene to furanic compounds, followed by dehydrative aromatization, was demonstrated in good yields, using a strong Brønsted acidic catalyst, WOx/ZrO2. As both ethylene and furanics can be derived from carbohydrates by known processes, this constitutes...... to be an efficient initial conversion step in the utilization of biomass for chemicals production. The shift from an oil based chemical industry to one based on renewable resources is bound to happen sooner or later, however the environmental problems associated with the burning of fossil resources means...

  11. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Kirsten E; Swaminathan, Harish; Copin, Richard; Lun, Desmond S; Ernst, Joel D

    2013-01-01

    The HLA (human leukocyte antigen) molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  12. Equivalent T cell epitope promiscuity in ecologically diverse human pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsten E Wiens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The HLA (human leukocyte antigen molecules that present pathogen-derived epitopes to T cells are highly diverse. Correspondingly, many pathogens such as HIV evolve epitope variants in order to evade immune recognition. In contrast, another persistent human pathogen, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, has highly conserved epitope sequences. This raises the question whether there is also a difference in the ability of these pathogens' epitopes to bind diverse HLA alleles, referred to as an epitope's binding promiscuity. To address this question, we compared the in silico HLA binding promiscuity of T cell epitopes from pathogens with distinct infection strategies and outcomes of human exposure. METHODS: We used computer algorithms to predict the binding affinity of experimentally-verified microbial epitope peptides to diverse HLA-DR, HLA-A and HLA-B alleles. We then analyzed binding promiscuity of epitopes derived from HIV and M. tuberculosis. We also analyzed promiscuity of epitopes from Streptococcus pyogenes, which is known to exhibit epitope diversity, and epitopes of Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium tetani toxins, as these bacteria do not depend on human hosts for their survival or replication, and their toxin antigens are highly immunogenic human vaccines. RESULTS: We found that B. anthracis and C. tetani epitopes were the most promiscuous of the group that we analyzed. However, there was no consistent difference or trend in promiscuity in epitopes contained in HIV, M. tuberculosis, and S. pyogenes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that human pathogens with distinct immune evasion strategies and epitope diversities exhibit equivalent levels of T cell epitope promiscuity. These results indicate that differences in epitope promiscuity do not account for the observed differences in epitope variation and conservation.

  13. Reverse preferential spread in complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoizumi, Hiroshi; Tani, Seiichi; Miyoshi, Naoto; Okamoto, Yoshio

    2012-08-01

    Large-degree nodes may have a larger influence on the network, but they can be bottlenecks for spreading information since spreading attempts tend to concentrate on these nodes and become redundant. We discuss that the reverse preferential spread (distributing information inversely proportional to the degree of the receiving node) has an advantage over other spread mechanisms. In large uncorrelated networks, we show that the mean number of nodes that receive information under the reverse preferential spread is an upper bound among any other weight-based spread mechanisms, and this upper bound is indeed a logistic growth independent of the degree distribution.

  14. Assortativity in generalized preferential attachment models

    CERN Document Server

    Krot, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we analyze assortativity of preferential attachment models. We deal with a wide class of preferential attachment models (PA-class). It was previously shown that the degree distribution in all models of the PA-class follows a power law. Also, the global and the average local clustering coefficients were analyzed. We expand these results by analyzing the assortativity property of the PA-class of models. Namely, we analyze the behavior of $d_{nn}(d)$ which is the average degree of a neighbor of a vertex of degree $d$.

  15. Carbohydrate Microarrays in Plant Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Pedersen, H.L.; Vidal-Melgosa, S.

    2012-01-01

    industrially and nutritionally. Understanding the biological roles of plant glycans and the effective exploitation of their useful properties requires a detailed understanding of their structures, occurrence, and molecular interactions. Microarray technology has revolutionized the massively high......-throughput analysis of nucleotides, proteins, and increasingly carbohydrates. Using microarrays, the abundance of and interactions between hundreds and thousands of molecules can be assessed simultaneously using very small amounts of analytes. Here we show that carbohydrate microarrays are multifunctional tools...... for plant research and can be used to map glycan populations across large numbers of samples to screen antibodies, carbohydrate binding proteins, and carbohydrate binding modules and to investigate enzyme activities....

  16. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  17. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  18. Immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Peng; Kim, Yohan;

    2008-01-01

    We present a new release of the immune epitope database analysis resource (IEDB-AR, http://tools.immuneepitope.org), a repository of web-based tools for the prediction and analysis of immune epitopes. New functionalities have been added to most of the previously implemented tools, and a total...... of eight new tools were added, including two B-cell epitope prediction tools, four T-cell epitope prediction tools and two analysis tools....

  19. Genetic mapping of a highly variable norovirus GII.4 blockade epitope: potential role in escape from human herd immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debbink, Kari; Donaldson, Eric F; Lindesmith, Lisa C; Baric, Ralph S

    2012-01-01

    Noroviruses account for 96% of viral gastroenteritis cases worldwide, with GII.4 strains responsible >80% of norovirus outbreaks. Histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) are norovirus binding ligands, and antigenic and preferential HBGA binding profiles vary over time as new GII.4 strains emerge. The capsid P2 subdomain facilitates HBGA binding, contains neutralizing antibody epitopes, and likely evolves in response to herd immunity. To identify amino acids regulating HBGA binding and antigenic differences over time, we created chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs) between the GII.4-1987 and GII.4-2006 strains by exchanging amino acids in putative epitopes and characterized their antigenic and HBGA binding profiles using anti-GII.4-1987 and -2006 mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and polyclonal sera, 1988 outbreak human sera, and synthetic HBGAs. The exchange of amino acids 393 to 395 between GII.4-1987 and GII.4-2006 resulted in altered synthetic HBGA binding compared to parental strains. Introduction of GII.4-1987 residues 294, 297 to 298, 368, and 372 (epitope A) into GII.4-2006 resulted in reactivity with three anti-GII.4-1987 MAbs and reduced reactivity with four anti-GII.4-2006 MAbs. The three anti-GII.4-1987 MAbs also blocked chimeric VLP-HBGA interaction, while an anti-GII.4-2006 blocking antibody did not, indicating that epitope A amino acids comprise a potential neutralizing epitope for GII.4-1987 and GII.4-2006. We also tested GII.4-1987-immunized mouse polyclonal sera and 1988 outbreak human sera for the ability to block chimeric VLP-HBGA interaction and found that epitope A amino acids contribute significantly to the GII.4-1987 blockade response. Our data provide insights that help explain the emergence of new GII.4 epidemic strains over time, may aid development of norovirus therapeutics, and may help predict the emergence of future epidemic strains.

  20. Characterization of T cell epitopes in bovine α-lactalbumin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meulenbroek, Laura A P M; den Hartog Jager, Constance F; Lebens, Ans F M; Knulst, André C; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Garssen, Johan; Knippels, Léon M J; van Hoffen, Els

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have indicated that peptides containing T cell epitopes may be used for immunotherapy. While for several cow's milk allergens the T cell epitopes have been described, the T cell epitopes in the major allergen α-lactalbumin (α-LAC) are unknown. Therefore, the aim of this st

  1. Modules for C-terminal epitope tagging of Tetrahymena genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Kensuke; Schoeberl, Ursula E.; Mochizuki, Kazufumi

    2010-01-01

    Although epitope tagging has been widely used for analyzing protein function in many organisms, there are few genetic tools for epitope tagging in Tetrahymena. In this study, we describe several C-terminal epitope tagging modules that can be used to express tagged proteins in Tetrahymena cells by both plasmid- and PCR-based strategies. PMID:20624430

  2. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  3. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  4. Development of an epitope conservancy analysis tool to facilitate the design of epitope-based diagnostics and vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusseder Nicolas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In an epitope-based vaccine setting, the use of conserved epitopes would be expected to provide broader protection across multiple strains, or even species, than epitopes derived from highly variable genome regions. Conversely, in a diagnostic and disease monitoring setting, epitopes that are specific to a given pathogen strain, for example, can be used to monitor responses to that particular infectious strain. In both cases, concrete information pertaining to the degree of conservancy of the epitope(s considered is crucial. Results To assist in the selection of epitopes with the desired degree of conservation, we have developed a new tool to determine the variability of epitopes within a given set of protein sequences. The tool was implemented as a component of the Immune Epitope Database and Analysis Resources (IEDB, and is directly accessible at http://tools.immuneepitope.org/tools/conservancy. Conclusion An epitope conservancy analysis tool was developed to analyze the variability or conservation of epitopes. The tool is user friendly, and is expected to aid in the design of epitope-based vaccines and diagnostics.

  5. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  6. Dominant epitopes and allergic cross-reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirza, Osman Asghar; Henriksen, A; Ipsen, H

    2000-01-01

    The symptoms characteristic of allergic hypersensitivity are caused by the release of mediators, i.e., histamine, from effector cells such as basophils and mast cells. Allergens with more than one B cell epitope cross-link IgE Abs bound to high affinity FcepsilonRI receptors on mast cell surfaces...

  7. IgE-binding epitopes: a reappraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.C. Aalberse; R. Crameri

    2011-01-01

    Here, we discuss various questions related to IgE epitopes: What are the technical possibilities and pitfalls, what is currently known, how can we put this information into hypothetical frameworks and the unavoidable question: how useful is this information for patient care or allergenicity predicti

  8. [Immunoglobulin genes encoding antibodies directed to oncodevelopmental carbohydrate antigens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenita, K; Yago, K; Fujimoto, E; Kannagi, R

    1990-07-01

    We investigated the immunoglobulin genes which encode the variable region of the monoclonal antibodies directed to the onco-developmental carbohydrate antigens such SSEA-1, fucosyl SSEA-1, SSEA-3 and SSEA-4. The VH region of these antibodies was preferentially encoded by the gene members of the X24, VH7183 and Q52 families, the families which are known to be located at the 3'-end region of the murine germ line VH gene. This result is interesting particularly when considering that the members of the 3'-end VH families are known to be preferentially expressed in embryonic B lymphocytes by an intrinsic genetic program. The comparative study of the nucleic acid sequences of mRNAs encoding these antibodies and the sequences of the corresponding germ line VH genes disclosed that the sequences encoding the antibodies contain no mutation from the germ line VH genes, or contain only a few somatic mutations, which are thought to be insignificant for the reactivity of the antibodies to the nominal antigens. These results imply that some of the embryonic B lymphocytes that express the unmutated germ line VH genes of the 3'-end families can be reactive with embryonic carbohydrate antigens, albeit rearranged with appropriate D-JH gene segments, and coupled with proper light chains. The VH region of the syngenic monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies directed to these anti-carbohydrate antibodies were also encoded preferentially by the members of the 3'-end VH families. We propose here that a part of the virgin embryonic B lymphocytes, which express the antibody encoded by the gene members of the 3'-end VH families at the cell surface, will be stimulated by the embryonic carbohydrate antigens which are abundantly present in the internal milieu of the embryo. The clonally expanded B lymphocytes, in turn, will facilitate the proliferation of other populations of embryonic B lymphocytes expressing the corresponding anti-idiotypic antibodies, which are also encoded by the gene members

  9. Adenovirus-mediated expression of pig α(1, 3) galactosyltransferase reconstructs Gal α(1, 3) Gal epitope on the surface of human tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Gal α(1,3)Gal(gal epitope)is a carbohydrate epitope and synthesized in large amount by α(1,3)galactosyltransferase [α(1,3)GT] enzyme on the cells of lower mammalian animals such as pigs and mice.Human has no gal epitope due to the inactivation of α(1,3)GT gene but produces a large amount of antibodies(anti-Gal)which recognize Gal α(1,3)Gal structures specifically.In this study,a replicationdeficient recombinant adenoviral vector Ad5sGT containing pig α(1,3)GT cDNA was constructed and characterized.Adenoviral vector-mediated transfer of pig α(1,3)GT gene into human tumor cells such as malignant melanoma A375,stomach cancer SGC-7901,and lung cancer SPC-A-1 was reported for the first time.Results showed that Gal epitope did not increase the sensitivity of human tumor cells to human complement-mediated lysis,although human complement activation and the binding of human IgG and IgM natural antibodies to human tumor cells were enhanced significantly after Ad5sGT transduction.Appearance of gal epitope on the human tumor cells changed the expression of cell surface carbohydrates reacting with Ulex europaeus I(UEA I)lectins,Vicia villosa agglutinin(VVA),Arachis hypogaea agglutinin(PNA),and Glycine max agglutinin(SBA)to different degrees.In addition,no effect of gal epitope on the growth in vitro of human tumor cells was observed in MTT assay.

  10. The ABCs (Antibody, B cells, and Carbohydrate epitopes) of cholera immunity: considerations for an improved vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzano, Daniele; Kovác, Pavol; Wade, William F

    2006-01-01

    Cholera, a diarrheal disease, is known for explosive epidemics that can quickly kill thousands. Endemic cholera is a seasonal torment that also has a significant mortality. Not all nations with extensive rural communities can achieve the required infrastructure or behavioral changes to prevent epidemic or endemic cholera. For some communities, a single-dose cholera vaccine that protects those at risk is the most efficacious means to reduce morbidity and mortality. It is clear that our understanding of what a protective cholera immune response is has not progressed at the rate our understanding of the pathogenesis and molecular biology of cholera infection has. This review addresses V. cholerae lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-based immunogens because LPS is the only immunogen proven to induce protective antibody in humans. We discuss the role of anti-LPS antibodies in protection from cholera, the importance and the potential role of B cell subsets in protection that is based on their anatomical location and the intrinsic antigen-receptor specificity of various subsets is introduced.

  11. Expression and immunoreactivity of HCV/HBV epitopes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Yu Xiong; Xiao Liu; Yuan-Ding Chen

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To develop the epitope-based vaccines to prevent Hepatitis C virus (HCV)/Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections.METHODS: The HCV core epitopes C1 STNPKPQRKTKRNTNRRPQD (residuals aa2-21) and C2 VKFPGGGQIVGGVYLLPRR (residuals aa22-40), envelope epitope E GHRMAWDMMMNWSP (residuals aa315-328) and HBsAg epitope S CTTPAQGNSMFPSCCCTKPTDGNC (residuals aa124-147) were displayed in five different sites of the flock house virus capsid protein as a vector, and expressed in E. coli cells (pET-3 system).Immunoreactivity of the epitopes with anti-HCV and anti-HBV antibodies in the serum from hepatitis C and hepatitis B patients were determined.RESULTS: The expressed chimeric protein carrying the HCV epitopes C1, C2, E (two times), L3C1-I2E-L1C2-L2E could react with anti-HCV antibodies. The expressed chimeric protein carrying the HBV epitopes S, I3S could react with anti-HBs antibodies. The expressed chimeric proteins carrying the HCV epitopes C1, C2, E plus HBV epitope S, L3C1-I2E-L1C2-L2E-I3S could react with antiHCV and anti-HBs antibodies.CONCLUSION: These epitopes have highly specific and sensitive immunoreaction and are useful in the development of epitope-based vaccines.

  12. Discovering Preferential Patterns in Sectoral Trade Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Isabella; Piccardi, Carlo; Tajoli, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the patterns of import/export bilateral relations, with the aim of assessing the relevance and shape of “preferentiality” in countries’ trade decisions. Preferentiality here is defined as the tendency to concentrate trade on one or few partners. With this purpose, we adopt a systemic approach through the use of the tools of complex network analysis. In particular, we apply a pattern detection approach based on community and pseudocommunity analysis, in order to highlight the groups of countries within which most of members’ trade occur. The method is applied to two intra-industry trade networks consisting of 221 countries, relative to the low-tech “Textiles and Textile Articles” and the high-tech “Electronics” sectors for the year 2006, to look at the structure of world trade before the start of the international financial crisis. It turns out that the two networks display some similarities and some differences in preferential trade patterns: they both include few significant communities that define narrow sets of countries trading with each other as preferential destinations markets or supply sources, and they are characterized by the presence of similar hierarchical structures, led by the largest economies. But there are also distinctive features due to the characteristics of the industries examined, in which the organization of production and the destination markets are different. Overall, the extent of preferentiality and partner selection at the sector level confirm the relevance of international trade costs still today, inducing countries to seek the highest efficiency in their trade patterns. PMID:26485163

  13. Satellite observed preferential states in soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilasa, Luis U.; De Jeu, Richard A. M.; Dolman, Han A. J.; Wang, Guojie

    2013-04-01

    This study presents observational evidence for the existence of preferential states in soil moisture content. Recently there has been much debate about the existence, location and explanations for preferential states in soil moisture. A number of studies have provided evidence either in support or against the hypothesis of a positive feedback mechanism between soil moisture and subsequent precipitation in certain regions. Researchers who support the hypothesis that preferential states in soil moisture holds information about land atmosphere feedback base their theory on the impact of soil moisture on the evaporation process. Evaporation recycles moisture to the atmosphere and soil moisture has a direct impact on the supply part of this process but also on the partitioning of the available energy for evaporation. According to this theory, the existence of soil moisture bimodality can be used as an indication of possible land-atmosphere feedbacks, to be compared with model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. On the other hand, other researchers argue that seasonality in the meteorological conditions in combination with the non-linearity of soil moisture response alone can induce bimodality. In this study we estimate the soil moisture bimodality at a global scale as derived from the recently available 30+ year ESA Climate Change Initative satellite soil moisture dataset. An Expectation-Maximization iterative algorithm is used to find the best Gaussian Mixture Model, pursuing the highest likelihood for soil moisture bimodality. With this approach we mapped the regions where bi-modal probability distribution of soil moisture appears for each month for the period between 1979-2010. These bimodality areas are analyzed and compared to maps of model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. The areas where more than one preferential state exists compare surprisingly well with the map of land-atmosphere coupling strength from model simulations. This approach might

  14. B cell epitope spreading: mechanisms and contribution to autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornaby, Caleb; Gibbons, Lauren; Mayhew, Vera; Sloan, Chad S; Welling, Andrew; Poole, Brian D

    2015-01-01

    While a variety of factors act to trigger or initiate autoimmune diseases, the process of epitope spreading is an important contributor in their development. Epitope spreading is a diversification of the epitopes recognized by the immune system. This process happens to both T and B cells, with this review focusing on B cells. Such spreading can progress among multiple epitopes on a single antigen, or from one antigenic molecule to another. Systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and other autoimmune diseases, are all influenced by intermolecular and intramolecular B cell epitope spreading. Endocytic processing, antigen presentation, and somatic hypermutation act as molecular mechanisms that assist in driving epitope spreading and broadening the immune response in autoimmune diseases. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of B cell epitope spreading with regard to autoimmunity, how it contributes during the progression of various autoimmune diseases, and treatment options available.

  15. Decarbonylation and dehydrogenation of carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Mark A.; Klaeren, Stephen A.

    1991-01-01

    Carbohydrates, especially aldose or ketose sugars, including those whose carbonyl group is masked by hemi-acetal or hemi-ketal formation, are decarbonylated by heating the feed carbohydrate together with a transition metal complex in a suitable solvent. Also, primary alcohols, including sugar alditols are simultaneously dehydrogenated and decarbonylated by heating a mixture of rhodium and ruthenium complexes and the alcohol and optionally a hydrogen acceptor in an acceptable solvent. Such defarbonylation and/or dehydrogenation of sugars provides a convenient procedure for the synthesis of certain carbohydrates and may provide a means for the conversion of biomass into useful products.

  16. Epitope mapping on the dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN) pathogen-attachment factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Estecha, Ana; Samaniego, Rafael; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena; Colmenares, María; Sánchez-Mateos, Paloma; Steinman, Ralph M; Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Corbí, Angel L

    2010-01-01

    DC-SIGN (dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin) is a myeloid pathogen-attachment factor C-type lectin which recognizes mannose- and fucose-containing oligosaccharide ligands on clinically relevant pathogens. Intracellular signaling initiated upon ligand engagement of DC-SIGN interferes with TLR-initiated signals, and modulates the T cell activating and polarizing ability of antigen-presenting cells. The C-terminal carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD) of DC-SIGN is preceded by a neck domain composed of eight 23-residue repeats which mediate molecule multimerization, and whose polymorphism correlates with altered susceptibility to SARS and HIV infection. Naturally occurring isoforms and chimaeric molecules, in combination with established recognition properties, were used to define seven structural and functional epitopes on DC-SIGN. Three epitopes mapped to the CRD, one of which is multimerization-dependent and only exposed on DC-SIGN monomers. Epitopes within the neck domain were conformation-independent and unaltered upon molecule multimerization, but were differentially affected by neck domain truncations. Although neck-specific antibodies exhibited lower function-blocking ability, they were more efficient at inducing molecule internalization. Moreover, crosslinking of the different epitopes resulted in distinct levels of microclustering on the cell surface. The identification of independent epitopes on the DC-SIGN molecule might facilitate the design of reagents that modulate the T cell activating and polarizing ability of DC-SIGN-expressing cells without preventing its antigen- and pathogen-recognition capacities.

  17. Carbohydrate microarrays in plant science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangel, Jonatan U; Pedersen, Henriette L; Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Ahl, Louise I; Salmean, Armando Asuncion; Egelund, Jack; Rydahl, Maja Gro; Clausen, Mads H; Willats, William G T

    2012-01-01

    Almost all plant cells are surrounded by glycan-rich cell walls, which form much of the plant body and collectively are the largest source of biomass on earth. Plants use polysaccharides for support, defense, signaling, cell adhesion, and as energy storage, and many plant glycans are also important industrially and nutritionally. Understanding the biological roles of plant glycans and the effective exploitation of their useful properties requires a detailed understanding of their structures, occurrence, and molecular interactions. Microarray technology has revolutionized the massively high-throughput analysis of nucleotides, proteins, and increasingly carbohydrates. Using microarrays, the abundance of and interactions between hundreds and thousands of molecules can be assessed simultaneously using very small amounts of analytes. Here we show that carbohydrate microarrays are multifunctional tools for plant research and can be used to map glycan populations across large numbers of samples to screen antibodies, carbohydrate binding proteins, and carbohydrate binding modules and to investigate enzyme activities.

  18. Transition metals in carbohydrate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This review describes the application of transition metal mediated reactions in carbohydrate synthesis. The different metal mediated transformations are divided into reaction types and illustrated by various examples on monosaccharide derivatives. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions are further ...

  19. Transition metals in carbohydrate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This review describes the application of transition metal mediated reactions in carbohydrate synthesis. The different metal mediated transformations are divided into reaction types and illustrated by various examples on monosaccharide derivatives. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions are further...

  20. Racemic carbohydrates - fact or fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senning, Alexander Erich Eugen

    2007-01-01

    Chemical Abstracts Service has developed unsound practices in the naming and handling of simple carbohydrates such as aldopentoses 1, aldohexoses 2, and ketohexoses 3. Typically, the common name glucose is sometimes, inappropriately, interpreted as meaning DL-glucose DL-2d. Thus, a considerable...... number of CA names and registry numbers have been created for non-existing racemic carbohydrates and linked to irrelevant references which, moreover, in many cases cannot be retrieved by the SciFinder Scholar program....

  1. Carbohydrate drugs: current status and development prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort devoted to the investigation of the roles of carbohydrates in various essential biological processes and the development of carbohydrates to therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the carbohydrate drugs which have been recorded in several pharmacopoeias, marketed, and under development. A prospect of the future development of carbohydrate drugs is discussed as well.

  2. Preferential sampling of helicity by isotropic helicoids

    CERN Document Server

    Gustavsson, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    We present a theoretical and numerical study on the motion of isotropic helicoids in complex flows. These are particles whose motion is invariant under rotations but not under mirror reflections of the particle. This is the simplest, yet unexplored, extension of the much studied case of small spherical particles. We show that heavy isotropic helicoids, due to the coupling between translational and rotational degrees of freedom, preferentially sample different helical regions in laminar or chaotic advecting flows. This opens the way to control and engineer particles able to track complex flow structures with potential applications to microfluidics and turbulence.

  3. Neutral carbohydrate geochemistry of particulate material in the central equatorial Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernes, Peter J.; Hedges, John I.; Peterson, Michael L.; Wakeham, Stuart G.; Lee, Cindy

    Neutral carbohydrate compositions were determined for particulate samples from plankton net tows, shallow floating sediment traps, mid-depth and deep moored sediment traps, and sediment cores collected along a north-south transect in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean during the U.S. JGOFS EqPac program. Total neutral carbohydrate depth profiles and patterns along the transect follow essentially the same trends as bulk and organic carbon (OC) fluxes—attenuating with depth, high near the equator and decreasing poleward. OC-normalized total aldose (TCH 2,O) yields along the transect and with depth do not show any consitent patterns. Relative to a planktonic source, neutral carbohydrate compositions in sediment trap and sediment core samples reflect preferential loss of ribose and storage carbohydrates rich in glucose, and preferential preservation of structural carbohydrates rich in rhamnose, xylose, fucose, and mannose. There is also evidence for an intermediately labile component rich in galactose. It appears that compositional signatures of neutral carbohydrates in sediments are more dependent upon their planktonic source than on any particular diagenetic pathway. Relative to other types of organic matter, neutral carbohydrates are better preserved in calcareous oozes from 12°S to 5°N than in red clays at 9°N based on OC-normalized TCH 2O yields, due to either differing sources or sorption characteristics. Weight per cent glucose generally decreases with increased degradation of organic material in the central equatorial Pacific region. Based on weight per cent glucose, comparisons of samples between Survey I (El Niõn) and Survey II (non-El Niño) indicate that during Survey I, organic material in the epipelagic zone in the northern hemisphere may have undergone more degradation than organic material in the southern hemisphere.

  4. Complex cooperative networks from evolutionary preferential attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Poncela

    Full Text Available In spite of its relevance to the origin of complex networks, the interplay between form and function and its role during network formation remains largely unexplored. While recent studies introduce dynamics by considering rewiring processes of a pre-existent network, we study network growth and formation by proposing an evolutionary preferential attachment model, its main feature being that the capacity of a node to attract new links depends on a dynamical variable governed in turn by the node interactions. As a specific example, we focus on the problem of the emergence of cooperation by analyzing the formation of a social network with interactions given by the Prisoner's Dilemma. The resulting networks show many features of real systems, such as scale-free degree distributions, cooperative behavior and hierarchical clustering. Interestingly, results such as the cooperators being located mostly on nodes of intermediate degree are very different from the observations of cooperative behavior on static networks. The evolutionary preferential attachment mechanism points to an evolutionary origin of scale-free networks and may help understand similar feedback problems in the dynamics of complex networks by appropriately choosing the game describing the interaction of nodes.

  5. Preferential Flow in Fractured Welded Tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salve, Rohit

    2004-08-15

    To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This experiment involved the release of {approx} 22 m3 of ponded water (at a pressure head of {approx} 0.04 m) over a period of 7 months, directly onto a 12 m2 infiltration plot located on a fractured welded tuff surface. As water was released, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation {approx} 19-22 m below. Distinct flow zones, varying in flow velocity, wetted cross-sectional area, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the monitoring boreholes. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggest that isolated conduits, each encompassing a large number of fractures, develop within the fractured rock formation to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. In addition, in fractured welded tuffs the propensity for fracture-matrix interactions is significantly greater than that suggested by existing conceptual models,in which flow occurs along a section of fracture surfaces. An overriding conclusion is that field investigations at spatial scales of tens of meters provide data critical to the fundamental understanding of flow in fractured rock.

  6. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  7. Identification of immunodominant epitopes in Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote surface antigen-1 protein that mask protective epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrightsman, R A; Dawson, B D; Fouts, D L; Manning, J E

    1994-10-01

    The gene that encodes trypomastigote surface Ag-1 (TSA-1), a major surface Ag of the bloodstream trypomastigote stage of Trypanosoma cruzi, was expressed in a baculovirus expression system. To determine the epitope(s) in TSA-1 that was recognized during T. cruzi infection and after immunization with TSA-1, subregions of the TSA-1 gene were expressed in a bacterial expression system. As seen by Western blotting, both mice and rabbits immunized with recombinant TSA-1 protein, as well as T. cruzi-infected mice, developed strong immune responses to the carboxyl-proximal region of TSA-1, but show no reaction to the amino-proximal portion of TSA-1. When mice were immunized with either recombinant TSA-1 protein or the carboxyl-proximal region of TSA-1, they did not survive challenge with 10(3) bloodstream trypomastigotes. However, 70% of the mice immunized with the amino-proximal portion of TSA-1 survived challenge with 10(3) bloodstream trypomastigotes. Thus, the immune responses elicited by recombinant TSA-1 or the carboxyl-proximal portion of TSA-1 are nonprotective during T. cruzi infection. In contrast, vaccination with the amino proximal region of TSA-1 elicits a protective immune response. These results suggest that responses to immunodominant epitope(s) within the carboxyl-proximal portion of TSA-1 mask epitopes within the amino-proximal portion that are capable of stimulating host-protective immune responses. It is suggested that immunodominant regions in surface molecules such as TSA-1 may provide a mechanism for the parasite to evade the host immune response by directing the response away from epitopes that have the potential to elicit a reaction that is damaging to the parasite.

  8. Advances of Bioinformatics Tools Applied in Virus Epitopes Prediction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Chen; Simon Rayner; Kang-hong Hu

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, the in silico epitopes prediction tools have facilitated the progress of vaccines development significantly and many have been applied to predict epitopes in viruses successfully. Herein, a general overview of different tools currently available, including T cell and B cell epitopes prediction tools, is presented. And the principles of different prediction algorithms are reviewed briefly. Finally, several examples are present to illustrate the application of the prediction tools.

  9. Atomic-level mapping of antibody epitopes on a GPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paes, Cheryl; Ingalls, Jada; Kampani, Karan; Sulli, Chidananda; Kakkar, Esha; Murray, Meredith; Kotelnikov, Valery; Greene, Tiffani A; Rucker, Joseph B; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2009-05-27

    Epitopes that define the immunodominant regions of conformationally complex integral membrane proteins have been difficult to reliably delineate. Here, a high-throughput approach termed shotgun mutagenesis was used to map the binding epitopes of five different monoclonal antibodies targeting the GPCR CCR5. The amino acids, and in some cases the atoms, that comprise the critical contact points of each epitope were identified, defining the immunodominant structures of this GPCR and their physicochemistry.

  10. Gender Differences in Carbohydrate Metabolism and Carbohydrate Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willoughby Darryn

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Prior to endurance competition, many endurance athletes participate in a carbohydrate loading regimen in order to help delay the onset of fatigue. The "classic" regimen generally includes an intense glycogen depleting training period of approximately two days followed by a glycogen loading period for 3–4 days, ingesting approximately 60–70% of total energy intake as carbohydrates, while the newer method does not consist of an intense glycogen depletion protocol. However, recent evidence has indicated that glycogen loading does not occur in the same manner for males and females, thus affecting performance. The scope of this literature review will include a brief description of the role of estradiol in relation to metabolism and gender differences seen in carbohydrate metabolism and loading.

  11. Carbohydrates Through Animation: Preliminary Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods of education are changing, so the educational tools must change too. The developmentof the systems of information and communication gave the opportunity to bring new technology tothe learning process. Modern education needs interactive programs that may be available to theacademic community, in order to ease the learning process and sharing of the knowledge. Then,an educational software on Carbohydrates is being developed using concept maps and FLASH-MXanimations program, and approached through six modules. The introduction of Carbohydrates wasmade by the module Carbohydrates on Nature, which shows the animations gures of a teacher andstudents, visiting a farm, identifying the carbohydrates found in vegetables, animals, and microor-ganisms, integrated by links containing short texts to help understanding the structure and functionof carbohydrates. This module was presented, as pilot experiment, to teachers and students, whichdemonstrated satisfaction, and high receptivity, by using animation and interactivitys program asstrategy to biochemistrys education. The present work is part of the project Biochemistry throughanimation, which is having continuity.

  12. Aminooxylated Carbohydrates: Synthesis and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Carlo; Daskhan, Gour Chand; Fiore, Michele; Shiao, Tze Chieh; Roy, René; Renaudet, Olivier

    2017-08-09

    Among other classes of biomolecules, carbohydrates and glycoconjugates are widely involved in numerous biological functions. In addition to addressing the related synthetic challenges, glycochemists have invested intense efforts in providing access to structures that can be used to study, activate, or inhibit these biological processes. Over the past few decades, aminooxylated carbohydrates have been found to be key building blocks for achieving these goals. This review provides the first in-depth overview covering several aspects related to the syntheses and applications of aminooxylated carbohydrates. After a brief introduction to oxime bonds and their relative stabilities compared to related C═N functions, synthetic aspects of oxime ligation and methodologies for introducing the aminooxy functionality onto both glycofuranosyls and glycopyranosyls are described. The subsequent section focuses on biological applications involving aminooxylated carbohydrates as components for the construcion of diverse architectures. Mimetics of natural structures represent useful tools for better understanding the features that drive carbohydrate-receptor interaction, their biological output and they also represent interesting structures with improved stability and tunable properties. In the next section, multivalent structures such as glycoclusters and glycodendrimers obtained through oxime ligation are described in terms of synthetic design and their biological applications such as immunomodulators. The second-to-last section discusses miscellaneous applications of oxime-based glycoconjugates, such as enantioselective catalysis and glycosylated oligonucleotides, and conclusions and perspectives are provided in the last section.

  13. Developmentally regulated epitopes of cell surface arabinogalactan proteins and their relation to root tissue pattern formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, J P; Linstead, P J; Peart, J; Cooper, C; Roberts, K

    1991-11-01

    Two polymorphic forms of an extracellular arabinogalactan protein (AGP1 and AGP2), obtained from the conditioned media of two carrot suspension-cultured cell lines, have been identified in terms of binding of the anti-plasma membrane antibodies JIM4 and MAC207. AGP1 and AGP2 have been used as immunogens to generate further anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies. JIM14 identified an epitope carried by AGP2 and also by glycoproteins of low molecular weight localized to the plant cell wall. In addition, further antibodies (JIM13 and JIM15) identified carbohydrate epitopes of the AGPs that also occur on plasma membrane glycoproteins and are expressed by patterns of cells that reflect cell position at the carrot root apex. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy indicated that JIM13 recognized the surface of cells forming the epidermis and cells marking the region and axis of the future xylem. JIM15 recognized a pattern of cells directly complementary to the JIM13 pattern. The panel of anti-AGP monoclonal antibodies now available indicates groups of cells within the root meristem that may reflect an early pre-pattern of the tissues of the mature root structure and suggests extensive modulation of cell surface AGPs during cell development and the positioning of cells within the apex.

  14. Growth fluctuation in preferential attachment dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    In the Yule-Simon process, creation and selection of words follows the preferential attachment mechanism, resulting in a power-law growth in the cumulative number of individual word occurrences as well as the power-law population distribution of the vocabulary. This is derived using mean-field approximation, assuming a continuum limit of both the time and number of word occurrences. However, time and word occurrences are inherently discrete in the process, and it is natural to assume that the cumulative number of word occurrences has a certain fluctuation around the average behavior predicted by the mean-field approximation. We derive the exact and approximate forms of the probability distribution of such fluctuation analytically, and confirm that those probability distributions are well supported by the numerical experiments.

  15. Epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis: spacers and ubiquitin modulates cellular immune responses elicited by epitope DNA vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang QM; Sun SH; Hu ZL; Zhou FJ; Yin M; Xiao CJ; Zhang JC

    2005-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses are crucial in the protection against tuberculosis. In this study, we constructed epitope DNA vaccines (p3-M-38) encoding cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes of MPT64 and 38 kDa proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In order to observe the influence of spacer sequence (Ala-Ala-Tyr) or ubiquitin (UbGR) on the efficacy of the two CTL epitopes, we also constructed DNA vaccines, p3-M-S(spacer)-38, p3-Ub (UbGR)-M-S-38 and p3-Ub-M-38. The immune responses elicited by the four DNA vaccines were tested in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The cytotoxicity of T cells was detected by LDH-release method and by enzyme-linked immunospot assay for epitope-specific cells secreting interferon-gamma. The results showed that DNA immunization with p3-M-38 vaccine could induce epitope-specific CD8+ CTL response and that the spacer sequence (AAY) only enhanced M epitope presentation. The protein-targeting sequence (UbGR) enhanced the immunogenicity of the two epitopes. The finding that defined spacer sequences at C-terminus and protein-targeting degradation modulated the immune response of epitope string DNA vaccines will be of importance for the further development of multi-epitope DNA vaccines against tuberculosis.

  16. Amylin regulation of carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, A; Pittner, R; Gedulin, B; Vine, W; Rink, T

    1995-05-01

    This review describes how amylin may work in the control of carbohydrate metabolism by actions on gastric emptying and on muscle glycogen metabolism. Amylin, which is co-secreted with insulin from pancreatic beta-cells in response to nutrient stimuli, affects both carbohydrate absorption and carbohydrate disposal. Amylin appears to regulate carbohydrate metabolism as a partner to insulin. Defending fuel stores tends to be hierarchical; plasma glucose is defended first, then muscle glycogen, then liver glycogen, then fat. Fuel stores are replenished by both incorporating ingested nutrient and by translocating nutrient stores among body sites. Lactate may better be regarded as a vector of fuel transfer rather than a 'dead end' in metabolism. Amylin can promote the translocation of lactate from muscle to liver. The amylin effect, illustrated by the simultaneous decrease in muscle glycogen and increase in liver glycogen [53, 56], is similar to the catecholamine effect observed by Cori et al. [57]. Amylin thus may be important in maintaining liver glycogen stores via the Cori cycle and the 'indirect' glycogen synthesis pathway [58,59]. Unlike catecholamines, amylin does not mobilize fat or impede insulin action in adipose tissue [30,35]. It can supply lactate to the liver, and because lactate is a preferred lipogenic substrate [60], may thereby favour fat storage. Amylin may also help to control carbohydrate absorption via an 'entero-insular loop' to ensure that absorption from the gut remains within the regulatory limits for carbohydrate disposal by peripheral tissues. This regulatory system is essential for normal control of plasma glucose and appears to be disrupted in type-1 diabetes, an amylin-deficient state.

  17. Identification of candidate T-cell epitopes and molecular mimics in chronic Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, B; Gran, B; Zhao, Y; Marques, A; Pascal, J; Tzou, A; Kondo, T; Cortese, I; Bielekova, B; Straus, S E; McFarland, H F; Houghten, R; Simon, R; Pinilla, C; Martin, R

    1999-12-01

    Elucidating the cellular immune response to infectious agents is a prerequisite for understanding disease pathogenesis and designing effective vaccines. In the identification of microbial T-cell epitopes, the availability of purified or recombinant bacterial proteins has been a chief limiting factor. In chronic infectious diseases such as Lyme disease, immune-mediated damage may add to the effects of direct infection by means of molecular mimicry to tissue autoantigens. Here, we describe a new method to effectively identify both microbial epitopes and candidate autoantigens. The approach combines data acquisition by positional scanning peptide combinatorial libraries and biometric data analysis by generation of scoring matrices. In a patient with chronic neuroborreliosis, we show that this strategy leads to the identification of potentially relevant T-cell targets derived from both Borrelia burgdorferi and the host. We also found that the antigen specificity of a single T-cell clone can be degenerate and yet the clone can preferentially recognize different peptides derived from the same organism, thus demonstrating that flexibility in T-cell recognition does not preclude specificity. This approach has potential applications in the identification of ligands in infectious diseases, tumors and autoimmune diseases.

  18. The Fas antigen (CD95) on human lymphoid cells: epitope analysis with ten antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zola, H; Fusco, M; Ridings, J; Flego, L R; Weedon, H M; Nicholson, I; Organ, N; Roberton, D M; Macardle, P J

    1996-11-01

    The expression of CD95 antigen was examined on adult and cord blood lymphocytes using a highly sensitive immunofluorescence/flow cytometric procedure. CD95 was expressed by the majority of circulating blood T cells in adults, and by a smaller proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in cord blood. The majority of circulating B cells did not react with seven CD95 antibodies, but three antibodies did stain B cells. In tonsil sections, CD95 was expressed throughout the tissue but germinal centres showed generally stronger staining than the surrounding follicular mantle and interfollicular areas. This was confirmed by flow cytometry, which showed expression preferentially on B cells with a germinal centre phenotype. Because different antibodies stained different proportions of B cells, CD95 epitopes were examined by inhibition, additive binding and protease susceptibility studies using a panel of ten CD95 antibodies. B cells apparently reacting selectively with CD95 antibodies were sorted and CD95 mRNA was reverse transcribed to cDNA and analyzed, in order to confirm the presence of CD95 in cells which reacted selectively and to explore the possible existence of CD95 isoforms. The major cDNA band was identical in the two populations. Inhibition of N-glycosylation suggested that the epitopes detected differentially could not be accounted for by differential N-glycosylation.

  19. Challenges with nonfiber carbohydrate methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, M B

    2003-12-01

    Nonfiber carbohydrates (NFC) encompass a compositionally and nutritionally diverse group exclusive of those carbohydrates found in NDF. Their content in feeds has often been described as a single value estimated by difference as 100% of dry matter minus the percentages of CP, NDF (adjusted for CP in NDF), ether extract, and ash. A calculated value was used because of difficulties with assays for individual NFC, but it does not differentiate among nutritionally distinct NFC. Errors in NFC estimation can arise from not accounting for CP in NDF and when multipliers other than 6.25 are appropriate to estimate CP. Analyses that begin to distinguish among NFC are those for starch, soluble fiber (non-NDF, nonstarch polysaccharides), and low molecular weight carbohydrates (mono- and oligosaccharides). Many starch analyses quantify alpha-glucans through specific hydrolysis of alpha-(1 --> 4) and alpha-(1 --> 6) linkages in the glucan, and measurement of released glucose. Incomplete gelatinization and hydrolysis will lead to underestimation of starch content. Starch values are inflated by enzyme preparations that hydrolyze carbohydrates other than alpha-glucan, measurement of all released monosaccharides without specificity for glucose, and failure to exclude free glucose present in the unhydrolyzed sample. Soluble fiber analyses err in a fashion similar to NFC if estimation of CP requires multipliers other than 6.25, or if contaminants such as CP and starch have not been properly accounted. Depolymerization and incomplete precipitation can also decrease soluble fiber estimates. The low molecular weight carbohydrates have been defined as carbohydrates soluble in 78 to 80% ethanol, which separates them from polysaccharides. They can be measured in extracts using broad-spectrum colorimetric assays (phenol-sulfuric acid assay or reducing sugar analysis of acid hydrolyzed samples) or chromatographic methods. Limitations of the colorimetric assays include lack of differentiation

  20. A xylogalacturonan epitope is specifically associated with plant cell detachment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willats, William George Tycho; McCartney, L.; Steele-King, C.G.

    2004-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (LM8) was generated with specificity for xyloglacturonan (XGA) isolated from pea (Pisum sativum L.) testae. Characterization of the LM8 epitope indicates that it is a region of XGA that is highly substituted with xylose. Immunocytochemical analysis indicates that this epitope...... that is specifically associated with a plant cell separation process that results in complete cell detachment....

  1. Positive Selection in CD8+ T-Cell Epitopes of Influenza Virus Nucleoprotein Revealed by a Comparative Analysis of Human and Swine Viral Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machkovech, Heather M; Bedford, Trevor; Suchard, Marc A; Bloom, Jesse D

    2015-11-01

    Numerous experimental studies have demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells contribute to immunity against influenza by limiting viral replication. It is therefore surprising that rigorous statistical tests have failed to find evidence of positive selection in the epitopes targeted by CD8(+) T cells. Here we use a novel computational approach to test for selection in CD8(+) T-cell epitopes. We define all epitopes in the nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein (M1) with experimentally identified human CD8(+) T-cell responses and then compare the evolution of these epitopes in parallel lineages of human and swine influenza viruses that have been diverging since roughly 1918. We find a significant enrichment of substitutions that alter human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes in NP of human versus swine influenza virus, consistent with the idea that these epitopes are under positive selection. Furthermore, we show that epitope-altering substitutions in human influenza virus NP are enriched on the trunk versus the branches of the phylogenetic tree, indicating that viruses that acquire these mutations have a selective advantage. However, even in human influenza virus NP, sites in T-cell epitopes evolve more slowly than do nonepitope sites, presumably because these epitopes are under stronger inherent functional constraint. Overall, our work demonstrates that there is clear selection from CD8(+) T cells in human influenza virus NP and illustrates how comparative analyses of viral lineages from different hosts can identify positive selection that is otherwise obscured by strong functional constraint. There is a strong interest in correlates of anti-influenza immunity that are protective against diverse virus strains. CD8(+) T cells provide such broad immunity, since they target conserved viral proteins. An important question is whether T-cell immunity is sufficiently strong to drive influenza virus evolution. Although many studies have shown that T cells limit viral replication in animal

  2. Racemic carbohydrates - fact or fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senning, Alexander Erich Eugen

    2007-01-01

    Chemical Abstracts Service has developed unsound practices in the naming and handling of simple carbohydrates such as aldopentoses 1, aldohexoses 2, and ketohexoses 3. Typically, the common name glucose is sometimes, inappropriately, interpreted as meaning DL-glucose DL-2d. Thus, a considerable...

  3. Facultative thermogenesis induced by carbohydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, A; Bülow, J; Christensen, N J

    1986-01-01

    In addition to the obligatory thermogenesis due to processing and storage, carbohydrate ingestion is accompanied by a facultative thermogenesis mediated by catecholamines via beta-adrenoceptors. The anatomical origin of facultative thermogenesis has hitherto not been determined. The possible invo....... The facultative thermogenesis in skeletal muscle may be of importance for the regulation of body weight in humans....

  4. Carbohydrates of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism by which viral infection induces the appearance of carbohydrate neoantigens is highly important. Results from such studies could be expected to be significant for a general understanding of the regulation of glycosylation, and perhaps especially important for the unde...

  5. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  6. High-Throughput Tools for Characterization of Antibody Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Anders

    , it is important to characterize antibodies thoroughly. In parallel to the characterization of antibodies, it is also important to characterize the binding area that is recognized by the antibody, known as an epitope. With the development of new technologies, such as high-throughput sequencing (HTS....... In this study, these improvements were utilized to characterize epitopes at high resolution, i.e. determine the importance of each residue for antibody binding, for all major peanut allergens. Epitope reactivity among patients often converged on known epitope hotspots, however the binding patterns were somewhat...... multiple years. Taken together, the presented studies demonstrated new applications for the investigated techniques focusing on their utilization in epitope mapping. In the process, new insights were obtained into how antibodies recognize their targets in a major disease, i.e. food allergy....

  7. Analysis of cytotoxic T cell epitopes in relation to cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas

    kill the infected cells. The focus of my PhD project has been on improving a method for CTL epitope pathway prediction, on analyzing the epitope density in the alternative cancer exome, and on a study investigating minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags) associated with leukemia. Part I......CTL methods, the experimental effort to identify 90% of new epitopes can be reduced by 15% and 40%, respectively. Part III reports the results of an analysis investigating how the alternatively spliced cancer exome differs from the exome of normal tissue in terms of containing predicted MHC class I binding...... epitopes. We show that peptides unique to cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes than peptides unique to spliced transcripts in normal tissue. We furthermore find that hydrophilic amino acids are significantly enriched in the unique carcinoma sequences, which...

  8. Bovine Norovirus: Carbohydrate Ligand, Environmental Contamination, and Potential Cross-Species Transmission via Oysters ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans. PMID:20709837

  9. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG SpaC pilin subunit binds to the carbohydrate moieties of intestinal glycoconjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Keita; Ueno, Shintaro; Sugiyama, Makoto; Yamamoto, Yuji; Mukai, Takao

    2016-06-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is a well-established probiotic strain. The beneficial properties of this strain are partially dependent on its prolonged residence in the gastrointestinal tract, and are likely influenced by its adhesion to the intestinal mucosa. The pilin SpaC subunit, located within the Spa pili structure, is the most well studied LGG adhesion factor. However, the binding epitopes of SpaC remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the binding properties of SpaC to the carbohydrate moieties of intestinal glycoconjugates using a recombinant SpaC protein. In a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, SpaC binding was markedly reduced by addition of purified mucin and the mucin oligosaccharide fraction. Histochemical staining revealed that the binding of SpaC was drastically reduced by periodic acid treatment. Moreover, in the surface plasmon resonance-based Biacore assay, SpaC bound strongly to the carbohydrate moieties containing β-galactoside at the non-reducing terminus of glycolipids. We here provide the first demonstration that SpaC binds to the oligosaccharide chains of mucins, and that the carbohydrate moieties containing β-galactoside at the non-reducing termini of glycoconjugates play a crucial role in this binding. Our results demonstrate the importance of carbohydrates of SpaC for mucus interactions.

  10. Carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Chojnowska, Sylwia; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of death from cancer in the world and the sixth in Europe. Pancreatic cancer is more frequent in males than females. Worldwide, following diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, <2% of patients survive for 5 years, 8% survive for 2 years and <50% survive for only approx. 3 months. The biggest risk factor in pancreatic cancer is age, with a peak of morbidity at 65 years. Difficulty in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer causes a delay in its detection. It is one of the most difficult cancers to diagnose and therefore to treat successfully. Additional detection of carbohydrate markers may offer a better diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Carbohydrate markers of cancer may be produced by the cancer itself or by the body in response to cancer, whose presence in body fluids suggests the presence and growth of the cancer. The most widely used, and best-recognized, carbohydrate marker of pancreatic cancer is CA 19-9 [CA (carbohydrate antigen) 19-9]. However, the relatively non-specific nature of CA 19-9 limits its routine use in the early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer, but it may be useful in monitoring treatment of pancreatic cancer (e.g. the effectiveness of chemotherapy), as a complement to other diagnostic methods. Some other carbohydrate markers of pancreatic cancer may be considered, such as CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen), CA 50 and CA 242, and the mucins MUC1, MUC2 and MUC5AC, but enzymes involved in the processing of glycoconjugates could also be involved. Our preliminary research shows that the activity of lysosomal exoglycosidases, including HEX (N-acetyl-β-D-hexosaminidase), GAL (β-D-galactosidase), FUC (α-L-fucosidase) and MAN (α-D-mannosidase), in serum and urine may be used in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.

  11. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  12. Broad epitope coverage of a human in vitro antibody library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivasubramanian, Arvind; Lynaugh, Heather; Yu, Yao; Miles, Adam; Eckman, Josh; Schutz, Kevin; Piffath, Crystal; Boland, Nadthakarn; Durand, Stéphanie; Boland, Todd; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Xu, Yingda; Abdiche, Yasmina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful discovery of therapeutic antibodies hinges on the identification of appropriate affinity binders targeting a diversity of molecular epitopes presented by the antigen. Antibody campaigns that yield such broad “epitope coverage” increase the likelihood of identifying candidates with the desired biological functions. Accordingly, epitope binning assays are employed in the early discovery stages to partition antibodies into epitope families or “bins” and prioritize leads for further characterization and optimization. The collaborative program described here, which used hen egg white lysozyme (HEL) as a model antigen, combined 3 key capabilities: 1) access to a diverse panel of antibodies selected from a human in vitro antibody library; 2) application of state-of-the-art high-throughput epitope binning; and 3) analysis and interpretation of the epitope binning data with reference to an exhaustive set of published antibody:HEL co-crystal structures. Binning experiments on a large merged panel of antibodies containing clones from the library and the literature revealed that the inferred epitopes for the library clones overlapped with, and extended beyond, the known structural epitopes. Our analysis revealed that nearly the entire solvent-exposed surface of HEL is antigenic, as has been proposed for protein antigens in general. The data further demonstrated that synthetic antibody repertoires provide as wide epitope coverage as those obtained from animal immunizations. The work highlights molecular insights contributed by increasingly higher-throughput binning methods and their broad utility to guide the discovery of therapeutic antibodies representing a diverse set of functional epitopes. PMID:27748644

  13. B Epitope Multiplicity and B/T Epitope Orientation Influence Immunogenicity of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Peptide Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Blanco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic peptides incorporating protective B- and T-cell epitopes are candidates for new safer foot-and-mouth disease (FMD vaccines. We have reported that dendrimeric peptides including four copies of a B-cell epitope (VP1 136 to 154 linked to a T-cell epitope (3A 21 to 35 of FMD virus (FMDV elicit potent B- and T-cell specific responses and confer protection to viral challenge, while juxtaposition of these epitopes in a linear peptide induces less efficient responses. To assess the relevance of B-cell epitope multivalency, dendrimers bearing two (B2T or four (B4T copies of the B-cell epitope from type O FMDV (a widespread circulating serotype were tested in CD1 mice and showed that multivalency is advantageous over simple B-T-epitope juxtaposition, resulting in efficient induction of neutralizing antibodies and optimal release of IFNγ. Interestingly, the bivalent B2T construction elicited similar or even better B- and T-cell specific responses than tetravalent B4T. In addition, the presence of the T-cell epitope and its orientation were shown to be critical for the immunogenicity of the linear juxtaposed monovalent peptides analyzed in parallel. Taken together, our results provide useful insights for a more accurate design of FMD subunit vaccines.

  14. EPITOPE MAPPING OF SCLC-CLUSTER-2 MABS AND GENERATION OF ANTIBODIES DIRECTED AGAINST NEW EGP-2 EPITOPES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HELFRICH, W; KONING, PW; THE, TH; DELEIJ, L

    1994-01-01

    Western blot analysis proved that all cluster-2 MAbs recognize identical or overlapping disulfide-bond-dependent epitopes, indicating the presence of a disulfide-bond-stabilized EGP-2 domain carrying highly immunodominant non-linear epitopes. The apparent immunodominance of this domain makes it diff

  15. Student incentives and preferential treatment in college admissions

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    We consider a framework in which the optimal admissions policy of a purely academicquality oriented college implements preferential treatment in favor of the student from the deprived socioeconomic background which maximizes the competition between candidates. We find that the exact form of the preferential treatment admissions policy matters for student incentives and hence for student-body diversity in equilibrium. Preferential treatment policy in college admissions often tak...

  16. MEASURING THE RELATIVE STRENGTH OF PREFERENTIAL MARKET ACCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Nicita

    2011-01-01

    In the past 20 years, tariffs imposed on international trade have been decreasing both in virtue of multilateral agreements under the auspices of the World Trade Organization (WTO) and of the proliferation of preferential trade agreements (PTAs) at the regional and bilateral level. The consequence of the large number of PTAs is that an increasing share of international trade is not subject to the most favoured nation tariffs, but enters markets through preferential access. Preferential access...

  17. Interactions of carbohydrates and proteins by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gang-Liang Huang; Xin-Ya Mei; Peng-George Wang

    2006-06-01

    A sensitive, specific, and rapid method for the detection of carbohydrate-protein interactions is demonstrated by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE). The procedure is simple and the cost is low. The advantage of this method is that carbohydrate-protein interactions can be easily displayed by FACE, and the carbohydrates do not need to be purified.

  18. Dissolved carbohydrate in the central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dhople, V.M.; Bhosle, N.B.

    Seawater samples (161), collected from 8 depths (0 to 1000 m) at 21 stations were analysed for total dissolved carbohydrate. Dissolved carbohydrate concentrations varied from 0.072 to 1.15 mg.l-1. Carbohydrate concentrations did not decrease...

  19. Modeling online social networks based on preferential linking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Hai-Bo; Guo Jin-Li; Chen Jun

    2012-01-01

    We study the phenomena of preferential linking in a large-scale evolving online social network and find that the linear preference holds for preferential creation,preferential acceptance,and preferential attachment.Based on the linear preference,we propose an analyzable model,which illustrates the mechanism of network growth and reproduces the process of network evolution.Our simulations demonstrate that the degree distribution of the network produced by the model is in good agreement with that of the real network.This work provides a possible bridge between the micro-mechanisms of network growth and the macrostructures of online social networks.

  20. Disorders of carbohydrate digestion and absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitlinger, L A; Lebenthal, E

    1988-04-01

    The carbohydrate malabsorptive syndromes are frequently seen by pediatricians. The congenital deficiency states are quite rare, but adult type hypolactasia and lactose intolerance following rotavirus infection are recognized with increasing frequency by primary care physicians. Therapy for these disorders involves identification of the offending carbohydrate, removal of the carbohydrate from the diet, and exclusion of other entities that may result in carbohydrate malabsorption but not respond to its removal from the diet. Prognosis for both the primary and secondary carbohydrate malabsorption syndromes is excellent. Compliance with diets for those pediatric patients who will require lifelong therapy remains problematic.

  1. Identification of Autoantigen Epitopes in Alopecia Areata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Eddy H C; Yu, Mei; Breitkopf, Trisia; Akhoundsadegh, Noushin; Wang, Xiaojie; Shi, Feng-Tao; Leung, Gigi; Dutz, Jan P; Shapiro, Jerry; McElwee, Kevin J

    2016-08-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is believed to be a cell-mediated autoimmune hair loss disease. Both CD4 and cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs) are important for the onset and progression of AA. Hair follicle (HF) keratinocyte and/or melanocyte antigen epitopes are suspected potential targets of autoreactive CTLs, but the specific epitopes have not yet been identified. We investigated the potential for a panel of known epitopes, expressed by HF keratinocytes and melanocytes, to induce activation of CTL populations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Specific synthetic epitopes derived from HF antigens trichohyalin and tyrosinase-related protein-2 induced significantly higher frequencies of response in AA CTLs compared with healthy controls (IFN-gamma secretion). Apoptosis assays revealed conditioned media from AA peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with trichohyalin peptides elevated the expression of apoptosis markers in primary HF keratinocytes. A cytokine array revealed higher expression of IL-13 and chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5, RANTES) from AA peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated with trichohyalin peptides compared with controls. The data indicate that AA affected subjects present with an increased frequency of CTLs responsive to epitopes originating from keratinocytes and melanocytes; the activated CTLs secreted soluble factors that induced apoptosis in HF keratinocytes. Potentially, CTL response to self-antigen epitopes, particularly trichohyalin epitopes, could be a prognostic marker for human AA.

  2. B Cell Epitope-Based Vaccination Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshie Kametani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently, many peptide vaccines are undergoing clinical studies. Most of these vaccines were developed to activate cytotoxic T cells; however, the response is not robust. Unlike vaccines, anti-cancer antibodies based on passive immunity have been approved as a standard treatment. Since passive immunity is more effective in tumor treatment, the evidence suggests that limited B cell epitope-based peptide vaccines may have similar activity. Nevertheless, such peptide vaccines have not been intensively developed primarily because humoral immunity is thought to be preferable to cancer progression. B cells secrete cytokines, which suppress immune functions. This review discusses the possibility of therapeutic antibody induction by a peptide vaccine and the role of active and passive B cell immunity in cancer patients. We also discuss the use of humanized mice as a pre-clinical model. The necessity of a better understanding of the activity of B cells in cancer is also discussed.

  3. Carbohydrates Through Animation: Preliminary Step

    OpenAIRE

    J.K. Sugai; M.S.R. Figueiredo; ANTÔNIO, R. V.; P. M. Oliveira; V.A Cardoso; Ricardo, J.; Merino, E.; L.F Figueiredo; D.N. Heidrich

    2004-01-01

    Methods of education are changing, so the educational tools must change too. The developmentof the systems of information and communication gave the opportunity to bring new technology tothe learning process. Modern education needs interactive programs that may be available to theacademic community, in order to ease the learning process and sharing of the knowledge. Then,an educational software on Carbohydrates is being developed using concept maps and FLASH-MXanimations program, and approach...

  4. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Submariner Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    metabolism the Wilkerson Point System, for glucose values, used in conjunction with patterns of insulin response described by Kraft(4) serves as the means...amount of exercise and carbohydrate metabolism characteristics occurred in both submariners and non-submariners. An inverse relationship also seems to...individuals(7). In the present study a significant negative correlation was also found between exercise vs one and two hour postprandial glucose and two hour

  5. Preferential Regulatory Treatment and Banks' Demand for Government Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonner, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of preferential regulatory treatment on banks’ demand for government bonds. Using unique transaction-level data, our analysis suggests that preferential treatment in microprudential liquidity and capital regulation significantly increases banks’ dem

  6. Preferential Regulatory Treatment and Banks' Demand for Government Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonner, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of preferential regulatory treatment on banks’ demand for government bonds. Using unique transaction-level data, our analysis suggests that preferential treatment in microprudential liquidity and capital regulation significantly increases banks’

  7. Preferential Option for the Poor: Making a Pedagogical Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirylo, James D.

    2006-01-01

    When children are sick, hurt, or in desperate need, parents/caregivers naturally make preferential options for them. Yet, as it relates to social justice, particularly when working with students from marginalized and poverty situations, the concept of making a preferential option in a school setting is not as clear. However, a school setting is a…

  8. Preferential Regulatory Treatment and Banks' Demand for Government Bonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonner, Clemens

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of preferential regulatory treatment on banks’ demand for government bonds. Using unique transaction-level data, our analysis suggests that preferential treatment in microprudential liquidity and capital regulation significantly increases banks’ dem

  9. Prediction of epitopes using neural network based methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten

    2011-01-01

    been evaluated to be among the very best performing MHC:peptide binding predictors available. Here we describe the background for these methods, and the rationale behind the different optimization steps implemented in the methods. We go through the practical use of the methods, which are publicly...... available in the form of relatively fast and simple web interfaces. Furthermore, we will review results obtained in actual epitope discovery projects where previous implementations of the described methods have been used in the initial selection of potential epitopes. Selected potential epitopes were all...

  10. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness...... of the relevance of preferential flow was broadly re-established in the community by the early 1990s. However, since then, the notion remains widespread among soil scientists that the occurrence and strength of preferential flow cannot be predicted from measurable proxy variables such as soil properties or land...... management practices (e.g. Beven, K., 1991, modeling preferential flow - an uncertain future, Preferential Flow, 1-11). In our study, we present evidence that disproves this notion. We evaluated breakthrough curve experiments under a constant irrigation rate of 1 cm/h conducted on 65 soil columns (20 cm...

  11. Design and characterization of epitope-scaffold immunogens that present the motavizumab epitope from respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Jason S; Correia, Bruno E; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S; Schief, William R; Kwong, Peter D

    2011-06-24

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 Å resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Design and Characterization of Epitope-Scaffold Immunogens That Present the Motavizumab Epitope from Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLellan, Jason S.; Correia, Bruno E.; Chen, Man; Yang, Yongping; Graham, Barney S.; Schief, William R.; Kwong, Peter D. (UWASH); (NIH)

    2012-06-28

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory tract infections in infants, but an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. An ideal vaccine would elicit protective antibodies while avoiding virus-specific T-cell responses, which have been implicated in vaccine-enhanced disease with previous RSV vaccines. We propose that heterologous proteins designed to present RSV-neutralizing antibody epitopes and to elicit cognate antibodies have the potential to fulfill these vaccine requirements, as they can be fashioned to be free of viral T-cell epitopes. Here we present the design and characterization of three epitope-scaffolds that present the epitope of motavizumab, a potent neutralizing antibody that binds to a helix-loop-helix motif in the RSV fusion glycoprotein. Two of the epitope-scaffolds could be purified, and one epitope-scaffold based on a Staphylococcus aureus protein A domain bound motavizumab with kinetic and thermodynamic properties consistent with the free epitope-scaffold being stabilized in a conformation that closely resembled the motavizumab-bound state. This epitope-scaffold was well folded as assessed by circular dichroism and isothermal titration calorimetry, and its crystal structure (determined in complex with motavizumab to 1.9 {angstrom} resolution) was similar to the computationally designed model, with all hydrogen-bond interactions critical for binding to motavizumab preserved. Immunization of mice with this epitope-scaffold failed to elicit neutralizing antibodies but did elicit sera with F binding activity. The elicitation of F binding antibodies suggests that some of the design criteria for eliciting protective antibodies without virus-specific T-cell responses are being met, but additional optimization of these novel immunogens is required.

  13. Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates in contrasting marine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdige, D. J.; Skoog, A.; Gardner, K.

    2000-03-01

    Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates were examined in contrasting Chesapeake Bay (estuarine) and mid-Atlantic shelf/slope break (continental margin) sediments. Particulate carbohydrates (PCHOs) represented ˜5-9% of the total sediment particulate organic carbon (POC), and PCHO remineralization appeared to be a similar fraction of total sediment carbon oxidation (or C ox). When these results are compared with results from other coastal sediments and a pelagic turbidite, PCHO remineralization (as a percentage of C ox) did not vary by more than a factor of ˜2-3 over a 3-4 order of magnitude range in C ox values. The causes of this are not well understood, but may be related to specific effects associated with the remineralization of highly altered organic matter mixtures under aerobic conditions. Dissolved carbohydrates (DCHOs) in these sediment pore waters ranged from ˜30 to 400 μM, increased with depth in a manner similar to total DOC, and represented ˜10 to 55% of pore water DOC. In Chesapeake Bay sediments this percentage decreased with sediment depth, while in these continental margin sediments it was constant (upper 30 cm). Of the DCHOs in these pore waters ˜30 to 50% could be identified as individual aldoses (monomeric neutral sugars), and total aldose yields (individual aldoses as a percentage of total DOC) were higher in these continental margin sediment pore waters (>9%) than they were in the estuarine sediment pore waters (<5%). A comparison of DCHO and PCHO concentrations in these sediments indicates that their concentrations are uncoupled, and that pore water DCHO concentrations are primarily controlled by sediment remineralization processes. Pore water DCHOs appeared to be preferentially found in the high molecular weight (HMW) DOC pool, and likely occur as some of the initial HMW intermediates produced and consumed during sediment POC remineralization. These results also support past suggestions about the differing controls on carbon

  14. A systematic study of chemogenomics of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiangyong; Luo, Fang; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-03-04

    Chemogenomics focuses on the interactions between biologically active molecules and protein targets for drug discovery. Carbohydrates are the most abundant compounds in natural products. Compared with other drugs, the carbohydrate drugs show weaker side effects. Searching for multi-target carbohydrate drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 60 344 carbohydrates from the Universal Natural Products Database (UNPD) and explored the chemical space of carbohydrates by principal component analysis. We found that there is a large quantity of potential lead compounds among carbohydrates. Then we explored the potential of carbohydrates in drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. All carbohydrates were docked to 2389 target proteins. The most potential carbohydrates for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between carbohydrates and target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  15. The Immune Epitope Database: How Data Are Entered and Retrieved

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ward Fleri; Kerrie Vaughan; Nima Salimi; Randi Vita; Bjoern Peters; Alessandro Sette

    2017-01-01

    .... It contains T cell, B cell, MHC binding, and MHC ligand elution experiments. Its data are curated primarily from the published literature and also include direct submissions from researchers involved in epitope discovery...

  16. Epitope finding in Zika virus molecule: The first world report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsri Wiwanitkit

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus infection is a new problematic virus infection that becomes the present public health problem. Now this mosquito borne infectious disease can be seen worldwide and can cause dengue-like infection. In addition, it can also induce transplacental infection and result in congenital neurological defect. To prevent this infection, there is still no specific vaccine. To find a new vaccine, finding epitope is the first step. Here, the authors report the study to find epitope within Zika virus molecule. According to this study, the appropriate epitopes can be seen. This is the first world report on epitope finding for Zika virus. The data can be useful for further vaccine development.

  17. Epitopemap: a web application for integrated whole proteome epitope prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Damien; Gordon, Stephen V

    2015-07-14

    Predictions of MHC binding affinity are commonly used in immunoinformatics for T cell epitope prediction. There are multiple available methods, some of which provide web access. However there is currently no convenient way to access the results from multiple methods at the same time or to execute predictions for an entire proteome at once. We designed a web application that allows integration of multiple epitope prediction methods for any number of proteins in a genome. The tool is a front-end for various freely available methods. Features include visualisation of results from multiple predictors within proteins in one plot, genome-wide analysis and estimates of epitope conservation. We present a self contained web application, Epitopemap, for calculating and viewing epitope predictions with multiple methods. The tool is easy to use and will assist in computational screening of viral or bacterial genomes.

  18. Preferential Leaching of Pinitol from Soybeans during Imbibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, P

    1984-10-01

    Sugars and cyclitols leached from soybeans (Glycine max var Sparks) during imbibition were assayed as a function of time. Pinitol leached many times faster than carbohydrates. During the initial 20 minutes of imibition, the pinitol/carbohydrate ratio was 3.4, declining to 0.29 for fully imbibed seeds. The value for dry soybeans was 0.14. Hypochlorite treatment of seeds more than doubled the rate at which carbohydrates leached out, but had little effect on pinitol. A role in development of soil microorganisms is postulated for pinitol.

  19. An assessment on epitope prediction methods for protozoa genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende Daniela M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epitope prediction using computational methods represents one of the most promising approaches to vaccine development. Reduction of time, cost, and the availability of completely sequenced genomes are key points and highly motivating regarding the use of reverse vaccinology. Parasites of genus Leishmania are widely spread and they are the etiologic agents of leishmaniasis. Currently, there is no efficient vaccine against this pathogen and the drug treatment is highly toxic. The lack of sufficiently large datasets of experimentally validated parasites epitopes represents a serious limitation, especially for trypanomatids genomes. In this work we highlight the predictive performances of several algorithms that were evaluated through the development of a MySQL database built with the purpose of: a evaluating individual algorithms prediction performances and their combination for CD8+ T cell epitopes, B-cell epitopes and subcellular localization by means of AUC (Area Under Curve performance and a threshold dependent method that employs a confusion matrix; b integrating data from experimentally validated and in silico predicted epitopes; and c integrating the subcellular localization predictions and experimental data. NetCTL, NetMHC, BepiPred, BCPred12, and AAP12 algorithms were used for in silico epitope prediction and WoLF PSORT, Sigcleave and TargetP for in silico subcellular localization prediction against trypanosomatid genomes. Results A database-driven epitope prediction method was developed with built-in functions that were capable of: a removing experimental data redundancy; b parsing algorithms predictions and storage experimental validated and predict data; and c evaluating algorithm performances. Results show that a better performance is achieved when the combined prediction is considered. This is particularly true for B cell epitope predictors, where the combined prediction of AAP12 and BCPred12 reached an AUC value

  20. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... products, and do not help you feel as satisfied. FIBER High-fiber foods include: Whole grains, such ... ADAM Health Solutions. About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Get email updates Subscribe to RSS Follow ...

  1. Preferential Interactions and the Effect of Protein PEGylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Stenstrup Holm

    Full Text Available PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation excipients that preferentially interact with the protein.The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000 and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose and preferentially bound guanine hydrochloride. Structural characterization by far- and near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy was supplemented by investigation of protein thermal stability with the use of differential scanning calorimetry, far and near-UV circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy. It was found that PEGylated lysozyme was stabilized by the preferentially excluded excipient and destabilized by the preferentially bound excipient in a similar manner as lysozyme. However, compared to lysozyme in all cases the melting transition was lower by up to a few degrees and the calorimetric melting enthalpy was decreased to half the value for PEGylated lysozyme. The ratio between calorimetric and van't Hoff enthalpy suggests that our PEGylated lysozyme is a dimer.The PEGylated model protein displayed similar stability responses to the addition of preferentially active excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins.

  2. Antibodies to both terminal and internal B-cell epitopes of Francisella tularensis O-polysaccharide produced by patients with tularemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaohua; Perkins, Hillary M; Sharon, Jacqueline

    2014-02-01

    Francisella tularensis, the Gram-negative bacterium that causes tularemia, is considered a potential bioterrorism threat due to its low infectivity dose and the high morbidity and mortality from respiratory disease. We previously characterized two mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for the O-polysaccharide (O antigen [OAg]) of F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS): Ab63, which targets a terminal epitope at the nonreducing end of OAg, and Ab52, which targets a repeating internal OAg epitope. These two MAbs were protective in a mouse model of respiratory tularemia. To determine whether these epitope types are also targeted by humans, we tested the ability of each of 18 blood serum samples from 11 tularemia patients to inhibit the binding of Ab63 or Ab52 to F. tularensis LPS in a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Although all serum samples had Ab63- and Ab52-inhibitory activities, the ratios of Ab63 to Ab52 inhibitory potencies varied 75-fold. However, the variation was only 2.3-fold for sequential serum samples from the same patient, indicating different distributions of terminal- versus internal-binding antibodies in different individuals. Western blot analysis using class-specific anti-human Ig secondary antibodies showed that both terminal- and internal-binding OAg antibodies were of the IgG, IgM, and IgA isotypes. These results support the use of a mouse model to discover protective B-cell epitopes for tularemia vaccines or prophylactic/therapeutic antibodies, and they present a general strategy for interrogating the antibody responses of patients and vaccinees to microbial carbohydrate epitopes that have been characterized in experimental animals.

  3. Kinetics of antigen expression and epitope presentation during virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan P Croft

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge about the dynamics of antigen presentation to T cells during viral infection is very poor despite being of fundamental importance to our understanding of anti-viral immunity. Here we use an advanced mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify the presentation of eight vaccinia virus peptide-MHC complexes (epitopes on infected cells and the amounts of their source antigens at multiple times after infection. The results show a startling 1000-fold range in abundance as well as strikingly different kinetics across the epitopes monitored. The tight correlation between onset of protein expression and epitope display for most antigens provides the strongest support to date that antigen presentation is largely linked to translation and not later degradation of antigens. Finally, we show a complete disconnect between the epitope abundance and immunodominance hierarchy of these eight epitopes. This study highlights the complexity of viral antigen presentation by the host and demonstrates the weakness of simple models that assume total protein levels are directly linked to epitope presentation and immunogenicity.

  4. Strategic Use of Epitope Matching to Improve Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Chris; Nickerson, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the events leading to allorecognition and the subsequent effector pathways engaged is key for the development of strategies to prolong graft survival. Optimizing patient outcomes will require 2 major advancements: (1) minimizing premature death with a functioning graft in the patients with stable graft function, and (2) maximizing graft survival by avoiding the aforementioned allorecognition. This necessitates personalized immunosuppression to avoid known metabolic side effects, risk for infection, and malignancy, while holding the alloimmune system in check. Since the beginning of transplant a key strategy to achieve this goal is to minimize HLA mismatching between donor and recipient. What has not evolved is any refinement in our evaluation of HLA relatedness between donor and recipient when HLA mismatch exists. Donor-recipient HLA mismatch at the amino acid level can now be determined. These mismatches serve as potential epitopes for de novo donor specific antibody development and correlate with late rejection and graft loss. It is in this context that HLA epitope analysis is considered as a strategy to permit safe immunosuppression minimization to improve patient outcomes through: (1) improved allocation schemes that favor donor-recipient pairs with a low HLA epitope mismatch load (especially at the class II loci) or avoiding specific epitope mismatches known to be highly immunogenic and (2) immunosuppressive minimization in patients with low epitope mismatch loads or without highly immunogenic epitope mismatches.

  5. Computational elucidation of potential antigenic CTL epitopes in Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikhit, Manas R; Kumar, Santosh; Vijaymahantesh; Sahoo, Bikash R; Mansuri, Rani; Amit, Ajay; Yousuf Ansari, Md; Sahoo, Ganesh C; Bimal, Sanjiva; Das, Pradeep

    2015-12-01

    Cell-mediated immunity is important for the control of Ebola virus infection. We hypothesized that those HLA A0201 and HLA B40 restricted epitopes derived from Ebola virus proteins, would mount a good antigenic response. Here we employed an immunoinformatics approach to identify specific 9mer amino acid which may be capable of inducing a robust cell-mediated immune response in humans. We identified a set of 28 epitopes that had no homologs in humans. Specifically, the epitopes derived from NP, RdRp, GP and VP40 share population coverage of 93.40%, 84.15%, 74.94% and 77.12%, respectively. Based on the other HLA binding specificity and population coverage, seven novel promiscuous epitopes were identified. These 7 promiscuous epitopes from NP, RdRp and GP were found to have world-wide population coverage of more than 95% indicating their potential significance as useful candidates for vaccine design. Epitope conservancy analysis also suggested that most of the peptides are highly conserved (100%) in other virulent Ebola strain (Mayinga-76, Kikwit-95 and Makona-G3816- 2014) and can therefore be further investigated for their immunological relevance and usefulness as vaccine candidates.

  6. Surface characterization of carbohydrate microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurr, David J; Horlacher, Tim; Oberli, Matthias A; Werz, Daniel B; Kroeck, Lenz; Bufali, Simone; Seeberger, Peter H; Shard, Alexander G; Alexander, Morgan R

    2010-11-16

    Carbohydrate microarrays are essential tools to determine the biological function of glycans. Here, we analyze a glycan array by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to gain a better understanding of the physicochemical properties of the individual spots and to improve carbohydrate microarray quality. The carbohydrate microarray is prepared by piezo printing of thiol-terminated sugars onto a maleimide functionalized glass slide. The hyperspectral ToF-SIMS imaging data are analyzed by multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to discern secondary ions from regions of the array containing saccharide, linker, salts from the printing buffer, and the background linker chemistry. Analysis of secondary ions from the linker common to all of the sugar molecules employed reveals a relatively uniform distribution of the sugars within the spots formed from solutions with saccharide concentration of 0.4 mM and less, whereas a doughnut shape is often formed at higher-concentration solutions. A detailed analysis of individual spots reveals that in the larger spots the phosphate buffered saline (PBS) salts are heterogeneously distributed, apparently resulting in saccharide concentrated at the rim of the spots. A model of spot formation from the evaporating sessile drop is proposed to explain these observations. Saccharide spot diameters increase with saccharide concentration due to a reduction in surface tension of the saccharide solution compared to PBS. The multivariate analytical partial least squares (PLS) technique identifies ions from the sugars that in the complex ToF-SIMS spectra correlate with the binding of galectin proteins.

  7. Preferential interactions and the effect of protein PEGylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Louise Stenstrup; Thulstrup, Peter Waaben; Kasimova, Marina Robertovna;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: PEGylation is a strategy used by the pharmaceutical industry to prolong systemic circulation of protein drugs, whereas formulation excipients are used for stabilization of proteins during storage. Here we investigate the role of PEGylation in protein stabilization by formulation...... excipients that preferentially interact with the protein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The model protein hen egg white lysozyme was doubly PEGylated on two lysines with 5 kDa linear PEGs (mPEG-succinimidyl valerate, MW 5000) and studied in the absence and presence of preferentially excluded sucrose...... excipients. This suggests that formulation principles using preferentially interacting excipients are similar for PEGylated and non-PEGylated proteins....

  8. Numerical Simulation of Preferential Flow of Contaminants in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A simple modeling approach was suggested to simulate preferential transport of water and contaminants in soil.After saturated hydraulic conductivity was interpolated by means of Krige interpolation method or scaling method, and then zoned,the locations where saturated hydraulic conductivity was larger represented regions where preferential flow occurred,because heterogeneity of soil,one of the mechanisms resulting in preferential flow,could be reflected through the difference in saturated hydraulic conductivity.The modeling approach was validated through numerical simulation of contaminant transport in a two-dimensional hypothetical soil profile.The results of the numerical simulation showed that the approach suggested in this study was feasible.

  9. Preferential Market Access, Foreign Aid and Economic Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afesorgbor, Sylvanus Kwaku; Abreha, Kaleb Girma

    contributed to the economic development of the beneficiary countries. Focusing on the ACP countries over the period 1970-2009, we show that only the EU preferential scheme is effective in promoting exports and that market access plays a significant and economically large role in the development of beneficiary......Several studies highlight that exporters in developing countries face substantial trade costs. To reduce these costs, a few developed countries mainly Canada, the EU, Japan and the USA granted preferential market access to these exporters. We assess whether these preferential accesses have...

  10. Applications of synthetic carbohydrates to chemical biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepenies, Bernd; Yin, Jian; Seeberger, Peter H

    2010-06-01

    Access to synthetic carbohydrates is an urgent need for the development of carbohydrate-based drugs, vaccines, adjuvants as well as novel drug delivery systems. Besides traditional synthesis in solution, synthetic carbohydrates have been generated by chemoenzymatic methods as well as automated solid-phase synthesis. Synthetic oligosaccharides have proven to be useful for identifying ligands of carbohydrate-binding proteins such as C-type lectins and siglecs using glycan arrays. Furthermore, glyconanoparticles and glycodendrimers have been used for specific targeting of lectins of the immune system such as selectins, DC-SIGN, and CD22. This review focuses on how diverse carbohydrate structures can be synthetically derived and highlights the benefit of synthetic carbohydrates for glycobiology.

  11. New fabrication and applications of carbohydrate arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gangliang; Chen, Xin; Xiao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrate arrays are used as high-throughput screening platforms to study the carbohydrate-mediated recognition events for glycobiology. The polysaccharide arrays are easy to fabricate by non-covalently or covalently immobilizing polysaccharides onto array surfaces because polysaccharides have hydrophobic interactions. Oligosaccharides must be derived and covalently or non-covalently immobilized onto array surfaces to fabricate oligosaccharide arrays because they have hydrophilic interactions. At the moment, carbohydrate arrays are mainly used to study the carbohydrate-protein interactions and carbohydrate-binding lectins or antibodies, which are possible to be applied to clinics and diagnoses. This review mainly summed up the new fabrication strategies of carbohydrate arrays and their applications in recent four years.

  12. Epitope Mapping of Avian Influenza M2e Protein: Different Species Recognise Various Epitopes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Haliza Hasan

    Full Text Available A common approach for developing diagnostic tests for influenza virus detection is the use of mouse or rabbit monoclonal and/or polyclonal antibodies against a target antigen of the virus. However, comparative mapping of the target antigen using antibodies from different animal sources has not been evaluated before. This is important because identification of antigenic determinants of the target antigen in different species plays a central role to ensure the efficiency of a diagnostic test, such as competitive ELISA or immunohistochemistry-based tests. Interest in the matrix 2 ectodomain (M2e protein of avian influenza virus (AIV as a candidate for a universal vaccine and also as a marker for detection of virus infection in vaccinated animals (DIVA is the rationale for the selection of this protein for comparative mapping evaluation. This study aimed to map the epitopes of the M2e protein of avian influenza virus H5N1 using chicken, mouse and rabbit monoclonal or monospecific antibodies. Our findings revealed that rabbit antibodies (rAbs recognized epitope 6EVETPTRN13 of the M2e, located at the N-terminal of the protein, while mouse (mAb and chicken antibodies (cAbs recognized epitope 10PTRNEWECK18, located at the centre region of the protein. The findings highlighted the difference between the M2e antigenic determinants recognized by different species that emphasized the importance of comparative mapping of antibody reactivity from different animals to the same antigen, especially in the case of multi-host infectious agents such as influenza. The findings are of importance for antigenic mapping, as well as diagnostic test and vaccine development.

  13. Identification and characterization of CD4⁺ T-cell epitopes on GapC protein of Streptococcus dysgalactiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Di; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xintong; Yu, Simiao; Wei, Yuhua; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jiannan; Chen, Xiaoting; Zhang, Zhenghai; Sun, Hunan; Yu, Liquan; Ma, Jinzhu; Tong, Chunyu; Song, Baifen; Cui, Yudong

    2016-02-01

    The GapC protein is highly conserved surface dehydrogenase among Streptococcus dysgalactiae (S. dysgalactiae) and is shown to be involved in bacterial virulence. Immunization of GapC protein can induce specific CD4(+) T-cell immune responses and protect against S. dysgalactiae infection. However, there are no studies to identify immunodominant CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. In this study, in silico MHC affinity measurement method was firstly used to predict potential CD4(+) T-cell epitopes on GapC protein. Six predictive 15-mer peptides were synthesized and two novel GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes, GapC63-77 and GapC96-110, were for the first time identified using CD4(+) T-cells obtained from GapC-immunized BALB/c (H-2(d)) and C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice spleen based on cell proliferation and cytokines response. The results showed that peptides containing 63-77 and 96-110 induced significant antigen-specific CD4(+) T-cells proliferation response in vivo. At the same time, high levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A, as well as moderate levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were detected in CD4(+) T-cells isolated from both GapC and peptide-immunized mice in vivo, suggesting that GapC63-77 and GapC96-110 preferentially elicited polarized Th1/Th17-type responses. The characterization of GapC CD4(+) T-cell epitopes not only helps us understand its protective immunity, but also contributes to design effective T-cell epitope-based vaccine against S. dysgalactiae infection.

  14. Regioselective azidotrimethylsilylation of carbohydrates and applications thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    L, Mallikharjuna Rao; Yousuf, Syed Khalid; Mukherjee, Debaraj; Taneja, Subhash Chandra

    2012-12-07

    Azidotrimethylsilylation of carbohydrates (monosaccharides and disaccharides) has been achieved in high yields under Mitsunobu conditions. The azidation of carbohydrates is effected at 0 °C essentially only at the primary alcoholic position in mono, di- and triols in protected/unprotected glycosides, whereas the remaining secondary hydroxyl groups got silylated. Surprisingly, no azidation of the secondary hydroxyls was observed in all the carbohydrate substrates. Applications of the methodology for the synthesis of amino sugars, triazoles and azasugars are reported.

  15. Low-carbohydrate nutrition and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westman, Eric C; Feinman, Richard D; Mavropoulos, John C; Vernon, Mary C; Volek, Jeff S; Wortman, James A; Yancy, William S; Phinney, Stephen D

    2007-08-01

    The persistence of an epidemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes suggests that new nutritional strategies are needed if the epidemic is to be overcome. A promising nutritional approach suggested by this thematic review is carbohydrate restriction. Recent studies show that, under conditions of carbohydrate restriction, fuel sources shift from glucose and fatty acids to fatty acids and ketones, and that ad libitum-fed carbohydrate-restricted diets lead to appetite reduction, weight loss, and improvement in surrogate markers of cardiovascular disease.

  16. Digestion of carbohydrates in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drochner, W

    1993-01-01

    A review of carbohydrate digestion in the pig is given. The cascade of digestion in the mouth, stomach, small and large intestine is described. Principles of enzymatic and fermentative digestion according to new results with fistulated animals are discussed. The efficacy and quality of fermentation in the large intestine depending on level and quality of carbohydrates in the diet are demonstrated. Some aspects of energetical efficacy of hindgut digestion are discussed. Dietetic effects of carbohydrates are described.

  17. Glycoproteomic characterization of carriers of the CD15/Lewisx epitope on Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitchen Paul G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lewisx trisaccharide, also referred to as the CD15 antigen, is a diagnostic marker used to distinguish Hodgkin's lymphoma from other lymphocytic cancers. However, the role of such fucosylated structures remains poorly understood, in part because carriers of Lewisx structures on Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cells have not been identified. Methods GalMBP, an engineered carbohydrate-recognition protein that binds selectively to oligosaccharides with paired terminal galactose and fucose residues, has been used in conjunction with proteomic and glycomic analysis to identify glycoprotein carriers of Lewisx and related glycan structures in multiple Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cell lines. Results Multiple glycoproteins that bind to GalMBP and carry CD15/Lewisx have been identified in a panel of six Reed-Sternberg cell lines. The most commonly identified Lewisx-bearing glycoproteins are CD98hc, which was found in all six cell lines tested, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and DEC-205, which were detected in five and four of the lines, respectively. Thus, several of the most prominent cell adhesion molecules on the lymphomas carry this characteristic glycan epitope. In addition, the Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cell lines can be grouped into subsets based on the presence or absence of less common Lewisx-bearing glycoproteins. Conclusions CD98 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 are major carriers of CD15/Lewisx on Reed-Sternberg cells. Binding of DC-SIGN and other glycan-specific receptors to the Lewisx epitopes on CD98 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 may facilitate interaction of the lymphoma cells with lymphocytes and myeloid cells in lymph nodes.

  18. Glycoproteomic characterization of carriers of the CD15/Lewisx epitope on Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powlesland, Alex S; Barrio, Maria Marcela; Mordoh, José; Hitchen, Paul G; Dell, Anne; Drickamer, Kurt; Taylor, Maureen E

    2011-03-24

    The Lewisx trisaccharide, also referred to as the CD15 antigen, is a diagnostic marker used to distinguish Hodgkin's lymphoma from other lymphocytic cancers. However, the role of such fucosylated structures remains poorly understood, in part because carriers of Lewisx structures on Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cells have not been identified. GalMBP, an engineered carbohydrate-recognition protein that binds selectively to oligosaccharides with paired terminal galactose and fucose residues, has been used in conjunction with proteomic and glycomic analysis to identify glycoprotein carriers of Lewisx and related glycan structures in multiple Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cell lines. Multiple glycoproteins that bind to GalMBP and carry CD15/Lewisx have been identified in a panel of six Reed-Sternberg cell lines. The most commonly identified Lewisx-bearing glycoproteins are CD98hc, which was found in all six cell lines tested, and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and DEC-205, which were detected in five and four of the lines, respectively. Thus, several of the most prominent cell adhesion molecules on the lymphomas carry this characteristic glycan epitope. In addition, the Hodgkin's Reed-Sternberg cell lines can be grouped into subsets based on the presence or absence of less common Lewisx-bearing glycoproteins. CD98 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 are major carriers of CD15/Lewisx on Reed-Sternberg cells. Binding of DC-SIGN and other glycan-specific receptors to the Lewisx epitopes on CD98 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 may facilitate interaction of the lymphoma cells with lymphocytes and myeloid cells in lymph nodes.

  19. Identification, characterization, and synthesis of peptide epitopes and a recombinant six-epitope protein for Trichomonas vaginalis serodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, J F; Neace, Calvin J

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a rapid, accurate serodiagnostic test useful for both women and men infected by Trichomonas vaginalis, which causes the number one sexually transmitted infection (STI). Women and men exposed to T. vaginalis make serum antibody to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (ALD), α-enolase (ENO), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP). We identified, by epitope mapping, the common and distinct epitopes of each protein detected by the sera of women patients with trichomonosis and by the sera of men highly seropositive to the immunogenic protein α-actinin (positive control sera). We analyzed the amino acid sequences to determine the extent of identity of the epitopes of each protein with other proteins in the databanks. This approach identified epitopes unique to T. vaginalis, indicating these peptide-epitopes as possible targets for a serodiagnostic test. Individual or combinations of 15-mer peptide epitopes with low to no identity with other proteins were reactive with positive control sera from both women and men but were unreactive with negative control sera. These analyses permitted the synthesis of a recombinant His6 fusion protein of 111 amino acids with an Mr of ~13.4 kDa, which consisted of 15-mer peptides of two distinct epitopes each for ALD, ENO, and GAP. This recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. This composite protein was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), dot blots, and immunoblots, using positive control sera from women and men. These data indicate that it is possible to identify epitopes and that either singly, in combination, or as a composite protein represent targets for a point-of-care serodiagnostic test for T. vaginalis.

  20. Identification, characterization, and synthesis of peptide epitopes and a recombinant six-epitope protein for Trichomonas vaginalis serodiagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alderete JF

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available J F Alderete, Calvin J NeaceSchool of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USAAbstract: There is a need for a rapid, accurate serodiagnostic test useful for both women and men infected by Trichomonas vaginalis, which causes the number one sexually transmitted infection (STI. Women and men exposed to T. vaginalis make serum antibody to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (ALD, α-enolase (ENO, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP. We identified, by epitope mapping, the common and distinct epitopes of each protein detected by the sera of women patients with trichomonosis and by the sera of men highly seropositive to the immunogenic protein α-actinin (positive control sera. We analyzed the amino acid sequences to determine the extent of identity of the epitopes of each protein with other proteins in the databanks. This approach identified epitopes unique to T. vaginalis, indicating these peptide-epitopes as possible targets for a serodiagnostic test. Individual or combinations of 15-mer peptide epitopes with low to no identity with other proteins were reactive with positive control sera from both women and men but were unreactive with negative control sera. These analyses permitted the synthesis of a recombinant His6 fusion protein of 111 amino acids with an Mr of ~13.4 kDa, which consisted of 15-mer peptides of two distinct epitopes each for ALD, ENO, and GAP. This recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. This composite protein was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, dot blots, and immunoblots, using positive control sera from women and men. These data indicate that it is possible to identify epitopes and that either singly, in combination, or as a composite protein represent targets for a point-of-care serodiagnostic test for T. vaginalis.Keywords: diagnostics, point-of-care, targets, trichomonosis

  1. The center for plant and microbial complex carbohydrates at the University of Georgia Complex Carbohydrate Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albersheim, P.; Darvill, A.

    1991-08-01

    Research from the Complex Carbohydrates Research Center at the University of Georgia is presented. Topics include: Structural determination of soybean isoflavones which specifically induce Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodD1 but not the nodYABCSUIJ operon; structural analysis of the lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) from symbiotic mutants of Bradyrhizobium japonicum; structural characterization of lipooligosaccharides from Bradyrhizobium japonicum that are required for the specific nodulation of soybean; structural characterization of the LPSs from R. Leguminosarum biovar phaseoli, the symbiont of bean; characterization of bacteroid-specific LPS epitopes in R. leguminosarum biovar viciae; analysis of the surface polysaccharides of Rhizobium meliloti mutants whose lipopolysaccharides and extracellular polysaccharides can have the same function in symbiosis; characterization of a polysaccharide produced by certain Bradyrhizobium japonicum strains within soybean nodules; structural analysis of a streptococcal adhesin polysaccharide receptor; conformational studies of xyloglucan, the role of the fucosylated side chain in surface-specific cellulose-xyloglucan interactions; the structure of an acylated glucosamine oligosaccharide signal molecule (nod factor) involved in the symbiosis of Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae with its host Vicia sativa; investigating membrane responses induced by oligogalacturonides in cultured cells; the polygalacturonase inhibitor protein; characterization of the self-incompatability glycoproteins from Petunia hybrida; investigation of the cell wall polysaccharide structures of Arabidopsis thaliana; and the glucan inhibition of virus infection of tabacco.

  2. The effects of carbohydrate variation in isocaloric diets on glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; Arias, AMP; Ackermans, MT; Endert, E; Pijl, H; Kuipers, F; Meijer, AJ; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate content on postabsorptive glucose metabolism, we quantified gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis after 11 days of high carbohydrate (85% carbohydrate), control (44% carbohydrate), and very low carbohydrate (2% carbohydrate) diets in six healthy men. Diets

  3. One-pot multienzyme (OPME) systems for chemoenzymatic synthesis of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hai; Chen, Xi

    2016-03-14

    Glycosyltransferase-catalyzed enzymatic and chemoenzymatic syntheses are powerful approaches for the production of oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, glycoconjugates, and their derivatives. Enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of sugar nucleotide donors can be combined with glycosyltransferases in one pot for efficient production of the target glycans from simple monosaccharides and acceptors. The identification of enzymes involved in the salvage pathway of sugar nucleotide generation has greatly facilitated the development of simplified and efficient one-pot multienzyme (OPME) systems for synthesizing major glycan epitopes in mammalian glycomes. The applications of OPME methods are steadily gaining popularity mainly due to the increasing availability of wild-type and engineered enzymes. Substrate promiscuity of these enzymes and their mutants allows OPME synthesis of carbohydrates with naturally occurring post-glycosylational modifications (PGMs) and their non-natural derivatives using modified monosaccharides as precursors. The OPME systems can be applied in sequence for synthesizing complex carbohydrates. The sequence of the sequential OPME processes, the glycosyltransferase used, and the substrate specificities of the glycosyltransferases define the structures of the products. The OPME and sequential OPME strategies can be extended to diverse glycans in other glycomes when suitable enzymes with substrate promiscuity become available. This Perspective summarizes the work of the authors and collaborators on the development of glycosyltransferase-based OPME systems for carbohydrate synthesis. Future directions are also discussed.

  4. T cell epitope-based allergy vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larché, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Specific immunotherapy (SIT) with extracts containing intact allergen molecules is clinically efficacious, but associated with frequent adverse events related to the allergic sensitization of the patient. As a result, treatment is initiated in an incremental dose fashion which ultimately achieves a plateau (maintenance dose) that may be continued for several years. Reduction of allergic adverse events may allow safer and more rapid treatment Thus, many groups have developed and evaluated strategies to reduce allergenicity whilst maintaining immunogenicity, the latter being required to achieve specific modulation of the immune response. Peptide immunotherapy can be used to target T and/or B cells in an antigen-specific manner. To date, only approaches that target T cells have been clinically evaluated. Short, synthetic peptides representing immunodominant T cell epitopes of major allergens are able to modulate allergen-specific T cell responses in the absence of IgE cross linking and activation of effector cells. Here we review clinical and mechanistic studies associated with peptide immunotherapy targeting allergy to cats or to bee venom. 

  5. Regioselective monodeprotection of peracetylated carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filice, Marco; Guisan, Jose M; Terreni, Marco; Palomo, Jose M

    2012-10-01

    This protocol describes the regioselective deprotection of single hydroxyls in peracetylated monosaccharides and disaccharides by enzymatic or chemoenzymatic strategies. The introduction of a one-pot enzymatic step by using immobilized biocatalysts obviates the requirement to carry out tedious workups and time-consuming purifications. By using this straightforward protocol, different per-O-acetylated glycopyranosides (mono- or disaccharides, 1-substituted or glycals) can be transformed into a whole set of differentially monodeprotected 1-alcohols, 3-alcohols, 4-alcohols and 6-alcohols in high yields. These tailor-made glycosyl acceptors can then be used for stereoselective glycosylation for oligosaccharide and glycoderivative synthesis. They have been successfully used as building blocks to synthesize tailor-made di- and trisaccharides involved in the structure of lacto-N-neo-tetraose and precursors of the tumor-associated carbohydrate antigen T and the antitumoral drug peracetylated β-naphtyl-lactosamine. We are able to prepare a purified monoprotected carbohydrate in between 1 and 4 d. With this protocol, the small library of monodeprotected products can be synthesized in 1-2 weeks.

  6. Formative mechanism of preferential solution flow during dump leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ai-xiang; YIN Sheng-hua; LIU Jin-zhi; YANG Bao-hua

    2006-01-01

    Preferential flow is a rapid movement of solution through pores caused by coarse ores. Macropore is the main factor for the preferential flow. Macropore can be defined from three aspects. Segregation of the ores during dumping was studied according to particle kinematics. Small ores become smaller under the effect of acid and weathering. Clay in the rainwater from the hillside precipitates in the dump. Segregation and fine ores are the main causes in macropore. The permeability in coarse ores is better than that in fine ores. The mechanism in the preferential flows was studied combining the fast conducting effect of the macropore. Experimental result shows that, at certain application rate, fine ore area is saturated while large volume of solution flows laterally to the coarse ore area and leaks out quickly through the macropores. Thus the mechanism of preferential solution flows is further illustrated.

  7. Characteristics of Preferentially Attached Network Grown from Small World

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Seungyoung

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a model for a preferentially attached network which has grown from a small world network. Here, the average path length and the clustering coefficient are estimated, and the topological properties of modeled networks are compared as the initial conditions are changed. As a result, it is shown that the topological properties of the initial network remain even after the network growth. However, the vulnerability of each to preferentially attached nodes being added is not the same. It is found that the average path length rapidly decreases as the ratio of preferentially attached nodes increases and that the characteristics of the initial network can be easily disappeared. On the other hand, the clustering coefficient of the initial network slowly decreases with the ratio of preferentially attached nodes and its clustering characteristic remains much longer.

  8. Nanocavity Shrinkage and Preferential Amorphization during Irradiation in Silicon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Xian-Fang; WANG Zhan-Guo

    2005-01-01

    @@ We model the recent experimental results and demonstrate that the internal shrinkage of nanocavities in silicon is intrinsically associated with preferential amorphization as induced by self-ion irradiation.

  9. Preferential attachment in the evolution of metabolic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elofsson Arne

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many biological networks show some characteristics of scale-free networks. Scale-free networks can evolve through preferential attachment where new nodes are preferentially attached to well connected nodes. In networks which have evolved through preferential attachment older nodes should have a higher average connectivity than younger nodes. Here we have investigated preferential attachment in the context of metabolic networks. Results The connectivities of the enzymes in the metabolic network of Escherichia coli were determined and representatives for these enzymes were located in 11 eukaryotes, 17 archaea and 46 bacteria. E. coli enzymes which have representatives in eukaryotes have a higher average connectivity while enzymes which are represented only in the prokaryotes, and especially the enzymes only present in βγ-proteobacteria, have lower connectivities than expected by chance. Interestingly, the enzymes which have been proposed as candidates for horizontal gene transfer have a higher average connectivity than the other enzymes. Furthermore, It was found that new edges are added to the highly connected enzymes at a faster rate than to enzymes with low connectivities which is consistent with preferential attachment. Conclusion Here, we have found indications of preferential attachment in the metabolic network of E. coli. A possible biological explanation for preferential attachment growth of metabolic networks is that novel enzymes created through gene duplication maintain some of the compounds involved in the original reaction, throughout its future evolution. In addition, we found that enzymes which are candidates for horizontal gene transfer have a higher average connectivity than other enzymes. This indicates that while new enzymes are attached preferentially to highly connected enzymes, these highly connected enzymes have sometimes been introduced into the E. coli genome by horizontal gene transfer. We speculate

  10. Effects of carbohydrate quantity and glycemic index on resting metabolic rate and body composition during weight loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, J Philip; Roberts, Susan B; Schaefer, Ernst J; Gleason, Joi A; Fuss, Paul; Rasmussen, Helen; Saltzman, Edward; Das, Sai Krupa

    2015-11-01

    To examine the effects of diets varying in carbohydrate and glycemic index (GI) on changes in body composition, resting metabolic rate (RMR), and metabolic adaptation during and after weight loss. Adults with obesity (n = 91) were randomized to one of four provided-food diets for 17 weeks. Diets differed in percentage energy from carbohydrate (55% or 70%) and GI (low or high) but were matched for protein, fiber, and energy. Body weight, body composition, RMR, and metabolic adaptation (measured RMR-predicted RMR) were measured during weight loss and subsequent weight stability. No effect of dietary carbohydrate content or GI on body weight loss or percentage of weight lost as fat mass (FM) was observed. Measured RMR was significantly lower (-226 kJ/day [95% CI: -314 to -138 kJ/day], P weight loss, but this difference was attenuated after 5 weeks of weight stability. Metabolic adaptation did not differ by dietary carbohydrate content or GI and was not associated with weight regain 12 months later. Moderate-carbohydrate and low-GI diets did not preferentially reduce FM, preserve lean mass, or attenuate metabolic adaptation during weight loss compared to high-carbohydrate and high-GI diets. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  11. Characterization of the LM5 pectic galactan epitope with synthetic analogues of β-1,4-d-galactotetraose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mathias Christian Franch; Boos, Irene; Marcus, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Plant cell wall glycans are important polymers that are crucial to plant development and serve as an important source of sustainable biomass. The study of polysaccharides in the plant cell wall relies heavily on monoclonal antibodies for localization and visualization of glycans, using e.g. Immun......Plant cell wall glycans are important polymers that are crucial to plant development and serve as an important source of sustainable biomass. The study of polysaccharides in the plant cell wall relies heavily on monoclonal antibodies for localization and visualization of glycans, using e.......g. Immunofluorescent microscopy. Here, we describe the detailed epitope mapping of the mab LM5 that is shown to bind to a minimum of three sugar residues at the non-reducing end of linear beta-1,4-linked galactan. The study uses de novo synthetic analogs of galactans combined with carbohydrate microarray...

  12. Biochemical software: Carbohydrates on Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Heidrich

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Educators around  the  world  are  being  challenged  to  develop  and  design  better and  more  effective strategies for student learning  using a variety  of modern  resources.  In this  present  work, an educa- tional  hypermedia  software  was constructed as a support tool to biochemistry teaching.  Occurrence, structure, main  characteristics and  biological  function  of the  biomolecule  Carbohydrates were pre- sented  through  modules.  The  software was developed  using concept  maps,  ISIS-Draw,  and  FLASH- MX animation program.  The chapter  Carbohydrates on Laboratory illustrates experimental methods of carbohydrates characterization, through  animation of a laboratory scenery.   The  subject was de- veloped showing reactions  as Bial, Benedict, Selliwanoff, Barfoed, Phenol  Sulphuric,  and Iodines, and also enzymatic  reactions  as glucose oxidase and amylase.  There are also links with short texts  in order to help the understanding of the contents  and principles of laboratory practice  as well as background reactions. Application of the software to undergraduate students and high school teachers  showed an excellent  acceptance.   All of them  considered  the  software  a very good learning  tool.  Both  teachers and students welcomed this program  as it is more flexible, and allows the learning in a more individual rhythm. In addition, application of the software would be suitable  to a more effective learning  and it is less expensive than conventional experimental teaching.

  13. Carbohydrate clearance receptors in transfusion medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise Tølbøll; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2012-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates play important functions for circulation of proteins and cells. They provide protective shields and refraction from non-specific interactions with negative charges from sialic acids to enhance circulatory half-life. For recombinant protein therapeutics carbohydrates are espe...

  14. Wood adhesives containing proteins and carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    In recent years there has been resurgent interest in using biopolymers as sustainable and environmentally friendly ingredients in wood adhesive formulations. Among them, proteins and carbohydrates are the most commonly used. In this chapter, an overview is given of protein-based and carbohydrate-...

  15. Mastering ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: the impact of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, Uwe

    2008-01-01

    Mycorrhiza formation is the consequence of a mutualistic interaction between certain soil fungi and plant roots that helps to overcome nutritional limitations faced by the respective partners. In symbiosis, fungi contribute to tree nutrition by means of mineral weathering and mobilization of nutrients from organic matter, and obtain plant-derived carbohydrates as a response. Support with easily degradable carbohydrates seems to be the driving force for fungi to undergo this type of interaction. As a consequence, the fungal hexose uptake capacity is strongly increased in Hartig net hyphae of the model fungi Amanita muscaria and Laccaria bicolor. Next to fast carbohydrate uptake and metabolism, storage carbohydrates are of special interest. In functional A. muscaria ectomycorrhizas, expression and activity of proteins involved in trehalose biosynthesis is mainly localized in hyphae of the Hartig net, indicating an important function of trehalose in generation of a strong carbon sink by fungal hyphae. In symbiosis, fungal partners receive up to approximately 19 times more carbohydrates from their hosts than normal leakage of the root system would cause, resulting in a strong carbohydrate demand of infected roots and, as a consequence, a more efficient plant photosynthesis. To avoid fungal parasitism, the plant seems to have developed mechanisms to control carbohydrate drain towards the fungal partner and link it to the fungus-derived mineral nutrition. In this contribution, current knowledge on fungal strategies to obtain carbohydrates from its host and plant strategies to enable, but also to control and restrict (under certain conditions), carbon transfer are summarized.

  16. Carbohydrate plasma expanders for passive tumor targeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Stefan; Caysa, Henrike; Kuntsche, Judith

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of carbohydrate plasma volume expanders as a novel polymer platform for tumor targeting. Many synthetic polymers have already been synthesized for targeted tumor therapy, but potential advantages of these carbohydrates include...

  17. Total dissolved carbohydrate in Mahi river estuary

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Rokade, M.A.; Zingde, M.D.

    Total dissolved carbohydrate varied from 4.37-15 mg l-1 and 3.71-15.95 mg l-1 in the surface and bottom samples respectively. Highest concentration of carbohydrate was observed at station 1 which decreased downward upto Station 6 which showed...

  18. Carbohydrates from Detarium microcarpum bark extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Pedro; Relva, Angela

    2002-10-08

    The bark extract of the medicinal plant Detarium microcarpum was analysed for its carbohydrate content by GLC-CIMS. Preparative HPLC of the benzoylated carbohydrate fraction led to the isolation of L-quino-1,5-lactone, D-(-)-bornesitol, D-pinitol, myo-inositol, sucrose, D-glucose, and D-fructose benzoates, which were characterised by NMR spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Vacuum ultraviolet photoionization of carbohydrates and nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Joong-Won, E-mail: jshin@govst.edu [Division of Science, Governors State University, University Park, Illinois 60484-0975 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States); Bernstein, Elliot R., E-mail: erb@lamar.colostate.edu [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523-1872 (United States)

    2014-01-28

    Carbohydrates (2-deoxyribose, ribose, and xylose) and nucleotides (adenosine-, cytidine-, guanosine-, and uridine-5{sup ′}-monophosphate) are generated in the gas phase, and ionized with vacuum ultraviolet photons (VUV, 118.2 nm). The observed time of flight mass spectra of the carbohydrate fragmentation are similar to those observed [J.-W. Shin, F. Dong, M. Grisham, J. J. Rocca, and E. R. Bernstein, Chem. Phys. Lett. 506, 161 (2011)] for 46.9 nm photon ionization, but with more intensity in higher mass fragment ions. The tendency of carbohydrate ions to fragment extensively following ionization seemingly suggests that nucleic acids might undergo radiation damage as a result of carbohydrate, rather than nucleobase fragmentation. VUV photoionization of nucleotides (monophosphate-carbohydrate-nucleobase), however, shows that the carbohydrate-nucleobase bond is the primary fragmentation site for these species. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that the removed carbohydrate electrons by the 118.2 nm photons are associated with endocyclic C–C and C–O ring centered orbitals: loss of electron density in the ring bonds of the nascent ion can thus account for the observed fragmentation patterns following carbohydrate ionization. DFT calculations also indicate that electrons removed from nucleotides under these same conditions are associated with orbitals involved with the nucleobase-saccharide linkage electron density. The calculations give a general mechanism and explanation of the experimental results.

  20. Derivatization Reaction of Carbohydrates with Urea as the Reagent and Fluorimetric Determination of Carbohydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG,Jing-He(杨景和); CAO,Xi-Hui(曹西慧); WANG,Min(王敏); WU,Xia(吴霞); SUN,Chang-Xia(孙长侠)

    2002-01-01

    It is found that in the presence of sulfuric acid carbohydrates condense with urea to afford the condensation products, which emit fluorescence. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensities of system are proportional to the concentrations of carbohydrates. Based on this linear relationship,quantitative determination of kinds of carbohydrates has been made. Among an the carbohydrates tested, the sensitivity of α-rhamnose is the highest and its limits of detection reaches 3.5 × 10-8 mol/L. So α-rhamnose can be selectively determed in the presence of other carbohydrates. A interaction mechanism is also discussed.

  1. Industrial applications of marine carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudha, Prasad N; Aisverya, S; Nithya, R; Vijayalakshmi, K

    2014-01-01

    Biomaterials have been used increasingly in various fields, such as drug delivery, imaging, and tissue engineering. The main reason justifying the widespread use of biomaterials relies on its valuable and low-cost source of new drugs. Current research goals are focused on identifying more potent and specific compounds with antitumor, immunomodulatory, antihyperlipidemic, anticoagulant, and antiviral activities. The increasing knowledge of structural analysis and chemical modifications enables the use of these marine carbohydrates in a newer way for the human welfare. This chapter focuses on the recent developments related to industrial and biomedical applications using chitin, chitosan, alginate, agar, and carrageenan derivatives and reports the main advances published over the last 10-15 years.

  2. Nondigestible carbohydrates and mineral bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greger, J L

    1999-07-01

    Generally, fiber and compounds associated with fiber in cereal products (e.g., phytates) have been found to reduce the apparent absorption of minerals (such as calcium, magnesium, zinc and manganese) in humans, livestock and animal models. The effects of "soluble" forms of fiber (specifically pectins, gums, resistant starches, lactulose, oligofructose and inulin) on mineral absorption are more difficult to characterize. The addition of these soluble forms of fiber has been found in various studies to add viscosity to the gut contents, promote fermentation and the production of volatile fatty acids in the cecum, have a trophic effect on the ceca of animals and increase serum enteroglucagon concentrations. Thus it is not surprising that the addition of soluble forms of fiber to diets often has been found to improve absorption of minerals. This may reflect absorption of electrolytes from the large intestine. Future work should address the mechanisms by which ingestion of nondigestible carbohydrates improves mineral absorption in humans.

  3. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin and alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomons, Hilary Denis

    2012-06-01

    Alcohol abuse is an important public health problem, with major implications in patients with a pre-existing liver pathology of viral origin. Hepatitis C, for example, is one of the diseases in which alcohol consumption can lead to the transition from a fairly benign outline to a potentially life-threatening liver disease. Alcohol abuse is usually identified on the basis of clinical judgment, alcoholism related questionnaires, laboratory tests and, more recently, biomarkers. Also on this list of tests, carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) is widely available and useful for determining recent alcohol consumption, particularly when corroborated with elevation of other liver-associated enzymes. Clinicians should be aware of the indications and limitations of this test in order to better evaluate alcohol consumption in their patients.

  4. High Throughput T Epitope Mapping and Vaccine Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Li Pira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mapping of antigenic peptide sequences from proteins of relevant pathogens recognized by T helper (Th and by cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL is crucial for vaccine development. In fact, mapping of T-cell epitopes provides useful information for the design of peptide-based vaccines and of peptide libraries to monitor specific cellular immunity in protected individuals, patients and vaccinees. Nevertheless, epitope mapping is a challenging task. In fact, large panels of overlapping peptides need to be tested with lymphocytes to identify the sequences that induce a T-cell response. Since numerous peptide panels from antigenic proteins are to be screened, lymphocytes available from human subjects are a limiting factor. To overcome this limitation, high throughput (HTP approaches based on miniaturization and automation of T-cell assays are needed. Here we consider the most recent applications of the HTP approach to T epitope mapping. The alternative or complementary use of in silico prediction and experimental epitope definition is discussed in the context of the recent literature. The currently used methods are described with special reference to the possibility of applying the HTP concept to make epitope mapping an easier procedure in terms of time, workload, reagents, cells and overall cost.

  5. Confirmation of a new conserved linear epitope of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinjun, Lv; Xuejun, Ma; Lihua, Wang; Hao, Li; Xinxin, Shen; Pengcheng, Yu; Qing, Tang; Guodong, Liang

    2012-05-01

    Bioinformatics analysis was used to predict potential epitopes of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein and highlighted some distinct differences in the quantity and localization of the epitopes disclosed by epitope analysis of monoclonal antibodies against Lyssavirus nucleoprotein. Bioinformatics analysis showed that the domain containing residues 152-164 of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein was a conserved linear epitope that had not been reported previously. Immunization of two rabbits with the corresponding synthetic peptide conjugated to the Keyhole Limpe hemocyanin (KLH) macromolecule resulted in a titer of anti-peptide antibody above 1:200,000 in rabbit sera as detected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Western blot analysis demonstrated that the anti-peptide antibody recognized denatured Lyssavirus nucleoprotein in sodium dodecylsulfonate-polyacrylate gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Affinity chromatography purification and FITC-labeling of the anti-peptide antibody in rabbit sera was performed. FITC-labeled anti-peptide antibody could recognize Lyssavirus nucleoprotein in BSR cells and canine brain tissues even at a 1:200 dilution. Residues 152-164 of Lyssavirus nucleoprotein were verified as a conserved linear epitope in Lyssavirus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental Study of Preferential Solute Transportation During Dump Leaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Sheng-hua; WU Ai-xiang

    2006-01-01

    The production of dump leaching of the Dexing Copper Mine was affected by a preferential solution flow. Formative mechanism of the preferential solution flow was investigated by analyzing the relationship between both dump permeability and surface tension and ore diameter. The preferential solution flow occurred in the fine ore area when the application rate was low. The preferential solution flow entered into the coarse ore area because the negative pore water pressure disappeared with an increase of the application rate. The preferential solute transportation experiment was conducted by selecting NaCl as mineral. Results of the experiment showed that the concentration of the outflow solution reduced over time. The concentration of the coarse ore area outflow solution was greater than that of the fine ore area. The process of NaCl leaching can be divided into two stages. NaCl was carried out directly by diffusion-convection during the first stage, so the leaching rate increased sharply. But in the second stage, only a small amount of NaCl dissolved in the immobile water. The leaching rate increased slowly because NaCl, dissolved in the immobile water, can only be leached by diffusion.

  7. Cognitive control modulates preferential sensory processing of affective stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Marco; Flaisch, Tobias; Meinzer, Marcus; Schupp, Harald T

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive human behavior crucially relies on the ability of the brain to allocate resources automatically to emotionally significant stimuli. This ability has consistently been demonstrated by studies showing preferential processing of affective stimuli in sensory cortical areas. It is still unclear, however, whether this putatively automatic mechanism can be modulated by cognitive control processes. Here, we use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate whether preferential processing of an affective face distractor is suppressed when an affective distractor has previously elicited a response conflict in a word-face Stroop task. We analyzed this for three consecutive stages in the ventral stream of visual processing for which preferential processing of affective stimuli has previously been demonstrated: the striate area (BA 17), category-unspecific extrastriate areas (BA 18/19), and the fusiform face area (FFA). We found that response conflict led to a selective suppression of affective face processing in category-unspecific extrastriate areas and the FFA, and this effect was accompanied by changes in functional connectivity between these areas and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. In contrast, preferential processing of affective face distractors was unaffected in the striate area. Our results indicate that cognitive control processes adaptively suppress preferential processing of affective stimuli under conditions where affective processing is detrimental because it elicits response conflict.

  8. Antibody specific epitope prediction-emergence of a new paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Ofran, Yanay; Peters, Bjoern

    2015-04-01

    The development of accurate tools for predicting B-cell epitopes is important but difficult. Traditional methods have examined which regions in an antigen are likely binding sites of an antibody. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that most antigen surface residues will be able to bind one or more of the myriad of possible antibodies. In recent years, new approaches have emerged for predicting an epitope for a specific antibody, utilizing information encoded in antibody sequence or structure. Applying such antibody-specific predictions to groups of antibodies in combination with easily obtainable experimental data improves the performance of epitope predictions. We expect that further advances of such tools will be possible with the integration of immunoglobulin repertoire sequencing data.

  9. Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Hiroaki; Yokooji, Tomoharu; Taogoshi, Takanori

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is an adverse immune response to certain kinds of food. Although any food can cause allergic reactions, chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shellfish, fruit, and buckwheat account for 75% of food allergies in Japan. Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies play a pivotal role in the development of food allergy. Recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the efficient analysis of food allergens. As a result, many food allergens have been identified, and their molecular structure and IgE-binding epitopes have also been identified. Studies of allergens have demonstrated that IgE antibodies specific to allergen components and/or the peptide epitopes are good indicators for the identification of patients with food allergy, prediction of clinical severity and development of tolerance. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the allergens and IgE epitopes in the well-researched allergies to chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shrimp, and peanut.

  10. Phage displaying epitope of Candida albicans HSP90 and serodiagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨琼; 王丽; 卢大宁; 邢沈阳; 尹东; 朱筱娟

    2004-01-01

    @@ Recently, the frequent use of immunosuppressants and chemotherapeutic drugs for cancers has caused an increase in the frequency of life-threatening systemic candidiasis.1 Studies by Matthews et al2 indicated HSP90 fragments are major targets for the immune system in infection due to C. albicans, and anti-epitope LKVIRK of HSP90 antibody is a serological marker for diagnosis of invasive candidiasis. Cloning and sequencing HSP90 antigen revealed that the linear epitope LKVIRK, localized near the C-terminus of the 47 kDa protein which circulates in the sera of patients with invasive candidiasis, as a heat-stable breakdown product of large more heat-labile antigen HSP90.2 In this study, epitope LKVIRK was displayed on the surface of phage fd to develop a new serological test for systemic candidiasis.

  11. Branched peptide amphiphiles, related epitope compounds and self assembled structures thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupp, Samuel I.; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2008-11-18

    Branched peptide amphiphilic compounds incorporating one or residues providing a pendant amino group for coupling one or more epitope sequences thereto, such compounds and related compositions for enhanced epitope presentation.

  12. Mature Epitope Density - A strategy for target selection based on immunoinformatics and exported prokaryotic proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Anderson R; Pereira, Vanessa Bastos; Barbosa, Eudes;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current immunological bioinformatic approaches focus on the prediction of allele-specific epitopes capable of triggering immunogenic activity. The prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I epitopes is well studied, and various software solutions exist for this purpo...

  13. Antibody protection reveals extended epitopes on the human TSH receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rauf Latif

    Full Text Available Stimulating, and some blocking, antibodies to the TSH receptor (TSHR have conformation-dependent epitopes reported to involve primarily the leucine rich repeat region of the ectodomain (LRD. However, successful crystallization of TSHR residues 22-260 has omitted important extracellular non-LRD residues including the hinge region which connects the TSHR ectodomain to the transmembrane domain and which is involved in ligand induced signal transduction. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to determine if TSHR antibodies (TSHR-Abs have non-LRD binding sites outside the LRD. To obtain this information we employed the method of epitope protection in which we first protected TSHR residues 1-412 with intact TSHR antibodies and then enzymatically digested the unprotected residues. Those peptides remaining were subsequently delineated by mass spectrometry. Fourteen out of 23 of the reported stimulating monoclonal TSHR-Ab crystal contact residues were protected by this technique which may reflect the higher binding energies of certain residues detected in this approach. Comparing the protected epitopes of two stimulating TSHR-Abs we found both similarities and differences but both antibodies also contacted the hinge region and the amino terminus of the TSHR following the signal peptide and encompassing cysteine box 1 which has previously been shown to be important for TSH binding and activation. A monoclonal blocking TSHR antibody revealed a similar pattern of binding regions but the residues that it contacted on the LRD were again distinct. These data demonstrated that conformationally dependent TSHR-Abs had epitopes not confined to the LRDs but also incorporated epitopes not revealed in the available crystal structure. Furthermore, the data also indicated that in addition to overlapping contact regions within the LRD, there are unique epitope patterns for each of the antibodies which may contribute to their functional heterogeneity.

  14. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  15. The fully synthetic MAG-Tn3 therapeutic vaccine containing the tetanus toxoid-derived TT830-844 universal epitope provides anti-tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laubreton, Daphné; Bay, Sylvie; Sedlik, Christine; Artaud, Cécile; Ganneau, Christelle; Dériaud, Edith; Viel, Sophie; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Amigorena, Sebastian; Gérard, Catherine; Lo-Man, Richard; Leclerc, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Malignant transformations are often associated with aberrant glycosylation processes that lead to the expression of new carbohydrate antigens at the surface of tumor cells. Of these carbohydrate antigens, the Tn antigen is particularly highly expressed in many carcinomas, especially in breast carcinoma. We designed MAG-Tn3, a fully synthetic vaccine based on three consecutive Tn moieties that are O-linked to a CD4+ T cell epitope, to induce anti-Tn antibody responses that could be helpful for therapeutic vaccination against cancer. To ensure broad coverage within the human population, the tetanus toxoid-derived peptide TT830-844 was selected as a T-helper epitope because it can bind to various HLA-DRB molecules. We showed that the MAG-Tn3 vaccine, which was formulated with the GSK proprietary immunostimulant AS15 and designed for human cancer therapy, is able to induce an anti-Tn antibody response in mice of various H-2 haplotypes, and this response correlates with the ability to induce a specific T cell response against the TT830-844 peptide. The universality of the TT830-844 peptide was extended to new H-2 and HLA-DRB molecules that were capable of binding this T cell epitope. Finally, the MAG-Tn3 vaccine was able to induce anti-Tn antibody responses in cynomolgus monkeys, which targeted Tn-expressing tumor cells and mediated tumor cell death both in vitro and in vivo. Thus, MAG-Tn3 is a highly promising anticancer vaccine that is currently under evaluation in a phase I clinical trial.

  16. Preferential sampling and Bayesian geostatistics: Statistical modeling and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecconi, Lorenzo; Grisotto, Laura; Catelan, Dolores; Lagazio, Corrado; Berrocal, Veronica; Biggeri, Annibale

    2016-08-01

    Preferential sampling refers to any situation in which the spatial process and the sampling locations are not stochastically independent. In this paper, we present two examples of geostatistical analysis in which the usual assumption of stochastic independence between the point process and the measurement process is violated. To account for preferential sampling, we specify a flexible and general Bayesian geostatistical model that includes a shared spatial random component. We apply the proposed model to two different case studies that allow us to highlight three different modeling and inferential aspects of geostatistical modeling under preferential sampling: (1) continuous or finite spatial sampling frame; (2) underlying causal model and relevant covariates; and (3) inferential goals related to mean prediction surface or prediction uncertainty.

  17. The role of glycosylated epitopes in the serodiagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inês, Elizabete de Jesus; Silva, Mônica Lopes Sampaio; Souza, Joelma Nascimento; Teixeira, Márcia Cristina Aquino; Soares, Neci Matos

    2013-05-01

    Carbohydrates of pathogen antigens have been disrupted by periodate oxidation, in order to reduce nonspecific bindings and improve serodiagnosis of parasite infections. In the present study, the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was carried out with filariform larvae antigen treated, or not treated, with sodium metaperiodate. Groups of sera from patients with Strongyloides stercoralis infection, with other intestinal parasites and a normal control, were used. The oxidation of Strongyloides stercoralis glycosylated epitopes reduced the seroreactivity of sera from patients with S. stercoralis infection as demonstrated by ELISA, with a decrease in sera optical densities. The number of cross-reactions of IgG and IgE-ELISAs increased by 12% and 16%, respectively, after antigen treatment with metaperiodate. This was more often observed in patients infected with Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm. Moreover, the IgG depletion from sera tested by IgE-ELISA led to the detection of previous false-negative samples from S. stercoralis-infected patients.

  18. High-throughput epitope identification for snakebite antivenom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; De Masi, Federico; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    Insight into the epitopic recognition pattern for polyclonal antivenoms is a strong tool for accurate prediction of antivenom cross-reactivity and provides a basis for design of novel antivenoms. In this work, a high-throughput approach was applied to characterize linear epitopes in 966 individua...... toxins from pit vipers (Crotalidae) using the ICP Crotalidae antivenom. Due to an abundance of snake venom metalloproteinases and phospholipase A2s in the venoms used for production of the investigated antivenom, this study focuses on these toxin families....

  19. Current challenges in quantifying preferential flow through the vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koestel, John; Larsbo, Mats; Jarvis, Nick

    2017-04-01

    In this presentation, we give an overview of current challenges in quantifying preferential flow through the vadose zone. A review of the literature suggests that current generation models do not fully reflect the present state of process understanding and empirical knowledge of preferential flow. We believe that the development of improved models will be stimulated by the increasingly widespread application of novel imaging technologies as well as future advances in computational power and numerical techniques. One of the main challenges in this respect is to bridge the large gap between the scales at which preferential flow occurs (pore to Darcy scales) and the scale of interest for management (fields, catchments, regions). Studies at the pore scale are being supported by the development of 3-D non-invasive imaging and numerical simulation techniques. These studies are leading to a better understanding of how macropore network topology and initial/boundary conditions control key state variables like matric potential and thus the strength of preferential flow. Extrapolation of this knowledge to larger scales would require support from theoretical frameworks such as key concepts from percolation and network theory, since we lack measurement technologies to quantify macropore networks at these large scales. Linked hydro-geophysical measurement techniques that produce highly spatially and temporally resolved data enable investigation of the larger-scale heterogeneities that can generate preferential flow patterns at pedon, hillslope and field scales. At larger regional and global scales, improved methods of data-mining and analyses of large datasets (machine learning) may help in parameterizing models as well as lead to new insights into the relationships between soil susceptibility to preferential flow and site attributes (climate, land uses, soil types).

  20. Epitope mapping by epitope excision, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and peptide-panning techniques combined with in silico analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Nicola; Mancini, Nicasio; Criscuolo, Elena; Cappelletti, Francesca; Clementi, Massimo; Burioni, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The fine characterization of protective B cell epitopes plays a pivotal role in the development of novel vaccines. The development of epitope-based vaccines, in fact, cannot be possible without a clear definition of the antigenic regions involved in the binding between the protective antibody (Ab) and its molecular target. To achieve this result, different epitope-mapping approaches have been widely described (Clementi et al. Drug Discov Today 18(9-10):464-471, 2013). Nowadays, the best way to characterize an Ab bound region is still the resolution of Ab-antigen (Ag) co-crystal structure. Unfortunately, the crystallization approaches are not always feasible. However, different experimental strategies aimed to predict Ab-Ag interaction and followed by in silico analysis of the results may be good surrogate approaches to achieve this result. Here, we review few experimental techniques followed by the use of "basic" informatics tools for the analysis of the results.

  1. Declustering of clustered preferential sampling for histogram and semivariogram inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olea, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of attributes obtained more as a consequence of business ventures than sampling design frequently result in samplings that are preferential both in location and value, typically in the form of clusters along the pay. Preferential sampling requires preprocessing for the purpose of properly inferring characteristics of the parent population, such as the cumulative distribution and the semivariogram. Consideration of the distance to the nearest neighbor allows preparation of resampled sets that produce comparable results to those from previously proposed methods. Clustered sampling of size 140, taken from an exhaustive sampling, is employed to illustrate this approach. ?? International Association for Mathematical Geology 2007.

  2. A Generalized Preferential Attachment Model for Complex Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yamasaki, K; Fu, D; Buldyrev, S V; Pammolli, F; Riccaboni, M; Stanley, H E; Yamasaki, Kazuko; Matia, Kaushik; Fu, Dongfeng; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Pammolli, Fabio; Riccaboni, Massimo

    2005-01-01

    Complex systems can be characterized by classes of equivalency of their elements defined according to system specific rules. We propose a generalized preferential attachment model to describe the class size distribution. The model postulates preferential growth of the existing classes and the steady influx of new classes. We investigate how the distribution depends on the initial conditions and changes from a pure exponential form for zero influx of new classes to a power law with an exponential cutoff form when the influx of new classes is substantial. We apply the model to study the growth dynamics of pharmaceutical industry.

  3. Preferential trade agreements and their role in world trade

    OpenAIRE

    Medvedev, Denis

    2006-01-01

    The author investigates the effects of preferential trade agreements (PTAs) on bilateral trade flows using a comprehensive database of PTAs in force and a detailed matrix of world trade. He shows that total trade between PTA partners is a poor proxy for preferential trade (trade in tariff lines where preferences are likely to matter): while the former amounted to one-third of global trade in 2000-02, the latter was between one-sixth and one-tenth of world trade. His gravity model estimates in...

  4. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, T. E-mail: kume@taka.jaeri.go.jp; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  5. Carbohydrate functionalized carbon nanotubes and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorityala, Bala Kishan; Ma, Jimei; Wang, Xin; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted tremendous attention in biomedical applications due to their molecular size and unique properties. This tutorial review summarizes the strategies to functionalize CNTs with bioactive carbohydrates, which improve their solubility, biocompatibility and biofunctionalities while preserving their desired properties. In addition, studies on the usage of carbohydrate functionalized CNTs to detect bacteria, to bind to specific lectins, to deliver glycomimetic drug molecules into cells and to probe cellular activities as biosensors are reviewed. Improvement in biocompatibility and introduction of bio-functionalities by integration of carbohydrate with CNTs are paving the way to glyconanotechnology and may provide new tools for glycobiological studies.

  6. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...995,SRX275809,SRX275811 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  8. File list: Oth.Pan.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX153153,SRX...153152,SRX153151 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.YSt.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  11. File list: Oth.YSt.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  12. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  13. File list: Oth.CDV.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.Kid.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  15. File list: Oth.Unc.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Oth.Oth.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  18. File list: Oth.Kid.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: Oth.Myo.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem c...ell SRX555489 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Adl.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Adult SRX181419,SRX...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.Liv.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Liv.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Liver SRX1165095,S...RX1165103,SRX1165100,SRX1165096,SRX1165104,SRX1165101,SRX1165090,SRX1165102,SRX1165091 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Liv.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.CeL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CeL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Cell line SRX330995...099636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.CeL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.NoD.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  5. File list: Oth.YSt.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.YSt.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Yeast strain SR...1370,SRX211371,SRX493939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.YSt.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Oth.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Others SRX228677,SR...X228679,SRX228676,SRX228678 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Oth.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Utr.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Uterus SRX188854,S...,SRX210703,SRX968127,SRX610673,SRX610674,SRX610672,SRX095386 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Adl.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Adult SRX181427,SRX...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Oth.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Oth.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Others SRX228677,SR...X228676,SRX228679,SRX228678 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Oth.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. High frequency of T cells specific for cryptic epitopes in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke Sick; Andersen, Sofie Ramskov; Hjortsø, Mads Duus

    2013-01-01

    A number of cytotoxic T-cell epitopes are cryptic epitopes generated from non-conventional sources. These include epitopes that are encoded by alternative open reading frames or in generally non-coding genomic regions, such as introns. We have previously observed a frequent recognition of cryptic...

  11. Epitope-dependent functional effects of celiac disease autoantibodies on transglutaminase 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hnida, Kathrin; Stamnaes, Jorunn; du Pré, M Fleur

    2016-01-01

    could be relevant to the pathogenesis of CD. In A20 B cells transduced with TG2-specific B-cell receptor, epitope 2-expressing cells had poorer uptake of TG2-gluten complexes and were less efficient in gluten epitope presentation to T cells than cells expressing an epitope 1 receptor. Thus, the ability...

  12. File list: Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX367452,S...RX367451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  14. File list: Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX204898,SR...X204899 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.NoD.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  16. File list: Oth.Brs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  17. File list: Oth.NoD.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  18. File list: Oth.Kid.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  19. File list: Oth.EmF.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  20. File list: Oth.CDV.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  1. File list: Oth.EmF.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  4. File list: Oth.CeL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  5. File list: Oth.Liv.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  6. File list: Oth.Prs.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  7. File list: Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  8. File list: Oth.Unc.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

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  9. File list: Oth.CeL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CeL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Cell line SRX099635...099636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.CeL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Bld.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Blood SRX180156,SRX...,SRX180155,SRX695808 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types ...211371,SRX493939,SRX381289 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX204899,SR...X204898 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX71842...0,SRX512368,SRX512366,SRX807621,SRX512367,SRX512372,SRX512373,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.Unc.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Cell line SRX099638...099636 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.CeL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Unc.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.Unc.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Adl.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Adult SRX181427,SRX...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Prs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Prostate SRX084528...,SRX084527,SRX084524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem c...ell SRX555489 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Kid.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Kid.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Kidney SRX065541,S...RX644719,SRX170375,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Kid.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Brs.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Breast SRX667411,S...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Brs.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.EmF.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.EmF.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryonic fibroblas...RX255460,SRX204644,SRX542102,SRX204643,SRX204642 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.EmF.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types ...493939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Bld.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bld.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Blood SRX718015,SRX...,SRX180155,SRX695808 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Bld.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX066244,SR...X815533,SRX066245,SRX815531,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX1...304813 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Emb.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX066244,SR...X815533,SRX066245,SRX815531,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX275807,SR...SRX691799,SRX691794,SRX759286,SRX691798,SRX691797,SRX275809,SRX275811,SRX691795,SRX022866 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX51236...8,SRX512367,SRX718420,SRX512372,SRX512366,SRX512373,SRX807621,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags No description ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Utr.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Utr.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Uterus SRX248763,S...,SRX735140,SRX735139,SRX210703,SRX210702,SRX095386,SRX968127 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Utr.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types ...211370,SRX493939,SRX211371 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX485264,SR...SRX663358,SRX967653 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX1470542,...SRX1470544 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX1470542,...SRX1470544 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX367452,S...RX367451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.PSC.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem ce...708,ERX320411,SRX647912,SRX204802,SRX352995 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Emb.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX815533,SR...X066244,SRX066245,SRX815531,SRX066247 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Prs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Prostate SRX084527...,SRX084528,SRX084524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Brs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Breast SRX667411,S...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Brs.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags No description htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.NoD.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...460,ERX320411,SRX695808 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags No description ...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.NoD.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX1470542,...SRX1470544 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified SRX88...9798 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Bon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Bone SRX065557,SRX...096356,SRX096358,SRX316960,SRX065556 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Liv.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Liv.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Liver SRX1165095,S...RX1165103,SRX1165096,SRX1165104,SRX1165100,SRX1165101,SRX1165102,SRX1165090,SRX1165091 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Liv.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX367452,S...RX367451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX...322539,SRX170374,SRX644727,SRX644719,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX275807,SR...SRX759284,SRX691794,SRX759286,SRX691798,SRX691797,SRX691795,SRX022866,SRX275809,SRX275811 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.Pan.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Pan.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pancreas SRX747491,...SRX747492 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Pan.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags Unclassified ht...tp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.Unc.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Lng.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Lng.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Lung SRX119639,SRX...119641,SRX119640,SRX119642,SRX119638,SRX119637 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Lng.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Embryo SRX066244,SR...X815533,SRX066247,SRX066245,SRX815531 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Emb.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Bon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Bone SRX065557,SRX...096356,SRX096358,SRX316960,SRX065556 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bon.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Epidermis SRX71842...0,SRX512368,SRX512366,SRX807621,SRX512367,SRX512372,SRX512373,SRX807620 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Epd.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Cardiovascular SRX...096360,SRX096362 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.CDV.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Gon.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX153153,SRX...153152,SRX153151 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  19. File list: Oth.Neu.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Neural SRX367452,S...RX367451 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Neu.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Dig.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Digestive tract SRX...365692 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  1. File list: Oth.Liv.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Liv.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Liver SRX1165103,S...RX1165095,SRX1165100,SRX1165101,SRX1165104,SRX1165102,SRX1165090,SRX1165091,SRX1165096 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Liv.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  2. File list: Oth.PSC.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem ce...821,ERX320410,SRX266822,SRX352996,ERX320411 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  3. File list: Oth.Dig.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Dig.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Digestive tract SRX...365692 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Dig.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX153152,SRX...153153,SRX153151 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  5. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX...644715,SRX555489,SRX644719,SRX527876,SRX644723 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  6. File list: Oth.Myo.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX344965,SR...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  7. File list: Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX039346,SR...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  8. File list: Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Muscle SRX039346,SR...http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Myo.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  9. File list: Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell sacCer3 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types ...211370,SRX211371,SRX493939 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/sacCer3/assembled/Oth.ALL.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  10. File list: Oth.Bon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Bon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Bone SRX065557,SRX...096356,SRX096358,SRX316960,SRX065556 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Bon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  11. File list: Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags All cell types SRX1...802,SRX204643,SRX204642 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.ALL.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  12. File list: Oth.Brs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Brs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Breast SRX667411,S...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Brs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  13. File list: Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX153153,SRX...153151,SRX153152 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  14. File list: Oth.Prs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Prostate SRX084527...,SRX084528,SRX084524 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Prs.50.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  15. File list: Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell hg19 TFs and others Epitope tags Gonad SRX204898,SR...X204899 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/assembled/Oth.Gon.10.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Adl.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Adl.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell dm3 TFs and others Epitope tags Adult SRX181427,SRX...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/dm3/assembled/Oth.Adl.05.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell mm9 TFs and others Epitope tags Pluripotent stem ce...822,SRX266828,SRX352996,ERX320411,SRX204802 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.PSC.20.Epitope_tags.AllCell.bed ...

  18. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications.

  19. Nonstructural Proteins Are Preferential Positive Selection Targets in Zika Virus and Related Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Manuela; Forni, Diego; Clerici, Mario; Cagliani, Rachele

    2016-01-01

    The Flavivirus genus comprises several human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and Zika virus (ZIKV). Although ZIKV usually causes mild symptoms, growing evidence is linking it to congenital birth defects and to increased risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome. ZIKV encodes a polyprotein that is processed to produce three structural and seven nonstructural (NS) proteins. We investigated the evolution of the viral polyprotein in ZIKV and in related flaviviruses (DENV, Spondweni virus, and Kedougou virus). After accounting for saturation issues, alignment uncertainties, and recombination, we found evidence of episodic positive selection on the branch that separates DENV from the other flaviviruses. NS1 emerged as the major selection target, and selected sites were located in immune epitopes or in functionally important protein regions. Three of these sites are located in an NS1 region that interacts with structural proteins and is essential for virion biogenesis. Analysis of the more recent evolutionary history of ZIKV lineages indicated that positive selection acted on NS5 and NS4B, this latter representing the preferential target. All selected sites were located in the N-terminal portion of NS4B, which inhibits interferon response. One of the positively selected sites (26M/I/T/V) in ZIKV also represents a selection target in sylvatic DENV2 isolates, and a nearby residue evolves adaptively in JEV. Two additional positively selected sites are within a protein region that interacts with host (e.g. STING) and viral (i.e. NS1, NS4A) proteins. Notably, mutations in the NS4B region of other flaviviruses modulate neurovirulence and/or neuroinvasiveness. These results suggest that the positively selected sites we identified modulate viral replication and contribute to immune evasion. These sites should be prioritized in future experimental studies. However, analyses herein detected no selective events associated to the spread of the Asian

  20. Preferential repair of DNA double-strand break at the active gene in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, Priyasri; Sen, Rwik; Pandita, Tej K; Bhaumik, Sukesh R

    2012-10-19

    Previous studies have demonstrated transcription-coupled nucleotide/base excision repair. We report here for the first time that DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is also coupled to transcription. We generated a yeast strain by introducing a homing (Ho) endonuclease cut site followed by a nucleotide sequence for multiple Myc epitopes at the 3' end of the coding sequence of a highly active gene, ADH1. This yeast strain also contains the Ho cut site at the nearly silent or poorly active mating type α (MATα) locus and expresses Ho endonuclease under the galactose-inducible GAL1 promoter. Using this strain, DSBs were generated at the ADH1 and MATα loci in galactose-containing growth medium that induced HO expression. Subsequently, yeast cells were transferred to dextrose-containing growth medium to stop HO expression, and the DSB repair was monitored at the ADH1 and MATα loci by PCR, using the primer pairs flanking the Ho cut sites. Our results revealed a faster DSB repair at the highly active ADH1 than that at the nearly silent MATα locus, hence implicating a transcription-coupled DSB repair at the active gene in vivo. Subsequently, we extended this study to another gene, PHO5 (carrying the Ho cut site at its coding sequence), under transcriptionally active and inactive growth conditions. We found a fast DSB repair at the active PHO5 gene in comparison to its inactive state. Collectively, our results demonstrate a preferential DSB repair at the active gene, thus supporting transcription-coupled DSB repair in living cells.

  1. Male cockroaches prefer a high carbohydrate diet that makes them more attractive to females: implications for the study of condition dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Sandra H; House, Clarissa M; Moore, Allen J; Simpson, Stephen J; Hunt, John

    2011-06-01

    Sexual selection is a major force driving the evolution of elaborate male sexual traits. Handicap models of sexual selection predict that male sexual traits should covary positively with condition, making them reliable indicators of male quality. However, most studies have either manipulated condition through varying diet quantity and/or caloric content without knowledge of specific nutrient effects or have correlated proxies of condition with sexual trait expression. We used nutritional geometry to quantify protein and carbohydrate intake by male cockroaches, Nauphoeta cinerea, and related this to sex pheromone expression, attractiveness, and dominance status. We found that carbohydrate, but not protein, intake is related to male sex pheromone expression and attractiveness but not dominance status. Additionally, we related two condition proxies (weight gain and lipid reserves) to protein and carbohydrate acquisition. Weight gain increased with the intake of both nutrients, whereas lipid reserves only increased with carbohydrate intake. Importantly, lipid accumulation was not as responsive to carbohydrate intake as attractiveness and thus was a less-accurate condition proxy. Moreover, males preferentially consumed high carbohydrate diets with little regard for protein content suggesting that they actively increase their carbohydrate intake thereby maximizing their reproductive fitness by being attractive. © 2011 The Author(s). Evolution© 2011 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Improved method for linear B-cell epitope prediction using antigen's primary sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harinder Singh

    Full Text Available One of the major challenges in designing a peptide-based vaccine is the identification of antigenic regions in an antigen that can stimulate B-cell's response, also called B-cell epitopes. In the past, several methods have been developed for the prediction of conformational and linear (or continuous B-cell epitopes. However, the existing methods for predicting linear B-cell epitopes are far from perfection. In this study, an attempt has been made to develop an improved method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. We have retrieved experimentally validated B-cell epitopes as well as non B-cell epitopes from Immune Epitope Database and derived two types of datasets called Lbtope_Variable and Lbtope_Fixed length datasets. The Lbtope_Variable dataset contains 14876 B-cell epitope and 23321 non-epitopes of variable length where as Lbtope_Fixed length dataset contains 12063 B-cell epitopes and 20589 non-epitopes of fixed length. We also evaluated the performance of models on above datasets after removing highly identical peptides from the datasets. In addition, we have derived third dataset Lbtope_Confirm having 1042 epitopes and 1795 non-epitopes where each epitope or non-epitope has been experimentally validated in at least two studies. A number of models have been developed to discriminate epitopes and non-epitopes using different machine-learning techniques like Support Vector Machine, and K-Nearest Neighbor. We achieved accuracy from ∼54% to 86% using diverse s features like binary profile, dipeptide composition, AAP (amino acid pair profile. In this study, for the first time experimentally validated non B-cell epitopes have been used for developing method for predicting linear B-cell epitopes. In previous studies, random peptides have been used as non B-cell epitopes. In order to provide service to scientific community, a web server LBtope has been developed for predicting and designing B-cell epitopes (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/lbtope/.

  3. Down-regulation of αGal epitopes by co-transfection of α1,3-galactosidase gene and α1,2-fucosyltransferase gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Feng; ZHANG Yangpei; JIA Yanjun; WANG Yingli; TAN Yingxia; TIAN Shuguang

    2005-01-01

    The polycarbohydrate structure of Galα1- 3Galβ1-4GluNAc-R (known as αGal epitopes of xenoantigen), produced by α1-3-galactosyltransferase (α1,3-GT) in the course of animal development, is the major xenoantigen on the cell surface of porcine which causes hyperacute rejection in pig-to-human xenotransplantation. Alpha-1,3-galactosi- dase (AGL), a hydrolytic enzyme, can remove the terminal α-1,3-galactosyl from the Galα1-3Galβ1-4GluNAc-R structure resulting in cleaning αGal epitopes from the porcine cells. Alpha-1,2-fucosyltransferase (HT) can modify the surface carbohydrate phenotype of porcine cells, bringing about reduction of αGal epitopes expression. In this study, human AGL and HT gene were co-transfected to porcine fetal fibroblast (PFFb) in equimolar concentration to reduce the xenoantigen. Gene and protein of hAGL and HT were both detected to express at high level by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. There was an 84% reduction in αGal xenoantigen and an 82% increase in H antigen as assayed by flow cytometry in the AGL and HT gene co-transfected PFFb. The number and morphology of transgenic PFFb chromosome were normal. Findings indicate that Galα1-3Gal epitopes of PFFb could be down regulated by AGL and HT co-transfection without deleterious effects on the chromosomal profile of the transgenic cell.

  4. Carbohydrate feeding and exercise: effect of beverage carbohydrate content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R; Seifert, J G; Eddy, D E; Paul, G L; Halaby, G A

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ingesting fluids of varying carbohydrate content upon sensory response, physiologic function, and exercise performance during 1.25 h of intermittent cycling in a warm environment (Tdb = 33.4 degrees C). Twelve subjects (7 male, 5 female) completed four separate exercise sessions; each session consisted of three 20 min bouts of cycling at 65% VO2max, with each bout followed by 5 min rest. A timed cycling task (1200 pedal revolutions) completed each exercise session. Immediately prior to the first 20 min cycling bout and during each rest period, subjects consumed 2.5 ml.kg BW-1 of water placebo (WP), or solutions of 6%, 8%, or 10% sucrose with electrolytes (20 mmol.l-1 Na+, 3.2 mmol.l-1 K+). Beverages were administered in double blind, counterbalanced order. Mean (+/- SE) times for the 1200 cycling task differed significantly: WP = 13.62 +/- 0.33 min, *6% = 13.03 +/- 0.24 min, 8% = 13.30 +/- 0.25 min, 10% = 13.57 +/- 0.22 min (* = different from WP and 10%, P less than 0.05). Compared to WP, ingestion of the CHO beverages resulted in higher plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, and higher RER values during the final 20 min of exercise (P less than 0.05). Markers of physiologic function and sensory perception changed similarly throughout exercise; no differences were observed among subjects in response to beverage treatments for changes in plasma concentrations of lactate, sodium, potassium, for changes in plasma volume, plasma osmolality, rectal temperature, heart rate, oxygen uptake, rating of perceived exertion, or for indices of gastrointestinal distress, perceived thirst, and overall beverage acceptance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. An antibody produced in tobacco expressing a hybrid beta-1,4-galactosyltransferase is essentially devoid of plant carbohydrate epitopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bakker; G.J.A. Rouwendal; A.S. Karnoup; D.E.A. Florack; G.M. Stoopen; J.P.F.G. Helsper; R. van Ree; I. van Die; D. Bosch

    2006-01-01

    N-glycosylation of a mAb may have a major impact on its therapeutic merits. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a hybrid enzyme (called xylGaIT), consisting of the N-terminal domain of Arabidopsis thaliana xylosyltra nsf erase and the catalytic domain of human 0-1,4-galactosyltransf erase I (GaI

  6. The binding specificity of the marker antibodies Tra-1-60 and Tra-1-81 reveals a novel pluripotency-associated type 1 lactosamine epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natunen, Suvi; Satomaa, Tero; Pitkänen, Virve; Salo, Hanna; Mikkola, Milla; Natunen, Jari; Otonkoski, Timo; Valmu, Leena

    2011-09-01

    The expression of the epitopes recognized by the monoclonal antibodies Tra-1-60 and Tra-1-81 is routinely used to assess the pluripotency status of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Although it is known that the epitopes recognized by Tra-1-60 and Tra-1-81 are carbohydrates, the exact molecular identity of these epitopes has been unclear. Glycan array analysis with more than 500 oligosaccharide structures revealed specific binding of Tra-1-60 and Tra-1-81 to two molecules containing terminal type 1 lactosamine: Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc and Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6(Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ1-3)Galβ1-4Glc. The type 1 disaccharide in itself was not sufficient for binding, indicating that the complete epitope requires an extended tetrasaccharide structure where the type 1 disaccharide is β1,3-linked to type 2 lactosamine. Our mass spectrometric analysis complemented with glycosidase digestions of hESC O-glycans indicated the presence of the extended tetrasaccharide epitope on an O-glycan with the likely structure Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAc. Thus, the present data indicate that the pluripotency marker antibodies Tra-1-60 and Tra-1-81 recognize the minimal epitope Galβ1-3GlcNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc, which is present in hESCs as a part of a mucin-type O-glycan structure. The exact molecular identity of Tra-1-60 and Tra-1-81 is important for the development of improved tools to characterize the pluripotent phenotype.

  7. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  8. DETERMINATION OF CARBOHYDRATE AND β-CAROTENE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    estimate retinol equivalent (vitamin A content) of the vegetables. Moringa leaves ... revealed varying levels of carbohydrate and β-carotene content in the vegetables analysed which ... 50% of the dry weight of most plants (Lehninger,. 1993).

  9. Identification and immunogenicity of two new HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes on dengue NS1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiang; Zeng, Gucheng; Pang, Xianwu; Liang, Mifang; Zhou, Junmei; Fang, Danyun; Liu, Yan; Li, Dexin; Jiang, Lifang

    2012-04-01

    Immunopathogenesis of dengue virus (DEN) infection remains poorly studied. Identification and characterization of human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes on DEN are necessary for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis of dengue infection and would facilitate the development of immunotherapy and vaccines to protect from dengue infection. Here, we identified two new HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8(+) T-cell epitopes, DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) and DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) that are conserved in three or four major DEN serotypes, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that immunization of HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice with DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) epitope peptide induced de novo synthesis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IFN-γ, two important pro-inflammatory molecules that are hard to be detected directly without in vitro antigenic re-stimulation. Importantly, we demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells specifically activated by DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) epitope peptide induced de novo synthesis of perforin. Furthermore, we observed that DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005)-specific CD8(+) T cells capable of producing large amounts of perforin, TNF-α and IFN-γ preferentially displayed CD27(+)CD45RA(-), but not CD27(-)CD45RA(+), phenotypes. This study, therefore, suggested the importance of synergistic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic molecules which were produced by dengue-specific CD8(+) T cells in immunopathogenesis or anti-dengue immunity during dengue infection.

  10. Co-receptor Binding Site Antibodies Enable CD4-Mimetics to Expose Conserved Anti-cluster A ADCC Epitopes on HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Richard

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 has evolved a sophisticated strategy to conceal conserved epitopes of its envelope glycoproteins (Env recognized by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC-mediating antibodies. These antibodies, which are present in the sera of most HIV-1-infected individuals, preferentially recognize Env in its CD4-bound conformation. Accordingly, recent studies showed that small CD4-mimetics (CD4mc able to “push” Env into this conformation sensitize HIV-1-infected cells to ADCC mediated by HIV+ sera. Here we test whether CD4mc also expose epitopes recognized by anti-cluster A monoclonal antibodies such as A32, thought to be responsible for the majority of ADCC activity present in HIV+ sera and linked to decreased HIV-1 transmission in the RV144 trial. We made the surprising observation that CD4mc are unable to enhance recognition of HIV-1-infected cells by this family of antibodies in the absence of antibodies such as 17b, which binds a highly conserved CD4-induced epitope overlapping the co-receptor binding site (CoRBS. Our results indicate that CD4mc initially open the trimeric Env enough to allow the binding of CoRBS antibodies but not anti-cluster A antibodies. CoRBS antibody binding further opens the trimeric Env, allowing anti-cluster A antibody interaction and sensitization of infected cells to ADCC. Therefore, ADCC responses mediated by cluster A antibodies in HIV-positive sera involve a sequential opening of the Env trimer on the surface of HIV-1-infected cells. The understanding of the conformational changes required to expose these vulnerable Env epitopes might be important in the design of new strategies aimed at fighting HIV-1.

  11. Global microarray analysis of carbohydrate use in alkaliphilic hemicellulolytic bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajian Song

    Full Text Available The alkaliphilic hemicellulolytic bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 has a broad substrate spectrum and exhibits the capacity to utilize complex carbohydrates such as galactomannan, xylan, and pectin. In the monosaccharide mixture, sequential utilization by Bacillus sp. N16-5 was observed. Glucose appeared to be its preferential monosaccharide, followed by fructose, mannose, arabinose, xylose, and galactose. Global transcription profiles of the strain were determined separately for growth on six monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, and xylose and four polysaccharides (galactomannan, xylan, pectin, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose using one-color microarrays. Numerous genes potentially related to polysaccharide degradation, sugar transport, and monosaccharide metabolism were found to respond to a specific substrate. Putative gene clusters for different carbohydrates were identified according to transcriptional patterns and genome annotation. Identification and analysis of these gene clusters contributed to pathway reconstruction for carbohydrate utilization in Bacillus sp. N16-5. Several genes encoding putative sugar transporters were highly expressed during growth on specific sugars, suggesting their functional roles. Two phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems were identified as candidate transporters for mannose and fructose, and a major facilitator superfamily transporter was identified as a candidate transporter for arabinose and xylose. Five carbohydrate uptake transporter 1 family ATP-binding cassette transporters were predicted to participate in the uptake of hemicellulose and pectin degradation products. Collectively, microarray data improved the pathway reconstruction involved in carbohydrate utilization of Bacillus sp. N16-5 and revealed that the organism precisely regulates gene transcription in response to fluctuations in energy resources.

  12. Preferential associations between oral clefts and other major congenital anomalies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rittler, Monica; Lopez-Camelo, Jorge S.; Castilla, Eduardo E.; Bermejo, Eva; Cocchi, Guido; Correa, Adolfo; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Danderfer, Ron; De Vigan, Catherine; De Walle, Hermien; da Graca Dutra, Maria; Hirahara, Fumiki; Luisa Martinez-Frias, Maria; Merlob, Paul; Mutchinick, Osvaldo; Ritvanen, Annukka; Robert-Gnansia, Elisabeth; Scarano, Gioacchino; Siffel, Csaba; Stoll, Claude; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: To identify preferential associations between oral clefts (CL = cleft lip only, CLP = cleft lip with cleft palate, CP = cleft palate) and nonoral cleft anomalies, to interpret them on clinical grounds, and, based on the patterns of associated defects, to establish whether CL and CLP are

  13. Preferential treatment of women and psychological reactance theory: An experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Vrugt

    1992-01-01

    187 male academic staff members read a low- or high-threat (freedom restricting) description of measures for the preferential treatment of women in job selection for academic staff functions. The high-threat condition evoked more psychological reactance than the low-threat condition. Ss with high se

  14. Predicting Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use from Preferential Music Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Crystal D.; Garcia, Javier A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana may be predicted from preferential consumption of particular music genres. Undergraduates (257 women and 78 men) completed a questionnaire assessing these variables. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for sensation-seeking tendencies and behaviors, revealed that…

  15. Infants' Preferential Attention to Sung and Spoken Stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Giomi, Eugenia; Ilari, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    Caregivers and early childhood teachers all over the world use singing and speech to elicit and maintain infants' attention. Research comparing infants' preferential attention to music and speech is inconclusive regarding their responses to these two types of auditory stimuli, with one study showing a music bias and another one…

  16. Soil surfactant stops water repellency and preferential flow paths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oostindie, K.; Dekker, L.W.; Wesseling, J.G.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2008-01-01

    This study reports the effects of a soil surfactant on reduction and prevention of water repellency and preferential flow paths in a sandy soil of a golf course fairway, located at Bosch en Duin near Utrecht, the Netherlands. The golf course is constructed on inland dunes composed of fine sand with

  17. Copper Smelters Ask for Resumption of the Preferential Tax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>China’s major copper smelters have asked the related government authorities to resume the preferential tax policies on the export of copper and gold. These policies, just eliminated in January this year, allow the smelters to export copper and gold free from tax payment.

  18. Unified Model for Generation Complex Networks with Utility Preferential Attachment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-Jun; GAO Zi-You; SUN Hui-Jun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, based on the utility preferential attachment, we propose a new unified model to generate different network topologies such as scale-free, small-world and random networks. Moreover, a new network structure named super scale network is found, which has monopoly characteristic in our simulation experiments. Finally, the characteristics ofthis new network are given.

  19. Predicting Alcohol, Cigarette, and Marijuana Use from Preferential Music Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberle, Crystal D.; Garcia, Javier A.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether use of alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana may be predicted from preferential consumption of particular music genres. Undergraduates (257 women and 78 men) completed a questionnaire assessing these variables. Partial correlation analyses, controlling for sensation-seeking tendencies and behaviors, revealed that…

  20. An epitope delivery system for use with recombinant mycobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetzel, C.; Janssen, R.; Ely, S.J.; Kristensen, N.M.; Bunting, K.; Cooper, J.B.; Lamb, J.R.; Young, D.B.; Thole, J.E.R.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a novel epitope delivery system based on the insertion of peptides within a permissive loop of a bacterial superoxide dismutase molecule. This system allowed high-level expression of heterologous peptides in two mycobacterial vaccine strains, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette- G

  1. High-throughput epitope profiling of snake venom toxins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engmark, Mikael; Andersen, Mikael Rørdam; Laustsen, Andreas Hougaard

    Insight into the molecular details of polyclonal antivenom antibody specificity is a prerequisite for accurate prediction of cross-reactivity and can provide a basis for design of novel antivenoms. In this work, a highthroughput approach was applied to characterize linear elements in epitopes in ...... toxins from four African mamba and three neurotoxic cobra snakes obtained from public databases....

  2. Mast Cells Produce a Unique Chondroitin Sulfate Epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; O'Grady, Robert; Caterson, Bruce; Lord, Megan S

    2016-02-01

    The granules of mast cells contain a myriad of mediators that are stored and protected by the sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains that decorate proteoglycans. Whereas heparin is the GAG predominantly associated with mast cells, mast cell proteoglycans are also decorated with heparan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate (CS). This study investigated a unique CS structure produced by mast cells that was detected with the antibody clone 2B6 in the absence of chondroitinase ABC digestion. Mast cells in rodent tissue sections were characterized using toluidine blue, Leder stain and the presence of mast cell tryptase. The novel CS epitope was identified in rodent tissue sections and localized to cells that were morphologically similar to cells chemically identified as mast cells. The rodent mast cell-like line RBL-2H3 was also shown to express the novel CS epitope. This epitope co-localized with multiple CS proteoglycans in both rodent tissue and RBL-2H3 cultured cells. These findings suggest that the novel CS epitope that decorates mast cell proteoglycans may play a role in the way these chains are structured in mast cells.

  3. An epitope delivery system for use with recombinant mycobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hetzel, C.; Janssen, R.; Ely, S.J.; Kristensen, N.M.; Bunting, K.; Cooper, J.B.; Lamb, J.R.; Young, D.B.; Thole, J.E.R.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a novel epitope delivery system based on the insertion of peptides within a permissive loop of a bacterial superoxide dismutase molecule. This system allowed high-level expression of heterologous peptides in two mycobacterial vaccine strains, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette- G

  4. The Origin of the Constant Carbohydrate Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Herbert Read

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Constant Carbohydrate diet, based entirely on carbohydrate exchanges, is now widely used in the dietary treatment of diabetes mellitus. Being based on sound scientific principles and simple in design, the Constant Carabohydrate diet is appropriate for all those having diabetes mellitus, young or old, no matter their ethncity. This report describes why and how it was developed in 1951. Its simplicity makes it adaptable to all ethnic diets.

  5. The Origin of the Constant Carbohydrate Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read CharlesHerbert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Constant Carbohydrate diet, based entirely on carbohydrate exchanges, is now widely used in the dietary treatment of diabetes mellitus. Being based on sound scientific principles and simple in design, the Constant Carabohydrate diet is appropriate for all those having diabetes mellitus, young or old, no matter their ethncity. This report describes why and how it was developed in 1951. Its simplicity makes it adaptable to all ethnic diets.

  6. Conversion of carbohydrates to levulinic acid esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of converting carbohydrates into levulinic acid, a platform chemical for many chemical end products. More specifically the invention relates to a method for converting carbohydrates such as mono-, di- or polysaccharides, obtained from for example biomass...... production into a suitable levulinic acid ester in the presence of a zeolite or zeotype catalyst and a suitable alcohol, and the ester may be further converted into levulinic acid if desired....

  7. Molecular simulations of carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate interactions: motivation, issues and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J

    2010-08-01

    The characterization of the 3D structure of oligosaccharides, their conjugates and analogs is particularly challenging for traditional experimental methods. Molecular simulation methods provide a basis for interpreting sparse experimental data and for independently predicting conformational and dynamic properties of glycans. Here, we summarize and analyze the issues associated with modeling carbohydrates, with a detailed discussion of four of the most recently developed carbohydrate force fields, reviewed in terms of applicability to natural glycans, carbohydrate-protein complexes and the emerging area of glycomimetic drugs. In addition, we discuss prospectives and new applications of carbohydrate modeling in drug discovery.

  8. The carbohydrate sequence markup language (CabosML): an XML description of carbohydrate structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Norihiro; Kameyama, Akihiko; Nakaya, Shuuichi; Ito, Hiromi; Sato, Takashi; Shikanai, Toshihide; Takahashi, Yoriko; Narimatsu, Hisashi

    2005-04-15

    Bioinformatics resources for glycomics are very poor as compared with those for genomics and proteomics. The complexity of carbohydrate sequences makes it difficult to define a common language to represent them, and the development of bioinformatics tools for glycomics has not progressed. In this study, we developed a carbohydrate sequence markup language (CabosML), an XML description of carbohydrate structures. The language definition (XML Schema) and an experimental database of carbohydrate structures using an XML database management system are available at http://www.phoenix.hydra.mki.co.jp/CabosDemo.html kikuchi@hydra.mki.co.jp.

  9. B- and T-cell epitope mapping of human sapovirus capsid protein: an immunomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M Ruhul; Siddiqui, Mohammad S; Ahmed, Dilruba; Ahmed, Firoz; Hossain, Anowar

    2011-01-01

    Human sapovirus is one of the major causes of viral gastroenteritis. Although the capsid protein (VP1) confers antigenic cross-reactivity, immunity against sapovirus is still unclear. Using immunoinformatics approach, we defined putative T- and B-cell epitopes of VP1 and mapped on to its predicted three-dimensional structure. Identified five putative T-cell epitopes also occupied the putative B-cell epitope region. These putative epitopes were conserved in all existing serotypes. Predicted epitopes can be generated through proteasome cleavage and may be useful in designing peptide-based subunit vaccine to confer both humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

  10. MIMOX: a web tool for phage display based epitope mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honda Wataru

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phage display is widely used in basic research such as the exploration of protein-protein interaction sites and networks, and applied research such as the development of new drugs, vaccines, and diagnostics. It has also become a promising method for epitope mapping. Research on new algorithms that assist and automate phage display based epitope mapping has attracted many groups. Most of the existing tools have not been implemented as an online service until now however, making it less convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate them. Results We present MIMOX, a free web tool that helps to map the native epitope of an antibody based on one or more user supplied mimotopes and the antigen structure. MIMOX was coded in Perl using modules from the Bioperl project. It has two sections. In the first section, MIMOX provides a simple interface for ClustalW to align a set of mimotopes. It also provides a simple statistical method to derive the consensus sequence and embeds JalView as a Java applet to view and manage the alignment. In the second section, MIMOX can map a single mimotope or a consensus sequence of a set of mimotopes, on to the corresponding antigen structure and search for all of the clusters of residues that could represent the native epitope. NACCESS is used to evaluate the surface accessibility of the candidate clusters; and Jmol is embedded to view them interactively in their 3D context. Initial case studies show that MIMOX can reproduce mappings from existing tools such as FINDMAP and 3DEX, as well as providing novel, rational results. Conclusion A web-based tool called MIMOX has been developed for phage display based epitope mapping. As a publicly available online service in this area, it is convenient for the community to access, utilize, and evaluate, complementing other existing programs. MIMOX is freely available at http://web.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~hjian/mimox.

  11. Two highly similar LAEDDTNAQKT and LTDKIGTEI epitopes in G glycoprotein may be useful for effective epitope based vaccine design against pathogenic Henipavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvege, Md Masud; Rahman, Monzilur; Nibir, Yead Morshed; Hossain, Mohammad Shahnoor

    2016-04-01

    Nipah virus and Hendra virus, two members of the genus Henipavirus, are newly emerging zoonotic pathogens which cause acute respiratory illness and severe encephalitis in human. Lack of the effective antiviral therapy endorses the urgency for the development of vaccine against these deadly viruses. In this study, we employed various computational approaches to identify epitopes which has the potential for vaccine development. By analyzing the immune parameters of the conserved sequences of G glycoprotein using various databases and bioinformatics tools, we identified two potential epitopes which may be used as peptide vaccines. Using different B cell epitope prediction servers, four highly similar B cell epitopes were identified. Immunoinformatics analyses revealed that LAEDDTNAQKT is a highly flexible and accessible B-cell epitope to antibody. Highly similar putative CTL epitopes were analyzed for their binding with the HLA-C 12*03 molecule. Docking simulation assay revealed that LTDKIGTEI has significantly lower binding energy, which bolstered its potential as epitope-based vaccine design. Finally, cytotoxicity analysis has also justified their potential as promising epitope-based vaccine candidate. In sum, our computational analysis indicates that either LAEDDTNAQKT or LTDKIGTEI epitope holds a promise for the development of universal vaccine against all kinds of pathogenic Henipavirus. Further in vivo and in vitro studies are necessary to validate the obtained findings.

  12. A novel multi-epitope vaccine from MMSA-1 and DKK1 for multiple myeloma immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chenyang; Meng, Shan; Jin, Yanxia; Zhang, Wanggang; Li, Zongfang; Wang, Fang; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Wei, Yongchang; Liu, Hailing; Tu, Honglei; Su, Dan; He, Aili; Cao, Xingmei; Zhou, Fuling

    2017-08-01

    The identification of novel tumour-associated antigens is urgently needed to improve the efficacy of immunotherapy for multiple myeloma (MM). In this study, we identified a membrane protein MMSA-1 (multiple myeloma special antigen-1) that was specifically expressed in MM and exhibited significantly positive correlation with MM. We then identified HLA-A*0201-restricted MMSA-1 epitopes and tested their cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response. The MMSA-1 epitope SLSLLTIYV vaccine was shown to induce an obvious CTL response in vitro. To improve the immunotherapy, we constructed a multi-epitope peptide vaccine by combining epitopes derived from MMSA-1 and Dickkopf-1 (DKK1). The effector T cells induced by multi-epitope peptide vaccine-loaded dendritic cells lysed U266 cells more effectively than MMSA-1/DKK1 single-epitope vaccine. In myeloma-bearing severe combined immunodeficient mice, the multi-epitope vaccine improved the survival rate significantly compared with single-epitope vaccine. Consistently, multi-epitope vaccine decreased the tumour volume greatly and alleviated bone destruction. The frequencies of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was significantly increased in mouse blood induced by the multi-epitope vaccine, indicating that it inhibits myeloma growth by changing T cell subsets and alleviating immune paralysis. This study identified a novel peptide from MMSA-1 and the multi-epitope vaccine will be used to establish appropriate individualized therapy for MM. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Ramanathan

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  14. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Babu; Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine.

  15. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poh, Chit Laa; Kirk, Kristin; McBride, William John Hannan; Aaskov, John; Grollo, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction approach. The selected peptides representing B-cell epitopes were attached to a known dengue T-helper epitope and evaluated for their vaccine potency. Immunization of mice revealed two novel synthetic vaccine constructs that elicited good humoral immune responses and produced cross-reactive neutralising antibodies against DENV-1, 2 and 3. The findings indicate new directions for epitope mapping and contribute towards the future development of multi-epitope based synthetic peptide vaccine. PMID:27223692

  16. Epitope-specific antibody levels in tuberculosis: biomarkers of protection, disease and response to treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham H Bothamley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies restricted to Mycobacterium tuberculosis can measure epitope-specific antibody levels in a competition assay. Immunodominant epitopes were defined from clinical samples and related to the clinical spectrum of disease. Antibody to the immunodominant epitopes was associated with HLA-DR15. Occupational exposure showed a different response and was consistent with recognition of dormancy related proteins and protection despite exposure to tuberculosis. Studies in leprosy revealed the importance of immune deviation and the relationships between T and B cell epitopes. During treatment, antibody levels increased, epitope spreading occurred, but the affinity constants remained the same after further antigen exposure, suggesting constraints on the process of epitope selection. Epitope-specific antibody levels have a potential role as biomarkers for new vaccines which might prevent the progression of latent to active tuberculosis and as tools to measure treatment effects on subpopulations of tubercle bacilli.

  17. Metabolic aspects of low carbohydrate diets and exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Following a low carbohydrate diet, there is a shift towards more fat and less carbohydrate oxidation to provide energy to skeletal muscle, both at rest and during exercise. This review summarizes recent work on human skeletal muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolic adaptations to a low carbohydrate diet, focusing mainly on pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and how these changes relate to the capacity for carbohydrate oxidation during exercise.

  18. Metabolic aspects of low carbohydrate diets and exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Peters Sandra; LeBlanc Paul

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Following a low carbohydrate diet, there is a shift towards more fat and less carbohydrate oxidation to provide energy to skeletal muscle, both at rest and during exercise. This review summarizes recent work on human skeletal muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolic adaptations to a low carbohydrate diet, focusing mainly on pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and how these changes relate to the capacity for carbohydrate oxidation during exercise.

  19. Automated Detection of Conformational Epitopes Using Phage Display Peptide Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surendra S Negi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Precise determination of conformational epitopes of neutralizing antibodies represents a key step in the rational design of novel vaccines. A powerful experimental method to gain insights on the physical chemical nature of conformational epitopes is the selection of linear peptides that bind with high affinities to a monoclonal antibody of interest by phage display technology. However, the structural characterization of conformational epitopes from these mimotopes is not straightforward, and in the past the interpretation of peptide sequences from phage display experiments focused on linear sequence analysis to find a consensus sequence or common sequence motifs.Results: We present a fully automated search method, EpiSearch that predicts the possible location of conformational epitopes on the surface of an antigen. The algorithm uses peptide sequences from phage display experiments as input, and ranks all surface exposed patches according to the frequency distribution of similar residues in the peptides and in the patch. We have tested the performance of the EpiSearch algorithm for six experimental data sets of phage display experiments, the human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2/neu, the antibody mAb Bo2C11 targeting the C2 domain of FVIII, antibodies mAb 17b and mAb b12 of the HIV envelope protein gp120, mAb 13b5 targeting HIV-1 capsid protein and 80R of the SARS coronavirus spike protein. In all these examples the conformational epitopes as determined by the X-ray crystal structures of the antibody-antigen complexes, were found within the highest scoring patches of EpiSearch, covering in most cases more than 50% residues of experimental observed conformational epitopes. Input options of the program include mapping of a single peptide or a set of peptides on the antigen structure, and the results of the calculation can be visualized on our interactive web server.Availability: Users can access the EpiSearch from our web

  20. Innovation and Nested Preferential Growth in Chess Playing Behavior

    CERN Document Server

    Perotti, Juan I; Schaigorodsky, Ana L; Billoni, Orlando V

    2013-01-01

    We study innovation in chess by analyzing how different move sequences are played at the population level. It is found that the probability of exploring a new or innovative move decreases as a power law with the frequency in which the preceding move sequence is played. Chess players also exploit already known move sequences according to their frequencies, following a preferential growth mechanism. Furthermore, innovation in chess exhibits Heaps' law suggesting similarities with the process of vocabulary growth. We propose a robust generative mechanism based on nested Yule-Simon preferential growth processes that reproduces the empirical observations. These results, supporting the self-similar nature of innovations in chess, are important in the context of decision making in a competitive scenario.

  1. Preferentially quantized linker DNA lengths in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji-Ping; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne; Xi, Liqun; Tsai, Guei-Feng; Segal, Eran; Widom, Jonathan

    2008-09-12

    The exact lengths of linker DNAs connecting adjacent nucleosomes specify the intrinsic three-dimensional structures of eukaryotic chromatin fibers. Some studies suggest that linker DNA lengths preferentially occur at certain quantized values, differing one from another by integral multiples of the DNA helical repeat, approximately 10 bp; however, studies in the literature are inconsistent. Here, we investigate linker DNA length distributions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, using two novel methods: a Fourier analysis of genomic dinucleotide periodicities adjacent to experimentally mapped nucleosomes and a duration hidden Markov model applied to experimentally defined dinucleosomes. Both methods reveal that linker DNA lengths in yeast are preferentially periodic at the DNA helical repeat ( approximately 10 bp), obeying the forms 10n+5 bp (integer n). This 10 bp periodicity implies an ordered superhelical intrinsic structure for the average chromatin fiber in yeast.

  2. Preferentially quantized linker DNA lengths in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Ping Wang

    Full Text Available The exact lengths of linker DNAs connecting adjacent nucleosomes specify the intrinsic three-dimensional structures of eukaryotic chromatin fibers. Some studies suggest that linker DNA lengths preferentially occur at certain quantized values, differing one from another by integral multiples of the DNA helical repeat, approximately 10 bp; however, studies in the literature are inconsistent. Here, we investigate linker DNA length distributions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, using two novel methods: a Fourier analysis of genomic dinucleotide periodicities adjacent to experimentally mapped nucleosomes and a duration hidden Markov model applied to experimentally defined dinucleosomes. Both methods reveal that linker DNA lengths in yeast are preferentially periodic at the DNA helical repeat ( approximately 10 bp, obeying the forms 10n+5 bp (integer n. This 10 bp periodicity implies an ordered superhelical intrinsic structure for the average chromatin fiber in yeast.

  3. PREFERENTIAL SPUTTERING OF Cu76Ni15Sn9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王震遐; 王传珊; 等

    1995-01-01

    Using collection film technique combined with Auger electron spectroscopy is analysis,the preferential sputtering of the ternary alloy Cu76Ni15Sn9 bombarded with 27keV Ar+ at normal incidence is studied.After bombardment,the target surface is examined with SEM,and the surface composition of different topographical feature areas is measured with electron probe micro-analyser(EPMA),The experiment results show that Cu atoms are preferentially ejected compared with Ni atoms,and Sn atoms come third within the ejection angle range from 0°to 60°.The results are discussed from the viewpoint of sputtering from a very rough surface.

  4. Preferential Biases for Texts That Include Neuroscientific Jargon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacchi, Marco E; Cardaci, Maurizio

    2016-06-01

    The results of an experiment of preferential biases for texts that include neuroscientific jargon are presented. Such preferential bias has been reported even when the presented jargon is meaningless. In a variation of the well-known Weisberg et al. experiment, a group of undergraduate students (N = 150; females 48%, males 52%, other 0%; M age = 22.4 year, SD = 2.6) chose between two possible explanations for a psychological phenomenon: a correct explanation or a circular restatement of facts. Unrelated neuroscientific terms were added to one of the explanations. Participants were asked to choose the correct explanation. There was a statistically significant preference for the explanation without neuroscientific terms. These findings differ from Weisberg et al.'s experiment and a number of others. The implications of this discrepancy are discussed.

  5. Emergence of soft communities from geometric preferential attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Konstantin; Boguñá, Marián; Bianconi, Ginestra; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-04-29

    All real networks are different, but many have some structural properties in common. There seems to be no consensus on what the most common properties are, but scale-free degree distributions, strong clustering, and community structure are frequently mentioned without question. Surprisingly, there exists no simple generative mechanism explaining all the three properties at once in growing networks. Here we show how latent network geometry coupled with preferential attachment of nodes to this geometry fills this gap. We call this mechanism geometric preferential attachment (GPA), and validate it against the Internet. GPA gives rise to soft communities that provide a different perspective on the community structure in networks. The connections between GPA and cosmological models, including inflation, are also discussed.

  6. Preferential growth in FeCoV/Ti:N multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, D.; Senthil Kumar, M.; Boeni, P.; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    The preferential growth in Fe{sub 0.50}Co{sub 0.48}V{sub 0.02}/Ti:N multilayers was studied by X-ray diffraction. X-ray specular reflectometry and subsequent simulation of the spectra was used to extract information about the thickness and interface roughness of individual layers. The investigation gives structural information about the material combination and its potential for the use of neutron polarizers. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 2 refs.

  7. Cascades with coupled map lattices in preferential attachment community networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Di; Gao Zi-You; Zhao Xiao-Mei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,cascading failure is studied by coupled map lattice (CML) methods in preferential attachment community networks.It is found that external perturbation R is increasing with modularity Q growing by simulation.In particular,the large modularity Q can hold off the cascading failure dynamic process in community networks.Furthermore,different attack strategies also greatly affect the cascading failure dynamic process. It is particularly significant to control cascading failure process in real community networks.

  8. The trade effects of endogenous preferential trade agreements

    OpenAIRE

    Egger, Peter; Larch, Mario; Staub, Kevin E; Winkelmann, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Recent work by Anderson and van Wincoop (2003) establishes an empirical modelling strategy which takes full account of the structural, non-(log-)linear impact of trade barriers on trade in new trade theory models. Structural new trade theory models have never been used to evaluate and quantify the role of endogenous preferential trade agreement (PTA) membership for trade in a way which is consistent with general equilibrium. Apart from this gap, the present paper aims at delivering an empiric...

  9. Network Evolution by Relevance and Importance Preferential Attachment

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Weituo

    2014-01-01

    Relevance and importance are the main factors when humans build network connections. We propose an evolutionary network model based on preferential attachment(PA) considering these factors. We analyze and compute several important features of the network class generated by this algorithm including scale free degree distribution, high clustering coefficient, small world property and core-periphery structure. We then compare this model with other network models and empirical data such as inter-city road transportation and air traffic networks.

  10. Potential effect of ultrasound on carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Smritilekha; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Martin, Jacob T; Singh, Man

    2015-06-17

    The use of ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful alternative energy sources for the synthesis of carbohydrate-derived biologically and pharmaceutically potential compounds. Spectacular advances have been made in the field of sonication-assisted organic reactions, which are known for producing superior yields, enhanced reactivity of the reactant, improved stereoselectivity, and shortened reaction times. Orthogonal protection-deprotection reactions and/or modification and manipulation of functional groups in carbohydrates are common synthetic steps in carbohydrate chemistry. These reaction steps can be driven by the ultrasonic energy generated by acoustic cavitation via the formation and subsequent collapse of ultrasound-induced bubbles. The ultrasound-assisted synthesis of differently functionalised monosaccharides is useful in a wide variety of applications of carbohydrate chemistry such as the glycosylation of oligosaccharides, one pot domino reactions, thioglycoside syntheses, azidoglycoside syntheses, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, and syntheses of natural products. This review article covers ultrasound-mediated reactions on carbohydrates that have been described in the literature since 2000.

  11. Saturated fat, carbohydrate, and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri-Tarino, Patty W; Sun, Qi; Hu, Frank B; Krauss, Ronald M

    2010-03-01

    A focus of dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and treatment has been a reduction in saturated fat intake, primarily as a means of lowering LDL-cholesterol concentrations. However, the evidence that supports a reduction in saturated fat intake must be evaluated in the context of replacement by other macronutrients. Clinical trials that replaced saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat have generally shown a reduction in CVD events, although several studies showed no effects. An independent association of saturated fat intake with CVD risk has not been consistently shown in prospective epidemiologic studies, although some have provided evidence of an increased risk in young individuals and in women. Replacement of saturated fat by polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fat lowers both LDL and HDL cholesterol. However, replacement with a higher carbohydrate intake, particularly refined carbohydrate, can exacerbate the atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistance and obesity that includes increased triglycerides, small LDL particles, and reduced HDL cholesterol. In summary, although substitution of dietary polyunsaturated fat for saturated fat has been shown to lower CVD risk, there are few epidemiologic or clinical trial data to support a benefit of replacing saturated fat with carbohydrate. Furthermore, particularly given the differential effects of dietary saturated fats and carbohydrates on concentrations of larger and smaller LDL particles, respectively, dietary efforts to improve the increasing burden of CVD risk associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia should primarily emphasize the limitation of refined carbohydrate intakes and a reduction in excess adiposity.

  12. Saturated fat, carbohydrate, and cardiovascular disease1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siri-Tarino, Patty W; Sun, Qi; Hu, Frank B; Krauss, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    A focus of dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and treatment has been a reduction in saturated fat intake, primarily as a means of lowering LDL-cholesterol concentrations. However, the evidence that supports a reduction in saturated fat intake must be evaluated in the context of replacement by other macronutrients. Clinical trials that replaced saturated fat with polyunsaturated fat have generally shown a reduction in CVD events, although several studies showed no effects. An independent association of saturated fat intake with CVD risk has not been consistently shown in prospective epidemiologic studies, although some have provided evidence of an increased risk in young individuals and in women. Replacement of saturated fat by polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fat lowers both LDL and HDL cholesterol. However, replacement with a higher carbohydrate intake, particularly refined carbohydrate, can exacerbate the atherogenic dyslipidemia associated with insulin resistance and obesity that includes increased triglycerides, small LDL particles, and reduced HDL cholesterol. In summary, although substitution of dietary polyunsaturated fat for saturated fat has been shown to lower CVD risk, there are few epidemiologic or clinical trial data to support a benefit of replacing saturated fat with carbohydrate. Furthermore, particularly given the differential effects of dietary saturated fats and carbohydrates on concentrations of larger and smaller LDL particles, respectively, dietary efforts to improve the increasing burden of CVD risk associated with atherogenic dyslipidemia should primarily emphasize the limitation of refined carbohydrate intakes and a reduction in excess adiposity. PMID:20089734

  13. Neurobiologic basis of craving for carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Tamara; Santander, Jaime; Torres, Rafael; Contreras, Ana María

    2014-03-01

    There is a relationship between emotional disorders, obesity, and craving for carbohydrates. This relationship complicates the success of treatments aimed at combatting obesity, which is considered to be the epidemic of the twenty-first century. We conducted a review of the neurobiologic basis for carbohydrate craving, with the hope that this understanding will enable the design of more efficient therapeutic strategies. We conducted a non-systematic literature search in PubMed using MeSH. Research on the basis of carbohydrate craving is varied, but may be grouped into five main areas: the serotonergic system, palatability and hedonic response, the motivational system, stress response systems, and gene-environment interaction. The models that integrate motivational systems with palatability and hedonic response studies are the ones that we believe can best explain both craving for carbohydrates and related addictive phenomena. Research has contributed to a greater understanding of the neurobiologic basis of carbohydrate craving. The latter, in turn, contributes to an understanding of the implications, challenges, and possible therapies that might be put in place to cope with this phenomenon. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Considerations in producing preferentially reduced half-antibody fragments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaraviciute, Asta; Jackson, Carolyn D; Millner, Paul A; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Half-antibody fragments are a promising reagent for biosensing, drug-delivery and labeling applications, since exposure of the free thiol group in the Fc hinge region allows oriented reaction. Despite the structural variations among the molecules of different IgG subclasses and those obtained from different hosts, only generalized preferential antibody reduction protocols are currently available. Preferential reduction of polyclonal sheep anti-digoxin, rabbit anti-Escherichia coli and anti-myoglobin class IgG antibodies to half-antibody fragments has been investigated. A mild reductant 2-mercaptoethylamine (2-MEA) and a slightly stronger reductant tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) were used and the fragments obtained were quantitatively determined by SDS-PAGE analysis. It has been shown that the yields of half-antibody fragments could be increased by lowering the pH of the reduction mixtures. However, antibody susceptibility to the reductants varied. At pH4.5 the highest yield of sheep anti-digoxin IgG half-antibody fragments was obtained with 1M 2-MEA. Conversely, rabbit IgG half-antibody fragments could only be obtained with the stronger reductant TCEP. Preferential reduction of rabbit anti-myoglobin IgG antibodies was optimized and the highest half-antibody yield was obtained with 35 mM TCEP. Finally, it has been demonstrated that produced anti-myoglobin half-IgG fragments retained their binding activity.

  15. Preferential uptake of soil nitrogen forms by grassland plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigelt, Alexandra; Bol, Roland; Bardgett, Richard D

    2005-02-01

    In this study, we assessed whether a range of temperate grassland species showed preferential uptake for different chemical forms of N, including inorganic N and a range of amino acids that commonly occur in temperate grassland soil. Preferential uptake of dual-labelled (13C and 15N) glycine, serine, arginine and phenylalanine, as compared to inorganic N, was tested using plants growing in pots with natural field soil. We selected five grass species representing a gradient from fertilised, productive pastures to extensive, low productivity pastures (Lolium perenne, Holcus lanatus, Anthoxanthum odoratum, Deschampsia flexuosa, and Nardus stricta). Our data show that all grass species were able to take up directly a diversity of soil amino acids of varying complexity. Moreover, we present evidence of marked inter-species differences in preferential use of chemical forms of N of varying complexity. L. perenne was relatively more effective at using inorganic N and glycine compared to the most complex amino acid phenylalanine, whereas N. stricta showed a significant preference for serine over inorganic N. Total plant N acquisition, measured as root and shoot concentration of labelled compounds, also revealed pronounced inter-species differences which were related to plant growth rate: plants with higher biomass production were found to take up more inorganic N. Our findings indicate that species-specific differences in direct uptake of different N forms combined with total N acquisition could explain changes in competitive dominance of grass species in grasslands of differing fertility.

  16. Significance of tree roots for preferential infiltration in stagnic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lange

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that roots have an effect on infiltration. In this study we analysed the influence of tree roots from Norway spruce (Picea abies (L. Karst, silver fir (Abies alba Miller and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. on preferential infiltration in stagnic soils in the northern pre-Alps in Switzerland. We conducted irrigation experiments (1 m2 and recorded water content variations with time domain reflectrometry (TDR. A rivulet approach was applied to characterise preferential infiltration. Roots were sampled down to a depth of 0.5 to 1 m at the same position where the TDR-probes had been inserted and digitally measured. The basic properties of preferential infiltration, film thickness of mobile water and the contact length between soil and mobile water in the horizontal plane are closely related to fine root densities. An increase in root density resulted in an increase in contact length, but a decrease in film thickness. We modelled water content waves based on fine root densities and identified a range of root densities that lead to a maximum volume flux density and infiltration capacity. These findings provide convincing evidence that tree roots improve soil structure and thus infiltration.

  17. Preferential interactions promote blind cooperation and informed defection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escudero, Alfonso; Friedman, Jonathan; Gore, Jeff

    2016-12-06

    It is common sense that costs and benefits should be carefully weighed before deciding on a course of action. However, we often disapprove of people who do so, even when their actual decision benefits us. For example, we prefer people who directly agree to do us a favor over those who agree only after securing enough information to ensure that the favor will not be too costly. Why should we care about how people make their decisions, rather than just focus on the decisions themselves? Current models show that punishment of information gathering can be beneficial because it forces blind decisions, which under some circumstances enhances cooperation. Here we show that aversion to information gathering can be beneficial even in the absence of punishment, due to a different mechanism: preferential interactions with reliable partners. In a diverse population where different people have different-and unknown-preferences, those who seek additional information before agreeing to cooperate reveal that their preferences are close to the point where they would choose not to cooperate. Blind cooperators are therefore more likely to keep cooperating even if conditions change, and aversion to information gathering helps to interact preferentially with them. Conversely, blind defectors are more likely to keep defecting in the future, leading to a preference for informed defectors over blind ones. Both mechanisms-punishment to force blind decisions and preferential interactions-give qualitatively different predictions, which may enable experimental tests to disentangle them in real-world situations.

  18. Radiolabeled Peptide Scaffolds for PET/SPECT - Optical in Vivo Imaging of Carbohydrate-Lectin Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutscher, Susan

    2014-09-30

    labeled peptides, including our lectin/carbohydrate- targeting peptides, by displaying the targeting epitopes on small ~29 amino acid cyclic plant protein scaffolds known as cyclotides. Cyclotides are extremely stable molecules with long serum half-lives and low kidney uptake (7). More than one copy of the peptide can be engineered into the cyclotide loops, thus increasing the avidity of the peptide construct for its target.

  19. Close-up of the alpha-1,3-Gal epitope as defined by a monoclonal chimeric IgE and human serum using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Melanie; Michel, Yvonne; Wallach, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    by mediator release assays, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and STD NMR analyses. The alpha-Gal-specific chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies were proven functional regarding interaction with antigen and Fc receptors. SPR measurements demonstrated affinities in the micromolar range. In contrast to a reference...... antibody, anti-Gal IgE did not induce mediator release, potentially reflecting the delayed type of anaphylaxis. The alpha-1,3-Gal epitope fine structure of both the recombinant IgE and affinity-purified serum were defined by STD NMR revealing similar contributions of carbohydrate residues and participation...

  20. Close-up of the alpha-1,3-Gal epitope as defined by a monoclonal chimeric IgE and human serum using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plum, Melanie; Michel, Yvonne; Wallach, Katharina;

    2011-01-01

    by mediator release assays, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and STD NMR analyses. The alpha-Gal-specific chimeric IgE and IgG antibodies were proven functional regarding interaction with antigen and Fc receptors. SPR measurements demonstrated affinities in the micromolar range. In contrast to a reference...... antibody, anti-Gal IgE did not induce mediator release, potentially reflecting the delayed type of anaphylaxis. The alpha-1,3-Gal epitope fine structure of both the recombinant IgE and affinity-purified serum were defined by STD NMR revealing similar contributions of carbohydrate residues and participation...

  1. Epitope mapping porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus by phage display: the nsp2 fragment of the replicase polyprotein contains a cluster of B-cell epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oleksiewicz, M.B.; Bøtner, Anette; Toft, P.;

    2001-01-01

    We screened phage display libraries of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) protein fragments with sera from experimentally infected pigs to identify linear B-cell epitopes that are commonly recognized during infection in vivo. We identified 10 linear epitope sites (ES) 11...

  2. Anti-epitope antibody,a novel site-directed antibody against human acetylcholinesterase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-mei ZHANG; Gang LIU; Man-ji SUN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct synthetic antigens using the epitope of human brain acetylcholinesterase (hbAChE) for induction and detection of the specific antibody against the epitope, and to analyse the immunogenicity of the antibody.METHODS: The epitope (RTVLVSMNYR, amino acids 143-152) of hbAChE was chemically synthesized, coupled with the carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) to construct an artificial immunogen (KLH-epitope), and injected into rabbits to raise antibody. The epitope conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as the detection antigen. The specificity of the antibody was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and Western blotting. The immunoreaction between the anti-recombinant human butyrylcholinesterase (rhBChE)polyclonal antibody and the biotinylated-epitope was examined by indirect ELISA. RESULTS: The erythrocyte AChE, the hbAChE, rhBChE and the BSA-epitope all immunoreacted with the anti-epitope antibody against the epitope (143-152) of hbAChE, whereas the torpedo AChE did not. CONCLUSION: The hbAChE, the human erythrocyte AChE and hBChE share the conservative antigenic epitope RTVLVSMNYR, hence they can all immunoreact with the anti-epitope antibody. Since the epitope of hbAChE is less similar with the aligned amino acid sequences of AChE of Torpedo californica or Torpedo marmorata, there is not any immunoreactivity between them. The R, M, and N residues in the epitope seem to be necessary radicals for the conservation of antigenicity.

  3. Three Candidate Epitope-Vaccines in Combination Inducing High Levels of Multiantibodies Against HIV-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘祖强; 田海军; 王颖; 陈应华

    2003-01-01

    HIV-1 mutation results in immune evasion, which presents a serious challenge for conventional strategies for developing effective vaccines.So far, much experimental evidence indicates that HIV-1 particles in the blood of patients can be cleaned principally by neutralizing antibodies.Based on these facts, we prepared triple combination of epitope-vaccines with the objective of inducing antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity against HIV-1.According to the sequences of three neutralizing epitopes (RILAVERYLKD, ELDKWA and GPGRAFY, designated E1, E2, and E3, respectively) on HIV-1 envelope proteins, three epitope-peptides ((E1)2: C-(RILAVERYLKDG)2; (E2)4: C-(ELDKWAG)4; and (E3)2: C-(GPGRAFY)2) were synthesized and then conjugated with carrier protein keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or bovine serum albumin (BSA), and used for immunizing rabbits.After the vaccine course, the triple combination of epitope-vaccines induced high levels of predefined multi-epitope-specific antibodies.An immunoblotting-analysis demonstrated that the antibodies could recognize the native epitopes on both gp41 protein and V3 loop peptide.Furthermore, we compared the immune responses of three doses of epitope-peptides in the candidate epitope-vaccine.Strong antibody responses to three epitopes were observed in a dose dependent manner, with increasing dose raising the immune response.This result indicated that immunotolerance did not occur using an epitope vaccine dose of 80 μg.Thus, our results demonstrate that epitope-vaccines in combination can synchronously induce high levels of antibodies with predefined multi-epitope-specificity against HIV-1, and may be used to develop effective vaccines against HIV as a new strategy.

  4. Construction and immunogenicity prediction of Plasmodium falciparum CTL epitope minigene vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The minigenes encoding Plasmodium falciparum CTL epitopesrestricted to human MHC class I molecular HLA-A2 and HLA-B51, which were both at high frequency among Chinese population, were constructed as mono-epitope CTL vaccines named pcDNA3.1/tr and pcDNA3.1/ sh. The minigenes of the two epitopes were then tandem linked to form a dimeric CTL epitope minigene recombinant vaccine. After DNA transfection, the epitope minigenes were expressed respectively in two human cell lines, each bearing one MHC class I molecule named CIR/HLA-A2.1 and K562/HLA-B51. The intracellular expression of the CTL epitope minigenes not only enhanced the stability of HLA-A2.1 and HLA-B51 molecules but also increased the assemblage of MHC class I molecules on cell surfaces, which testified the specific process and presentation of those endogenous expressed epitopes. For the cells transfected with the dimeric minigene encoding two tandem linked epitopes, the expression and presentation of each epitope were also detected on cell membranes that bore different MHC class I molecules. It meant that the adjacency of the two CTL epitopes did not interfere with the specific process and presentation of each epitope. Compared with the ordinary CTL studies that inoculated synthesized epitope peptides with peripheral blood cells, this work aimed to process the epitopes directly inside HLA class I allele specific human cells, and thus theoretically imitated the same procedure in vivo. It was also an economical way to predict the immunogenicity of CTL epitopes at an early stage especially in laboratories with limited financial resource.

  5. Identification of an epitope of SARS-coronavirus nucleocapsid protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING LIN; JIN WANG; HONG XIA WANG; HUA LIANG JIANG; JIAN HUA SHEN; YOU HUA XIE; YUAN WANG; GANG PEI; BEI FEN SHEN; JIA RUI WU; BING SUN; XU SHEN; RUI FU YANG; YI XUE LI; YONG YONG JI; YOU YU HE; MUDE SHI; WEI LU; TIE LIU SHI

    2003-01-01

    The nucleocapsid (N) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a majorvirion structural protein. In this study, two epitopes (N1 and N2) of the N protein of SARS-CoV werepredicted by bioinformatics analysis. After immunization with two peptides, the peptides-specific antibodieswere isolated from the immunized rabbits. The further experiments demonstrated that N1 peptide-inducedpolyclonal antibodies had a high affinity to bind to E. coli expressed N protein of SARS-CoV. Furthermore, itwas confirmed that N1 peptide-specific IgG antibodies were detectable in the sera of severe acute respiratorysyndrome (SARS) patients. The results indicated that an epitope of the N protein has been identified andN protein specific Abs were produced by peptide immunization, which will be useful for the study of SARS-CoV.

  6. Preparation and epitope characterization of monoclonal antibodies against firefly luciferase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐沁; 丁建芳; 胡红雨; 许根俊

    1999-01-01

    The 6-His tagged firefly luciferase was highly expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. After immunizing Balb/c mice with the antigen, 6 hybridomas clones were found to secrete monoelonal antibodies (mAbs) and the mAbs were also purified separately. The competitive binding experiments show that 2 mAbs can bind heat-denatured antigen or its proteolytic fragments but not the native lueiferase, suggesting that their epitopes might be accommodated in the internal segments of the protein. On the other hand, the other 4 mAbs are capable of binding both native and denatured antigens. It infers that their epitopes locate in the segments on the protein surface. The results also suggest that the six mAbs are all sequence-specific.

  7. FRED--a framework for T-cell epitope detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldhahn, Magdalena; Dönnes, Pierre; Thiel, Philipp; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2009-10-15

    Over the last decade, immunoinformatics has made significant progress. Computational approaches, in particular the prediction of T-cell epitopes using machine learning methods, are at the core of modern vaccine design. Large-scale analyses and the integration or comparison of different methods become increasingly important. We have developed FRED, an extendable, open source software framework for key tasks in immunoinformatics. In this, its first version, FRED offers easily accessible prediction methods for MHC binding and antigen processing as well as general infrastructure for the handling of antigen sequence data and epitopes. FRED is implemented in Python in a modular way and allows the integration of external methods. FRED is freely available for download at http://www-bs.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/Software/FRED.

  8. Synthesis, biological evaluation, WAC and NMR studies of S-galactosides and non-carbohydrate ligands of cholera toxin based on polyhydroxyalkylfuroate moieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Soriano, Javier; Niss, Ulf; Angulo, Jesús; Angulo, Manuel; Moreno-Vargas, Antonio J; Carmona, Ana T; Ohlson, Sten; Robina, Inmaculada

    2013-12-23

    The synthesis of several non-carbohydrate ligands of cholera toxin based on polyhydroxyalkylfuroate moieties is reported. Some of them have been linked to D-galactose through a stable and well-tolerated S-glycosidic bond. They represent a novel type of non-hydrolyzable bidentate ligand featuring galactose and polyhydroxyalkylfuroic esters as pharmacophoric residues, thus mimicking the GM1 ganglioside. The affinity of the new compounds towards cholera toxin was measured by weak affinity chromatography (WAC). The interaction of the best candidates with this toxin was also studied by saturation transfer difference NMR experiments, which allowed identification of the binding epitopes of the ligands interacting with the protein. Interestingly, the highest affinity was shown by non-carbohydrate mimics based on a polyhydroxyalkylfuroic ester structure.

  9. Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) in the development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods for hematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, Maiko; Yamazaki, Rie; Ikeda, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2003-03-01

    PRAME (Preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma), highly expressed in various solid tumor cells and normal testis, was first isolated as a human melanoma antigen recognized by cytotoxic T cells (CTL). This gene was also expressed in some of the hematological malignancies, including acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and multiple myeloma. We and others have extensively evaluated the PRAME expression in various hematological malignancies and demonstrated high expression of the PRAME gene in subsets of AML, chronic myelogenous leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, lymphoma and multiple myeloma. In addition, we have demonstrated that PRAME was a useful marker for detection of minimal residual disease (MRD) in patients with leukemia, particularly those leukemias in which tumor specific markers are currently unavailable. Since PRAME was first identified as a tumor antigen recognized by T cells, the possibility that PRAME is a leukemia antigen recognized by T cells was evaluated, and it was found that PRAME-positive leukemia cell lines and fresh leukemia cells were susceptible to lysis by the PRAME-specific CTL. Five CTL epitopes associated with either HLA-A*0201 or HLA-A*2402 have recently been identified. It is, therefore, an attractive strategy to apply PRAME specific immunotherapy on patients with PRAME positive leukemia in MRD condition.

  10. Boronic acids for fluorescence imaging of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaolong; Zhai, Wenlei; Fossey, John S; James, Tony D

    2016-02-28

    "Fluorescence imaging" is a particularly exciting and rapidly developing area of research; the annual number of publications in the area has increased ten-fold over the last decade. The rapid increase of interest in fluorescence imaging will necessitate the development of an increasing number of molecular receptors and binding agents in order to meet the demand in this rapidly expanding area. Carbohydrate biomarkers are particularly important targets for fluorescence imaging given their pivotal role in numerous important biological events, including the development and progression of many diseases. Therefore, the development of new fluorescent receptors and binding agents for carbohydrates is and will be increasing in demand. This review highlights the development of fluorescence imaging agents based on boronic acids a particularly promising class of receptors given their strong and selective binding with carbohydrates in aqueous media.

  11. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  12. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin R. Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (biomolecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  13. 'Multi-epitope-targeted' immune-specific therapy for a multiple sclerosis-like disease via engineered multi-epitope protein is superior to peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathali Kaushansky

    Full Text Available Antigen-induced peripheral tolerance is potentially one of the most efficient and specific therapeutic approaches for autoimmune diseases. Although highly effective in animal models, antigen-based strategies have not yet been translated into practicable human therapy, and several clinical trials using a single antigen or peptidic-epitope in multiple sclerosis (MS yielded disappointing results. In these clinical trials, however, the apparent complexity and dynamics of the pathogenic autoimmunity associated with MS, which result from the multiplicity of potential target antigens and "epitope spread", have not been sufficiently considered. Thus, targeting pathogenic T-cells reactive against a single antigen/epitope is unlikely to be sufficient; to be effective, immunospecific therapy to MS should logically neutralize concomitantly T-cells reactive against as many major target antigens/epitopes as possible. We investigated such "multi-epitope-targeting" approach in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE associated with a single ("classical" or multiple ("complex" anti-myelin autoreactivities, using cocktail of different encephalitogenic peptides vis-a-vis artificial multi-epitope-protein (designated Y-MSPc encompassing rationally selected MS-relevant epitopes of five major myelin antigens, as "multi-epitope-targeting" agents. Y-MSPc was superior to peptide(s in concomitantly downregulating pathogenic T-cells reactive against multiple myelin antigens/epitopes, via inducing more effective, longer lasting peripheral regulatory mechanisms (cytokine shift, anergy, and Foxp3+ CTLA4+ regulatory T-cells. Y-MSPc was also consistently more effective than the disease-inducing single peptide or peptide cocktail, not only in suppressing the development of "classical" or "complex EAE" or ameliorating ongoing disease, but most importantly, in reversing chronic EAE. Overall, our data emphasize that a "multi-epitope-targeting" strategy is required for

  14. Common antiviral cytotoxic t-lymphocyte epitope for diverse arenaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone, M B; Lewicki, H; Homann, D; Nguyen, C; Julien, S; Gairin, J E

    2001-07-01

    Members of the Arenaviridae family have been isolated from mammalian hosts in disparate geographic locations, leading to their grouping as Old World types (i.e., lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus [LCMV], Lassa fever virus [LFV], Mopeia virus, and Mobala virus) and New World types (i.e., Junin, Machupo, Tacaribe, and Sabia viruses) (C. J. Peters, M. J. Buchmeier, P. E. Rollin, and T. G. Ksiazek, p. 1521-1551, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996; P. J. Southern, p. 1505-1519, in B. N. Fields, D. M. Knipe, and P. M. Howley [ed.], Fields virology, 3rd ed., 1996). Several types in both groups-LFV, Junin, Machupo, and Sabia viruses-cause severe and often lethal human diseases. By sequence comparison, we noted that eight Old World and New World arenaviruses share several amino acids with the nucleoprotein (NP) that consists of amino acids (aa) 118 to 126 (NP 118-126) (RPQASGVYM) of LCMV that comprise the immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitope for H-2(d) mice (32). This L(d)-restricted epitope constituted >97% of the total bulk CTLs produced in the specific antiviral or clonal responses of H-2(d) BALB mice. NP 118-126 of the Old World arenaviruses LFV, Mopeia virus, and LCMV and the New World arenavirus Sabia virus bound at high affinity to L(d). The primary H-2(d) CTL anti-LCMV response as well as that of a CTL clone responsive to LCMV NP 118-126 recognized target cells coated with NP 118-126 peptides derived from LCMV, LFV, and Mopeia virus but not Sabia virus, indicating that a common functional NP epitope exists among Old World arenaviruses. Use of site-specific amino acid exchanges in the NP CTL epitope among these arenaviruses identified amino acids involved in major histocompatibility complex binding and CTL recognition.

  15. Combinatorial Contextualization of Peptidic Epitopes for Enhanced Cellular Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masaki; Hayashi, Kazumi; Adachi, Eru; Minamisawa, Tamiko; Homma, Sadamu; Koido, Shigeo; Shiba, Kiyotaka

    2014-01-01

    Invocation of cellular immunity by epitopic peptides remains largely dependent on empirically developed protocols, such as interfusion of aluminum salts or emulsification using terpenoids and surfactants. To explore novel vaccine formulation, epitopic peptide motifs were co-programmed with structural motifs to produce artificial antigens using our “motif-programming” approach. As a proof of concept, we used an ovalbumin (OVA) system and prepared an artificial protein library by combinatorially polymerizing MHC class I and II sequences from OVA along with a sequence that tends to form secondary structures. The purified endotoxin-free proteins were then examined for their ability to activate OVA-specific T-cell hybridoma cells after being processed within dendritic cells. One clone, F37A (containing three MHC I and two MHC II OVA epitopes), possessed a greater ability to evoke cellular immunity than the native OVA or the other artificial antigens. The sensitivity profiles of drugs that interfered with the F37A uptake differed from those of the other artificial proteins and OVA, suggesting that alteration of the cross-presentation pathway is responsible for the enhanced immunogenicity. Moreover, F37A, but not an epitopic peptide, invoked cellular immunity when injected together with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), and retarded tumor growth in mice. Thus, an artificially synthesized protein antigen induced cellular immunity in vivo in the absence of incomplete Freund's adjuvant or aluminum salts. The method described here could be potentially used for developing vaccines for such intractable ailments as AIDS, malaria and cancer, ailments in which cellular immunity likely play a crucial role in prevention and treatment. PMID:25343355

  16. A General Method to Discover Epitopes from Sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Whittemore

    Full Text Available Antigen-antibody complexes are central players in an effective immune response. However, finding those interactions relevant to a particular disease state can be arduous. Nonetheless many paths to discovery have been explored since deciphering these interactions can greatly facilitate the development of new diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. In silico B cell epitope mapping approaches have been widely pursued, though success has not been consistent. Antibody mixtures in immune sera have been used as handles for biologically relevant antigens, but these and other experimental approaches have proven resource intensive and time consuming. In addition, these methods are often tailored to individual diseases or a specific proteome, rather than providing a universal platform. Most of these methods are not able to identify the specific antibody's epitopes from unknown antigens, such as un-annotated neo antigens in cancer. Alternatively, a peptide library comprised of sequences unrestricted by naturally-found protein space provides for a universal search for mimotopes of an antibody's epitope. Here we present the utility of such a non-natural random sequence library of 10,000 peptides physically addressed on a microarray for mimotope discovery without sequence information of the specific antigen. The peptide arrays were probed with serum from an antigen-immunized rabbit, or alternatively probed with serum pre-absorbed with the same immunizing antigen. With this positive and negative screening scheme, we identified the library-peptides as the mimotopes of the antigen. The unique library peptides were successfully used to isolate antigen-specific antibodies from complete immune serum. Sequence analysis of these peptides revealed the epitopes in the immunized antigen. We present this method as an inexpensive, efficient method for identifying mimotopes of any antibody's targets. These mimotopes should be useful in defining both components of the

  17. Elicitation of structure-specific antibodies by epitope scaffolds

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Elicitation of antibodies against targets that are immunorecessive, cryptic, or transient in their native context has been a challenge for vaccine design. Here we demonstrate the elicitation of structure-specific antibodies against the HIV-1 gp41 epitope of the broadly neutralizing antibody 2F5. This conformationally flexible region of gp41 assumes mostly helical conformations but adopts a kinked, extended structure when bound by antibody 2F5. Computational techniques were employed to transpl...

  18. Optimal selection of epitopes for TXP-immunoaffinity mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joos Thomas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass spectrometry (MS based protein profiling has become one of the key technologies in biomedical research and biomarker discovery. One bottleneck in MS-based protein analysis is sample preparation and an efficient fractionation step to reduce the complexity of the biological samples, which are too complex to be analyzed directly with MS. Sample preparation strategies that reduce the complexity of tryptic digests by using immunoaffinity based methods have shown to lead to a substantial increase in throughput and sensitivity in the proteomic mass spectrometry approach. The limitation of using such immunoaffinity-based approaches is the availability of the appropriate peptide specific capture antibodies. Recent developments in these approaches, where subsets of peptides with short identical terminal sequences can be enriched using antibodies directed against short terminal epitopes, promise a significant gain in efficiency. Results We show that the minimal set of terminal epitopes for the coverage of a target protein list can be found by the formulation as a set cover problem, preceded by a filtering pipeline for the exclusion of peptides and target epitopes with undesirable properties. Conclusions For small datasets (a few hundred proteins it is possible to solve the problem to optimality with moderate computational effort using commercial or free solvers. Larger datasets, like full proteomes require the use of heuristics.

  19. Common food allergens and their IgE-binding epitopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Matsuo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Food allergy is an adverse immune response to certain kinds of food. Although any food can cause allergic reactions, chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shellfish, fruit, and buckwheat account for 75% of food allergies in Japan. Allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE antibodies play a pivotal role in the development of food allergy. Recent advances in molecular biological techniques have enabled the efficient analysis of food allergens. As a result, many food allergens have been identified, and their molecular structure and IgE-binding epitopes have also been identified. Studies of allergens have demonstrated that IgE antibodies specific to allergen components and/or the peptide epitopes are good indicators for the identification of patients with food allergy, prediction of clinical severity and development of tolerance. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding the allergens and IgE epitopes in the well-researched allergies to chicken egg, cow's milk, wheat, shrimp, and peanut.

  20. Capillary electrophoresis-mass spectrometry of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaia, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    The development of methods for capillary electrophoresis (CE) with on-line mass spectrometric detection (CE/MS) is driven by the need for accurate, robust, and sensitive glycomics analysis for basic biomedicine, biomarker discovery, and analysis of recombinant protein therapeutics. One important capability is to profile glycan mixtures with respect to the patterns of substituents including sialic acids, acetate, sulfate, phosphate, and other groups. There is additional need for an MS-compatible separation system capable of resolving carbohydrate isomers. This chapter summarizes applications of CS/MS to analysis of carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and glycopeptides that have appeared since 2008. Readers are referred to recent comprehensive reviews covering earlier publications.

  1. Carbocyclic Carbohydrate Mimics as Potential Glycosidase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanefjord, Mette; Lundt, Inge

    It has been proven that aminocyclopentanols having the aminogroup adjacent to a carbon sidechain could be potential anomer-selective glycosidase inhibitors [1]. A successful pathway for synthesising mimics to L-carbohydrates 2, by introducing nitrogen to the C6 position in compound 1, has been...... developed in our group. A similar strategy has been used for synthesising mimics of D-carbohydrates. The α,β-unsaturated lactone 3 was cyclised to compound 4 which was further transformed into 5. The nitrogen functionality in compound 7 is introduced by an Overman rearrangement of 6 and the hydroxyl...

  2. A Sulfated Glycosaminoglycan Linkage Region is a Novel Type of Human Natural Killer-1 (HNK-1 Epitope Expressed on Aggrecan in Perineuronal Nets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Yabuno

    Full Text Available Human natural killer-1 (HNK-1 carbohydrate (HSO3-3GlcAβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcNAc-R is highly expressed in the brain and required for learning and neural plasticity. We previously demonstrated that expression of the HNK-1 epitope is mostly abolished in knockout mice for GlcAT-P (B3gat1, a major glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis, but remained in specific regions such as perineuronal nets (PNNs in these mutant mice. Considering PNNs are mainly composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs and regulate neural plasticity, GlcAT-P-independent expression of HNK-1 in PNNs is suggested to play a role in neural plasticity. However, the function, structure, carrier glycoprotein and biosynthetic pathway for GlcAT-P-irrelevant HNK-1 epitope remain unclear. In this study, we identified a unique HNK-1 structure on aggrecan in PNNs. To determine the biosynthetic pathway for the novel HNK-1, we generated knockout mice for GlcAT-S (B3gat2, the other glucuronyltransferase required for HNK-1 biosynthesis. However, GlcAT-P and GlcAT-S double-knockout mice did not exhibit reduced HNK-1 expression compared with single GlcAT-P-knockout mice, indicating an unusual biosynthetic pathway for the HNK-1 epitope in PNNs. Aggrecan was purified from cultured cells in which GlcAT-P and -S are not expressed and we determined the structure of the novel HNK-1 epitope using liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS as a sulfated linkage region of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs, HSO3-GlcA-Gal-Gal-Xyl-R. Taken together, we propose a hypothetical model where GlcAT-I, the sole glucuronyltransferase required for synthesis of the GAG linkage, is also responsible for biosynthesis of the novel HNK-1 on aggrecan. These results could lead to discovery of new roles of the HNK-1 epitope in neural plasticity.

  3. Flavor-Nutrient Learning is Less Rapid with Fat than with Carbohydrate in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, Christina Humphries; Warwick, Zoe S.

    2009-01-01

    Flavor-nutrient learning occurs when the post-ingestive consequences of a food are associated with its flavor. As a signal of the food's energy density, flavor-nutrient associations have the potential to contribute to the regulation of meal size. While all calorie sources (fat, carbohydrate, protein, ethanol) can support flavor-nutrient learning, prior research has found that flavor-nutrient associations based on fat may require higher nutrient concentrations and more rigorous experimental protocols than are required to train carbohydrate (cho)-based associations. To further explore potential macronutrient-specific differences in flavor-nutrient learning, the present study compared the time course of acquisition of cho- and fat-based associations. Rats were trained to associate distinctive flavors with high-density (3.2kcal/mL) and low-density (0.2kcal/mL) orally-consumed solutions, either fat (corn oil emulsion) or carbohydrate (sucrose). For each nutrient, both within- and between-groups designs were used to assess (via two-bottle preference testing) whether flavor-nutrient learning had occurred after 2, 4, or 6 training trial pairs. Rats trained with carbohydrate demonstrated preferential intake of the low-density paired flavor after only 2 training pairs; in contrast, rats trained with fat required 6 training pairs. These findings demonstrate differential rapidity of acquisition flavor-nutrient associations. The longer time course of acquisition of fat-based flavor-nutrient associations may be yet another mechanism by which high-fat foods promote overeating. PMID:19303030

  4. Flavor-nutrient learning is less rapid with fat than with carbohydrate in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, Christina Humphries; Warwick, Zoe S

    2009-06-22

    Flavor-nutrient learning occurs when the post-ingestive consequences of a food are associated with its flavor. As a signal of the food's energy density, flavor-nutrient associations have the potential to contribute to the regulation of meal size. While all calorie sources (fat, carbohydrate, protein, ethanol) can support flavor-nutrient learning, prior research has found that flavor-nutrient associations based on fat may require higher nutrient concentrations and more rigorous experimental protocols than are required to train carbohydrate (cho)-based associations. To further explore potential macronutrient-specific differences in flavor-nutrient learning, the present study compared the time course of acquisition of cho- and fat-based associations. Rats were trained to associate distinctive flavors with high-density (3.2 kcal/mL) and low-density (0.2 kcal/mL) orally-consumed solutions, either fat (corn oil emulsion) or carbohydrate (sucrose). For each nutrient, both within- and between-group designs were used to assess (via two-bottle preference testing) whether flavor-nutrient learning had occurred after 2, 4, or 6 training trial pairs. Rats trained with carbohydrate demonstrated preferential intake of the low-density paired flavor after only 2 training pairs; in contrast, rats trained with fat required 6 training pairs. These findings demonstrate differential rapidity of acquisition flavor-nutrient associations. The longer time course of acquisition of fat-based flavor-nutrient associations may be yet another mechanism by which high-fat foods promote overeating.

  5. Molecular simulations of carbohydrates and protein-carbohydrate interactions: motivation, issues and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, Elisa; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of the 3D structure of oligosaccharides, their conjugates and analogs is particularly challenging for traditional experimental methods. Molecular simulation methods provide a basis for interpreting sparse experimental data and for independently predicting conformational and dynamic properties of glycans. Here, we summarize and analyze the issues associated with modeling carbohydrates, with a detailed discussion of four of the most recently developed carbohydrate force fields, reviewed in terms of applicability to natural glycans, carbohydrate–protein complexes and the emerging area of glycomimetic drugs. In addition, we discuss prospectives and new applications of carbohydrate modeling in drug discovery. PMID:20594934

  6. A Universal Protocol for Photochemical Covalent Immobilization of Intact Carbohydrates for the Preparation of Carbohydrate Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huibin; Zhang, Yiming; Yuan, Xun; Chen, Yi; Yan, Mingdi

    2010-01-01

    A universal photochemical method has been established for the immobilization of intact carbohydrates and their analogues, and for the fabrication of carbohydrate microarrays. The method features the use of perfluorophenyl azide (PFPA)-modified substrates and the photochemical reaction of surface azido groups with printed carbohydrates. Various aldoses, ketoses, non-reducing sugars such as alditols and their derivatives can be directly arrayed on the PFPA-modified chips. The lectin-recognition ability of arrayed mannose, glucose and their oligo- and polysaccharides were confirmed using surface plasmon resonance imaging and laser-induced fluorescence imaging. PMID:21138274

  7. Recent advance in carbohydrate-based cancer vaccines%肿瘤糖疫苗的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍常鑫; 叶新山

    2012-01-01

    The abnormal glycans expressing on the surface of tumor cells are good targets to develop carbohydrate-based anti-cancer vaccines. However, one of the major problems is that carbohydrate antigens possess weak immunogenicity. This review summarizes the recent efforts to overcome this problem: glycoconjugates produced by coupling the carbohydrate antigens and proper carrier proteins improve their immunogenicity, many glycoconjugates have entered clinical trials; the vaccines become chemically well-defined when coupling the carbohydrate antigens with a T-cell peptide epitope and an immunostimulant to form fully synthetic multi-component glycoconjugate vaccines; the modification of carbohydrate antigens in combination with the technology of metabolic oligosaccharide engineering of tumor cells induces a strong immune response; and the fact that the antibodies elicited against the unnatural carbohydrate antigens can recognize the native carbohydrate antigens on tumor cells provides a new promising strategy for the development of anti-cancer vaccines.%肿瘤细胞表面异常表达的糖抗原为肿瘤糖疫苗的研究提供了合适的靶标,然而由于这些糖抗原的免疫原性较差,这又给糖疫苗的发展带来了很大的困难.本文概述了近年来科学工作者在提高肿瘤糖疫苗的免疫原性方面所做的努力:半合成的肿瘤糖疫苗将糖抗原与蛋白共价连接,已经有很多疫苗进入了临床试验;随后发展的全合成的肿瘤糖疫苗将糖抗原、T细胞表位和内源性佐剂共价连接,使疫苗的结构和组成更加确定;基于细胞代谢糖工程的肿瘤糖疫苗将非天然的糖疫苗与细胞表面代谢糖工程相结合,得到了强烈的免疫应答;某些基于天然糖抗原结构修饰的疫苗产生的抗体也可以与天然糖抗原发生交叉反应,这为肿瘤糖疫苗的发展提供了新的方向.

  8. Transport of soluble carbohydrates in temperate deciduous trees: beech (Fagus sylvatica) and ash (Fraxinus excelsior) in comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Ronny; Köhler, Michael; Gessler, Arthur; Gleixner, Gerd

    2015-04-01

    The structure of phloem cells and the physiology of the transport of soluble carbohydrates in plants are well studied. However, the influence of different phloem un- and uploading strategies on the translocation of carbohydrates in different tree species is largely unknown. Therefore, we conducted a pulse labeling on 20 young trees of European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and European ash (Fraxinus excelsior) respectively, using the stable isotope 13C in a temperate deciduous forest in Central Germany. In one growing season each tree species was labeled in a closed transparent plastic chamber with 99% 13CO2 for 5 h. The compound specific δ 13C from carbohydrates in the different compartments leaf, branch, stem and root was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography linked with an isotope ratio mass spectrometer (HPLC-IRMS). We found that both tree species used sucrose as a transport sugar, but carbohydrates of the raffinose group (RFO) served as main transport sugar in ash trees. This indicate that beech used only the apoplastic loading strategy into the phloem cells while ash trees relied on both, apoplastic and symplastic loading, preferring the latter at the end of the growing season. Furthermore, we observed different transport velocities of labeled sugars in the two species. Here, sucrose in beech and carbohydrates of the RFO in ash were transported fastest, whereas sucrose was constantly slowest in ash trees. The label of carbohydrates was found over 60 day in the roots of both tree species, with the highest δ 13C enrichment in carbohydrates of RFO than in the other sugars. Accordingly, the mean residence time (MRT) and half life time (HLT) of 13C in different compartments were longest for carbohydrates of RFO in roots (25.6 days) and sucrose in stems (14.9 days), while the shortest MRT and HLT for sucrose appeared in beech in all compartments. Our results give evidence that RFO are preferentially transported to the root tissue as an agent against frost

  9. Identification of immunodominant epitopes of alpha-gliadin in HLA-DQ8 transgenic mice following oral immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Stefania; Maurano, Francesco; Mazzeo, Maria F; Gaita, Marcello; Fierro, Olga; David, Chella S; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore; Siciliano, Rosa A; Rossi, Mauro

    2005-12-15

    Celiac disease, triggered by wheat gliadin and related prolamins from barley and rye, is characterized by a strong association with HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 genes. Gliadin is a mixture of many proteins that makes difficult the identification of major immunodominant epitopes. To address this issue, we expressed in Escherichia coli a recombinant alpha-gliadin (r-alpha-gliadin) showing the most conserved sequence among the fraction of alpha-gliadins. HLA-DQ8 mice, on a gluten-free diet, were intragastrically immunized with a chymotryptic digest of r-alpha-gliadin along with cholera toxin as adjuvant. Spleen and mesenteric lymph node T cell responses were analyzed for in vitro proliferative assay using a panel of synthetic peptides encompassing the entire sequence of r-alpha-gliadin. Two immunodominant epitopes corresponding to peptide p13 (aa 120-139) and p23 (aa 220-239) were identified. The response was restricted to DQ and mediated by CD4+ T cells. In vitro tissue transglutaminase deamidation of both peptides did not increase the response; furthermore, tissue transglutaminase catalyzed extensive deamidation in vitro along the entire r-alpha-gliadin molecule, but failed to elicit new immunogenic determinants. Surprisingly, the analysis of the cytokine profile showed that both deamidated and native peptides induced preferentially IFN-gamma secretion, despite the use of cholera toxin, a mucosal adjuvant that normally induces a Th2 response to bystander Ags. Taken together, these data suggest that, in this model of gluten hypersensitivity, deamidation is not a prerequisite for the initiation of gluten responses.

  10. Characterization of a cashew allergen, 11S globulin (Ana o 2), conformational epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robotham, Jason M; Xia, Lixin; Willison, LeAnna N; Teuber, Suzanne S; Sathe, Shridhar K; Roux, Kenneth H

    2010-05-01

    Both linear and conformational epitopes likely contribute to the allergenicity of tree nut allergens, yet, due largely to technical issues, few conformational epitopes have been characterized. Using the well studied recombinant cashew allergen, Ana o 2, an 11S globulin or legumin, we identified a murine monoclonal antibody which recognizes a conformational epitope and competes with patient IgE Ana o 2-reactive antibodies. This epitope is expressed on the large subunit of Ana o 2, but only when associated with an 11S globulin small subunit. Both Ana o 2 and the homologous soybean Gly m 6 small subunits can foster epitope expression, even when the natural N-terminal to C-terminal subunit order is reversed in chimeric molecules. The epitope, which is also expressed on native Ana o 2, is readily susceptible to destruction by physical and chemical denaturants.

  11. Limitations of homology searching for identification of T-cell antigens with library derived mimicry epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, H S; van Veelen, P A; Geluk, A; Schloot, N C; de Vries, R R; Ottenhoff, T H; Roep, B O; Drijfhout, J W

    1999-09-01

    Mimicry epitopes that are recognized by T-cells can be identified through screening of synthetic peptide libraries. We have shown that these mimicry epitopes share sequence similarity with the corresponding natural epitopes and that mimicry sequences can be used for the definition of protein derived T-cell epitopes from databases. This can be done by either homology searching or pattern searching. Here we discuss the advantages and disadvantages of homology searching as an alternative for the generally applicable recognition pattern approach. We show that only for part of the library derived mimicry epitopes, the degree of similarity to the natural epitope may be high enough for successful homology searching in small databases.

  12. Revival of the identification of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes for immunological diagnosis, therapy and vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Shihong; Tan, Shuguang; Zheng, Beiwen; Gao, George F

    2011-03-01

    Immunogenic T-cell epitopes have a central role in the cellular immunity against pathogens and tumors. However, in the early stage of cellular immunity studies, it was complicated and time-consuming to identify and characterize T-cell epitopes. Currently, the epitope screening is experiencing renewed enthusiasm due to advances in novel techniques and theories. Moreover, the application of T-cell epitope-based diagnoses for tuberculosis and new data on epitope-based vaccine development have also revived the field. There is a growing knowledge on the emphasis of epitope-stimulated T-cell immune responses in the elimination of pathogens and tumors. In this review, we outline the significance of the identification and characterization of T-cell epitopes. We also summarize the methods and strategies for epitope definition and, more importantly, address the relevance of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes to clinical diagnoses, therapy and vaccine development.

  13. Assessing preferential flow by simultaneously injecting nanoparticle and chemical tracers

    KAUST Repository

    Subramanian, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    The exact manner in which preferential (e.g., much faster than average) flow occurs in the subsurface through small fractures or permeable connected pathways of other kinds is important to many processes but is difficult to determine, because most chemical tracers diffuse quickly enough from small flow channels that they appear to move more uniformly through the rock than they actually do. We show how preferential flow can be assessed by injecting 2 to 5 nm carbon particles (C-Dots) and an inert KBr chemical tracer at different flow rates into a permeable core channel that is surrounded by a less permeable matrix in laboratory apparatus of three different designs. When the KBr tracer has a long enough transit through the system to diffuse into the matrix, but the C-Dot tracer does not, the C-Dot tracer arrives first and the KBr tracer later, and the separation measures the degree of preferential flow. Tracer sequestration in the matrix can be estimated with a Peclet number, and this is useful for experiment design. A model is used to determine the best fitting core and matrix dispersion parameters and refine estimates of the core and matrix porosities. Almost the same parameter values explain all experiments. The methods demonstrated in the laboratory can be applied to field tests. If nanoparticles can be designed that do not stick while flowing through the subsurface, the methods presented here could be used to determine the degree of fracture control in natural environments, and this capability would have very wide ranging value and applicability.

  14. Synthetic B-Cell Epitopes Eliciting Cross-Neutralizing Antibodies: Strategies for Future Dengue Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Babu Ramanathan; Chit Laa Poh; Kristin Kirk; William John Hannan McBride; John Aaskov; Lara Grollo

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a major public health threat worldwide. A key element in protection from dengue fever is the neutralising antibody response. Anti-dengue IgG purified from DENV-2 infected human sera showed reactivity against several peptides when evaluated by ELISA and epitope extraction techniques. A multi-step computational approach predicted six antigenic regions within the E protein of DENV-2 that concur with the 6 epitopes identified by the combined ELISA and epitope extraction app...

  15. Vaccine Design for H5N1 Based on B- and T-cell Epitope Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambunan, Usman Sumo Friend; Sipahutar, Feimmy Ruth Pratiwi; Parikesit, Arli Aditya; Kerami, Djati

    2016-01-01

    From 2003 to 2013, Indonesia had the highest number of avian influenza A cases in humans, with 192 cases and 160 fatalities. Avian influenza is caused by influenza virus type A, such as subtype H5N1. This virus has two glycoproteins: hemagglutinin and neuraminidase, which will become the primary target to be neutralized by vaccine. Vaccine is the most effective immunologic intervention. In this study, we use the epitope-based vaccine design from hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of H5N1 Indonesian strain virus by using immunoinformatics approach in order to predict the binding of B-cell and T-cell epitopes (class I and class II human leukocyte antigen [HLA]). BCPREDS was used to predict the B-cell epitope. Propred, Propred I, netMHCpan, and netMHCIIpan were used to predict the T-cell epitope. Two B-cell epitopes of hemagglutinin candidates and one B-cell epitope of neuraminidase candidates were obtained to bind T-cell CD4(+) (class II HLA), and also five T-cell epitope hemagglutinin and four T-cell epitope neuraminidase were obtained to bind T-cell CD8(+) (class I HLA). The visualization of epitopes was done using MOE 2008.10. It shows that the binding affinity of epitope-HLA was based on minimum binding free energy (ΔG binding). Based on this result, visualization, and dynamic simulation, four hemagglutinin epitopes (MEKIVLLLA, CPYLGSPSF, KCQTPMGAI, and IGTSTLNQR) and two neuraminidase epitopes (NPNQKIITI and CYPDAGEIT) were computed as having the best binding affinity from HLA ligand. The results mentioned above are from in silico experiments and need to be validated using wet experiment.

  16. Reactive oxygen species expose cryptic epitopes associated with autoimmune goodpasture syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, R; Cantley, L G; Kerjaschki, D; Neilson, E G

    2000-06-30

    Goodpasture syndrome is an autoimmune disease of the kidneys and lungs mediated by antibodies and T-cells directed to cryptic epitopes hidden within basement membrane hexamers rich in alpha3 non-collagenous globular (NC1) domains of type IV collagen. These epitopes are normally invisible to the immune system, but this privilege can be obviated by chemical modification. Endogenous drivers of immune activation consequent to the loss of privilege have long been suspected. We have examined the ability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) to expose Goodpasture epitopes buried within NC1 hexamers obtained from renal glomeruli abundant in alpha3(IV) NC1 domains. For some hexameric epitopes, like the Goodpasture epitopes, exposure to ROS specifically enhanced recognition by Goodpasture antibodies in a sequential and time-dependent fashion; control binding of epitopes to alpha3(IV) alloantibodies from renal transplant recipients with Alport syndrome was decreased, whereas epitope binding to heterologous antibodies recognizing all alpha3 NC1 epitopes remained the same. Inhibitors of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical scavengers were capable of attenuating the effects of ROS in cells and kidney by 30-50%, respectively, thereby keeping the Goodpasture epitopes largely concealed when compared with a 70% maximum inhibition by iron chelators. Hydrogen peroxide administration to rodents was sufficient to expose Goodpasture epitope in vivo and initiate autoantibody production. Our findings collectively suggest that ROS can alter the hexameric structure of type IV collagen to expose or destroy selectively immunologic epitopes embedded in basement membrane. The reasons for autoimmunity in Goodpasture syndrome may lie in an age-dependent deterioration in inhibitor function modulating oxidative damage to structural molecules. ROS therefore may play an important role in shaping post-translational epitope diversity or neoantigen formation in organ tissues.

  17. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse.

  18. Saturated fat, carbohydrates and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R. S.; de Graaf, D. J.; Luxwolda, M. F.; Muskiet, M. H. A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. J.; Muskiet, F. A. J.

    The dietary intake of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) is associated with a modest increase in serum total cholesterol, but not with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Replacing dietary SAFA with carbohydrates (CHO), notably those with a high glycaemic index, is associated with an increase in CVD risk in

  19. General Properties, Occurrence, and Preparation of Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyt, John F.

    D-Glucose and its derivatives and analogues, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-muramic acid, D-glucopyranosyl uronic acid, and D-glucitol represent 99.9% of the carbohydrates on the earth. D-Glucose is found in the free state in human blood and in the combined state in disaccharides, sucrose, lactose, and α,α-trehalose, in cyclic dextrins, and in polysaccharides, starch, glycogen, cellulose, dextrans; N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and an analogue N-acetyl-D-muramic acid are found in bacterial cell wall polysaccharide, murein, along with teichoic acids made up of poly-glycerol or -ribitol phosphodiesters. Other carbohydrates, D-mannose, D-mannuronic acid, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-galacturonic acid, D-iduronic acid, L-guluronic acid, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, D-xylose, and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid are found in glycoproteins, hemicelluloses, glycosaminoglycans, and polysaccharides of plant exudates, bacterial capsules, alginates, and heparin. D-Ribofuranose-5-phosphate is found in many coenzymes and is the backbone of RNAs (ribonucleic acid), and 2-deoxy-D-ribofuranose-5-phosphate is the backbone of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). D-Fructofuranose is found in sucrose, inulin, and levan. The general properties and occurrence of these carbohydrates and general methods of isolation and preparation of carbohydrates are presented.

  20. Occurrence and Biocatalytic Potential of Carbohydrate Oxidases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellemond, van E.W.; Leferink, N.G.H.; Heuts, D.P.H.M.; Fraaije, M.W.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Carbohydrate oxidases are found in all kingdoms of life but are mostly found in fungi. Their natural role is not always clear. Usage of molecular oxygen as electron acceptor is not a logical choice when the enzyme is part of a catabolic pathway. This chapter provides an overview of the occurrence

  1. Carbohydrate Metabolism in Bifidobacteria: Human Symbiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bifidobacterium ssp. constitute up to 90% of microbial gut flora in the infant colon, but considerably less in adults. Carbohydrate metabolism in these bacteria is highly unusual. Data from four Bifidobacterium genomes indicates genes missing from glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the TCA cycle, in...

  2. Genetics of carbohydrate accumulation in onion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fructans are soluble carbohydrates composed of fructose chains attached to a basal sucrose molecule and act both as health-enhancing pro- and pre-biotics. In onion, higher fructan concentrations are correlated with greater soluble solids content, dry weights, and pungency. We analyzed dry weights ...

  3. The carbohydrate recognition domain of collectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, E.J.A.; van Eijk, M.; Haagsman, H.P.

    2011-01-01

    Collectins are effector molecules of the innate immune system that play an important role in the first line of defence against bacteria, viruses and fungi. Most of their interactions with microorganisms are mediated through their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), which binds in a Ca2+-dependent

  4. Hydropriming effects on carbohydrate metabolism, antioxidant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CQ60

    2012-02-21

    Feb 21, 2012 ... The high amylase activity with remaining glucose content may associate to ... and enzyme activation to breakdown food reserve .... soluble carbohydrate involved with hydroprimed seed ... of xanthine oxidase (from bovine milk; Sigma-Aldrich Chemie .... levels may not be an appropriate indicator for maize.

  5. Carbohydrate modified phenol-formaldehyde resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony H. Conner; Linda F. Lorenz

    1986-01-01

    For adhesive self-sufficiency, the wood industry needs new adhesive systems in which all or part of the petroleum-derived phenolic component is replaced by a renewable material without sacrificing high durability or ease of bonding. We tested the bonding of wood veneers, using phenolic resins in which part of the phenol-formaldehyde was replaced with carbohydrates. Our...

  6. Particulate carbohydrates in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhosle, N.B.; Nandakumar, K.; Venkat, K.

    Particulate matter collected from 77 water samples over a 3000 m water column was analyzed for particulate carbohydrates (PCHO). PCHO in the surface waters ranged from 43 to 143 mu g.l-1, and below 250 m it was 16.PCHO showed large variations at all...

  7. Selective carbohydrate utilization by lactobacilli and bifidobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watson, D.; O'Connell Motherway, M.; Schoterman, M.H.C.; Neerven, van R.J.J.; Nauta, A.; Sinderen, van D.

    2013-01-01

    Aim - To evaluate the ability of specific carbohydrates, including commercially available products, to support the growth of representatives of two well-known groups of gut commensals, namely lactobacilli and bifidobacteria. Methods and Results - Sixty-eight bacterial strains, representing 29 human-

  8. Carbohydrates in pig nutrition - Recent advances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach; Lærke, Helle Nygaard; Ingerslev, Anne Krog

    2016-01-01

    polymers with 3 and more monomeric units plus lignin, which are not hydrolyzed by the endogenous enzymes in the small intestine of humans. This physiologically based definition is broader than what classically has been considered fiber in animal nutrition and delimitates carbohydrates according...

  9. Vadose Zone Sampling Methods for Detection of Preferential Pesticides Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peranginangin, N.; Richards, B. K.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2003-12-01

    Leaching of agricultural applied chemicals through the vadose zone is a major cause for the occurrence of agrichemicals in groundwater. Accurate soil water sampling methods are needed to ensure meaningful monitoring results, especially for soils that have significant preferential flow paths. The purpose of this study was to assess the capability and the effectiveness of various soil water sampling methods in detecting preferential transport of pesticides in a strongly-structured silty clay loam (Hudson series) soil. Soil water sampling devices tested were wick pan and gravity pan lysimeters, tile lines, porous ceramic cups, and pipe lysimeters; all installed at 45 to105 cm depth below the ground surface. A reasonable worse-case scenario was tested by applying a simulated rain storm soon after pesticides were sprayed at agronomic rates. Herbicides atrazine (6-chloro-N2-ethyl-N4-isopropyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine) and 2,4-D (2,4-dichloro-phenoxyacetic acid) were chosen as model compounds. Chloride (KCl) tracer was used to determine spatial and temporal distribution of non-reactive solute and water as well as a basis for determining the retardation in pesticides movement. Results show that observed pesticide mobility was much greater than would be predicted by uniform flow. Under relatively high soil moisture conditions, gravity and wick pan lysimeters had comparably good collection efficiencies, whereas the wick samplers had an advantage over gravity driven sampler when the soil moisture content was below field capacity. Pipe lysimeters had breakthrough patterns that were similar to pan samplers. At small plot scale, tile line samplers tended to underestimate solute concentration because of water dilution around the samplers. The use of porous cup samplers performed poorly because of their sensitivity to local profile characteristics: only by chance can they intercept and sample the preferential flow paths that are critical to transport. Wick sampler had the least

  10. Soil organic carbon, macropore networks and preferential transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsbo, Mats; Koestel, John; Kätterer, Thomas; Jarvis, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Agricultural management practices such as tillage, crop rotations, residue management and fertilization can have a strong influence on soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks. An increase in SOC content will generally improve soil structure, which in turn determines the solute transport pathways through the soil. The aim of this study was to quantify the architecture of macropore networks in undisturbed soil columns (15 cm high, 12.7 cm diameter) sampled along a transect with natural variations in SOC using X-ray tomography and to relate the network characteristics to the degree of preferential transport in the columns. Two tracer experiments were carried out at constant irrigation rates of 2 and 5 mm h-1. We used the normalised 5% arrival time which reflects the tendency for early arrival of the solutes as a measure of the degree of preferential transport. The soil macropore networks were analysed in cylindrical sub-volumes (8 cm high, 10 cm diameter) located centrally within the soil columns. These sub-volumes were considered unaffected by sampling artefacts. Analyses were also carried out the for whole sample volumes to enable comparisons with the results from the transport experiments. Image processing and analysis were carried out in ImageJ and R. The same grey value threshold was applied to all images after harmonisation of grey values using the PVC column walls and the air outside the columns. This approach resulted in a satisfactory separation between the pore space and the surrounding soil matrix and organic matter. The SOC content along the transect, which varied from 4.2 to 15% , was correlated to all measures of the pore network for the sub-volumes except for the connectivity probability. Columns with high SOC content were associated with large macroporosities (both total and connected), large specific surface areas, large fractal dimensions and small mean pore thicknesses. The SOC content for whole sample volumes was positively correlated to 5% arrival times

  11. Preferential Voting in Denmark: How, Why, and to What Effect?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elklit, Jørgen

    ’ multi-member constituency branches) decide which one of four possible preferential list options they want to employ in an upcoming election. The two dominant options are explained in some detail, to allow a full understanding of how they function. The paper then goes on to discuss how this system can...... be classified if one looks at the classification schemes proposed by in previous works in this field. The way forward is to understand that “Denmark” is not one, but at least two different – but simultaneously used – systems, which belong in different classification categories. The Danish PLPR system...

  12. A continuous rating method for preferential voting. The complete case

    CERN Document Server

    Camps, Rosa; Saumell, Laia

    2009-01-01

    A method is given for quantitatively rating the social acceptance of different options which are the matter of a complete preferential vote. Completeness means that every voter expresses a comparison (a preference or a tie) about each pair of options. The proposed method is proved to have certain desirable properties, which include: compliance with a majority principle, clone consistency, and continuity of the rates with respect to the data. One can view this method as a quantitative complement for a qualitative method introduced in 1997 by Markus Schulze. It is also related to certain methods of one-dimensional scaling or cluster analysis.

  13. Using DC electrical resistivity tomography to quantify preferential flow in fractured rock environments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    May, F

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available . This investigation aims to identify preferential flow paths in fractured rock environments. Time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography (TLERT, Lund Imaging System), is regarded as a suitable method for identifying preferential water flow....

  14. Field investigation of preferential fissure flow paths with hydrochemical analysis of small-scale sprinkling experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krzeminska, D.M.; Bogaard, T.A.; Debieche, T.-H.; Cervi, F.; Marc, V.; Malet, J.-P.

    2014-01-01

    The unsaturated zone largely controls groundwater recharge by buffering precipitation while at the same time providing preferential flow paths for infiltration. The importance of preferential flow on landslide hydrology is recognised in the literature; however, its monitoring and quantification

  15. FMC46, a cell protrusion-associated leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 epitope on human lymphocytes and thymocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilarski, L M; Turley, E A; Shaw, A R; Gallatin, W M; Laderoute, M P; Gillitzer, R; Beckman, I G; Zola, H

    1991-07-01

    In this report, we describe a 76-kDa glycoprotein recognized by mAb FMC46 that, by virtue of its concentration on cell protrusions involved in motility, may be important in lymphoid cell locomotion. FMC46 detects an epitope of the leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (LAM-1), a member of the selecting family (LAM-1, Endothelial Leukocyte Adhesion Molecular-1 (ELAM-1), and Granule Membrane Protein-140 (GMP-140), that is expressed on LAM-1-transfected cell lines, is a glycosylation epitope based on its loss after culture in tunicamycin, and is closely related to the LAM-1.2 epitope. FMC46 is expressed at high density on the majority of CD45RA+ and CD45RO+ peripheral blood T cells (60 to 70%) and on a subset of thymocytes that includes the multinegative CD3- CD4- CD8- progenitor cells (100% FMC46hi) and the CD45R0- presumptive thymic generative lineage (70% FMC46hi). It appears at reduced density and frequency on CD45RA- thymocytes (50% FMC46lo), comprised mainly of death-committed thymocytes. Among thymic subsets defined by expression of CD4 and/or CD8, FMC46 is expressed at high density predominantly on a subset of single-positive cells and not on double-positive cells. These results suggest a fundamental role for LAM-1 in thymic development, with a high density preferentially expressed on cells involved in thymic generative processes and a low density on cells progressing to intrathymic death. A major subset of peripheral blood B cells and thymic B cells also express FMC46. Immunohistochemistry on frozen sections indicated strong staining in splenic follicles and around blood vessels, staining of the thymic medulla and subcapsular areas, and staining of the mantle zone of germinal centers of the lymph node. FMC46+ lymphocytes accumulated along high endothelial venules in the lymph node. On locomoting multinegative thymocytes, FMC46 is concentrated on the leading tip of extended processes, on pseudopods, and on ruffles, unlike the distribution of either CD44 or TQ1 (LAM 1

  16. Cell surface carbohydrates as prognostic markers in human carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Tumour development is usually associated with changes in cell surface carbohydrates. These are often divided into changes related to terminal carbohydrate structures, which include incomplete synthesis and modification of normally existing carbohydrates, and changes in the carbohydrate core...... structure. The latter includes chain elongation of both glycolipids and proteins, increased branching of carbohydrates in N-linked glycoproteins, and blocked synthesis of carbohydrates in O-linked mucin-like glycoproteins. In mature organisms, expression of distinct carbohydrates is restricted to specific...... cell types; within a given tissue, variation in expression may be related to cell maturation. Tumour-associated carbohydrate structures often reflect a certain stage of cellular development; most of these moieties are structures normally found in other adult or embryonic tissues. There is no unique...

  17. Carbohydrates and the Risk of Breast Cancer among Mexican Women

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Isabelle Romieu; Eduardo Lazcano-Ponce; Luisa Maria Sanchez-Zamorano; Walter Willett; Mauricio Hernandez-Avila

    2004-01-01

    .... Results: Carbohydrate intake was positively associated with breast cancer risk. Compared with women in the lowest quartile of total carbohydrate intake, the relative risk of breast cancer for women in the highest quartile was 2.22 [95...

  18. High Carbohydrate-Fiber Nutrition for Running and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battinelli, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    The roles of carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and fiber in producing energy for health and exercise are discussed. Long-distance runners should have a high intake of complex carbohydrates and fiber. (PP)

  19. In silico-accelerated identification of conserved and immunogenic variola/vaccinia T-cell epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moise, Leonard; McMurry, Julie A; Buus, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Epitopes shared by the vaccinia and variola viruses underlie the protective effect of vaccinia immunization against variola infection. We set out to identify a subset of cross-reactive epitopes using bioinformatics and immunological methods. Putative T-cell epitopes were computationally predicted...... from highly conserved open reading frames from seven complete vaccinia and variola genomes using EpiMatrix. Over 100 epitopes bearing low human sequence homology were selected and assessed in HLA binding assays and in T-cell antigenicity assays using PBMCs isolated from Dryvax-immunized subjects...

  20. EpiJen: a server for multistep T cell epitope prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Pingping

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main processing pathway for MHC class I ligands involves degradation of proteins by the proteasome, followed by transport of products by the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, where peptides are bound by MHC class I molecules, and then presented on the cell surface by MHCs. The whole process is modeled here using an integrated approach, which we call EpiJen. EpiJen is based on quantitative matrices, derived by the additive method, and applied successively to select epitopes. EpiJen is available free online. Results To identify epitopes, a source protein is passed through four steps: proteasome cleavage, TAP transport, MHC binding and epitope selection. At each stage, different proportions of non-epitopes are eliminated. The final set of peptides represents no more than 5% of the whole protein sequence and will contain 85% of the true epitopes, as indicated by external validation. Compared to other integrated methods (NetCTL, WAPP and SMM, EpiJen performs best, predicting 61 of the 99 HIV epitopes used in this study. Conclusion EpiJen is a reliable multi-step algorithm for T cell epitope prediction, which belongs to the next generation of in silico T cell epitope identification methods. These methods aim to reduce subsequent experimental work by improving the success rate of epitope prediction.