WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbohydrate binding modules

  1. Using structure to inform carbohydrate binding module function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, D. Wade; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Generally, non-catalytic carbohydrate binding module (CBM) specificity has been shown to parallel the catalytic activity of the carbohydrate active enzyme (CAZyme) module it is appended to. With the rapid expansion in metagenomic sequence space for the potential discovery of new CBMs in addition to

  2. Modeling of Carbohydrate Binding Modules Complexed to Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Bomble, Y. J.

    2012-01-01

    Modeling results are presented for the interaction of two carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) with cellulose. The family 1 CBM from Trichoderma reesei's Cel7A cellulase was modeled using molecular dynamics to confirm that this protein selectively binds to the hydrophobic (100) surface of cellulose fibrils and to determine the energetics and mechanisms for locating this surface. Modeling was also conducted of binding of the family 4 CBM from the CbhA complex from Clostridium thermocellum. There is a cleft in this protein, which may accommodate a cellulose chain that is detached from crystalline cellulose. This possibility is explored using molecular dynamics.

  3. Carbohydrate Binding Modules: Biochemical Properties and Novel Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shani, Ziv; Levy, Ilan

    2006-01-01

    Polysaccharide-degrading microorganisms express a repertoire of hydrolytic enzymes that act in synergy on plant cell wall and other natural polysaccharides to elicit the degradation of often-recalcitrant substrates. These enzymes, particularly those that hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose, have a complex molecular architecture comprising discrete modules which are normally joined by relatively unstructured linker sequences. This structure is typically comprised of a catalytic module and one or more carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) that bind to the polysaccharide. CBMs, by bringing the biocatalyst into intimate and prolonged association with its substrate, allow and promote catalysis. Based on their properties, CBMs are grouped into 43 families that display substantial variation in substrate specificity, along with other properties that make them a gold mine for biotechnologists who seek natural molecular “Velcro” for diverse and unusual applications. In this article, we review recent progress in the field of CBMs and provide an up-to-date summary of the latest developments in CBM applications. PMID:16760304

  4. Computational Investigation of Glycosylation Effects on a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C. B.; Talib, M. F.; McCabe, C.; Bu, L.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.; Beckham, G. T.

    2012-01-27

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are ubiquitous components of glycoside hydrolases, which degrade polysaccharides in nature. CBMs target specific polysaccharides, and CBM binding affinity to cellulose is known to be proportional to cellulase activity, such that increasing binding affinity is an important component of performance improvement. To ascertain the impact of protein and glycan engineering on CBM binding, we use molecular simulation to quantify cellulose binding of a natively glycosylated Family 1 CBM. To validate our approach, we first examine aromatic-carbohydrate interactions on binding, and our predictions are consistent with previous experiments, showing that a tyrosine to tryptophan mutation yields a 2-fold improvement in binding affinity. We then demonstrate that enhanced binding of 3-6-fold over a nonglycosylated CBM is achieved by the addition of a single, native mannose or a mannose dimer, respectively, which has not been considered previously. Furthermore, we show that the addition of a single, artificial glycan on the anterior of the CBM, with the native, posterior glycans also present, can have a dramatic impact on binding affinity in our model, increasing it up to 140-fold relative to the nonglycosylated CBM. These results suggest new directions in protein engineering, in that modifying glycosylation patterns via heterologous expression, manipulation of culture conditions, or introduction of artificial glycosylation sites, can alter CBM binding affinity to carbohydrates and may thus be a general strategy to enhance cellulase performance. Our results also suggest that CBM binding studies should consider the effects of glycosylation on binding and function.

  5. Affinity maturation generates greatly improved xyloglucan-specific carbohydrate binding modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cicortas Gunnarsson Lavinia

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular evolution of carbohydrate binding modules (CBM is a new approach for the generation of glycan-specific molecular probes. To date, the possibility of performing affinity maturation on CBM has not been investigated. In this study we show that binding characteristics such as affinity can be improved for CBM generated from the CBM4-2 scaffold by using random mutagenesis in combination with phage display technology. Results Two modified proteins with greatly improved affinity for xyloglucan, a key polysaccharide abundant in the plant kingdom crucial for providing plant support, were generated. Both improved modules differ from other existing xyloglucan probes by binding to galactose-decorated subunits of xyloglucan. The usefulness of the evolved binders was verified by staining of plant sections, where they performed better than the xyloglucan-binding module from which they had been derived. They discriminated non-fucosylated from fucosylated xyloglucan as shown by their ability to stain only the endosperm, rich in non-fucosylated xyloglucan, but not the integument rich in fucosylated xyloglucan, on tamarind seed sections. Conclusion We conclude that affinity maturation of CBM selected from molecular libraries based on the CBM4-2 scaffold is possible and has the potential to generate new analytical tools for detection of plant carbohydrates.

  6. Engineering Cel7A carbohydrate binding module and linker for reduced lignin inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Kathryn L; Pfeiffer, Katherine A; Blanch, Harvey W; Clark, Douglas S

    2016-06-01

    Non-productive binding of cellulases to lignin inhibits enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass, increasing enzyme requirements and the cost of biofuels. This study used site-directed mutagenesis of the Trichoderma Cel7A carbohydrate binding module (CBM) and linker to investigate the mechanisms of adsorption to lignin and engineer a cellulase with increased binding specificity for cellulose. CBM mutations that added hydrophobic or positively charged residues decreased the specificity for cellulose, while mutations that added negatively charged residues increased the specificity. Linker mutations that altered predicted glycosylation patterns selectively impacted lignin affinity. Beneficial mutations were combined to generate a mutant with 2.5-fold less lignin affinity while fully retaining cellulose affinity. This mutant was uninhibited by added lignin during hydrolysis of Avicel and generated 40% more glucose than the wild-type enzyme from dilute acid-pretreated Miscanthus. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1369-1374. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26616493

  7. Analysis of the carbohydrate-binding-module from Fragaria x ananassa α-L-arabinofuranosidase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, I N; Perini, M A; Martínez, G A; Civello, P M

    2016-10-01

    α-L-arabinofuranosidases (EC 3.2.1.55) are enzymes involved in the catabolism of several cell-wall polysaccharides such as pectins and hemicelluloses, catalyzing the hydrolysis of terminal non-reducing α-L-arabinofuranosil residues. Bioinformatic analysis of the aminoacidic sequences of Fragaria x ananassa α-L-arabinofuranosidases predict a putative carbohydrate-binding-module of the family CBM_4_9, associated to a wide range of carbohydrate affinities. In this study, we report the characterization of the binding affinity profile to different cell wall polysaccharides of the putative CBM of α-L-arabinofuranosidase 1 from Fragaria x ananassa (CBM-FaARA1). The sequence encoding for the putative CBM was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, and the resultant recombinant protein was purified from inclusion bodies by a Nickel affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The refolded recombinant protein was then subjected to binding assays and affinity gel electrophoresis, which indicated its ability to bind cellulose and also high affinity for homogalacturonans. PMID:27262101

  8. Plant carbohydrate binding module enhances activity of hybrid microbial cellulase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Siobhan Byrt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic, highly active cellulase enzyme suitable for in planta production may be a valuable tool for biotechnological approaches to develop transgenic biofuel crops with improved digestibility. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of a plant derived carbohydrate binding module (CBM to a synthetic glycosyl hydrolase (GH improved the activity of the hydrolase in releasing sugar from plant biomass. A CEL-HYB1-CBM enzyme was generated by fusing a hybrid microbial cellulase, CEL-HYB1, with the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum SlCel9C1 cellulase. CEL-HYB1 and CEL-HYB1-CBM enzymes were produced in vitro using Pichia pastoris and the activity of these enzymes was tested using CMC, MUC and native crystalline cellulose assays. The presence of the CBM substantially improved the endo-glucanase activity of CEL-HYB1, especially against the native crystalline cellulose encountered in Sorghum plant cell walls. These results indicate that addition of an endogenous plant derived CBM to cellulase enzymes may enhance hydrolytic activity.

  9. Novel characteristics of a carbohydrate-binding module 20 from hyperthermophilic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Il-Nam; Jane, Jay-Lin; Wang, Kan; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Kwan-Hwa

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a gene fragment coding carbohydrate-binding module 20 (CBM20) in the amylopullulanase (APU) gene was cloned from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus 39E and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, hereafter Tp39E, possesses very low sequence similarity with the CBM20s previously reported and has no starch binding site 2. Tp39E did not demonstrate thermal denaturation at 50 °C; however, thermal unfolding of the protein was observed at 59.5 °C. A binding assay with Tp39E was conducted using various soluble and insoluble substrates, and starch was the best binding polysaccharide. Intriguingly, Tp39E bound, to a lesser extent, to soluble and insoluble xylan as well. The dissociation constant (K d) and the maximum specific binding (B max) of Tp39E to corn starch granules were 0.537 μM and 5.79 μM/g, respectively, at pH 5.5 and 20 °C. 99APU1357 with a Tp39E domain exhibited 2.2-fold greater activity than a CBM20-truncation mutant when starch granules were the substrate. Tp39E was an independently thermostable CBM and had a considerable effect on APU activity in the hydrolysis of insoluble substrates. PMID:25575613

  10. Binding Preferences, Surface Attachment, Diffusivity, and Orientation of a Family 1 Carbohydrate-Binding Module on Cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimlos, M. R.; Beckham, G. T.; Matthews, J. F.; Bu, L.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-06-08

    Cellulase enzymes often contain carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) for binding to cellulose. The mechanisms by which CBMs recognize specific surfaces of cellulose and aid in deconstruction are essential to understand cellulase action. The Family 1 CBM from the Trichoderma reesei Family 7 cellobiohydrolase, Cel7A, is known to selectively bind to hydrophobic surfaces of native cellulose. It is most commonly suggested that three aromatic residues identify the planar binding face of this CBM, but several recent studies have challenged this hypothesis. Here, we use molecular simulation to study the CBM binding orientation and affinity on hydrophilic and hydrophobic cellulose surfaces. Roughly 43 {mu}s of molecular dynamics simulations were conducted, which enables statistically significant observations. We quantify the fractions of the CBMs that detach from crystal surfaces or diffuse to other surfaces, the diffusivity along the hydrophobic surface, and the overall orientation of the CBM on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic faces. The simulations demonstrate that there is a thermodynamic driving force for the Cel7A CBM to bind preferentially to the hydrophobic surface of cellulose relative to hydrophilic surfaces. In addition, the simulations demonstrate that the CBM can diffuse from hydrophilic surfaces to the hydrophobic surface, whereas the reverse transition is not observed. Lastly, our simulations suggest that the flat faces of Family 1 CBMs are the preferred binding surfaces. These results enhance our understanding of how Family 1 CBMs interact with and recognize specific cellulose surfaces and provide insights into the initial events of cellulase adsorption and diffusion on cellulose.

  11. Promiscuous, non-catalytic, tandem carbohydrate-binding modules modulate the cell-wall structure and development of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olawole, O.; Jacobsen, E.; Timmers, J.F.P.; Gilbert, H.J.; Blake, W.; Knox, J.P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Vincken, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    We have compared heterologous expression of two types of carbohydrate binding module (CBM) in tobacco cell walls. These are the promiscuous CBM29 modules (a tandem CBM29-1-2 and its single derivative CBM29-2), derived from a non-catalytic protein1, NCP1, of the Piromyces equi cellulase/hemicellulase

  12. Probing the Functions of Carbohydrate Binding Modules in the CBEL Protein from the Oomycete Phytophthora parasitica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Martinez

    Full Text Available Oomycetes are microorganisms that are distantly related to true fungi and many members of this phylum are major plant pathogens. Oomycetes express proteins that are able to interact with plant cell wall polysaccharides, such as cellulose. This interaction is thought to be mediated by carbohydrate-binding modules that are classified into CBM family 1 in the CAZy database. In this study, the two CBMs (1-1 and 1-2 that form part of the cell wall glycoprotein, CBEL, from Phytophthora parasitica have been submitted to detailed characterization, first to better quantify their interaction with cellulose and second to determine whether these CBMs can be useful for biotechnological applications, such as biomass hydrolysis. A variety of biophysical techniques were used to study the interaction of the CBMs with various substrates and the data obtained indicate that CBEL's CBM1-1 exhibits much greater cellulose binding ability than CBM1-2. Engineering of the family 11 xylanase from Talaromyces versatilis (TvXynB, an enzyme that naturally bears a fungal family 1 CBM, has produced two variants. The first one lacks its native CBM, whereas the second contains the CBEL CBM1-1. The study of these enzymes has revealed that wild type TvXynB binds to cellulose, via its CBM1, and that the substitution of its CBM by oomycetal CBM1-1 does not affect its activity on wheat straw. However, intriguingly the addition of CBEL during the hydrolysis of wheat straw actually potentiates the action of TvXynB variant lacking a CBM1. This suggests that the potentiating effect of CBM1-1 might not require the formation of a covalent linkage to TvXynB.

  13. RETENTION AND PAPER-STRENGTH CHARACTERISTICS OF ANIONIC POLYACRYLAMIDES CONJUGATED WITH CARBOHYDRATE-BINDING MODULES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shingo Yokota

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The retention behavior of polymers having the specific affinities of glyco-hydrolases for pulp fibers was investigated with regard to paper-strength enhancement in contaminated papermaking systems. Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs of cellulases derived from Trichoderma viride and T. reesei, and of xylanase from Thermomyces lanuginosus, were obtained by site-directed digestion with papain, then introduced into anionic polyacrylamide (A-PAM via a peptide condensation reaction. Three types of CBM-conjugated A-PAMs (CBM-A-PAMs displayed different retention behavior, depending on the kind of pulp substrates, i.e. hardwood and softwood fibers. The CBM-A-PAM from T. viride demonstrated good additive retention for hardwood pulp fibers, resulting in high tensile strength of paper sheets, even under contaminated conditions in the presence of Ca2+ ions and ligninsulfonate. The CBM-A-PAM from T. reesei showed better performance for softwood than for hardwood sheets. The xylanase CBM-A-PAM was preferentially retained on hardwood fibers in which hemicelluloses might be present. Such an additive retention system, with inherent affinities of enzymes for pulp fibers, is expected to expand the application range of CBM-polymers in practical wet-end processes.

  14. Improving the affinity of fibroblasts for bacterial cellulose using carbohydrate-binding modules fused to RGD

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Fábia K; Moreira, Susana Margarida Gomes; Domingues, Lucília; Gama, F. M.

    2010-01-01

    The attachment of cells to biomedical materials can be improved by using adhesion sequences, such as Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD), found in several extracellular matrix proteins. In this work, bifunctional recombinant proteins, with a Cellulose-Binding Module (CBM), from the cellulosome of Clostridium thermocellum and cell binding sequences - RGD, GRGDY - were cloned and expressed in E.coli. These RGD-containing cellulose binding proteins were purified and used to coat bacterial cellulose fibres. Its ef...

  15. Dynamics of starch granule biogenesis - the role of redox-regulated enzymes and low-affinity carbohydrate-binding modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow, A.; Svensson, Birte

    2010-01-01

    of a substantially more extensive and coordinated redox regulation involving a larger number of enzymes. Noticeably several of these enzymes contain a new type of low-affinity carbohydrate-binding module that we term a low-affinity starch-binding domain or LA-SBD. These are present in the CBM20, CBM45 and CBM53...... families and can enable diurnal dynamics of starch-enzyme recognition. Such diurnal changes in starch binding have been indicated for the redox-regulated GWD and SEX4.......The deposition and degradation of starch in plants is subject to extensive post-translational regulation. To permit degradation of B-type crystallites present in tuberous and leaf starch these starch types are phosphorylated by glucan, water dikinase (GWD). At the level of post-translational redox...

  16. Fusion of carbohydrate binding modules from Thermotoga neapolitana with a family 10 xylanase from Bacillus halodurans S7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamo, Gashaw; Hatti-Kaul, Rajni; Mattiasson, Bo

    2007-01-01

    Xylanase A of Thermotoga neapolitana contains binding domains both at the N- and C-terminal ends of the catalytic domain. In the N-terminal position it contains two carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM) which belong to family 22. These CBMs bind xylan but not to cellulose. The gene encoding the mature peptide of these CBMs was fused with an alkaline active GH10 xylanase from Bacillus halodurans S7 and expressed in Escherichia coli. The (His)(6) tagged hybrid protein was purified by immobilized metal affinity chromatography and characterized. Xylan binding by the chimeric protein was influenced by NaCl concentration and pH of the binding medium. Binding increased with increasing salt concentration up to 200 mM. Higher extent of binding was observed under acidic conditions. The fusion of the CBM structures enhanced the hydrolytic efficiency of the xylanase against insoluble xylan, but decreased the stability of the enzyme. The optimum temperature and pH for the activity of the xylanase did not change.

  17. Overexpression of the carbohydrate binding module of strawberry expansin2 in Arabidopsis thaliana modifies plant growth and cell wall metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Cristina F; Villarreal, Natalia M; Rossi, Franco R; Martínez, Santiago; Martínez, Gustavo A; Civello, Pedro M

    2015-05-01

    Several cell wall enzymes are carbohydrate active enzymes that contain a putative Carbohydrate Binding Module (CBM) in their structures. The main function of these non-catalitic modules is to facilitate the interaction between the enzyme and its substrate. Expansins are non-hydrolytic proteins present in the cell wall, and their structure includes a CBM in the C-terminal that bind to cell wall polymers such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and pectins. We studied the ability of the Expansin2 CBM (CBMFaEXP2) from strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa, Duch) to modify the cell wall of Arabidopsis thaliana. Plants overexpressing CBMFaEXP2 were characterized phenotypically and biochemically. Transgenic plants were taller than wild type, possibly owing to a faster growth of the main stem. Cell walls of CBMFaEXP2-expressing plants were thicker and contained higher amount of pectins. Lower activity of a set of enzymes involved in cell wall degradation (PG, β-Gal, β-Xyl) was found, and the expression of the corresponding genes (AtPG, Atβ-Gal, Atβ-Xyl5) was reduced also. In addition, a decrease in the expression of two A. thaliana Expansin genes (AtEXP5 and AtEXP8) was observed. Transgenic plants were more resistant to Botrytis cinerea infection than wild type, possibly as a consequence of higher cell wall integrity. Our results support the hypothesis that the overexpression of a putative CBM is able to modify plant cell wall structure leading to modulation of wall loosening and plant growth. These findings might offer a tool to controlling physiological processes where cell wall disassembly is relevant, such as fruit softening. PMID:25837738

  18. Cell wall regeneration in Bangia atropurpurea (Rhodophyta) protoplasts observed using a mannan-specific carbohydrate-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemoto, Yoshiaki; Araki, Toshiyoshi

    2010-02-01

    The cell wall of the red alga Bangia atropurpurea is composed of three unique polysaccharides (beta-1,4-mannan, beta-1,3-xylan, and porphyran), similar to that in Porphyra. In this study, we visualized beta-mannan in the regenerating cell walls of B. atropurpurea protoplasts by using a fusion protein of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). A mannan-binding family 27 CBM (CBM27) of beta-1,4-mannanase (Man5C) from Vibrio sp. strain MA-138 was fused to GFP, and the resultant fusion protein (GFP-CBM27) was expressed in Escherichia coli. Native affinity gel electrophoresis revealed that GFP-CBM27 maintained its binding ability to soluble beta-mannans, while normal GFP could not bind to beta-mannans. Protoplasts were isolated from the fronds of B. atropurpurea by using three kinds of bacterial enzymes. The GFP-CBM27 was mixed with protoplasts from different growth stages, and the process of cell wall regeneration was observed by fluorescence microscopy. Some protoplasts began to excrete beta-mannan at certain areas of their cell surface after 12 h of culture. As the protoplast culture progressed, beta-mannans were spread on their entire cell surfaces. The percentages of protoplasts bound to GFP-CBM27 were 3%, 12%, 17%, 29%, and 25% after 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 h of culture, respectively. Although GFP-CBM27 bound to cells at the initial growth stages, its binding to the mature fronds was not confirmed definitely. This is the first report on the visualization of beta-mannan in regenerating algal cell walls by using a fluorescence-labeled CBM. PMID:19466498

  19. Purification and simultaneous immobilization of Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxynitrile lyase using a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopka, Benita; Diener, Martin; Wirtz, Astrid; Pohl, Martina; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Krauss, Ulrich

    2015-05-01

    Tedious, time- and labor-intensive protein purification and immobilization procedures still represent a major bottleneck limiting the widespread application of enzymes in synthetic chemistry and industry. We here exemplify a simple strategy for the direct site-specific immobilization of proteins from crude cell extracts by fusion of a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) derived from the exoglucanase/xylanase Cex from Cellulomonas fimi to a target enzyme. By employing a tripartite fusion protein consisting of the CBM, a flavin-based fluorescent protein (FbFP), and the Arabidopsis thaliana hydroxynitrile lyase (AtHNL), binding to cellulosic carrier materials can easily be monitored via FbFP fluorescence. Adsorption properties (kinetics and quantities) were studied for commercially available Avicel PH-101 and regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC) derived from Avicel. The resulting immobilizates showed similar activities as the wild-type enzyme but displayed increased stability in the weakly acidic pH range. Finally, Avicel, RAC and cellulose acetate (CA) preparations were used for the synthesis of (R)-mandelonitrile in micro-aqueous methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) demonstrating the applicability and stability of the immobilizates for biotransformations in both aqueous and organic reaction systems. PMID:25755120

  20. The carbohydrate-binding module family 20-diversity, structure, and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Camilla; Abou Hachem, Maher; Janecek, S.;

    2009-01-01

    relationships. Data on binding to and enzymatic activity towards soluble ligands and starch granules are summarized for wild-type, mutant and chimeric fusion proteins involving CBM20s. Noticeably, whereas CBM20s in amylolytic enzymes confer moderate binding affinities, with dissociation constants in the low...... diversity characterizes CBM20s, which occur in starch-active glycoside hydrolase families 13, 14, 15, and 77, and enzymes involved in starch or glycogen metabolism, exemplified by the starch-phosphorylating enzyme glucan, water dikinase 3 from Arabidopsis thaliana and the mammalian glycogen phosphatases...

  1. Structural Insights into the Affinity of Cel7A Carbohydrate-binding Module for Lignin*

    OpenAIRE

    Strobel, Kathryn L.; Pfeiffer, Katherine A.; Blanch, Harvey W.; Clark, Douglas S.

    2015-01-01

    The high cost of hydrolytic enzymes impedes the commercial production of lignocellulosic biofuels. High enzyme loadings are required in part due to their non-productive adsorption to lignin, a major component of biomass. Despite numerous studies documenting cellulase adsorption to lignin, few attempts have been made to engineer enzymes to reduce lignin binding. In this work, we used alanine-scanning mutagenesis to elucidate the structural basis for the lignin affinity of Trichoderma reesei Ce...

  2. The C-terminal domain of the Arabinosyltransferase Mycobacterium tuberculosis EmbC is a lectin-like carbohydrate binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke J Alderwick

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The D-arabinan-containing polymers arabinogalactan (AG and lipoarabinomannan (LAM are essential components of the unique cell envelope of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Biosynthesis of AG and LAM involves a series of membrane-embedded arabinofuranosyl (Araf transferases whose structures are largely uncharacterised, despite the fact that several of them are pharmacological targets of ethambutol, a frontline drug in tuberculosis therapy. Herein, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal hydrophilic domain of the ethambutol-sensitive Araf transferase M. tuberculosis EmbC, which is essential for LAM synthesis. The structure of the C-terminal domain of EmbC (EmbC(CT encompasses two sub-domains of different folds, of which subdomain II shows distinct similarity to lectin-like carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM. Co-crystallisation with a cell wall-derived di-arabinoside acceptor analogue and structural comparison with ligand-bound CBMs suggest that EmbC(CT contains two separate carbohydrate binding sites, associated with subdomains I and II, respectively. Single-residue substitution of conserved tryptophan residues (Trp868, Trp985 at these respective sites inhibited EmbC-catalysed extension of LAM. The same substitutions differentially abrogated binding of di- and penta-arabinofuranoside acceptor analogues to EmbC(CT, linking the loss of activity to compromised acceptor substrate binding, indicating the presence of two separate carbohydrate binding sites, and demonstrating that subdomain II indeed functions as a carbohydrate-binding module. This work provides the first step towards unravelling the structure and function of a GT-C-type glycosyltransferase that is essential in M. tuberculosis.

  3. Carbohydrate-binding module 74 is a novel starch-binding domain associated with large and multidomain α-amylase enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-06-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of Domain 2 from MaAmyA did not affect its ability to degrade starch granules but resulted in a strong reduction in granular pore size. Here, we separately expressed and purified this Domain 2 in Escherichia coli and determined its likely function in starch pore formation. Domain 2 independently binds amylose, amylopectin, and granular starch but does not have any detectable catalytic (hydrolytic or oxidizing) activity on α-glucan substrates. Therefore, we propose that this novel starch-binding domain is a new carbohydrate-binding module (CBM), the first representative of family CBM74 that assists MaAmyA in efficient pore formation in starch granules. Protein sequence-based BLAST searches revealed that CBM74 occurs widespread, but in bacteria only, and is often associated with large and multi-domain α-amylases containing family CBM25 or CBM26 domains. CBM74 may specifically function in binding to granular starches to enhance the capability of α-amylase enzymes to degrade resistant starches (RSs). Interestingly, the majority of family CBM74 representatives are found in α-amylases originating from human gut-associated Bifidobacteria, where they may assist in resistant starch degradation. The CBM74 domain thus may have a strong impact on the efficiency of RS digestion in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. PMID:27101946

  4. A mannanase, ManA, of the polycentric anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 has carbohydrate binding and docking modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ximenes, Eduardo A; Chen, Huizhong; Kataeva, Irina A; Cotta, Michael A; Felix, Carlos R; Ljungdahl, Lars G; Li, Xin-Liang

    2005-07-01

    The anaerobic fungus Orpinomyces sp. strain PC-2 produces a broad spectrum of glycoside hydrolases, most of which are components of a high molecular mass cellulosomal complex. Here we report about a cDNA (manA) having 1924 bp isolated from the fungus and found to encode a polypeptide of 579 amino acid residues. Analysis of the deduced sequence revealed that it had a mannanase catalytic module, a family 1 carbohydrate-binding module, and a noncatalytic docking module. The catalytic module was homologous to aerobic fungal mannanases belonging to family 5 glycoside hydrolases, but unrelated to the previously isolated mannanases (family 26) of the anaerobic fungus Piromyces. No mannanase activity could be detected in Escherichia coli harboring a manA-containing plasmid. The manA was expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ManA was secreted into the culture medium in multiple forms. The purified extracellular heterologous mannanase hydrolyzed several types of mannan but lacked activity against cellulose, chitin, or beta-glucan. The enzyme had high specific activity toward locust bean mannan and an extremely broad pH profile. It was stable for several hours at 50 degrees C, but was rapidly inactivated at 60 degrees C. The carbohydrate-binding module of the Man A produced separately in E. coli bound preferably to insoluble lignocellulosic substrates, suggesting that it might play an important role in the complex enzyme system of the fungus for lignocellulose degradation. PMID:16175204

  5. A platform to screen for C-type lectin receptor-binding carbohydrates and their potential for cell-specific targeting and immune modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglinao, Maha; Eriksson, Magdalena; Schlegel, Mark K; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Johannssen, Timo; Götze, Sebastian; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd

    2014-02-10

    Myeloid C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) in innate immunity represent a superfamily of pattern recognition receptors that recognize carbohydrate structures on pathogens and self-antigens. The primary interaction of an antigen-presenting cell and a pathogen shapes the following immune response. Therefore, the identification of CLR ligands that can either enhance or modulate the immune response is of interest. We have developed a screening platform based on glycan arrays to identify immune modulatory carbohydrate ligands of CLRs. A comprehensive library of CLRs was expressed by fusing the extracellular part of each respective CLR, the part containing the carbohydrate-recognition domain (CRD), to the Fc fragment of human IgG1 molecules. CLR-Fc fusion proteins display the CRD in a dimeric form, are properly glycosylated, and can be detected by a secondary antibody with a conjugated fluorophore. Thus, they are valuable tools for high-throughput screening. We were able to identify novel carbohydrate binders of CLRs using the glycan array technology. These CLR-binding carbohydrates were then covalently attached to the model antigen ovalbumin. The ovalbumin neoglycoconjugates were used in a dendritic cell/T cell co-culture assay to stimulate transgenic T cells in vitro. In addition, mice were immunized with these conjugates to analyze the immune modulatory properties of the CLR ligands in vivo. The CLR ligands induced an increased Th1 cytokine production in vitro and modulated the humoral response in vivo. The platform described here allows for the identification of CLR ligands, as well as the evaluation of each ligand's cell-specific targeting and immune modulatory properties.

  6. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol;

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...... for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon...... resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding...

  7. A starch-binding domain identified in α-amylase (AmyP) represents a new family of carbohydrate-binding modules that contribute to enzymatic hydrolysis of soluble starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zheng, Yunyun; Chen, Maojiao; Wang, Ying; Xiao, Yazhong; Gao, Yi

    2014-04-01

    A novel starch-binding domain (SBD) that represents a new carbohydrate-binding module family (CBM69) was identified in the α-amylase (AmyP) of the recently established alpha-amylase subfamily GH13_37. The SBD and its homologues come mostly from marine bacteria, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that they are closely related to the CBM20 and CBM48 families. The SBD exhibited a binding preference toward raw rice starch, but the truncated mutant (AmyPΔSBD) still retained similar substrate preference. Kinetic analyses revealed that the SBD plays an important role in soluble starch hydrolysis because different catalytic efficiencies have been observed in AmyP and the AmyPΔSBD.

  8. Clostridium thermocellum cellulase CelT, a family 9 endoglucanase without an Ig-like domain or family 3c carbohydrate-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, J; Hemjinda, E; Arai, T; Kimura, T; Sakka, K; Ohmiya, K

    2002-08-01

    The celT gene of Clostridium thermocellum strain F1 was found downstream of the mannanase gene man26B [Kurokawa J et al. (2001) Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 65:548-554] in pKS305. The open reading frame of celT consists of 1,833 nucleotides encoding a protein of 611 amino acids with a predicted molecular weight of 68,510. The mature form of CelT consists of a family 9 cellulase domain and a dockerin domain responsible for cellulosome assembly, but lacks a family 3c carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) and an immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domain, which are often found with family 9 catalytic domains. CelT devoid of the dockerin domain (CelTDeltadoc) was constructed and purified from a recombinant Escherichia coli, and its enzyme properties were examined. CelTDeltadoc showed strong activity toward carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) and barley beta-glucan, and low activity toward xylan. The V(max) and K(m) values were 137 micro mol min(-1) mg(-1) and 16.7 mg/ml, respectively, for CMC. Immunological analysis indicated that CelT is a catalytic component of the C. thermocellum F1 cellulosome. This is the first report describing the characterization of a family 9 cellulase without an Ig-like domain or family 3c CBM.

  9. Cloning, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM_E1) derived from sugarcane soil metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Bruna Medeia; Alvarez, Thabata Maria; Liberato, Marcelo Vizona; Polikarpov, Igor; Gilbert, Harry J.; Zeri, Ana Carolina de Mattos; Squina, Fabio Marcio

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, owing to the growing global demand for energy, dependence on fossil fuels, limited natural resources and environmental pollution, biofuels have attracted great interest as a source of renewable energy. However, the production of biofuels from plant biomass is still considered to be an expensive technology. In this context, the study of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs), which are involved in guiding the catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolases for polysaccharide degradation, is attracting growing attention. Aiming at the identification of new CBMs, a sugarcane soil metagenomic library was analyzed and an uncharacterized CBM (CBM_E1) was identified. In this study, CBM_E1 was expressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.95 Å resolution. The crystals, which were obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method, belonged to space group I23, with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 88.07 Å. PMID:25195898

  10. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Lewińska, Anna; Abou Hachem, Maher; Svensson, Birte

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical for the activity of their cognate enzyme, though they are not readily detected in the sequence of a protein, but normally require a crystal structure of a complex for their identification. A variety of methods, including affinity electrophoresis (AE), insoluble polysaccharide pulldown (IPP) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) have been used to study auxiliary binding sites. These techniques are complementary as AE allows monitoring of binding to soluble polysaccharides, IPP to insoluble polysaccharides and SPR to oligosaccharides. Here we show that these methods are useful not only for analyzing known binding sites, but also for identifying new ones, even without structural data available. We further verify the chosen assays discriminate between known SBS/CBM containing enzymes and negative controls. Altogether 35 enzymes are screened for the presence of SBSs or CBMs and several novel binding sites are identified, including the first SBS ever reported in a cellulase. This work demonstrates that combinations of these methods can be used as a part of routine enzyme characterization to identify new binding sites and advance the study of SBSs and CBMs, allowing them to be detected in the absence of structural data. PMID:27504624

  11. Extra carbohydrate binding module contributes to the processivity and catalytic activity of a non-modular hydrolase family 5 endoglucanase from Fomitiporia mediterranea MF3/22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ronghua; Hu, Yimei; Long, Liangkun; Wang, Jing; Ding, Shaojun

    2016-09-01

    FmEG from Fomitiporia mediterranea is a non-modular endoglucanase composed of a 24-amino acids extension and 13-amino acids linker-like peptide at the N-terminus and a 312-amino acids GH5 catalytic domain (CD) at the C-terminus. In this study, six FmEG derivatives with deletion of N-terminal fragments or fusion with an extra family 1 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1) was constructed in order to evaluate the contribution of CBM1 to FmEG processivity and catalytic activity. FmEG showed a weak processivity and released cellobiose (G2) and cellotriose (G3) as main end products, and cellotriose (G4) as minor end product from filter paper (FP), but more amount of G4 was released from regenerated amorphous cellulose (RAC). All derivatives had similar activity on carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) with the same optimal pH (7.0) and temperature (50°C). However, fusing an extra CBM1 to FmEG△24 or FmEG△37 with flexible peptide significantly improved its processivity and catalytic activity to FP and RAC. Overall, 1.79- and 1.84-fold increases in the soluble/insoluble product ratio on FP, and 1.38- and 1.39-fold increases on RAC, compared to FmEG△24, were recorded for CBM1-FmEG△24 and CBM1-linker-FmEG△24, respectively. Meanwhile, they displayed 2.64- and 2.67-fold more activity on RAC, and 1.68- and 1.77-fold on FP, respectively. Similar improvement was also obtained for CBM1-linker-FmEG△37 as compared with FmEG△37. Interestingly, fusion of an extra CBM1 with FmEG also caused an alteration of cleavage pattern on insoluble celluloses. Our results suggest that such improvements in processivity and catalytic activity may arise from CBM1 binding affinity. The N-terminal 24- or 37-amino acids may serve as linker for sufficient spatial separation of the two domains required for processivity and catalytic activity. In addition, deletion of the N-terminal 24- or 37-amino acids led to significant reduction in thermostability but not the enzymatic activity. PMID:27444328

  12. Roles of multiple surface sites, long substrate binding clefts, and carbohydrate binding modules in the action of amylolytic enzymes on polysaccharide substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Seo, E.S.; Dilokpimol, Adiphol;

    2008-01-01

    Germinating barley seeds contain multiple forms of alpha-amylase, which are subject to both differential gene expression and differential degradation as part of the repertoire of starch-degrading enzymes. The alpha-amylases are endo-acting and possess a long substrate binding cleft with a charact...

  13. Analysis of surface binding sites (SBSs) in carbohydrate active enzymes with focus on glycoside hydrolase families 13 and 77

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Ruzanski, Christian;

    2014-01-01

    Surface binding sites (SBSs) interact with carbohydrates outside of the enzyme active site. They are frequently situated on catalytic domains and are distinct from carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). SBSs are found in a variety of enzymes and often seen in crystal structures. Notably about half ...

  14. Promiscuity of the Euonymus Carbohydrate-Binding Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Els J.M. Van Damme

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants synthesize small amounts of carbohydrate-binding proteins on exposure to stress. For example, on exposure to drought, high salt, wounding and by treatment with some plant hormones or by pathogen attack. In contrast to the ‘classical’ plant lectins that are mostly located in the vacuolar compartment, this new class of inducible lectins is present in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Taking into account that any physiological role of plant lectins most likely relies on their specific carbohydrate-binding activity and specificity, the discovery of these stress-related lectins provides strong evidence for the importance of protein-carbohydrate-interactions in plant cells. Hitherto, six families of such nucleocytoplasmic lectins have been identified in plants. This review will focus on the nucleocytoplasmic lectins with one or more Euonymus lectin (EUL domain(s. The carbohydrate-binding specificity of EUL proteins from a monocot, a dicot and a lower plant has been compared. Furthermore, modeling of the different EUL domains revealed a similar ß-trefoil fold consisting of three bundles of ß-sheet organized around a pseudo three-fold symmetry axis. Despite the sequence similarity and the conserved amino acids in the binding site, glycan array analyses showed that the EUL domain has a promiscuous carbohydrate-binding site capable of accommodating high mannose N-glycans, blood group B related structures and galactosylated epitopes.

  15. Deciphering ligand specificity of a Clostridium thermocellum family 35 carbohydrate binding module (CtCBM35 for gluco- and galacto- substituted mannans and its calcium induced stability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arabinda Ghosh

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of CBM35 from Clostridium thermocellum (CtCBM35 in polysaccharide recognition. CtCBM35 was cloned into pET28a (+ vector with an engineered His6 tag and expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3 cells. A homogenous 15 kDa protein was purified by immobilized metal ion chromatography (IMAC. Ligand binding analysis of CtCBM35 was carried out by affinity electrophoresis using various soluble ligands. CtCBM35 showed a manno-configured ligand specific binding displaying significant association with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 14.3×10(4 M(-1, carob galactomannan (Ka = 12.4×10(4 M(-1 and negligible association (Ka = 12 µM(-1 with insoluble mannan. Binding of CtCBM35 with polysaccharides which was calcium dependent exhibited two fold higher association in presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ion with konjac glucomannan (Ka = 41×10(4 M(-1 and carob galactomannan (Ka = 30×10(4 M(-1. The polysaccharide binding was further investigated by fluorescence spectrophotometric studies. On binding with carob galactomannan and konjac glucomannan the conformation of CtCBM35 changed significantly with regular 21 nm peak shifts towards lower quantum yield. The degree of association (K a with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan, 14.3×10(4 M(-1 and 11.4×10(4 M(-1, respectively, corroborated the findings from affinity electrophoresis. The association of CtCBM35with konjac glucomannan led to higher free energy of binding (ΔG -25 kJ mole(-1 as compared to carob galactomannan (ΔG -22 kJ mole(-1. On binding CtCBM35 with konjac glucomannan and carob galactomannan the hydrodynamic radius (RH as analysed by dynamic light scattering (DLS study, increased to 8 nm and 6 nm, respectively, from 4.25 nm in absence of ligand. The presence of 10 mM Ca(2+ ions imparted stiffer orientation of CtCBM35 particles with increased RH of 4.52 nm. Due to such stiffer orientation CtCBM35 became more thermostable and its melting temperature was

  16. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes, particularly those that are active on polysaccharides, are often found associated with carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which can play several roles in supporting enzyme function, such as localizing the enzyme to the substrate. However, the presence of CBMs...... is not universal and is in fact rare among some families of enzymes. In some cases an alternative to possessing a CBM is for the enzyme to bind to the substrate at a site on the catalytic domain, but away from the active site. Such a site is termed a surface (or secondary) binding site (SBS). SBSs have been...... identified in enzymes from a wide variety of families, though almost half are found in the α-amylase family GH13. The roles attributed to SBSs are not limited to targeting the enzyme to the substrate, but also include a variety of others such as guiding the substrate into the active site, altering enzyme...

  17. The Multiple Carbohydrate Binding Specificities of Helicobacter pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneberg, Susann

    Persistent colonization of the human stomach by Helicobacter pylori is a risk factor for the development of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. Adhesion of microbes to the target tissue is an important determinant for successful initiation, establishment and maintenance of infection, and a variety of different candidate carbohydrate receptors for H. pylori have been identified. Here the different the binding specifities, and their potential role in adhesion to human gastric epithelium are described. Finally, recent findings on the roles of sialic acid binding SabA adhesin in interactions with human neutrophils and erythrocytes are discussed.

  18. PROCARB: A Database of Known and Modelled Carbohydrate-Binding Protein Structures with Sequence-Based Prediction Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeel Malik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the three-dimensional structures of proteins that interact with carbohydrates covalently (glycoproteins as well as noncovalently (protein-carbohydrate complexes is essential to many biological processes and plays a significant role in normal and disease-associated functions. It is important to have a central repository of knowledge available about these protein-carbohydrate complexes as well as preprocessed data of predicted structures. This can be significantly enhanced by tools de novo which can predict carbohydrate-binding sites for proteins in the absence of structure of experimentally known binding site. PROCARB is an open-access database comprising three independently working components, namely, (i Core PROCARB module, consisting of three-dimensional structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes taken from Protein Data Bank (PDB, (ii Homology Models module, consisting of manually developed three-dimensional models of N-linked and O-linked glycoproteins of unknown three-dimensional structure, and (iii CBS-Pred prediction module, consisting of web servers to predict carbohydrate-binding sites using single sequence or server-generated PSSM. Several precomputed structural and functional properties of complexes are also included in the database for quick analysis. In particular, information about function, secondary structure, solvent accessibility, hydrogen bonds and literature reference, and so forth, is included. In addition, each protein in the database is mapped to Uniprot, Pfam, PDB, and so forth.

  19. Liver X receptor regulates hepatic nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Fan, Qiong; Nørgaard, Rikke C;

    2015-01-01

    Liver X receptor (LXR)α and LXRβ play key roles in hepatic de novo lipogenesis through their regulation of lipogenic genes, including sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1c and carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP). LXRs activate lipogenic gene transcription...... metabolic sensors upstream of ChREBP by modulating GK expression, nuclear O-GlcNAc signaling, and ChREBP expression and activity....

  20. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbohydrates are one of the main types of nutrients. They are the most important source of energy for your body. Your digestive system changes carbohydrates into glucose (blood sugar). Your body uses this ...

  1. Multiplicity of carbohydrate-binding sites in -prism fold lectins: occurrence and possible evolutionary implications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alok Sharma; Divya Chandran; Desh D Singh; M Vijayan

    2007-09-01

    The -prism II fold lectins of known structure, all from monocots, invariably have three carbohydrate-binding sites in each subunit/domain. Until recently, -prism I fold lectins of known structure were all from dicots and they exhibited one carbohydrate-binding site per subunit/domain. However, the recently determined structure of the -prism fold I lectin from banana, a monocot, has two very similar carbohydrate-binding sites. This prompted a detailed analysis of all the sequences appropriate for two-lectin folds and which carry one or more relevant carbohydrate-binding motifs. The very recent observation of a -prism I fold lectin, griffithsin, with three binding sites in each domain further confirmed the need for such an analysis. The analysis demonstrates substantial diversity in the number of binding sites unrelated to the taxonomical position of the plant source. However, the number of binding sites and the symmetry within the sequence exhibit reasonable correlation. The distribution of the two families of -prism fold lectins among plants and the number of binding sites in them, appear to suggest that both of them arose through successive gene duplication, fusion and divergent evolution of the same primitive carbohydrate-binding motif involving a Greek key. Analysis with sequences in individual Greek keys as independent units lends further support to this conclusion. It would seem that the preponderance of three carbohydrate-binding sites per domain in monocot lectins, particularly those with the -prism II fold, is related to the role of plant lectins in defence.

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izquierdo, Laure; Oliveira, Catarina; Fournier, Carole; Descamps, Véronique; Morel, Virginie; Dubuisson, Jean; Brochot, Etienne; Francois, Catherine; Castelain, Sandrine; Duverlie, Gilles; Helle, Francois

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs), including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis C Virus (HCV), Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms. PMID:26871442

  3. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laure Izquierdo

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs, including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Hepatitis C Virus (HCV, Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  4. Alteration of the carbohydrate-binding specificity of a C-type lectin CEL-I mutant with an EPN carbohydrate-binding motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Ishimine, Tomohiro; Baba, Tomohiro; Kimura, Masanari; Unno, Hideaki; Goda, Shuichiro

    2013-07-01

    CEL-I is a Gal/GalNAc-specific C-type lectin isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of two carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs) with the carbohydrate-recognition motif QPD (Gln-Pro- Asp), which is generally known to exist in galactose-specific C-type CRDs. In the present study, a mutant CEL-I with EPN (Glu-Pro-Asn) motif, which is thought to be responsible for the carbohydrate-recognition of mannose-specific Ctype CRDs, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its effects on the carbohydrate-binding specificity were examined using polyamidoamine dendrimer (PD) conjugated with carbohydrates. Although wild-type CEL-I effectively formed complexes with N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-PD but not with mannose-PD, the mutant CEL-I showed relatively weak but definite affinity for mannose-PD. These results indicated that the QPD and EPN motifs play a significant role in the carbohydrate-recognition mechanism of CEL-I, especially in the discrimination of galactose and mannose. Additional mutations in the recombinant CEL-I binding site may further increase its specificity for mannose, and should provide insights into designing novel carbohydrate-recognition proteins. PMID:23157284

  5. A structural model for binding of the serine-rich repeat adhesin GspB to host carbohydrate receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasia M Pyburn

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIbα. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB(BR, both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB(BR structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: 1 an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; 2 a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; 3 a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIbα. Further examination of purified GspB(BR-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspB(BR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  6. A Structural Model for Binding of the Serine-Rich Repeat Adhesin GspB to Host Carbohydrate Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Bensing, Barbara A.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Melancon, Bruce J.; Tomasiak, Thomas M.; Ward, Nicholas J.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Oliver, Kevin M.; Cecchini, Gary; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Tyska, Matthew J.; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (UCLA); (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2014-10-02

    GspB is a serine-rich repeat (SRR) adhesin of Streptococcus gordonii that mediates binding of this organism to human platelets via its interaction with sialyl-T antigen on the receptor GPIb{alpha}. This interaction appears to be a major virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of infective endocarditis. To address the mechanism by which GspB recognizes its carbohydrate ligand, we determined the high-resolution x-ray crystal structure of the GspB binding region (GspB{sub BR}), both alone and in complex with a disaccharide precursor to sialyl-T antigen. Analysis of the GspB{sub BR} structure revealed that it is comprised of three independently folded subdomains or modules: (1) an Ig-fold resembling a CnaA domain from prokaryotic pathogens; (2) a second Ig-fold resembling the binding region of mammalian Siglecs; (3) a subdomain of unique fold. The disaccharide was found to bind in a pocket within the Siglec subdomain, but at a site distinct from that observed in mammalian Siglecs. Confirming the biological relevance of this binding pocket, we produced three isogenic variants of S. gordonii, each containing a single point mutation of a residue lining this binding pocket. These variants have reduced binding to carbohydrates of GPIb{alpha}. Further examination of purified GspB{sub BR}-R484E showed reduced binding to sialyl-T antigen while S. gordonii harboring this mutation did not efficiently bind platelets and showed a significant reduction in virulence, as measured by an animal model of endocarditis. Analysis of other SRR proteins revealed that the predicted binding regions of these adhesins also had a modular organization, with those known to bind carbohydrate receptors having modules homologous to the Siglec and Unique subdomains of GspBBR. This suggests that the binding specificity of the SRR family of adhesins is determined by the type and organization of discrete modules within the binding domains, which may affect the tropism of organisms for different tissues.

  7. Interleukin-2 carbohydrate recognition modulates CTLL-2 cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, K; Yamashita, K

    2001-03-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) specifically recognizes high-mannose type glycans with five or six mannosyl residues. To determine whether the carbohydrate recognition activity of IL-2 contributes to its physiological activity, the inhibitory effects of high-mannose type glycans on IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cell proliferation were investigated. Man(5)GlcNAc(2)Asn added to CTLL-2 cell cultures inhibited not only phosphorylation of tyrosine kinases but also IL-2-dependent cell proliferation. We found that a complex of IL-2, IL-2 receptor alpha, beta, gamma subunits, and tyrosine kinases was formed in rhIL-2-stimulated CTLL-2 cells. Among the components of this complex, only the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit was stained with Galanthus nivalis agglutinin which specifically recognizes high-mannose type glycans. This staining was diminished after digestion of the glycans with endo-beta-N-acetylglucosaminidase H or D, suggesting that at least a N-glycan containing Man(5)GlcNAc(2) is linked to the extracellular portion of the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit. Our findings indicate that IL-2 binds the IL-2 receptor alpha subunit through Man(5)GlcNAc(2) and a specific peptide sequence on the surface of CTLL-2 cells. When IL-2 binds to the IL-2Ralpha subunit, this may trigger formation of the high affinity complex of IL-2-IL-2Ralpha, -beta, and -gamma subunits, leading to cellular signaling.

  8. A role for carbohydrate recognition in mammalian sperm-egg binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, Gary F., E-mail: clarkgf@health.missouri.edu

    2014-08-01

    Highlights: • Mammalian sperm-egg binding as a carbohydrate dependent species recognition event. • The role of carbohydrate recognition in human, mouse and pig sperm-egg binding. • Historical perspective and future directions for research focused on gamete binding. - Abstract: Mammalian fertilization usually requires three sequential cell–cell interactions: (i) initial binding of sperm to the specialized extracellular matrix coating the egg known as the zona pellucida (ZP); (ii) binding of sperm to the ZP via the inner acrosomal membrane that is exposed following the induction of acrosomal exocytosis; and (iii) adhesion of acrosome-reacted sperm to the plasma membrane of the egg cell, enabling subsequent fusion of these gametes. The focus of this review is on the initial binding of intact sperm to the mammalian ZP. Evidence collected over the past fifty years has confirmed that this interaction relies primarily on the recognition of carbohydrate sequences presented on the ZP by lectin-like egg binding proteins located on the plasma membrane of sperm. There is also evidence that the same carbohydrate sequences that mediate binding also function as ligands for lectins on lymphocytes that can inactivate immune responses, likely protecting the egg and the developing embryo up to the stage of blastocyst hatching. The literature related to initial sperm-ZP binding in the three major mammalian models (human, mouse and pig) is discussed. Historical perspectives and future directions for research related to this aspect of gamete adhesion are also presented.

  9. The ion dependence of carbohydrate binding of CBM36: an MD and 3D-RISM study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Shoichi; Higashi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2016-09-01

    The molecular recognition process of the carbohydrate-binding module family 36 (CBM36) was examined theoretically. The mechanism of xylan binding by CBM36 and the role of Ca2+ were investigated by the combined use of molecular dynamics simulations and the 3D reference interaction site model method. The CBM36 showed affinity for xylan after Ca2+ binding, but not after Mg2+ binding. Free-energy component analysis of the xylan-binding process revealed that the major factor for xylan-binding affinity is the electrostatic interaction between the Ca2+ and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. The van der Waals interaction between the hydrophobic side chain of CBM36 and the glucopyranose ring of xylan also contributes to the stabilization of the xylan-binding state. Dehydration on the formation of the complex has the opposite effect on these interactions. The affinity of CBM36 for xylan results from a balance of the interactions between the binding ion and solvents, hydrophilic residues around xylan, and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. When CBM binds Ca2+, these interactions are well balanced; in contrast, when CBM binds Mg2+, the dehydration penalty is excessively large.

  10. The ion dependence of carbohydrate binding of CBM36: an MD and 3D-RISM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Shoichi; Higashi, Masahiro; Yoshida, Norio; Nakano, Haruyuki

    2016-09-01

    The molecular recognition process of the carbohydrate-binding module family 36 (CBM36) was examined theoretically. The mechanism of xylan binding by CBM36 and the role of Ca(2+) were investigated by the combined use of molecular dynamics simulations and the 3D reference interaction site model method. The CBM36 showed affinity for xylan after Ca(2+) binding, but not after Mg(2+) binding. Free-energy component analysis of the xylan-binding process revealed that the major factor for xylan-binding affinity is the electrostatic interaction between the Ca(2+) and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. The van der Waals interaction between the hydrophobic side chain of CBM36 and the glucopyranose ring of xylan also contributes to the stabilization of the xylan-binding state. Dehydration on the formation of the complex has the opposite effect on these interactions. The affinity of CBM36 for xylan results from a balance of the interactions between the binding ion and solvents, hydrophilic residues around xylan, and the hydroxyl oxygens of xylan. When CBM binds Ca(2+), these interactions are well balanced; in contrast, when CBM binds Mg(2+), the dehydration penalty is excessively large. PMID:27366974

  11. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is fine because they contain important vitamins and minerals. But your body rapidly digests the starch in white potatoes. This can raise your blood glucose level. Healthy carbohydrates include: Natural sugars in fruits, vegetables, milk, and milk products Dietary fiber Starches in whole- ...

  12. Species Differences in the Carbohydrate Binding Preferences of Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouch, Erika C.; Smith, Kelly; McDonald, Barbara;

    2006-01-01

    Interactions of surfactant protein D (SP-D) with micro-organisms and organic antigens involve binding to the trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domain (neck+CRD). In these studies, we compared the ligand binding of homologous human, rat, and mouse trimeric neck+CRD fusion proteins, each...... of the corresponding murine sequence (Asn324-Asn325) conferred a capacity to interact with immobilized maltose. Thus, ligand recognition by human SP-D involves a complex interplay between saccharide presentation, the valency of trimeric subunits, and species-specific residues that flank the primary carbohydrate...

  13. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion.

  14. Biophysical studies on calcium and carbohydrate binding to carbohydrate recognition domain of Gal/GalNAc lectin from Entamoeba histolytica: insights into host cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Rupali; Verma, Kuldeep; Chandra, Mintu; Mukherjee, Madhumita; Datta, Sunando

    2016-09-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, an enteric parasite expresses a Gal/GalNAc-specific lectin that contributes to its virulence by establishing adhesion to host cell. In this study, carbohydrate recognition domain of Hgl (EhCRD) was purified and biophysical studies were conducted to understand the thermodynamic basis of its binding to carbohydrate and Ca(++) Here, we show that carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) of the lectin binds to calcium through DPN motif. To decipher the role of calcium in carbohydrate binding and host cell adhesion, biophysical and cell-based studies were carried out. We demonstrated that the presence of the cation neither change the affinity of the lectin for carbohydrates nor alters its conformation. Mutation of the calcium-binding motif in EhCRD resulted in complete loss of ability to bind calcium but retained its affinity for carbohydrates. Purified EhCRD significantly diminished adhesion of the amebic trophozoites to Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells as well as triggered red blood cell agglutination. The calcium-binding defective mutant abrogated amebic adhesion to CHO cells similar to the wild-type protein, but it failed to agglutinate RBCs suggesting a differential role of the cation in these two processes. This study provides the first molecular description of the role of calcium in Gal/GalNAc mediated host cell adhesion. PMID:27008865

  15. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N.; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S.

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  16. Localizing Carbohydrate Binding Sites in Proteins Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Kitova, Elena N; Li, Jun; Eugenio, Luiz; Ng, Kenneth; Klassen, John S

    2016-01-01

    The application of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) to localize ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins is described. Proteins from three bacterial toxins, the B subunit homopentamers of Cholera toxin and Shiga toxin type 1 and a fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin A, and their interactions with native carbohydrate receptors, GM1 pentasaccharides (β-Gal-(1→3)-β-GalNAc-(1→4)[α-Neu5Ac-(2→3)]-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc), Pk trisaccharide (α-Gal-(1→4)-β-Gal-(1→4)-Glc) and CD-grease (α-Gal-(1→3)-β-Gal-(1→4)-β-GlcNAcO(CH2)8CO2CH3), respectively, served as model systems for this study. Comparison of the differences in deuterium uptake for peptic peptides produced in the absence and presence of ligand revealed regions of the proteins that are protected against deuterium exchange upon ligand binding. Notably, protected regions generally coincide with the carbohydrate binding sites identified by X-ray crystallography. However, ligand binding can also result in increased deuterium exchange in other parts of the protein, presumably through allosteric effects. Overall, the results of this study suggest that HDX-MS can serve as a useful tool for localizing the ligand binding sites in carbohydrate-binding proteins. However, a detailed interpretation of the changes in deuterium exchange upon ligand binding can be challenging because of the presence of ligand-induced changes in protein structure and dynamics.

  17. Identification and characterization of sulfated carbohydrate-binding protein from Lactobacillus reuteri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Nishiyama

    Full Text Available We previously purified a putative sulfated-galactosylceramide (sulfatide-binding protein with a molecular weight of 47 kDa from the cell surface of Lactobacillus reuteri JCM1081. The aim of this study was to identify the 47-kDa protein, examine its binding to sulfated glycolipids and mucins, and evaluate its role in bacterial adhesion to mucosal surfaces. By cloning and sequencing analysis, the 47-kDa protein was identified as elongation factor-Tu (EF-Tu. Adhesion properties were examined using 6 × Histidine-fused EF-Tu (His6-EF-Tu. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated pH-dependent binding of His6-EF-Tu to sulfated glycolipids, but not to neutral or sialylated glycolipids, suggesting that a sulfated galactose residue was responsible for EF-Tu binding. Furthermore, His6-EF-Tu was found to bind to porcine gastric mucin (PGM by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Binding was markedly reduced by sulfatase treatment of PGM and in the presence of acidic and desialylated oligosaccharide fractions containing sulfated carbohydrate residues prepared from PGM, demonstrating that sulfated carbohydrate moieties mediated binding. Histochemical staining revealed similar localization of His6-EF-Tu and high iron diamine staining in porcine mucosa. These results indicated that EF-Tu bound PGM via sulfated carbohydrate moieties. To characterize the contribution of EF-Tu to the interaction between bacterial cells and PGM, we tested whether anti-EF-Tu antibodies could inhibit the interaction. Binding of L. reuteri JCM1081 to PGM was significantly blocked in a concentration-dependent matter, demonstrating the involvement of EF-Tu in bacterial adhesion. In conclusion, the present results demonstrated, for the first time, that EF-Tu bound sulfated carbohydrate moieties of sulfated glycolipids and sulfomucin, thereby promoting adhesion of L. reuteri to mucosal surfaces.

  18. Unique carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions are required for high affinity binding between FcgammaRIII and antibodies lacking core fucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Claudia; Grau, Sandra; Jäger, Christiane; Sondermann, Peter; Brünker, Peter; Waldhauer, Inja; Hennig, Michael; Ruf, Armin; Rufer, Arne Christian; Stihle, Martine; Umaña, Pablo; Benz, Jörg

    2011-08-01

    Antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), a key immune effector mechanism, relies on the binding of antigen-antibody complexes to Fcγ receptors expressed on immune cells. Antibodies lacking core fucosylation show a large increase in affinity for FcγRIIIa leading to an improved receptor-mediated effector function. Although afucosylated IgGs exist naturally, a next generation of recombinant therapeutic, glycoenginereed antibodies is currently being developed to exploit this finding. In this study, the crystal structures of a glycosylated Fcγ receptor complexed with either afucosylated or fucosylated Fc were determined allowing a detailed, molecular understanding of the regulatory role of Fc-oligosaccharide core fucosylation in improving ADCC. The structures reveal a unique type of interface consisting of carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions between glycans of the receptor and the afucosylated Fc. In contrast, in the complex structure with fucosylated Fc, these contacts are weakened or nonexistent, explaining the decreased affinity for the receptor. These findings allow us to understand the higher efficacy of therapeutic antibodies lacking the core fucose and also suggest a unique mechanism by which the immune system can regulate antibody-mediated effector functions.

  19. Structure of Dioclea virgata lectin: relations between carbohydrate binding site and nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delatorre, P.; Gadelha, C.A.A.; Santi-Gadelha, T. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba (UFPB), Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Nobrega, R.B.; Rocha, B.A.M.; Nascimento, K.S.; Naganao, C.S.; Sampaio, A.H.; Cavada, B.S. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Pires, A.F.; Assreuy, A.M.S. [Universidade Estadual do Ceara (UECE), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Lectins are proteins/glycoproteins with at least one noncatalytic domain binding reversibly to specific monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. By binding to carbohydrate moieties on the cell surface, lectins participate in a range of cellular processes without changing the properties of the carbohydrates involved. The lectin of Dioclea virgata (DvirL), both native and complexed with X-man, was submitted to X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal structure was compared to that of other Diocleinae lectins in order to better understand differences in biological proper- ties, especially with regard to the ability of lectins to induce nitric oxide (NO) production. The DvirL diffraction analysis revealed that both the native crystal and the X-Man-complexed form are orthorhombic and belong to space group I222. The cell parameters were: a=65.4 , b=86.6 and c=90.2 (native structure), and a=61.89 , b=87.67 and c=88.78 (X-Man-complexed structure). An association was observed between the volume of the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the ability to induce NO production and the relative positions of Tyr12, Arg228 and Leu99. Thus, differences in biological activity induced by Diocleinae lectins are related to the configuration of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate binding site and to the structural conformation of subsequent regions capable of influencing site-ligand interactions. In conclusion, the ability of Diocleinae lectins to induce NO production depends on CRD configuration. (author)

  20. Farnesoid X Receptor Inhibits the Transcriptional Activity of Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein in Human Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, Sandrine; Huaman Samanez, Carolina; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the...

  1. Stability and Sugar Recognition Ability of Ricin-Like Carbohydrate Binding Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jianzhuang [ORNL; Nellas, Ricky B [ORNL; Glover, Mary M [ORNL; Shen, Tongye [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Lectins are a class of proteins known for their novel binding to saccharides. Understanding this sugar recognition process can be crucial in creating structure-based designs of proteins with various biological roles. We focus on the sugar binding of a particular lectin, ricin, which has two -trefoil carbohydrate-binding domains (CRDs) found in several plant protein toxins. The binding ability of possible sites of ricin-like CRD has been puzzling. The apo and various (multiple) ligand-bound forms of the sugar-binding domains of ricin were studied by molecular dynamics simulations. By evaluating structural stability, hydrogen bond dynamics, flexibility, and binding energy, we obtained a detailed picture of the sugar recognition of the ricin-like CRD. Unlike what was previously believed, we found that the binding abilities of the two known sites are not independent of each other. The binding ability of one site is positively affected by the other site. While the mean positions of different binding scenarios are not altered significantly, the flexibility of the binding pockets visibly decreases upon multiple ligand binding. This change in flexibility seems to be the origin of the binding cooperativity. All the hydrogen bonds that are strong in the monoligand state are also strong in the double-ligand complex, although the stability is much higher in the latter form due to cooperativity. These strong hydrogen bonds in a monoligand state are deemed to be the essential hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, by examining the structural correlation matrix, the two domains are structurally one entity. Galactose hydroxyl groups, OH4 and OH3, are the most critical parts in both site 1 and site 2 recognition.

  2. Affinity labeling of the carbohydrate binding site of the lectin discoidin I using a photoactivatable radioiodinated monosaccharide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnken, R.E.; Berger, E.A.

    1987-12-29

    N-(4-Azidosalicyl) galactosamine (GalNASA), a photoactivatable, radioiodinatable analog of N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), has been prepared and characterized. The authors have used this reagent for labeling of the carbohydrate binding site of discoidin I, an endogenous lectin produced by Dictyostelium discoideum. GalNASA behaved as a ligand for discoidin I, as judged by its ability to compete in an assay measuring the carbohydrate binding activity of discoidin I. In this assay, it exhibited a K/sub i,app/ of 800 ..mu..M, comparable to that of GalNAc. The K/sub i,app/ of GalNASA decreased to 40 ..mu..m upon prior photolysis with ultraviolet light. In contrast, N-(4-azidosalicyl) ethanolamine produced no inhibition of carbohydrate binding regardless of photolysis. Covalent labeling of discoidin I with /sup 125/I-GalNASA was entirely dependent upon ultraviolet light. A portion of labeling, representing 40-60% of the total, was sensitive to reagents which were known to inhibit carbohydrate binding by discoidin I, including GalNAc, asialofetuin, and ethyl-enediaminetetraacetic acid. The carbohydrate-sensitive fraction of discoidin I photolabeling with /sup 125/I-GalNASA exhibited a K/sub d/ of 15-40 ..mu..M, in agreement with the K/sub i,app/ of prephotolyzed GalNASA observed in the carbohydrate binding assay. Partial proteolytic digestion of photolabeled discoidin I revealed specific fragments whose labeling was completely blocked by GalNAc. This indicated that the location of carbohydrate-sensitive labeling within the structure of discoidin I was restricted. One particular tryptic fragment, Tr1, was examined in detail. These data suggest that Tr1 is derived from the carbohydrate binding site of discoidin I.

  3. Related lectins from snowdrop and maize differ in their carbohydrate-binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouquaert, Elke; Smith, David F; Peumans, Willy J; Proost, Paul; Balzarini, Jan; Savvides, Savvas N; Damme, Els J M Van

    2009-03-01

    Searches in an EST database from maize revealed the expression of a protein related to the Galanthus nivalis (GNA) agglutinin, referred to as GNA(maize). Heterologous expression of GNA(maize) in Pichia pastoris allowed characterization of the first nucleocytoplasmic GNA homolog from plants. GNA(maize) is a tetrameric protein which shares 64% sequence similarity with GNA. Glycan microarray analyses revealed important differences in the specificity. Unlike GNA, which binds strongly to high-mannose N-glycans, the lectin from maize reacts almost exclusively with more complex glycans. Interestingly, GNA(maize) prefers complex glycans containing beta1-2 GlcNAc residues. The obvious difference in carbohydrate-binding properties is accompanied by a 100-fold reduced anti-HIV activity. Although the sequences of GNA and GNA(maize) are clearly related they show only 28% sequence identity. Our results indicate that gene divergence within the family of GNA-related lectins leads to changes in carbohydrate-binding specificity, as shown on N-glycan arrays.

  4. Amino Acid Change in the Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein is associated with lower triglycerides and myocardial infarction incidence depending on level of adherence to the Mediterranean diet in the PREDIMED trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    A variant (rs3812316, C771G, and Gln241His) in the MLXIPL (Max-like protein X interacting protein-like) gene encoding the carbohydrate response element binding protein has been associated with lower triglycerides. However, its association with cardiovascular diseases and gene-diet interactions modul...

  5. Screening for carbohydrate-binding proteins in extracts of Uruguayan plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plá A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of carbohydrate-binding proteins, namely lectins, ß-galactosidases and amylases, was determined in aqueous extracts of plants collected in Uruguay. Twenty-six extracts were prepared from 15 Uruguayan plants belonging to 12 Phanerogam families. Among them, 18 extracts caused hemagglutination (HAG that was inhibited by mono- and disaccharides in 13 cases, indicating the presence of lectins. The other 8 extracts did not cause any HAG with the four systems used to detect HAG activity (rabbit and mouse red cells, trypsin-treated rabbit and mouse red cells. For the extracts prepared from Solanum commersonii, HAG activity and HAG inhibition were similar for those prepared from tubers, leaves and fruits, with the chitocompounds being responsible for all the inhibitions. Purification of the S. commersonii tuber lectin was carried out by affinity chromatography on asialofetuin-Sepharose, and SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions gave a single band of Mr of approximately 80 kDa. The monomer N-acetylglucosamine did not inhibit HAG induced by the purified lectin, but chitobiose inhibited HAG at 24 mM and chitotriose inhibited it at 1 mM. ß-Galactosidase activity was detected in leaves and stems of Cayaponia martiana, and in seeds from Datura ferox. Only traces of amylase activity were detected in some of the extracts analyzed. The present screening increases knowledge about the occurrence of carbohydrate-binding proteins present in regional plants.

  6. Flow cytometric analysis of lectin binding to in vitro-cultured Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, J.D.; Jenkins, J.A.; La Peyre, Jerome F.

    2004-01-01

    Parasite surface glycoconjugates are frequently involved in cellular recognition and colonization of the host. This study reports on the identification of Perkinsus marinus surface carbohydrates by flow cytometric analyses of fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated lectin binding. Lectin-binding specificity was confirmed by sugar inhibition and Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics. Clear, measurable fluorescence peaks were discriminated, and no parasite autofluorescence was observed. Parasites (GTLA-5 and Perkinsus-1 strains) harvested during log and stationary phases of growth in a protein-free medium reacted strongly with concanavalin A and wheat germ agglutinin, which bind to glucose-mannose and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, respectively. Both P. marinus strains bound with lower intensity to Maclura pomifera agglutinin, Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin, soybean agglutinin (N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific lectins), peanut agglutinin (PNA) (terminal galactose specific), and Griffonia simplicifolia II (GlcNAc specific). Only background fluorescence levels were detected with Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (L-fucose specific) and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin (sialic acid specific). The lectin-binding profiles were similar for the 2 strains except for a greater relative binding intensity of PNA for Perkinsus-1 and an overall greater lectin-binding capacity of Perkinsus-1 compared with GTLA-5. Growth stage comparisons revealed increased lectin-binding intensities during stationary phase compared with log phase of growth. This is the first report of the identification of surface glycoconjugates on a Perkinsus spp. by flow cytometry and the first to demonstrate that differential surface sugar expression is growth phase and strain dependent. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2004.

  7. Potential of carbohydrate-binding agents as therapeutics against enveloped viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, K O; Balzarini, J

    2012-03-01

    Twenty-seven years after the discovery of HIV as the cause of AIDS more than 25 drugs directed against four different viral targets (i.e. reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, envelope gp41) and one cellular target (i.e. CCR5 co-receptor) are available for treatment. However, the search for an efficient vaccine is still ongoing. One of the main problems is the presence of a continuously evolving dense carbohydrate shield, consisting of N-linked glycans that surrounds the virion and protects it against efficient recognition and persistent neutralization by the immune system. However, several lectins from the innate immune system specifically bind to these glycans in an attempt to process the virus antigens to provoke an immune response. Across a wide variety of different species in nature lectins can be found that can interact with the glycosylated envelope of HIV-1 and can block the infection of susceptible cells by the virus. In this review, we will give an overview of the lectins from non-mammalian origin that are endowed with antiviral properties and discuss the complex interactions between lectins of the innate immune system and HIV-1. Also, attention will be given to different carbohydrate-related modalities that can be exploited for antiviral chemotherapy.

  8. An adenovirus vector incorporating carbohydrate binding domains utilizes glycans for gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius W Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vectors based on human adenovirus serotype 5 (HAdV-5 continue to show promise as delivery vehicles for cancer gene therapy. Nevertheless, it has become clear that therapeutic benefit is directly linked to tumor-specific vector localization, highlighting the need for tumor-targeted gene delivery. Aberrant glycosylation of cell surface glycoproteins and glycolipids is a central feature of malignant transformation, and tumor-associated glycoforms are recognized as cancer biomarkers. On this basis, we hypothesized that cancer-specific cell-surface glycans could be the basis of a novel paradigm in HAdV-5-based vector targeting. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: As a first step toward this goal, we constructed a novel HAdV-5 vector encoding a unique chimeric fiber protein that contains the tandem carbohydrate binding domains of the fiber protein of the NADC-1 strain of porcine adenovirus type 4 (PAdV-4. This glycan-targeted vector displays augmented CAR-independent gene transfer in cells with low CAR expression. Further, we show that gene transfer is markedly decreased in cells with genetic glycosylation defects and by inhibitors of glycosylation in normal cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide the initial proof-of-concept for HAdV-5 vector-mediated gene delivery based on the presence of cell-surface carbohydrates. Further development of this new targeting paradigm could provide targeted gene delivery based on vector recognition of disease-specific glycan biomarkers.

  9. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig;

    2007-01-01

    to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has......-T2). Both lectins exhibited specificity for binding of free GalNAc. Kinetic and time-course analysis of GalNAc-T2 demonstrated that the lectin domain did not affect transfer to initial glycosylation sites, but selectively modulated velocity of transfer to subsequent sites and affected the number......Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity...

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming V. [Program of Cardiovascular Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chen, Weiqin [Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Harmancey, Romain N. [Division of Cardiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip [Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Taegtmeyer, Heinrich [Division of Cardiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chan, Lawrence, E-mail: lchan@bcm.tmc.edu [Program of Cardiovascular Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  11. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M. [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Midtgaard, Søren Roi [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gysel, Kira [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J. [University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.blaise@cpbs.cnrs.fr [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  12. Carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity of legume lectins in respect to their proposed biological functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viana Ramos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The lectins, proteins which specifically recognize carbohydrate moieties, have been extensively studied in many biochemical and structural aspects in order to establish the molecular basis of this non-catalytic event. On the other hand, their clinical and agricultural potentials have been growing fast. Although lectins, mainly those from legume plants, had been investigated for biological properties, studies about the physiological functions of lectins are scarce in literature. Therefore, despite the accumulated data on lectins (as proteins, the role played by these signalizing molecules is poorly discussed. In the light of our accumulated results on legume lectins, specially those obtained from plants belonging to the Diocleinae sub-tribe and available data in literature, we discuss here the main hypothesis of their functions according to their carbohydrate/glycan-binding specificity.As lectinas, proteinas que especificamente reconhecem estruturas que contém carboidratos, têm sido extensivamente estudadas em muitos aspectos bioquímicos e estruturais, objetivando estabelecer as bases moleculares deste evento não-catalítico. Por outro lado, os potenciais clínicos e agriculturais destas proteínas têm crescido rapidamente. Embora as lectinas, principalmente aquelas de legumes tenham sido bastante investigadas em suas propriedades biológicas, estudos sobre as funcões fisiológicas de lectinas são escassos na literatura. Além disto, a despeito da quantidade de dados acumulados sobre lectinas (como proteínas, o papel desempenhado por estas moléculas de sinalização é pobremente discutido. Valendo-se de nossos estudos sobre lectinas de leguminosas, principalmente da sub-tribo Diocleinae, e outros dados presentes na literatura, discutimos aqui, as principais hipóteses de suas funções com base na especificidade por carboidratos e glicanos complexos.

  13. Improved binding affinity and interesting selectivities of aminopyrimidine-bearing carbohydrate receptors in comparison with their aminopyridine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippe, Jan; Seichter, Wilhelm; Mazik, Monika

    2015-12-28

    Due to the problems with the exact prediction of the binding properties of an artificial carbohydrate receptor, the identification of characteristic structural features, having the ability to influence the binding properties in a predictable way, is of high importance. The purpose of our investigation was to examine whether the previously observed higher affinity of 2-aminopyrimidine-bearing carbohydrate receptors in comparison with aminopyridine substituted analogues represents a general tendency of aminopyrimidine-bearing compounds. Systematic binding studies on new compounds consisting of 2-aminopyrimidine groups confirmed such a tendency and allowed the identification of interesting structure-activity relationships. Receptors having different symmetries showed systematic preferences for specific glycosides, which are remarkable for such simple receptor systems. Particularly suitable receptor architectures for the recognition of selected glycosides were identified and represent a valuable base for further developments in this field. PMID:26467387

  14. Antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against Nidovirales in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meer, F J U M; de Haan, C A M; Schuurman, N M P; Haijema, B J; Peumans, W J; Van Damme, E J M; Delputte, P L; Balzarini, J; Egberink, H F

    2007-10-01

    Coronaviruses are important human and animal pathogens, the relevance of which increased due to the emergence of new human coronaviruses like SARS-CoV, HKU1 and NL63. Together with toroviruses, arteriviruses, and roniviruses the coronaviruses belong to the order Nidovirales. So far antivirals are hardly available to combat infections with viruses of this order. Therefore, various antiviral strategies to counter nidoviral infections are under evaluation. Lectins, which bind to N-linked oligosaccharide elements of enveloped viruses, can be considered as a conceptionally new class of virus inhibitors. These agents were recently evaluated for their antiviral activity towards a variety of enveloped viruses and were shown in most cases to inhibit virus infection at low concentrations. However, limited knowledge is available for their efficacy towards nidoviruses. In this article the application of the plant lectins Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin (HHA), Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), Cymbidium sp. agglutinin (CA) and Urtica dioica agglutinin (UDA) as well as non-plant derived pradimicin-A (PRM-A) and cyanovirin-N (CV-N) as potential antiviral agents was evaluated. Three antiviral tests were compared based on different evaluation principles: cell viability (MTT-based colorimetric assay), number of infected cells (immunoperoxidase assay) and amount of viral protein expression (luciferase-based assay). The presence of carbohydrate-binding agents strongly inhibited coronaviruses (transmissible gastroenteritis virus, infectious bronchitis virus, feline coronaviruses serotypes I and II, mouse hepatitis virus), arteriviruses (equine arteritis virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus) and torovirus (equine Berne virus). Remarkably, serotype II feline coronaviruses and arteriviruses were not inhibited by PRM-A, in contrast to the other viruses tested.

  15. The Carbohydrate-linked Phosphorylcholine of the Parasitic Nematode Product ES-62 Modulates Complement Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Umul Kulthum; Maller, N Claire; Iqbal, Asif J; Al-Riyami, Lamyaa; Harnett, William; Raynes, John G

    2016-05-27

    Parasitic nematodes manufacture various carbohydrate-linked phosphorylcholine (PCh)-containing molecules, including ES-62, a protein with an N-linked glycan terminally substituted with PCh. The PCh component is biologically important because it is required for immunomodulatory effects. We showed that most ES-62 was bound to a single protein, C-reactive protein (CRP), in normal human serum, displaying a calcium-dependent, high-avidity interaction and ability to form large complexes. Unexpectedly, CRP binding to ES-62 failed to efficiently activate complement as far as the C3 convertase stage in comparison with PCh-BSA and PCh-containing Streptococcus pneumoniae cell wall polysaccharide. C1q capture assays demonstrated an ES-62-CRP-C1q interaction in serum. The three ligands all activated C1 and generated C4b to similar extents. However, a C2a active site was not generated following ES-62 binding to CRP, demonstrating that C2 cleavage was far less efficient for ES-62-containing complexes. We proposed that failure of C2 cleavage was due to the flexible nature of carbohydrate-bound PCh and that reduced proximity of the C1 complex was the reason that C2 was poorly cleaved. This was confirmed using synthetic analogues that were similar to ES-62 only in respect of having a flexible PCh. Furthermore, ES-62 was shown to deplete early complement components, such as the rate-limiting C4, following CRP interaction and thereby inhibit classical pathway activation. Thus, flexible PCh-glycan represents a novel mechanism for subversion of complement activation. These data illustrate the importance of the rate-limiting C4/C2 stage of complement activation and reveal a new addition to the repertoire of ES-62 immunomodulatory mechanisms with possible therapeutic applications. PMID:27044740

  16. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Nakano

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm–oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm–oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  17. Binding of Sperm to the Zona Pellucida Mediated by Sperm Carbohydrate-Binding Proteins is not Species-Specific in Vitro between Pigs and Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuya; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Uchida, Yasuomi; Kanai-Kitayama, Saeko; Suzuki, Reiichiro; Sato, Reiko; Toma, Kazunori; Geshi, Masaya; Akagi, Satoshi; Nakano, Minoru; Yonezawa, Naoto

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates are candidates for the basis of species-selective interaction of gametes during mammalian fertilization. In this study, we sought to clarify the roles of sugar residues in the species-selective, sperm-oocyte interaction in pigs and cattle. Acrosome-intact porcine and bovine sperm exhibited their strongest binding affinities for β-Gal and α-Man residues, respectively. Porcine-sperm specificity changed from β-Gal to α-Man after the acrosome reaction, while bovine-sperm specificity did not. Binding of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm decreased after trypsinization, indicating that the carbohydrate-binding components are proteins. While immature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm, oocytes matured in vitro bound similar numbers of homologous and heterologous sperm. Lectin staining revealed the aggregation of α-Man residues on the outer surface of the porcine zona during maturation. In both species, zona-free, mature oocytes bound homologous sperm preferentially to heterologous sperm. The lectin-staining patterns of the zona pellucida and zona-free oocytes coincided with the carbohydrate-binding specificities of acrosome-intact and acrosome-reacted sperm, respectively, supporting the involvement of carbohydrates in gamete recognition in pigs and cattle. These results also indicate that sperm-zona pellucida and sperm-oolemma bindings are not strictly species-specific in pigs and cattle, and further suggest that sperm penetration into the zona and/or fusion with oolemma may be species-specific between pigs and cattle.

  18. Carbohydrate-Binding Non-Peptidic Pradimicins for the Treatment of Acute Sleeping Sickness in Murine Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Acosta, Víctor M.; Ruiz-Pérez, Luis M.; Reichardt, Niels C.; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Liekens, Sandra; Balzarini, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments available for African sleeping sickness or human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) are limited, with poor efficacy and unacceptable safety profiles. Here, we report a new approach to address treatment of this disease based on the use of compounds that bind to parasite surface glycans leading to rapid killing of trypanosomes. Pradimicin and its derivatives are non-peptidic carbohydrate-binding agents that adhere to the carbohydrate moiety of the parasite surface glycoproteins inducing parasite lysis in vitro. Notably, pradimicin S has good pharmaceutical properties and enables cure of an acute form of the disease in mice. By inducing resistance in vitro we have established that the composition of the sugars attached to the variant surface glycoproteins are critical to the mode of action of pradimicins and play an important role in infectivity. The compounds identified represent a novel approach to develop drugs to treat HAT. PMID:27662652

  19. Targeting the Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii Cell Wall Using Lectins: Study of the Carbohydrate-Binding Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Pamella de Brito Ximenes; Eduardo Isidoro Carneiro Beltrão; Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira Macêdo; Maria Daniela Silva Buonafina; Reginaldo Gonçalves de Lima-Neto; Rejane Pereira Neves

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii is considered to be the major cause of cryptococcosis in immunosuppressed patients. Understanding cell wall glycoproteins using lectins is of medical interest and can contribute to specific therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the carbohydrates on the cell wall of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii clinical isolates, using a fluorescein isothiocyanate-lectin binding protocol. Thirty yeast strains stocked in the culture collection were cultivated ...

  20. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig; Bennett, Eric P; Mandel, Ulla; Takeuchi, Hideyuki; Kato, Kentaro; Irimura, Tatsuro; Suryanarayanan, Ganesh; Hollingsworth, Michael A; Clausen, Henrik

    2007-04-01

    Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has not been previously presented. Here, we report the direct carbohydrate binding of two GalNAc-transferase lectin domains, GalNAc-T4 and GalNAc-T2, representing isoforms reported to have distinct glycopeptide activity (GalNAc-T4) and isoforms without apparent distinct GalNAc-glycopeptide specificity (GalNAc-T2). Both lectins exhibited specificity for binding of free GalNAc. Kinetic and time-course analysis of GalNAc-T2 demonstrated that the lectin domain did not affect transfer to initial glycosylation sites, but selectively modulated velocity of transfer to subsequent sites and affected the number of acceptor sites utilized. The results suggest that GalNAc-transferase lectins serve to modulate the kinetic properties of the enzymes in the late stages of the initiation process of O-glycosylation to accomplish dense or complete O-glycan occupancy.

  1. Binding Sites for Acylated Trehalose Analogs of Glycolipid Ligands on an Extended Carbohydrate Recognition Domain of the Macrophage Receptor Mincle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Hadar; Rambaruth, Neela D. S.; Jégouzo, Sabine A. F.; Jacobsen, Kristian M.; Djurhuus, Rasmus; Poulsen, Thomas B.; Weis, William I.; Taylor, Maureen E.; Drickamer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    The macrophage receptor mincle binds to trehalose dimycolate on the surface of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Signaling initiated by this interaction leads to cytokine production, which underlies the ability of mycobacteria to evade the immune system and also to function as adjuvants. In previous work the mechanism for binding of the sugar headgroup of trehalose dimycolate to mincle has been elucidated, but the basis for enhanced binding to glycolipid ligands, in which hydrophobic substituents are attached to the 6-hydroxyl groups, has been the subject of speculation. In the work reported here, the interaction of trehalose derivatives with bovine mincle has been probed with a series of synthetic mimics of trehalose dimycolate in binding assays, in structural studies by x-ray crystallography, and by site-directed mutagenesis. Binding studies reveal that, rather than reflecting specific structural preference, the apparent affinity of mincle for ligands with hydrophobic substituents correlates with their overall size. Structural and mutagenesis analysis provides evidence for interaction of the hydrophobic substituents with multiple different portions of the surface of mincle and confirms the presence of three Ca2+-binding sites. The structure of an extended portion of the extracellular domain of mincle, beyond the minimal C-type carbohydrate recognition domain, also constrains the way the binding domains may interact on the surface of macrophages. PMID:27542410

  2. Structural motif screening reveals a novel, conserved carbohydrate-binding surface in the pathogenesis-related protein PR-5d

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffatt Barbara A

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aromatic amino acids play a critical role in protein-glycan interactions. Clusters of surface aromatic residues and their features may therefore be useful in distinguishing glycan-binding sites as well as predicting novel glycan-binding proteins. In this work, a structural bioinformatics approach was used to screen the Protein Data Bank (PDB for coplanar aromatic motifs similar to those found in known glycan-binding proteins. Results The proteins identified in the screen were significantly associated with carbohydrate-related functions according to gene ontology (GO enrichment analysis, and predicted motifs were found frequently within novel folds and glycan-binding sites not included in the training set. In addition to numerous binding sites predicted in structural genomics proteins of unknown function, one novel prediction was a surface motif (W34/W36/W192 in the tobacco pathogenesis-related protein, PR-5d. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the surface motif is exclusive to a subfamily of PR-5 proteins from the Solanaceae family of plants, and is absent completely in more distant homologs. To confirm PR-5d's insoluble-polysaccharide binding activity, a cellulose-pulldown assay of tobacco proteins was performed and PR-5d was identified in the cellulose-binding fraction by mass spectrometry. Conclusions Based on the combined results, we propose that the putative binding site in PR-5d may be an evolutionary adaptation of Solanaceae plants including potato, tomato, and tobacco, towards defense against cellulose-containing pathogens such as species of the deadly oomycete genus, Phytophthora. More generally, the results demonstrate that coplanar aromatic clusters on protein surfaces are a structural signature of glycan-binding proteins, and can be used to computationally predict novel glycan-binding proteins from 3 D structure.

  3. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R.; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B.; Dauter, Zbigniew; O' Keefe, Barry R.; Wlodawer, Alexander (NCI)

    2010-10-28

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  4. Mutational analysis of the pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate lectin, PP2 reveals Ser-104 is crucial for carbohydrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbili, Kishore Babu; Bandari, Shyam; Grobe, Kay; Swamy, Musti J

    2014-07-18

    The pumpkin phloem lectin (PP2) is an RNA-binding, defense-related, chitooligosaccharide-specific, homodimeric lectin of Mr 48 kDa expressed at high concentrations in the sieve elements and companion cells of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima). In the present study, PP2 was expressed in the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris with the Saccharomyces α-factor sequence to direct the recombinant protein into the secretory pathway as a prerequisite for unimpaired folding and posttranslational glycosylation of recombinant PP2. Previous computational modeling and ligand docking studies predicted a putative chitooligosaccharide-binding site on the PP2 surface, which was divided into three subsites, with two amino acid residues in each subsite identified as possible candidates for interaction with chitooligosaccharides (CHOs). In this work, mutational analysis and hemagglutination assays were employed to verify the role of the predicted residues in the carbohydrate binding activity of the protein. The results obtained revealed that mutation of Ser-104 to Ala (S104A) at subsite-2 resulted in about 90% loss of agglutination activity of the protein, indicating that Ser-104 is crucial for the binding of CHOs to PP2. Also, L100A (at subsite-1) and K200A (at subsite-3) independently decreased the lectin activity by about 40%, indicating that these two residues also contribute significantly to sugar binding by PP2. Together, these findings confirm that all the three subsites contribute to varying degrees toward PP2-carbohydrate interaction, and confirm the validity of the computational model, as proposed earlier. PMID:24950405

  5. Digestion and Interaction of Starches with α-Amylases: I. Mutational analysis of Carbohydrate Binding Sites in barley. II. In Vitro Starch Digestion of Legumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch

    2006-01-01

    pancreatic α-amylase. The degradation of insoluble polysaccharides by glycoside hydrolases is relative inefficient as the polysaccharide chains often are barely inaccessible to the active site of the enzymes. Many raw starch-degrading enzymes contain secondary carbohydrate binding sites on the catalytic...... domain or on separate starch binding domains. AMY1 is so far the simplest enzyme known to possess two distinct carbohydrate surface binding sites (here called starch binding site 1 and 2, in short: SBS1 and SBS2). The substrate binding cleft of AMY1 is composed of two aglycone and seven glycone binding...... subsites, of which subsite –6 (key residue: Y105) is characterized by having the highest binding affinity and being situated at the opposite end of the enzyme molecule of SBS2 at a distance of 60 Å. SBS1 (key residues: W278 and W279) and SBS2 (key residues: Y380 and H395) along with the high affinity...

  6. Molecular cloning and expression of the carbohydrate response element binding protein gene and related genes involved in hepatic lipogenesis during post-hatch development of broiler chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) are known to be key regulators of glucose metabolism and lipid synthesis in mammals. Responding to changes in the level of glucose (ChREBP) and insulin (SREBP-1c), these two transcripti...

  7. Solid phase measurements of antibody and lectin binding to xenogenic carbohydrate antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; André, Sabine; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2004-01-01

    -Galalpha1 antibodies that both have been raised against glycans on rabbit red blood cells may recognize Galalpha-antigens with varying specificities. Binding results obtained after digestion with alpha-galactosidase indicate that some xenoreactive Galalpha groups are not directly accessible for removal......OBJECTIVES: In future pig-to-man xenotransplantation it is important to master tools that identify potentially xenogenic alphagalactose (Galalpha) antigens in the doner tissue. DESIGN AND METHODS: We have measured the binding potentials of Galalpha detecting lectins and antibodies, including...... and neoglycoproteins were treated with alpha-galactosidase and subsequently incubated with antibodies and lectins. The enzyme treatment was more deleterious on antibody binding than on lectin binding. CONCLUSION: Antibodies and lectins may bind to different galactose determinants on the glycoproteins. Two anti...

  8. A new zinc binding fold underlines the versatility of zinc binding modules in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Belinda K; Matthews, Jacqueline M; Kwan, Ann H Y; Newton, Anthea; Gell, David A; Crossley, Merlin; Mackay, Joel P

    2002-05-01

    Many different zinc binding modules have been identified. Their abundance and variety suggests that the formation of zinc binding folds might be relatively common. We have determined the structure of CH1(1), a 27-residue peptide derived from the first cysteine/histidine-rich region (CH1) of CREB binding protein (CBP). This peptide forms a highly ordered zinc-dependent fold that is distinct from known folds. The structure differs from a subsequently determined structure of a larger region from the CH3 region of CBP, and the CH1(1) fold probably represents a nonphysiologically active form. Despite this, the fold is thermostable and tolerant to both multiple alanine mutations and changes in the zinc-ligand spacing. Our data support the idea that zinc binding domains may arise frequently. Additionally, such structures may prove useful as scaffolds for protein design, given their stability and robustness.

  9. A photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag for the facile release of a photo-crosslinked carbohydrate-binding protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Tsung-Che; Adak, Avijit K; Lin, Ting-Wei; Li, Pei-Jhen; Chen, Yi-Ju; Lai, Chain-Hui; Liang, Chien-Fu; Chen, Yu-Ju; Lin, Chun-Cheng

    2016-03-15

    The use of photo-crosslinking glycoprobes represents a powerful strategy for the covalent capture of labile protein complexes and allows detailed characterization of carbohydrate-mediated interactions. The selective release of target proteins from solid support is a key step in functional proteomics. We envisaged that light activation can be exploited for releasing labeled protein in a dual photo-affinity probe-based strategy. To investigate this possibility, we designed a trifunctional, galactose-based, multivalent glycoprobe for affinity labeling of carbohydrate-binding proteins. The resulting covalent protein-probe adduct is attached to a photo-cleavable biotin affinity tag; the biotin moiety enables specific presentation of the conjugate on streptavidin-coated beads, and the photolabile linker allows the release of the labeled proteins. This dual probe promotes both the labeling and the facile cleavage of the target protein complexes from the solid surfaces and the remainder of the cell lysate in a completely unaltered form, thus eliminating many of the common pitfalls associated with traditional affinity-based purification methods.

  10. Conservation of carbohydrate binding interfaces: evidence of human HBGA selection in norovirus evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human noroviruses are the major viral pathogens of epidemic acute gastroenteritis. These genetically diverse viruses comprise two major genogroups (GI and GII and approximately 30 genotypes. Noroviruses recognize human histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs in a diverse, strain-specific manner. Recently the crystal structures of the HBGA-binding interfaces of the GI Norwalk virus and the GII VA387 have been determined, which allows us to examine the genetic and structural relationships of the HBGA-binding interfaces of noroviruses with variable HBGA-binding patterns. Our hypothesis is that, if HBGAs are the viral receptors necessary for norovirus infection and spread, their binding interfaces should be under a selection pressure in the evolution of noroviruses. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Structural comparison of the HBGA-binding interfaces of the two noroviruses has revealed shared features but significant differences in the location, sequence composition, and HBGA-binding modes. On the other hand, the primary sequences of the HBGA-binding interfaces are highly conserved among strains within each genogroup. The roles of critical residues within the binding sites have been verified by site-directed mutagenesis followed by functional analysis of strains with variable HBGA-binding patterns. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that the human HBGAs are an important factor in norovirus evolution. Each of the two major genogroups represents an evolutionary lineage characterized by distinct genetic traits. Functional convergence of strains with the same HBGA targets subsequently resulted in acquisition of analogous HBGA binding interfaces in the two genogroups that share an overall structural similarity, despite their distinct locations and amino acid compositions. On the other hand, divergent evolution may have contributed to the observed overall differences between and within the two lineages. Thus, both divergent and convergent

  11. An efficient arabinoxylan-debranching α-L-arabinofuranosidase of family GH62 from Aspergillus nidulans contains a secondary carbohydrate binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Casper; Andersen, Susan; Petersen, Bent O; Li, An; Busse-Wicher, Marta; Birch, Johnny; Cockburn, Darrell; Nakai, Hiroyuki; Christensen, Hans E M; Kragelund, Birthe B; Dupree, Paul; McCleary, Barry; Hindsgaul, Ole; Hachem, Maher Abou; Svensson, Birte

    2016-07-01

    An α-L-arabinofuranosidase of GH62 from Aspergillus nidulans FGSC A4 (AnAbf62A-m2,3) has an unusually high activity towards wheat arabinoxylan (WAX) (67 U/mg; k cat = 178/s, K m = 4.90 mg/ml) and arabinoxylooligosaccharides (AXOS) with degrees of polymerisation (DP) 3-5 (37-80 U/mg), but about 50 times lower activity for sugar beet arabinan and 4-nitrophenyl-α-L-arabinofuranoside. α-1,2- and α-1,3-linked arabinofuranoses are released from monosubstituted, but not from disubstituted, xylose in WAX and different AXOS as demonstrated by NMR and polysaccharide analysis by carbohydrate gel electrophoresis (PACE). Mutants of the predicted general acid (Glu(188)) and base (Asp(28)) catalysts, and the general acid pK a modulator (Asp(136)) lost 1700-, 165- and 130-fold activities for WAX. WAX, oat spelt xylan, birchwood xylan and barley β-glucan retarded migration of AnAbf62A-m2,3 in affinity electrophoresis (AE) although the latter two are neither substrates nor inhibitors. Trp(23) and Tyr(44), situated about 30 Å from the catalytic site as seen in an AnAbf62A-m2,3 homology model generated using Streptomyces thermoviolaceus SthAbf62A as template, participate in carbohydrate binding. Compared to wild-type, W23A and W23A/Y44A mutants are less retarded in AE, maintain about 70 % activity towards WAX with K i of WAX substrate inhibition increasing 4-7-folds, but lost 77-96 % activity for the AXOS. The Y44A single mutant had less effect, suggesting Trp(23) is a key determinant. AnAbf62A-m2,3 seems to apply different polysaccharide-dependent binding modes, and Trp(23) and Tyr(44) belong to a putative surface binding site which is situated at a distance of the active site and has to be occupied to achieve full activity. PMID:26946172

  12. Capacitance-modulated transistor detects odorant binding protein chiral interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Mohammad Yusuf; Tuccori, Elena; Magliulo, Maria; Lattanzi, Gianluca; Palazzo, Gerardo; Persaud, Krishna; Torsi, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral events in olfaction involve odorant binding proteins (OBPs) whose role in the recognition of different volatile chemicals is yet unclear. Here we report on the sensitive and quantitative measurement of the weak interactions associated with neutral enantiomers differentially binding to OBPs immobilized through a self-assembled monolayer to the gate of an organic bio-electronic transistor. The transduction is remarkably sensitive as the transistor output current is governed by the small capacitance of the protein layer undergoing minute changes as the ligand-protein complex is formed. Accurate determination of the free-energy balances and of the capacitance changes associated with the binding process allows derivation of the free-energy components as well as of the occurrence of conformational events associated with OBP ligand binding. Capacitance-modulated transistors open a new pathway for the study of ultra-weak molecular interactions in surface-bound protein-ligand complexes through an approach that combines bio-chemical and electronic thermodynamic parameters.

  13. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira;

    2015-01-01

    of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering...

  14. Exploring the interactions between bacteriophage-encoded glycan binding proteins and carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, David J; Sacher, Jessica C; Szymanski, Christine M

    2015-10-01

    There is an unprecedented interest in glycobiology due to the increasing appreciation of its impact on all aspects of life. Likewise, bacteriophage biology is enjoying a new renaissance as the post-antibiotic era fuels the search for novel ways to control harmful bacteria. Phages have spent the last 3 billion years developing ways of recognizing and manipulating bacterial surface glycans. Therefore, phages comprise a massive reservoir of glycan-binding and -hydrolyzing proteins with the potential to be exploited for glycan analysis, bacterial diagnostics and therapeutics. We discuss phage tail proteins that recognize bacterial surface polysaccharides, endolysins that bind and cleave peptidoglycan, Ig-like proteins that attach to mucin glycans, and phage effector proteins that recognize both bacterial and eukaryotic oligosaccharides.

  15. Metabolic inhibition of galectin-1-binding carbohydrates accentuates anti-tumor immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Cedeno-Laurent, Filiberto; Opperman, Matthew; Barthel, Steven R.; Hays, Danielle; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; He, Xiaoying; Matta, Khushi L.; Supko, Jeffrey G; Frank, Markus H; Murphy, George F.; Dimitroff, Charles J

    2011-01-01

    Galectin-1 (Gal-1) has been shown to play a major role in tumor immune escape by inducing apoptosis of effector leukocytes and correlating with tumor aggressiveness and disease progression. Targeting the Gal-1 – Gal-1 ligand axis, thus, represents a promising cancer therapeutic approach. Here, to test the Gal-1-mediated tumor immune evasion hypothesis and demonstrate the importance of Gal-1-binding N-acetyllactosamines in controlling the fate and function of anti-tumor immune cells, we treate...

  16. Modulation of carbohydrate residues in regenerative nodules and neoplasms of canine and feline pancreas.

    OpenAIRE

    Skutelsky, E.; Alroy, J.; Ucci, A. A.; Carpenter, J.L.; Moore, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    The glycoconjugates of regenerative acinar cells, acinic cell carcinomas, islet cell tumors, and normal canine and feline pancreas were studied. The authors used biotinylated lectins as probes and avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex as visualant to identify and to compare the distribution of carbohydrate residues on paraffin sections from 74 cases. The findings demonstrate a difference in the staining pattern between normal acinar, islet, and ductal cells in each species and small differences in...

  17. Carbohydrate Microarrays in Plant Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fangel, Jonatan Ulrik; Pedersen, H.L.; Vidal-Melgosa, S.;

    2012-01-01

    Almost all plant cells are surrounded by glycan-rich cell walls, which form much of the plant body and collectively are the largest source of biomass on earth. Plants use polysaccharides for support, defense, signaling, cell adhesion, and as energy storage, and many plant glycans are also important...... industrially and nutritionally. Understanding the biological roles of plant glycans and the effective exploitation of their useful properties requires a detailed understanding of their structures, occurrence, and molecular interactions. Microarray technology has revolutionized the massively high...... for plant research and can be used to map glycan populations across large numbers of samples to screen antibodies, carbohydrate binding proteins, and carbohydrate binding modules and to investigate enzyme activities....

  18. A computational approach for exploring carbohydrate recognition by lectins in innate immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark eAgostino

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of pathogen-associated carbohydrates by a broad range of carbohydrate binding proteins is central to both adaptive and innate immunity. A large functionally diverse group of mammalian carbohydrate binding proteins are lectins, which often display calcium-dependent carbohydrate interactions mediated by one or more carbohydrate recognition domains. We report here the application of molecular docking and site mapping to study carbohydrate recognition by several lectins involved in innate immunity or in modulating adaptive immune responses. It was found that molecular docking programs can identify the correct carbohydrate binding mode, but often have difficulty in ranking it as the best pose. This is largely attributed to the broad and shallow nature of lectin binding sites, and the high flexibility of carbohydrates. Site mapping is very effective at identifying lectin residues involved in carbohydrate recognition, especially with cases that were found to be particularly difficult to characterize via molecular docking. This study highlights the need for alternative strategies to examine carbohydrate-lectin interactions, and specifically demonstrates the potential for mapping methods to extract additional and relevant information from the ensembles of binding poses generated by molecular docking.

  19. In silico analysis of molecular mechanisms of Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced cancer cell death from carbohydrate-binding motif evolution hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qi-Jia; Li, Zi-Yue; Yao, Shun; Ming, Miao; Wang, Shu-Ya; Liu, Bo; Bao, Jin-Ku

    2011-10-01

    Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectins, a superfamily of strictly mannose-binding-specific lectins widespread amongst monotyledonous plants, have drawn a rising attention for their remarkable anti-proliferative and apoptosis-inducing activities toward various types of cancer cells; however, the precise molecular mechanisms by which they induce tumor cell apoptosis are still only rudimentarily understood. Herein, we found that the three conserved motifs "QXDXNXVXY," the mannose-specific binding sites, could mutate at one or more amino acid sites, which might be a driving force for the sequential evolution and thus ultimately leading to the complete disappearance of the three conserved motifs. In addition, we found that the motif evolution could result in the diversification of sugar-binding types that G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins could bind from specific mannose receptors to more types of sugar-containing receptors in cancer cells. Subsequently, we indicated that some sugar-containing receptors such as TNFR1, EGFR, Hsp90, and Hsp70 could block downstream anti-apoptotic or survival signaling pathways, which, in turn, resulted in tumor cell apoptosis. Taken together, our hypothesis that carbohydrate-binding motif evolution may impact the G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectin-induced survival or anti-apoptotic pathways would provide a new perspective for further elucidating the intricate relationships between the carbohydrate-binding specificities and complex molecular mechanisms by which G. nivalis agglutinin-related lectins induce cancer cell death.

  20. Farnesoid X receptor inhibits the transcriptional activity of carbohydrate response element binding protein in human hepatocytes. : Transrepression of ChREBP by FXR

    OpenAIRE

    Caron, Sandrine; Samanez, Carolina Huaman; Dehondt, Hélène; Ploton, Maheul; Briand, Olivier; Lien, Fleur; Dorchies, Emilie; Dumont, Julie; Postic, Catherine; Cariou, Bertrand; Lefebvre, Philippe; Staels, Bart

    2013-01-01

    The glucose-activated transcription factor carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) induces the expression of hepatic glycolytic and lipogenic genes. The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a nuclear bile acid receptor controlling bile acid, lipid, and glucose homeostasis. FXR negatively regulates hepatic glycolysis and lipogenesis in mouse liver. The aim of this study was to determine whether FXR regulates the transcriptional activity of ChREBP in human hepatocytes and to unravel the...

  1. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: Regulation of glucose and fat metabolism in the liver by Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein (ChREBP) and impact of dietary influence

    OpenAIRE

    Elkatry, Haiam Omar Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Deregulationen in der Leberlipidsynthese sind häufig mit Adipositas und Diabetes Typ 2 verbunden und daher ist ein detailliertes Verständnis der beteiligten, regulierenden Stoffwechselwege sehr wichtig, um künftig potentielle therapeutische Targets zu identifizieren. Die Leber ist der wichtigste Ort für den Kohlenhydratstoffwechsel (Glykolyse und Glykogen-Synthese) sowie Triglycerid-Synthese (Lipogenese). Carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) wurden in die Regulation durch ...

  2. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael;

    2016-01-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de....... Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility....

  3. Changes of Mouse Gut Microbiota Diversity and Composition by Modulating Dietary Protein and Carbohydrate Contents: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Eunjung; Kim, Dan-Bi; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Dietary proteins influence colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, depending on their quantity and quality. Here, using pyrosequencing, we compared the fecal microbiota composition in Balb/c mice fed either a normal protein/carbohydrate diet (ND, 20% casein and 68% carbohydrate) or a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet (HPLCD, 30% casein and 57% carbohydrate). The results showed that HPLCD feeding for 2 weeks reduced the diversity and altered the composition of the microbiota compared with the ND mice, ...

  4. Copper at synapse: Release, binding and modulation of neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ambrosi, Nadia; Rossi, Luisa

    2015-11-01

    Over the last decade, a piece of the research studying copper role in biological systems was devoted to unravelling a still elusive, but extremely intriguing, aspect that is the involvement of copper in synaptic function. These studies were prompted to provide a rationale to the finding that copper is released in the synaptic cleft upon depolarization. The copper pump ATP7A, which mutations are responsible for diseases with a prominent neurodegenerative component, seems to play a pivotal role in the release of copper at synapses. Furthermore, it was found that, when in the synaptic cleft, copper can control, directly or indirectly, the activity of the neurotransmitter receptors (NMDA, AMPA, GABA, P2X receptors), thus affecting excitability. In turn, neurotransmission can affect copper trafficking and delivery in neuronal cells. Furthermore, it was reported that copper can also modulate synaptic vesicles trafficking and the interaction between proteins of the secretory pathways. Interestingly, proteins with a still unclear role in neuronal system though associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases (the amyloid precursor protein, APP, the prion protein, PrP, α-synuclein, α-syn) show copper-binding domains. They may act as copper buffer at synapses and participate in the interplay between copper and the neurotransmitters receptors. Given that copper dysmetabolism occurs in several diseases affecting central and peripheral nervous system, the findings on the contribution of copper in synaptic transmission, beside its more consolidate role as a neuronal enzymes cofactor, may open new insights for therapy interventions.

  5. Amino acid sequence and carbohydrate-binding analysis of the N-acetyl-D-galactosamine-specific C-type lectin, CEL-I, from the Holothuroidea, Cucumaria echinata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Matsuo, Noriaki; Shiba, Kouhei; Nishinohara, Shoichi; Yamasaki, Nobuyuki; Sugawara, Hajime; Aoyagi, Haruhiko

    2002-01-01

    CEL-I is one of the Ca2+-dependent lectins that has been isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This protein is composed of two identical subunits held by a single disulfide bond. The complete amino acid sequence of CEL-I was determined by sequencing the peptides produced by proteolytic fragmentation of S-pyridylethylated CEL-I. A subunit of CEL-I is composed of 140 amino acid residues. Two intrachain (Cys3-Cys14 and Cys31-Cys135) and one interchain (Cys36) disulfide bonds were also identified from an analysis of the cystine-containing peptides obtained from the intact protein. The similarity between the sequence of CEL-I and that of other C-type lectins was low, while the C-terminal region, including the putative Ca2+ and carbohydrate-binding sites, was relatively well conserved. When the carbohydrate-binding activity was examined by a solid-phase microplate assay, CEL-I showed much higher affinity for N-acetyl-D-galactosamine than for other galactose-related carbohydrates. The association constant of CEL-I for p-nitrophenyl N-acetyl-beta-D-galactosaminide (NP-GalNAc) was determined to be 2.3 x 10(4) M(-1), and the maximum number of bound NP-GalNAc was estimated to be 1.6 by an equilibrium dialysis experiment. PMID:11866098

  6. Mining anaerobic digester consortia metagenomes for secreted carbohydrate active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Busk, Peter Kamp; Pilgaard, Bo;

    . To gain insight into both the degradation of the carbohydrates and the various roles of the microbes in the ADs we have mined metagenomes from both types of ADs for glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, polysaccharide lyases, auxiliary activities, and carbohydrate binding modules. The mining...... thermophilic and mesophilic ADs a wide variety of carbohydrate active enzyme functions were discovered in the metagenomic sequencing of the microbial consortia. The most dominating type of glycoside hydrolases were β-glucosidases (up to 27%), α-amylases (up to 10%), α-glucosidases (up to 8%), α......-galactosidases (up to 9%) and β-galactosidases (up to 7%). For carbohydrate esterases the by far most dominating type was acetylxylan esterases (up to 59%) followed by feruloyl esterases (up to 16%). Less than 15 polysaccharide lyases were identified in the different metagenomes and not surprisingly...

  7. Counting carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carb counting; Carbohydrate-controlled diet; Diabetic diet; Diabetes-counting carbohydrates ... goal is not to limit carbohydrates in the diet completely, but to make ... with diabetes can better control their blood sugar if they ...

  8. Ecto-phosphatase activity on the external surface of Rhodnius prolixus salivary glands: modulation by carbohydrates and Trypanosoma rangeli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Suzete A O; Fonseca de Souza, André L; Kiffer-Moreira, Tina; Dick, Claudia F; dos Santos, André L A; Meyer-Fernandes, José R

    2008-05-01

    The salivary glands of insect's vectors are target organs to study the vectors-pathogens interactions. Rhodnius prolixus an important vector of Trypanosoma cruzi can also transmit Trypanosoma rangeli by bite. In the present study we have investigated ecto-phosphatase activity on the surface of R. prolixus salivary glands. Ecto-phosphatases are able to hydrolyze phosphorylated substrates in the extracellular medium. We characterized these ecto-enzyme activities on the salivary glands external surface and employed it to investigate R. prolixus-T. rangeli interaction. Salivary glands present a low level of hydrolytic activity (4.30+/-0.35 nmol p-nitrophenol (p-NP)xh(-1)xgland pair(-1)). The salivary glands ecto-phosphatase activity was not affected by pH variation; and it was insensitive to alkaline inhibitor levamisole and inhibited approximately 50% by inorganic phosphate (Pi). MgCl2, CaCl2 and SrCl2 enhanced significantly the ecto-phosphatase activity detected on the surface of salivary glands. The ecto-phosphatase from salivary glands surface efficiently releases phosphate groups from different phosphorylated amino acids, giving a higher rate of phosphate release when phospho-tyrosine is used as a substrate. This ecto-phosphatase activity was inhibited by carbohydrates as d-galactose and d-mannose. Living short epimastigotes of T. rangeli inhibited salivary glands ecto-phosphatase activity at 75%, while boiled parasites did not. Living long epimastigote forms induced a lower, but significant inhibitory effect on the salivary glands phosphatase activity. Interestingly, boiled long epimastigote forms did not loose the ability to modulate salivary glands phosphatase activity. Taken together, these data suggest a possible role for ecto-phosphatase on the R. prolixus salivary glands-T. rangeli interaction. PMID:18407240

  9. Metabolite Regulation of Nuclear Localization of Carbohydrate-response Element-binding Protein (ChREBP): ROLE OF AMP AS AN ALLOSTERIC INHIBITOR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Shogo; Jung, Hunmin; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Pawlosky, Robert; Takeshima, Tomomi; Lee, Wan-Ru; Sakiyama, Haruhiko; Laxman, Sunil; Wynn, R Max; Tu, Benjamin P; MacMillan, John B; De Brabander, Jef K; Veech, Richard L; Uyeda, Kosaku

    2016-05-13

    The carbohydrate-response element-binding protein (ChREBP) is a glucose-responsive transcription factor that plays an essential role in converting excess carbohydrate to fat storage in the liver. In response to glucose levels, ChREBP is regulated by nuclear/cytosol trafficking via interaction with 14-3-3 proteins, CRM-1 (exportin-1 or XPO-1), or importins. Nuclear localization of ChREBP was rapidly inhibited when incubated in branched-chain α-ketoacids, saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, or 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide. Here, we discovered that protein-free extracts of high fat-fed livers contained, in addition to ketone bodies, a new metabolite, identified as AMP, which specifically activates the interaction between ChREBP and 14-3-3. The crystal structure showed that AMP binds directly to the N terminus of ChREBP-α2 helix. Our results suggest that AMP inhibits the nuclear localization of ChREBP through an allosteric activation of ChREBP/14-3-3 interactions and not by activation of AMPK. AMP and ketone bodies together can therefore inhibit lipogenesis by restricting localization of ChREBP to the cytoplasm during periods of ketosis. PMID:26984404

  10. Cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* carbohydrate-binding protein of the human rotavirus strain Wa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraschnefski, Mark J.; Scott, Stacy A. [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia); Holloway, Gavan; Coulson, Barbara S.; Itzstein, Mark von [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Blanchard, Helen, E-mail: h.blanchard@griffith.edu.au [Institute for Glycomics, Griffith University (Gold Coast Campus), PMB 50 Gold Coast Mail Centre, Queensland 9726 (Australia)

    2005-11-01

    The carbohydrate-binding component (VP8*{sub 64–223}) of the human Wa rotavirus spike protein has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized in two different crystal forms. X-ray diffraction data have been collected that have enabled determination of the Wa VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement. Rotaviruses exhibit host-specificity and the first crystallographic information on a rotavirus strain that infects humans is reported here. Recognition and attachment to host cells, leading to invasion and infection, is critically linked to the function of the outer capsid spike protein of the rotavirus particle. In some strains the VP8* component of the spike protein is implicated in recognition and binding of sialic-acid-containing cell-surface carbohydrates, thereby enabling infection by the virus. The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of the VP8* core from human Wa rotavirus is reported. Two crystal forms (trigonal P3{sub 2}21 and monoclinic P2{sub 1}) have been obtained and X-ray diffraction data have been collected, enabling determination of the VP8*{sub 64–223} structure by molecular replacement.

  11. Tropomyosin-binding properties modulate competition between tropomodulin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpan, Mert; Moroz, Natalia A; Gray, Kevin T; Cooper, Dillon A; Diaz, Christian A; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-06-15

    The formation and fine-tuning of cytoskeleton in cells are governed by proteins that influence actin filament dynamics. Tropomodulin (Tmod) regulates the length of actin filaments by capping the pointed ends in a tropomyosin (TM)-dependent manner. Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 are associated with the cytoskeleton of non-muscle cells and their expression has distinct consequences on cell morphology. To understand the molecular basis of differences in the function and localization of Tmod isoforms in a cell, we compared the actin filament-binding abilities of Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 in the presence of Tpm3.1, a non-muscle TM isoform. Tmod3 displayed preferential binding to actin filaments when competing with other isoforms. Mutating the second or both TM-binding sites of Tmod3 destroyed its preferential binding. Our findings clarify how Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 compete for binding actin filaments. Different binding mechanisms and strengths of Tmod isoforms for Tpm3.1 contribute to their divergent functional capabilities.

  12. Tropomyosin-binding properties modulate competition between tropomodulin isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpan, Mert; Moroz, Natalia A; Gray, Kevin T; Cooper, Dillon A; Diaz, Christian A; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-06-15

    The formation and fine-tuning of cytoskeleton in cells are governed by proteins that influence actin filament dynamics. Tropomodulin (Tmod) regulates the length of actin filaments by capping the pointed ends in a tropomyosin (TM)-dependent manner. Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 are associated with the cytoskeleton of non-muscle cells and their expression has distinct consequences on cell morphology. To understand the molecular basis of differences in the function and localization of Tmod isoforms in a cell, we compared the actin filament-binding abilities of Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 in the presence of Tpm3.1, a non-muscle TM isoform. Tmod3 displayed preferential binding to actin filaments when competing with other isoforms. Mutating the second or both TM-binding sites of Tmod3 destroyed its preferential binding. Our findings clarify how Tmod1, Tmod2 and Tmod3 compete for binding actin filaments. Different binding mechanisms and strengths of Tmod isoforms for Tpm3.1 contribute to their divergent functional capabilities. PMID:27091317

  13. Changes of Mouse Gut Microbiota Diversity and Composition by Modulating Dietary Protein and Carbohydrate Contents: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunjung; Kim, Dan-Bi; Park, Jae-Yong

    2016-03-01

    Dietary proteins influence colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, depending on their quantity and quality. Here, using pyrosequencing, we compared the fecal microbiota composition in Balb/c mice fed either a normal protein/carbohydrate diet (ND, 20% casein and 68% carbohydrate) or a high-protein/low-carbohydrate diet (HPLCD, 30% casein and 57% carbohydrate). The results showed that HPLCD feeding for 2 weeks reduced the diversity and altered the composition of the microbiota compared with the ND mice, which included a decrease in the proportion of the family Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae and increases in the proportions of the genus Bacteroides and Parabacteroides, especially the species EF09600_s and EF604598_s. Similar changes were reported in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and in mouse models of CRC and colitis, respectively. This suggests that HPLCD may lead to a deleterious luminal environment and may have adverse effects on the intestinal health of individuals consuming such a diet. PMID:27069907

  14. Tropomodulin isoforms utilize specific binding functions to modulate dendrite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kevin T; Suchowerska, Alexandra K; Bland, Tyler; Colpan, Mert; Wayman, Gary; Fath, Thomas; Kostyukova, Alla S

    2016-06-01

    Tropomodulins (Tmods) cap F-actin pointed ends and have altered expression in the brain in neurological diseases. The function of Tmods in neurons has been poorly studied and their role in neurological diseases is entirely unknown. In this article, we show that Tmod1 and Tmod2, but not Tmod3, are positive regulators of dendritic complexity and dendritic spine morphology. Tmod1 increases dendritic branching distal from the cell body and the number of filopodia/thin spines. Tmod2 increases dendritic branching proximal to the cell body and the number of mature dendritic spines. Tmods utilize two actin-binding sites and two tropomyosin (Tpm)-binding sites to cap F-actin. Overexpression of Tmods with disrupted Tpm-binding sites indicates that Tmod1 and Tmod2 differentially utilize their Tpm- and actin-binding sites to affect morphology. Disruption of Tmod1's Tpm-binding sites abolished the overexpression phenotype. In contrast, overexpression of the mutated Tmod2 caused the same phenotype as wild type overexpression. Proximity ligation assays indicate that the mutated Tmods are shuttled similarly to wild type Tmods. Our data begins to uncover the roles of Tmods in neural development and the mechanism by which Tmods alter neural morphology. These observations in combination with altered Tmod expression found in several neurological diseases also suggest that dysregulation of Tmod expression may be involved in the pathology of these diseases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27126680

  15. The carboxy-terminal domain of Dictyostelium C-module-binding factor is an independent gene regulatory entity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Lucas

    Full Text Available The C-module-binding factor (CbfA is a multidomain protein that belongs to the family of jumonji-type (JmjC transcription regulators. In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, CbfA regulates gene expression during the unicellular growth phase and multicellular development. CbfA and a related D. discoideum CbfA-like protein, CbfB, share a paralogous domain arrangement that includes the JmjC domain, presumably a chromatin-remodeling activity, and two zinc finger-like (ZF motifs. On the other hand, the CbfA and CbfB proteins have completely different carboxy-terminal domains, suggesting that the plasticity of such domains may have contributed to the adaptation of the CbfA-like transcription factors to the rapid genome evolution in the dictyostelid clade. To support this hypothesis we performed DNA microarray and real-time RT-PCR measurements and found that CbfA regulates at least 160 genes during the vegetative growth of D. discoideum cells. Functional annotation of these genes revealed that CbfA predominantly controls the expression of gene products involved in housekeeping functions, such as carbohydrate, purine nucleoside/nucleotide, and amino acid metabolism. The CbfA protein displays two different mechanisms of gene regulation. The expression of one set of CbfA-dependent genes requires at least the JmjC/ZF domain of the CbfA protein and thus may depend on chromatin modulation. Regulation of the larger group of genes, however, does not depend on the entire CbfA protein and requires only the carboxy-terminal domain of CbfA (CbfA-CTD. An AT-hook motif located in CbfA-CTD, which is known to mediate DNA binding to A+T-rich sequences in vitro, contributed to CbfA-CTD-dependent gene regulatory functions in vivo.

  16. Functional equivalence of an evolutionarily conserved RNA binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Melissa L; Hicks, Stephanie N; Perera, Lalith; Blackshear, Perry J

    2015-10-01

    Members of the tristetraprolin (TTP) family of proteins participate in the regulation of mRNA turnover after initially binding to AU-rich elements in target mRNAs. Related proteins from most groups of eukaryotes contain a conserved tandem zinc finger (TZF) domain consisting of two closely spaced, similar CCCH zinc fingers that form the primary RNA binding domain. There is considerable sequence variation within the TZF domains from different family members within a single organism and from different organisms, raising questions about sequence-specific effects on RNA binding and decay promotion. We hypothesized that TZF domains from evolutionarily distant species are functionally interchangeable. The single family member expressed in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Zfs1, promotes the turnover of several dozen transcripts, some of which are involved in cell-cell interactions. Using knockin techniques, we replaced the TZF domain of S. pombe Zfs1 with the equivalent domains from human TTP and the single family member proteins expressed in the silkworm Bombyx mori, the pathogenic yeast Candida guilliermondii, and the plant Chromolaena odorata. We found that the TZF domains from these widely disparate species could completely substitute for the native S. pombe TZF domain, as determined by measurement of target transcript levels and the flocculation phenotype characteristic of Zfs1 deletion. Recombinant TZF domain peptides from several of these species bound to an AU-rich RNA oligonucleotide with comparably high affinity. We conclude that the TZF domains from TTP family members in these evolutionarily widely divergent species are functionally interchangeable in mRNA binding and decay. PMID:26292216

  17. The heparin-binding site in tetranectin is located in the N-terminal region and binding does not involve the carbohydrate recognition domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentsen, R H; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Caterer, N R;

    2000-01-01

    Tetranectin is a homotrimeric plasma and extracellular-matrix protein that binds plasminogen and complex sulphated polysaccharides including heparin. In terms of primary and tertiary structure, tetranectin is related to the collectin family of Ca(2+)-binding C-type lectins. Tetranectin is encoded...

  18. Role of the carbohydrate-binding sites of griffithsin in the prevention of DC-SIGN-mediated capture and transmission of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Hoorelbeke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The glycan-targeting C-type DC-SIGN lectin receptor is implicated in the transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV by binding the virus and transferring the captured HIV-1 to CD4(+ T lymphocytes. Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs have been reported to block HIV-1 infection. We have now investigated the potent mannose-specific anti-HIV CBA griffithsin (GRFT on its ability to inhibit the capture of HIV-1 to DC-SIGN, its DC-SIGN-directed transmission to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes and the role of the three carbohydrate-binding sites (CBS of GRFT in these processes. FINDINGS: GRFT inhibited HIV-1(IIIB infection of CEM and HIV-1(NL4.3 infection of C8166 CD4(+ T-lymphocytes at an EC50 of 0.059 and 0.444 nM, respectively. The single mutant CBS variants of GRFT (in which a key Asp in one of the CBS was mutated to Ala were about ∼20 to 60-fold less potent to prevent HIV-1 infection and ∼20 to 90-fold less potent to inhibit syncytia formation in co-cultures of persistently HIV-1 infected HuT-78 and uninfected C8166 CD4(+ T-lymphocytes. GRFT prevents DC-SIGN-mediated virus capture and HIV-1 transmission to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes at an EC50 of 1.5 nM and 0.012 nM, respectively. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR studies revealed that wild-type GRFT efficiently blocked the binding between DC-SIGN and immobilized gp120, whereas the point mutant CBS variants of GRFT were ∼10- to 15-fold less efficient. SPR-analysis also demonstrated that wild-type GRFT and its single mutant CBS variants have the capacity to expel bound gp120 from the gp120-DC-SIGN complex in a dose dependent manner, a property that was not observed for HHA, another mannose-specific potent anti-HIV-1 CBA. CONCLUSION: GRFT is inhibitory against HIV gp120 binding to DC-SIGN, efficiently prevents DC-SIGN-mediated transfer of HIV-1 to CD4(+ T-lymphocytes and is able to expel gp120 from the gp120-DC-SIGN complex. Functionally intact CBS of GRFT are important for the optimal action of

  19. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael; Roy, Virginie; Favier, Maryline; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille

    2016-05-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de novo lipogenesis. Here, we identify a termite orthologue of ChREBP and its downstream lipogenic targets, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase. We show that all of these genes, including ChREBP, are upregulated in mature queens compared with kings, sterile workers and soldiers in eight different termite species. ChREBP is expressed in several tissues, including ovaries and fat bodies, and increases in expression in totipotent workers during their differentiation into neotenic mature queens. We further show that ChREBP is regulated by a carbohydrate diet in termite queens. Suppression of the lipogenic pathway by a pharmacological agent in queens elicits the same behavioural alterations in sterile workers as observed in queenless colonies, supporting that the ChREBP pathway partakes in the biosynthesis of semiochemicals that convey the signal of the presence of a fertile queen. Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility. PMID:27249798

  20. The role of the glucose-sensing transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein pathway in termite queen fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillam-Dussès, David; Hanus, Robert; Poulsen, Michael; Roy, Virginie; Favier, Maryline

    2016-01-01

    Termites are among the few animals that themselves can digest the most abundant organic polymer, cellulose, into glucose. In mice and Drosophila, glucose can activate genes via the transcription factor carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) to induce glucose utilization and de novo lipogenesis. Here, we identify a termite orthologue of ChREBP and its downstream lipogenic targets, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase. We show that all of these genes, including ChREBP, are upregulated in mature queens compared with kings, sterile workers and soldiers in eight different termite species. ChREBP is expressed in several tissues, including ovaries and fat bodies, and increases in expression in totipotent workers during their differentiation into neotenic mature queens. We further show that ChREBP is regulated by a carbohydrate diet in termite queens. Suppression of the lipogenic pathway by a pharmacological agent in queens elicits the same behavioural alterations in sterile workers as observed in queenless colonies, supporting that the ChREBP pathway partakes in the biosynthesis of semiochemicals that convey the signal of the presence of a fertile queen. Our results highlight ChREBP as a likely key factor for the regulation and signalling of queen fertility. PMID:27249798

  1. 碳水化合物反应元件结合蛋白的研究进展%Research Progress on Carbohydrate Response Element Binding Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐慧; 付茂忠; 潘志雄; 王继文; 易军; 王淮; 易礼胜; 邓由飞; 甘佳; 俄木曲者

    2013-01-01

    Glycolipid metabolism is the foundation of the energy sources of normal growth and development in human and animals,directly affects the animal lipid traits,therefore it has become the breakthrough point of cultivating high quality livestock and poultry breed. Carbohydrate response element binding protein(ChREBP) plays an important role in regulation of animal glycolipid metabolism in recent years,especially in major site of glycolipid metabolism-liver. In this review,the author summarised the structure characteristics,tissue distributions,mechanism of glucose-responsive,biological functions,gene expression regulation of ChREBP,and it might provide theoretical basis for following research.%糖脂代谢是人和动物正常生长发育的能源基础,这将直接影响着动物的脂质性状,因此糖脂代谢目前已经成为培育优质畜禽品种的切入点.近年来,发现碳水化合物反应元件结合蛋白(carbohydrate response element binding protein,ChREBP)在调控动物糖脂代谢中具有重要的作用,特别在糖脂代谢的主要场所——肝脏中对糖脂代谢发挥着关键作用.作者就ChREBP的结构特征、组织分布、葡萄糖应答机制、生物学功能、表达调控等方面作一综述,以期为今后的研究提供理论依据.

  2. Coordinate regulation/localization of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP) by two nuclear export signal sites: Discovery of a new leucine-rich nuclear export signal site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is responsible for conversion of dietary carbohydrate to storage fat in liver by coordinating expression of the enzymes that channel glycolytic pyruvate into lipogenesis. The activation of ChREBP in response to high glucose is nuclear localization and transcription, and the inactivation of ChREBP under low glucose involves export from the nucleus to the cytosol. Here we report a new nuclear export signal site ('NES1') of ChREBP. Together these signals provide ChREBP with two NES sequences, both the previously reported NES2 and now the new NES1 coordinate to interact together with CRM1 (exportin) for nuclear export of the carbohydrate response element binding protein.

  3. Endogenous dopamine (DA) modulates (3H)spiperone binding in vivo in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, S.; Krauss, J.; Grunenwald, C.; Gunst, F.; Heinrich, M.; Schaub, M.; Stoecklin, K.V.; Vassout, A.; Waldmeier, P.; Maitre, L. (Research Department, CIBA-GEIGY Ltd., Basel (Switzerland))

    1991-01-01

    (3H)spiperone (SPI) binding in vivo, biochemical parameters and behavior were measured after modulating DA levels by various drug treatments. DA releasers and uptake inhibitors increased SPI binding in rat striatum. In other brain areas, the effects were variable, but only the pituitary remained unaffected. Surprisingly, nomifensine decreased SPI binding in frontal cortex. The effects of these drugs were monitored by measuring DA, serotonin (5-HT) and their metabolites in the same rats. The increased SPI binding in striatum was parallel to the locomotor stimulation with the following rank order: amfonelic acid greater than nomifensine greater than D-amphetamine greater than or equal to methylphenidate greater than amineptine greater than bupropion. Decreasing DA levels with reserpine or alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine reduced SPI binding by 45% in striatum only when both drugs were combined. In contrast, reserpine enhanced SPI binding in pituitary. Thus, the amount of releasable DA seems to modulate SPI binding characteristics. It is suggested that in vivo, DA receptors are submitted to dynamic regulation in response to changes in intrasynaptic concentrations of DA.

  4. Structural basis for entropy-driven cellulose binding by a type-A cellulose-binding module (CBM) and bacterial expansin

    OpenAIRE

    Georgelis, Nikolaos; Yennawar, Neela H.; Cosgrove, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Components of modular cellulases, type-A cellulose-binding modules (CBMs) bind to crystalline cellulose and enhance enzyme effectiveness, but structural details of the interaction are uncertain. We analyzed cellulose binding by EXLX1, a bacterial expansin with ability to loosen plant cell walls and whose domain D2 has type-A CBM characteristics. EXLX1 strongly binds to crystalline cellulose via D2, whereas its affinity for soluble cellooligosaccharides is weak. Calorimetry indicated cellulose...

  5. Carbohydrate Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemiller, James N.

    Carbohydrates are important in foods as a major source of energy, to impart crucial textural properties, and as dietary fiber which influences physiological processes. Digestible carbohydrates, which are converted into monosaccharides, which are absorbed, provide metabolic energy. Worldwide, carbohydrates account for more than 70% of the caloric value of the human diet. It is recommended that all persons should limit calories from fat (the other significant source) to not more than 30% and that most of the carbohydrate calories should come from starch. Nondigestible polysaccharides (all those other than starch) comprise the major portion of dietary fiber (Sect. 10.5). Carbohydrates also contribute other attributes, including bulk, body, viscosity, stability to emulsions and foams, water-holding capacity, freeze-thaw stability, browning, flavors, aromas, and a range of desirable textures (from crispness to smooth, soft gels). They also provide satiety. Basic carbohydrate structures, chemistry, and terminology can be found in references (1, 2).

  6. Binding of modulators to mouse and human multidrug resistance P-glycoprotein. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Gabriel E; Vera, D Mariano A; Pierini, Adriana B

    2013-11-01

    The human multidrug resistance (MDR) P-glycoprotein (P-gp) mediates the extrusion of chemotherapeutic drugs from cancer cells. Modulators are relevant pharmaceutical targets since they are intended to control or to inhibit its pumping activity. In the present work, a common binding site for Rhodamine 123 and modulators with different modulation activity was found by molecular docking over the crystal structure of the mouse P-gp. The modulators involved a family of compounds, including derivatives of propafenone (3-phenylpropiophenone nucleus) and XR9576 (tariquidar). Our results showed that the relative binding energies estimated by molecular docking were in good correlation with the experimental activities. Preliminary classical molecular dynamics results on selected P-gp/modulator complexes were also performed in order to understand the nature of the prevalent molecular interactions and the possible main molecular features that characterize a modulator. Besides, the results obtained with a human P-gp homology model from the mouse structure are also presented and analyzed. Our observations suggest that the hydrophobicity and molecular flexibility are the main features related to the inhibitory activity. The latter factor would increase the modulator ability to fit the aromatic rings inside the transmembrane domain. PMID:24095875

  7. Carbohydrate-active enzymes from pigmented Bacilli: a genomic approach to assess carbohydrate utilization and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrissat Bernard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Spore-forming Bacilli are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in a variety of natural habitats, including soil, water and the gastro-intestinal (GI-tract of animals. Isolates of various Bacillus species produce pigments, mostly carotenoids, with a putative protective role against UV irradiation and oxygen-reactive forms. Results We report the annotation of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes of two pigmented Bacilli isolated from the human GI-tract and belonging to the Bacillus indicus and B. firmus species. A high number of glycoside hydrolases (GHs and carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs were found in both isolates. A detailed analysis of CAZyme families, was performed and supported by growth data. Carbohydrates able to support growth as the sole carbon source negatively effected carotenoid formation in rich medium, suggesting that a catabolite repression-like mechanism controls carotenoid biosynthesis in both Bacilli. Experimental results on biofilm formation confirmed genomic data on the potentials of B. indicus HU36 to produce a levan-based biofilm, while mucin-binding and -degradation experiments supported genomic data suggesting the ability of both Bacilli to degrade mammalian glycans. Conclusions CAZy analyses of the genomes of the two pigmented Bacilli, compared to other Bacillus species and validated by experimental data on carbohydrate utilization, biofilm formation and mucin degradation, suggests that the two pigmented Bacilli are adapted to the intestinal environment and are suited to grow in and colonize the human gut.

  8. Carbohydrate Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csernus, Marilyn

    Carbohydrate loading is a frequently used technique to improve performance by altering an athlete's diet. The objective is to increase glycogen stored in muscles for use in prolonged strenuous exercise. For two to three days, the athlete consumes a diet that is low in carbohydrates and high in fat and protein while continuing to exercise and…

  9. Characterization of an endo-processive-type xyloglucanase having a β-1,4-glucan-binding module and an endo-type xyloglucanase from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Hitomi; Araki, Yuko; Michikawa, Mari; Harazono, Koichi; Yaoi, Katsuro; Karita, Shuichi; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2012-11-01

    We cloned two glycoside hydrolase family 74 genes, the sav_1856 gene and the sav_2574 gene, from Streptomyces avermitilis NBRC14893 and characterized the resultant recombinant proteins. The sav_1856 gene product (SaGH74A) consisted of a catalytic domain and a family 2 carbohydrate-binding module at the C terminus, while the sav_2574 gene product (SaGH74B) consisted of only a catalytic domain. SaGH74A and SaGH74B were expressed successfully and had molecular masses of 92 and 78 kDa, respectively. Both recombinant proteins were xyloglucanases. SaGH74A had optimal activity at 60°C and pH 5.5, while SaGH74B had optimal activity at 55°C and pH 6.0. SaGH74A was stable over a broad pH range (pH 4.5 to 9.0), whereas SaGH74B was stable over a relatively narrow pH range (pH 6.0 to 6.5). Analysis of the hydrolysis products of tamarind xyloglucan and xyloglucan-derived oligosaccharides indicated that SaGH74A was endo-processive, while SaGH74B was a typical endo-enzyme. The C terminus of SaGH74A, which was annotated as a carbohydrate-binding module, bound to β-1,4-linked glucan-containing soluble polysaccharides such as hydroxyethyl cellulose, barley glucan, and xyloglucan. PMID:22941084

  10. Sepsis as a modulator of adaptation to low and high carbohydrate and low and high fat intakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, R R

    1999-04-01

    Catabolism of lean body mass (particularly muscle) occurs in sepsis and other forms of critical illness despite apparently adequate nutritional support. The determination of the optimal balance of carbohydrate and fat intake in this circumstance should be based on the resulting effect on the maintenance of lean body mass, and the nature and extent of any side effects. The general stress response involves a disruption in normal glucoregulation, in that hepatic glucose production is accelerated and the normal blood glucose lowering action of insulin is diminished. Nonetheless, the capacity to oxidize glucose once inside the cells is not impaired. Lipolysis, or the breakdown of peripheral triglycerides to free fatty acids (FFA) and glycerol, is accelerated in critical illness, to a greater extent than fat oxidation. Provision of exogenous fat maintains fat stores, but has minimal effect on the direct oxidation of plasma FFA. From the results of oxidation studies, it seems that about 5 mg kg x min of glucose can be readily oxidized, and the balance of energy will be supplied by the oxidation of fat, either endogenous or exogenous. However, an additional consideration in determining the optimal caloric substrate is that insulin is a potent anabolic hormone and stimulates muscle protein synthesis. Consequently, provision of exogenous insulin enhances retention of muscle. This procedure dictates that almost all non-protein calories be provided as carbohydrate to avoid hypoglycemia. Preliminary studies suggest this may be the optimal approach in critically ill patients. Glucose and fatty acids are the major energy substrates in the body. The oxidative metabolism of these substrates provides the ATP needed for physiological function, including protein synthesis. Over the past 20 y, development of new techniques in nutritional support have made it possible to provide large amounts of carbohydrate and fat to critically-ill patients, along with protein or amino acids. However

  11. Broad antiviral activity of carbohydrate-binding agents against the four serotypes of dengue virus in monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marijke M F Alen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dendritic cells (DC, present in the skin, are the first target cells of dengue virus (DENV. Dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN is present on DC and recognizes N-glycosylation sites on the E-glycoprotein of DENV. Thus, the DC-SIGN/E-glycoprotein interaction can be considered as an important target for inhibitors of viral replication. We evaluated various carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs against all four described serotypes of DENV replication in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in monocyte-derived DC (MDDC. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A dose-dependent anti-DENV activity of the CBAs Hippeastrum hybrid (HHA, Galanthus nivalis (GNA and Urtica dioica (UDA, but not actinohivin (AH was observed against all four DENV serotypes as analyzed by flow cytometry making use of anti-DENV antibodies. Remarkably, the potency of the CBAs against DENV in MDDC cultures was significantly higher (up to 100-fold than in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. Pradimicin-S (PRM-S, a small-size non-peptidic CBA, exerted antiviral activity in MDDC but not in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells. The CBAs act at an early step of DENV infection as they bind to the viral envelope of DENV and subsequently prevent virus attachment. Only weak antiviral activity of the CBAs was detected when administered after the virus attachment step. The CBAs were also able to completely prevent the cellular activation and differentiation process of MDDC induced upon DENV infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CBAs exerted broad spectrum antiviral activity against the four DENV serotypes, laboratory-adapted viruses and low passage clinical isolates, evaluated in Raji/DC-SIGN(+ cells and in primary MDDC.

  12. Sensitivity of transmitted and founder human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelopes to carbohydrate-binding agents griffithsin, cyanovirin-N and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bodan; Du, Tao; Li, Chang; Luo, Sukun; Liu, Yalan; Huang, Xin; Hu, Qinxue

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission often results from infection by a single transmitted/founder (T/F) virus. Here, we investigated the sensitivity of T/F HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs) to microbicide candidate carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) griffithsin (GRFT), cyanovirin-N (CV-N) and Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA), showing that T/F Envs demonstrated different sensitivity to CBAs, with IC50 values ranging from 0.006 ± 0.0003 to >10 nM for GRFT, from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 28.9 ± 2.9 nM for CV-N and from 1.3 ± 0.2 to >500 nM for GNA. We further revealed that deglycosylation at position 295 or 448 decreased the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT, and at 339 to both CV-N and GNA. Mutation of all the three glcyans rendered a CBA-sensitive T/F Env largely resistant to GRFT, indicating that the sensitivity of T/F Env to GRFT is mainly determined by glycans at 295, 339 and 448. Our study identified specific T/F Env residues associated with CBA sensitivity.

  13. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the carbohydrate-binding region of the Streptococcus gordonii adhesin GspB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyburn, Tasia M.; Yankovskaya, Victoria; Bensing, Barbara A.; Cecchini, Gary; Sullam, Paul M.; Iverson, T.M. (VA); (Vanderbilt); (UCSF)

    2012-07-11

    The carbohydrate-binding region of the bacterial adhesin GspB from Streptococcus gordonii strain M99 (GspB{sub BR}) was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using affinity and size-exclusion chromatography. Separate sparse-matrix screening of GspB{sub BR} buffered in either 20 mM Tris pH 7.4 or 20 mM HEPES pH 7.5 resulted in different crystallographic behavior such that different precipitants, salts and additives supported crystallization of GspB{sub BR} in each buffer. While both sets of conditions supported crystal growth in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, the crystals had distinct unit-cell parameters of a = 33.3, b = 86.7, c = 117.9 {angstrom} for crystal form 1 and a = 34.6, b = 98.3, c = 99.0 {angstrom} for crystal form 2. Additive screening improved the crystals grown in both conditions such that diffraction extended to beyond 2 {angstrom} resolution. A complete data set has been collected to 1.3 {angstrom} resolution with an overall R{sub merge} value of 0.04 and an R{sub merge} value of 0.33 in the highest resolution shell.

  14. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eghorn, Laura Friis; Høstgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth Thermann;

    2014-01-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate...... whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive...... conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed...

  15. The Microtubule-Associated Protein END BINDING1 Modulates Membrane Trafficking Pathways in Plant Root Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shahidi, Saeid

    2013-01-01

    EB1 protein preferentially binds to the fast growing ends of microtubules where it regulates microtubule dynamics. In addition to microtubules, EB1 interacts with several additional proteins, and through these interactions modulates various cellular processes. Arabidopsis thaliana eb1 mutants have roots that exhibit aberrant responses to touch/gravity cues. Columella cells in the centre of the root cap are polarized and play key roles in these responses by functioning as sensors.I examined th...

  16. Carbohydrate malabsorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J; Nordgaard-Andersen, I; Gudmand-Høyer, E

    1994-01-01

    Previous studies in small series of healthy adults have suggested that parallel measurement of hydrogen and methane resulting from gut fermentation may improve the precision of quantitative estimates of carbohydrate malabsorption. Systematic, controlled studies of the role of simultaneous hydrogen...

  17. Calcium modulates promoter occupancy by the Entamoeba histolytica Ca2+-binding transcription factor URE3-BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Leo, Megan; Line, C Genghis; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A

    2003-02-14

    The Entamoeba histolytica upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) binds to the URE3 sequence of the Gal/GalNAc-inhibitable lectin hgl5 and ferredoxin 1 (fdx) gene promoters. This binding can be inhibited in vitro by addition of calcium. Two EF-hand motifs, which are associated with the ability to bind calcium, are present in the amino acid sequence of URE3-BP. Mutation of the second EF-hand motif in URE3-BP resulted in the loss of calcium inhibition of DNA binding as monitored by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that URE3-BP was physically bound to the hgl5 and fdx promoters in vivo. Parasite intracellular calcium concentrations were altered by changes in extracellular calcium. Promoter occupancy was lost when intracellular calcium levels were increased by coordinate increases in extracellular calcium. Increased intracellular calcium also resulted in decreased levels of URE3-BP mRNA. Together these results demonstrate that changes in extracellular calcium result in changes in URE3-BP mRNA and in the ability of URE3-BP to bind to URE3-containing promoters. Modulation of URE3-BP by calcium may represent an important mechanism of control of gene expression in E. histolytica.

  18. Molecular docking characterizes substrate-binding sites and efflux modulation mechanisms within P-glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ricardo J; Ferreira, Maria-José U; dos Santos, Daniel J V A

    2013-07-22

    P-Glycoprotein (Pgp) is one of the best characterized ABC transporters, often involved in the multidrug-resistance phenotype overexpressed by several cancer cell lines. Experimental studies contributed to important knowledge concerning substrate polyspecificity, efflux mechanism, and drug-binding sites. This information is, however, scattered through different perspectives, not existing a unifying model for the knowledge available for this transporter. Using a previously refined structure of murine Pgp, three putative drug-binding sites were hereby characterized by means of molecular docking. The modulator site (M-site) is characterized by cross interactions between both Pgp halves herein defined for the first time, having an important role in impairing conformational changes leading to substrate efflux. Two other binding sites, located next to the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer, were identified as the substrate-binding H and R sites by matching docking and experimental results. A new classification model with the ability to discriminate substrates from modulators is also proposed, integrating a vast number of theoretical and experimental data. PMID:23802684

  19. Imatinib binding to human serum albumin modulates heme association and reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Muzio, Elena; Polticelli, Fabio; Trezza, Viviana; Fanali, Gabriella; Fasano, Mauro; Ascenzi, Paolo

    2014-10-15

    Imatinib, an inhibitor of the Bcr-Abl tyrosine kinase, is approximately 95% bound to plasma proteins, α1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) being the primary carrier. However, human serum albumin (HSA) may represent the secondary carrier of imatinib in pathological states characterized by low AGP levels, such as pancreatic cancer, hepatic cirrhosis, hepatitis, hyperthyroidism, nephrotic syndrome, malnutrition, and cachexia. Here, thermodynamics of imatinib binding to full-length HSA and its recombinant Asp1-Glu382 truncated form (containing only the FA1, FA2, FA6, and FA7 binding sites; trHSA), in the absence and presence of ferric heme (heme-Fe(III)), and the thermodynamics of heme-Fe(III) binding to HSA and trHSA, in the absence and presence of imatinib, has been investigated. Moreover, the effect of imatinib on kinetics of peroxynitrite detoxification by ferric human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(III)) and ferric truncated human serum heme-albumin (trHSA-heme-Fe(III)) has been explored. All data were obtained at pH 7.0, and 20.0 °C and 37.0 °C. Imatinib binding to the FA7 site of HSA and trHSA inhibits allosterically heme-Fe(III) association to the FA1 site and vice versa, according to linked functions. Moreover, imatinib binding to the secondary FA2 site of HSA-heme-Fe(III) inhibits allosterically peroxynitrite detoxification. Docking simulations and local structural comparison with other imatinib-binding proteins support functional data indicating the preferential binding of imatinib to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA, and to the FA2 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(III). Present results highlight the allosteric coupling of the FA1, FA2, and FA7 sites of HSA, and may be relevant in modulating ligand binding and reactivity properties of HSA in vivo. PMID:25057771

  20. Reciprocal allosteric modulation of carbon monoxide and warfarin binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Bocedi

    Full Text Available Human serum albumin (HSA, the most abundant protein in human plasma, could be considered as a prototypic monomeric allosteric protein, since the ligand-dependent conformational adaptability of HSA spreads beyond the immediate proximity of the binding site(s. As a matter of fact, HSA is a major transport protein in the bloodstream and the regulation of the functional allosteric interrelationships between the different binding sites represents a fundamental information for the knowledge of its transport function. Here, kinetics and thermodynamics of the allosteric modulation: (i of carbon monoxide (CO binding to ferrous human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe(II by warfarin (WF, and (ii of WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II by CO are reported. All data were obtained at pH 7.0 and 25°C. Kinetics of CO and WF binding to the FA1 and FA7 sites of HSA-heme-Fe(II, respectively, follows a multi-exponential behavior (with the same relative percentage for the two ligands. This can be accounted for by the existence of multiple conformations and/or heme-protein axial coordination forms of HSA-heme-Fe(II. The HSA-heme-Fe(II populations have been characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy, indicating the coexistence of different species characterized by four-, five- and six-coordination of the heme-Fe atom. As a whole, these results suggest that: (i upon CO binding a conformational change of HSA-heme-Fe(II takes place (likely reflecting the displacement of an endogenous ligand by CO, and (ii CO and/or WF binding brings about a ligand-dependent variation of the HSA-heme-Fe(II population distribution of the various coordinating species. The detailed thermodynamic and kinetic analysis here reported allows a quantitative description of the mutual allosteric effect of CO and WF binding to HSA-heme-Fe(II.

  1. Vina-Carb: Improving Glycosidic Angles during Carbohydrate Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivedha, Anita K; Thieker, David F; Makeneni, Spandana; Hu, Huimin; Woods, Robert J

    2016-02-01

    Molecular docking programs are primarily designed to align rigid, drug-like fragments into the binding sites of macromolecules and frequently display poor performance when applied to flexible carbohydrate molecules. A critical source of flexibility within an oligosaccharide is the glycosidic linkages. Recently, Carbohydrate Intrinsic (CHI) energy functions were reported that attempt to quantify the glycosidic torsion angle preferences. In the present work, the CHI-energy functions have been incorporated into the AutoDock Vina (ADV) scoring function, subsequently termed Vina-Carb (VC). Two user-adjustable parameters have been introduced, namely, a CHI- energy weight term (chi_coeff) that affects the magnitude of the CHI-energy penalty and a CHI-cutoff term (chi_cutoff) that negates CHI-energy penalties below a specified value. A data set consisting of 101 protein-carbohydrate complexes and 29 apoprotein structures was used in the development and testing of VC, including antibodies, lectins, and carbohydrate binding modules. Accounting for the intramolecular energies of the glycosidic linkages in the oligosaccharides during docking led VC to produce acceptable structures within the top five ranked poses in 74% of the systems tested, compared to a success rate of 55% for ADV. An enzyme system was employed in order to illustrate the potential application of VC to proteins that may distort glycosidic linkages of carbohydrate ligands upon binding. VC represents a significant step toward accurately predicting the structures of protein-carbohydrate complexes. Furthermore, the described approach is conceptually applicable to any class of ligands that populate well-defined conformational states. PMID:26744922

  2. Insights into the modulation of dopamine transporter function by amphetamine, orphenadrine and cocaine binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Hongying Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Human dopamine transporter (hDAT regulates dopaminergic signaling in the central nervous system by maintaining the synaptic concentration of dopamine (DA at physiological levels, upon reuptake of DA into presynaptic terminals. DA translocation involves the co-transport of two sodium ions and the channeling of a chloride ion, and it is achieved via alternating access between outward-facing and inward-facing states of DAT. hDAT is a target for addictive drugs such as cocaine, amphetamine (AMPH and therapeutic antidepressants. Our recent quantitative systems pharmacology study suggested that orphenadrine (ORPH, an anticholinergic agent and anti-PD drug, might be repurposable as a DAT drug. Previous studies have shown that DAT-substrates like AMPH or -blockers like cocaine modulate the function of DAT in different ways. However, the molecular mechanisms of modulation remained elusive due to the lack of structural data on DAT. The newly resolved DAT structure from Drosophila melanogaster opens the way to a deeper understanding of the mechanism and time evolution of DAT-drug/ligand interactions. Using a combination of homology modeling, docking analysis, molecular dynamics simulations and molecular biology experiments, we performed a comparative study of the binding properties of DA, AMPH, ORPH and cocaine, and their modulation of hDAT function. Simulations demonstrate that binding DA or AMPH drives a structural transition towards a functional form predisposed to translocate the ligand. In contrast, ORPH appears to inhibit DAT function by arresting it in the outward-facing open conformation. The analysis shows that cocaine and ORPH competitively bind DAT, with the binding pose and affinity dependent on the conformational state of DAT. Further assays show that the effect of ORPH on DAT uptake and endocytosis is comparable to that of cocaine.

  3. Insights into the Modulation of Dopamine Transporter Function by Amphetamine, Orphenadrine, and Cocaine Binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Mary Hongying; Block, Ethan; Hu, Feizhuo; Cobanoglu, Murat Can; Sorkin, Alexander; Bahar, Ivet

    2015-01-01

    Human dopamine (DA) transporter (hDAT) regulates dopaminergic signaling in the central nervous system by maintaining the synaptic concentration of DA at physiological levels, upon reuptake of DA into presynaptic terminals. DA translocation involves the co-transport of two sodium ions and the channeling of a chloride ion, and it is achieved via alternating access between outward-facing (OF) and inward-facing states of DAT. hDAT is a target for addictive drugs, such as cocaine, amphetamine (AMPH), and therapeutic antidepressants. Our recent quantitative systems pharmacology study suggested that orphenadrine (ORPH), an anticholinergic agent and anti-Parkinson drug, might be repurposable as a DAT drug. Previous studies have shown that DAT-substrates like AMPH or -blockers like cocaine modulate the function of DAT in different ways. However, the molecular mechanisms of modulation remained elusive due to the lack of structural data on DAT. The newly resolved DAT structure from Drosophila melanogaster opens the way to a deeper understanding of the mechanism and time evolution of DAT-drug/ligand interactions. Using a combination of homology modeling, docking analysis, molecular dynamics simulations, and molecular biology experiments, we performed a comparative study of the binding properties of DA, AMPH, ORPH, and cocaine and their modulation of hDAT function. Simulations demonstrate that binding DA or AMPH drives a structural transition toward a functional form predisposed to translocate the ligand. In contrast, ORPH appears to inhibit DAT function by arresting it in the OF open conformation. The analysis shows that cocaine and ORPH competitively bind DAT, with the binding pose and affinity dependent on the conformational state of DAT. Further assays show that the effect of ORPH on DAT uptake and endocytosis is comparable to that of cocaine. PMID:26106364

  4. Binding of histone H1 to DNA is differentially modulated by redox state of HMGB1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Polanská

    Full Text Available HMGB1 is an architectural protein in chromatin, acting also as a signaling molecule outside the cell. Recent reports from several laboratories provided evidence that a number of both the intracellular and extracellular functions of HMGB1 may depend on redox-sensitive cysteine residues of the protein. In this study we demonstrate that redox state of HMGB1 can significantly modulate the ability of the protein to bind and bend DNA, as well as to promote DNA end-joining. We also report a high affinity binding of histone H1 to hemicatenated DNA loops and DNA minicircles. Finally, we show that reduced HMGB1 can readily displace histone H1 from DNA, while oxidized HMGB1 has limited capacity for H1 displacement. Our results suggested a novel mechanism for the HMGB1-mediated modulation of histone H1 binding to DNA. Possible biological consequences of linker histones H1 replacement by HMGB1 for the functioning of chromatin are discussed.

  5. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation in the Binding of Modulators at Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor GluA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Christian; Francotte, Pierre; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    The 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide type of positive allosteric modulators of the ionotropic glutamate receptor A2 (GluA2) are promising lead compounds for the treatment of cognitive disorders, e.g., Alzheimer’s disease. The modulators bind in a cleft formed by the interface of two neighboring...

  6. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu;

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  7. Understanding Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low-calorie sweeteners are also called artificial sweeteners, sugar substitutes or non-nutritive sweeteners. They can be used to sweeten food and drinks for less calories and carbohydrate when they replace sugar. Sugar and Desserts With diabetes, it's important to ...

  8. Enhanced exo-inulinase activity and stability by fusion of an inulin-binding module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shun-Hua; Liu, Yuan; Zhao, Yu-Juan; Chi, Zhe; Chi, Zhen-Ming; Liu, Guang-Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an inulin-binding module from Bacillus macerans was successfully fused to an exo-inulinase from Kluyveromyces marxianus, creating a hybrid functional enzyme. The recombinant exo-inulinase (rINU), the hybrid enzyme (rINUIBM), and the recombinant inulin-binding module (rIBM) were, respectively, heterologously expressed and biochemically characterized. It was found that both the inulinase activity and the catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m(app)) of the rINUIBM were considerably higher than those of rINU. Though the rINU and the rINUIBM shared the same optimum pH of 4.5, the optimum temperature of the rINUIBM (60 °C) was 5 °C higher than that of the rINU. Notably, the fused IBM significantly enhanced both the pH stability and the thermostability of the rINUIBM, suggesting that the rINUIBM obtained would have more extensive potential applications. Furthermore, the fusion of the IBM could substantially improve the inulin-binding capability of the rINUIBM, which was consistent with the determination of the K m(app). This meant that the fused IBM could play a critical role in the recognition of polysaccharides and enhanced the hydrolase activity of the associated inulinase by increasing enzyme-substrate proximity. Besides, the extra supplement of the independent non-catalytic rIBM could also improve the inulinase activity of the rINU. However, this improvement was much better in case of the fusion. Consequently, the IBM could be designated as a multifunctional domain that was responsible for the activity enhancement, the stabilization, and the substrate binding of the rINUIBM. All these features obtained in this study make the rINUIBM become an attractive candidate for an efficient inulin hydrolysis.

  9. Positive allosteric modulation of the GHB high-affinity binding site by the GABAA receptor modulator monastrol and the flavonoid catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eghorn, Laura F; Hoestgaard-Jensen, Kirsten; Kongstad, Kenneth T; Bay, Tina; Higgins, David; Frølund, Bente; Wellendorph, Petrine

    2014-10-01

    γ-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) is a metabolite of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and a proposed neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain. We recently identified α4βδ GABAA receptors as possible high-affinity GHB targets. GABAA receptors are highly sensitive to allosteric modulation. Thus to investigate whether GHB high-affinity binding sites are also sensitive to allosteric modulation, we screened both known GABAA receptor ligands and a library of natural compounds in the rat cortical membrane GHB specific high-affinity [3H]NCS-382 binding assay. Two hits were identified: Monastrol, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA function at δ-containing GABAA receptors, and the naturally occurring flavonoid catechin. These compounds increased [3H]NCS-382 binding to 185-272% in high micromolar concentrations. Monastrol and (+)-catechin significantly reduced [3H]NCS-382 dissociation rates and induced conformational changes in the binding site, demonstrating a positive allosteric modulation of radioligand binding. Surprisingly, binding of [3H]GHB and the GHB high-affinity site-specific radioligands [125I]BnOPh-GHB and [3H]HOCPCA was either decreased or only weakly increased, indicating that the observed modulation was critically probe-dependent. Both monastrol and (+)-catechin were agonists at recombinant α4β3δ receptors expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. When monastrol and GHB were co-applied no changes were seen compared to the individual responses. In summary, we have identified the compounds monastrol and catechin as the first allosteric modulators of GHB high-affinity binding sites. Despite their relatively weak affinity, these compounds may aid in further characterization of the GHB high-affinity sites that are likely to represent certain GABAA receptors.

  10. Various Terpenoids Derived from Herbal and Dietary Plants Function as PPAR Modulators and Regulate Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Goto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Several herbal plants improve medical conditions. Such plants contain many bioactive phytochemicals. Terpenoids (also called “isoprenoids” constitute one of the largest families of natural products accounting for more than 40,000 individual compounds of both primary and secondary metabolisms. In particular, terpenoids are contained in many herbal plants, and several terpenoids have been shown to be available for pharmaceutical applications, for example, artemisinin and taxol as malaria and cancer medicines, respectively. Various terpenoids are contained in many plants for not only herbal use but also dietary use. In this paper, we describe several bioactive terpenoids contained in herbal or dietary plants, which can modulate the activities of ligand-dependent transcription factors, namely, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs. Because PPARs are dietary lipid sensors that control energy homeostasis, daily eating of these terpenoids might be useful for the management for obesity-induced metabolic disorders, such as type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, insulin resistance, and cardiovascular diseases.

  11. It's not my fault: postdictive modulation of intentional binding by monetary gains and losses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Takahata

    Full Text Available Sense of agency refers to the feeling that one's voluntary actions caused external events. Past studies have shown that compression of the subjective temporal interval between actions and external events, called intentional binding, is closely linked to the experience of agency. Current theories postulate that the experience of agency is constructed via predictive and postdictive pathways. One remaining problem is the source of human causality bias; people often make misjudgments on the causality of voluntary actions and external events depending on their rewarding or punishing outcomes. Although human causality bias implies that sense of agency can be modified by post-action information, convincing empirical findings for this issue are lacking. Here, we hypothesized that sense of agency would be modified by affective valences of action outcomes. To examine this issue, we investigated how rewarding and punishing outcomes following voluntary action modulate behavioral measures of agency using intentional binding paradigm and classical conditioning procedures. In the acquisition phase, auditory stimuli were paired with positive, neutral or negative monetary outcomes. Tone-reward associations were evaluated using reaction times and preference ratings. In the experimental session, participants performed a variant of intentional binding task, where participants made timing judgments for onsets of actions and sensory outcomes while playing simple slot games. Our results showed that temporal binding was modified by affective valences of action outcomes. Specifically, intentional binding was attenuated when negative outcome occurred, consistent with self-serving bias. Our study not only provides evidence for postdictive modification of agency, but also proposes a possible mechanism of human causality bias.

  12. A novel flow cytometric HTS assay reveals functional modulators of ATP binding cassette transporter ABCB6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Polireddy

    Full Text Available ABCB6 is a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP-binding cassette family of transporter proteins that is increasingly recognized as a relevant physiological and therapeutic target. Evaluation of modulators of ABCB6 activity would pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the significance of this transport process in tumor cell growth, proliferation and therapy-related drug resistance. In addition, this effort would improve our understanding of the function of ABCB6 in normal physiology with respect to heme biosynthesis, and cellular adaptation to metabolic demand and stress responses. To search for modulators of ABCB6, we developed a novel cell-based approach that, in combination with flow cytometric high-throughput screening (HTS, can be used to identify functional modulators of ABCB6. Accumulation of protoporphyrin, a fluorescent molecule, in wild-type ABCB6 expressing K562 cells, forms the basis of the HTS assay. Screening the Prestwick Chemical Library employing the HTS assay identified four compounds, benzethonium chloride, verteporfin, tomatine hydrochloride and piperlongumine, that reduced ABCB6 mediated cellular porphyrin levels. Validation of the identified compounds employing the hemin-agarose affinity chromatography and mitochondrial transport assays demonstrated that three out of the four compounds were capable of inhibiting ABCB6 mediated hemin transport into isolated mitochondria. However, only verteporfin and tomatine hydrochloride inhibited ABCB6's ability to compete with hemin as an ABCB6 substrate. This assay is therefore sensitive, robust, and suitable for automation in a high-throughput environment as demonstrated by our identification of selective functional modulators of ABCB6. Application of this assay to other libraries of synthetic compounds and natural products is expected to identify novel modulators of ABCB6 activity.

  13. pH modulates the binding of early growth response protein 1 transcription factor to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikles, David C; Bhat, Vikas; Schuchardt, Brett J; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-08-01

    The transcription factor early growth response protein (EGR)1 orchestrates a plethora of signaling cascades involved in cellular homeostasis, and its downregulation has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Herein, using a battery of biophysical tools, we show that the binding of EGR1 to DNA is tightly regulated by solution pH. Importantly, the binding affinity undergoes an enhancement of more than an order of magnitude with an increase in pH from 5 to 8, implying that the deprotonation of an ionizable residue accounts for such behavior. This ionizable residue is identified as His382 by virtue of the fact that its replacement by nonionizable residues abolishes the pH dependence of the binding of EGR1 to DNA. Notably, His382 inserts into the major groove of DNA, and stabilizes the EGR1-DNA interaction via both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals contacts. Remarkably, His382 is mainly conserved across other members of the EGR family, implying that histidine protonation-deprotonation may serve as a molecular switch for modulating the protein-DNA interactions that are central to this family of transcription factors. Collectively, our findings reveal an unexpected but a key step in the molecular recognition of the EGR family of transcription factors, and suggest that they may act as sensors of pH within the intracellular environment. PMID:23718776

  14. Structure-function analysis indicates that sumoylation modulates DNA-binding activity of STAT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grönholm Juha

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background STAT1 is an essential transcription factor for interferon-γ-mediated gene responses. A distinct sumoylation consensus site (ψKxE 702IKTE705 is localized in the C-terminal region of STAT1, where Lys703 is a target for PIAS-induced SUMO modification. Several studies indicate that sumoylation has an inhibitory role on STAT1-mediated gene expression but the molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Results Here, we have performed a structural and functional analysis of sumoylation in STAT1. We show that deconjugation of SUMO by SENP1 enhances the transcriptional activity of STAT1, confirming a negative regulatory effect of sumoylation on STAT1 activity. Inspection of molecular model indicated that consensus site is well exposed to SUMO-conjugation in STAT1 homodimer and that the conjugated SUMO moiety is directed towards DNA, thus able to form a sterical hindrance affecting promoter binding of dimeric STAT1. In addition, oligoprecipitation experiments indicated that sumoylation deficient STAT1 E705Q mutant has higher DNA-binding activity on STAT1 responsive gene promoters than wild-type STAT1. Furthermore, sumoylation deficient STAT1 E705Q mutant displayed enhanced histone H4 acetylation on interferon-γ-responsive promoter compared to wild-type STAT1. Conclusions Our results suggest that sumoylation participates in regulation of STAT1 responses by modulating DNA-binding properties of STAT1.

  15. Preferential binding of allosteric modulators to active and inactive conformational states of metabotropic glutamate receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein-Seetharaman Judith

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs are G protein coupled receptors that play important roles in synaptic plasticity and other neuro-physiological and pathological processes. Allosteric mGluR ligands are particularly promising drug targets because of their modulatory effects – enhancing or suppressing the response of mGluRs to glutamate. The mechanism by which this modulation occurs is not known. Here, we propose the hypothesis that positive and negative modulators will differentially stabilize the active and inactive conformations of the receptors, respectively. To test this hypothesis, we have generated computational models of the transmembrane regions of different mGluR subtypes in two different conformations. The inactive conformation was modeled using the crystal structure of the inactive, dark state of rhodopsin as template and the active conformation was created based on a recent model of the light-activated state of rhodopsin. Ligands for which the nature of their allosteric effects on mGluRs is experimentally known were docked to the modeled mGluR structures using ArgusLab and Autodock softwares. We find that the allosteric ligand binding pockets of mGluRs are overlapping with the retinal binding pocket of rhodopsin, and that ligands have strong preferences for the active and inactive states depending on their modulatory nature. In 8 out of 14 cases (57%, the negative modulators bound the inactive conformations with significant preference using both docking programs, and 6 out of 9 cases (67%, the positive modulators bound the active conformations. Considering results by the individual programs only, even higher correlations were observed: 12/14 (86% and 8/9 (89% for ArgusLab and 10/14 (71% and 7/9 (78% for AutoDock. These findings strongly support the hypothesis that mGluR allosteric modulation occurs via stabilization of different conformations analogous to those identified in rhodopsin where they are induced by

  16. Molecular simulations of carbohydrate-protein complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Eid, Sameh Mansour Abbas

    2013-01-01

    I. Generation and validation of a free-energy model for carbohydrate binding. Carbohy-drates play a key role in a variety of physiological and pathological processes and, hence, represent a rich source for the development of novel therapeutic agents. Being able to predict binding mode and binding affinity is an essential, yet lacking, aspect of the stru-cture-based design of carbohydrate-based ligands. To this end, we assembled a diverse data set of 316 carbohydrate–protein crystal structu...

  17. The lipopolysaccharide-binding protein participating in hemocyte nodule formation in the silkworm Bombyx mori is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with two different tandem carbohydrate-recognition domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koizumi, N; Imamura, M; Kadotani, T; Yaoi, K; Iwahana, H; Sato, R

    1999-01-25

    We recently isolated and characterized the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein, BmLBP, from the larval hemolymph of the silkworm Bombyx mori. BmLBP is a pattern recognition molecule that recognizes the lipid A portion of LPS and participates in a cellular defense reaction. This paper describes the cDNA cloning of BmLBP. The deduced amino acid sequence of BmLBP revealed that BmLBP is a novel member of the C-type lectin superfamily with a unique structural feature that consists of two different carbohydrate-recognition domains in tandem, a short and a long form. PMID:9989592

  18. Carbohydrates Through Animation: Preliminary Step

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.K. Sugai

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Methods of education are changing, so the educational tools must change too. The developmentof the systems of information and communication gave the opportunity to bring new technology tothe learning process. Modern education needs interactive programs that may be available to theacademic community, in order to ease the learning process and sharing of the knowledge. Then,an educational software on Carbohydrates is being developed using concept maps and FLASH-MXanimations program, and approached through six modules. The introduction of Carbohydrates wasmade by the module Carbohydrates on Nature, which shows the animations gures of a teacher andstudents, visiting a farm, identifying the carbohydrates found in vegetables, animals, and microor-ganisms, integrated by links containing short texts to help understanding the structure and functionof carbohydrates. This module was presented, as pilot experiment, to teachers and students, whichdemonstrated satisfaction, and high receptivity, by using animation and interactivitys program asstrategy to biochemistrys education. The present work is part of the project Biochemistry throughanimation, which is having continuity.

  19. Modulation of radioligand binding to the GABA(A)-benzodiazepine receptor complex by a new component from Cyperus rotundus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Lee, Kwang-Youn; Choi, Hyoung-Chul; Cho, Jungsook; Kang, Byung-Soo; Lim, Jae-Chul; Lee, Dong-Ung

    2002-01-01

    Four sesquiterpenes, beta-selinene, isocurcumenol, nootkatone and aristolone and one triterpene, oleanolic acid were isolated from the ethylacetate fraction of the rhizomes of Cyperus rotundus and tested for their ability to modulate gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA(A))-benzodiazepine receptor function by radioligand binding assays using rat cerebrocortical membranes. Among these compounds, only isocurcumenol, one of the newly identified constituents of this plant, was found to inhibit [3H]Ro15-1788 binding and enhance [3H]flunitrazepam binding in the presence of GABA. These results suggest that isocurcumenol may serve as a benzodiazepine receptor agonist and allosterically modulate GABAergic neurotransmission via enhancement of endogenous receptor ligand binding. PMID:11824542

  20. Allosteric enhancers, allosteric agonists and ago-allosteric modulators: where do they bind and how do they act?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Holst, Birgitte

    2007-01-01

    Many small-molecule agonists also display allosteric properties. Such ago-allosteric modulators act as co-agonists, providing additive efficacy--instead of partial antagonism--and they can affect--and often improve--the potency of the endogenous agonist. Surprisingly, the apparent binding sites...... different binding modes. In another, dimeric, receptor scenario, the endogenous agonist binds to one protomer while the ago-allosteric modulator binds to the other, 'allosteric' protomer. It is suggested that testing for ago-allosteric properties should be an integral part of the agonist drug discovery...... process because a compound that acts with--rather than against--the endogenous agonist could be an optimal agonist drug....

  1. Neuronal differentiation modulates the dystrophin Dp71d binding to the nuclear matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The function of dystrophin Dp71 in neuronal cells remains unknown. To approach this issue, we have selected the PC12 neuronal cell line. These cells express both a Dp71f cytoplasmic variant and a Dp71d nuclear isoform. In this study, we demonstrated by electron and confocal microscopy analyses of in situ nuclear matrices and Western blotting evaluation of cell extracts that Dp71d associates with the nuclear matrix. Interestingly, this binding is modulated during NGF-induced neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells with a twofold increment in the differentiated cells, compared to control cells. Also, distribution of Dp71d along the periphery of the nuclear matrix observed in the undifferentiated cells is replaced by intense fluorescent foci localized in Center of the nucleoskeletal structure. In summary, we revealed that Dp71d is a dynamic component of nuclear matrix that might participate in the nuclear modeling occurring during neuronal differentiation

  2. A novel function for the cellulose binding module of cellobiohydrolase I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A homogeneous cellulose-binding module(CBM)of cellobiohydrolase I(CBHI)from Trichoderma pseudokoningii S-38 was obtained by the limited proteolysis with papain and a series of chromatographs filtration.Analysis of FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the structural changes result from a weakening and splitting of the hydrogen bond network in cellulose by the action of CBMCBHI at 40℃for 24 h.The results of molecular dynamic simulations are consistent with the experimental conclusions, and provide a nanoscopic view of the mechanism that strong and medium H-bonds decreased dramatically when CBM was bound to the cellulose surface.The function of CBMCBHI is not only limited to locating intact CBHI in close proximity with cellulose fibrils,but also is involved in the structural disruption at the fibre surface.The present studies provided considerable evidence for the model of the intramolecular synergy between the catalytic domain and their CBMs.

  3. A novel function for the cellulose binding module of cellobiohydrolase I

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG LuShan; ZHANG YuZhong; GAO PeiJi

    2008-01-01

    A homogeneous cellulose-binding module (CBM) of cellobiohydrolase I (CBHI) from Trichoderma pseudokoningii S-38 was obtained by the limited proteolysis with papain and a series of chromato-graphs filtration. Analysis of FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the structural changes result from a weakening and splitting of the hydrogen bond network in cellulose by the action of CBMCBHI at 40℃ for 24 h. The results of molecular dynamic simulations are consistent with the experimental conclusions, and provide a nanoscopic view of the mechanism that strong and medium H-bonds decreased dra-matically when CBM was bound to the cellulose surface. The function of CBMCBHI is not only limited to locating intact CBHI in close proximity with cellulose fibrils, but also is involved in the structural dis-ruption at the fibre surface. The present studies provided considerable evidence for the model of the intramolecular synergy between the catalytic domain and their CBMs.

  4. Comparative analysis of carbohydrate active enzymes in Clostridium termitidis CT1112 reveals complex carbohydrate degradation ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riffat I Munir

    Full Text Available Clostridium termitidis strain CT1112 is an anaerobic, gram positive, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacillus isolated from the gut of the wood-feeding termite, Nasutitermes lujae. It produces biofuels such as hydrogen and ethanol from cellulose, cellobiose, xylan, xylose, glucose, and other sugars, and therefore could be used for biofuel production from biomass through consolidated bioprocessing. The first step in the production of biofuel from biomass by microorganisms is the hydrolysis of complex carbohydrates present in biomass. This is achieved through the presence of a repertoire of secreted or complexed carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes, sometimes organized in an extracellular organelle called cellulosome. To assess the ability and understand the mechanism of polysaccharide hydrolysis in C. termitidis, the recently sequenced strain CT1112 of C. termitidis was analyzed for both CAZymes and cellulosomal components, and compared to other cellulolytic bacteria. A total of 355 CAZyme sequences were identified in C. termitidis, significantly higher than other Clostridial species. Of these, high numbers of glycoside hydrolases (199 and carbohydrate binding modules (95 were identified. The presence of a variety of CAZymes involved with polysaccharide utilization/degradation ability suggests hydrolysis potential for a wide range of polysaccharides. In addition, dockerin-bearing enzymes, cohesion domains and a cellulosomal gene cluster were identified, indicating the presence of potential cellulosome assembly.

  5. Comparative analysis of carbohydrate active enzymes in Clostridium termitidis CT1112 reveals complex carbohydrate degradation ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Riffat I; Schellenberg, John; Henrissat, Bernard; Verbeke, Tobin J; Sparling, Richard; Levin, David B

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium termitidis strain CT1112 is an anaerobic, gram positive, mesophilic, cellulolytic bacillus isolated from the gut of the wood-feeding termite, Nasutitermes lujae. It produces biofuels such as hydrogen and ethanol from cellulose, cellobiose, xylan, xylose, glucose, and other sugars, and therefore could be used for biofuel production from biomass through consolidated bioprocessing. The first step in the production of biofuel from biomass by microorganisms is the hydrolysis of complex carbohydrates present in biomass. This is achieved through the presence of a repertoire of secreted or complexed carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZymes), sometimes organized in an extracellular organelle called cellulosome. To assess the ability and understand the mechanism of polysaccharide hydrolysis in C. termitidis, the recently sequenced strain CT1112 of C. termitidis was analyzed for both CAZymes and cellulosomal components, and compared to other cellulolytic bacteria. A total of 355 CAZyme sequences were identified in C. termitidis, significantly higher than other Clostridial species. Of these, high numbers of glycoside hydrolases (199) and carbohydrate binding modules (95) were identified. The presence of a variety of CAZymes involved with polysaccharide utilization/degradation ability suggests hydrolysis potential for a wide range of polysaccharides. In addition, dockerin-bearing enzymes, cohesion domains and a cellulosomal gene cluster were identified, indicating the presence of potential cellulosome assembly.

  6. Identification and Characterization of the Binding Sites of P-Glycoprotein for Multidrug Resistance-Related Drugs and Modulators

    OpenAIRE

    Safa, Ahmad R.

    2004-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to multiple chemotherapeutic agents in tumor cells. A major mechanism of this multidrug resistance (MDR) is overexpression of the MDR1 product P-glycoprotein, known to bind to and transport a wide variety of agents. This review concentrates on the progress made toward understanding the role of this protein in MDR, identifying and characterizing the drug binding sites of P-glycoprotein, and modulating MDR by P-glycoprotein-sp...

  7. Liver Fatty acid binding protein (L-Fabp) modulates murine stellate cell activation and diet induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Anping; Tang, Youcai; Davis, Victoria; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Kennedy, Susan M; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Newberry, Elizabeth P.; Davidson, Nicholas O.

    2013-01-01

    Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is crucial to the development of fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Quiescent HSCs contain lipid droplets (LDs), whose depletion upon activation induces a fibrogenic gene program. Here we show that liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-Fabp), an abundant cytosolic protein that modulates fatty acid (FA) metabolism in enterocytes and hepatocytes also modulates HSC FA utilization and in turn regulates the fibrogenic program. L-Fabp expression ...

  8. Bacterial Cellulose-Binding Domain Modulates in Vitro Elongation of Different Plant Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpigel, Etai; Roiz, Levava; Goren, Raphael; Shoseyov, Oded

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant cellulose-binding domain (CBD) derived from the cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium cellulovorans was found to modulate the elongation of different plant cells in vitro. In peach (Prunus persica L.) pollen tubes, maximum elongation was observed at 50 μg mL−1 CBD. Pollen tube staining with calcofluor showed a loss of crystallinity in the tip zone of CBD-treated pollen tubes. At low concentrations CBD enhanced elongation of Arabidopsis roots. At high concentrations CBD dramatically inhibited root elongation in a dose-responsive manner. Maximum effect on root hair elongation was at 100 μg mL−1, whereas root elongation was inhibited at that concentration. CBD was found to compete with xyloglucan for binding to cellulose when CBD was added first to the cellulose, before the addition of xyloglucan. When Acetobacter xylinum L. was used as a model system, CBD was found to increase the rate of cellulose synthase in a dose-responsive manner, up to 5-fold compared with the control. Electron microscopy examination of the cellulose ribbons produced by A. xylinum showed that CBD treatment resulted in a splayed ribbon composed of separate fibrillar subunits, compared with a thin, uniform ribbon in the control. PMID:9701575

  9. Carbohydrate Binding Module 74 is a novel starch binding domain associated with large and multi-domain α-amylase enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valk, Vincent; Lammerts van Bueren, Alicia; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2016-01-01

    Microbacterium aurum B8.A is a bacterium that originates from a potato starch-processing plant and employs a GH13 α-amylase (MaAmyA) enzyme that forms pores in potato starch granules. MaAmyA is a large and multi-modular protein that contains a novel domain at its C-terminus (Domain 2). Deletion of D

  10. Modulation of feeding behavior by odorant-binding proteins in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarup, Shilpa; Morozova, Tatiana V; Sridhar, Sruthipriya; Nokes, Michael; Anholt, Robert R H

    2014-02-01

    Nutrient intake and avoidance of toxins are essential for survival and controlled by attractive and aversive feeding responses. Drosophila melanogaster presents one of the best characterized systems for studies on chemosensation, which is mediated by multigene families of chemoreceptors, including olfactory receptors, gustatory receptors, and odorant-binding proteins (OBPs). Although the response profiles of gustatory receptors have been well studied, the contribution of OBPs to food intake is largely unknown. As most aversive ("bitter") tastants are hydrophobic, we hypothesized that OBPs may fulfill an essential function in transporting bitter tastants to gustatory receptors to modulate feeding behavior. Here, we used 16 RNAi lines that inhibit expression of individual target Obp genes and show that OBPs modulate sucrose intake in response to a panel of nine bitter compounds. Similar to their function in olfaction, OBPs appear to interact with bitter compounds in a combinatorial and sex-dependent manner. RNAi-mediated reduction in expression of individual Obp genes resulted either in enhanced or reduced intake of sucrose in the presence of bitter compounds, consistent with roles for OBPs in transporting tastants to bitter taste receptors, sequestering them to limit their access to these receptors, or interacting directly with gustatory neurons that respond to sucrose. PMID:24302688

  11. Changes in BQCA Allosteric Modulation of [(3)H]NMS Binding to Human Cortex within Schizophrenia and by Divalent Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian; Hopper, Shaun; Conn, P Jeffrey; Scarr, Elizabeth

    2016-05-01

    Stimulation of the cortical muscarinic M1 receptor (CHRM1) is proposed as a treatment for schizophrenia, a hypothesis testable using CHRM1 allosteric modulators. Allosteric modulators have been shown to change the activity of CHRMs using cloned human CHRMs and CHRM knockout mice but not human CNS, a prerequisite for them working in humans. Here we show in vitro that BQCA, a positive allosteric CHRM1 modulator, brings about the expected change in affinity of the CHRM1 orthosteric site for acetylcholine in human cortex. Moreover, this effect of BQCA is reduced in the cortex of a subset of subjects with schizophrenia, separated into a discrete population because of a profound loss of cortical [(3)H]pirenzepine binding. Surprisingly, there was no change in [(3)H]NMS binding to the cortex from this subset or those with schizophrenia but without a marked loss of cortical CHRM1. Hence, we explored the nature of [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding to human cortex and showed total [(3)H]pirenzepine and [(3)H]NMS binding was reduced by Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]NMS binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+), acetylcholine displacement of [(3)H]pirenzepine was reduced by Mg(2+) and enhanced by Zn(2+), whereas BQCA effects on [(3)H]NMS, but not [(3)H]pirenzepine, binding was enhanced by Mg(2+) and Zn(2+). These data suggest the orthosteric and allosteric sites on CHRMs respond differently to divalent cations and the effects of allosteric modulation of the cortical CHRM1 is reduced in a subset of people with schizophrenia, a finding that may have ramifications for the use of CHRM1 allosteric modulators in the treatment of schizophrenia.

  12. An in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of small molecule modulators of PDZ-peptide interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Tiwari

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions have important implications in a variety of biological processes including treatment of cancer and Parkinson's disease. Even though experimental studies have reported characterization of peptidomimetic inhibitors of PDZ-peptide interactions, the binding modes for most of them have not been characterized by structural studies. In this study we have attempted to understand the structural basis of the small molecule-PDZ interactions by in silico analysis of the binding modes and binding affinities of a set of 38 small molecules with known K(i or K(d values for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains of PSD-95 protein. These two PDZ domains show differential selectivity for these compounds despite having a high degree of sequence similarity and almost identical peptide binding pockets. Optimum binding modes for these ligands for PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains were identified by using a novel combination of semi-flexible docking and explicit solvent molecular dynamics (MD simulations. Analysis of the binding modes revealed most of the peptidomimectic ligands which had high K(i or K(d moved away from the peptide binding pocket, while ligands with high binding affinities remained in the peptide binding pocket. The differential specificities of the PDZ2 and PDZ3 domains primarily arise from differences in the conformation of the loop connecting βB and βC strands, because this loop interacts with the N-terminal chemical moieties of the ligands. We have also computed the MM/PBSA binding free energy values for these 38 compounds with both the PDZ domains from multiple 5 ns MD trajectories on each complex i.e. a total of 228 MD trajectories of 5 ns length each. Interestingly, computational binding free energies show good agreement with experimental binding free energies with a correlation coefficient of approximately 0.6. Thus our study demonstrates that combined use of docking and MD simulations can help in identification of potent inhibitors

  13. Integrative decomposition procedure and Kappa statistics set up ATF2 ion binding module in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying SUN; Lin WANG; Lei LIU

    2008-01-01

    Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) is a member of the ATF/cyclic AMP-responsive element bind-ing protein family of transcription factors. However, the information concerning ATF2 ion-mediated DNA binding module and function of ATF2 in malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) has never been addressed. In this study, by using GRNInfer and GVedit based on linear pro-gramming and a decomposition procedure, with integrated analysis of the function cluster using Kappa statistics and fuzzy heuristic clustering in MPM, we identified one ATF2 ion-mediated DNA binding module involved in invasive function including ATF2 inhibition to target genes FALZ, C20orf31, NME2, PLOD2, RNF10, and RNASEH1, upstream RNF10 and PLOD2 activation to ATF2, upstream RNASEH1 and FALZ inhibition to ATF2 from 40 MPM tumors and 5 normal pleural tissues. Remarkably, our results showed that the predominant effect of ATF2 occupancy is to suppress the activation of target genes on MPM. Importantly, the ATF2 ion-mediated DNA binding module reflects 'mutual' positive and negative feedback regulation mechanism of ATF2 with up-and down-stream genes. It may be useful for developing novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets in MPM.

  14. A novel fibronectin binding motif in MSCRAMMs targets F3 modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabitha Prabhakaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BBK32 is a surface expressed lipoprotein and fibronectin (Fn-binding microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Previous studies from our group showed that BBK32 is a virulence factor in experimental Lyme disease and located the Fn-binding region to residues 21-205 of the lipoprotein. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Studies aimed at identifying interacting sites between BBK32 and Fn revealed an interaction between the MSCRAMM and the Fn F3 modules. Further analysis of this interaction showed that BBK32 can cause the aggregation of human plasma Fn in a similar concentration-dependent manner to that of anastellin, the superfibronectin (sFn inducing agent. The resulting Fn aggregates are conformationally distinct from plasma Fn as indicated by a change in available thermolysin cleavage sites. Recombinant BBK32 and anastellin affect the structure of Fn matrices formed by cultured fibroblasts and inhibit endothelial cell proliferation similarly. Within BBK32, we have located the sFn-forming activity to a region between residues 160 and 175 which contains two sequence motifs that are also found in anastellin. Synthetic peptides mimicking these motifs induce Fn aggregation, whereas a peptide with a scrambled sequence motif was inactive, suggesting that these motifs represent the sFn-inducing sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that BBK32 induces the formation of Fn aggregates that are indistinguishable from those formed by anastellin. The results of this study provide evidence for how bacteria can target host proteins to manipulate host cell activities.

  15. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitange, Gaspar J.; Mladek, Ann C.; Schroeder, Mark A.; Pokorny, Jenny C.; Carlson, Brett L.; Zhang, Yuji; Nair, Asha A.; Lee, Jeong-Heon; Yan, Huihuang; Decker, Paul A.; Zhang, Zhiguo; Sarkaria, Jann N.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ) sensitivity through coordinate regulation of 2 key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51 and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3). Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51 and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors. PMID:26972001

  16. Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 4 Modulates Temozolomide Sensitivity in Glioblastoma by Regulating DNA Repair Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar J. Kitange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Here we provide evidence that RBBP4 modulates temozolomide (TMZ sensitivity through coordinate regulation of two key DNA repair genes critical for recovery from TMZ-induced DNA damage: methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT and RAD51. Disruption of RBBP4 enhanced TMZ sensitivity, induced synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition, and increased DNA damage signaling in response to TMZ. Moreover, RBBP4 silencing enhanced TMZ-induced H2AX phosphorylation and apoptosis in GBM cells. Intriguingly, RBBP4 knockdown suppressed the expression of MGMT, RAD51, and other genes in association with decreased promoter H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac and increased H3K9 tri-methylation (H3K9me3. Consistent with these data, RBBP4 interacts with CBP/p300 to form a chromatin-modifying complex that binds within the promoter of MGMT, RAD51, and perhaps other genes. Globally, RBBP4 positively and negatively regulates genes involved in critical cellular functions including tumorigenesis. The RBBP4/CBP/p300 complex may provide an interesting target for developing therapy-sensitizing strategies for GBM and other tumors.

  17. Dengue virus utilizes calcium modulating cyclophilin-binding ligand to subvert apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianling; Huang, Rongjie; Liao, Weiyong; Chen, Zhaoni; Zhang, Shijun; Huang, Renbin

    2012-02-24

    Dengue virus (DENV) capsid (C) proteins are the major structural component of virus particles. This study aimed to identify the host interacting partners of DENV C protein that could contribute to viral pathogenesis. DENV C protein was screened against human liver cDNA yeast two-hybrid library. We identified calcium modulating cyclophilin-binding ligand (CAML) as a novel interacting partner of DENV C protein. We report for the first time that CAML influenced DENV production. DENV production was significantly attenuated in CAML knock-down cells at 36h post-infection. CAML did not influence DENV entry, genome uncoating, viral transcription, viral translation and virus secretion. Our study pinpointed that CAML influenced the process of apoptosis by altering mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activation from 36h post-infection. Over-expression of CAML protected Huh7 cells from apoptosis and knock down of CAML favoured apoptosis following infection with DENV. We also showed that CAML expression was up-regulated during DENV infection. Increased CAML levels protected DENV-infected cells from undergoing apoptosis by preventing mitochondrial damage and caspase-3 activation which in turn favoured DENV production from 36h post-infection. Overall, this study demonstrated that DENV manipulated the levels of CAML to subvert the apoptotic process which in turn favoured efficient virus production. PMID:22281498

  18. High-throughput screening of monoclonal antibodies against plant cell wall glycans by hierarchical clustering of their carbohydrate microarray binding profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moller, Isabel; Marcus, Susan E.; Haeger, Ash;

    2007-01-01

    Antibody-producing hybridoma cell lines were created following immunisation with a crude extract of cell wall polymers from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana. In order to rapidly screen the specificities of individual monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), their binding to microarrays containing 50 cell wall...... investigated using subsequent immunochemical and biochemical analyses and two novel mAbs are described in detail. mAb LM13 binds to an arabinanase-sensitive pectic epitope and mAb LM14, binds to an epitope occurring on arabinogalactan-proteins. Both mAbs display novel patterns of recognition of cell walls in...... plant materials....

  19. Thermodynamic Characterization of New Positive Allosteric Modulators Binding to the Glutamate Receptor A2 Ligand-Binding Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørholm, Ann-Beth; Francotte, Pierre; Goffin, Eric;

    2014-01-01

    Positive allosteric modulation of the ionotropic glutamate receptor GluA2 presents a potential treatment of cognitive disorders, for example, Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we describe the synthesis, pharmacology, and thermodynamic studies of a series of monofluoro-substituted 3...

  20. High throughput techniques for discovering new glycine receptor modulators and their binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel F Gilbert

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory glycine receptor (GlyR is a member of the Cys-loop receptor family that mediates inhibitory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. These receptors are emerging as potential drug targets for inflammatory pain, immunomodulation, spasticity and epilepsy. Antagonists that specifically inhibit particular GlyR isoforms are also required as pharmacological probes for elucidating the roles of particular GlyR isoforms in health and disease. Although a substantial number of both positive and negative GlyR modulators have been identified, very few of these are specific for the GlyR over other receptor types. Thus, the potential of known compounds as either therapeutic leads or pharmacological probes is limited. It is therefore surprising that there have been few published studies describing attempts to discover novel GlyR isoform-specific compounds. The first aim of this review is to consider various methods for efficiently screening compounds against these receptors. We conclude that an anion sensitive yellow fluorescent protein is optimal for primary screening and that automated electrophysiology of cells stably expressing GlyRs is useful for confirming hits and quantitating the actions of identified compounds. The second aim of this review is to demonstrate how these techniques are used in our laboratory for the purpose of both discovering novel GlyR-active compounds and characterizing their binding sites. We also describe a reliable, cost effective method for transfecting HEK293 cells in single wells of a 384 well plate using nanogram quantities of cDNA.

  1. Module structure of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein (IRBP may provide bases for its complex role in the visual cycle – structure/function study of Xenopus IRBP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Debashis

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein's (IRBP remarkable module structure may be critical to its role in mediating the transport of all-trans and 11-cis retinol, and 11-cis retinal between rods, cones, RPE and Müller cells during the visual cycle. We isolated cDNAs for Xenopus IRBP, and expressed and purified its individual modules, module combinations, and the full-length polypeptide. Binding of all-trans retinol, 11-cis retinal and 9-(9-anthroyloxy stearic acid were characterized by fluorescence spectroscopy monitoring ligand-fluorescence enhancement, quenching of endogenous protein fluorescence, and energy transfer. Finally, the X-ray crystal structure of module-2 was used to predict the location of the ligand-binding sites, and compare their structures among modules using homology modeling. Results The full-length Xenopus IRBP cDNA codes for a polypeptide of 1,197 amino acid residues beginning with a signal peptide followed by four homologous modules each ~300 amino acid residues in length. Modules 1 and 3 are more closely related to each other than either is to modules 2 and 4. Modules 1 and 4 are most similar to the N- and C-terminal modules of the two module IRBP of teleosts. Our data are consistent with the model that vertebrate IRBPs arose through two genetic duplication events, but that the middle two modules were lost during the evolution of the ray finned fish. The sequence of the expressed full-length IRBP was confirmed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. The recombinant full-length Xenopus IRBP bound all-trans retinol and 11-cis retinaldehyde at 3 to 4 sites with Kd's of 0.2 to 0.3 μM, and was active in protecting all-trans retinol from degradation. Module 2 showed selectivity for all-trans retinol over 11-cis retinaldehyde. The binding data are correlated to the results of docking of all-trans-retinol to the crystal structure of Xenopus module 2 suggesting two ligand-binding sites

  2. A CBM20 low-affinity starch-binding domain from glucan, water dikinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Camilla; Abou Hachem, Maher; Glaring, M.A.;

    2009-01-01

    from GA. Homology modelling identified possible structural elements responsible for this weak binding of the intracellular CBM20. Differential binding of fluorescein-labelled GWD3 and GA modules to starch granules in vitro was demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy and yellow fluorescent......The family 20 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM20) of the Arabidopsis starch phosphorylator glucan, water dikinase 3 (GWD3) was heterologously produced and its properties were compared to the CBM20 from a fungal glucoamylase (GA). The GWD3 CBM20 has 50-fold lower affinity for cyclodextrins than that...... protein-tagged GWD3 CBM20 expressed in tobacco confirmed binding to starch granules in planta....

  3. Two Secondary Carbohydrate Binding Sites on the Surface of Barley alpha-Amylase 1 Have Distinct Functions and Display Synergy in Hydrolysis of Starch Granules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Munch; Bozonnet, Sophie; Seo, Eun-Seong;

    2009-01-01

    to binding and hydrolysis of starch granules, SBS2 exhibits a higher affinity for the starch mimic beta-cyclodextrin. Compared to that of wild-type AMY1, the K-d of starch granule binding by the SBS1 W278A, W279A, and W278A/W279A mutants thus increased 15-35 times; furthermore, the k(cat)/K-m of W278A/W279A...... of mutants showed that beta-cyclodextrin binds to SBS2 and SBS1 with K-d,K-1 and K-d,K-2 values of 0.07 and 1.40 mM, respectively. A model that accounts for the observed synergy in starch hydrolysis., where SBS1 and SBS2 bind ordered and free alpha-glucan chains, respectively, thus targeting the enzyme....... Site-directed mutagenesis of Trp(278) and Trp(279), stacking onto adjacent ligand glucosyl residues at SBS1, and of Tyr(380) and His(395), making numerous ligand contacts at SBS2, suggested that SBS1 and SBS2 act synergistically in degradation of starch granules. While SBS1 makes the major contribution...

  4. Comparison of the binding properties of the mushroom Marasmius oreades lectin and Griffonia simplicifolia I-B isolectin to alphagalactosyl carbohydrate antigens in the surface phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Winter, Harry C; Goldstein, Irwin J

    2004-01-01

    The binding of two alpha-galactophilic lectins, Marasmius oreades agglutinin (MOA), and Griffonia simplicifolia I isolectin B(4) (GS I-B(4)) to neoglycoproteins and natural glycoproteins were compared in a surface phase assay. Neoglycoproteins carrying various alpha-galactosylated glycans and lam...

  5. Carbohydrate nanotechnology: hierarchical assembly using nature's other information carrying biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xu; Zheng, Yeting; Munro, Catherine J; Ji, Yiwen; Braunschweig, Adam B

    2015-08-01

    Despite their central role in directing some of the most complex biological processes, carbohydrates--nature's other information carrying biopolymer--have been largely ignored as building blocks for synthetic hierarchical assemblies. The non-stoichiometric binding and astronomical diversity characteristic of carbohydrates could lead to tantalizingly complex assembly algorithms, but these attributes simultaneously increase the difficulty of preparing carbohydrate assemblies and anticipating their behavior. Convergences in biotechnology, nanotechnology, polymer chemistry, surface science, and supramolecular chemistry have led to many recent important breakthroughs in glycan microarrays and synthetic carbohydrate receptors, where the idiosyncrasies of carbohydrate structure and binding are increasingly considered. We hope to inspire more researchers to consider carbohydrate structure, diversity, and binding as attractive tools for constructing synthetic hierarchical assemblies.

  6. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation in the Binding of Modulators at Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor GluA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krintel, Christian; Francotte, Pierre; Pickering, Darryl S; Juknaitė, Lina; Pøhlsgaard, Jacob; Olsen, Lars; Frydenvang, Karla; Goffin, Eric; Pirotte, Bernard; Kastrup, Jette S

    2016-06-01

    The 1,2,4-benzothiadiazine 1,1-dioxide type of positive allosteric modulators of the ionotropic glutamate receptor A2 (GluA2) are promising lead compounds for the treatment of cognitive disorders, e.g., Alzheimer's disease. The modulators bind in a cleft formed by the interface of two neighboring ligand binding domains and act by stabilizing the agonist-bound open-channel conformation. The driving forces behind the binding of these modulators can be significantly altered with only minor substitutions to the parent molecules. In this study, we show that changing the 7-fluorine substituent of modulators BPAM97 (2) and BPAM344 (3) into a hydroxyl group (BPAM557 (4) and BPAM521 (5), respectively), leads to a more favorable binding enthalpy (ΔH, kcal/mol) from -4.9 (2) and -7.5 (3) to -6.2 (4) and -14.5 (5), but also a less favorable binding entropy (-TΔS, kcal/mol) from -2.3 (2) and -1.3 (3) to -0.5 (4) and 4.8 (5). Thus, the dissociation constants (Kd, μM) of 4 (11.2) and 5 (0.16) are similar to those of 2 (5.6) and 3 (0.35). Functionally, 4 and 5 potentiated responses of 10 μM L-glutamate at homomeric rat GluA2(Q)i receptors with EC50 values of 67.3 and 2.45 μM, respectively. The binding mode of 5 was examined with x-ray crystallography, showing that the only change compared to that of earlier compounds was the orientation of Ser-497 pointing toward the hydroxyl group of 5. The favorable enthalpy can be explained by the formation of a hydrogen bond from the side-chain hydroxyl group of Ser-497 to the hydroxyl group of 5, whereas the unfavorable entropy might be due to desolvation effects combined with a conformational restriction of Ser-497 and 5. In summary, this study shows a remarkable example of enthalpy-entropy compensation in drug development accompanied with a likely explanation of the underlying structural mechanism.

  7. Modulation of gene expression via overlapping binding sites exerted by ZNF143, Notch1 and THAP11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngondo-Mbongo, Richard Patryk; Myslinski, Evelyne; Aster, Jon C; Carbon, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    ZNF143 is a zinc-finger protein involved in the transcriptional regulation of both coding and non-coding genes from polymerase II and III promoters. Our study deciphers the genome-wide regulatory role of ZNF143 in relation with the two previously unrelated transcription factors Notch1/ICN1 and thanatos-associated protein 11 (THAP11) in several human and murine cells. We show that two distinct motifs, SBS1 and SBS2, are associated to ZNF143-binding events in promoters of >3000 genes. Without co-occupation, these sites are also bound by Notch1/ICN1 in T-lymphoblastic leukaemia cells as well as by THAP11, a factor involved in self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. We present evidence that ICN1 binding overlaps with ZNF143 binding events at the SBS1 and SBS2 motifs, whereas the overlap occurs only at SBS2 for THAP11. We demonstrate that the three factors modulate expression of common target genes through the mutually exclusive occupation of overlapping binding sites. The model we propose predicts that the binding competition between the three factors controls biological processes such as rapid cell growth of both neoplastic and stem cells. Overall, our study establishes a novel relationship between ZNF143, THAP11 and ICN1 and reveals important insights into ZNF143-mediated gene regulation. PMID:23408857

  8. Carbohydrate Metabolism Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you eat. Food is made up of proteins, carbohydrates, and fats. Chemicals in your digestive system (enzymes) ... metabolic disorder, something goes wrong with this process. Carbohydrate metabolism disorders are a group of metabolic disorders. ...

  9. Modulation of carbon and nitrogen allocation in Urtica dioica and Plantago major by elevated CO{sub 2}. Impact of accumulation of nonstructural carbohydrates and ontogenetic drift

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertog, J. den; Stulen, I.; Fonseca, F.; Delea, P.

    1996-10-01

    Doubling the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration from 350 to 700 {mu} l{sup -1} increased the relative growth rate (RGR) of hydroponically grown Urtica dioica L. and Plantagomajor ssp. pleiospherma Pilger only for the first 10-14 days. Previous experiments with P. major indicated that RGR did not respond i proportion to the rate of photosynthesis. The impact of changes in leaf morphology, dry matter partitioning, dry matter chemical composition and ontogenetic drift on this discrepancy is analysed. Soon after the start of the treatment, carbohydrate concentrations were higher at elevated CO{sub 2}; largely due to starch accumulation. An increase in the percentage of leaf dry matter and decreases in the specific leaf area (SLA) and the shoot nitrogen concentration were correlated with an increase in the total nonstructural carbohydrate concentration (TNC). A combination of accumulation of soluble sugars and starch and ontogenetic drift explains the decrease in SLA at the elevated CO{sub 2} level. A similar ontogenetic effect of elevated CO{sub 2} was observed on the specific root length (SRL). Shoot nitrogen concentration and percentage leaf dry matter were not affected. The net diurnal fluctuation of the carbohydrate pool in P. major was equal for both CO{sub 2} concentrations, indicating that the growth response to elevated CO{sub 2} may be ruled by other variables such as sink strength. Elevated CO{sub 2} did not greatly influence the partitioning of nitrogen between soluble and insoluble, reduced N and nitrate, nor the allocation of dry matter between leaf, stem and root. That the root to shoot ratio (F/S) was not affected by elevated CO{sub 2} implies that, to maintain a balanced activity between roots and shoot, no shift in partitioning of dry matter upon doubling of the atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration is required. (AB)

  10. Modulation of the cellular immune response by a carbohydrate rich fraction from Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces in infected or immunized Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dematteis, S; Pirotto, F; Marqués, J; Nieto, A; Orn, A; Baz, A

    2001-01-01

    Infection of Balb/c mice with Echinococcus granulosus protoscoleces constitutes the model for secondary hydatid infection. The immune response of Balb/c mice infected with E. granulosus is characterized by secretion of antibodies specific for carbohydrate epitopes and production of type-2 cytokines. A role for glycoconjugates in the induction of type-2 responses has been suggested in other host--parasite systems. Although glycoconjugates are immunogenic in E. granulosus infection, the role of these molecules in the establishment of the type-2 response has never been analysed. In this study, a carbohydrate rich fraction (E4+) from E. granulosus protoscoleces was obtained using the monoclonal antibody E492/G1 specific for the moiety Galalpha(1,4)Gal which is widely represented in protoscoleces and other E. granulosus antigenic preparations. The results showed that E4+ was immunogenic in Balb/c mice evoking an antibody response mainly directed against carbohydrate epitopes. In addition, splenocytes from E4+-immunized mice showed suppressed proliferative responses to Con A and E4+ induced IL-10 secretion by E4+-primed and naive splenocytes. The fraction E4+ also was immunogenic in infected mice during early infection. In this case also, splenocytes from infected mice as well as peritoneal cells from infected or naive mice, when stimulated in vitro with E4+, secreted IL-10. Collectively, these results suggest that E4+ may be involved in immunosuppression phenomena and, by stimulating IL-10 secretion, may contribute to the induction and sustaining of the type-2 cytokine response established in early experimental infection.

  11. Carbohydrate restriction and dietary cholesterol modulate the expression of HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor in mononuclear cells from adult men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volek Jeff S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The liver is responsible for controlling cholesterol homeostasis in the body. HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor (LDL-r are involved in this regulation and are also ubiquitously expressed in all major tissues. We have previously shown in guinea pigs that there is a correlation in gene expression of HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL-r between liver and mononuclear cells. The present study evaluated human mononuclear cells as a surrogate for hepatic expression of these genes. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate restriction with low and high cholesterol content on HMG-CoA reductase and LDL-r mRNA expression in mononuclear cells. All subjects were counseled to consume a carbohydrate restricted diet with 10–15% energy from carbohydrate, 30–35% energy from protein and 55–60% energy from fat. Subjects were randomly assigned to either EGG (640 mg/d additional dietary cholesterol or SUB groups [equivalent amount of egg substitute (0 dietary cholesterol contributions per day] for 12 weeks. At the end of the intervention, there were no changes in plasma total or LDL cholesterol (LDL-C compared to baseline (P > 0.10 or differences in plasma total or LDL-C between groups. The mRNA abundance for HMG-CoA reductase and LDL-r were measured in mononuclear cells using real time PCR. The EGG group showed a significant decrease in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA (1.98 ± 1.26 to 1.32 ± 0.92 arbitrary units P

  12. Sequence analyses of fimbriae subunit FimA proteins on Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and Actinomyces odontolyticus with variant carbohydrate binding specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persson Karina

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 express type-2 fimbriae (FimA subunit polymers with variant Galβ binding specificities and Actinomyces odontolyticus a sialic acid specificity to colonize different oral surfaces. However, the fimbrial nature of the sialic acid binding property and sequence information about FimA proteins from multiple strains are lacking. Results Here we have sequenced fimA genes from strains of A.naeslundii genospecies 1 (n = 4 and genospecies 2 (n = 4, both of which harboured variant Galβ-dependent hemagglutination (HA types, and from A.odontolyticus PK984 with a sialic acid-dependent HA pattern. Three unique subtypes of FimA proteins with 63.8–66.4% sequence identity were present in strains of A. naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and A. odontolyticus. The generally high FimA sequence identity (>97.2% within a genospecies revealed species specific sequences or segments that coincided with binding specificity. All three FimA protein variants contained a signal peptide, pilin motif, E box, proline-rich segment and an LPXTG sorting motif among other conserved segments for secretion, assembly and sorting of fimbrial proteins. The highly conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs are present in fimbriae proteins from other Gram-positive bacteria. Moreover, only strains of genospecies 1 were agglutinated with type-2 fimbriae antisera derived from A. naeslundii genospecies 1 strain 12104, emphasizing that the overall folding of FimA may generate different functionalities. Western blot analyses with FimA antisera revealed monomers and oligomers of FimA in whole cell protein extracts and a purified recombinant FimA preparation, indicating a sortase-independent oligomerization of FimA. Conclusion The genus Actinomyces involves a diversity of unique FimA proteins with conserved pilin, E box and LPXTG motifs, depending on subspecies and associated binding specificity. In addition, a sortase independent

  13. Differential Modulation of Annexin I Binding Sites on Monocytes and Neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Euzger

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Specific binding sites for the anti-inflammatory protein annexin I have been detected on the surface of human monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN. These binding sites are proteinaceous in nature and are sensitive to cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes trypsin, collagenase, elastase and cathepsin G. When monocytes and PMN were isolated independently from peripheral blood, only the monocytes exhibited constitutive annexin I binding. However PMN acquired the capacity to bind annexin I following co-culture with monocytes. PMN incubation with sodium azide, but not protease inhibitors, partially blocked this process. A similar increase in annexin I binding capacity was also detected in PMN following adhesion to endothelial monolayers. We propose that a juxtacrine activation rather than a cleavage-mediated transfer is involved in this process. Removal of annexin I binding sites from monocytes with elastase rendered monocytes functionally insensitive to full length annexin I or to the annexin I-derived pharmacophore, peptide Ac2-26, assessed as suppression of the respiratory burst. These data indicate that the annexin I binding site on phagocytic cells may have an important function in the feedback control of the inflammatory response and their loss through cleavage could potentiate such responses.

  14. Crystal Structure of an Integron Gene Cassette-Associated Protein from Vibrio cholerae Identifies a Cationic Drug-Binding Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Harrop, Stephen J.; Boucher, Yan; Hassan, Karl A.; Di Leo, Rosa; Xu, Xiaohui; Cui, Hong; Savchenko, Alexei; Chang, Changsoo; Labbate, Maurizio; Paulsen, Ian T.; Stokes, H.W.; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mabbutt, Bridget C. (MIT); (UT-Australia); (Macquarie); (Toronto); (New South)

    2012-02-15

    The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes. We report the 1.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators. Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  15. Crystal structure of an integron gene cassette-associated protein from Vibrio cholerae identifies a cationic drug-binding module.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrika N Deshpande

    Full Text Available The direct isolation of integron gene cassettes from cultivated and environmental microbial sources allows an assessment of the impact of the integron/gene cassette system on the emergence of new phenotypes, such as drug resistance or virulence. A structural approach is being exploited to investigate the modularity and function of novel integron gene cassettes.We report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of Cass2, an integron-associated protein derived from an environmental V. cholerae. The structure defines a monomeric beta-barrel protein with a fold related to the effector-binding portion of AraC/XylS transcription activators. The closest homologs of Cass2 are multi-drug binding proteins, such as BmrR. Consistent with this, a binding pocket made up of hydrophobic residues and a single glutamate side chain is evident in Cass2, occupied in the crystal form by polyethylene glycol. Fluorescence assays demonstrate that Cass2 is capable of binding cationic drug compounds with submicromolar affinity. The Cass2 module possesses a protein interaction surface proximal to its drug-binding cavity with features homologous to those seen in multi-domain transcriptional regulators.Genetic analysis identifies Cass2 to be representative of a larger family of independent effector-binding proteins associated with lateral gene transfer within Vibrio and closely-related species. We propose that the Cass2 family not only has capacity to form functional transcription regulator complexes, but represents possible evolutionary precursors to multi-domain regulators associated with cationic drug compounds.

  16. Structural proof of a dimeric positive modulator bridging two identical AMPA receptor-binding sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Birgitte Høiriis; Harpsøe, Kasper; Kastrup, Jette Sandholm Jensen;

    2007-01-01

    have dramatically increased potencies, more than three orders of magnitude higher than the corresponding monomers. Dimer (R,R)-2a was cocrystallized with the GluR2-S1S2J construct, and an X-ray crystallographic analysis showed (R,R)-2a to bridge two identical binding pockets on two neighboring GluR2...... subunits. Thus, this is biostructural evidence of a homomeric dimer bridging two identical receptor-binding sites....

  17. The antimicrobial antiproteinase elafin binds to lipopolysaccharide and modulates macrophage responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Jonathan W; Roghanian, Ali; Jiang, Lu; Ramage, Robert; Sallenave, Jean-Michel

    2005-05-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria represent a primary target for innate immune responses. We demonstrate here that the antimicrobial/anti-neutrophil elastase full-length elafin (FL-EL) is able to bind both smooth and rough forms of LPS. The N-terminus was shown to bind both forms of LPS more avidly. We demonstrate that the lipid A core-binding proteins polymyxin B (PB) and LPS-binding protein (LBP) compete with elafin for binding, and that LBP is able to displace prebound elafin from LPS. When PB, FL-EL, N-EL, and C-EL were pre-incubated with LPS before addition to immobilized LBP, PB was the most potent inhibitor of LPS transfer to LBP. These data prompted us to examine the biological consequences of elafin binding to LPS, using tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release by murine macrophages. In serum-containing conditions, N-EL had no effect, whereas both C-EL and FL-EL inhibited TNF-alpha production. In serum-free conditions, however, all moieties had a stimulatory activity on TNF-alpha release, with C-EL being the most potent at the highest concentration. The differential biological activity of elafin in different conditions suggests a role for this molecule in either LPS detoxification or activation of innate immune responses, depending on the external cellular environment. PMID:15668324

  18. TGF-β and IL-6 signals modulate chromatin binding and promoter occupancy by acetylated FOXP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Arabinda; Li, Bin; Song, Xiaomin; Bembas, Kathryn; Zhang, Geng; Katsumata, Makoto; Saouaf, Sandra J.; Wang, Qiang; Hancock, Wayne W.; Shen, Yuan; Greene, Mark I.

    2008-01-01

    Expression of FOXP3, a potent gene-specific transcriptional repressor, in regulatory T cells is required to suppress autoreactive and alloreactive effector T cell function. Recent studies have shown that FOXP3 is an acetylated protein in a large nuclear complex and FOXP3 actively represses transcription by recruiting enzymatic corepressors, including histone modification enzymes. The mechanism by which extracellular stimuli regulate the FOXP3 complex ensemble is currently unknown. Although TGF-β is known to induce murine FOXP3+ Treg cells, TGF-β in combination with IL-6 attenuates the induction of FOXP3 functional activities. Here we show that TCR stimuli and TGF-β signals modulate the disposition of FOXP3 into different subnuclear compartments, leading to enhanced chromatin binding in human CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells. TGF-β treatment increases the level of acetylated FOXP3 on chromatin and site-specific recruitment of FOXP3 on the human IL-2 promoter. However, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 down-regulates FOXP3 binding to chromatin in the presence of TGF-β. Moreover, histone deacetylation inhibitor (HDACi) treatment abrogates the down-regulating effects of IL-6 and TGF-β. These studies indicate that HDACi can enhance regulatory T cell function via promoting FOXP3 binding to chromatin even in a proinflammatory cellular microenvironment. Collectively, our data provide a framework of how different signals affect intranuclear redistribution, posttranslational modifications, and chromatin binding patterns of FOXP3. PMID:18779564

  19. TGF-beta and IL-6 signals modulate chromatin binding and promoter occupancy by acetylated FOXP3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Arabinda; Li, Bin; Song, Xiaomin; Bembas, Kathryn; Zhang, Geng; Katsumata, Makoto; Saouaf, Sandra J; Wang, Qiang; Hancock, Wayne W; Shen, Yuan; Greene, Mark I

    2008-09-16

    Expression of FOXP3, a potent gene-specific transcriptional repressor, in regulatory T cells is required to suppress autoreactive and alloreactive effector T cell function. Recent studies have shown that FOXP3 is an acetylated protein in a large nuclear complex and FOXP3 actively represses transcription by recruiting enzymatic corepressors, including histone modification enzymes. The mechanism by which extracellular stimuli regulate the FOXP3 complex ensemble is currently unknown. Although TGF-beta is known to induce murine FOXP3(+) Treg cells, TGF-beta in combination with IL-6 attenuates the induction of FOXP3 functional activities. Here we show that TCR stimuli and TGF-beta signals modulate the disposition of FOXP3 into different subnuclear compartments, leading to enhanced chromatin binding in human CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells. TGF-beta treatment increases the level of acetylated FOXP3 on chromatin and site-specific recruitment of FOXP3 on the human IL-2 promoter. However, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-6 down-regulates FOXP3 binding to chromatin in the presence of TGF-beta. Moreover, histone deacetylation inhibitor (HDACi) treatment abrogates the down-regulating effects of IL-6 and TGF-beta. These studies indicate that HDACi can enhance regulatory T cell function via promoting FOXP3 binding to chromatin even in a proinflammatory cellular microenvironment. Collectively, our data provide a framework of how different signals affect intranuclear redistribution, posttranslational modifications, and chromatin binding patterns of FOXP3. PMID:18779564

  20. The First Residue of the PWWP Motif Modulates HATH Domain Binding, Stability, and Protein-Protein Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Lee, Hsia-Ju; Jiang, Ingjye; Lin, Shang-Chi; Lo, Wei-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jan; Sue, Shih-Che

    2015-07-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (hHDGF) and HDGF-related proteins (HRPs) contain conserved N-terminal HATH domains with a characteristic structural motif, namely the PWWP motif. The HATH domain has attracted attention because of its ability to bind with heparin/heparan sulfate, DNA, and methylated histone peptide. Depending on the sequence of the PWWP motif, HRP HATHs are classified into P-type (Pro-His-Trp-Pro) and A-type (Ala-His-Trp-Pro) forms. A-type HATH is highly unstable and tends to precipitate in solution. We replaced the Pro residue in P-type HATHHDGF with Ala and evaluated the influence on structure, dynamics, and ligand binding. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) hydrogen/deuterium exchange and circular dichroism (CD) measurements revealed reduced stability. Analysis of NMR backbone (15)N relaxations (R1, R2, and nuclear Overhauser effect) revealed additional backbone dynamics in the interface between the β-barrel and the C-terminal helix bundle. The β1-β2 loop, where the AHWP sequence is located, has great structural flexibility, which aids HATH-HATH interaction through the loop. A-type HATH, therefore, shows a stronger tendency to aggregate when binding with heparin and DNA oligomers. This study defines the role of the first residue of the PWWP motif in modulating HATH domain stability and oligomer formation in binding.

  1. EndB, a Multidomain Family 44 Cellulase from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17, Binds to Cellulose via a Novel Cellulose-Binding Module and to Another R. flavefaciens Protein via a Dockerin Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Rincón, Marco T.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Kirby, James; Scott, Karen P.; Flint, Harry J.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes in Ruminococcus spp. bind to cellulose are not fully understood. The product of the newly isolated cellulase gene endB from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17 was purified as a His-tagged product after expression in Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind directly to crystalline cellulose. The ability to bind cellulose is shown to be associated with a novel cellulose-binding module (CBM) located within a region of 200 amino aci...

  2. Global identification of hnRNP A1 binding sites for SSO-based splicing modulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Gitte H; Doktor, Thomas K; Borch-Jensen, Jonas;

    2016-01-01

    for this deregulation by blocking other SREs with splice-switching oligonucleotides (SSOs). However, the location and sequence of most SREs are not well known. RESULTS: Here, we used individual-nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) to establish an in vivo binding map for the key splicing...... regulatory factor hnRNP A1 and to generate an hnRNP A1 consensus binding motif. We find that hnRNP A1 binding in proximal introns may be important for repressing exons. We show that inclusion of the alternative cassette exon 3 in SKA2 can be significantly increased by SSO-based treatment which blocks an iCLIP......-identified hnRNP A1 binding site immediately downstream of the 5' splice site. Because pseudoexons are well suited as models for constitutive exons which have been inactivated by pathogenic mutations in SREs, we used a pseudoexon in MTRR as a model and showed that an iCLIP-identified hnRNP A1 binding site...

  3. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; Di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D'Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-08

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  4. Miniaturizing VEGF: Peptides mimicking the discontinuous VEGF receptor-binding site modulate the angiogenic response

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Lucia; Finetti, Federica; Diana, Donatella; di Stasi, Rossella; Auriemma, Sara; Romanelli, Alessandra; Fattorusso, Roberto; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia; D’Andrea, Luca Domenico

    2016-08-01

    The angiogenic properties of VEGF are mediated through the binding of VEGF to its receptor VEGFR2. The VEGF/VEGFR interface is constituted by a discontinuous binding region distributed on both VEGF monomers. We attempted to reproduce this discontinuous binding site by covalently linking into a single molecular entity two VEGF segments involved in receptor recognition. We designed and synthesized by chemical ligation a set of peptides differing in length and flexibility of the molecular linker joining the two VEGF segments. The biological activity of the peptides was characterized in vitro and in vivo showing a VEGF-like activity. The most biologically active mini-VEGF was further analyzed by NMR to determine the atomic details of its interaction with the receptor.

  5. The structure of cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 highlights structural Ig-fold versatility for receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemčovičová, Ivana [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dúbravská cesta 9, SK 84505 Bratislava (Slovakia); Zajonc, Dirk M., E-mail: dzajonc@liai.org [La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The crystal structure of Human cytomegalovirus immune modulator UL141 was solved at 3.25 Å resolution. Here, a detailed analysis of its intimate dimerization interface and the biophysical properties of its receptor (TRAIL-R2 and CD155) binding interactions are presented. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of the innate immune system as they rapidly detect and destroy infected cells. To avoid immune recognition and to allow long-term persistence in the host, Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) has evolved a number of genes to evade or inhibit immune effector pathways. In particular, UL141 can inhibit cell-surface expression of both the NK cell-activating ligand CD155 as well as the TRAIL death receptors (TRAIL-R1 and TRAIL-R2). The crystal structure of unliganded HCMV UL141 refined to 3.25 Å resolution allowed analysis of its head-to-tail dimerization interface. A ‘dimerization-deficient’ mutant of UL141 (ddUL141) was further designed, which retained the ability to bind to TRAIL-R2 or CD155 while losing the ability to cross-link two receptor monomers. Structural comparison of unliganded UL141 with UL141 bound to TRAIL-R2 further identified a mobile loop that makes intimate contacts with TRAIL-R2 upon receptor engagement. Superposition of the Ig-like domain of UL141 on the CD155 ligand T-cell immunoreceptor with Ig and ITIM domains (TIGIT) revealed that UL141 can potentially engage CD155 similar to TIGIT by using the C′C′′ and GF loops. Further mutations in the TIGIT binding site of CD155 (Q63R and F128R) abrogated UL141 binding, suggesting that the Ig-like domain of UL141 is a viral mimic of TIGIT, as it targets the same binding site on CD155 using similar ‘lock-and-key’ interactions. Sequence alignment of the UL141 gene and its orthologues also showed conservation in this highly hydrophobic (L/A)X{sub 6}G ‘lock’ motif for CD155 binding as well as conservation of the TRAIL-R2 binding patches, suggesting that these host

  6. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed. PMID:26702928

  7. Interaction of an S100A9 gene variant with saturated fat and carbohydrates to modulate insulin resistance in 3 populations of different ancestries

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: S100 calcium binding protein A9 (S100A9) has previously been identified as a type 2 diabetes (T2D) gene. However, this finding requires independent validation and more in depth analyses in other populations and ancestries. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to replicate the associations between an S10...

  8. Structural and Functional Studies of Peptide-Carbohydrate Mimicry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Margaret A.; Pinto, B. Mario

    Certain peptides act as molecular mimics of carbohydrates in that they are specifically recognized by carbohydrate-binding proteins. Peptides that bind to anti-carbohydrate antibodies, carbohydrate-processing enzymes, and lectins have been identified. These peptides are potentially useful as vaccines and therapeutics; for example, immunologically functional peptide molecular mimics (mimotopes) can strengthen or modify immune responses induced by carbohydrate antigens. However, peptides that bind specifically to carbohydrate-binding proteins may not necessarily show the corresponding biological activity, and further selection based on biochemical studies is always required. The degree of structural mimicry required to generate the desired biological activity is therefore an interesting question. This review will discuss recent structural studies of peptide-carbohydrate mimicry employing NMR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and molecular modeling, as well as relevant biochemical data. These studies provide insights into the basis of mimicry at the molecular level. Comparisons with other carbohydrate-mimetic compounds, namely proteins and glycopeptides, will be drawn. Finally, implications for the design of new therapeutic compounds will also be presented.

  9. Allosteric modulators of the hERG K(+) channel: radioligand binding assays reveal allosteric characteristics of dofetilide analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyi; Klaasse, Elisabeth; Heitman, Laura H; Ijzerman, Adriaan P

    2014-01-01

    Drugs that block the cardiac K(+) channel encoded by the human ether-à-go-go gene (hERG) have been associated with QT interval prolongation leading to proarrhythmia, and in some cases, sudden cardiac death. Because of special structural features of the hERG K(+) channel, it has become a promiscuous target that interacts with pharmaceuticals of widely varying chemical structures and a reason for concern in the pharmaceutical industry. The structural diversity suggests that multiple binding sites are available on the channel with possible allosteric interactions between them. In the present study, three reference compounds and nine compounds of a previously disclosed series were evaluated for their allosteric effects on the binding of [(3)H]astemizole and [(3)H]dofetilide to the hERG K(+) channel. LUF6200 was identified as an allosteric inhibitor in dissociation assays with both radioligands, yielding similar EC50 values in the low micromolar range. However, potassium ions increased the binding of the two radioligands in a concentration-dependent manner, and their EC50 values were not significantly different, indicating that potassium ions behaved as allosteric enhancers. Furthermore, addition of potassium ions resulted in a concentration-dependent leftward shift of the LUF6200 response curve, suggesting positive cooperativity and distinct allosteric sites for them. In conclusion, our investigations provide evidence for allosteric modulation of the hERG K(+) channel, which is discussed in the light of findings on other ion channels. PMID:24200993

  10. Drosophila Nanos acts as a molecular clamp that modulates the RNA-binding and repression activities of Pumilio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Chase A; Qiu, Chen; Arvola, René M; Lou, Tzu-Fang; Killingsworth, Jordan; Campbell, Zachary T; Tanaka Hall, Traci M; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2016-01-01

    Collaboration among the multitude of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) is ubiquitous, yet our understanding of these key regulatory complexes has been limited to single RBPs. We investigated combinatorial translational regulation by Drosophila Pumilio (Pum) and Nanos (Nos), which control development, fertility, and neuronal functions. Our results show how the specificity of one RBP (Pum) is modulated by cooperative RNA recognition with a second RBP (Nos) to synergistically repress mRNAs. Crystal structures of Nos-Pum-RNA complexes reveal that Nos embraces Pum and RNA, contributes sequence-specific contacts, and increases Pum RNA-binding affinity. Nos shifts the recognition sequence and promotes repression complex formation on mRNAs that are not stably bound by Pum alone, explaining the preponderance of sub-optimal Pum sites regulated in vivo. Our results illuminate the molecular mechanism of a regulatory switch controlling crucial gene expression programs, and provide a framework for understanding how the partnering of RBPs evokes changes in binding specificity that underlie regulatory network dynamics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17096.001 PMID:27482653

  11. C-terminal substitution of MDM2 interacting peptides modulates binding affinity by distinctive mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Brown

    Full Text Available The complex between the proteins MDM2 and p53 is a promising drug target for cancer therapy. The residues 19-26 of p53 have been biochemically and structurally demonstrated to be a most critical region to maintain the association of MDM2 and p53. Variation of the amino acid sequence in this range obviously alters the binding affinity. Surprisingly, suitable substitutions contiguous to this region of the p53 peptides can yield tightly binding peptides. The peptide variants may differ by a single residue that vary little in their structural conformations and yet are characterized by large differences in their binding affinities. In this study a systematic analysis into the role of single C-terminal mutations of a 12 residue fragment of the p53 transactivation domain (TD and an equivalent phage optimized peptide (12/1 were undertaken to elucidate their mechanistic and thermodynamic differences in interacting with the N-terminal of MDM2. The experimental results together with atomistically detailed dynamics simulations provide insight into the principles that govern peptide design protocols with regard to protein-protein interactions and peptidomimetic design.

  12. NF45 and NF90 Bind HIV-1 RNA and Modulate HIV Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A previous proteomic screen in our laboratory identified nuclear factor 45 (NF45 and nuclear factor 90 (NF90 as potential cellular factors involved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 replication. Both are RNA binding proteins that regulate gene expression; and NF90 has been shown to regulate the expression of cyclin T1 which is required for Tat-dependent trans-activation of viral gene expression. In this study the roles of NF45 and NF90 in HIV replication were investigated through overexpression studies. Ectopic expression of either factor potentiated HIV infection, gene expression, and virus production. Deletion of the RNA binding domains of NF45 and NF90 diminished the enhancement of HIV infection and gene expression. Both proteins were found to interact with the HIV RNA. RNA decay assays demonstrated that NF90, but not NF45, increased the half-life of the HIV RNA. Overall, these studies indicate that both NF45 and NF90 potentiate HIV infection through their RNA binding domains.

  13. Viral infection controlled by a calcium-dependent lipid-binding module in ALIX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Christin; Lenoir, Marc; Velluz, Marie-Claire; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael; Gruenberg, Jean

    2013-05-28

    ALIX plays a role in nucleocapsid release during viral infection, as does lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that LBPA is recognized within an exposed site in ALIX Bro1 domain predicted by MODA, an algorithm for discovering membrane-docking areas in proteins. LBPA interactions revealed a strict requirement for a structural calcium tightly bound near the lipid interaction site. Unlike other calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins, the all-helical triangle-shaped fold of the Bro1 domain confers selectivity for LBPA via a pair of hydrophobic residues in a flexible loop, which undergoes a conformational change upon membrane association. Both LBPA and calcium binding are necessary for endosome association and virus infection, as are ALIX ESCRT binding and dimerization capacity. We conclude that LBPA recruits ALIX onto late endosomes via the calcium-bound Bro1 domain, triggering a conformational change in ALIX to mediate the delivery of viral nucleocapsids to the cytosol during infection. PMID:23664863

  14. TRAF4 is a novel phosphoinositide-binding protein modulating tight junctions and favoring cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrien Rousseau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor (TNF receptor-associated factor 4 (TRAF4 is frequently overexpressed in carcinomas, suggesting a specific role in cancer. Although TRAF4 protein is predominantly found at tight junctions (TJs in normal mammary epithelial cells (MECs, it accumulates in the cytoplasm of malignant MECs. How TRAF4 is recruited and functions at TJs is unclear. Here we show that TRAF4 possesses a novel phosphoinositide (PIP-binding domain crucial for its recruitment to TJs. Of interest, this property is shared by the other members of the TRAF protein family. Indeed, the TRAF domain of all TRAF proteins (TRAF1 to TRAF6 is a bona fide PIP-binding domain. Molecular and structural analyses revealed that the TRAF domain of TRAF4 exists as a trimer that binds up to three lipids using basic residues exposed at its surface. Cellular studies indicated that TRAF4 acts as a negative regulator of TJ and increases cell migration. These functions are dependent from its ability to interact with PIPs. Our results suggest that TRAF4 overexpression might contribute to breast cancer progression by destabilizing TJs and favoring cell migration.

  15. A new clan of CBM families based on bioinformatics of starch-binding domains from families CBM20 and CBM21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhovic, M.; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. A.;

    2005-01-01

    Approximately 10% of amylolytic enzymes are able to bind and degrade raw starch. Usually a distinct domain, the starch-binding domain (SBD), is responsible for this property. These domains have been classified into families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBM). At present, there are six SBD...... that the original idea of the CBM20 module being at the C-terminus and the CBM21 module at the N-terminus of a protein should be modified. Although the CBM20 functionally important tryptophans were found to be substituted in several cases, these aromatics and the regions around them belong to the best conserved...

  16. Ring size in cyclic endomorphin-2 analogs modulates receptor binding affinity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piekielna, Justyna; Kluczyk, Alicja; Gentilucci, Luca; Cerlesi, Maria Camilla; Calo', Girolamo; Tomböly, Csaba; Łapiński, Krzysztof; Janecki, Tomasz; Janecka, Anna

    2015-06-01

    The study reports the solid-phase synthesis and biological evaluation of a series of new side chain-to-side chain cyclized opioid peptide analogs of the general structure Tyr-[D-Xaa-Phe-Phe-Asp]NH2, where Xaa = Lys (1), Orn (2), Dab (3), or Dap (4) (Dab = 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, Dap = 2,3-diaminopropionic acid), containing 17- to 14-membered rings. The influence of the ring size on binding to the MOP, DOP and KOP opioid receptors was studied. In general, the reduction of the size of the macrocyclic ring increased the selectivity for the MOP receptor. The cyclopeptide incorporating Xaa = Lys displayed subnanomolar MOP affinity but modest selectivity over the KOP receptor, while the analog with the Orn residue showed increased affinity and selectivity for MOP. The analog with Dab was a weak MOP agonist and did not bind to the other two opioid receptors. Finally, the peptide with Xaa = Dap was completely MOP receptor-selective with subnanomolar affinity. Interestingly, the deletion of one Phe residue from 1 led to the 14-membered Tyr-c[D-Lys-Phe-Asp]NH2 (5), a potent and selective MOP receptor ligand. The in vitro potencies of the new analogs were determined in a calcium mobilization assay performed in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells expressing human recombinant opioid receptors and chimeric G proteins. A good correlation between binding and the functional test results was observed. The influence of the ring size, solid support and the N-terminal protecting group on the formation of cyclodimers was studied. PMID:25948019

  17. Matrix Domain Modulates HIV-1 Gag's Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity via Inositol Phosphate Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Christopher P.; Datta, Siddhartha A.K.; Rein, Alan; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Retroviruses replicate by reverse transcribing their single-stranded RNA genomes into double-stranded DNA using specific cellular tRNAs to prime cDNA synthesis. In HIV-1, human tRNA3Lys serves as the primer and is packaged into virions during assembly. The viral Gag protein is believed to chaperone tRNA3Lys placement onto the genomic RNA primer binding site; however, the timing and possible regulation of this event are currently unknown. Composed of the matrix (MA), capsid (CA), nucleocapsid ...

  18. Functional modulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 expression in melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Altaf A.; Majid, Shahana; Nosrati, Mehdi; deSemir, David; Federman, Scot; Kashani-Sabet, Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP3) is a member of the IGFBP family, which regulates mitogenic and anti-apoptotic effects of insulin-like growth factors. In this report we evaluated the role of IGFBP3 in melanoma. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western and ELISA analysis indicated a significant downregulation of IGFBP3 expression in melanoma cell lines as compared to a normal melanocyte cell line. Melanoma cell lines treated with the demethylating agent 5-AZA-2′ deoxy...

  19. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  20. Carbohydrates as allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commins, Scott P

    2015-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates are effective inducers of Th2 responses, and carbohydrate antigens can stimulate the production of glycan-specific antibodies. In instances where the antigen exposure occurs through the skin, the resulting antibody production can contain IgE class antibody. The glycan-stimulated IgE may be non-specific but may also be antigen specific. This review focuses on the production of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, the recently identified IgE antibody response to a mammalian oligosaccharide epitope, galactose-alpha-1,3-galactose (alpha-gal), as well as discusses practical implications of carbohydrates in allergy. In addition, the biological effects of carbohydrate antigens are reviewed in setting of receptors and host recognition.

  1. Tight-binding electrons on triangular and kagome lattices under staggered modulated magnetic fields: quantum Hall effects and Hofstadter butterflies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Juan; Wang Yifei; Gong Changde, E-mail: yfwang_nju@hotmail.com [Center for Statistical and Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, and Department of Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua 321004 (China)

    2011-04-20

    We consider the tight-binding models of electrons on a two-dimensional triangular lattice and kagome lattice under staggered modulated magnetic fields. Such fields have two components: a uniform-flux part with strength {phi}, and a staggered-flux part with strength {Delta}{phi}. Various properties of the Hall conductances and Hofstadter butterflies are studied. When {phi} is fixed, variation of {Delta}{phi} leads to the quantum Hall transitions and Chern numbers of Landau subbands being redistributed between neighboring pairs. The energy spectra with nonzero {Delta}{phi}s have similar fractal structures but quite different energy gaps compared with the original Hofstadter butterflies of {Delta}{phi} = 0. Moreover, the fan-like structure of Landau levels in the low magnetic field region is also modified appreciably by {Delta}{phi}.

  2. Fatty-acid binding proteins modulate sleep and enhance long-term memory consolidation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason R Gerstner

    Full Text Available Sleep is thought to be important for memory consolidation, since sleep deprivation has been shown to interfere with memory processing. However, the effects of augmenting sleep on memory formation are not well known, and testing the role of sleep in memory enhancement has been limited to pharmacological and behavioral approaches. Here we test the effect of overexpressing the brain-type fatty acid binding protein (Fabp7 on sleep and long-term memory (LTM formation in Drosophila melanogaster. Transgenic flies carrying the murine Fabp7 or the Drosophila homologue dFabp had reduced baseline sleep but normal LTM, while Fabp induction produced increases in both net sleep and LTM. We also define a post-training consolidation "window" that is sufficient for the observed Fabp-mediated memory enhancement. Since Fabp overexpression increases consolidated daytime sleep bouts, these data support a role for longer naps in improving memory and provide a novel role for lipid-binding proteins in regulating memory consolidation concurrently with changes in behavioral state.

  3. Cholesterol Oxidase Binds TLR2 and Modulates Functional Responses of Human Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Bednarska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholesterol oxidase (ChoD is considered to be an important virulence factor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, but its influence on macrophage activity is unknown. Here we used Nocardia erythropolis ChoD, which is very similar to the Mtb enzyme (70% identity at the amino-acid level, to evaluate the impact of bacterial ChoD on the activity of THP-1-derived macrophages in vitro. We found that ChoD decreased the surface expression of Toll-like receptor type 2 (TLR2 and complement receptor 3 (CR3 on these macrophages. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that ChoD competed with lipoteichoic acid for ligand binding sites on TLR2 but not on CR3, suggesting that ChoD signaling is mediated via TLR2. Binding of ChoD to the membrane of macrophages had diverse effects on the activity of macrophages, activating p38 mitogen activated kinase and stimulating production of a large amount of interleukin-10. Moreover, ChoD primed macrophages to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species in response to the phorbol myristate acetate, which was reduced by “switching off” TLR-derived signaling through interleukin-1 receptor-associated kinases 1 and 4 inhibition. Our study revealed that ChoD interacts directly with macrophages via TLR2 and influences the biological activity of macrophages during the development of the initial response to infection.

  4. Dihydrostreptomycin Directly Binds to, Modulates, and Passes through the MscL Channel Pore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Li, Hua; Wang, Junmei; Blount, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The primary mechanism of action of the antibiotic dihydrostreptomycin is binding to and modifying the function of the bacterial ribosome, thus leading to decreased and aberrant translation of proteins; however, the routes by which it enters the bacterial cell are largely unknown. The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance, MscL, is found in the vast majority of bacterial species, where it serves as an emergency release valve rescuing the cell from sudden decreases in external osmolarity. While it is known that MscL expression increases the potency of dihydrostreptomycin, it has remained unclear if this effect is due to a direct interaction. Here, we use a combination of genetic screening, MD simulations, and biochemical and mutational approaches to determine if dihydrostreptomycin directly interacts with MscL. Our data strongly suggest that dihydrostreptomycin binds to a specific site on MscL and modifies its conformation, thus allowing the passage of K+ and glutamate out of, and dihydrostreptomycin into, the cell. PMID:27280286

  5. Cell Surface Binding and Internalization of Aβ Modulated by Degree of Aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Bateman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The amyloid peptides, Aβ40 and Aβ42, are generated through endoproteolytic cleavage of the amyloid precursor protein. Here we have developed a model to investigate the interaction of living cells with various forms of aggregated Aβ40/42. After incubation at endosomal pH 6, we observed a variety of Aβ conformations after 3 (Aβ3, 24 (Aβ24, and 90 hours (Aβ90. Both Aβ4224 and Aβ4024 were observed to rapidly bind and internalize into differentiated PC12 cells, leading to accumulation in the lysosome. In contrast, Aβ40/4290 were both found to only weakly associate with cells, but were observed as the most aggregated using dynamic light scattering and thioflavin-T. Internalization of Aβ40/4224 was inhibited with treatment of monodansylcadaverine, an endocytosis inhibitor. These studies indicate that the ability of Aβ40/42 to bind and internalize into living cells increases with degree of aggregation until it reaches a maximum beyond which its ability to interact with cells diminishes drastically.

  6. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of (TH)triazolam binding in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earle, M.E.; Concas, A.; Wamsley, J.K.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of (TH)TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 0C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 37C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 0C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 37C). Saturation studies of (TH)TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100 M) showed a GABA-shift. At 0C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 37C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables.

  7. Temperature dependence and GABA modulation of [3H]triazolam binding in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypnotic triazolam (TZ), a triazolobenzodiazepine displays a short physiological half life and has been used for the treatment of insomnia related to anxiety states. The authors major objectives were the direct measurement of the temperature dependence and the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) effect of [3H]TZ binding in the rat brain. Saturation studies showed a shift to lower affinity with increasing temperatures (K/sub d/ = 0.27 +/- 08 nM at 00C; K/sub d/ = 1.96 +/- 0.85 nM at 370C) while the B/sub max/ values remained unchanged (1220 +/- 176 fmoles/mg protein at 00C and 1160 +/- 383 fmoles/mg protein at 370C). Saturation studies of [3H]TZ binding in the presence or absence of GABA (100μM) showed a GABA-shift. At 00C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 0.24 +/- 0.03 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.16 +/- 0.04/+GABA) and at 370C the K/sub d/ values were (K/sub d/ = 1.84 +/- 0.44 nM/-GABA; K/sub d/ = 0.95 +/- 0.29 nM/+GABA). In contrast to reported literature, the authors findings show that TZ interacts with benzodiazepine receptors with a temperature dependence and GABA-shift consistent with predicted behavior for benzodiazepine agonists. 20 references, 3 tables

  8. Binding sites for abundant nuclear factors modulate RNA polymerase I-dependent enhancer function in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J J; Yokoi, T J; Holland, M J

    1995-12-01

    The 190-base pair (bp) rDNA enhancer within the intergenic spacer sequences of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rRNA cistrons activates synthesis of the 35S-rRNA precursor about 20-fold in vivo (Mestel,, R., Yip, M., Holland, J. P., Wang, E., Kang, J., and Holland, M. J. (1989) Mol. Cell. Biol. 9, 1243-1254). We now report identification and analysis of transcriptional activities mediated by three cis-acting sites within a 90-bp portion of the rDNA enhancer designated the modulator region. In vivo, these sequences mediated termination of transcription by RNA polymerase I and potentiated the activity of the rDNA enhancer element. Two trans-acting factors, REB1 and REB2, bind independently to sites within the modulator region (Morrow, B. E., Johnson, S. P., and Warner, J. R. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 9061-9068). We show that REB2 is identical to the ABF1 protien. Site-directed mutagenesis of REB1 and ABF1 binding sites demonstrated uncoupling of RNA polymerase I-dependent termination from transcriptional activation in vivo. We conclude that REB1 and ABF1 are required for RNA polymerase I-dependent termination and enhancer function, respectively, Since REB1 and ABF1 proteins also regulate expression of class II genes and other nuclear functions, our results suggest further similarities between RNA polymerase I and II regulatory mechanisms. Two rDNA enhancers flanking a rDNA minigene stimulated RNA polymerase I transcription in a "multiplicative" fashion. Deletion mapping analysis showed that similar cis-acting sequences were required for enhancer function when positioned upstream or downstream from a rDNA minigene.

  9. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  10. NITRIC OXIDE BINDS TO AND MODULATES THE ACTIVITY OF A POLLEN SPECIFIC ARABIDOPSIS DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2014-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important signaling molecule in plants. In the pollen of Arabidopsis thaliana, NO causes re-orientation of the growing tube and this response is mediated by 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). However, in plants, NO-sensors have remained somewhat elusive. Here, the findings of an NO-binding candidate, Arabidopsis thaliana DIACYLGLYCEROL KINASE 4 (ATDGK4; AT5G57690) is presented. In addition to the annotated diacylglycerol kinase domain, this molecule also harbors a predicted heme-NO/oxygen (H-NOX) binding site and a guanylyl cyclase (GC) catalytic domain which have been identified based on the alignment of functionally conserved amino acid residues across species. A 3D model of the molecule was constructed, and from which the locations of the kinase catalytic center, the ATP-binding site, the GC and H-NOX domains were estimated. Docking of ATP to the kinase catalytic center was also modeled. The recombinant ATDGK4 demonstrated kinase activity in vitro, catalyzing the ATP-dependent conversion of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) to phosphatidic acid (PA). This activity was inhibited by the mammalian DAG kinase inhibitor R59949 and importantly also by the NO donors diethylamine NONOate (DEA NONOate) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP). Recombinant ATDGK4 also has GC activity in vitro, catalyzing the conversion of guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) to cGMP. The catalytic domains of ATDGK4 kinase and GC may be independently regulated since the kinase but not the GC, was inhibited by NO while Ca2+ only stimulates the GC. It is likely that the DAG kinase product, PA, causes the release of Ca2+ from the intracellular stores and Ca2+ in turn activates the GC domain of ATDGK4 through a feedback mechanism. Analysis of publicly available microarray data has revealed that ATDGK4 is highly expressed in the pollen. Here, the pollen tubes of mis-expressing atdgk4 recorded slower growth rates than the wild-type (Col-0) and importantly, they showed altered

  11. Carbohydrate-binding domain of the POMGnT1 stem region modulates O-mannosylation sites of α-dystroglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, Naoyuki; Manya, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takeyuki; Tateno, Hiroaki; Kanagawa, Motoi; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Akasaka-Manya, Keiko; Hirose, Yuriko; Mizuno, Mamoru; Ikeguchi, Mitsunori; Toda, Tatsushi; Hirabayashi, Jun; Senda, Toshiya; Endo, Tamao; Kato, Ryuichi

    2016-01-01

    The dystrophin glycoprotein complex, which connects the cell membrane to the basement membrane, is essential for a variety of biological events, including maintenance of muscle integrity. An O-mannose–type GalNAc-β1,3-GlcNAc-β1,4-(phosphate-6)-Man structure of α-dystroglycan (α-DG), a subunit of the complex that is anchored to the cell membrane, interacts directly with laminin in the basement membrane. Reduced glycosylation of α-DG is linked to some types of inherited muscular dystrophy; consistent with this relationship, many disease-related mutations have been detected in genes involved in O-mannosyl glycan synthesis. Defects in protein O-linked mannose β1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1 (POMGnT1), a glycosyltransferase that participates in the formation of GlcNAc-β1,2-Man glycan, are causally related to muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB), a congenital muscular dystrophy, although the role of POMGnT1 in postphosphoryl modification of GalNAc-β1,3-GlcNAc-β1,4-(phosphate-6)-Man glycan remains elusive. Our crystal structures of POMGnT1 agreed with our previous results showing that the catalytic domain recognizes substrate O-mannosylated proteins via hydrophobic interactions with little sequence specificity. Unexpectedly, we found that the stem domain recognizes the β-linked GlcNAc of O-mannosyl glycan, an enzymatic product of POMGnT1. This interaction may recruit POMGnT1 to a specific site of α-DG to promote GlcNAc-β1,2-Man clustering and also may recruit other enzymes that interact with POMGnT1, e.g., fukutin, which is required for further modification of the GalNAc-β1,3-GlcNAc-β1,4-(phosphate-6)-Man glycan. On the basis of our findings, we propose a mechanism for the deficiency in postphosphoryl modification of the glycan observed in POMGnT1-KO mice and MEB patients. PMID:27493216

  12. Structure of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) of human androgen receptor in complex with a selective modulator LGD2226

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structure of the ligand-binding domain of androgen receptor in complex with LGD2226. The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-inducible steroid hormone receptor that mediates androgen action, determining male sexual phenotypes and promoting spermatogenesis. As the androgens play a dominant role in male sexual development and function, steroidal androgen agonists have been used clinically for some years. However, there is a risk of potential side effects and most steroidal androgens cannot be dosed orally, which limits the use of these substances. 1,2-Dihydro-6-N,N-bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) amino-4-trifluoromethyl-2-quinolinone (LGD2226) is a synthetic nonsteroidal ligand and a novel selective AR modulator. The crystal structure of the complex of LGD2226 with the androgen receptor ligand-binding domain (AR LBD) at 2.1 Å was solved and compared with the structure of the AR LBD–R1881 complex. It is hoped that this will aid in further explaining the selectivity of LGD2226 observed in in vitro and in vivo assays and in developing more selective and effective therapeutic agents

  13. Enthalpy-Entropy Compensation in the Binding of Modulators at Ionotropic Glutamate Receptor GluA2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, Christian; Francotte, Pierre; Pickering, Darryl S;

    2016-01-01

    modulators BPAM97 (2) and BPAM344 (3) into a hydroxyl group (BPAM557 (4) and BPAM521 (5), respectively), leads to a more favorable binding enthalpy (ΔH, kcal/mol) from −4.9 (2) and −7.5 (3) to −6.2 (4) and −14.5 (5), but also a less favorable binding entropy (−TΔS, kcal/mol) from −2.3 (2) and −1.3 (3) to −0...... of 5 was examined with x-ray crystallography, showing that the only change compared to that of earlier compounds was the orientation of Ser-497 pointing toward the hydroxyl group of 5. The favorable enthalpy can be explained by the formation of a hydrogen bond from the side-chain hydroxyl group of...... Ser-497 to the hydroxyl group of 5, whereas the unfavorable entropy might be due to desolvation effects combined with a conformational restriction of Ser-497 and 5. In summary, this study shows a remarkable example of enthalpy-entropy compensation in drug development accompanied with a likely...

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin modulates mucin glycosylation with sialyl-Lewis(x) to increase binding to airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, J L; Jia, J; Choi, W; Choe, S; Miao, J; Xu, Y; Powell, R; Lin, J; Kuang, Z; Gaskins, H R; Lau, G W

    2016-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients battle life-long pulmonary infections with the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). An overabundance of mucus in CF airways provides a favorable niche for PA growth. When compared with that of non-CF individuals, mucus of CF airways is enriched in sialyl-Lewis(x), a preferred binding receptor for PA. Notably, the levels of sialyl-Lewis(x) directly correlate with infection severity in CF patients. However, the mechanism by which PA causes increased sialylation remains uncharacterized. In this study, we examined the ability of PA virulence factors to modulate sialyl-Lewis(x) modification in airway mucins. We found pyocyanin (PCN) to be a potent inducer of sialyl-Lewis(x) in both mouse airways and in primary and immortalized CF and non-CF human airway epithelial cells. PCN increased the expression of C2/4GnT and ST3Gal-IV, two of the glycosyltransferases responsible for the stepwise biosynthesis of sialyl-Lewis(x), through a tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-mediated phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC)-dependent pathway. Furthermore, PA bound more efficiently to airway epithelial cells pre-exposed to PCN in a flagellar cap-dependent manner. Importantly, antibodies against sialyl-Lewis(x) and anti-TNF-α attenuated PA binding. These results indicate that PA secretes PCN to induce a favorable environment for chronic colonization of CF lungs by increasing the glycosylation of airway mucins with sialyl-Lewis(x). PMID:26555707

  15. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  16. Trichomonas vaginalis Lipophosphoglycan Exploits Binding to Galectin-1 and -3 to Modulate Epithelial Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichorova, Raina N; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Fashemi, Titilayo; Foley, Evan; Ryan, Stanthia; Beatty, Noah; Dawood, Hassan; Hayes, Gary R; St-Pierre, Guillaume; Sato, Sachiko; Singh, Bibhuti N

    2016-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is the most common non-viral sexually transmitted infection caused by the vaginotropic extracellular protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis. The infection is recurrent, with no lasting immunity, often asymptomatic, and linked to pregnancy complications and risk of viral infection. The molecular mechanisms of immune evasion by the parasite are poorly understood. We demonstrate that galectin-1 and -3 are expressed by the human cervical and vaginal epithelial cells and act as pathogen-recognition receptors for the ceramide phosphoinositol glycan core (CPI-GC) of the dominant surface protozoan lipophosphoglycan (LPG). We used an in vitro model with siRNA galectin knockdown epithelial clones, recombinant galectins, clinical Trichomonas isolates, and mutant protozoan derivatives to dissect the function of galectin-1 and -3 in the context of Trichomonas infection. Galectin-1 suppressed chemokines that facilitate recruitment of phagocytes, which can eliminate extracellular protozoa (IL-8) or bridge innate to adaptive immunity (MIP-3α and RANTES (regulated on activation normal T cell expressed and secreted)). Silencing galectin-1 increased and adding exogenous galectin-1 suppressed chemokine responses to Trichomonas or CPI-GC/LPG. In contrast, silencing galectin-3 reduced IL-8 response to LPG. Live Trichomonas depleted the extracellular levels of galectin-3. Clinical isolates and mutant Trichomonas CPI-GC that had reduced affinity to galectin-3 but maintained affinity to galectin-1 suppressed chemokine expression. Thus via CPI-GC binding, Trichomonas is capable of regulating galectin bioavailability and function to the benefit of its parasitic survival. These findings suggest novel approaches to control trichomoniasis and warrant further studies of galectin-binding diversity among clinical isolates as a possible source for symptom disparity in parasitic infections.

  17. Modulation of glutamate transport and receptor binding by glutamate receptor antagonists in EAE rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkowski, Grzegorz; Dąbrowska-Bouta, Beata; Salińska, Elżbieta; Strużyńska, Lidia

    2014-01-01

    The etiology of multiple sclerosis (MS) is currently unknown. However, one potential mechanism involved in the disease may be excitotoxicity. The elevation of glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid, as well as changes in the expression of glutamate receptors (iGluRs and mGluRs) and excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs), have been observed in the brains of MS patients and animals subjected to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), which is the predominant animal model used to investigate the pathophysiology of MS. In the present paper, the effects of glutamatergic receptor antagonists, including amantadine, memantine, LY 367583, and MPEP, on glutamate transport, the expression of mRNA of glutamate transporters (EAATs), the kinetic parameters of ligand binding to N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and the morphology of nerve endings in EAE rat brains were investigated. The extracellular level of glutamate in the brain is primarily regulated by astrocytic glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and glutamate-aspartate transporter (GLAST). Excess glutamate is taken up from the synaptic space and metabolized by astrocytes. Thus, the extracellular level of glutamate decreases, which protects neurons from excitotoxicity. Our investigations showed changes in the expression of EAAT mRNA, glutamate transport (uptake and release) by synaptosomal and glial plasmalemmal vesicle fractions, and ligand binding to NMDA receptors; these effects were partially reversed after the treatment of EAE rats with the NMDA antagonists amantadine and memantine. The antagonists of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), including LY 367385 and MPEP, did not exert any effect on the examined parameters. These results suggest that disturbances in these mechanisms may play a role in the processes associated with glutamate excitotoxicity and the progressive brain damage in EAE.

  18. Insights into Regulated Ligand Binding Sites from the Structure of ZO-1 Src Homology 3-Guanylate Kinase Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lye, Ming F.; Fanning, Alan S.; Su, Ying; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon (UNC); (UIC)

    2010-11-09

    Tight junctions are dynamic components of epithelial and endothelial cells that regulate the paracellular transport of ions, solutes, and immune cells. The assembly and permeability of these junctions is dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) proteins, members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase homolog (MAGUK) protein family, which are characterized by a core Src homology 3 (SH3)-GUK module that coordinates multiple protein-protein interactions. The structure of the ZO-1 SH3-GUK domain confirms that the interdependent folding of the SH3 and GUK domains is a conserved feature of MAGUKs, but differences in the orientation of the GUK domains in three different MAGUKs reveal interdomain flexibility of the core unit. Using pull-down assays, we show that an effector loop, the U6 region in ZO-1, forms a novel intramolecular interaction with the core module. This interaction is divalent cation-dependent and overlaps with the binding site for the regulatory molecule calmodulin on the GUK domain. These findings provide insight into the previously observed ability of the U6 region to regulate TJ assembly in vivo and the structural basis for the complex protein interactions of the MAGUK family.

  19. Adhesive and migratory effects of phosphophoryn are modulated by flanking peptides of the integrin binding motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Phosphophoryn (PP is generated from the proteolytic cleavage of dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP. Gene duplications in the ancestor dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1 genomic sequence created the DSPP gene in toothed animals. PP and DMP-1 are phosphorylated extracellular matrix proteins that belong to the family of small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs. Many SIBLING members have been shown to evoke various cell responses through the integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD domain; however, the RGD-dependent function of PP is not yet fully understood. We demonstrated that recombinant PP did not exhibit any obvious cell adhesion ability, whereas the simultaneously purified recombinant DMP-1 did. A cell adhesion inhibitory analysis was performed by pre-incubating human osteosarcoma MG63 cells with various PP peptides before seeding onto vitronectin. The results obtained revealed that the incorporation of more than one amino acid on both sides of the PP-RGD domain was unable to inhibit the adhesion of MG63 cells onto vitronectin. Furthermore, the inhibitory activity of a peptide containing the PP-RGD domain with an open carboxyl-terminal side (H-463SDESDTNSESANESGSRGDA482-OH was more potent than that of a peptide containing the RGD domain with an open amino-terminal side (H-478SRGDASYTSDESSDDDNDSDSH499-OH. This phenomenon was supported by the potent cell adhesion and migration abilities of the recombinant truncated PP, which terminated with Ala482. Furthermore, various point mutations in Ala482 and/or Ser483 converted recombinant PP into cell-adhesive proteins. Therefore, we concluded that the Ala482-Ser483 flanking sequence, which was detected in primates and mice, was the key peptide bond that allowed the PP-RGD domain to be sequestered. The differential abilities of PP and DMP-1 to act on integrin imply that DSPP was duplicated from DMP-1 to serve as a crucial extracellular protein for tooth development rather than as an integrin

  20. The quaternary structure of the recombinant bovine odorant-binding protein is modulated by chemical denaturants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga V Stepanenko

    Full Text Available A large group of odorant-binding proteins (OBPs has attracted great scientific interest as promising building blocks in constructing optical biosensors for dangerous substances, such as toxic and explosive molecules. Native tissue-extracted bovine OBP (bOBP has a unique dimer folding pattern that involves crossing the α-helical domain in each monomer over the other monomer's β-barrel. In contrast, recombinant bOBP maintaining the high level of stability inherent to native tissue bOBP is produced in a stable native-like state with a decreased tendency for dimerization and is a mixture of monomers and dimers in a buffered solution. This work is focused on the study of the quaternary structure and the folding-unfolding processes of the recombinant bOBP in the absence and in the presence of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl. Our results show that the recombinant bOBP native dimer is only formed at elevated GdnHCl concentrations (1.5 M. This process requires re-organizing the protein structure by progressing through the formation of an intermediate state. The bOBP dimerization process appears to be irreversible and it occurs before the protein unfolds. Though the observed structural changes for recombinant bOBP at pre-denaturing GdnHCl concentrations show a local character and the overall protein structure is maintained, such changes should be considered where the protein is used as a sensitive element in a biosensor system.

  1. The fragile X protein binds mRNAs involved in cancer progression and modulates metastasis formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucá, Rossella; Averna, Michele; Zalfa, Francesca; Vecchi, Manuela; Bianchi, Fabrizio; La Fata, Giorgio; Del Nonno, Franca; Nardacci, Roberta; Bianchi, Marco; Nuciforo, Paolo; Munck, Sebastian; Parrella, Paola; Moura, Rute; Signori, Emanuela; Alston, Robert; Kuchnio, Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Fazio, Vito Michele; Piacentini, Mauro; De Strooper, Bart; Achsel, Tilmann; Neri, Giovanni; Neven, Patrick; Evans, D Gareth; Carmeliet, Peter; Mazzone, Massimiliano; Bagni, Claudia

    2013-10-01

    The role of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is well established in brain, where its absence leads to the fragile X syndrome (FXS). FMRP is almost ubiquitously expressed, suggesting that, in addition to its effects in brain, it may have fundamental roles in other organs. There is evidence that FMRP expression can be linked to cancer. FMR1 mRNA, encoding FMRP, is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A decreased risk of cancer has been reported in patients with FXS while a patient-case with FXS showed an unusual decrease of tumour brain invasiveness. However, a role for FMRP in regulating cancer biology, if any, remains unknown. We show here that FMRP and FMR1 mRNA levels correlate with prognostic indicators of aggressive breast cancer, lung metastases probability and triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). We establish that FMRP overexpression in murine breast primary tumours enhances lung metastasis while its reduction has the opposite effect regulating cell spreading and invasion. FMRP binds mRNAs involved in epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) and invasion including E-cadherin and Vimentin mRNAs, hallmarks of EMT and cancer progression. PMID:24092663

  2. Regulatable and Modulable Background Expression Control in Prokaryotic Synthetic Circuits by Auxiliary Repressor Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merulla, Davide; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2016-01-15

    Expression control in synthetic genetic circuitry, for example, for construction of sensitive biosensors, is hampered by the lack of DNA parts that maintain ultralow background yet achieve high output upon signal integration by the cells. Here, we demonstrate how placement of auxiliary transcription factor binding sites within a regulatable promoter context can yield an important gain in signal-to-noise output ratios from prokaryotic biosensor circuits. As a proof of principle, we use the arsenite-responsive ArsR repressor protein from Escherichia coli and its cognate operator. Additional ArsR operators placed downstream of its target promoter can act as a transcription roadblock in a distance-dependent manner and reduce background expression of downstream-placed reporter genes. We show that the transcription roadblock functions both in cognate and heterologous promoter contexts. Secondary ArsR operators placed upstream of their promoter can also improve signal-to-noise output while maintaining effector dependency. Importantly, background control can be released through the addition of micromolar concentrations of arsenite. The ArsR-operator system thus provides a flexible system for additional gene expression control, which, given the extreme sensitivity to micrograms per liter effector concentrations, could be applicable in more general contexts.

  3. Glutathione selectively modulates the binding of platinum drugs to human copper chaperone Cox17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Linhong; Wang, Zhen; Wu, Han; Xi, Zhaoyong; Liu, Yangzhong

    2015-12-01

    The copper chaperone Cox17 (cytochrome c oxidase copper chaperone) has been shown to facilitate the delivery of cisplatin to mitochondria, which contributes to the overall cytotoxicity of the drug [Zhao et al. (2014) Chem. Commun. 50: , 2667-2669]. Kinetic data indicate that Cox17 has reactivity similar to glutathione (GSH), the most abundant thiol-rich molecule in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we found that GSH significantly modulates the reaction of platinum complexes with Cox17. GSH enhances the reactivity of three anti-cancer drugs (cisplatin, carboplatin and oxaliplatin) to Cox17, but suppresses the reaction of transplatin. Surprisingly, the pre-formed cisplatin-GSH adducts are highly reactive to Cox17; over 90% platinum transfers from GSH to Cox17. On the other hand, transplatin-GSH adducts are inert to Cox17. These different effects are consistent with the drug activity of these platinum complexes. In addition, GSH attenuates the protein aggregation of Cox17 induced by platination. These results indicate that the platinum-protein interactions could be substantially influenced by the cellular environment.

  4. Distribution of a 69-kD laminin-binding protein in aortic and microvascular endothelial cells: modulation during cell attachment, spreading, and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yannariello-Brown, J; Wewer, U; Liotta, L;

    1988-01-01

    cultured subconfluent cells actively synthesizing matrix. Endothelial cells express a 69-kD laminin-binding protein that is membrane associated and appears to colocalize with actin microfilaments. The topological distribution of 69 kD and its cytoskeletal associations can be modulated by the cell during...

  5. Carbohydrates and Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.; Wurtman, Judith J.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the symptoms, such as appetite change and mood fluctuation, basic mechanisms, and some treatments of Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), Carbohydrate-Craving Obesity (CCO) and Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS). Provides several tables and diagrams, and three reading references. (YP)

  6. Novel interactions of complex carbohydrates with peanut (PNA), Ricinus communis (RCA-I), Sambucus nigra (SNA-I) and wheat germ (WGA) agglutinins as revealed by the binding specificities of these lectins towards mucin core-2 O-linked and N-linked glycans and related structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, E V; Xue, Jun; Xia, Jie; Khaja, Siraj D; Piskorz, Conrad F; Locke, Robert D; Neelamegham, Sriram; Matta, Khushi L

    2016-10-01

    Plant lectins through their multivalent quaternary structures bind intrinsically flexible oligosaccharides. They recognize fine structural differences in carbohydrates and interact with different sequences in mucin core 2 or complex-type N-glycan chain and also in healthy and malignant tissues. They are used in characterizing cellular and extracellular glycoconjugates modified in pathological processes. We study here, the complex carbohydrate-lectin interactions by determining the effects of substituents in mucin core 2 tetrasaccharide Galβ1-4GlcNAcβ1-6(Galβ1-3)GalNAcα-O-R and fetuin glycopeptides on their binding to agarose-immobilized lectins PNA, RCA-I, SNA-I and WGA. Briefly, in mucin core 2 tetrasaccharide (i) structures modified by α2-3/6-Sialyl LacNAc, LewisX and α1-3-Galactosyl LacNAc resulted in regular binding to PNA whereas compounds with 6-sulfo LacNAc displayed no-binding; (ii) strucures bearing α2-6-sialyl 6-sulfo LacNAc, or 6-sialyl LacdiNAc carbohydrates displayed strong binding to SNA-I; (iii) structures with α2-3/6-sialyl, α1-3Gal LacNAc or LewisX were non-binder to RCA-I and compounds with 6-sulfo LacNAc only displayed weak binding; (iv) structures containing LewisX, 6-Sulfo LewisX, α2-3/6-sialyl LacNAc, α2-3/6-sialyl 6-sulfo LacNAc and GalNAc Lewis-a were non-binding to WGA, those with α1-2Fucosyl, α1-3-Galactosyl LacNAc, α2-3-sialyl T-hapten plus 3'/6'sulfo LacNAc displayed weak binding, and compounds with α2-3-sialyl T-hapten, α2.6-Sialyl LacdiNAc, α2-3-sialyl D-Fucβ1-3 GalNAc and Fucα-1-2 D-Fucβ-1-3GalNAc displaying regular binding and GalNAc LewisX and LacdiNAc plus D-Fuc β-1-3 GalNAcα resulting in tight binding. RCA-I binds Fetuin triantennary asialoglycopeptide 100 % after α-2-3 and 25 % after α-2-6 sialylation, 30 % after α-1-2 and 100 % after α-1-3 fucosylation, and 50 % after α-1-3 galactosylation. WGA binds 3-but not 6-Fucosyl chitobiose core. Thus, information on the influence of complex carbohydrate

  7. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  8. RM-04RETINOBLASTOMA BINDING PROTEIN 4 (RBBP4) MODULATES TEMOZOLOMIDE RESPONSE THROUGH REGULATION OF MGMT EXPRESSION IN GLIOBLASTOMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitange, Gaspar; Schroeder, Mark; Sarkaria, Jann

    2014-01-01

    Through shRNA library screen we identified RBBP4 as a modulator of TMZ response in glioblastoma (GBM). Consequently, we investigated the mechanisms whereby RBBP4 modulates TMZ response using shRNA to silence this gene in MGMT-expressing T98G and U138 GBM cells. The cytotoxicity was evaluated using fluorescence-based CYQUANT proliferation assay. A total of 4 shRNA constructs significantly suppressed RBBP4 in both T98G and U138. Cells expressing non-specific targeting shRNA (NT-shRNA) were used as control. RBBP4 knockdown significantly sensitized TMZ both in T98G and U138 cells; the relative fluorescence for the TMZ-treated (100 µM) control T98NT-shRNA cells was 1.17 ± 0.15, whereas for T98RBBP4-shRNA clones were 0.54 ± 0.02, 0.29 ± 0.03, 0.36 ± 0.05, and 0.34 ± 0.03, respectively (p < 0.001). Similar sensitization was observed in U138 cells; relative fluorescence for the TMZ-treated (300 µM) control U138NT-shRNA cells was 0.70 ± 0.05 and for U138RBBP4-shRNA clones were 0.42 ± 0.06, 0.27 ± 0.01, 0.28 ± 0.02, and 0.30 ± 0.01, respectively (p < 0.001). Interestingly, knockdown of RBBP4 in T98G was accompanied with a synthetic lethality to PARP inhibition and increased response to TMZ-induced DNA damage, as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of KAP1, CHK1 and CHK2. Moreover, phosphorylation of H2AX in response to TMZ treatment was significantly higher in T98RBBP4-shRNA clones. Consistent with deficient homologous recombination (HR), T98RBBP4-shRNA clones significantly expressed less RAD51 compared with the control T98NT-shRNA cells. Even more interesting, RBBP4 knockdown silenced MGMT expression in both T98G and U138, which was accompanied by decreased recruitment of acetylated H3K9 coupled with increased recruitment of tri-methylated H3K9. Moreover, RBBP4 knockdown was coupled with loss of p300 recruitment to bind MGMT promoter region. Collectively, these findings suggest that RBBP4 modulates TMZ response in GBM cells through epigenetic regulation of

  9. ERp46 binds to AdipoR1, but not AdipoR2, and modulates adiponectin signalling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlton, Hayley K.; Webster, Julie; Kruger, Sarah; Simpson, Fiona; Richards, Ayanthi A. [Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine, University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4102 (Australia); Whitehead, Jonathan P., E-mail: j.whitehead1@uq.edu.au [Diamantina Institute for Cancer, Immunology and Metabolic Medicine, University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, QLD 4102 (Australia)

    2010-02-05

    The pleiotropic effects of the insulin-sensitizing adipokine adiponectin are mediated, at least in part, by two seven-transmembrane domain receptors AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Recent reports indicate a role for AdipoR-binding proteins, namely APPL1, RACK1 and CK2{beta}, in proximal signal transduction events. Here we demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum protein 46 (ERp46) interacts specifically with AdipoR1 and provide evidence that ERp46 modulates adiponectin signalling. Co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry identified ERp46 as an AdipoR1-, but not AdipoR2-, interacting protein. Analysis of truncated constructs and GST-fusion proteins revealed the interaction was mediated by the cytoplasmic, N-terminal residues (1-70) of AdipoR1. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and subcellular fractionation studies demonstrated that ERp46 was present in the ER and the plasma membrane (PM). Transient knockdown of ERp46 increased the levels of AdipoR1, and AdipoR2, at the PM and this correlated with increased adiponectin-stimulated phosphorylation of AMPK. In contrast, adiponectin-stimulated phosphorylation of p38MAPK was reduced following ERp46 knockdown. Collectively these results establish ERp46 as the first AdipoR1-specific interacting protein and suggest a role for ERp46 in adiponectin receptor biology and adiponectin signalling.

  10. A cholesterol-binding domain in STIM1 modulates STIM1-Orai1 physical and functional interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Jonathan; Dominguez, Laura; Bohórquez-Hernández, A; Asanov, Alexander; Vaca, Luis

    2016-01-01

    STIM1 and Orai1 are the main components of a widely conserved Calcium influx pathway known as store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). STIM1 is a calcium sensor, which oligomerizes and activates Orai channels when calcium levels drop inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The series of molecular rearrangements that STIM1 undergoes until final activation of Orai1 require the direct exposure of the STIM1 domain known as SOAR (Stim Orai Activating Region). In addition to these complex molecular rearrangements, other constituents like lipids at the plasma membrane, play critical roles orchestrating SOCE. PI(4,5)P2 and enriched cholesterol microdomains have been shown as important signaling platforms that recruit the SOCE machinery in steps previous to Orai1 activation. However, little is known about the molecular role of cholesterol once SOCE is activated. In this study we provide clear evidence that STIM1 has a cholesterol-binding domain located inside the SOAR region and modulates Orai1 channels. We demonstrate a functional association of STIM1 and SOAR to cholesterol, indicating a close proximity of SOAR to the inner layer of the plasma membrane. In contrast, the depletion of cholesterol induces the SOAR detachment from the plasma membrane and enhances its association to Orai1. These results are recapitulated with full length STIM1. PMID:27459950

  11. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Molecules that modulate our mood?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Nair; V A Vaidya

    2006-09-01

    Depression is the major psychiatric ailment of our times, afflicting ∼20% of the population. Despite its prevalence, the pathophysiology of this complex disorder is not well understood. In addition, although antidepressants have been in existence for the past several decades, the mechanisms that underlie their therapeutic effects remain elusive. Building evidence implicates a role for the plasticity of specific neuro-circuitry in both the pathophysiology and treatment of depression. Damage to limbic regions is thought to contribute to the etiology of depression and antidepressants have been reported to reverse such damage and promote adaptive plasticity. The molecular pathways that contribute to the damage associated with depression and antidepressant-mediated plasticity are a major focus of scientific enquiry. The transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, CREB and BDNF have emerged as molecules that may play an important role in modulating mood. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of CREB and BDNF in depression and as targets/mediators of antidepressant action.

  12. Identification and Structural Basis of Binding to Host Lung Glycogen by Streptococcal Virulence Factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lammerts van Bueren,A.; Higgins, M.; Wang, D.; Burke, R.; Boraston, A.

    2007-01-01

    The ability of pathogenic bacteria to recognize host glycans is often essential to their virulence. Here we report structure-function studies of previously uncharacterized glycogen-binding modules in the surface-anchored pullulanases from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpuA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (PulA). Multivalent binding to glycogen leads to a strong interaction with alveolar type II cells in mouse lung tissue. X-ray crystal structures of the binding modules reveal a novel fusion of tandem modules into single, bivalent functional domains. In addition to indicating a structural basis for multivalent attachment, the structure of the SpuA modules in complex with carbohydrate provides insight into the molecular basis for glycogen specificity. This report provides the first evidence that intracellular lung glycogen may be a novel target of pathogenic streptococci and thus provides a rationale for the identification of the streptococcal {alpha}-glucan-metabolizing machinery as virulence factors.

  13. EndB, a Multidomain Family 44 Cellulase from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17, Binds to Cellulose via a Novel Cellulose-Binding Module and to Another R. flavefaciens Protein via a Dockerin Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Marco T.; McCrae, Sheila I.; Kirby, James; Scott, Karen P.; Flint, Harry J.

    2001-01-01

    The mechanisms by which cellulolytic enzymes and enzyme complexes in Ruminococcus spp. bind to cellulose are not fully understood. The product of the newly isolated cellulase gene endB from Ruminococcus flavefaciens 17 was purified as a His-tagged product after expression in Escherichia coli and found to be able to bind directly to crystalline cellulose. The ability to bind cellulose is shown to be associated with a novel cellulose-binding module (CBM) located within a region of 200 amino acids that is unrelated to known protein sequences. EndB (808 amino acids) also contains a catalytic domain belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 44 and a C-terminal dockerin-like domain. Purified EndB is also shown to bind specifically via its dockerin domain to a polypeptide of ca. 130 kDa present among supernatant proteins from Avicel-grown R. flavefaciens that attach to cellulose. The protein to which EndB attaches is a strong candidate for the scaffolding component of a cellulosome-like multienzyme complex recently identified in this species (S.-Y. Ding et al., J. Bacteriol. 183:1945–1953, 2001). It is concluded that binding of EndB to cellulose may occur both through its own CBM and potentially also through its involvement in a cellulosome complex. PMID:11571138

  14. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 modulates muscle differentiation through an insulin-like growth factor-dependent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are a family of six secreted proteins which bind to and modulate the actions of insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and -II). IGFBP-5 is more conserved than other IGFBPs characterized to date, and is expressed in adult rodent muscle and in the developing myotome. We have shown previously that C2 myoblasts secrete IGFBP-5 as their sole IGFBP. Here we use these cells to study the function of IGFBP-5 during myogenesis, a process s...

  15. Pharmacological characterization and modeling of the binding sites of novel 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)benzenes as metabotropic glutamate receptor 5-selective negative allosteric modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølck, Christina; Harpsøe, Kasper; Gloriam, David E;

    2012-01-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGluR5) is a potential drug target in neurological and psychiatric disorders, and subtype-selective allosteric modulators have attracted much attention as potential drug candidates. In this study, the binding sites of three novel 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl......)pyridine (MPEP)-derived negative allosteric modulators, 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB, have been characterized. 2-, 3-, and 4-BisPEB are 1,3-bis(pyridinylethynyl)-benzenes and differ only by the position of the nitrogen atoms in the pyridine rings. Despite their high structural similarity, 2-BisPEB [1,3-bis(pyridin-2...

  16. PilN Binding Modulates the Structure and Binding Partners of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type IVa Pilus Protein PilM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Matthew; Tammam, Stephanie; Little, Dustin J; Robinson, Howard; Koo, Jason; Shah, Megha; Calmettes, Charles; Moraes, Trevor F; Burrows, Lori L; Howell, P Lynne

    2016-05-20

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic bacterial pathogen that expresses type IVa pili. The pilus assembly system, which promotes surface-associated twitching motility and virulence, is composed of inner and outer membrane subcomplexes, connected by an alignment subcomplex composed of PilMNOP. PilM binds to the N terminus of PilN, and we hypothesize that this interaction causes functionally significant structural changes in PilM. To characterize this interaction, we determined the crystal structures of PilM and a PilM chimera where PilM was fused to the first 12 residues of PilN (PilM·PilN(1-12)). Structural analysis, multiangle light scattering coupled with size exclusion chromatography, and bacterial two-hybrid data revealed that PilM forms dimers mediated by the binding of a novel conserved motif in the N terminus of PilM, and binding PilN abrogates this binding interface, resulting in PilM monomerization. Structural comparison of PilM with PilM·PilN(1-12) revealed that upon PilN binding, there is a large domain closure in PilM that alters its ATP binding site. Using biolayer interferometry, we found that the association rate of PilN with PilM is higher in the presence of ATP compared with ADP. Bacterial two-hybrid data suggested the connectivity of the cytoplasmic and inner membrane components of the type IVa pilus machinery in P. aeruginosa, with PilM binding to PilB, PilT, and PilC in addition to PilN. Pull-down experiments demonstrated direct interactions of PilM with PilB and PilT. We propose a working model in which dynamic binding of PilN facilitates functionally relevant structural changes in PilM.

  17. Combinatorial binding leads to diverse regulatory responses: Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo M F Cunha

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how complex patterns of temporal and spatial expression are regulated is central to deciphering genetic programs that drive development. Gene expression is initiated through the action of transcription factors and their cofactors converging on enhancer elements leading to a defined activity. Specific constellations of combinatorial occupancy are therefore often conceptualized as rigid binding codes that give rise to a common output of spatio-temporal expression. Here, we assessed this assumption using the regulatory input of two essential transcription factors within the Drosophila myogenic network. Mutations in either Myocyte enhancing factor 2 (Mef2 or the zinc-finger transcription factor lame duck (lmd lead to very similar defects in myoblast fusion, yet the underlying molecular mechanism for this shared phenotype is not understood. Using a combination of ChIP-on-chip analysis and expression profiling of loss-of-function mutants, we obtained a global view of the regulatory input of both factors during development. The majority of Lmd-bound enhancers are co-bound by Mef2, representing a subset of Mef2's transcriptional input during these stages of development. Systematic analyses of the regulatory contribution of both factors demonstrate diverse regulatory roles, despite their co-occupancy of shared enhancer elements. These results indicate that Lmd is a tissue-specific modulator of Mef2 activity, acting as both a transcriptional activator and repressor, which has important implications for myogenesis. More generally, this study demonstrates considerable flexibility in the regulatory output of two factors, leading to additive, cooperative, and repressive modes of co-regulation.

  18. KIR polymorphisms modulate peptide-dependent binding to an MHC class I ligand with a Bw6 motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud D Colantonio

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular interactions between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs and their MHC class I ligands play a central role in the regulation of natural killer (NK cell responses to viral pathogens and tumors. Here we identify Mamu-A1*00201 (Mamu-A*02, a common MHC class I molecule in the rhesus macaque with a canonical Bw6 motif, as a ligand for Mamu-KIR3DL05. Mamu-A1*00201 tetramers folded with certain SIV peptides, but not others, directly stained primary NK cells and Jurkat cells expressing multiple allotypes of Mamu-KIR3DL05. Differences in binding avidity were associated with polymorphisms in the D0 and D1 domains of Mamu-KIR3DL05, whereas differences in peptide-selectivity mapped to the D1 domain. The reciprocal exchange of the third predicted MHC class I-contact loop of the D1 domain switched the specificity of two Mamu-KIR3DL05 allotypes for different Mamu-A1*00201-peptide complexes. Consistent with the function of an inhibitory KIR, incubation of lymphocytes from Mamu-KIR3DL05(+ macaques with target cells expressing Mamu-A1*00201 suppressed the degranulation of tetramer-positive NK cells. These observations reveal a previously unappreciated role for D1 polymorphisms in determining the selectivity of KIRs for MHC class I-bound peptides, and identify the first functional KIR-MHC class I interaction in the rhesus macaque. The modulation of KIR-MHC class I interactions by viral peptides has important implications to pathogenesis, since it suggests that the immunodeficiency viruses, and potentially other types of viruses and tumors, may acquire changes in epitopes that increase the affinity of certain MHC class I ligands for inhibitory KIRs to prevent the activation of specific NK cell subsets.

  19. Complex carbohydrates (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... foods such as peas, beans, whole grains, and vegetables. Both simple and complex carbohydrates are turned to glucose (blood sugar) in the body and are used as energy. Glucose is used in the cells of the body and in the brain. Any ...

  20. Specific binding of a mutated fragment of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin to endothelial claudin-5 and its modulation of cerebral vascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhuangbin; Yang, Zhenguo; Piontek, Anna; Eichner, Miriam; Krause, Gerd; Li, Longxuan; Piontek, Joerg; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    The vertebrate blood-brain barrier (BBB) creates an obstacle for central nervous system-related drug delivery. Claudin-5 (Cldn5), expressed in large quantities in BBB, plays a vital role in restricting BBB permeability. The C-terminal domain of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin (cCPE) has been verified as binding to a subset of claudins (Cldns). The Cldn5-binding cCPE194-319 variant cCPEY306W/S313H was applied in this study to investigate its ability to modulate the permeability of zebrafish larval BBB. In vitro results showed that cCPEY306W/S313H is able to bind specifically to Cldn5 in murine brain vascular endothelial (bEnd.3) cells, and is transported along with Cldn5 from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm, which in turn results in a reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER). Conversely, this effect can be reversed by removal of cCPEY306W/S313H. In an in vivo experiment, this study estimates the capability of cCPEY306W/S313H to modulate Cldn5 using a rhodamine B-Dextran dye diffusion assay in zebrafish larval BBB. The results show that cCPEY306W/S313H co-localized with Cldn5 in zebrafish cerebral vascular cells and modulated BBB permeability, resulting in dye leakage. Taken together, this study suggests that cCPEY306W/S313H has the capability - both in vitro and in vivo - to modulate BBB permeability temporarily by specific binding to Cldn5. PMID:27095710

  1. Recyclable Cellulose-Containing Magnetic Nanoparticles: Immobilization of Cellulose-Binding Module-Tagged Proteins and Synthetic Metabolon Featuring Substrate Channeling

    OpenAIRE

    Myung, Suwan; You, Chun; Zhang, Y. H. Percival

    2013-01-01

    Easily recyclable cellulose-containing magnetic nanoparticles were developed for immobilizing family 3 cellulose-binding module (CBM)-tagged enzymes/proteins and a self-assembled three-enzyme complex called the synthetic metabolon. Avicel (microcrystalline cellulose)-containing magnetic nanoparticles (A-MNPs) and two controls of dextran-containing magnetic nanoparticles (D-MNPs) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were prepared by a solvothermal method. Their adsorption ability was investigated...

  2. IGD motifs, which are required for migration stimulatory activity of fibronectin type I modules, do not mediate binding in matrix assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Maurer

    Full Text Available Picomolar concentrations of proteins comprising only the N-terminal 70-kDa region (70K of fibronectin (FN stimulate cell migration into collagen gels. The Ile-Gly-Asp (IGD motifs in four of the nine FN type 1 (FNI modules in 70K are important for such migratory stimulating activity. The 70K region mediates binding of nanomolar concentrations of intact FN to cell-surface sites where FN is assembled. Using baculovirus, we expressed wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations in (3FNI and (5FNI; (7FNI and (9FNI; or (3FNI, (5FNI, (7FNI, and (9FNI. Wildtype 70K and 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations were equally active in binding to assembly sites of FN-null fibroblasts. This finding indicates that IGD motifs do not mediate the interaction between 70K and the cell-surface that is important for FN assembly. Further, FN fragment N-(3FNIII, which does not stimulate migration, binds to assembly sites on FN-null fibroblast. The Ile-to-Ala mutations had effects on the structure of FNI modules as evidenced by decreases in abilities of 70K with Ile-to-Ala mutations to bind to monoclonal antibody 5C3, which recognizes an epitope in (9FNI, or to bind to FUD, a polypeptide based on the F1 adhesin of Streptococcus pyogenes that interacts with 70K by the β-zipper mechanism. These results suggest that the picomolar interactions of 70K with cells that stimulate cell migration require different conformations of FNI modules than the nanomolar interactions required for assembly.

  3. Escherichia coli Single-Stranded DNA-Binding Protein: NanoESI-MS Studies of Salt-Modulated Subunit Exchange and DNA Binding Transactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Claire E.; Jergic, Slobodan; Lo, Allen T. Y.; Wang, Yao; Dixon, Nicholas E.; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2013-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBs) are ubiquitous oligomeric proteins that bind with very high affinity to single-stranded DNA and have a variety of essential roles in DNA metabolism. Nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) was used to monitor subunit exchange in full-length and truncated forms of the homotetrameric SSB from Escherichia coli. Subunit exchange in the native protein was found to occur slowly over a period of hours, but was significantly more rapid in a truncated variant of SSB from which the eight C-terminal residues were deleted. This effect is proposed to result from C-terminus mediated stabilization of the SSB tetramer, in which the C-termini interact with the DNA-binding cores of adjacent subunits. NanoESI-MS was also used to examine DNA binding to the SSB tetramer. Binding of single-stranded oligonucleotides [one molecule of (dT)70, one molecule of (dT)35, or two molecules of (dT)35] was found to prevent SSB subunit exchange. Transfer of SSB tetramers between discrete oligonucleotides was also observed and is consistent with predictions from solution-phase studies, suggesting that SSB-DNA complexes can be reliably analyzed by ESI mass spectrometry.

  4. Carbohydrates and dietary fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, P M

    2005-01-01

    The most widely spread eating habit is characterized by a reduced intake of dietary fiber, an increased intake of simple sugars, a high intake of refined grain products, an altered fat composition of the diet, and a dietary pattern characterized by a high glycemic load, an increased body weight and reduced physical activity. In this chapter the effects of this eating pattern on disease risk will be outlined. There are no epidemiological studies showing that the increase of glucose, fructose or sucrose intake is directly and independently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease (CHD). On the other hand a large number of studies has reported a reduction of fatal and non-fatal CHD events as a function of the intake of complex carbohydrates--respectively 'dietary fiber' or selected fiber-rich food (e.g., whole grain cereals). It seems that eating too much 'fast' carbohydrate [i.e., carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (GI)] may have deleterious long-term consequences. Indeed the last decades have shown that a low fat (and consecutively high carbohydrate) diet alone is not the best strategy to combat modern diseases including atherosclerosis. Quantity and quality issues in carbohydrate nutrient content are as important as they are for fat. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that for cardiovascular disease prevention a high sugar intake should be avoided. There is growing evidence of the high impact of dietary fiber and foods with a low GI on single risk factors (e.g., lipid pattern, diabetes, inflammation, endothelial function etc.) as well as also the development of the endpoints of atherosclerosis especially CHD. PMID:16596802

  5. A low-carbohydrate/high-fat diet improves glucoregulation in type 2 diabetes mellitus by reducing postabsorptive glycogenolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allick, G; Bisschop, PH; Ackermans, MT; Endert, E; Meijer, AJ; Kuipers, F; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the mechanisms by which dietary carbohydrate and fat modulate fasting glycemia. We compared the effects of an eucaloric high-carbohydrate (89% carbohydrate) and high-fat (89% fat) diet on fasting glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity in seven obese patients

  6. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainshtein, Jeffrey M., E-mail: jvainsh@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Schipper, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Zalupski, Mark M. [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Abrams, Ross [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Francis, Isaac R. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Khan, Gazala [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Leslie, William [Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Ben-Josef, Edgar [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  7. Prognostic Significance of Carbohydrate Antigen 19-9 in Unresectable Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Treated With Dose-Escalated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Full-Dose Gemcitabine: Analysis of a Prospective Phase 1/2 Dose Escalation Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Although established in the postresection setting, the prognostic value of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is less clear. We examined the prognostic utility of CA19-9 in patients with unresectable LAPC treated on a prospective trial of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. Methods and Materials: Forty-six patients with unresectable LAPC were treated at the University of Michigan on a phase 1/2 trial of IMRT dose escalation with concurrent gemcitabine. CA19-9 was obtained at baseline and during routine follow-up. Cox models were used to assess the effect of baseline factors on freedom from local progression (FFLP), distant progression (FFDP), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Stepwise forward regression was used to build multivariate predictive models for each endpoint. Results: Thirty-eight patients were eligible for the present analysis. On univariate analysis, baseline CA19-9 and age predicted OS, CA19-9 at baseline and 3 months predicted PFS, gross tumor volume (GTV) and black race predicted FFLP, and CA19-9 at 3 months predicted FFDP. On stepwise multivariate regression modeling, baseline CA19-9, age, and female sex predicted OS; baseline CA19-9 and female sex predicted both PFS and FFDP; and GTV predicted FFLP. Patients with baseline CA19-9 ≤90 U/mL had improved OS (median 23.0 vs 11.1 months, HR 2.88, P<.01) and PFS (14.4 vs 7.0 months, HR 3.61, P=.001). CA19-9 progression over 90 U/mL was prognostic for both OS (HR 3.65, P=.001) and PFS (HR 3.04, P=.001), and it was a stronger predictor of death than either local progression (HR 1.46, P=.42) or distant progression (HR 3.31, P=.004). Conclusions: In patients with unresectable LAPC undergoing definitive chemoradiation therapy, baseline CA19-9 was independently prognostic even after established prognostic factors were controlled for, whereas CA19-9 progression

  8. Helicobacter pylori induces β3GnT5 in human gastric cell lines, modulating expression of the SabA ligand sialyl–Lewis x

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos, Nuno T; Magalhães, Ana; Ferreira, Bibiana; Maria J Oliveira; Carvalho, Ana S.; Mendes, Nuno; Gilmartin, Tim; Head, Steven R; Figueiredo, Céu; David, Leonor; Santos-Silva, Filipe; Celso A Reis

    2008-01-01

    Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is recognized as a cause of gastric cancer. H. pylori adhesion to gastric cells is mediated by bacterial adhesins such as sialic acid–binding adhesin (SabA), which binds the carbohydrate structure sialyl–Lewis x. Sialyl–Lewis x expression in the gastric epithelium is induced during persistent H. pylori infection, suggesting that H. pylori modulates host cell glycosylation patterns for enhanced adhesion. Here, we evaluate changes in the glycosylation-relat...

  9. Biochemical software: Carbohydrates on Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Heidrich

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Educators around  the  world  are  being  challenged  to  develop  and  design  better and  more  effective strategies for student learning  using a variety  of modern  resources.  In this  present  work, an educa- tional  hypermedia  software  was constructed as a support tool to biochemistry teaching.  Occurrence, structure, main  characteristics and  biological  function  of the  biomolecule  Carbohydrates were pre- sented  through  modules.  The  software was developed  using concept  maps,  ISIS-Draw,  and  FLASH- MX animation program.  The chapter  Carbohydrates on Laboratory illustrates experimental methods of carbohydrates characterization, through  animation of a laboratory scenery.   The  subject was de- veloped showing reactions  as Bial, Benedict, Selliwanoff, Barfoed, Phenol  Sulphuric,  and Iodines, and also enzymatic  reactions  as glucose oxidase and amylase.  There are also links with short texts  in order to help the understanding of the contents  and principles of laboratory practice  as well as background reactions. Application of the software to undergraduate students and high school teachers  showed an excellent  acceptance.   All of them  considered  the  software  a very good learning  tool.  Both  teachers and students welcomed this program  as it is more flexible, and allows the learning in a more individual rhythm. In addition, application of the software would be suitable  to a more effective learning  and it is less expensive than conventional experimental teaching.

  10. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Juli D; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-04-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints. PMID:27058369

  11. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-01

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  12. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  13. Crystal Structure of a Fibroblast Growth Factor Homologous Factor (FHF) Defines a Conserved Surface on FHFs for Binding and Modulation of Voltage-gated Sodium Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, R.; Dover, K; Laezza, F; Shtraizent, N; Huang, X; Tchetchik, D; Eliseenkova, A; Goldfarb, M; Mohammadi, M; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) produce sodium currents that underlie the initiation and propagation of action potentials in nerve and muscle cells. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) bind to the intracellular C-terminal region of the Nav alpha subunit to modulate fast inactivation of the channel. In this study we solved the crystal structure of a 149-residue-long fragment of human FHF2A which unveils the structural features of the homology core domain of all 10 human FHF isoforms. Through analysis of crystal packing contacts and site-directed mutagenesis experiments we identified a conserved surface on the FHF core domain that mediates channel binding in vitro and in vivo. Mutations at this channel binding surface impaired the ability of FHFs to co-localize with Navs at the axon initial segment of hippocampal neurons. The mutations also disabled FHF modulation of voltage-dependent fast inactivation of sodium channels in neuronal cells. Based on our data, we propose that FHFs constitute auxiliary subunits for Navs.

  14. Assessing Bacterial Interactions Using Carbohydrate-Based Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Flannery

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates play a crucial role in host-microorganism interactions and many host glycoconjugates are receptors or co-receptors for microbial binding. Host glycosylation varies with species and location in the body, and this contributes to species specificity and tropism of commensal and pathogenic bacteria. Additionally, bacterial glycosylation is often the first bacterial molecular species encountered and responded to by the host system. Accordingly, characterising and identifying the exact structures involved in these critical interactions is an important priority in deciphering microbial pathogenesis. Carbohydrate-based microarray platforms have been an underused tool for screening bacterial interactions with specific carbohydrate structures, but they are growing in popularity in recent years. In this review, we discuss carbohydrate-based microarrays that have been profiled with whole bacteria, recombinantly expressed adhesins or serum antibodies. Three main types of carbohydrate-based microarray platform are considered; (i conventional carbohydrate or glycan microarrays; (ii whole mucin microarrays; and (iii microarrays constructed from bacterial polysaccharides or their components. Determining the nature of the interactions between bacteria and host can help clarify the molecular mechanisms of carbohydrate-mediated interactions in microbial pathogenesis, infectious disease and host immune response and may lead to new strategies to boost therapeutic treatments.

  15. Neuroplastin-65 and a mimetic peptide derived from its homophilic binding site modulate neuritogenesis and neuronal plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owczarek, Sylwia; Soroka, Vladislav; Kiryushko, Darya;

    2011-01-01

    Neuroplastin-65 (Np65) is a brain-specific cell adhesion molecule belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily. Homophilic trans-interaction of Np65 mediates adhesion between cells and modulates synaptic plasticity. This interaction solely occurs through the first immunoglobulin (Ig) module of Np6...

  16. Production of Single-Chain Variable-Fragments against Carbohydrate Antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Yoko Fujita-Yamaguchi

    2014-01-01

    The production of human single-chain variable-fragments (scFvs) against carbohydrate antigens by phage display technology is seemingly a logical strategy towards the development of antibody therapeutics, since carbohydrates are self-antigens. Panning and screening of phages displaying human scFvs using a variety of neoglycolipids presenting structurally-defined carbohydrates resulted in a number of candidate phage clones as judged by cautious evaluation of DNA sequences and specific binding t...

  17. Interaction of carbohydrates with alcohol dehydrogenase: Effect on enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Swati B; Bankar, Sandip B; Granström, Tom; Ojamo, Heikki; Singhal, Rekha S; Survase, Shrikant A

    2015-09-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenase was covalently conjugated with three different oxidized carbohydrates i.e., glucose, starch and pectin. All the carbohydrates inhibited the enzyme. The inhibition was studied with respect to the inhibition rate constant, involvement of thiol groups in the binding, and structural changes in the enzyme. The enzyme activity decreased to half of its original activity at the concentration of 2 mg/mL of pectin, 4 mg/mL of glucose and 10 mg/mL of starch within 10 min at pH 7. This study showed oxidized pectin to be a potent inhibitor of alcohol dehydrogenase followed by glucose and starch. Along with the aldehyde-amino group interaction, thiol groups were also involved in the binding between alcohol dehydrogenase and carbohydrates. The structural changes occurring on binding of alcohol dehydrogenase with oxidized carbohydrates was also confirmed by fluorescence spectrophotometry. Oxidized carbohydrates could thus be used as potential inhibitors of alcohol dehydrogenase.

  18. Sugar for my honey: carbohydrate partitioning in ectomycorrhizal symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, Uwe; Grunze, Nina; Willmann, Martin; Reich, Marlis; Küster, Helge

    2007-01-01

    Simple, readily utilizable carbohydrates, necessary for growth and maintenance of large numbers of microbes are rare in forest soils. Among other types of mutualistic interactions, the formation of ectomycorrhizas, a symbiosis between tree roots and certain soil fungi, is a way to overcome nutrient and carbohydrate limitations typical for many forest ecosystems. Ectomycorrhiza formation is typical for trees in boreal and temperate forests of the northern hemisphere and alpine regions world-wide. The main function of this symbiosis is the exchange of fungus-derived nutrients for plant-derived carbohydrates, enabling the colonization of mineral nutrient-poor environments. In ectomycorrhizal symbiosis up to 1/3 of plant photoassimilates could be transferred toward the fungal partner. The creation of such a strong sink is directly related to the efficiency of fungal hexose uptake at the plant/fungus interface, a modulated fungal carbohydrate metabolism in the ectomycorrhiza, and the export of carbohydrates towards soil growing hyphae. However, not only the fungus but also the plant partner increase its expression of hexose importer genes at the plant/fungus interface. This increase in hexose uptake capacity of plant roots in combination with an increase in photosynthesis may explain how the plant deals with the growing fungal carbohydrate demand in symbiosis and how it can restrict this loss of carbohydrates under certain conditions to avoid fungal parasitism. PMID:17078984

  19. Effects of Carbohydrate Consumption Case Study: carbohydrates in Bread

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neacsu N.A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates perform numerous roles in living organisms; they are an important source of energy. The body uses carbohydrates to make glucose which is the fuel that gives it energy and helps keep everything going. However, excess carbohydrate consumption has negative health effects. Bread is a basic product in our nutrition and it also is a product with a high content of carbohydrates. So, it is important to find out more information on bread and on the recommended bread type best for consumption.

  20. Molecular recognition of surface-immobilized carbohydrates by a synthetic lectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Rauschenberg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The molecular recognition of carbohydrates and proteins mediates a wide range of physiological processes and the development of synthetic carbohydrate receptors (“synthetic lectins” constitutes a key advance in biomedical technology. In this article we report a synthetic lectin that selectively binds to carbohydrates immobilized in a molecular monolayer. Inspired by our previous work, we prepared a fluorescently labeled synthetic lectin consisting of a cyclic dimer of the tripeptide Cys-His-Cys, which forms spontaneously by air oxidation of the monomer. Amine-tethered derivatives of N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA, β-D-galactose, β-D-glucose and α-D-mannose were microcontact printed on epoxide-terminated self-assembled monolayers. Successive prints resulted in simple microarrays of two carbohydrates. The selectivity of the synthetic lectin was investigated by incubation on the immobilized carbohydrates. Selective binding of the synthetic lectin to immobilized NANA and β-D-galactose was observed by fluorescence microscopy. The selectivity and affinity of the synthetic lectin was screened in competition experiments. In addition, the carbohydrate binding of the synthetic lectin was compared with the carbohydrate binding of the lectins concanavalin A and peanut agglutinin. It was found that the printed carbohydrates retain their characteristic selectivity towards the synthetic and natural lectins and that the recognition of synthetic and natural lectins is strictly orthogonal.

  1. Heparin/heparan sulfates bind to and modulate neuronal L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garau, Gianpiero; Magotti, Paola; Heine, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    Our previous studies revealed that L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (Cav1.2 L-VDCCs) are modulated by the neural extracellular matrix backbone, polyanionic glycan hyaluronic acid. Here we used isothermal titration calorimetry and screened a set of peptides derived from the extracellular...... domains of Cav1.2α1 to identify putative binding sites between the channel and hyaluronic acid or another class of polyanionic glycans, such as heparin/heparan sulfates. None of the tested peptides showed detectable interaction with hyaluronic acid, but two peptides derived from the first pore...

  2. Resveratrol and EGCG bind directly and distinctively to miR-33a and miR-122 and modulate divergently their levels in hepatic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Baselga-Escudero, Laura; Blade, Cinta; Ribas-Latre, Aleix; Casanova, Ester; Suárez, Manuel; Torres, Josep Lluís; Salvadó, M. Josepa; Arola, Lluis; Arola-Arnal, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Modulation of miR-33 and miR-122 has been proposed to be a promising strategy to treat dyslipidemia and insulin resistance associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Interestingly, specific polyphenols reduce the levels of these mi(cro)RNAs. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of polyphenols of different chemical structure on miR-33a and miR-122 expression and to determine whether direct binding of the polyphenol to the mature microRNAs (miRNAs) is a plausible mechanism of ...

  3. Escherichia coli OxyR modulation of bacteriophage Mu mom expression in dam+ cells can be attributed to its ability to bind hemimethylated Pmom promoter DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Hattman, S; Sun, W.

    1997-01-01

    Transcription of the bacteriophage Mu mom operon is strongly repressed by the host OxyR protein in dam - but not dam + cells. In this work we show that the extent of mom modification is sensitive to the relative levels of the Dam and OxyR proteins and OxyR appears to modulate the level of mom expression even in dam + cells. In vitro studies demonstrated that OxyR is capable of binding hemimethylated P mom , although its affinity is reduced slightly compared with unmethylated DNA. Thus, OxyR m...

  4. Sequence analyses of fimbriae subunit FimA proteins on Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 and Actinomyces odontolyticus with variant carbohydrate binding specificities

    OpenAIRE

    Persson Karina; Birve Anna; Öhman Ulla; Hallberg Kristina; Drobni Mirva; Johansson Ingegerd; Strömberg Nicklas

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Actinomyces naeslundii genospecies 1 and 2 express type-2 fimbriae (FimA subunit polymers) with variant Galβ binding specificities and Actinomyces odontolyticus a sialic acid specificity to colonize different oral surfaces. However, the fimbrial nature of the sialic acid binding property and sequence information about FimA proteins from multiple strains are lacking. Results Here we have sequenced fimA genes from strains of A.naeslundii genospecies 1 (n = 4) and genospecies...

  5. Impact of Dietary Carbohydrate and Protein Levels on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Denise Ann

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation was to investigate the impact of changing dietary carbohydrate (CARB) intakes within recommended dietary guidelines on metabolic outcomes specifically associated with glycemic regulations and carbohydrate metabolism. This research utilized both human and animal studies to examine changes in metabolism across a wide…

  6. Drugs Modulate Interactions between the First Nucleotide-Binding Domain and the Fourth Cytoplasmic Loop of Human P-Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Tip W; Clarke, David M

    2016-05-24

    Drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity of the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) ATP-binding cassette drug pump by an unknown mechanism. Cross-linking analysis was performed to test if drug substrates stimulate P-gp ATPase activity by altering cross-talk at the first transmission interface linking the drug-binding [intracellular loop 4 (S909C)] and first nucleotide-binding domains [NBD1 (V472C or L443C)]. In the absence of lipid (inactive P-gp), only V472C/S909C showed cross-linking. Drugs blocked V472C/S909C cross-linking. In the presence of lipids (active P-gp), drug substrates promoted only L443C/S909C cross-linking. This suggests that drug substrates stimulate ATPase activity through a conformational change that shifts Ser909 away from Val472 and toward Leu443. PMID:27159830

  7. A Novel Binding Pattern Unique in Two Ligands for One Carbohydrate Recognition Domain in Galectins%半乳糖凝集素糖结合的新模式:一个糖结合域的双重配体结合

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞乘凤; 张英; 李德峰; 王大成

    2011-01-01

    半乳糖凝集素家族通过糖识别结构域(CRD)可以专一性识别和结合含β-半乳糖的多糖配体来发挥其生物学功能.到目前发现的CRD对β-半乳糖的识别模式是非常保守的,在结构已知的半乳糖凝集素结构中,一个CRD只能结合一个多糖配体分子.最近,通过对人源半乳糖凝聚素-3 CRD与对硝基TF二糖(TFN)复合物的晶体结构解析首次发现,一个CRD可以同时结合2个TFN分子.与这2个TFN分子有双向结合的残基突变体E165A结构分析显示,一个残基的突变引起的结构上的微小变化会使结合位点2丧失结合糖底物的能力,而位点1的配体结合却不受影响.这表明,结合位点1对糖底物保守的识别和结合是基本的、主要的,而结合位点2对于糖有条件的结合,是额外的、次要的.序列比对和立体化学分析显示,参与新位点2结合的关键残基在其他半乳糖凝集素分子中都是保守的,而它们参与糖配体结合并不常见,表明它们作用的发挥是有条件的.可能在复杂寡聚结构的情况下,如有多重分支结构,双重结合位点将有利于对这类配体分子的辨识和结合,已有一系列研究报道,具有分支结构的寡糖与半乳糖分子的亲和势明显高于单价糖配体,与上述分析相一致.对这类双重位点糖结合的可能生物学意义进行了讨论.%Galectins are a protein family with diverse biological functions,which are unique in specifically recognition and binding with β-galactosides as the primary structural basis for its functional performance.So far,all structurally characterized galectins display a conservative binding mode for the β-galactoside-containing carbohydrate ligands,in which one carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) binds only one ligand.Here a novel binding pattern unique in two carbohydrate ligands for one CRD was reported,which is observed from the structure of Gal-3 CRD complexed with glycan TFN.In this doublet binding

  8. Sodium modulation of 3H-agonist and 3H-antagonist binding to alpha 2-adrenoceptor subtypes.

    OpenAIRE

    MacKinnon, A. C.; Spedding, M.; Brown, C. M.(University of Victoria, V8W 3P6, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada)

    1993-01-01

    1. The alpha 2-adrenoceptors on human platelets and neonatal rat lung were characterized with the agonist and antagonist ligands [3H]-adrenaline and [3H]-RS-15385-197 respectively. A correlation of affinities for 3H-antagonist binding showed the receptors to be of the alpha 2A-(platelet) and alpha 2B-(neonatal rat lung) adrenoceptor subtypes, whereas a correlation of affinities for 3H-agonist binding showed the receptors to have similar characteristics (r = 0.88). 2. NaCl (100 mM) had no effe...

  9. Multifunctional roles for the N-terminal basic motif of Alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein: nucleolar/cytoplasmic shuttling, modulation of RNA-binding activity, and virion formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, Mari Carmen; Pallas, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic

    2012-08-01

    In addition to virion formation, the coat protein (CP) of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is involved in the regulation of replication and translation of viral RNAs, and in cell-to-cell and systemic movement of the virus. An intriguing feature of the AMV CP is its nuclear and nucleolar accumulation. Here, we identify an N-terminal lysine-rich nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in the AMV CP required to both enter the nucleus and accumulate in the nucleolus of infected cells, and a C-terminal leucine-rich domain which might function as a nuclear export signal. Moreover, we demonstrate that AMV CP interacts with importin-α, a component of the classical nuclear import pathway. A mutant AMV RNA 3 unable to target the nucleolus exhibited reduced plus-strand RNA synthesis and cell-to-cell spread. Moreover, virion formation and systemic movement were completely abolished in plants infected with this mutant. In vitro analysis demonstrated that specific lysine residues within the NoLS are also involved in modulating CP-RNA binding and CP dimerization, suggesting that the NoLS represents a multifunctional domain within the AMV CP. The observation that nuclear and nucleolar import signals mask RNA-binding properties of AMV CP, essential for viral replication and translation, supports a model in which viral expression is carefully modulated by a cytoplasmic/nuclear balance of CP accumulation. PMID:22746826

  10. Carbohydrates and Diabetes (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of diet foods. These foods may contain extra sugar as a substitute for fat calories. Try to include your child or teen as you evaluate and select healthy carbohydrate-containing foods. With ... blood sugar. By taking a smart approach to balancing carbohydrates, ...

  11. 14-3-3 Binding and Sumoylation Concur to the Down-Modulation of β-catenin Antagonist chibby 1 in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Mancini

    Full Text Available The down-modulation of the β-catenin antagonist Chibby 1 (CBY1 associated with the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML contributes to the aberrant activation of β-catenin, particularly in leukemic stem cells (LSC resistant to tyrosine kinase (TK inhibitors. It is, at least partly, driven by transcriptional events and gene promoter hyper-methylation. Here we demonstrate that it also arises from reduced protein stability upon binding to 14-3-3σ adapter protein. CBY1/14-3-3σ interaction in BCR-ABL1+ cells is mediated by the fusion protein TK and AKT phosphorylation of CBY1 at critical serine 20, and encompasses the 14-3-3σ binding modes I and II involved in the binding with client proteins. Moreover, it is impaired by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK phosphorylation of 14-3-3σ at serine 186, which promotes dissociation of client proteins. The ubiquitin proteasome system UPS participates in reducing stability of CBY1 bound with 14-3-3σ through enhanced SUMOylation. Our results open new routes towards the research on molecular pathways promoting the proliferative advantage of leukemic hematopoiesis over the normal counterpart.

  12. Macro Domain from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Is an Efficient ADP-ribose Binding Module: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Hsuan; Chuang, Chien-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The newly emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) encodes the conserved macro domain within non-structural protein 3. However, the precise biochemical function and structure of the macro domain is unclear. Using differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterized the MERS-CoV macro domain as a more efficient adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose binding module than macro domains from other CoVs. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the MERS-CoV macro domain was determined at 1.43-Å resolution in complex with ADP-ribose. Comparison of macro domains from MERS-CoV and other human CoVs revealed structural differences in the α1 helix alters how the conserved Asp-20 interacts with ADP-ribose and may explain the efficient binding of the MERS-CoV macro domain to ADP-ribose. This study provides structural and biophysical bases to further evaluate the role of the MERS-CoV macro domain in the host response via ADP-ribose binding but also as a potential target for drug design.

  13. A single-molecule force spectroscopy study of the interactions between lectins and carbohydrates on cancer and normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weidong; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Wang, Hongda

    2013-03-01

    The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells.The interaction forces between carbohydrates and lectins were investigated by single-molecule force spectroscopy on both cancer and normal cells. The binding kinetics was also studied, which shows that the carbohydrate-lectin complex on cancer cells is less stable than that on normal cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr00553d

  14. Oral carbohydrate loading with 18% carbohydrate beverage alleviates insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Takahiko; Yatabe, Tomoaki; Kitagawa, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Koichi; Hanazaki, Kazuhiro; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2013-01-01

    Preoperative 12.6% oral carbohydrate loading is an element of the Enhanced Recovery After Surgery (ERAS) protocol aimed at alleviating postoperative insulin resistance; however, in Japan, beverages with 18% carbohydrate content are generally used for preoperative carbohydrate loading. We investigated the effect of 18% carbohydrate loading on alleviating insulin resistance. Six healthy volunteers participated in this crossover-randomized study and were segregated into 2 groups: volunteers in the carbohydrate-loading group (group A) who fasted from after 9 pm and ingested 375 mL of a beverage containing 18% carbohydrate (ArginaidWaterTM; Nestle, Tokyo, Japan) between 9 pm and 12 pm, and 250 mL of the same liquid at 6:30 am. Volunteers in control group (group B) drank only water. At 8:30 am, a hyperinsulinemic normoglycemic clamp was initiated. Glucose infusion rate (GIR) and levels of ketone bodies and cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α) before clamping were evaluated. p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Levels of blood glucose, insulin, and cytokines at the start of the clamp were similar in both the groups. The GIR in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (11.5±2.4 vs 6.2±2.2 mg/kg/min, p=0.005), while blood ketone body levels were significantly lower in group A (22±4 vs 124±119 μmol/L, p=0.04). Preoperative 18% carbohydrate loading could prevent the decrease in insulin sensitivity and suppress catabolism in healthy volunteers. Thus, carbohydrate loading with a beverage with 18% carbohydrate content might contribute to improvements in perioperative management. PMID:23353610

  15. Binding specificity and in vivo targets of the EH domain, a novel protein-protein interaction module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salcini, A E; Confalonieri, S; Doria, M;

    1997-01-01

    EH is a recently identified protein-protein interaction domain found in the signal transducers Eps15 and Eps15R and several other proteins of yeast nematode. We show that EH domains from Eps15 and Eps15R bind in vitro to peptides containing an asparagine-proline-phenylalanine (NPF) motif. Direct...... screening of expression libraries with EH domains yielded a number of putative EH interactors, all of which possessed NPF motifs that were shown to be responsible for the interaction. Among these interactors were the human homolog of NUMB, a developmentally reguated gene of Drosophila, and RAB, the cellular...... cofactor of the HIV REV protein. We demonstrated coimmunoprecipitation of Eps15 with NUMB and RAB. Finally, in vitro binding of NPF-containing peptides to cellular proteins and EST database screening established the existence of a family of EH-containing proteins in mammals. Based on the characteristics of...

  16. Identification and modulation of a growth hormone-binding protein in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) plasma during seawater adaptation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sohm, F.; Manfroid, Isabelle; Pezet, A.; Rentier-Delrue, Françoise; Rand-Weaver, M; Kelly, P A; Boeuf, G.; Postel-Vinay, M C; de Luze, A; Edery, M.

    1998-01-01

    A soluble protein that specifically bound 125I-human growth hormone (hGH) was identified in rainbow trout plasma, using HPLC-gel filtration. The binding affinity of the protein for hGH was 1.2 x 10(9)M-1. 125I-rainbow trout GH (tGH) was also able to bind to the protein albeit with a lower affinity (6.6 x 10(7)M-1) than hGH. Crosslinking experiments using 125I-hGH revealed two specific bands of 150 and 130 kDa. The complex 125I-hGH-BP could be precipitated by a monoclonal anti-GH receptor anti...

  17. Telomere-Binding Protein TPP1 Modulates Telomere Homeostasis and Confers Radioresistance to Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Yang; Wenbo Wang; Liu Hu; Xiaoxi Yang; Juan Zhong; Zheng Li; Hui Yang; Han Lei; Haijun Yu; ZhengKai Liao; Fuxiang Zhou; Conghua Xie; Yunfeng Zhou

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telo...

  18. Modulation of enteroviral proteinase cleavage of poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) by conformation and PABP-associated factors

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Carlos I.; Lloyd, Richard E.

    2008-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) causes a drastic inhibition of cellular cap-dependant protein synthesis due to the cleavage of translation factors eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and poly (A) binding protein (PABP). Only about half of cellular PABP is cleaved by viral 2A and 3C proteinases during infection. We have investigated PABP cleavage determinants that regulate this partial cleavage. PABP cleavage kinetics analyses indicate that PABP exists in multiple conformations, some of which are resistan...

  19. C-type lectin-like carbohydrate recognition of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III containing ricin-type -trefoil folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Unno, Hideaki; Kouzuma, Yoshiaki; Uchida, Tatsuya; Eto, Seiichiro; Hidemura, Haruki; Kato, Norihisa; Yonekura, Masami; Kusunoki, Masami

    2007-12-28

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent hemolytic lectin, isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata. The three-dimensional structure of CEL-III/GalNAc and CEL-III/methyl alpha-galactoside complexes was solved by x-ray crystallographic analysis. In these complexes, five carbohydrate molecules were found to be bound to two carbohydrate-binding domains (domains 1 and 2) located in the N-terminal 2/3 portion of the polypeptide and that contained beta-trefoil folds similar to ricin B-chain. The 3-OH and 4-OH of bound carbohydrate molecules were coordinated with Ca(2+) located at the subdomains 1alpha, 1gamma, 2alpha, 2beta, and 2gamma, simultaneously forming hydrogen bond networks with nearby amino acid side chains, which is similar to carbohydrate binding in C-type lectins. The binding of carbohydrates was further stabilized by aromatic amino acid residues, such as tyrosine and tryptophan, through a stacking interaction with the hydrophobic face of carbohydrates. The importance of amino acid residues in the carbohydrate-binding sites was confirmed by the mutational analyses. The orientation of bound GalNAc and methyl alpha-galactoside was similar to the galactose moiety of lactose bound to the carbohydrate-binding site of the ricin B-chain, although the ricin B-chain does not require Ca(2+) ions for carbohydrate binding. The binding of the carbohydrates induced local structural changes in carbohydrate-binding sites in subdomains 2alpha and 2beta. Binding of GalNAc also induced a slight change in the main chain structure of domain 3, which could be related to the conformational change upon binding of specific carbohydrates to induce oligomerization of the protein. PMID:17977832

  20. Heparin/heparan sulfates bind to and modulate neuronal L-type (Cav1.2) voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garau, Gianpiero; Magotti, Paola; Heine, Martin; Korotchenko, Svetlana; Lievens, Patricia Marie-Jeanne; Berezin, Vladimir; Dityatev, Alexander

    2015-12-01

    Our previous studies revealed that L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (Cav1.2 L-VDCCs) are modulated by the neural extracellular matrix backbone, polyanionic glycan hyaluronic acid. Here we used isothermal titration calorimetry and screened a set of peptides derived from the extracellular domains of Cav1.2α1 to identify putative binding sites between the channel and hyaluronic acid or another class of polyanionic glycans, such as heparin/heparan sulfates. None of the tested peptides showed detectable interaction with hyaluronic acid, but two peptides derived from the first pore-forming domain of Cav1.2α1 subunit bound to heparin. At 25 °C the binding of the peptide P7 (MGKMHKTCYN) was at ~50 μM, and that of the peptide P8 (GHGRQCQNGTVCKPGWDGPKHG) was at ~21 μM. The Cav1.2α1 first pore forming segment that contained both peptides maintained a high affinity for heparin (~23 μM), integrating their enthalpic and entropic binding contributions. Interaction between heparin and recombinant as well as native full-length neuronal Cav1.2α1 channels was confirmed using the heparin-agarose pull down assay. Whole cell patch clamp recordings in HEK293 cells transfected with neuronal Cav1.2 channels revealed that enzymatic digestion of highly sulfated heparan sulfates with heparinase 1 affects neither voltage-dependence of channel activation nor the level of steady state inactivation, but did speed up channel inactivation. Treatment of hippocampal cultures with heparinase 1 reduced the firing rate and led to appearance of long-lasting bursts in the same manner as treatment with the inhibitor of L-VDCC diltiazem. Thus, heparan sulfate proteoglycans may bind to and regulate L-VDCC inactivation and network activity.

  1. Impact of dietary polyphenols on carbohydrate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanhineva, Kati; Törrönen, Riitta; Bondia-Pons, Isabel; Pekkinen, Jenna; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Mykkänen, Hannu; Poutanen, Kaisa

    2010-03-31

    Polyphenols, including flavonoids, phenolic acids, proanthocyanidins and resveratrol, are a large and heterogeneous group of phytochemicals in plant-based foods, such as tea, coffee, wine, cocoa, cereal grains, soy, fruits and berries. Growing evidence indicates that various dietary polyphenols may influence carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. In animal models and a limited number of human studies carried out so far, polyphenols and foods or beverages rich in polyphenols have attenuated postprandial glycemic responses and fasting hyperglycemia, and improved acute insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. The possible mechanisms include inhibition of carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption in the intestine, stimulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic beta-cells, modulation of glucose release from the liver, activation of insulin receptors and glucose uptake in the insulin-sensitive tissues, and modulation of intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression. The positive effects of polyphenols on glucose homeostasis observed in a large number of in vitro and animal models are supported by epidemiological evidence on polyphenol-rich diets. To confirm the implications of polyphenol consumption for prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and eventually type 2 diabetes, human trials with well-defined diets, controlled study designs and clinically relevant end-points together with holistic approaches e.g., systems biology profiling technologies are needed.

  2. Impact of Dietary Polyphenols on Carbohydrate Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kati Hanhineva

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols, including flavonoids, phenolic acids, proanthocyanidins and resveratrol, are a large and heterogeneous group of phytochemicals in plant-based foods, such as tea, coffee, wine, cocoa, cereal grains, soy, fruits and berries. Growing evidence indicates that various dietary polyphenols may influence carbohydrate metabolism at many levels. In animal models and a limited number of human studies carried out so far, polyphenols and foods or beverages rich in polyphenols have attenuated postprandial glycemic responses and fasting hyperglycemia, and improved acute insulin secretion and insulin sensitivity. The possible mechanisms include inhibition of carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption in the intestine, stimulation of insulin secretion from the pancreatic b-cells, modulation of glucose release from the liver, activation of insulin receptors and glucose uptake in the insulin-sensitive tissues, and modulation of intracellular signalling pathways and gene expression. The positive effects of polyphenols on glucose homeostasis observed in a large number of in vitro and animal models are supported by epidemiological evidence on polyphenol-rich diets. To confirm the implications of polyphenol consumption for prevention of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and eventually type 2 diabetes, human trials with well-defined diets, controlled study designs and clinically relevant end-points together with holistic approaches e.g., systems biology profiling technologies are needed.

  3. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) modulates syntaxin-1A binding to sulfonylurea receptor 2A to regulate cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Li; Liang, Tao; Kang, Youhou; Lin, Xianguang; Sobbi, Roozbeh; Xie, Huanli; Chao, Christin; Backx, Peter; Feng, Zhong-Ping; Shyng, Show-Ling; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac sarcolemmal syntaxin (Syn)-1A interacts with sulfonylurea receptor (SUR) 2A to inhibit ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), a ubiquitous endogenous inositol phospholipid, known to bind Kir6.2 subunit to open KATP channels, has recently been shown to directly bind Syn-1A in plasma membrane to form Syn-1A clusters. Here, we sought to determine whether the interaction between Syn-1A and PIP2 interferes with the ability of Syn-1A to bind SUR2A and inhibit KATP channel activity. We found that PIP2 dose-dependently reduced SUR2A binding to GST-Syn-1A by in vitro pulldown assays. FRET studies in intact cells using TIRFM revealed that increasing endogenous PIP2 levels led to increased Syn-1A (-EGFP) cluster formation and a severe reduction in availability of Syn-1A molecules to interact with SUR2A (-mCherry) molecules outside the Syn-1A clusters. Correspondingly, electrophysiological studies employing SUR2A/Kir6.2-expressing HEK cells showed that increasing endogenous or exogenous PIP2 diminished the inhibitory effect of Syn-1A on KATP currents. The physiological relevance of these findings was confirmed by ability of exogenous PIP2 to block exogenous Syn-1A inhibition of cardiac KATP currents in inside-out patches of mouse ventricular myocytes. The effect of PIP2 on physical and functional interactions between Syn-1A and KATP channels is specific and not observed with physiologic concentrations of other phospholipids. To unequivocally demonstrate the specificity of PIP2 interaction with Syn-1A and its impact on KATP channel modulation by Syn-1A, we employed a PIP2-insensitive Syn-1A-5RK/A mutant. The Syn-1A-5RK/A mutant retains the ability to interact with SUR2A in both in vitro binding and in vivo FRET assays, although as expected the interaction is no longer disrupted by PIP2. Interestingly, at physiological PIP2 concentrations, Syn-1A-5RK/A inhibited KATP currents to a greater extent than Syn-1A-WT, indicating

  4. The GH5 1,4-β-mannanase from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 possesses a low-affinity mannan-binding module and highlights the diversity of mannanolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrill, Johan; Kulcinskaja, Evelina; Sulewska, Anna Maria;

    2015-01-01

    β-Mannans are abundant and diverse plant structural and storage polysaccharides. Certain human gut microbiota members including health-promoting Bifidobacterium spp. catabolize dietary mannans. Little insight is available on the enzymology of mannan deconstruction in the gut ecological niche. Here....... Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed the binding of the CBM10 to manno-oligosaccharides, albeit with slightly lower affinity than the catalytic module of the enzyme. This is the first example of a low-affinity mannan-specific CBM, which forms a subfamily of CBM10 together with close homologs...... by an exceptionally low Km and the presence of an atypical low affinity CBM, which increases binding to specifically to soluble mannan while causing minimal decrease in catalytic efficiency as opposed to enzymes with canonical mannan binding modules. These features highlight fine tuning of catalytic and binding...

  5. Lipocalin 2 binds to membrane phosphatidylethanolamine to induce lipid raft movement in a PKA-dependent manner and modulates sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hitomi; Takeo, Toru; Tojo, Hiromasa; Sakoh, Kazuhito; Berger, Thorsten; Nakagata, Naomi; Mak, Tak W; Kondoh, Gen

    2014-05-01

    Mammalian sperm undergo multiple maturation steps after leaving the testis in order to become competent for fertilization, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. In terms of identifying factors crucial for these processes in vivo, we found that lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), which is known as an innate immune factor inhibiting bacterial and malarial growth, can modulate sperm maturation. Most sperm that migrated to the oviduct of wild-type females underwent lipid raft reorganization and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein shedding, which are signatures of sperm maturation, but few did so in Lcn2 null mice. Furthermore, we found that LCN2 binds to membrane phosphatidylethanolamine to reinforce lipid raft reorganization via a PKA-dependent mechanism and promotes sperm to acquire fertility by facilitating cholesterol efflux. These observations imply that mammals possess a mode for sperm maturation in addition to the albumin-mediated pathway.

  6. Modulation of the antioxidant activity of HO* scavengers by albumin binding: a 19F-NMR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aime, Silvio; Digilio, Giuseppe; Bruno, Erik; Mainero, Valentina; Baroni, Simona; Fasano, Mauro

    2003-08-01

    The interaction between different HO(z.rad;) radical scavengers in a three-component antioxidant system has been investigated by means of 19F-NMR spectroscopy. This system is composed of bovine serum albumin (BSA), trolox, and N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-trifluoroacetamide (CF(3)PAF). The antioxidant capacity of BSA and trolox has been assessed by measuring the amount of trifluoroacetamide (TFAM) arising from the radical mediated decomposition of CF(3)PAF. When assayed separately, both trolox and BSA behaved as antioxidants, as they were effective to protect CF(3)PAF from HO* radical-mediated decomposition. By contrast, trolox enhanced the production of TFAM in the presence of BSA, thus behaving as a pro-oxidant. Urate, carnosine, glucose, and propylgallate showed antioxidant properties both with or without BSA. CF(3)PAF and trolox were found to bind to BSA with association constants in the order of 5 x 10(3)M(-1) and to compete for the same binding sites. These results have been discussed in terms of BSA-catalysed cross-reactions between trolox-derived secondary radicals and CF(3)PAF. PMID:12878205

  7. Chemokine binding protein M3 of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 modulates the host response to infection in a natural host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J Hughes

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68 infection of Mus musculus-derived strains of mice is an attractive model of γ-herpesvirus infection. Surprisingly, however, ablation of expression of MHV-68 M3, a secreted protein with broad chemokine-binding properties in vitro, has no discernable effect during experimental infection via the respiratory tract. Here we demonstrate that M3 indeed contributes significantly to MHV-68 infection, but only in the context of a natural host, the wood mouse (Apodemus sylvaticus. Specifically, M3 was essential for two features unique to the wood mouse: virus-dependent inducible bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue (iBALT in the lung and highly organized secondary follicles in the spleen, both predominant sites of latency in these organs. Consequently, lack of M3 resulted in substantially reduced latency in the spleen and lung. In the absence of M3, splenic germinal centers appeared as previously described for MHV-68-infected laboratory strains of mice, further evidence that M3 is not fully functional in the established model host. Finally, analyses of M3's influence on chemokine and cytokine levels within the lungs of infected wood mice were consistent with the known chemokine-binding profile of M3, and revealed additional influences that provide further insight into its role in MHV-68 biology.

  8. Kv Channel S1-S2 Linker Working as a Binding Site of Human β-Defensin 2 for Channel Activation Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jing; Yang, Weishan; Xie, Zili; Xiang, Fang; Cao, Zhijian; Li, Wenxin; Hu, Hongzhen; Chen, Zongyun; Wu, Yingliang

    2015-06-19

    Among the three extracellular domains of the tetrameric voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels consisting of six membrane-spanning helical segments named S1-S6, the functional role of the S1-S2 linker still remains unclear because of the lack of a peptide ligand. In this study, the Kv1.3 channel S1-S2 linker was reported as a novel receptor site for human β-defensin 2 (hBD2). hBD2 shifts the conductance-voltage relationship curve of the human Kv1.3 channel in a positive direction by nearly 10.5 mV and increases the activation time constant for the channel. Unlike classical gating modifiers of toxin peptides from animal venoms, which generally bind to the Kv channel S3-S4 linker, hBD2 only targets residues in both the N and C termini of the S1-S2 linker to influence channel gating and inhibit channel currents. The increment and decrement of the basic residue number in a positively charged S4 sensor of Kv1.3 channel yields conductance-voltage relationship curves in the positive direction by ∼31.2 mV and 2-4 mV, which suggests that positively charged hBD2 is anchored in the channel S1-S2 linker and is modulating channel activation through electrostatic repulsion with an adjacent S4 helix. Together, these findings reveal a novel peptide ligand that binds with the Kv channel S1-S2 linker to modulate channel activation. These findings also highlight the functional importance of the Kv channel S1-S2 linker in ligand recognition and modification of channel activation.

  9. Transition metals in carbohydrate chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Robert

    1997-01-01

    This review describes the application of transition metal mediated reactions in carbohydrate synthesis. The different metal mediated transformations are divided into reaction types and illustrated by various examples on monosaccharide derivatives. Carbon-carbon bond forming reactions are further ...

  10. Carbohydrates, Sugar, and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are: simple carbohydrates (or simple sugars): these include fructose, glucose, and lactose, which also are found in nutritious ... look at the ingredient list for sugar, corn syrup or sweetener, dextrose, fructose, honey, or molasses, to name just a few. ...

  11. Racemic carbohydrates - fact or fiction?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senning, Alexander Erich Eugen

    2007-01-01

    Chemical Abstracts Service has developed unsound practices in the naming and handling of simple carbohydrates such as aldopentoses 1, aldohexoses 2, and ketohexoses 3. Typically, the common name glucose is sometimes, inappropriately, interpreted as meaning DL-glucose DL-2d. Thus, a considerable...... number of CA names and registry numbers have been created for non-existing racemic carbohydrates and linked to irrelevant references which, moreover, in many cases cannot be retrieved by the SciFinder Scholar program....

  12. BA321, a novel carborane analog that binds to androgen and estrogen receptors, acts as a new selective androgen receptor modulator of bone in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenta; Hirata, Michiko; Tominari, Tsukasa; Matsumoto, Chiho; Endo, Yasuyuki; Murphy, Gillian; Nagase, Hideaki; Inada, Masaki; Miyaura, Chisato

    2016-09-01

    Carboranes are a class of carbon-containing polyhedral boron cluster compounds with globular geometry and hydrophobic surface that interact with hormone receptors such as estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR). We have synthesized BA321, a novel carborane compound, which binds to AR. We found here that it also binds to ERs, ERα and ERβ. In orchidectomized (ORX) mice, femoral bone mass was markedly reduced due to androgen deficiency and BA321 restored bone loss in the male, whilst the decreased weight of seminal vesicle in ORX mice was not recovered by administration of BA321. In female mice, BA321 acts as a pure estrogen agonist, and restored both the loss of bone mass and uterine atrophy due to estrogen deficiency in ovariectomized (OVX) mice. In bone tissues, the trabecular bone loss occurred in both ORX and OVX mice, and BA321 completely restored the trabecular bone loss in both sexes. Cortical bone loss occurred in ORX mice but not in OVX mice, and BA321 clearly restored cortical bone loss due to androgen deficiency in ORX mice. Therefore, BA321 is a novel selective androgen receptor modulator (SARM) that may offer a new therapy option for osteoporosis in the male. PMID:27402268

  13. Kr-pok increases FASN expression by modulating the DNA binding of SREBP-1c and Sp1 at the proximal promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Kim, Yeon-Sook; Choi, Won-Il; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Benjamin; Paik, Philip Dong-Hyun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2012-04-01

    Kr-pok (kidney cancer-related POZ domain and Krüppel-like protein) is a new proto-oncogenic POZ-domain transcription factor. Fatty acid synthase gene (FASN) encodes one of the key enzymes in fatty acids synthesis and is the only enzyme that synthesizes fatty acids in cancer cells. Sp1 and SREBP-1c are the two major transcription activators of FASN. We investigated whether Kr-pok modulates transcription of the FASN. FASN expression is significantly decreased in Kr-pok knockout murine embryonic fibroblasts. Coimmunoprecipitation, GST fusion protein pull-down, and immunocytochemistry assays show that the zinc-finger domain of Kr-pok interacts directly with the bZIP DNA binding domain of SREBP-1. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay, oligonucleotide pull-down, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that Kr-pok changes the transcription factor binding dynamics of Sp1 and SREBP-1c to the SRE/E-box elements of the proximal promoter. We found that Kr-pok expression increased during 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation and that FASN expression is decreased by the knockdown of Kr-pok. Kr-pok facilitates the SREBP-1c-mediated preadipocyte differentiation and/or fatty acid synthesis. Kr-pok may act as an important regulator of fatty acid synthesis and may induce rapid cancer cell proliferation by increasing palmitate synthesis.

  14. Monoclonal antibody-assisted structure-function analysis of the carbohydrate recognition domain of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Rynkiewicz, Michael;

    2010-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in host defense against a variety of pathogens including influenza A virus (IAV). Ligand binding by SP-D is mediated by the trimeric neck and carbohydrate recognition domain (NCRD). We used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human SP-D and a panel......, for the first time, an extended binding site for IAV; calcium-dependent antiviral activity involves residues flanking the primary carbohydrate binding site as well as more remote residues displayed on the carbohydrate recognition domain surface....

  15. An In-tether Chiral Center Modulates the Helicity, Cell Permeability, and Target Binding Affinity of a Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kuan; Geng, Hao; Zhang, Qingzhou; Liu, Qisong; Xie, Mingsheng; Sun, Chengjie; Li, Wenjun; Lin, Huacan; Jiang, Fan; Wang, Tao; Wu, Yun-Dong; Li, Zigang

    2016-07-01

    The addition of a precisely positioned chiral center in the tether of a constrained peptide is reported, yielding two separable peptide diastereomers with significantly different helicity, as supported by circular dichroism (CD) and NMR spectroscopy. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis suggests that the absolute configuration of the in-tether chiral center in helical form is R, which is in agreement with theoretical simulations. The relationship between the secondary structure of the short peptides and their biochemical/biophysical properties remains elusive, largely because of the lack of proper controls. The present strategy provides the only method for investigating the influence of solely conformational differences upon the biochemical/biophysical properties of peptides. The significant differences in permeability and target binding affinity between the peptide diastereomers demonstrate the importance of helical conformation. PMID:27167181

  16. Modulation of microtubule assembly by the HIV-1 Tat protein is strongly dependent on zinc binding to Tat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller Sylviane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During HIV-1 infection, the Tat protein plays a key role by transactivating the transcription of the HIV-1 proviral DNA. In addition, Tat induces apoptosis of non-infected T lymphocytes, leading to a massive loss of immune competence. This apoptosis is notably mediated by the interaction of Tat with microtubules, which are dynamic components essential for cell structure and division. Tat binds two Zn2+ ions through its conserved cysteine-rich region in vitro, but the role of zinc in the structure and properties of Tat is still controversial. Results To investigate the role of zinc, we first characterized Tat apo- and holo-forms by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Both of the Tat forms are monomeric and poorly folded but differ by local conformational changes in the vicinity of the cysteine-rich region. The interaction of the two Tat forms with tubulin dimers and microtubules was monitored by analytical ultracentrifugation, turbidity measurements and electron microscopy. At 20°C, both of the Tat forms bind tubulin dimers, but only the holo-Tat was found to form discrete complexes. At 37°C, both forms promoted the nucleation and increased the elongation rates of tubulin assembly. However, only the holo-Tat increased the amount of microtubules, decreased the tubulin critical concentration, and stabilized the microtubules. In contrast, apo-Tat induced a large amount of tubulin aggregates. Conclusion Our data suggest that holo-Tat corresponds to the active form, responsible for the Tat-mediated apoptosis.

  17. Carbohydrate drugs: current status and development prospect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fengshan

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a great effort devoted to the investigation of the roles of carbohydrates in various essential biological processes and the development of carbohydrates to therapeutic drugs. This review summarizes the carbohydrate drugs which have been recorded in several pharmacopoeias, marketed, and under development. A prospect of the future development of carbohydrate drugs is discussed as well.

  18. Glycosylation Helps Cellulase Enzymes Bind to Plant Cell Walls (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2012-06-01

    Computer simulations suggest a new strategy to design enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. Large-scale computer simulations predict that the addition of glycosylation on carbohydrate-binding modules can dramatically improve the binding affinity of these protein domains over amino acid mutations alone. These simulations suggest that glycosylation can be used as a protein engineering tool to enhance the activity of cellulase enzymes, which are a key component in the conversion of cellulose to soluble sugars in the production of biofuels. Glycosylation is the covalent attachment of carbohydrate molecules to protein side chains, and is present in many proteins across all kingdoms of life. Moreover, glycosylation is known to serve a wide variety of functions in biological recognition, cell signaling, and metabolism. Cellulase enzymes, which are responsible for deconstructing cellulose found in plant cell walls to glucose, contain glycosylation that when modified can affect enzymatic activity-often in an unpredictable manner. To gain insight into the role of glycosylation on cellulase activity, scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) used computer simulation to predict that adding glycosylation on the carbohydrate-binding module of a cellulase enzyme dramatically boosts the binding affinity to cellulose-more than standard protein engineering approaches in which amino acids are mutated. Because it is known that higher binding affinity in cellulases leads to higher activity, this work suggests a new route to designing enhanced enzymes for biofuels production. More generally, this work suggests that tuning glycosylation in cellulase enzymes is a key factor to consider when engineering biochemical conversion processes, and that more work is needed to understand how glycosylation affects cellulase activity at the molecular level.

  19. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishat, Sharmeen; Andreana, Peter R.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs). Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs), isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses. PMID:27213458

  20. Entirely Carbohydrate-Based Vaccines: An Emerging Field for Specific and Selective Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmeen Nishat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrates are regarded as promising targets for vaccine development against infectious disease because cell surface glycans on many infectious agents are attributed to playing an important role in pathogenesis. In addition, oncogenic transformation of normal cells, in many cases, is associated with aberrant glycosylation of the cell surface glycan generating tumor associated carbohydrate antigens (TACAs. Technological advances in glycobiology have added a new dimension to immunotherapy when considering carbohydrates as key targets in developing safe and effective vaccines to combat cancer, bacterial infections, viral infections, etc. Many consider effective vaccines induce T-cell dependent immunity with satisfactory levels of immunological memory that preclude recurrence. Unfortunately, carbohydrates alone are poorly immunogenic as they do not bind strongly to the MHCII complex and thus fail to elicit T-cell immunity. To increase immunogenicity, carbohydrates have been conjugated to carrier proteins, which sometimes can impede carbohydrate specific immunity as peptide-based immune responses can negate antibodies directed at the targeted carbohydrate antigens. To overcome many challenges in using carbohydrate-based vaccine design and development approaches targeting cancer and other diseases, zwitterionic polysaccharides (ZPSs, isolated from the capsule of commensal anaerobic bacteria, will be discussed as promising carriers of carbohydrate antigens to achieve desired immunological responses.

  1. Two unique ligand-binding clamps of Rhizopus oryzae starch binding domain for helical structure disruption of amylose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Ying Jiang

    Full Text Available The N-terminal starch binding domain of Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (RoSBD has a high binding affinity for raw starch. RoSBD has two ligand-binding sites, each containing a ligand-binding clamp: a polyN clamp residing near binding site I is unique in that it is expressed in only three members of carbohydrate binding module family 21 (CBM21 members, and a Y32/F58 clamp located at binding site II is conserved in several CBMs. Here we characterized different roles of these sites in the binding of insoluble and soluble starches using an amylose-iodine complex assay, atomic force microscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural bioinformatics. RoSBD induced the release of iodine from the amylose helical cavity and disrupted the helical structure of amylose type III, thereby significantly diminishing the thickness and length of the amylose type III fibrils. A point mutation in the critical ligand-binding residues of sites I and II, however, reduced both the binding affinity and amylose helix disruption. This is the first molecular model for structure disruption of the amylose helix by a non-hydrolytic CBM21 member. RoSBD apparently twists the helical amylose strands apart to expose more ligand surface for further SBD binding. Repeating the process triggers the relaxation and unwinding of amylose helices to generate thinner and shorter amylose fibrils, which are more susceptible to hydrolysis by glucoamylase. This model aids in understanding the natural roles of CBMs in protein-glycan interactions and contributes to potential molecular engineering of CBMs.

  2. Carbohydrates and endothelial function: is a low-carbohydrate diet or a low-glycemic index diet favourable for vascular health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovski, Elena; Zurbau, Andreea; Vuksan, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Low-carbohydrate diets have become increasingly popular in both media and clinical research settings. Although they may improve some metabolic markers, their effects on arterial function remain unclear. Endothelial dysfunction is the well-established response to cardiovascular risk factors and a pivotal feature that precedes atherosclerotic diseases. It has been demonstrated that a high carbohydrate-induced hyperglycemia and subsequent oxidative stress acutely worsen the efficacy of the endothelial vasodilatory system. Thus, in theory, a carbohydrate restricted diet may preserve the integrity of the arterial system. This review attempts to provide insight on whether low-carbohydrate diets have a favorable or detrimental impact on vascular function, or it is perhaps the quality of carbohydrate that should direct dietary recommendations. Research to date suggests that diets low in carbohydrate amount may negatively impact vascular endothelial function. Conversely, it appears that maintaining recommended carbohydrate intake with utilization of low glycemic index foods generates a more favorable vascular profile. Understanding these relationships will aid in deciphering the diverging role of modulating quantity and quality of carbohydrates on cardiovascular risk.

  3. Binding of PAI-1 to endothelial cells stimulated by thymosin beta4 and modulation of their fibrinolytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncela, Joanna; Smolarczyk, Katarzyna; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2006-01-13

    Our previous studies showed that thymosin beta4 (Tbeta4) induced the synthesis of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) via the AP-1 dependent mechanism and its enhanced secretion. In this work we provide evidence that the released PAI-1 is accumulated on the surface of HUVECs, exclusively in its active form, in a complex with alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) that is also up-regulated and released from the cells. This mechanism is supported by several lines of experiments, in which expression of both proteins was analyzed by flow cytometry and their colocalization supported by confocal microscopy. PAI-1 did not bind to quiescent cells but only to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells. In contrast, significant amounts of AGP were found to be associated with the cells overexpressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-alpha1-acid glycoprotein (AGP) without Tbeta4 treatment. The AGP.PAI-1 complex was accumulated essentially at the basal surface of endothelial cells, and such cells showed (a) morphology characteristic for strongly adhered and spread cells and (b) significantly reduced plasmin formation. Taken together, these results provide the evidence supporting a novel mechanism by which active PAI-1 can be bound to the Tbeta4-activated endothelial cells, thus influencing their adhesive properties as well as their ability to generate plasmin.

  4. Telomere-binding protein TPP1 modulates telomere homeostasis and confers radioresistance to human colorectal cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiotherapy is one of the major therapeutic strategies in cancer treatment. The telomere-binding protein TPP1 is an important component of the shelterin complex at mammalian telomeres. Our previous reports showed that TPP1 expression was elevated in radioresistant cells, but the exact effects and mechanisms of TPP1 on radiosensitivity is unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we found that elevated TPP1 expression significantly correlated with radioresistance and longer telomere length in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, TPP1 overexpression showed lengthened telomere length and a significant decrease of radiosensitivity to X-rays. TPP1 mediated radioresistance was correlated with a decreased apoptosis rate after IR exposure. Furthermore, TPP1 overexpression showed prolonged G2/M arrest mediated by ATM/ATR-Chk1 signal pathway after IR exposure. Moreover, TPP1 overexpression accelerated the repair kinetics of total DNA damage and telomere dysfunction induced by ionizing radiation. CONCLUSIONS: We demonstrated that elevated expressions of TPP1 in human colorectal cancer cells could protect telomere from DNA damage and confer radioresistance. These results suggested that TPP1 may be a potential target in the radiotherapy of colorectal cancer.

  5. ATP-binding cassette transporters and sterol O-acyltransferases interact at membrane microdomains to modulate sterol uptake and esterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Sonia; Balderes, Dina; Kim, Christine; Guo, Zhongmin A; Wilcox, Lisa; Area-Gomez, Estela; Snider, Jamie; Wolinski, Heimo; Stagljar, Igor; Granato, Juliana T; Ruggles, Kelly V; DeGiorgis, Joseph A; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Schon, Eric A; Sturley, Stephen L

    2015-11-01

    A key component of eukaryotic lipid homeostasis is the esterification of sterols with fatty acids by sterol O-acyltransferases (SOATs). The esterification reactions are allosterically activated by their sterol substrates, the majority of which accumulate at the plasma membrane. We demonstrate that in yeast, sterol transport from the plasma membrane to the site of esterification is associated with the physical interaction of the major SOAT, acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT)-related enzyme (Are)2p, with 2 plasma membrane ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters: Aus1p and Pdr11p. Are2p, Aus1p, and Pdr11p, unlike the minor acyltransferase, Are1p, colocalize to sterol and sphingolipid-enriched, detergent-resistant microdomains (DRMs). Deletion of either ABC transporter results in Are2p relocalization to detergent-soluble membrane domains and a significant decrease (53-36%) in esterification of exogenous sterol. Similarly, in murine tissues, the SOAT1/Acat1 enzyme and activity localize to DRMs. This subcellular localization is diminished upon deletion of murine ABC transporters, such as Abcg1, which itself is DRM associated. We propose that the close proximity of sterol esterification and transport proteins to each other combined with their residence in lipid-enriched membrane microdomains facilitates rapid, high-capacity sterol transport and esterification, obviating any requirement for soluble intermediary proteins.

  6. Modulation of nuclear T3 binding by T3 in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver) - T3 stimulation of cell growth but not of malic enzyme, glucose-6-phosphatdehydrogenase or 6-phosphogluconate-dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, L E; Kristensen, S R; Kvetny, J

    1991-01-01

    The T3 modulation of nuclear T3 binding (NBT3), the T3 effect on cell growth, and the T3 and insulin effects on malic enzyme (ME), glucose-6-phosphat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) and 6-phosphogluconat-dehydrogenase (G6PD) were studied in a human hepatocyte cell-line (Chang-liver). T3 was bound to a high...

  7. Dopaminergic modulation of mitral cell activity in the frog olfactory bulb: a combined radioligand binding-electrophysiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dopamine content in the amphibian olfactory bulb is supplied by interneurons scattered among mitral cells in the external plexiform/mitral cell layer. In mammals, dopamine has been found to be involved in various aspects of bulbar information processing by influencing mitral cell odour responsiveness. Dopamine action in the bulb depends directly on the localization of its receptor targets, found to be mainly of the D2 type in mammals. The present study assessed, in the frog, both the anatomical localization of D2-like, radioligand-labelled receptors of dopamine and the in vivo action of dopamine on unitary mitral cell activity in response to odours delivered over a wide range of concentrations. The [125I]iodosulpride-labelled D2 binding sites were visualized on frozen sagittal sections of frog brains by film radioautography. The sites were found to be restricted to the external plexiform/mitral cell layer; other layers of the olfactory bulb were devoid of specific labelling. Electrophysiological recordings of mitral unit activity revealed that dopamine or its agonist apomorphine induced a drastic reduction of spontaneous firing rate of mitral cells in most cases without altering odour intensity coding properties of these cells. Moreover, pre-treatment with the D2 antagonist eticlopride blocked the dopamine-induced reduction of mitral cell spontaneous activity.In the frog olfactory bulb, both anatomical localization of D2-like receptors and functional data on dopamine involvement in information processing differ from those reported in mammals. This suggests a phylogenetic evolution of dopamine action in the olfactory bulb. In the frog, anatomical data perfectly corroborate electrophysiological results, together strongly suggesting a direct action of dopamine on mitral cells. In a physiologically operating system, such an action would result in a global improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Dopaminergic modulation of mitral cell activity in the frog olfactory bulb: a combined radioligand binding-electrophysiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchamp, A.; Moyse, E.; Delaleu, J.-C.; Coronas, V.; Duchamp-Viret, P. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurosensorielle, Universite Claude Bernard and CNRS, F69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-28

    Dopamine content in the amphibian olfactory bulb is supplied by interneurons scattered among mitral cells in the external plexiform/mitral cell layer. In mammals, dopamine has been found to be involved in various aspects of bulbar information processing by influencing mitral cell odour responsiveness. Dopamine action in the bulb depends directly on the localization of its receptor targets, found to be mainly of the D{sub 2} type in mammals. The present study assessed, in the frog, both the anatomical localization of D{sub 2}-like, radioligand-labelled receptors of dopamine and the in vivo action of dopamine on unitary mitral cell activity in response to odours delivered over a wide range of concentrations. The [{sup 125}I]iodosulpride-labelled D{sub 2} binding sites were visualized on frozen sagittal sections of frog brains by film radioautography. The sites were found to be restricted to the external plexiform/mitral cell layer; other layers of the olfactory bulb were devoid of specific labelling. Electrophysiological recordings of mitral unit activity revealed that dopamine or its agonist apomorphine induced a drastic reduction of spontaneous firing rate of mitral cells in most cases without altering odour intensity coding properties of these cells. Moreover, pre-treatment with the D{sub 2} antagonist eticlopride blocked the dopamine-induced reduction of mitral cell spontaneous activity.In the frog olfactory bulb, both anatomical localization of D{sub 2}-like receptors and functional data on dopamine involvement in information processing differ from those reported in mammals. This suggests a phylogenetic evolution of dopamine action in the olfactory bulb. In the frog, anatomical data perfectly corroborate electrophysiological results, together strongly suggesting a direct action of dopamine on mitral cells. In a physiologically operating system, such an action would result in a global improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B

  9. Fatty Acid Binding Protein 5 Modulates Docosahexaenoic Acid-Induced Recovery in Rats Undergoing Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Johnny D; Serrano-Illan, Miguel; Licero, Jenniffer; Cordero, Kathia; Miranda, Jorge D; De Leon, Marino

    2016-08-01

    Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs) promote functional recovery in rats undergoing spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the precise molecular mechanism coupling n-3 PUFAs to neurorestorative responses is not well understood. The aim of the present study was to determine the spatiotemporal expression of fatty acid binding protein 5 (FABP5) after contusive SCI and to investigate whether this protein plays a role in n-3 PUFA-mediated functional recovery post-SCI. We found that SCI resulted in a robust spinal cord up-regulation in FABP5 mRNA levels (556 ± 187%) and protein expression (518 ± 195%), when compared to sham-operated rats, at 7 days post-injury (dpi). This upregulation coincided with significant alterations in the metabolism of fatty acids in the injured spinal cord, as revealed by metabolomics-based lipid analyses. In particular, we found increased levels of the n-3 series PUFAs, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6 n-3) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA; 20:5 n-3) at 7 dpi. Animals consuming a diet rich in DHA and EPA exhibited a significant upregulation in FABP5 mRNA levels at 7 dpi. Immunofluorescence showed low basal FABP5 immunoreactivity in spinal cord ventral gray matter NeuN(+) neurons of sham-operated rats. SCI resulted in a robust induction of FABP5 in glial (GFAP(+), APC(+), and NG2(+)) and precursor cells (DCX(+), nestin(+)). We found that continuous intrathecal administration of FABP5 silencing with small interfering RNA (2 μg) impaired spontaneous open-field locomotion post-SCI. Further, FABP5 siRNA administration hindered the beneficial effects of DHA to ameliorate functional recovery at 7 dpi. Altogether, our findings suggest that FABP5 may be an important player in the promotion of cellular uptake, transport, and/or metabolism of DHA post-SCI. Given the beneficial roles of n-3 PUFAs in ameliorating functional recovery, we propose that FABP5 is an important contributor to basic repair mechanisms in the

  10. Glucoamylase starch-binding domain of Aspergillus niger B1: molecular cloning and functional characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paldi, Tzur; Levy, Ilan; Shoseyov, Oded

    2003-01-01

    Carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) are protein domains located within a carbohydrate-active enzyme, with a discrete fold that can be separated from the catalytic domain. Starch-binding domains (SBDs) are CBMs that are usually found at the C-terminus in many amylolytic enzymes. The SBD from Aspergillus niger B1 (CMI CC 324262) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as an independent domain and the recombinant protein was purified on starch. The A. niger B1 SBD was found to be similar to SBD from A. kawachii, A. niger var. awamori and A. shirusami (95-96% identity) and was classified as a member of the CBM family 20. Characterization of SBD binding to starch indicated that it is essentially irreversible and that its affinity to cationic or anionic starch, as well as to potato or corn starch, does not differ significantly. These observations indicate that the fundamental binding area on these starches is essentially the same. Natural and chemically modified starches are among the most useful biopolymers employed in the industry. Our study demonstrates that SBD binds effectively to both anionic and cationic starch. PMID:12646045

  11. Variations of Water-Soluble Carbohydrate Contents in Different Age Class Modules of Leymus chinensis Populations in Sandy and Saline-Alkaline Soil on the Songnen Plains of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-Mei Ding; Yun-Fei Yang

    2007-01-01

    Leymus chinensis (Trin.) Tzvel. is a rhizomatous pexennial herbage of Gramineae. Reproduction is mainly by vegetative reproduction. Tillering nodes and rhizomes of L. chinensis serve as organs for both vegetative reproduction and nutrient storage. Water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) contents were measured in tillering nodes, nodes and internodes of rhizomes of different age classes of L. chinensis populations at three development stages, namely the dough ripe stage, the vegetative growth stage after full ripeness, and the withering stage, in two habitats:sandy soil and saline-alkaline soil. The results showed that WSC content in tillering nodes of the three age classes of L. chinensis were all markedly decreased with increasing age in both sandy soil and saline-alkaline soil. A similar trend of changes in WSC contents was observed in the nodes and internodes of rhizomes in different age classes in both habitats. The highest WSC contents were in 2-age-class nodes and internodes of rhizomes, followed by those in the 1 age class, with the lowest WSC contents found in 3-age-class nodes and internodes of rhizomes at the dough ripe and vegetative growth stages after full ripening. In turn, WSC contents decreased with increasing age at the withering stage in both habitats. The WSC content in each age class of internode was higher than that in the node of rhizome at three development stages In both habitats.

  12. Binding and inhibition of drug transport proteins by heparin: a potential drug transporter modulator capable of reducing multidrug resistance in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunliang; Scully, Michael; Petralia, Gloria; Kakkar, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    A major problem in cancer treatment is the development of resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, multidrug resistance (MDR), associated with increased activity of transmembrane drug transporter proteins which impair cytotoxic treatment by rapidly removing the drugs from the targeted cells. Previously, it has been shown that heparin treatment of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy increases survival. In order to determine whether heparin is capable reducing MDR and increasing the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, the cytoxicity of a number of agents toward four cancer cell lines (a human enriched breast cancer stem cell line, two human breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and a human lung cancer cell line A549) was tested in the presence or absence of heparin. Results demonstrated that heparin increased the cytotoxicity of a range of chemotherapeutic agents. This effect was associated with the ability of heparin to bind to several of the drug transport proteins of the ABC and non ABC transporter systems. Among the ABC system, heparin treatment caused significant inhibition of the ATPase activity of ABCG2 and ABCC1, and of the efflux function observed as enhanced intracellular accumulation of specific substrates. Doxorubicin cytoxicity, which was enhanced by heparin treatment of MCF-7 cells, was found to be under the control of one of the major non-ABC transporter proteins, lung resistance protein (LRP). LRP was also shown to be a heparin-binding protein. These findings indicate that heparin has a potential role in the clinic as a drug transporter modulator to reduce multidrug resistance in cancer patients. PMID:24253450

  13. The expression of spinal methyl-CpG-binding protein 2, DNA methyltransferases and histone deacetylases is modulated in persistent pain states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tochiki Keri K

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA CpG methylation is carried out by DNA methyltransferases and induces chromatin remodeling and gene silencing through a transcription repressor complex comprising the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2 and a subset of histone deacetylases. Recently, we have found that MeCP2 activity had a crucial role in the pattern of gene expression seen in the superficial dorsal horn rapidly after injection of Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA in the rat ankle joint. The aim of the present study was to analyse the changes in expression of MeCP2, DNA methyltransferases and a subset of histone deacetylases in the superficial dorsal horn during the maintenance phase of persistent pain states. In this process, the cell specific expression of MeCP2 was also investigated. Results Using immunohistochemistry, we found that neurones, oligodendrocytes and astrocytes expressed MeCP2. Microglia, oligodendrocyte precursor cells and Schwann cells never showed any positive stain for MeCP2. Quantitative analyses showed that MeCP2 expression was increased in the superficial dorsal horn 7 days following CFA injection in the ankle joint but decreased 7 days following spared nerve injury. Overall, the expression of DNA methyltransferases and a subset of histone deacetylases followed the same pattern of expression. However, there were no significant changes in the expression of the MeCP2 targets that we had previously shown are regulated in the early time points following CFA injection in the ankle joint. Finally, the expression of MeCP2 was also down regulated in damaged dorsal root ganglion neurones following spared nerve injury. Conclusion Our results strongly suggest that changes in chromatin compaction, regulated by the binding of MeCP2 complexes to methylated DNA, are involved in the modulation of gene expression in the superficial dorsal horn and dorsal root ganglia during the maintenance of persistent pain states.

  14. Cell surface-expressed moesin-like receptor regulates T cell interactions with tissue components and binds an adhesion-modulating IL-2 peptide generated by elastase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Altbaum-Weiss, I; Ganor, S; Lider, O

    2001-03-01

    The adhesion of leukocytes to the extracellular matrix (ECM) depends on their responses to variations in the chemotactic signals in their milieu, as well as on the functioning of cytoskeletal and context-specific receptors. Ezrin, radixin, and moesin constitute a family of proteins that link the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton. The surface expression of moesin on T cells and its role in cell adhesion has not been fully elucidated. Recently, we found that IL-2 peptides generated by elastase modified the adhesion of activated T cells to ECM ligands. Here, we further examined the adhesion regulatory effects of EFLNRWIT, one of the IL-2 peptides, as well as the existence and putative function of its receptor on T cells. We found that when presented to T cells in the absence of another activator, the EFLNRWIT peptide induced cell adhesion to vessel wall and ECM components. Binding of a radiolabeled peptide to T cells, precipitation with the immobilized peptide, and amino acid sequencing of the precipitated protein revealed that EFLNRWIT exerts its function via a cell surface-expressed moesin-like moiety, whose constitutive expression on T cells was increased after activation. This notion was further supported by our findings that: 1) anti-moesin mAb inhibited the binding of T cells to the immobilized EFLNRWIT peptide, 2) immobilized recombinant moesin bound the IL-2 peptide, and 3) soluble moesin inhibited the EFLNRWIT-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Interestingly, moesin appears to be generally involved in T cell responses to adhesion-regulating signals. Thus, the IL-2 peptide EFLNRWIT appears to exert its modulating capacities via an adhesion-regulating moesin-like receptor. PMID:11207255

  15. The Ala54Thr Polymorphism of the Fatty Acid Binding Protein 2 Gene Modulates HDL Cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena M. Salto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The alanine to threonine amino acid substitution at codon 54 (Ala54Thr of the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (FABP2 has been associated with elevated levels of insulin and blood glucose as well as with dyslipidemia. The aim of this study was to characterize the effect of this FABP2 polymorphism in Mexican-Americans with type 2 diabetes (T2D in the context of a three-month intervention to determine if the polymorphism differentially modulates selected clinical outcomes. For this study, we genotyped 43 participant samples and performed post-hoc outcome analysis of the profile changes in fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, insulin, lipid panel and body composition, stratified by the Ala54Thr polymorphism. Our results show that the Thr54 allele carriers (those who were heterozygous or homozygous for the threonine-encoding allele had lower HDL cholesterol and higher triglyceride levels at baseline compared to the Ala54 homozygotes (those who were homozygous for the alanine-encoding allele. Both groups made clinically important improvements in lipid profiles and glycemic control as a response to the intervention. Whereas the Ala54 homozygotes decreased HDL cholesterol in the context of an overall total cholesterol decrease, Thr54 allele carriers increased HDL cholesterol as part of an overall total cholesterol decrease. We conclude that the Ala54Thr polymorphism of FABP2 modulates HDL cholesterol in Mexican-Americans with T2D and that Thr54 allele carriers may be responsive in interventions that include dietary changes.

  16. Transcriptional regulation of the carbohydrate utilization network in Thermotoga maritima

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Rodionov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermophilic bacteria from the Thermotogales lineage can produce hydrogen by fermenting a wide range of carbohydrates. Previous experimental studies identified a large fraction of genes committed to carbohydrate degradation and utilization in the model bacterium Thermotoga maritima. Knowledge of these genes enabled comprehensive reconstruction of biochemical pathways comprising the carbohydrate utilization network. However, transcriptional factors (TFs and regulatory mechanisms driving this network remained largely unknown. Here, we used an integrated approach based on comparative analysis of genomic and transcriptomic data for the reconstruction of the carbohydrate utilization regulatory networks in 11 Thermotogales genomes. We identified DNA-binding motifs and regulons for 19 orthologous TFs in the Thermotogales. The inferred regulatory network in T. maritima contains 181 genes encoding TFs, sugar catabolic enzymes and ABC-family transporters. In contrast to many previously described bacteria, a transcriptional regulation strategy of Thermotoga does not employ global regulatory factors. The reconstructed regulatory network in T. maritima was validated by gene expression profiling on a panel of mono- and disaccharides and by in vitro DNA-binding assays. The observed upregulation of genes involved in catabolism of pectin, trehalose, cellobiose, arabinose, rhamnose, xylose, glucose, galactose, and ribose showed a strong correlation with the UxaR, TreR, BglR, CelR, AraR, RhaR, XylR, GluR, GalR, and RbsR regulons. Ultimately, this study elucidated the transcriptional regulatory network and mechanisms controlling expression of carbohydrate utilization genes in T. maritima. In addition to improving the functional annotations of associated transporters and catabolic enzymes, this research provides novel insights into the evolution of regulatory networks in Thermotogales.

  17. An H3K9/S10 methyl-phospho switch modulates Polycomb and Pol II binding at repressed genes during differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbattini, Pierangela; Sjoberg, Marcela; Nikic, Svetlana; Frangini, Alberto; Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Kunowska, Natalia; Carroll, Tom; Brookes, Emily; Arthur, Simon J; Pombo, Ana; Dillon, Niall

    2014-03-01

    Methylated histones H3K9 and H3K27 are canonical epigenetic silencing modifications in metazoan organisms, but the relationship between the two modifications has not been well characterized. H3K9me3 coexists with H3K27me3 in pluripotent and differentiated cells. However, we find that the functioning of H3K9me3 is altered by H3S10 phosphorylation in differentiated postmitotic osteoblasts and cycling B cells. Deposition of H3K9me3/S10ph at silent genes is partially mediated by the mitogen- and stress-activated kinases (MSK1/2) and the Aurora B kinase. Acquisition of H3K9me3/S10ph during differentiation correlates with loss of paused S5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, which is present on Polycomb-regulated genes in embryonic stem cells. Reduction of the levels of H3K9me3/S10ph by kinase inhibition results in increased binding of RNAPIIS5ph and the H3K27 methyltransferase Ezh1 at silent promoters. Our results provide evidence of a novel developmentally regulated methyl-phospho switch that modulates Polycomb regulation in differentiated cells and stabilizes repressed states.

  18. A calcium-binding protein, rice annexin OsANN1, enhances heat stress tolerance by modulating the production of H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Bei; Zhang, Qian; Liu, Dongliang; Wang, Haiqi; Yin, Jingya; Wang, Rui; He, Mengli; Cui, Meng; Shang, Zhonglin; Wang, Dekai; Zhu, Zhengge

    2015-09-01

    OsANN1 is a member of the annexin protein family in rice. The function of this protein and the mechanisms of its involvement in stress responses and stress tolerance are largely unknown. Here it is reported that OsANN1 confers abiotic stress tolerance by modulating antioxidant accumulation under abiotic stress. OsANN1-knockdown [RNA interference (RNAi)] plants were more sensitive to heat and drought stresses, whereas OsANN1-overexpression (OE) lines showed improved growth with higher expression of OsANN1 under abiotic stress. Overexpression of OsANN1 promoted SOD (superoxide dismutase) and CAT (catalase) activities, which regulate H2O2 content and redox homeostasis, suggesting the existence of a feedback mechanism between OsANN1 and H2O2 production under abiotic stress. Higher expression of OsANN1 can provide overall cellular protection against abiotic stress-induced damage, and a significant accumulation of OsANN1-green fluorescent protein (GFP) signals was found in the cytosol after heat shock treatment. OsANN1 also has calcium-binding and ATPase activities in vitro, indicating that OsANN1 has multiple functions in rice growth. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays demonstrated that OsANN1 interacts with OsCDPK24. This cross-talk may provide additional layers of regulation in the abiotic stress response. PMID:26085678

  19. Dietary carbohydrate deprivation increases 24-hour nitrogen excretion without affecting postabsorptive hepatic or whole body protein metabolism in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; de Sain-van der Velden, MGM; Stellaard, F; Kuipers, F; Meijer, AJ; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    2003-01-01

    Because insulin is an important regulator of protein metabolism, we hypothesized that physiological modulation of insulin secretion, by means of extreme variations in dietary carbohydrate content, affects postabsorptive protein metabolism. Therefore, we studied the effects of three isocaloric diets

  20. Carbohydrates of human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E

    1992-01-01

    Elucidation of the mechanism by which viral infection induces the appearance of carbohydrate neoantigens is highly important. Results from such studies could be expected to be significant for a general understanding of the regulation of glycosylation, and perhaps especially important for the unde...

  1. Mechanistic insights into the distribution of carbohydrate clusters on cell membranes revealed by dSTORM imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junling; Gao, Jing; Cai, Mingjun; Xu, Haijiao; Jiang, Junguang; Tian, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hongda

    2016-07-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the carbohydrate-binding proteins (i.e., galectins) cross-linking their specific carbohydrate ligands. Our results clarify the organizational mechanism of carbohydrates on cell surfaces from their formation, stable existence and size-restriction, which promotes a better understanding of the relationship between the function and distribution of carbohydrates, as well as the structure of cell membranes.Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in many physiological processes and act as primary markers to indicate various cellular physiological states. The functions of carbohydrates are always associated with their expression and distribution on cell membranes. Based on our previous work, we found that carbohydrates tend to form clusters; however, the underlying mechanism of these clusters remains unknown. Through the direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) strategy, we found that with the contributions of lipid raft as a stable factor and actin cytoskeleton as a restrictive factor, carbohydrate clusters can stably exist with restricted size. Additionally, we revealed that the formation of most carbohydrate clusters (Gal and GlcANc clusters) depended on the

  2. Carbohydrates - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Carbohydrates URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/carbohydrates.html Other topics A-Z A B ...

  3. Carbohydrate-based immune adjuvants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovsky, Nikolai; Cooper, Peter D

    2011-01-01

    The role for adjuvants in human vaccines has been a matter of vigorous scientific debate, with the field hindered by the fact that for over 80 years, aluminum salts were the only adjuvants approved for human use. To this day, alum-based adjuvants, alone or combined with additional immune activators, remain the only adjuvants approved for use in the USA. This situation has not been helped by the fact that the mechanism of action of most adjuvants has been poorly understood. A relative lack of resources and funding for adjuvant development has only helped to maintain alum’s relative monopoly. To seriously challenge alum’s supremacy a new adjuvant has many major hurdles to overcome, not least being alum’s simplicity, tolerability, safety record and minimal cost. Carbohydrate structures play critical roles in immune system function and carbohydrates also have the virtue of a strong safety and tolerability record. A number of carbohydrate compounds from plant, bacterial, yeast and synthetic sources have emerged as promising vaccine adjuvant candidates. Carbohydrates are readily biodegradable and therefore unlikely to cause problems of long-term tissue deposits seen with alum adjuvants. Above all, the Holy Grail of human adjuvant development is to identify a compound that combines potent vaccine enhancement with maximum tolerability and safety. This has proved to be a tough challenge for many adjuvant contenders. Nevertheless, carbohydrate-based compounds have many favorable properties that could place them in a unique position to challenge alum’s monopoly over human vaccine usage. PMID:21506649

  4. The GH5 1,4-β-mannanase from Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 possesses a low-affinity mannan-binding module and highlights the diversity of mannanolytic enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrill, Johan; Kulcinskaja, Evelina; Sulewska, Anna Maria;

    2015-01-01

    and displays the highest catalytic efficiency reported to date for a GH5 mannanase owing to a very high kcat (1828 ± 87 s-1) and a low Km (1.58 ± 0.23 g · L-1) using locust bean galactomannan as substrate. The novel CBM of BlMan5_8 mediates increased binding to soluble mannan based on affinity electrophoresis....... Surface plasmon resonance analysis confirmed the binding of the CBM10 to manno-oligosaccharides, albeit with slightly lower affinity than the catalytic module of the enzyme. This is the first example of a low-affinity mannan-specific CBM, which forms a subfamily of CBM10 together with close homologs...... by an exceptionally low Km and the presence of an atypical low affinity CBM, which increases binding to specifically to soluble mannan while causing minimal decrease in catalytic efficiency as opposed to enzymes with canonical mannan binding modules. These features highlight fine tuning of catalytic and binding...

  5. Carbohydrate modified diet & insulin sensitizers reduce body weight & modulate metabolic syndrome measures in EMPOWIR (enhance the metabolic profile of women with insulin resistance: a randomized trial of normoglycemic women with midlife weight gain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harriette R Mogul

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Progressive midlife weight gain is associated with multiple adverse health outcomes and may represent an early manifestation of insulin resistance in a distinct subset of women. Emerging data implicate hyperinsulinema as a proximate cause of weight gain and support strategies that attenuate insulin secretion. OBJECTIVE: To assess a previously reported novel hypocaloric carbohydrate modified diet alone (D, and in combination with metformin (M and metformin plus low-dose rosiglitazone (MR, in diverse women with midlife weight gain (defined as >20lbs since the twenties, normal glucose tolerance, and hyperinsulinemia. PARTICIPANTS: 46 women, mean age 46.6±1.0, BMI 30.5±0.04 kg/m2, 54.5% white, 22.7% black, 15.9% Hispanic, at 2 university medical centers. METHODS: A dietary intervention designed to reduce insulin excursions was implemented in 4 weekly nutritional group workshops prior to randomization. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Change in 6-month fasting insulin. Pre-specified secondary outcomes were changes in body weight, HOMA-IR, metabolic syndrome (MS measures, leptin, and adiponectin. RESULTS: Six-month fasting insulin declined significantly in the M group: 12.5 to 8.0 µU/ml, p = .026. Mean 6-month weight decreased significantly and comparably in D, M, and MR groups: 4.7, 5.4, and 5.5% (p's.049, .002, and.032. HOMA-IR decreased in M and MR groups (2.5 to 1.6 and 1.9 to 1.3, p's = .054, .013. Additional improvement in MS measures included reduced waist circumference in D and MR groups and increased HDL in the D and M groups. Notably, mean fasting leptin did not decline in a subset of subjects with weight loss (26.15±2.01 ng/ml to 25.99±2.61 ng/ml, p = .907. Adiponectin increased significantly in the MR group (11.1±1.0 to 18.5±7.4, p<.001 Study medications were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that EMPOWIR's easily implemented dietary interventions, alone and in combination with pharmacotherapies that

  6. Fluorous-based carbohydrate quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sun, Pengfei; Chen, Guosong

    2015-03-20

    Fluorous chemistry has brought many applications from catalysis to separation science, from supramolecular materials to analytical chemistry. However, fluorous-based quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) has not been reported so far. In the current paper, fluorous interaction has been firstly utilized in QCM, and carbohydrate-protein interaction and carbohydrate-carbohydrate interaction have been detected afterward. PMID:25541017

  7. Interactions of carbohydrates and proteins by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gang-Liang Huang; Xin-Ya Mei; Peng-George Wang

    2006-06-01

    A sensitive, specific, and rapid method for the detection of carbohydrate-protein interactions is demonstrated by fluorophore-assisted carbohydrate electrophoresis (FACE). The procedure is simple and the cost is low. The advantage of this method is that carbohydrate-protein interactions can be easily displayed by FACE, and the carbohydrates do not need to be purified.

  8. Cell surface carbohydrates as prognostic markers in human carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabelsteen, Erik

    1996-01-01

    Tumour development is usually associated with changes in cell surface carbohydrates. These are often divided into changes related to terminal carbohydrate structures, which include incomplete synthesis and modification of normally existing carbohydrates, and changes in the carbohydrate core struc...

  9. Analyzing radioligand binding data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motulsky, Harvey; Neubig, Richard

    2002-08-01

    Radioligand binding experiments are easy to perform, and provide useful data in many fields. They can be used to study receptor regulation, discover new drugs by screening for compounds that compete with high affinity for radioligand binding to a particular receptor, investigate receptor localization in different organs or regions using autoradiography, categorize receptor subtypes, and probe mechanisms of receptor signaling, via measurements of agonist binding and its regulation by ions, nucleotides, and other allosteric modulators. This unit reviews the theory of receptor binding and explains how to analyze experimental data. Since binding data are usually best analyzed using nonlinear regression, this unit also explains the principles of curve fitting with nonlinear regression.

  10. Lipid-binding proteins modulate ligand-dependent trans-activation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and localize to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, T; Antonius, M; Sorensen, R V;

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are activated by a variety of fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Many of these compounds bind avidly to members of a family of small lipid-binding proteins, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Fatty...

  11. Galectin-3 silencing inhibits epirubicin-induced ATP binding cassette transporters and activates the mitochondrial apoptosis pathway via β-catenin/GSK-3β modulation in colorectal carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kuo Lee

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance (MDR, an unfavorable factor compromising the treatment efficacy of anticancer drugs, involves the upregulation of ATP binding cassette (ABC transporters and induction of galectin-3 signaling. Galectin-3 plays an anti-apoptotic role in many cancer cells and regulates various pathways to activate MDR. Thus, the inhibition of galectin-3 has the potential to enhance the efficacy of the anticancer drug epirubicin. In this study, we examined the effects and mechanisms of silencing galectin-3 via RNA interference (RNAi on the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Galectin-3 knockdown increased the intracellular accumulation of epirubicin in Caco-2 cells; suppressed the mRNA expression of galectin-3, β-catenin, cyclin D1, c-myc, P-glycoprotein (P-gp, MDR-associated protein (MRP 1, and MRP2; and downregulated the protein expression of P-gp, cyclin D1, galectin-3, β-catenin, c-Myc, and Bcl-2. Moreover, galectin-3 RNAi treatment significantly increased the mRNA level of GSK-3β, Bax, caspase-3, and caspase-9; remarkably increased the Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio; and upregulated the GSK-3β and Bax protein expressions. Apoptosis was induced by galectin-3 RNAi and/or epirubicin as demonstrated by chromatin condensation, a higher sub-G1 phase proportion, and increased caspase-3 and caspase-9 activity, indicating an intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptosis pathway. Epirubicin-mediated resistance was effectively inhibited via galectin-3 RNAi treatment. However, these phenomena could be rescued after galectin-3 overexpression. We show for the first time that the silencing of galectin-3 sensitizes MDR cells to epirubicin by inhibiting ABC transporters and activating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis through modulation of the β-catenin/GSK-3β pathway in human colon cancer cells.

  12. Cytokines modulate the sensitivity of human fibroblasts to stimulation with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) by altering endogenous IGF-binding protein production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yateman, M E; Claffey, D C; Cwyfan Hughes, S C; Frost, V J; Wass, J A; Holly, J M

    1993-04-01

    Human dermal fibroblasts produce a number of insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) including the main circulating form, IGFBP-3. It has been suggested that the regulation of IGFBP secretion may play a major role in modulating insulin-like growth factor (IGF) bioactivity. We have quantified the effects of two cytokines, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) which have opposing actions on fibroblast IGFBP-3 production, and examined their subsequent role in IGF-I mitogenesis. TGF-beta 1 caused a dose-dependent increase in IGFBP-3 in serum-free fibroblast-conditioned media. TGF-beta 1 (1 microgram/l) resulted in immunoreactive IGFBP-3 levels reaching 286.5 +/- 22.4% of control after 20 h, the increase being confirmed by Western ligand blot. TNF-alpha caused a dose-dependent decrease in fibroblast IGFBP-3 secretion, 1 microgram TNF-alpha/l reducing IGFBP-3 levels to 32.1 +/- 11.% of control. This effect was not due to cytotoxicity and was not cell-density-dependent. Fibroblast proliferation was examined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) colorimetric cytochemical bioassay. The addition of IGF-I resulted in dose-dependent growth stimulation after 48 h, the effective range being 20-100 micrograms/l. The IGF-I analogue Long-R3-IGF-I which has little affinity for the IGFBPs was approximately 20-fold more potent in this assay, and was unaffected by exogenous IGFBP-3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7684061

  13. Structural basis for the carbohydrate recognition of the Sclerotium rolfsii lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonidas, Demetres D; Swamy, Bale M; Hatzopoulos, George N; Gonchigar, Sathisha J; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Zographos, Spyros E; Oikonomakos, Nikos G

    2007-05-11

    The crystal structure of a novel fungal lectin from Sclerotium rolfsii (SRL) in its free form and in complex with N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (GalNAc) and N-acetyl- d -glucosamine (GlcNAc) has been determined at 1.1 A, 2.0 A, and 1.7 A resolution, respectively. The protein structure is composed of two beta-sheets, which consist of four and six beta-strands, connected by two alpha-helices. Sequence and structural comparisons reveal that SRL is the third member of a newly identified family of fungal lectins, which includes lectins from Agaricus bisporus and Xerocomus chrysenteron that share a high degree of structural similarity and carbohydrate specificity. The data for the free SRL are the highest resolution data for any protein of this family. The crystal structures of the SRL in complex with two carbohydrates, GalNAc and GlcNAc, which differ only in the configuration of a single epimeric hydroxyl group, provide the structural basis for its carbohydrate specificity. SRL has two distinct carbohydrate-binding sites, a primary and a secondary. GalNAc binds at the primary site, whereas GlcNAc binds only at the secondary site. Thus, SRL has the ability to recognize and probably bind at the same time two different carbohydrate structures. Structural comparison to Agaricus bisporus lectin-carbohydrate complexes reveals that the primary site is also able to bind the Thomsen-Friedenreich antigen (Galbeta1-->3GalNAc-alpha- glycan structures) whereas the secondary site cannot. The features of the molecular recognition at the two sites are described in detail. PMID:17391699

  14. The role of carbohydrate in determining the immunochemical properties of the hemagglutinin of influenza A virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the carbohydrate was removed from influenza with MRC II (H3N2) and its purified hemagglutinin (HA) on treatment with glycosidases, including α-mannosidase, #betta#-N-acetylglucosaminidase, #betta#-galactosidase and α-fucosidase. The release of 50 per cent of the carbohydrate from intact virus particles significantly affected hemagglutinating activity. The ability of untreated and glycosidase-treated virus to inhibit the binding of antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin was almost indistinguishable by competitive radioimmunoassay (RIA). Up to 60 per cent of the carbohydrate from the purified HA of influenza virus could be removed. The antigenicity of glycosidase treated HA molecules decreased 8-fold compared to intact HAs as measured by competitive RIA. In addition, glycosidase digestion of 125I-labeled HA resulted in a decrease in its reactivity in direct RIA. We conclude that the carbohydrate portion of the HA of influenza virus is not of major importance in defining the antigenicity of HA. (Author)

  15. A systematic study of chemogenomics of carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiangyong; Luo, Fang; Chen, Lirong; Yuan, Gu; Xu, Xiaojie

    2014-03-01

    Chemogenomics focuses on the interactions between biologically active molecules and protein targets for drug discovery. Carbohydrates are the most abundant compounds in natural products. Compared with other drugs, the carbohydrate drugs show weaker side effects. Searching for multi-target carbohydrate drugs can be regarded as a solution to improve therapeutic efficacy and safety. In this work, we collected 60 344 carbohydrates from the Universal Natural Products Database (UNPD) and explored the chemical space of carbohydrates by principal component analysis. We found that there is a large quantity of potential lead compounds among carbohydrates. Then we explored the potential of carbohydrates in drug discovery by using a network-based multi-target computational approach. All carbohydrates were docked to 2389 target proteins. The most potential carbohydrates for drug discovery and their indications were predicted based on a docking score-weighted prediction model. We also explored the interactions between carbohydrates and target proteins to find the pathological networks, potential drug candidates and new indications.

  16. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms. PMID:26456320

  17. Levorotatory carbohydrates and xylitol subdue Streptococcus mutans and Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Eugenio; Ionescu, Andrei C; Cazzaniga, Gloria; Ottobelli, Marco; Samaranayake, Lakshman P

    2016-05-01

    Dietary carbohydrates and polyols affect the microbial colonization of oral surfaces by modulating adhesion and biofilm formation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of a select group of l-carbohydrates and polyols on either Streptococcus mutans or Candida albicans adhesion and biofilm formation in vitro. S. mutans or C. albicans suspensions were inoculated on polystyrene substrata in the presence of Tryptic soy broth containing 5% of the following compounds: d-glucose, d-mannose, l-glucose, l-mannose, d- and l-glucose (raceme), d- and l-mannose (raceme), l-glucose and l-mannose, sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol. Microbial adhesion (2 h) and biofilm formation (24 h) were evaluated using MTT-test and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Xylitol and l-carbohydrates induced the lowest adhesion and biofilm formation in both the tested species, while sorbitol and mannitol did not promote C. albicans biofilm formation. Higher adhesion and biofilm formation was noted in both organisms in the presence of d-carbohydrates relative to their l-carbohydrate counterparts. These results elucidate, hitherto undescribed, interactions of the individually tested strains with l- and d-carbohydrates, and how they impact fungal and bacterial colonization. In translational terms, our data raise the possibility of using l-form of carbohydrates and xylitol for dietary control of oral plaque biofilms.

  18. Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with added sugar provide calories, but they lack vitamins, minerals, and fiber. Because they lack nutrients, these foods ... foods. In addition to calories, whole foods provide vitamins, minerals, and fiber. By making smart food choices, you ...

  19. Liver-specific gene expression: A-activator-binding site, a promoter module present in vitellogenin and acute-phase genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kaling, M; Kugler, W.; Ross, K.; Zoidl, C.; Ryffel, G U

    1991-01-01

    The A2 vitellogenin gene of Xenopus laevis, which is expressed liver specifically, contains an A-activator-binding site (AABS) that mediates high in vitro transcriptional activity in rat liver nuclear extracts. Footprint experiments with DNase I and gel retardation assays revealed the binding of several proteins to AABS. Using binding sites of known DNA-binding proteins as competitors in the gel retardation assay, we found that the transcription factor C/EBP and/or one of its "iso-binders" as...

  20. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    kinase SNF1 complex, and an adaptor–regulator related to the SNF1/AMPK family, AKINβγ. CBM20s and CBM48s of amylolytic enzymes occur predominantly in the microbial world, whereas the non-amylolytic proteins containing these modules are mostly of plant and animal origin. Comparison of amino acid sequences......Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several...... glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein...

  1. MiRNA-205 modulates cellular invasion and migration via regulating zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamashita Shunichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is often diagnosed at later stages until they are incurable. MicroRNA (miR is a small, non-coding RNA that negatively regulates gene expression mainly via translational repression. Accumulating evidence indicates that deregulation of miR is associated with human malignancies including ESCC. The aim of this study was to identify miR that could be specifically expressed and exert distinct biological actions in ESCC. Methods Total RNA was extracted from ESCC cell lines, OE21 and TE10, and a non-malignant human esophageal squamous cell line, Het-1A, and subjected to microarray analysis. Expression levels of miR that showed significant differences between the 2 ESCC and Het-1A cells based on the comprehensive analysis were analyzed by the quantitative reverse transcriptase (RT-PCR method. Then, functional analyses, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis and Matrigel invasion and the wound healing assay, for the specific miR were conducted. Using ESCC tumor samples and paired surrounding non-cancerous tissue obtained endoscopically, the association with histopathological differentiation was examined with quantitative RT-PCR. Results Based on the miR microarray analysis, there were 14 miRs that showed significant differences (more than 2-fold in expression between the 2 ESCC cells and non-malignant Het-1A. Among the significantly altered miRs, miR-205 expression levels were exclusively higher in 5 ESCC cell lines examined than any other types of malignant cell lines and Het-1A. Thus, miR-205 could be a specific miR in ESCC. Modulation of miR-205 expression by transfection with its precursor or anti-miR-205 inhibitor did not affect ESCC cell proliferation and apoptosis, but miR-205 was found to be involved in cell invasion and migration. Western blot revealed that knockdown of miR-205 expression in ESCC cells substantially enhanced expression of zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2

  2. Galactose recognition by a tetrameric C-type lectin, CEL-IV, containing the EPN carbohydrate recognition motif.

    OpenAIRE

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galac...

  3. Galactose Recognition by a Tetrameric C-type Lectin, CEL-IV, Containing the EPN Carbohydrate Recognition Motif*

    OpenAIRE

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-01-01

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galac...

  4. The solution structure of the C-terminal modular pair from Clostridium perfringens mu-toxin reveals a noncellulosomal dockerin module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitayat, Seth; Adams, Jarrett J; Furness, Heather S T; Bayer, Edward A; Smith, Steven P

    2008-09-19

    The genome of the opportunistic pathogen Clostridium perfringens encodes a large number of secreted glycoside hydrolases. Their predicted activities indicate that they are involved in the breakdown of complex carbohydrates and other glycans found in the mucosal layer of the human gastrointestinal tract, within the extracellular matrix, and on the surface of host cells. One such group of these enzymes is the family 84 glycoside hydrolases, which has predicted hyaluronidase activity and comprises five members [C. perfringens glycoside hydrolase family 84 (CpGH84) A-E]. The first identified member, CpGH84A, corresponds to the mu-toxin whose modular architecture includes an N-terminal catalytic domain, four family 32 carbohydrate-binding modules, three FIVAR modules of unknown function, and a C-terminal putative calcium-binding module. Here, we report the solution NMR structure of the C-terminal modular pair from the mu-toxin. The three-helix bundle FIVAR module displays structural homology to a heparin-binding module within the N-terminal of the a C protein from group B Streptoccocus. The C-terminal module has a typical calcium-binding dockerin fold comprising two anti-parallel helices that form a planar face with EF-hand calcium-binding loops at opposite ends of the module. The size of the helical face of the mu-toxin dockerin module is approximately equal to the planar region recently identified on the surface of a cohesin-like X82 module of CpGH84C. Size-exclusion chromatography and heteronuclear NMR-based chemical shift mapping studies indicate that the helical face of the dockerin module recognizes the CpGH84C X82 module. These studies represent the structural characterization of a noncellulolytic dockerin module and its interaction with a cohesin-like X82 module. Dockerin/X82-mediated enzyme complexes may have important implications in the pathogenic properties of C. perfringens. PMID:18602403

  5. Cause of impaired carbohydrate metabolism in hyperthyroidism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperthyroidism (HT) affects glucose metabolism in various ways. The role of insulin, glucagon and growth-hormone (GH) was determined. After glucose loading the insulin response is weaker in HT than in euthyroid subjects. Enhanced degradation of insulin has been reported. It is suggested that in HT the serum insulin concentration declines at a slightly accelerated rate. In HT the deranged carbohydrate metabolism might be a consequence of altered tissue sensitivity to insulin. To elucidate this problem insulin receptors on erythrocytes obtained from hyperthyroid women were investigated. The maximal specific binding of 125I-insulin to RBC of hyperthyroid patients was decreased and the analysis refers to a decreased receptor concentration in RBC. The nature of glucagon secretion and its influence on glucose metabolism in HT was investigated. The basal plasma glucagon is elevated in hyperthyroid patients. The suppression of glucagon secretion induced by an oral glucose loading was of significantly lesser degree in hyperthyroid patients than in controls. Applying the erythrocyte receptor assay a decreased specific binding of 125I-glucagon to RBC of hyperthyroid patients has been found and data indicate a significantly less glucagon receptor concentration in thyrotoxicosis. Physiological elevations of serum GH levels led to a significant impairment of glucose metabolism. Beside the GH-RH and somatostatin, the dopaminergic neurotransmitter system participates in the regulation of GH secretion too. It has been demonstrated that after administration of the dopamine agonist l-dopa the GH response was weaker in HT than in controls. This indicates that in thyrotoxicosis the GH secretion can not be stimulated in such a degree as in euthyroidism. (author)

  6. Synthesis of Bioinspired Carbohydrate Amphiphiles that Promote and Inhibit Biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dane, Eric L; Ballok, Alicia E; O'Toole, George A; Grinstaff, Mark W

    2014-02-01

    The synthesis and characterization of a new class of bioinspired carbohydrate amphiphiles that modulate Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm formation are reported. The carbohydrate head is an enantiopure poly-amido-saccharide (PAS) prepared by a controlled anionic polymerization of β-lactam monomers derived from either glucose or galactose. The supramolecular assemblies formed by PAS amphiphiles are investigated in solution using fluorescence assays and dynamic light scattering. Dried samples are investigated using X-ray, infrared spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Additionally, the amphiphiles are evaluated for their ability to modulate biofilm formation by the Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Remarkably, from a library of eight amphiphiles, we identify a structure that promotes biofilm formation and two structures that inhibit biofilm formation. Using biological assays and electron microscopy, we relate the chemical structure of the amphiphiles to the observed activity. Materials that modulate the formation of biofilms by bacteria are important both as research tools for microbiologists to study the process of biofilm formation and for their potential to provide new drug candidates for treating biofilm-associated infections.

  7. Genome-Wide DNA Binding of GBF1 IsModulated by Its Heterodimerizing ProteinPartners, HY5 and HYH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    Dear Editor, In today's post-genomic era where direct targets of manytranscription factors have been identified, it is becomingincreasingly evident that transcriptional networks are verycomplex. Heterodimerization of transcription factors is oneof the several methods by which these complex transcrip-tional networks are formed. By heterodimerization, DNA-binding specificity and affinity, transactivation properties,and ultimately cell physiology might be altered (Naar et al.,2001). The formation of heterodimers has the potential torecognize additional binding sites and increase the rangeof DNA-binding specificity (Foster et al., 1994). Further, het-erodimerization also allows the production of new proteinconfigurations. For example, the protein STF1 from soybeancan dimerize with GBF proteins and this dimerization bringstogether the acidic region from STF1 and the proline-richregion of the GBF proteins into one binding element (Cheonget al., 1998). These results highlight the importance and/orconsequences of heterodimerization of transcription factorsat particular locus. However, to understand the complex tran-scriptional networks, it is important to investigate that howheterodimerization affects the whole-genome-wide bind-ing and transcriptional properties of a transcription factor.Here in this study, we have investigated genome-wide DNAbinding of bZIP transcription factor GBF1, and analyzed theimportance of its heterodimerization with HY5 and HYH forits genome-wide binding. We have found that GBF1 bindingsites are enriched within the 1-kb regions upstream to thetranscription start sites of target genes. Moreover, the bind-ings of GBF1 to most of its targets are largely dependent onHY5, while HYH only affects the binding of GBF1 to somespecific sites.

  8. Carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespell, R B; Canale-Parola, E

    1970-07-01

    The pathways of carbohydrate metabolism in Spirochaeta stenostrepta, a free-living, strictly anaerobic spirochete, were studied. The organism fermented glucose to ethyl alcohol, acetate, lactate, CO(2), and H(2). Assays of enzymatic activities in cell extracts, and determinations of radioactivity distribution in products formed from (14)C-labeled glucose indicated that S. stenostrepta degraded glucose via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway. The spirochete utilized a clostridial-type clastic reaction to metabolize pyruvate to acetyl-coenzyme A, CO(2), and H(2), without production of formate. Acetyl-coenzyme A was converted to ethyl alcohol by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent acetaldehyde and alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Phosphotransacetylase and acetate kinase catalyzed the formation of acetate from acetyl-coenzyme A. Hydrogenase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were detected in cell extracts. A rubredoxin was isolated from cell extracts of S. stenostrepta. Preparations of this rubredoxin stimulated acetyl phosphate formation from pyruvate by diethylaminoethyl cellulose-treated extracts of S. stenostrepta, an indication that rubredoxin may participate in pyruvate cleavage by this spirochete. Nutritional studies showed that S. stenostrepta fermented a variety of carbohydrates, but did not ferment amino acids or other organic acids. An unidentified growth factor present in yeast extract was required by the organism. Exogenous supplements of biotin, riboflavin, and vitamin B(12) were either stimulatory or required for growth. PMID:5423371

  9. The effects of carbohydrate variation in isocaloric diets on glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in healthy men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; Arias, AMP; Ackermans, MT; Endert, E; Pijl, H; Kuipers, F; Meijer, AJ; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate content on postabsorptive glucose metabolism, we quantified gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis after 11 days of high carbohydrate (85% carbohydrate), control (44% carbohydrate), and very low carbohydrate (2% carbohydrate) diets in six healthy men. Diets

  10. Carbohydrate determinants in ferret conjunctiva are affected by infection with influenza H1N1 virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkeby, Svend; Martel, Cyril; Aasted, Bent;

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrates often accomplish as cell-surface receptors for microorganisms and influenza virus preferentially binds to sialic acid through the viral haemagglutinin. The virus may attach not only to the epithelium in the airways, but also to the surface ocular epithelium....

  11. Fat/carbohydrate ratio but not energy density determines snack food intake and activates brain reward areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Tobias; Kreitz, Silke; Gaffling, Simone; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hess, Andreas

    2015-05-14

    The snack food potato chips induces food intake in ad libitum fed rats, which is associated with modulation of the brain reward system and other circuits. Here, we show that food intake in satiated rats is triggered by an optimal fat/carbohydrate ratio. Like potato chips, an isocaloric fat/carbohydrate mixture influenced whole brain activity pattern of rats, affecting circuits related e.g. to reward/addiction, but the number of modulated areas and the extent of modulation was lower compared to the snack food itself.

  12. Fat/carbohydrate ratio but not energy density determines snack food intake and activates brain reward areas

    OpenAIRE

    Hoch, Tobias; Kreitz, Silke; Gaffling, Simone; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hess, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The snack food potato chips induces food intake in ad libitum fed rats, which is associated with modulation of the brain reward system and other circuits. Here, we show that food intake in satiated rats is triggered by an optimal fat/carbohydrate ratio. Like potato chips, an isocaloric fat/carbohydrate mixture influenced whole brain activity pattern of rats, affecting circuits related e.g. to reward/addiction, but the number of modulated areas and the extent of modulation was lower compared t...

  13. The effect of carbohydrate and fat variation in euenergetic diets on postabsorptive free fatty acid release

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bisschop, PH; Ackermans, MT; Endert, E; Ruiter, AFC; Meijer, AJ; Kuipers, F; Sauerwein, HP; Romijn, JA

    2002-01-01

    Diet composition and energy content modulate free fatty acid (FFA) release. The aim of this study was to evaluate the dose-response effects of euenergetic variations in dietary carbohydrate and fat content on postabsorptive FFA release. The rate of appearance (R-a) of palmitate was measured by infus

  14. Transcriptional modulation of hepatic lipoprotein assembly and secretion : coordinate regulation of the liver-fatty acid binding protein and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein genes

    OpenAIRE

    Spann, Nathanael J.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatic production of apolipoprotein (apo) B-containing lipoproteins provides a means to transport essential lipids and fat-soluble nutrients to peripheral tissues for utilization and storage. Liver-fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) bind fatty acids and glycerolipids, respectively and facilitate their transfer into the VLDL assembly and secretion pathway. Sequence analysis reveals that the proximal promoter regions of L-FABP and MTP contain...

  15. Carbohydrate clearance receptors in transfusion medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anne Louise Tølbøll; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H

    2012-01-01

    Complex carbohydrates play important functions for circulation of proteins and cells. They provide protective shields and refraction from non-specific interactions with negative charges from sialic acids to enhance circulatory half-life. For recombinant protein therapeutics carbohydrates are espe...

  16. Conversion of carbohydrates to levulinic acid esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to the field of converting carbohydrates into levulinic acid, a platform chemical for many chemical end products. More specifically the invention relates to a method for converting carbohydrates such as mono-, di- or polysaccharides, obtained from for example biomass...

  17. Derivatization Reaction of Carbohydrates with Urea as the Reagent and Fluorimetric Determination of Carbohydrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG,Jing-He(杨景和); CAO,Xi-Hui(曹西慧); WANG,Min(王敏); WU,Xia(吴霞); SUN,Chang-Xia(孙长侠)

    2002-01-01

    It is found that in the presence of sulfuric acid carbohydrates condense with urea to afford the condensation products, which emit fluorescence. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensities of system are proportional to the concentrations of carbohydrates. Based on this linear relationship,quantitative determination of kinds of carbohydrates has been made. Among an the carbohydrates tested, the sensitivity of α-rhamnose is the highest and its limits of detection reaches 3.5 × 10-8 mol/L. So α-rhamnose can be selectively determed in the presence of other carbohydrates. A interaction mechanism is also discussed.

  18. Stacking interactions between carbohydrate and protein quantified by combination of theoretical and experimental methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Wimmerová

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate-receptor interactions are an integral part of biological events. They play an important role in many cellular processes, such as cell-cell adhesion, cell differentiation and in-cell signaling. Carbohydrates can interact with a receptor by using several types of intermolecular interactions. One of the most important is the interaction of a carbohydrate's apolar part with aromatic amino acid residues, known as dispersion interaction or CH/π interaction. In the study presented here, we attempted for the first time to quantify how the CH/π interaction contributes to a more general carbohydrate-protein interaction. We used a combined experimental approach, creating single and double point mutants with high level computational methods, and applied both to Ralstonia solanacearum (RSL lectin complexes with α-L-Me-fucoside. Experimentally measured binding affinities were compared with computed carbohydrate-aromatic amino acid residue interaction energies. Experimental binding affinities for the RSL wild type, phenylalanine and alanine mutants were -8.5, -7.1 and -4.1 kcal x mol(-1, respectively. These affinities agree with the computed dispersion interaction energy between carbohydrate and aromatic amino acid residues for RSL wild type and phenylalanine, with values -8.8, -7.9 kcal x mol(-1, excluding the alanine mutant where the interaction energy was -0.9 kcal x mol(-1. Molecular dynamics simulations show that discrepancy can be caused by creation of a new hydrogen bond between the α-L-Me-fucoside and RSL. Observed results suggest that in this and similar cases the carbohydrate-receptor interaction can be driven mainly by a dispersion interaction.

  19. MicroRNA-155 Modulates the Pathogen Binding Ability of Dendritic Cells (DCs) by Down-regulation of DC-specific Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-3 Grabbing Non-integrin (DC-SIGN)*

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T.; Louafi, Fethi; Friedmann, Peter S.; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) has been involved in the response to inflammation in macrophages and lymphocytes. Here we show how miR-155 participates in the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC) and modulates pathogen binding by down-regulating DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), after directly targeting the transcription factor PU.1. During the maturation of DCs, miR-155 increases up to 130-fold, whereas PU.1 protein levels decrease accordingly. We esta...

  20. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  1. Carbohydrate recognition by the antiviral lectin cyanovirin-N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Yukiji K; Green, David F

    2012-12-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CVN) is a cyanobacterial lectin with potent antiviral activity and has been the focus of extensive preclinical investigation as a potential prophylactic for the prevention of the sexual transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Here we present a detailed analysis of carbohydrate recognition by this important protein, using a combination of computational methods, including extensive molecular dynamics simulations and molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) energetic analysis. The simulation results strongly suggest that the observed tendency of wild-type CVN to form domain-swapped dimers is the result of a previously unidentified cis-peptide bond present in the monomeric state. The energetic analysis additionally indicates that the highest-affinity ligand for CVN characterized to date (α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man) is recognized asymmetrically by the two binding sites. Finally, we are able to provide a detailed map of the role of all binding site functional groups (both backbone and side chain) to various aspects of molecular recognition: general affinity for cognate ligands, specificity for distinct oligosaccharide targets, and the asymmetric recognition of α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man-(1,2)-α-Man. Taken as a whole, these results complement past experimental characterization (both structural and thermodynamic) to provide the most complete understanding of carbohydrate recognition by CVN to date. The results also provide strong support for the application of similar approaches to the understanding of other protein-carbohydrate complexes. PMID:23057413

  2. Carbohydrate Recognition Specificity of Trans-sialidase Lectin Domain from Trypanosoma congolense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Waespy

    Full Text Available Fourteen different active Trypanosoma congolense trans-sialidases (TconTS, 11 variants of TconTS1 besides TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4, have been described. Notably, the specific transfer and sialidase activities of these TconTS differ by orders of magnitude. Surprisingly, phylogenetic analysis of the catalytic domains (CD grouped each of the highly active TconTS together with the less active enzymes. In contrast, when aligning lectin-like domains (LD, the highly active TconTS grouped together, leading to the hypothesis that the LD of TconTS modulates its enzymatic activity. So far, little is known about the function and ligand specificity of these LDs. To explore their carbohydrate-binding potential, glycan array analysis was performed on the LD of TconTS1, TconTS2, TconTS3 and TconTS4. In addition, Saturation Transfer Difference (STD NMR experiments were done on TconTS2-LD for a more detailed analysis of its lectin activity. Several mannose-containing oligosaccharides, such as mannobiose, mannotriose and higher mannosylated glycans, as well as Gal, GalNAc and LacNAc containing oligosaccharides were confirmed as binding partners of TconTS1-LD and TconTS2-LD. Interestingly, terminal mannose residues are not acceptor substrates for TconTS activity. This indicates a different, yet unknown biological function for TconTS-LD, including specific interactions with oligomannose-containing glycans on glycoproteins and GPI anchors found on the surface of the parasite, including the TconTS itself. Experimental evidence for such a scenario is presented.

  3. Technological aspects of functional food-related carbohydrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voragen, A.G.J.

    1998-01-01

    Carbohydrates in food occur as natural constituents or are added as ingredients or additives. The most important endogenous carbohydrates in food are starch, depolymerized starch, sucrose, lactose, glucose, fructose and sorbitol (digestible) and carbohydrates such as raffinose, stachyose, resistant

  4. NMR investigations of protein-carbohydrate interactions : Studies on the relevance of Trp/Tyr variations in lectin binding sites as deduced from titration microcalorimetry and NMR studies on hevein domains. Determination of the NMR structure of the complex between pseudohevein and N,N ',N ''-triacetylchitotriose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asensio, JL; Siebert, HC; von der Lieth, CW; Laynez, J; Bruix, M; Soedjanaamadja, UM; Beintema, JJ; Canada, FJ; Gabius, HJ; Jimenez-Barbero, J

    2000-01-01

    Model studies on lectins and their interactions with carbohydrate ligands in solution are essential to gain insights into the driving forces for complex formation and to optimize programs for computer simulations. The specific interaction of pseudohevein with N,N',N"-triacetylchitotriose has been an

  5. The cancer glycome: carbohydrates as mediators of metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavey, Siobhan V; Huynh, Daisy; Reagan, Michaela R; Manier, Salomon; Moschetta, Michele; Kawano, Yawara; Roccaro, Aldo M; Ghobrial, Irene M; Joshi, Lokesh; O'Dwyer, Michael E

    2015-07-01

    Glycosylation is a frequent post-translational modification which results in the addition of carbohydrate determinants, "glycans", to cell surface proteins and lipids. These glycan structures form the "glycome" and play an integral role in cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions through modulation of adhesion and cell trafficking. Glycosylation is increasingly recognized as a modulator of the malignant phenotype of cancer cells, where the interaction between cells and the tumor micro-environment is altered to facilitate processes such as drug resistance and metastasis. Changes in glycosylation of cell surface adhesion molecules such as selectin ligands, integrins and mucins have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several solid and hematological malignancies, often with prognostic implications. In this review we focus on the functional significance of alterations in cancer cell glycosylation, in terms of cell adhesion, trafficking and the metastatic cascade and provide insights into the prognostic and therapeutic implications of recent findings in this fast-evolving niche.

  6. Carbohydrate Detection and Lectin Isolation from Tegumental Tissue of Fasciola hepatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MB Molaei Rad

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Fascioliasis is a chronic hepatic disease and may be resulted from mechani­cal/molecular parasite adhesion to host liver tissue. The aim of this study was to detect surface car­bohydrate and lectin, carbohydrate-binding protein isolation that might be responsible of this molecular binding."nMethods: The present experimental work was conducted in the Department of Medical Parasitol­ogy and Mycology, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Te­hran, Iran.  Fasciola hepatica parasites were collected from abattoir (Saman, Tehran, Iran and surface mannose-carbohydrate was detected by fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC conju­gated lectin (Lentil. Lectin of tegumental tissue from F. hepatica was isolated by affinity chroma­tography and detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE."nResults: Mannose carbohydrate was observed on the surface of tegumental tissue from para­site under fluorescence microscope. Carbohydrate-binding protein or lectin with MW of 50 kDa also was isolated from homogenized tegument of helminth."nConclusion: These results are important for understanding of molecular pathogenesis of F. hepat­ica at the chronic phase of fascioliasis

  7. Carbohydrates mediate sperm-ovum adhesion and triggering of the acrosome reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DaulatR.P.Tulsiani

    2000-01-01

    The fertilization process is the net result of a complex sequence of events that collectively result in the fusion of the opposite gametes. The male gamete undergoes continuous morphological and biochemical modifications during sperm development in the testis (spermatogenesis), maturation in the epididymis, and capacitation in the female reproductive tract. Only the capacitated spermatozoa are able to recognize and bind to the bioactive glycan residue(s) on the ovum's extracellular coat, the zona pellucida (ZP). Sperm-zona binding in the mouse and several other species is believed to take place in two stages. First, capacitated (acrosome-intact) spermatozoa loosely and reversibly adhere to the zona-intact ovum. In the second stage tight irreversible binding occurs. Both types of bindings are attributed to the presence of glycan- binding proteins (receptors) on the sperm plasma membrane and their complementary bioactive glycan units (ligands) on the surface of the ZP. The carbohydrate-mediated adhesion event initiates a signal transduction cascade resulting in the exocytosis of acrosomal contents. This step is believed to be prerequisite which allows the hypemctivated acrosome-reacted spermatozoa to penetrate the ZP and fertilize the ovum. This review focuses on the role of carbohydrate residues in sperm-ovum interaction, and triggering of the acrosome reaction. I have attempted to discuss extensive progress that has been made to enhance our understanding of the well programmed multiple molecular events necessary for successful fertilization. This review will identify these events, and discuss the functional significance of carbohydrates in these events.

  8. Effect of anti-carbohydrate antibodies on HIV infection in a monocytic cell line (U937)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H;

    1991-01-01

    . This study therefore investigated the neutralization of HIV in a monocytic cell line (U937) using mAbs against these carbohydrate gp120-epitopes. While antibodies against one of the epitopes (AI) neutralized infection of U937 cells despite binding to the Fc-receptor, one mAb against the sialosyl-Tn epitope...... enhanced infection. This enhancement was independent of complement and could be blocked by mAb Leu3a against the CD4-receptor. The study indicated that enhancement of infection in monocytic cells can occur by the same anti-carbohydrate antibodies that neutralize infection in lymphocytes, and that antibody...

  9. Carbohydrate-mediated inhibition of ice recrystallization in cryopreserved human umbilical cord blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Luke K; Tokarew, Jacqueline M; Chaytor, Jennifer L; von Moos, Elizabeth; Li, Yuhua; Palii, Carmen; Ben, Robert N; Allan, David S

    2011-01-01

    Cryopreservation of human umbilical cord blood (UCB) typically involves the cryoprotectant dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), however, infusional toxicity and reductions in cell viability remain a concern. Ice recrystallization (IR) is an important source of cryopreservation-induced cellular injury and limits the stem cell dose in UCB units. Carbohydrates have wide-ranging intrinsic IR inhibition (IRI) activity related to structural properties. We investigated the impact of carbohydrate IRI on cell viability, induction of apoptosis and hematopoietic progenitor function in cryopreserved UCB. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) from UCB were cryopreserved in storage media containing specific carbohydrates (200mM) and compared to 5% DMSO. Samples were analyzed under conditions of high IR ('slow' thaw) and low IR ('fast' thaw). Thawed samples were analyzed for viability and apoptosis by flow cytometry and hematopoietic function using colony-forming unit (CFU) assays. IRI of carbohydrate solutions was determined using the 'splat cooling' assay. Greater IRI capacity of carbohydrates correlated with increased yield of viable MNCs (r(2)=0.92, p=0.004) and CD34(+) cells (r(2)=0.96, p=0.019) after thawing under conditions of high IR. The correlations were less apparent under conditions of low IR. Carbohydrates with greater IRI modulate the induction of early apoptosis during thawing, especially in CD34+ cells (r(2)=0.96, p=0.0001) as compared to total mononuclear cells (p=0.006), and preserve CFU capacity in vitro (r(2)=0.92, p=<0.0001). Our results suggest that carbohydrates with potent IRI increase the yield of non-apoptotic and functional hematopoietic progenitors and provide a foundation for the development of novel synthetic carbohydrates with enhanced IRI properties to improve cryopreservation of UCB.

  10. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain with a coactivator-like peptide and selective androgen receptor modulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The human androgen receptor ligand-binding domain has been crystallized as a ternary complex with a coactivator-like undecapeptide and two different synthetic ligands. The ligand-binding domain of the human androgen receptor has been cloned, overproduced and crystallized in the presence of a coactivator-like 11-mer peptide and two different nonsteroidal ligands. The crystals of the two ternary complexes were isomorphous and belonged to space group P212121, with one molecule in the asymmetric unit. They diffracted to 1.7 and 1.95 Å resolution, respectively. Structure determination of these two complexes will help in understanding the mode of binding of selective nonsteroidal androgens versus endogenous steroidal ligands and possibly the origin of their tissue selectivity

  11. ICAT Inhibits beta-Catenin Binding to Tcf/Lef-Family Transcription Factors and in the General Coactivator p300 Using Independent Structural Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, {beta}-catenin activates target genes through its interactions with Tcf/Lef-family transcription factors and additional transcriptional coactivators. The crystal structure of ICAT, an inhibitor of {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription, bound to the armadillo repeat domain of {beta}-catenin, has been determined. ICAT contains an N-terminal helilical domain that binds to repeats 11 and 12 of {beta}-catenin, and an extended C-terminal region that binds to repeats 5-10 in a manner similar that of Tcfs and other {beta}-catenin ligands. Full-length ICAT dissociates complexes of {beta}-catenin, Lef-1, and the transcriptional coactivator p300, whereas the helical domain alone selectively blocks binding to p300. The C-terminal armadillo repeats of {beta}-catenin may be an attractive target for compounds designed to disrupt aberrant {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription associated with various cancers.

  12. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  13. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Khursheed A; Catanese, Mary; Normantowicz, Robyn; Herd, Muriel; Maher, Kathryn N; Chase, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1) required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior. PMID:22629462

  14. D1 dopamine receptor signaling is modulated by the R7 RGS protein EAT-16 and the R7 binding protein RSBP-1 in Caenoerhabditis elegans motor neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khursheed A Wani

    Full Text Available Dopamine signaling modulates voluntary movement and reward-driven behaviors by acting through G protein-coupled receptors in striatal neurons, and defects in dopamine signaling underlie Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Despite the importance of understanding how dopamine modifies the activity of striatal neurons to control basal ganglia output, the molecular mechanisms that control dopamine signaling remain largely unclear. Dopamine signaling also controls locomotion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans. To better understand how dopamine acts in the brain we performed a large-scale dsRNA interference screen in C. elegans for genes required for endogenous dopamine signaling and identified six genes (eat-16, rsbp-1, unc-43, flp-1, grk-1, and cat-1 required for dopamine-mediated behavior. We then used a combination of mutant analysis and cell-specific transgenic rescue experiments to investigate the functional interaction between the proteins encoded by two of these genes, eat-16 and rsbp-1, within single cell types and to examine their role in the modulation of dopamine receptor signaling. We found that EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to modulate dopamine signaling and that while they are coexpressed with both D1-like and D2-like dopamine receptors, they do not modulate D2 receptor signaling. Instead, EAT-16 and RSBP-1 act together to selectively inhibit D1 dopamine receptor signaling in cholinergic motor neurons to modulate locomotion behavior.

  15. Enhancement of rabbit protein S anticoagulant cofactor activity in vivo by modulation of the protein S C4B binding protein interaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, R E; Walker, F. J.

    1990-01-01

    The carboxy-terminal region of protein S has been recently been observed to be involved in the interaction between protein S and C4b-binding protein (Walker, F. J. 1989. J. Biol. Chem. 264:17645-17658). A synthetic peptide, GVQLDLDEAI, corresponding to that region of protein S has been used to investigate the protein S/C4b-binding protein interaction in vitro and in vivo. Rabbit activated protein C possesses species-specific anticoagulant activity for which rabbit protein S functions as a cof...

  16. 抗菌肽人β防御素3融合糖类结合域对葡萄球菌的抑制作用%Inhibition role of fusing antimicrobial peptides humanβ-defensin 3 and carbohydrate binding domain on staphylococcus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄洁雯; 郭晓奎; 李擎天

    2014-01-01

    目的:探讨抗菌肽人β防御素3融合糖类结合域(hBD3-CBD)对金黄色葡萄球菌 N315、表皮葡萄球菌35984的抑制作用。方法以直接杀伤和分子生物学方法检测 hBD3-CBD 对金黄色葡萄球菌 N315和表皮葡萄球菌35984菌株的抑制作用以及对细菌关键基因表达的影响。结果直接杀菌作用显示,抗菌肽 hBD3以及 hBD3-CBD 对金黄色葡萄球菌 N315、表皮葡萄球菌35984均有显著的抑制作用;hBD3-CBD 的抑制作用强于 hBD3;hBD3-CBD 抑制作用的稳定性亦强于 hBD3。在金黄色葡萄球菌 N315、表皮葡萄球菌35984的关键基因表达检测中,hBD3-CBD 对葡萄球菌的 agr 和 mecA 基因表达有显著抑制作用,还抑制表皮葡萄球菌 icaA 基因的表达和促进 icaR 基因表达,这说明 hBD3-CBD 能够抑制表皮葡萄球菌的生物膜形成。结论抗菌肽的融合策略对于改善抗菌肽的抑菌效能意义重大,并为其未来的应用带来更多希望。%Objective To explore the inhibition of fusing antimicrobial peptides humanβ-defensin 3 and carbohydrate binding do-main on Staphylococcus aureus N315 and Staphylococcus epidermidis 35984.Methods The direct bactericidal test and other molec-ular biology methods were adopted to detect the inhibition role on Staphylococcus aureus strain N315 and Staphylococcus epidermi-dis strain 35984 and the influence on the key genes expression.Results The direct bactericidal test demonstrated that antimicrobial peptides hBD3 and hBD3-CBD had significantly inhibitory effects on staphylococcus aureus N315 and staphylococcus epidermidis 35984;the inhibitory effects of hBD3-CBD was stronger than that of hBD3;the stability of the inhibitory effects of hBD3-CBD also stronger than that of hBD3.In the key gene expression test,there were significant inhibitions on the agr and mecA gene expressions in Staphylococcus aureus N315 and Staphylococcus epidermidis 35984 by hBD3-CBD.At the same time,hBD3-CBD

  17. Utilization of carbohydrates by radiation processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, T. E-mail: kume@taka.jaeri.go.jp; Nagasawa, N.; Yoshii, F

    2002-03-01

    Upgrading and utilization of carbohydrates such as chitosan, sodium alginate, carrageenan, cellulose, pectin have been investigated for recycling these bio-resources and reducing the environmental pollution. These carbohydrates were easily degraded by irradiation and various kinds of biological activities such as anti-microbial activity, promotion of plant growth, suppression of heavy metal stress, phytoalexins induction, etc. were induced. On the other hand, some carbohydrate derivatives, carboxymethylcellulose and carboxymethylstarch, could be crosslinked under certain radiation condition and produce the biodegradable hydrogel for medical and agricultural use.

  18. Positive versus negative modulation of different endogenous chemokines for CC-chemokine receptor 1 by small molecule agonists through allosteric versus orthosteric binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Thiele, Stefanie; Ulven, Trond;

    2008-01-01

    5 and not CCL3 activation is affected by substitutions in the main ligand binding pocket including the conserved GluVII:06 anchor point. A series of metal ion chelator complexes were found to act as full agonists on CCR1 and to be critically affected by the same substitutions in the main ligand...

  19. Maize homologs of HCT, a key enzyme in lignin biosynthesis, bind the NLR Rp1 proteins to modulate the defense response

    Science.gov (United States)

    In plants, most disease resistance (R) genes encode nucleotide binding leucine-rich-repeat 42 (NLR) proteins that trigger a rapid localized cell death called a hypersensitive response (HR) 43 upon pathogen recognition. The maize NLR protein Rp1-D21 derives from an intragenic 44 recombination between...

  20. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae endopeptidase O (PepO) to complement component C1q modulates the complement attack and promotes host cell adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M

    2014-05-30

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen.

  1. Modulated Binding of SATB1, a Matrix Attachment Region Protein, to the AT-Rich Sequence Flanking the Major Breakpoint Region of BCL2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Meera; Liu, Wen-Man; DiCroce, Patricia A.; Posner, Aleza; Zheng, Jian; Kohwi-Shigematsu, Terumi; Krontiris, Theodore G.

    2000-01-01

    The t(14,18) chromosomal translocation that occurs in human follicular lymphoma constitutively activates the BCL2 gene and disrupts control of apoptosis. Interestingly, 70% of the t(14,18) translocations are confined to three 15-bp clusters positioned within a 150-bp region (major breakpoint region or [MBR]) in the untranslated portion of terminal exon 3. We analyzed DNA-protein interactions in the MBR, as these may play some role in targeting the translocation to this region. An 87-bp segment (87MBR) immediately 3′ to breakpoint cluster 3 was essential for DNA-protein interaction monitored with mobility shift assays. We further delineated a core binding region within 87MBR: a 33-bp, very AT-rich sequence highly conserved between the human and mouse BCL2 gene (37MBR). We have purified and identified one of the core factors as the matrix attachment region (MAR) binding protein, SATB1, which is known to bind to AT-rich sequences with a high propensity to unwind. Additional factors in nuclear extracts, which we have not yet characterized further, increased SATB1 affinity for the 37MBR target four- to fivefold. Specific binding activity within 37MBR displayed cell cycle regulation in Jurkat T cells, while levels of SATB1 remained constant throughout the cell cycle. Finally, we demonstrated in vivo binding of SATB1 to the MBR, strongly suggesting the BCL2 major breakpoint region is a MAR. We discuss the potential consequences of our observations for both MBR fragility and regulatory function. PMID:10629043

  2. Modulation of ligand-heme reactivity by binding pocket residues demonstrated in cytochrome c' over the femtosecond-second temporal range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Henry J; Hardman, Samantha J O; Heyes, Derren J; Hough, Michael A; Greetham, Gregory M; Towrie, Michael; Hay, Sam; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-12-01

    The ability of hemoproteins to discriminate between diatomic molecules, and the subsequent affinity for their chosen ligand, is fundamental to the existence of life. These processes are often controlled by precise structural arrangements in proteins, with heme pocket residues driving reactivity and specificity. One such protein is cytochrome c', which has the ability to bind nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) on opposite faces of the heme, a property that is shared with soluble guanylate cycle. Like soluble guanylate cyclase, cytochrome c' also excludes O2 completely from the binding pocket. Previous studies have shown that the NO binding mechanism is regulated by a proximal arginine residue (R124) and a distal leucine residue (L16). Here, we have investigated the roles of these residues in maintaining the affinity for NO in the heme binding environment by using various time-resolved spectroscopy techniques that span the entire femtosecond-second temporal range in the UV-vis spectrum, and the femtosecond-nanosecond range by IR spectroscopy. Our findings indicate that the tightly regulated NO rebinding events following excitation in wild-type cytochrome c' are affected in the R124A variant. In the R124A variant, vibrational and electronic changes extend continuously across all time scales (from fs-s), in contrast to wild-type cytochrome c' and the L16A variant. Based on these findings, we propose a NO (re)binding mechanism for the R124A variant of cytochrome c' that is distinct from that in wild-type cytochrome c'. In the wider context, these findings emphasize the importance of heme pocket architecture in maintaining the reactivity of hemoproteins towards their chosen ligand, and demonstrate the power of spectroscopic probes spanning a wide temporal range.

  3. Carbohydrate feeding and exercise: effect of beverage carbohydrate content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R; Seifert, J G; Eddy, D E; Paul, G L; Halaby, G A

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ingesting fluids of varying carbohydrate content upon sensory response, physiologic function, and exercise performance during 1.25 h of intermittent cycling in a warm environment (Tdb = 33.4 degrees C). Twelve subjects (7 male, 5 female) completed four separate exercise sessions; each session consisted of three 20 min bouts of cycling at 65% VO2max, with each bout followed by 5 min rest. A timed cycling task (1200 pedal revolutions) completed each exercise session. Immediately prior to the first 20 min cycling bout and during each rest period, subjects consumed 2.5 ml.kg BW-1 of water placebo (WP), or solutions of 6%, 8%, or 10% sucrose with electrolytes (20 mmol.l-1 Na+, 3.2 mmol.l-1 K+). Beverages were administered in double blind, counterbalanced order. Mean (+/- SE) times for the 1200 cycling task differed significantly: WP = 13.62 +/- 0.33 min, *6% = 13.03 +/- 0.24 min, 8% = 13.30 +/- 0.25 min, 10% = 13.57 +/- 0.22 min (* = different from WP and 10%, P less than 0.05). Compared to WP, ingestion of the CHO beverages resulted in higher plasma glucose and insulin concentrations, and higher RER values during the final 20 min of exercise (P less than 0.05). Markers of physiologic function and sensory perception changed similarly throughout exercise; no differences were observed among subjects in response to beverage treatments for changes in plasma concentrations of lactate, sodium, potassium, for changes in plasma volume, plasma osmolality, rectal temperature, heart rate, oxygen uptake, rating of perceived exertion, or for indices of gastrointestinal distress, perceived thirst, and overall beverage acceptance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. The staphylococcal accessory regulator, SarA, is an RNA-binding protein that modulates the mRNA turnover properties of late-exponential and stationary phase Staphylococcus aureus cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Morrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The modulation of mRNA turnover is gaining recognition as a mechanism by which Staphylococcus aureus regulates gene expression, but the factors that orchestrate alterations in transcript degradation are poorly understood. In that regard, we previously found that 138 mRNA species, including the virulence factors protein A (spa and collagen binding protein (cna, are stabilized in a sarA-dependent manner during exponential phase growth, suggesting that SarA protein may directly or indirectly effect the RNA turnover properties of these transcripts. Herein, we expanded our characterization of the effects of sarA on mRNA turnover during late exponential and stationary phases of growth. Results revealed that the locus affects the RNA degradation properties of cells during both growth phases. Further, using gel mobility shift assays and RIP-ChIP, it was found that SarA protein is capable of binding mRNA species that it stabilizes both in vitro and within bacterial cells. Taken together, these results suggest that SarA post-transcriptionally regulates S. aureus gene expression in a manner that involves binding to and consequently altering the mRNA turnover properties of target transcripts.

  5. Ribosomal protein S7 as a novel modulator of p53-MDM2 interaction: binding to MDM2, stabilization of p53 protein, and activation of p53 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D; Zhang, Z; Li, M; Wang, W; Li, Y; Rayburn, E R; Hill, D L; Wang, H; Zhang, R

    2007-08-01

    As a major negative regulator of p53, the MDM2 oncogene plays an important role in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. MDM2 promotes p53 proteasomal degradation and negatively regulates p53 function. The mechanisms by which the MDM2-p53 interaction is regulated are not fully understood, although several MDM2-interacting molecules have recently been identified. To search for novel MDM2-binding partners, we screened a human prostate cDNA library by the yeast two-hybrid assay using full-length MDM2 protein as the bait. Among the candidate proteins, ribosomal protein S7 was identified and confirmed as a novel MDM2-interacting protein. Herein, we demonstrate that S7 binds to MDM2, in vitro and in vivo, and that the interaction between MDM2 and S7 leads to modulation of MDM2-p53 binding by forming a ternary complex among MDM2, p53 and S7. This results in the stabilization of p53 protein through abrogation of MDM2-mediated p53 ubiquitination. Consequently, S7 overexpression increases p53 transactivational activities, induces apoptosis, and inhibits cell proliferation. The identification of S7 as a novel MDM2-interacting partner contributes to elucidation of the complex regulation of the MDM2-p53 interaction and has implications in cancer prevention and therapy.

  6. pRB binds to and modulates the transrepressing activity of the E1A-regulated transcription factor p120E4F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fajas, L.; Paul, C.; Zugasti, O.; Cam, L. Le; Polanowska, J.; Fabbrizio, E.; Medema, R.H.; Vignais, M.-L.; Sardet, C.

    2000-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein pRB is involved in the transcriptional control of genes essential for cell cycle progression and differentiation. pRB interacts with different transcription factors and thereby modulates their activity by sequestration, corepression, or activation. We report that pRB, but

  7. Effect of anti-carbohydrate antibodies on HIV infection in a monocytic cell line (U937)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Clausen, H;

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against carbohydrate epitopes of gp120 have recently been found to inhibit HIV infection of lymphocytes in vitro thereby opening new possibilities for vaccine considerations. Antibody-dependent enhancement of infection has however come increasingly into focus....... This study therefore investigated the neutralization of HIV in a monocytic cell line (U937) using mAbs against these carbohydrate gp120-epitopes. While antibodies against one of the epitopes (AI) neutralized infection of U937 cells despite binding to the Fc-receptor, one mAb against the sialosyl-Tn epitope...... enhanced infection. This enhancement was independent of complement and could be blocked by mAb Leu3a against the CD4-receptor. The study indicated that enhancement of infection in monocytic cells can occur by the same anti-carbohydrate antibodies that neutralize infection in lymphocytes, and that antibody...

  8. Workshop to establish databases of carbohydrate spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The workshop was organized to formulate guidelines for establishing spectral databases of complex carbohydrates. The databases will enable the scientific community to avoid the great waste of research effort and funds that frequently occurs when carbohydrate chemists are forced to duplicate the structural characterization of previously characterized complex carbohydrates. Chemists waste their effort on repetitive characterizations because in the absence of spectral databases they are unaware they are analyzing a known molecule until they have completely determined its structure. Chemists will be able to avoid much of this wasted effort when the collections of mass and of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra initiated at the workshop are subsequently developed into searchable databases. Then scientists only need query the databases with the spectrum or with information defining the spectrum of an unidentified carbohydrate to find out if it has been previously characterized.

  9. The Origin of the Constant Carbohydrate Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Herbert Read

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Constant Carbohydrate diet, based entirely on carbohydrate exchanges, is now widely used in the dietary treatment of diabetes mellitus. Being based on sound scientific principles and simple in design, the Constant Carabohydrate diet is appropriate for all those having diabetes mellitus, young or old, no matter their ethncity. This report describes why and how it was developed in 1951. Its simplicity makes it adaptable to all ethnic diets.

  10. The Origin of the Constant Carbohydrate Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Read CharlesHerbert

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The Constant Carbohydrate diet, based entirely on carbohydrate exchanges, is now widely used in the dietary treatment of diabetes mellitus. Being based on sound scientific principles and simple in design, the Constant Carabohydrate diet is appropriate for all those having diabetes mellitus, young or old, no matter their ethncity. This report describes why and how it was developed in 1951. Its simplicity makes it adaptable to all ethnic diets.

  11. The fibronectin-binding integrins alpha5beta1 and alphavbeta3 differentially modulate RhoA-GTP loading, organization of cell matrix adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danen, Erik H J; Sonneveld, Petra; Brakebusch, Cord;

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the formation of different types of cell matrix adhesions in cells that bind to fibronectin via either alpha5beta1 or alphavbeta3. In both cases, cell adhesion to fibronectin leads to a rapid decrease in RhoA activity. However, alpha5beta1 but not alphavbeta3 supports high levels...... of RhoA activity at later stages of cell spreading, which are associated with a translocation of focal contacts to peripheral cell protrusions, recruitment of tensin into fibrillar adhesions, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis. Expression of an activated mutant of RhoA stimulates alphavbeta3-mediated...... fibrillogenesis. Despite the fact that alpha5beta1-mediated adhesion to the central cell-binding domain of fibronectin supports activation of RhoA, other regions of fibronectin are required for the development of alpha5beta1-mediated but not alphavbeta3-mediated focal contacts. Using chimeras of beta1 and beta3...

  12. Enhancing the Apoptotic Potential of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-3 in Prostate Cancer by Modulation of CK2 Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Cobb, Laura J.; Mehta, Hemal; Cohen, Pinchas

    2009-01-01

    IGF-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) promotes apoptosis by both IGF-dependent and -independent mechanisms. We have previously reported that phosphorylation of IGFBP-3 (S156) by DNA-dependent protein kinase enhances its nuclear accumulation and is essential for its ability to interact with retinoid X receptor-α and induce apoptosis in cultured prostate cancer cells. Using specific chemical inhibitors and small interfering RNA, we demonstrate that preventing casein kinase 2 (CK2) activation enhanced...

  13. The Chemical Neurobiology of Carbohydrates

    OpenAIRE

    Murrey, Heather E.; Hsieh-Wilson, Linda C.

    2008-01-01

    The cell surface displays a complex array of oligosaccharides, glycoproteins, and glycolipids. This diverse mixture of glycans contains a wealth of information, modulating a wide range of processes such as cell migration, proliferation, transcriptional regulation, and differentiation. Glycosylation is one of the most ubiquitous forms of post-translational modification, with more than 50% of the human proteome estimated to be glycosylated. Glycosylation adds another dimension to the complexity...

  14. Dietary Carbohydrates and Childhood Functional Abdominal Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumpitazi, Bruno P; Shulman, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) affect a large number of children throughout the world. Carbohydrates (which provide the majority of calories consumed in the Western diet) have been implicated both as culprits for the etiology of symptoms and as potential therapeutic agents (e.g., fiber) in childhood FGIDs. In this review, we detail how carbohydrate malabsorption may cause gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., bloating) via the physiologic effects of both increased osmotic activity and increased gas production from bacterial fermentation. Several factors may play a role, including: (1) the amount of carbohydrate ingested; (2) whether ingestion is accompanied by a meal or other food; (3) the rate of gastric emptying (how quickly the meal enters the small intestine); (4) small intestinal transit time (the time it takes for a meal to enter the large intestine after first entering the small intestine); (5) whether the meal contains bacteria with enzymes capable of breaking down the carbohydrate; (6) colonic bacterial adaptation to one's diet, and (7) host factors such as the presence or absence of visceral hypersensitivity. By detailing controlled and uncontrolled trials, we describe how there is a general lack of strong evidence supporting restriction of individual carbohydrates (e.g., lactose, fructose) for childhood FGIDs. We review emerging evidence suggesting that a more comprehensive restriction of fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols (FODMAP) may be effective. Finally, we review how soluble fiber (a complex carbohydrate) supplementation via randomized controlled intervention trials in childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders has demonstrated efficacy. PMID:27355647

  15. Carbohydrate Nutrition and Team Sport Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Clyde; Rollo, Ian

    2015-11-01

    The common pattern of play in 'team sports' is 'stop and go', i.e. where players perform repeated bouts of brief high-intensity exercise punctuated by lower intensity activity. Sprints are generally 2-4 s long and recovery between sprints is of variable length. Energy production during brief sprints is derived from the degradation of intra-muscular phosphocreatine and glycogen (anaerobic metabolism). Prolonged periods of multiple sprints drain muscle glycogen stores, leading to a decrease in power output and a reduction in general work rate during training and competition. The impact of dietary carbohydrate interventions on team sport performance have been typically assessed using intermittent variable-speed shuttle running over a distance of 20 m. This method has evolved to include specific work to rest ratios and skills specific to team sports such as soccer, rugby and basketball. Increasing liver and muscle carbohydrate stores before sports helps delay the onset of fatigue during prolonged intermittent variable-speed running. Carbohydrate intake during exercise, typically ingested as carbohydrate-electrolyte solutions, is also associated with improved performance. The mechanisms responsible are likely to be the availability of carbohydrate as a substrate for central and peripheral functions. Variable-speed running in hot environments is limited by the degree of hyperthermia before muscle glycogen availability becomes a significant contributor to the onset of fatigue. Finally, ingesting carbohydrate immediately after training and competition will rapidly recover liver and muscle glycogen stores. PMID:26553494

  16. Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 is a competitive and dynamic modulator of SNARE binding and SYP121-dependent vesicle traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Rucha; Grefen, Christopher; Bayne, Robert; Honsbein, Annegret; Köhler, Tim; Kioumourtzoglou, Dimitrios; Williams, Mary; Bryant, Nia J; Blatt, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana Qa-SNARE SYP121 (=SYR1/PEN1) drives vesicle traffic at the plasma membrane of cells throughout the vegetative plant. It facilitates responses to drought, to the water stress hormone abscisic acid, and to pathogen attack, and it is essential for recovery from so-called programmed stomatal closure. How SYP121-mediated traffic is regulated is largely unknown, although it is thought to depend on formation of a fusion-competent SNARE core complex with the cognate partners VAMP721 and SNAP33. Like SYP121, the Arabidopsis Sec1/Munc18 protein SEC11 (=KEULE) is expressed throughout the vegetative plant. We find that SEC11 binds directly with SYP121 both in vitro and in vivo to affect secretory traffic. Binding occurs through two distinct modes, one requiring only SEC11 and SYP121 and the second dependent on assembly of a complex with VAMP721 and SNAP33. SEC11 competes dynamically for SYP121 binding with SNAP33 and VAMP721, and this competition is predicated by SEC11 association with the N terminus of SYP121. These and additional data are consistent with a model in which SYP121-mediated vesicle fusion is regulated by an unusual "handshaking" mechanism of concerted SEC11 debinding and rebinding. They also implicate one or more factors that alter or disrupt SEC11 association with the SYP121 N terminus as an early step initiating SNARE complex formation.

  17. Lectin binding in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinert, R; Radner, H

    1987-01-01

    Forty-two meningiomas of different morphological sub-type were examined to determine their pattern of binding to 11 different lectins which characterize cell surface components such as carbohydrate residues. Histiocytic and xanthoma cells within meningiomas could be demonstrated with six different lectins: wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) Bauhinia purpurea agglutinin (BPA), Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA), Vicia fava agglutinin (VFA) and Soyabean agglutinin (SBA). Vascular elements including endothelial cells and intimal cells, bound Ulex europaeus agglutinin type 1 (UEA 1), WGA and HPA. The fibrous stroma in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound PNA, Laburnum alpinum agglutinin (LAA) and SBA. Tumour cells in meningotheliomatous meningiomas and some areas of anaplastic meningiomas bound Concanavalin A, PNA, LAA and VFA whereas tumour cells in fibrous and fibroblastic meningiomas bound BPA, LAA and VFA. Lectin binding has proved to be of value in detecting histiocytic and xanthoma cells together with vascular elements within meningiomas. In addition, the different lectin binding patterns allow different histological sub-types of meningioma to be distinguished although the biological significance of the binding patterns is unclear. PMID:3658105

  18. Self-recognition and Ca2+-dependent carbohydrate-carbohydrate cell adhesion provide clues to the cambrian explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernàndez-Busquets, Xavier; Körnig, André; Bucior, Iwona; Burger, Max M; Anselmetti, Dario

    2009-11-01

    The Cambrian explosion of life was a relatively short period approximately 540 Ma that marked a generalized acceleration in the evolution of most animal phyla, but the trigger of this key biological event remains elusive. Sponges are the oldest extant Precambrian metazoan phylum and thus a valid model to study factors that could have unleashed the rise of multicellular animals. One such factor is the advent of self-/non-self-recognition systems, which would be evolutionarily beneficial to organisms to prevent germ-cell parasitism or the introduction of deleterious mutations resulting from fusion with genetically different individuals. However, the molecules responsible for allorecognition probably evolved gradually before the Cambrian period, and some other (external) factor remains to be identified as the missing triggering event. Sponge cells associate through calcium-dependent, multivalent carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions of the g200 glycan found on extracellular proteoglycans. Single molecule force spectroscopy analysis of g200-g200 binding indicates that calcium affects the lifetime (+Ca/-Ca: 680 s/3 s) and bond reaction length (+Ca/-Ca: 3.47 A/2.27 A). Calculation of mean g200 dissociation times in low and high calcium within the theoretical framework of a cooperative binding model indicates the nonlinear and divergent characteristics leading to either disaggregated cells or stable multicellular assemblies, respectively. This fundamental phenomenon can explain a switch from weak to strong adhesion between primitive metazoan cells caused by the well-documented rise in ocean calcium levels at the end of Precambrian time. We propose that stronger cell adhesion allowed the integrity of genetically uniform animals composed only of "self" cells, facilitating genetic constitutions to remain within the metazoan individual and be passed down inheritance lines. The Cambrian explosion might have been triggered by the coincidence in time of primitive animals

  19. Metabolic aspects of low carbohydrate diets and exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peters Sandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Following a low carbohydrate diet, there is a shift towards more fat and less carbohydrate oxidation to provide energy to skeletal muscle, both at rest and during exercise. This review summarizes recent work on human skeletal muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolic adaptations to a low carbohydrate diet, focusing mainly on pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase, and how these changes relate to the capacity for carbohydrate oxidation during exercise.

  20. Double-strand break repair and colorectal cancer: gene variants within 3′ UTRs and microRNAs binding as modulators of cancer risk and clinical outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarati, Alessio; Rosa, Fabio; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Barone, Elisa; Jiraskova, Katerina; Di Gaetano, Cornelia; Novotny, Jan; Levy, Miroslav; Vodickova, Ludmila; Gemignani, Federica; Buchler, Tomas; Landi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in 3′ untranslated regions of target genes may affect microRNA binding, resulting in differential protein expression. microRNAs regulate DNA repair, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites (miRSNPs) may account for interindividual differences in the DNA repair capacity. Our hypothesis is that miRSNPs in relevant DNA repair genes may ultimately affect cancer susceptibility and impact prognosis. In the present study, we analysed the association of polymorphisms in predicted microRNA target sites of double-strand breaks (DSBs) repair genes with colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Twenty-one miRSNPs in non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination pathways were assessed in 1111 cases and 1469 controls. The variant CC genotype of rs2155209 in MRE11A was strongly associated with decreased cancer risk when compared with the other genotypes (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.38–0.76, p = 0.0004). A reduced expression of the reporter gene was observed for the C allele of this polymorphism by in vitro assay, suggesting a more efficient interaction with potentially binding miRNAs. In colon cancer patients, the rs2155209 CC genotype was associated with shorter survival while the TT genotype of RAD52 rs11226 with longer survival when both compared with their respective more frequent genotypes (HR 1.63, 95% CI 1.06-2.51, p = 0.03 HR 0.60, 95% CI 0.41–0.89, p = 0.01, respectively). miRSNPs in DSB repair genes involved in the maintenance of genomic stability may have a role on CRC susceptibility and clinical outcome. PMID:26735576

  1. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  2. Glycosylated Conductive Polymer: A Multimodal Biointerface for Studying Carbohydrate-Protein Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiangqun; Qu, Ke; Rehman, Abdul

    2016-09-20

    Carbohydrate-protein interactions occur through glycoproteins, glycolipids, or polysaccharides displayed on the cell surface with lectins. However, studying these interactions is challenging because of the complexity and heterogeneity of the cell surface, the inherent structural complexity of carbohydrates, and the typically weak affinities of the binding reactions between the lectins and monovalent carbohydrates. The lack of chromophores and fluorophores in carbohydrate structures often drives such investigations toward fluorescence labeling techniques, which usually require tedious and complex synthetic work to conjugate fluorescent tags with additional risk of altering the reaction dynamics. Probing these interactions directly on the cell surface is even more difficult since cells could be too fragile for labeling or labile dynamics could be affected by the labeled molecules that may interfere with the cellular activities, resulting in unwanted cell responses. In contrast, label-free biosensors allow real-time monitoring of carbohydrate-protein interactions in their natural states. A prerequisite, though, for this strategy to work is to mimic the coding information on potential interactions of cell surfaces onto different biosensing platforms, while the complementary binding process can be transduced into a useful signal noninvasively. Through carbohydrate self-assembled monolayers and glycopolymer scaffolds, the multivalency of the naturally existing simple and complex carbohydrates can be mimicked and exploited with label-free readouts (e.g., optical, acoustic, mechanical, electrochemical, and electrical sensors), yet such inquiries reflect only limited aspects of complicated biointeraction processes due to the unimodal transduction. In this Account, we illustrate that functionalized glycosylated conductive polymer scaffolds are the ideal multimodal biointerfaces that not only simplify the immobilization process for surface fabrication via electrochemical

  3. Lessons from more than 80 structures of the GluA2 ligand-binding domain in complex with agonists, antagonists and allosteric modulators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pøhlsgaard, Jacob; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Madsen, Ulf;

    2011-01-01

    in learning and memory. However, iGluRs are also implicated in or have causal roles for several brain disorders, e.g. epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia. Their involvement in neurological diseases has stimulated widespread interest in their structure and function. Since...... the first publication in 1998 of the structure of a recombinant soluble protein comprising the ligand-binding domain of GluA2 extensive studies have afforded numerous crystal structures of wildtype and mutant proteins including different ligands. The structural information obtained combined with functional...

  4. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakomori Senitiroh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kinases and proteolipids; "type 2" having O-linked mucin-type glycoprotein associated with Src family kinases; and "type 3" having N-linked integrin receptor complexed with tetraspanin and ganglioside. Different cell types are characterized by presence of specific types of glycosynapse or their combinations, whose adhesion induces signal transduction to either facilitate or inhibit signaling. E.g., signaling through type 3 glycosynapse inhibits cell motility and differentiation. Glycosynapses are distinct from classically-known microdomains termed "caveolae", "caveolar membrane", or more recently "lipid raft", which are not involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion. Type 1 and type 3 glycosynapses are resistant to cholesterol-binding reagents, whereas structure and function of "caveolar membrane" or "lipid raft" are disrupted by these reagents. Various data indicate a functional role of glycosynapses during differentiation, development, and oncogenic transformation.

  5. TBL2 is a novel PERK-binding protein that modulates stress-signaling and cell survival during endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Tsukumo

    Full Text Available Under ER stress, PKR-like ER-resident kinase (PERK phosphorylates translation initiation factor eIF2α, resulting in repression of global protein synthesis and concomitant upregulation of the translation of specific mRNAs such as activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4. This PERK function is important for cell survival under ER stress and poor nutrient conditions. However, mechanisms of the PERK signaling pathway are not thoroughly understood. Here we identify transducin (beta-like 2 (TBL2 as a novel PERK-binding protein. We found that TBL2 is an ER-localized type-I transmembrane protein and preferentially binds to the phosphorylated form of PERK, but not another eIF2α kinase GCN2 or ER-resident kinase IRE1, under ER stress. Immunoprecipitation analysis using various deletion mutants revealed that TBL2 interacts with PERK via the N-terminus proximal region and also associates with eIF2α via the WD40 domain. In addition, TBL2 knockdown can lead to impaired ATF4 induction under ER stress or poor nutrient conditions such as glucose and oxygen deprivation. Consistently, TBL2 knockdown rendered cells vulnerable to stresses similarly to PERK knockdown. Thus, TBL2 serves as a potential regulator of the PERK pathway.

  6. Potential effect of ultrasound on carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Smritilekha; Mondal, Dhananjoy; Martin, Jacob T; Singh, Man

    2015-06-17

    The use of ultrasound has emerged as one of the most useful alternative energy sources for the synthesis of carbohydrate-derived biologically and pharmaceutically potential compounds. Spectacular advances have been made in the field of sonication-assisted organic reactions, which are known for producing superior yields, enhanced reactivity of the reactant, improved stereoselectivity, and shortened reaction times. Orthogonal protection-deprotection reactions and/or modification and manipulation of functional groups in carbohydrates are common synthetic steps in carbohydrate chemistry. These reaction steps can be driven by the ultrasonic energy generated by acoustic cavitation via the formation and subsequent collapse of ultrasound-induced bubbles. The ultrasound-assisted synthesis of differently functionalised monosaccharides is useful in a wide variety of applications of carbohydrate chemistry such as the glycosylation of oligosaccharides, one pot domino reactions, thioglycoside syntheses, azidoglycoside syntheses, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reactions, and syntheses of natural products. This review article covers ultrasound-mediated reactions on carbohydrates that have been described in the literature since 2000.

  7. Glycoconjugates of porphyrins with carbohydrates: methods of synthesis and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the main approaches to preparation of mono- and oligodentate glycoconjugates based on porphyrin scaffolds are surveyed. The prospects for using these compounds as sensitizers for photodynamic therapy of cancer and for suppression of bacterial and viral pathogens are considered. Data on the synthesis of oligodentate blocking agents for carbohydrate-binding proteins (lectins) based on porphyrin scaffolds are discussed. The bibliography includes 161 references

  8. C-type lectin-like domain and fibronectin-like type II domain of phospholipase A(2) receptor 1 modulate binding and migratory responses to collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Soichiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Yosuke; Fujioka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takamitsu; Nakamura, Kazuto; Obata, Jun-ei; Kugiyama, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-24

    Phospholipase A2 receptor 1 (PLA2R) mediates collagen-dependent migration. The mechanisms by which PLA2R interacts with collagen remain unclear. We produced HEK293 cells expressing full-length wild-type PLA2R or a truncated PLA2R that lacks fibronectin-like type II (FNII) domains or several regions of C-type lectin-like domain (CTLD). We show that the CTLD1-2 as well as the FNII domain of PLA2R are responsible for binding to collagen and for collagen-dependent migration. Thus, multiple regions and domains of the extracellular portion of PLA2R participate in the responses to collagen. These data suggest a potentially new mechanism for PLA2R-mediated biological response beyond that of a receptor for secretory PLA2.

  9. MicroRNA-155 modulates the pathogen binding ability of dendritic cells (DCs) by down-regulation of DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Nunez, Rocio T; Louafi, Fethi; Friedmann, Peter S; Sanchez-Elsner, Tilman

    2009-06-12

    MicroRNA-155 (miR-155) has been involved in the response to inflammation in macrophages and lymphocytes. Here we show how miR-155 participates in the maturation of human dendritic cells (DC) and modulates pathogen binding by down-regulating DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), after directly targeting the transcription factor PU.1. During the maturation of DCs, miR-155 increases up to 130-fold, whereas PU.1 protein levels decrease accordingly. We establish that human PU.1 is a direct target for miR-155 and localize the target sequence for miR-155 in the 3'-untranslated region of PU.1. Also, overexpression of miR-155 in the THP1 monocytic cell line decreases PU.1 protein levels and DC-SIGN at both the mRNA and protein levels. We prove a link between the down-regulation of PU.1 and reduced transcriptional activity of the DC-SIGN promoter, which is likely to be the basis for its reduced mRNA expression, after miR-155 overexpression. Finally, we show that, by reducing DC-SIGN in the cellular membrane, miR-155 is involved in regulating pathogen binding as dendritic cells exhibited the lower binding capacity for fungi and HIV protein gp-120 when the levels of miR-155 were higher. Thus, our results suggest a mechanism by which miR-155 regulates proteins involved in the cellular immune response against pathogens that could have clinical implications in the way pathogens enter the human organism. PMID:19386588

  10. Overlapping protein-binding sites within a negative regulatory element modulate the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rincon-Limas, D.E.; Amaya-Manzanares, E.; Nino-Rosales, M.L. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene, whose deficiency in humans causes the Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, is constitutively expressed at low levels in all tissues but at higher levels in the brain, the significance and mechanism of which is unknown. Towards dissecting this molecular mechanism, we have previously identified a 182 bp element (hHPRT-NE) within the 5{prime}-flanking region of the human HPRT gene which is involved not only in conferring neuronal specificity but also in repressing gene expression in non-neuronal tissues. Here we report that this element interacts with different nuclear proteins, some of which are present specifically in neuronal cells (complex I) and others of which are present in cells showing constitutive expression of the gene (complex II). In addition, we found that complex I factors are expressed in human NT2/D1 cells following induction of neuronal differentiation by retinoic acid. This finding correlates with an increase of HPRT gene transcription following neuronal differentiation, as demonstrated by RT-PCR and RNAase protection assays. We also mapped the binding sites for both complexes to a 60 bp region which, when tested by transient transfections in cultured fibroblasts, functioned as a repressor element. Methylation interference footprinting revealed a minimal unique DNA motif as the binding site for nuclear proteins from both neuronal and non-neuronal sources. Moreover, UV-crosslinking experiments showed that both complexes are formed by the association of several distinct proteins. Strikingly, site-directed mutagenesis of the footprinted region indicated that different nucleotides are essential for the association of these two complexes. These data suggest that differential formation of DNA-protein complexes at this regulatory domain could be a major determinant in the brain-preferential expression of the human HPRT gene.

  11. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hägg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD. The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n = 66/tissue and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n = 40/tissue isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n = 15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n = 3958 genes. In the second step (performed within tissue clusters, one atherosclerotic lesion (n = 49/48 and one visceral fat (n = 59 cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P = 0.008 and P = 0.00015. The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n = 55/54 relating to carotid stenosis (P = 0.04, 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n = 16/17, P<10(-27 and-30. Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module. In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the A-module was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004. The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2 was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2

  12. Nutraceutical and pharmacological implications of marine carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallela, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Current day's research has been focusing much on the potential pharmacological or nutraceutical agents of selective health benefits with less toxicity. As a consequence of increased demand of nutritional supplements of great medicinal values, development of therapeutic agents from natural sources, in particular, marine environment are being considered much important. A diverse array of marine natural products containing medicinally useful nutritional substances, i.e., marine nutraceuticals have been focused to the benefit of mankind. Carbohydrates, by being constituted in considerable amount of many marine organisms display several nutraceutical and pharmaceutical behavior to defend from various diseases. Moreover, the carbohydrates from algae as well as from shellfish wastes, like chitosan and its derivatives, showed tremendous applications in biology and biomedicine. In the current chapter, several of marine carbohydrates from various marine flora and fauna have been covered with their applications and prospects in the development of nutraceuticals and pharmaceuticals.

  13. Investigation of Carbohydrate Recognition via Computer Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin R. Johnson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate recognition by proteins, such as lectins and other (biomolecules, can be essential for many biological functions. Recently, interest has arisen due to potential protein and drug design and future bioengineering applications. A quantitative measurement of carbohydrate-protein interaction is thus important for the full characterization of sugar recognition. We focus on the aspect of utilizing computer simulations and biophysical models to evaluate the strength and specificity of carbohydrate recognition in this review. With increasing computational resources, better algorithms and refined modeling parameters, using state-of-the-art supercomputers to calculate the strength of the interaction between molecules has become increasingly mainstream. We review the current state of this technique and its successful applications for studying protein-sugar interactions in recent years.

  14. Inhibiting oral intoxication of botulinum neurotoxin A complex by carbohydrate receptor mimics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwangkook; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Kruel, Anna-Magdalena; Mahrhold, Stefan; Perry, Kay; Cheng, Luisa W; Rummel, Andreas; Jin, Rongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) cause the disease botulism manifested by flaccid paralysis that could be fatal to humans and animals. Oral ingestion of the toxin with contaminated food is one of the most common routes for botulism. BoNT assembles with several auxiliary proteins to survive in the gastrointestinal tract and is subsequently transported through the intestinal epithelium into the general circulation. Several hemagglutinin proteins form a multi-protein complex (HA complex) that recognizes host glycans on the intestinal epithelial cell surface to facilitate BoNT absorption. Blocking carbohydrate binding to the HA complex could significantly inhibit the oral toxicity of BoNT. Here, we identify lactulose, a galactose-containing non-digestible sugar commonly used to treat constipation, as a prototype inhibitor against oral BoNT/A intoxication. As revealed by a crystal structure, lactulose binds to the HA complex at the same site where the host galactose-containing carbohydrate receptors bind. In vitro assays using intestinal Caco-2 cells demonstrated that lactulose inhibits HA from compromising the integrity of the epithelial cell monolayers and blocks the internalization of HA. Furthermore, co-administration of lactulose significantly protected mice against BoNT/A oral intoxication in vivo. Taken together, these data encourage the development of carbohydrate receptor mimics as a therapeutic intervention to prevent BoNT oral intoxication.

  15. Protein-carbohydrate complex reveals circulating metastatic cells in a microfluidic assay

    KAUST Repository

    Simone, Giuseppina

    2013-02-11

    Advances in carbohydrate sequencing technologies reveal the tremendous complexity of the glycome and the role that glycomics might have to bring insight into the biological functions. Carbohydrate-protein interactions, in particular, are known to be crucial to most mammalian physiological processes as mediators of cell adhesion and metastasis, signal transducers, and organizers of protein interactions. An assay is developed here to mimic the multivalency of biological complexes that selectively and sensitively detect carbohydrate-protein interactions. The binding of β-galactosides and galectin-3 - a protein that is correlated to the progress of tumor and metastasis - is examined. The efficiency of the assay is related to the expression of the receptor while anchoring to the interaction\\'s strength. Comparative binding experiments reveal molecular binding preferences. This study establishes that the assay is robust to isolate metastatic cells from colon affected patients and paves the way to personalized medicine. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Synthesis of chiral dopants based on carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, Toru; Koyama, Tetsuo; Yasutake, Mikio; Hatano, Ken; Matsuoka, Koji

    2014-07-01

    Chiral dopants based on carbohydrates for nematic liquid crystals were synthesized from D-glucose, and their helical twisting power (HTP) values were evaluated. The chiral dopants induced helices in the host nematic liquid crystals. An acetyl derivative having an ether-type glycosidic linkage between carbohydrate and a mesogenic moiety showed the highest HTP value of 10.4 μm(-1), while an acetyl derivative having an anomeric ester-type linkage did not show any HTP. It was surprising that this molecule had no HTP despite the presence of chirality in the molecule. A relationship between HTP and specific rotation was not observed in this study.

  17. Intrinsic Immunomodulatory Effects of Low-Digestible Carbohydrates Selectively Extend Their Anti-Inflammatory Prebiotic Potentials

    OpenAIRE

    Jérôme Breton; Coline Plé; Laetitia Guerin-Deremaux; Bruno Pot; Catherine Lefranc-Millot; Daniel Wils; Benoit Foligné

    2015-01-01

    The beneficial effects of carbohydrate-derived fibers are mainly attributed to modulation of the microbiota, increased colonic fermentation, and the production of short-chain fatty acids. We studied the direct immune responses to alimentary fibers in in vitro and in vivo models. Firstly, we evaluated the immunomodulation induced by nine different types of low-digestible fibers on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. None of the fibers tested induced cytokine production in baseline condit...

  18. Structural determination of the carbohydrate chains from arthropod and mollusc hemocyanin by means of 500-MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis carbohydrate structures of hemocyanins of arthropods and molluscs are studied. Hemocyanins are high-molecular-mass, copper-containing oxygen-transport proteins. The function of these carbohydrate chains are yet still unknown. It is not probable that they play a role in the oxygen-binding processes. They are rather thought to have a function in the build-up of the hemocyanin molecules. 286 refs.; 30 figs.; 25 tabs

  19. Src-Like adaptor protein (SLAP) binds to the receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 and modulates receptor stability and downstream signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazi, Julhash U; Rönnstrand, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3) is an important growth factor receptor in hematopoiesis. Gain-of-function mutations of the receptor contribute to the transformation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP) is an interaction partner of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl that can regulate receptor tyrosine kinases-mediated signal transduction. In this study, we analyzed the role of SLAP in signal transduction downstream of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3. The results show that upon ligand stimulation SLAP stably associates with Flt3 through multiple phosphotyrosine residues in Flt3. SLAP constitutively interacts with oncogenic Flt3-ITD and co-localizes with Flt3 near the cell membrane. This association initiates Cbl-dependent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Depletion of SLAP expression by shRNA in Flt3-transfected Ba/F3 cells resulted in a weaker activation of FL-induced PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling. Meta-analysis of microarray data from patient samples suggests that SLAP mRNA is differentially expressed in different cancers and its expression was significantly increased in patients carrying the Flt3-ITD mutation. Thus, our data suggest a novel role of SLAP in different cancers and in modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling apart from its conventional role in regulation of receptor stability.

  20. Src-Like adaptor protein (SLAP binds to the receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3 and modulates receptor stability and downstream signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julhash U Kazi

    Full Text Available Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3 is an important growth factor receptor in hematopoiesis. Gain-of-function mutations of the receptor contribute to the transformation of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Src-like adaptor protein (SLAP is an interaction partner of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl that can regulate receptor tyrosine kinases-mediated signal transduction. In this study, we analyzed the role of SLAP in signal transduction downstream of the type III receptor tyrosine kinase Flt3. The results show that upon ligand stimulation SLAP stably associates with Flt3 through multiple phosphotyrosine residues in Flt3. SLAP constitutively interacts with oncogenic Flt3-ITD and co-localizes with Flt3 near the cell membrane. This association initiates Cbl-dependent receptor ubiquitination and degradation. Depletion of SLAP expression by shRNA in Flt3-transfected Ba/F3 cells resulted in a weaker activation of FL-induced PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling. Meta-analysis of microarray data from patient samples suggests that SLAP mRNA is differentially expressed in different cancers and its expression was significantly increased in patients carrying the Flt3-ITD mutation. Thus, our data suggest a novel role of SLAP in different cancers and in modulation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling apart from its conventional role in regulation of receptor stability.

  1. Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction between Sperm and the Egg-Coating Envelope and Its Regulation by Dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis Zona Pellucida Protein-Associated Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naofumi Miwa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein-carbohydrate interaction regulates multiple important processes during fertilization, an essential biological event where individual gametes undergo intercellular recognition to fuse and generate a zygote. In the mammalian female reproductive tract, sperm temporarily adhere to the oviductal epithelium via the complementary interaction between carbohydrate-binding proteins on the sperm membrane and carbohydrates on the oviductal cells. After detachment from the oviductal epithelium at the appropriate time point following ovulation, sperm migrate and occasionally bind to the extracellular matrix, called the zona pellucida (ZP, which surrounds the egg, thereafter undergoing the exocytotic acrosomal reaction to penetrate the envelope and to reach the egg plasma membrane. This sperm-ZP interaction also involves the direct interaction between sperm carbohydrate-binding proteins and carbohydrates within the ZP, most of which have been conserved across divergent species from mammals to amphibians and echinoderms. This review focuses on the carbohydrate-mediated interaction of sperm with the female reproductive tract, mainly the interaction between sperm and the ZP, and introduces the fertilization-suppressive action of dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis ZP protein-associated protein. The action of dicalcin correlates significantly with a dicalcin-dependent change in the lectin-staining pattern within the ZP, suggesting a unique role of dicalcin as an inherent protein that is capable of regulating the affinity between the lectin and oligosaccharides attached on its target glycoprotein.

  2. Protein-Carbohydrate Interaction between Sperm and the Egg-Coating Envelope and Its Regulation by Dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis Zona Pellucida Protein-Associated Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Naofumi

    2015-05-22

    Protein-carbohydrate interaction regulates multiple important processes during fertilization, an essential biological event where individual gametes undergo intercellular recognition to fuse and generate a zygote. In the mammalian female reproductive tract, sperm temporarily adhere to the oviductal epithelium via the complementary interaction between carbohydrate-binding proteins on the sperm membrane and carbohydrates on the oviductal cells. After detachment from the oviductal epithelium at the appropriate time point following ovulation, sperm migrate and occasionally bind to the extracellular matrix, called the zona pellucida (ZP), which surrounds the egg, thereafter undergoing the exocytotic acrosomal reaction to penetrate the envelope and to reach the egg plasma membrane. This sperm-ZP interaction also involves the direct interaction between sperm carbohydrate-binding proteins and carbohydrates within the ZP, most of which have been conserved across divergent species from mammals to amphibians and echinoderms. This review focuses on the carbohydrate-mediated interaction of sperm with the female reproductive tract, mainly the interaction between sperm and the ZP, and introduces the fertilization-suppressive action of dicalcin, a Xenopus laevis ZP protein-associated protein. The action of dicalcin correlates significantly with a dicalcin-dependent change in the lectin-staining pattern within the ZP, suggesting a unique role of dicalcin as an inherent protein that is capable of regulating the affinity between the lectin and oligosaccharides attached on its target glycoprotein.

  3. Multi-organ expression profiling uncovers a gene module in coronary artery disease involving transendothelial migration of leukocytes and LIM domain binding 2: The Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study

    KAUST Repository

    Hägg, Sara

    2009-12-04

    Environmental exposures filtered through the genetic make-up of each individual alter the transcriptional repertoire in organs central to metabolic homeostasis, thereby affecting arterial lipid accumulation, inflammation, and the development of coronary artery disease (CAD). The primary aim of the Stockholm Atherosclerosis Gene Expression (STAGE) study was to determine whether there are functionally associated genes (rather than individual genes) important for CAD development. To this end, two-way clustering was used on 278 transcriptional profiles of liver, skeletal muscle, and visceral fat (n =66/tissue) and atherosclerotic and unaffected arterial wall (n =40/tissue) isolated from CAD patients during coronary artery bypass surgery. The first step, across all mRNA signals (n =15,042/12,621 RefSeqs/genes) in each tissue, resulted in a total of 60 tissue clusters (n= 3958 genes). In the second step (performed within tissue clusters), one atherosclerotic lesion (n =49/48) and one visceral fat (n =59) cluster segregated the patients into two groups that differed in the extent of coronary stenosis (P=0.008 and P=0.00015). The associations of these clusters with coronary atherosclerosis were validated by analyzing carotid atherosclerosis expression profiles. Remarkably, in one cluster (n =55/54) relating to carotid stenosis (P =0.04), 27 genes in the two clusters relating to coronary stenosis were confirmed (n= 16/17, P<10 -27and-30). Genes in the transendothelial migration of leukocytes (TEML) pathway were overrepresented in all three clusters, referred to as the atherosclerosis module (A-module). In a second validation step, using three independent cohorts, the Amodule was found to be genetically enriched with CAD risk by 1.8-fold (P<0.004). The transcription co-factor LIM domain binding 2 (LDB2) was identified as a potential high-hierarchy regulator of the A-module, a notion supported by subnetwork analysis, by cellular and lesion expression of LDB2, and by the

  4. Separation and quantification of microalgal carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, David W; Quinn, Matthew; Van Wychen, Stefanie; Hyman, Deborah; Laurens, Lieve M L

    2012-12-28

    Structural carbohydrates can constitute a large fraction of the dry weight of algal biomass and thus accurate identification and quantification is important for summative mass closure. Two limitations to the accurate characterization of microalgal carbohydrates are the lack of a robust analytical procedure to hydrolyze polymeric carbohydrates to their respective monomers and the subsequent identification and quantification of those monosaccharides. We address the second limitation, chromatographic separation of monosaccharides, here by identifying optimum conditions for the resolution of a synthetic mixture of 13 microalgae-specific monosaccharides, comprised of 8 neutral, 2 amino sugars, 2 uronic acids and 1 alditol (myo-inositol as an internal standard). The synthetic 13-carbohydrate mix showed incomplete resolution across 11 traditional high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods, but showed improved resolution and accurate quantification using anion exchange chromatography (HPAEC) as well as alditol acetate derivatization followed by gas chromatography (for the neutral- and amino-sugars only). We demonstrate the application of monosaccharide quantification using optimized chromatography conditions after sulfuric acid analytical hydrolysis for three model algae strains and compare the quantification and complexity of monosaccharides in analytical hydrolysates relative to a typical terrestrial feedstock, sugarcane bagasse. PMID:23177152

  5. Nutrient and carbohydrate partitioning in sorghum stover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] stover has been demonstrated to be a potential biomass energy source. Complete aboveground crop removal, however, can result in soil degradation. Differential dry matter, nutrient, and carbohydrate partitioning by sorghum cultivars may allow management strategies that return certain parts to the field while removing other portions for alternative uses, such as energy production. A field study was conducted to determine N,P,K, nonstructural carbohydrate, cellulose hemicellulose, and lignin distributions in stover of three diverse sorghum cultivars of differing harvest indices. Determinations were based on total vegetative biomass; total blades; total stalks; and upper middle, and lower blades and stalks. Concentrations of N and P were higher in blades than stalks and generally declines from upper to lower stover parts. Large carbohydrate and lignin concentration differences were observed on the basis of cultivar and stover part. Greater nutrient partitioning to the upper third of the intermediate and forage-type sorghum stovers was observed as compared to the conventional grain cultivar. Stover carbohydrates for all cultivars were mainly contained in the lower two-thirds of the stalk fraction. A system was proposed for returning upper stover portion to soil, while removing remaining portions for alternative uses

  6. The diagenesis of carbohydrates by hydrogen sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Frank D.

    1983-08-01

    Carbohydrates react with hydrogen sulfide under low temperature (100° to 200°C) yielding a variety of organosulfur compounds including thiophenes, thiols, sulfides and sulfones. A polymer is also produced, whose elemental composition is within the range of natural coals. When reductive dehydration is carried out in the presence of hydrocarbon, organosulfur compounds are formed in the carbon number range of the hydrocarbon used. In these processes, an active hydrogen transfer catalyst is produced which facilitates the passage of hydrogen between normal paraffins and saccharide units, distributing sulfur between these two families primarily in the form of thiophene rings. The simplicity of these systems - H 2S, carbohydrates, H 2O, hydrocarbon - and the facility of the chemistry would suggest that the carbohydrates and hydrogen sulfide may be important agents in the diagenetic processes leading to petroleum and coal. Carbohydrate reduction by hydrogen sulfide may constitute an important route through which certain organosulfur compounds found in petroleum and coal entered these materials in early diagenesis.

  7. Saturated fat, carbohydrates and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R. S.; de Graaf, D. J.; Luxwolda, M. F.; Muskiet, M. H. A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. J.; Muskiet, F. A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The dietary intake of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) is associated with a modest increase in serum total cholesterol, but not with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Replacing dietary SAFA with carbohydrates (CHO), notably those with a high glycaemic index, is associated with an increase in CVD risk in obs

  8. General Properties, Occurrence, and Preparation of Carbohydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyt, John F.

    D-Glucose and its derivatives and analogues, N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, N-acetyl-D-muramic acid, D-glucopyranosyl uronic acid, and D-glucitol represent 99.9% of the carbohydrates on the earth. D-Glucose is found in the free state in human blood and in the combined state in disaccharides, sucrose, lactose, and α,α-trehalose, in cyclic dextrins, and in polysaccharides, starch, glycogen, cellulose, dextrans; N-acetyl-D-glucosamine and an analogue N-acetyl-D-muramic acid are found in bacterial cell wall polysaccharide, murein, along with teichoic acids made up of poly-glycerol or -ribitol phosphodiesters. Other carbohydrates, D-mannose, D-mannuronic acid, D-galactose, N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, D-galacturonic acid, D-iduronic acid, L-guluronic acid, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, D-xylose, and N-acetyl-D-neuraminic acid are found in glycoproteins, hemicelluloses, glycosaminoglycans, and polysaccharides of plant exudates, bacterial capsules, alginates, and heparin. D-Ribofuranose-5-phosphate is found in many coenzymes and is the backbone of RNAs (ribonucleic acid), and 2-deoxy-D-ribofuranose-5-phosphate is the backbone of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid). D-Fructofuranose is found in sucrose, inulin, and levan. The general properties and occurrence of these carbohydrates and general methods of isolation and preparation of carbohydrates are presented.

  9. Effects of the 54G/C polymorphism of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c on changes of serum lipid ratios induced by high-carbohydrate/low-fat diet in healthy youth%固醇调节元件结合蛋白-1c基因54G/C多态性对高糖低脂膳食诱导的健康青年人血脂比值的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张珍; 方定志; 龚仁蓉; 杜娟; 汤慧; 黄鑫; 甘婵芬

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of 54G/C polymorphism of sterol regulatory elementbinding protein-1c gene (SREBP-1c)on serum lipid ratios and their response to high-carbohydrate/low-fat(HC/LF) diet in healthy youth. Methods After a regular diet for 7 days of wash-out, 56 healthy youth (22.89±1.80 yrs) were given HC/LF diet for 6 days. The regular diet contained 54% carbohydrate, 15%protein, and 31% fat of the total energy. The HC/LF diet contained 70% carbohydrate, 15% protein, and 15% fat of the total energy. The serum lipids and glucose were measured on the 1st, 8th and 14th days.The ratios of TG/HDL-C, log (TG/HDL-C), TC/HDL-C, and LDL-C/HDL-C were calculated. The 54G/C polymorphism of SREBP-1c gene was analyzed by PCR-RFLP method. Results No significant difference was found in lipid ratios and glucose at baseline and after regular diet in subjects with different genotypes in either the whole studied population or in males or females only. However, after HC/LF diet, LDL-C/HDL-C was significantly lower in females carrying the C allele than those of GG homozygotes (P< 0.05).Compared with those before HC/LF diet, TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C were significantly decreased in all the subjects (P<0.05). When gender was taken into account, significant increase of TG/HDL-C and log(TG/HDL-C) was found only in females with GG genotype (P<0.05). All the subjects experienced significant decrease of TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C regardless of their genders and genotypes (P<0.05). Conclusion The 54G/C polymorphism of SREBP-1c gene can influence the response of TG/HDL-C and log(TG/HDL-C) to HC/LF diet in females. The C allele may be a protective factor to prevent the increase of TG induced by HC/LF diet in females.%目的 探讨固醇调节元件结合蛋白-1c(sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c,SREBP-1c)基因54G/C多态性对健康青年血脂比值的影响及在高糖低脂(high-carbohydrate/low-fat,HC/LF)膳食诱导的变化中的作用.方法 对56

  10. DDB2 (damaged-DNA binding 2) protein: a new modulator of nanomechanical properties and cell adhesion of breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieux, Claire; Bacharouche, Jalal; Soussen, Charles; Hupont, Sébastien; Razafitianamaharavo, Angélina; Klotz, Rémi; Pannequin, Rémi; Brie, David; Bécuwe, Philippe; Francius, Grégory; Grandemange, Stéphanie

    2016-02-01

    DDB2, known for its role in DNA repair, was recently shown to reduce mammary tumor invasiveness by inducing the transcription of IκBα, an inhibitor of NF-κB activity. Since cellular adhesion is a key event during the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) leading to the invasive capacities of breast tumor cells, the aim of this study was to investigate the role of DDB2 in this process. Thus, using low and high DDB2-expressing MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, respectively, in which DDB2 expression was modulated experimentally, we showed that DDB2 overexpression was associated with a decrease of adhesion abilities on glass and plastic areas of breast cancer cells. Then, we investigated cell nanomechanical properties by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Our results revealed significant changes in the Young's Modulus value and the adhesion force in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 cells, whether DDB2 was expressed or not. The cell stiffness decrease observed in MDA-MB231 and MCF7 expressing DDB2 was correlated with a loss of the cortical actin-cytoskeleton staining. To understand how DDB2 regulates these processes, an adhesion-related gene PCR-Array was performed. Several adhesion-related genes were differentially expressed according to DDB2 expression, indicating that important changes are occurring at the molecular level. Thus, this work demonstrates that AFM technology is an important tool to follow cellular changes during tumorigenesis. Moreover, our data revealed that DDB2 is involved in early events occurring during metastatic progression of breast cancer cells and will contribute to define this protein as a new marker of metastatic progression in this type of cancer.

  11. Hydrogen and methane breath tests for evaluation of resistant carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    This review considers in detail the background, principles, techniques, limitations and advantages of the hydrogen and methane breath tests. Resistant food carbohydrates, defined as dietary carbohydrates partly or totally escaping small intestinal assimilation, are fermented in the human colon. T...

  12. Exercise and Regulation of Carbohydrate Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, Joram D; Stanford, Kristin I; Hirshman, Michael F; Goodyear, Laurie J

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrates are the preferred substrate for contracting skeletal muscles during high-intensity exercise and are also readily utilized during moderate intensity exercise. This use of carbohydrates during physical activity likely played an important role during the survival of early Homo sapiens, and genes and traits regulating physical activity, carbohydrate metabolism, and energy storage have undoubtedly been selected throughout evolution. In contrast to the life of early H. sapiens, modern lifestyles are predominantly sedentary. As a result, intake of excessive amounts of carbohydrates due to the easy and continuous accessibility to modern high-energy food and drinks has not only become unnecessary but also led to metabolic diseases in the face of physical inactivity. A resulting metabolic disease is type 2 diabetes, a complex endocrine disorder characterized by abnormally high concentrations of circulating glucose. This disease now affects millions of people worldwide. Exercise has beneficial effects to help control impaired glucose homeostasis with metabolic disease, and is a well-established tool to prevent and combat type 2 diabetes. This chapter focuses on the effects of exercise on carbohydrate metabolism in skeletal muscle and systemic glucose homeostasis. We will also focus on the molecular mechanisms that mediate the effects of exercise to increase glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. It is now well established that there are different proximal signaling pathways that mediate the effects of exercise and insulin on glucose uptake, and these distinct mechanisms are consistent with the ability of exercise to increase glucose uptake in the face of insulin resistance in people with type 2 diabetes. Ongoing research in this area is aimed at defining the precise mechanism by which exercise increases glucose uptake and insulin sensitivity and the types of exercise necessary for these important health benefits.

  13. Energy and carbohydrate for training and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; Loucks, Anne B; Broad, Nick

    2006-07-01

    Soccer players should achieve an energy intake that provides sufficient carbohydrate to fuel the training and competition programme, supplies all nutrient requirements, and allows manipulation of energy or nutrient balance to achieve changes in lean body mass, body fat or growth. Although the traditional culture of soccer has focused on carbohydrate intake for immediate match preparation, top players should adapt their carbohydrate intake on a daily basis to ensure adequate fuel for training and recovery between matches. For players with a mobile playing style, there is sound evidence that dietary programmes that restore and even super-compensate muscle glycogen levels can enhance activity patterns during matches. This will presumably also benefit intensive training, such as twice daily practices. As well as achieving a total intake of carbohydrate commensurate with fuel needs, the everyday diet should promote strategic intake of carbohydrate and protein before and after key training sessions to optimize the adaptations and enhance recovery. The achievement of the ideal physique for soccer is a long-term goal that should be undertaken over successive years, and particularly during the off-season and pre-season. An increase in lean body mass or a decrease in body fat is the product of a targeted training and eating programme. Consultation with a sports nutrition expert can assist soccer players to manipulate energy and nutrient intake to meet such goals. Players should be warned against the accidental or deliberate mismatch of energy intake and energy expenditure, such that energy availability (intake minus the cost of exercise) falls below 125 kJ (30 kcal) per kilogram of fat-free mass per day. Such low energy availability causes disturbances to hormonal, metabolic, and immune function. PMID:16766497

  14. The intrinsic cysteine and histidine residues of the anti-Salmonella antibody Se155-4: a model for the introduction of new functions into antibody-binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, N Martin; Watson, David C; Cunningham, Anna M; MacKenzie, C Roger

    2014-10-01

    New functions can be incorporated into anti-hapten or anti-protein antibodies by mutating selected residues in the binding-site region either to Cys, to allow alkylation with reagents bearing the desired functional groups, or to His, to create metal-binding sites or to make antigen binding pH-sensitive. However, choosing suitable sites for these mutations has been hampered by the lack of antibodies with these features, to serve as models. Remarkably, the anti-carbohydrate antibody Se155-4, specific for the Salmonella group B lipopolysaccharide, already has a Cys and two pairs of His residues close to the antigen-binding pocket in its structure, and shows pH-dependent antigen binding. We therefore investigated modification of its Cys94L in an scFv version of the antibody with the aims of creating a 'reagentless' fluorescent sensor and attaching a metal-binding group that might confer lyase activity. These groups were successfully introduced, as judged by mass spectrometry, and had only slightly reduced antigen binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The fluorescent product was sensitive to addition of antigen in a solution format, unlike a modification of a more distant Cys introduced into the VH CDR4 loop. Two other routes to modulate antigen binding were also explored, metal binding by the His pair alongside the antigen-binding pocket and insertions into CDR4 to extend the antigen-contact area. His residues adjacent to the antigen-binding pocket bound copper, causing a 5-fold decrease in antigen binding. In CDR4 of the VH domain, the preferred insert length was four residues, which gave stable antigen-binding products but did not improve overall antigen affinity.

  15. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT) in alcoholic cirrhosis: a kinetic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Grønbaek, M; Møller, Søren;

    1997-01-01

    controls (n = 8), which indicates a slow turnover rate of carbohydrate deficient transferrin. Food ingestion did not affect the circulating level of carbohydrate deficient transferrin, and the analysis of carbohydrate deficient transferrin was almost unaffected by the presence of ethanol in plasma within...... alcohol intake, but the overlap is substantial in patients with cirrhosis. Carbohydrate deficient transferrin has a low turnover rate in both patients with cirrhosis and normals....

  16. Bovine Norovirus: Carbohydrate Ligand, Environmental Contamination, and Potential Cross-Species Transmission via Oysters ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhour, Maha; Maalouf, Haifa; Di Bartolo, Ilaria; Haugarreau, Larissa; Le Guyader, Françoise S.; Ruvoën-Clouet, Nathalie; Le Saux, Jean-Claude; Ruggeri, Franco Maria; Pommepuy, Monique; Le Pendu, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    Noroviruses (NoV) are major agents of acute gastroenteritis in humans and the primary pathogens of shellfish-related outbreaks. Previous studies showed that some human strains bind to oyster tissues through carbohydrate ligands that are similar to their human receptors. Thus, based on presentation of shared norovirus carbohydrate ligands, oysters could selectively concentrate animal strains with increased ability to overcome species barriers. In comparison with human GI and GII strains, bovine GIII NoV strains, although frequently detected in bovine feces and waters of two estuaries of Brittany, were seldom detected in oysters grown in these estuaries. Characterization of the carbohydrate ligand from a new GIII strain indicated recognition of the alpha-galactosidase (α-Gal) epitope not expressed by humans, similar to the GIII.2 Newbury2 strain. This ligand was not detectable on oyster tissues, suggesting that oysters may not be able to accumulate substantial amounts of GIII strains due to the lack of shared carbohydrate ligand and that they should be unable to contribute to select GIII strains with an increased ability to recognize humans. PMID:20709837

  17. Role of carbohydrate in determining the immunochemical properties of the hemagglutinin of influenza A virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gitelman, A.K.; Berezin, V.A.; Kharitonenkov, I.G. (Akademiya Meditsinskikh Nauk SSSR, Moscow)

    1981-01-01

    Most of the carbohydrate was removed from influenza with MRC II (H3N2) and its purified hemagglutinin (HA) on treatment with glycosidases, including ..cap alpha..-mannosidase, ..beta..-N-acetylglucosaminidase, ..beta..-galactosidase and ..cap alpha..-fucosidase. The release of 50 per cent of the carbohydrate from intact virus particles significantly affected hemagglutinating activity. The ability of untreated and glycosidase-treated virus to inhibit the binding of antibodies directed against the hemagglutinin was almost indistinguishable by competitive radioimmunoassay (RIA). Up to 60 per cent of the carbohydrate from the purified HA of influenza virus could be removed. The antigenicity of glycosidase treated HA molecules decreased 8-fold compared to intact HAs as measured by competitive RIA. In addition, glycosidase digestion of /sup 125/I-labeled HA resulted in a decrease in its reactivity in direct RIA. We conclude that the carbohydrate portion of the HA of influenza virus is not of major importance in defining the antigenicity of HA.

  18. Efficient, rapid one-electron photooxidation of chemisorbed polyhydroxyl alcohols and carbohydrates by TiO2 nanoparticles in an aqueous solution

    CERN Document Server

    Shkrob, I A; Gosztola, D J

    2004-01-01

    Time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy has been used to study nanosecond and sub-microsecond electron dynamics in aqueous anatase nanoparticles in the presence of hole scavengers: chemisorbed polyols and carbohydrates. These polyhydroxylated compounds are rapidly oxidized by the holes; 50-60% of these holes are scavenged within the duration of 355 nm excitation laser pulse. The scavenging efficiency rapidly increases with the number of anchoring hydroxyl groups and varies considerably as a function of the carbohydrate structure. A specific binding site for the polyols and carbohydrates is suggested that involves an octahedral Ti atom chelated by the poly-OH ligand. This mode of binding accounts for the depletion of undercoordinated Ti atoms observed in the XANES spectra of polyol coated nanoparticles. We suggest that these binding sites trap a substantial fraction of holes before the latter descend to surface traps and/or recombine with free electrons. The resulting oxygen hole center rapidly loses a...

  19. Galactose recognition by a tetrameric C-type lectin, CEL-IV, containing the EPN carbohydrate recognition motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu; Kamiya, Takuro; Kusunoki, Masami; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Hirabayashi, Jun; Goda, Shuichiro; Unno, Hideaki

    2011-03-25

    CEL-IV is a C-type lectin isolated from a sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata. This lectin is composed of four identical C-type carbohydrate-recognition domains (CRDs). X-ray crystallographic analysis of CEL-IV revealed that its tetrameric structure was stabilized by multiple interchain disulfide bonds among the subunits. Although CEL-IV has the EPN motif in its carbohydrate-binding sites, which is known to be characteristic of mannose binding C-type CRDs, it showed preferential binding of galactose and N-acetylgalactosamine. Structural analyses of CEL-IV-melibiose and CEL-IV-raffinose complexes revealed that their galactose residues were recognized in an inverted orientation compared with mannose binding C-type CRDs containing the EPN motif, by the aid of a stacking interaction with the side chain of Trp-79. Changes in the environment of Trp-79 induced by binding to galactose were detected by changes in the intrinsic fluorescence and UV absorption spectra of WT CEL-IV and its site-directed mutants. The binding specificity of CEL-IV toward complex oligosaccharides was analyzed by frontal affinity chromatography using various pyridylamino sugars, and the results indicate preferential binding to oligosaccharides containing Galβ1-3/4(Fucα1-3/4)GlcNAc structures. These findings suggest that the specificity for oligosaccharides may be largely affected by interactions with amino acid residues in the binding site other than those determining the monosaccharide specificity. PMID:21247895

  20. Role of carbohydrate metabolism in grass tetany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.K.; Madsen, F.C.; Lentz, D.E.; Hansard, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical hypomagnesemia is confined primarily to beef cattle in the United States but also occurs in dairy cattle in other countries, probably due to different management practices. During periods when grass tetany is likely, early vegetative temperate zone grasses are usually low in total readily available carbohydrates and magnesium but high in potassium and nitrogen. The tetany syndrome may include hypoglycemia and ketosis, suggesting an imbalance in intermediary energy metabolism. Many enzyme systems critical to cellular metabolism, including those which hydrolyze and transfer phosphate groups, are activated by Mg. Thus, by inference, Mg is required for normal glucose utilization, fat, protein, nucleic acid and coenzyme synthesis, muscle contraction, methyl group transfer, and sulfate, acetate, and formate activation. Numerous clinical and experimental studies suggest an intimate relationship between metabolism of Mg and that of carbohydrate, glucagon, and insulin. The objective is to review this literature and suggest ways in which these relationships might contribute to a chain of events leading to grass tetany.

  1. Solubility of carbohydrates in heavy water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Marcus V C; Carvalho, Larissa V C; Sabadini, Edvaldo

    2012-05-15

    The solubility of several mono-(glucose and xylose), di-(sucrose and maltose), tri-(raffinose) and cyclic (α-cyclodextrin) saccharides in H(2)O and in D(2)O were measured over a range of temperatures. The solution enthalpies for the different carbohydrates in the two solvents were determined using the vant' Hoff equation and the values in D(2)O are presented here for the first time. Our findings indicate that the replacement of H(2)O by D(2)O remarkably decreases the solubilities of the less soluble carbohydrates, such as maltose, raffinose and α-cyclodextrin. On the other hand, the more soluble saccharides, glucose, xylose, and sucrose, are practically insensitive to the H/D replacement in water. PMID:22480785

  2. Binding Procurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  3. Carbohydrate drugs%糖类药物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜晓光; 耿美玉

    2011-01-01

    As an important biological information molecules and high-density information carriers, sugar chain involved in almost all life processes in living beings, especially in cell differentiation, development, immunity, aging, cancer, signal transduction and other basic life activities and diseases. For the bioactivities of carbohydrates, carbohydrate drugs had been widely used in anti-tumor, Alzheimer's disease, immune, anti-virus, and other diseases. And the use of carbohydrates is still expanding. Therefore, the various bioactivities and low toxicity endow carbohydrates broad prospects.%糖链作为重要的生物信息分了和高密度的信息载体,参与细胞生物几乎所有的生命过程,特别是在细胞分化、发育、免疫、老化、癌变、信息传递等生命基础活动和重大疾病过程中起着特异性的识别、介导与调控作用.由于糖类物质的多种多样的生物活性,糖类药物在抗肿瘤、老年痴呆、免疫、抗病毒等多个重大疾病领域广泛应用,而且其使用范围还在不断开拓中.因此,糖类药物生物活性多样,毒副作用低,具有广阔的发展前景.

  4. Direct synthesis of methyl phosphoramidates in carbohydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhurandhare, Vijay M; Mishra, Girija Prasad; Lam, Sarah; Wang, Cheng-Chung

    2015-09-28

    A direct installation of a methyl phosphoramidate group by using methyl benzylphosphoramidochloridate into carbohydrates and amino acid is described. This one-step synthesis is efficient for both primary and secondary alcohols and exhibited excellent regioselectivity and functional group compatibility. Formation of a single diastereomer is observed in certain cases. The N-benzyl protecting group on methyl phosphoramidates is easily removed under mild conditions.

  5. Analysis and validation of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article summarizes the information that is gained from and the errors that are found in carbohydrate structures in the Protein Data Bank. Validation tools that can locate these errors are described. Knowledge of the three-dimensional structures of the carbohydrate molecules is indispensable for a full understanding of the molecular processes in which carbohydrates are involved, such as protein glycosylation or protein–carbohydrate interactions. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is a valuable resource for three-dimensional structural information on glycoproteins and protein–carbohydrate complexes. Unfortunately, many carbohydrate moieties in the PDB contain inconsistencies or errors. This article gives an overview of the information that can be obtained from individual PDB entries and from statistical analyses of sets of three-dimensional structures, of typical problems that arise during the analysis of carbohydrate three-dimensional structures and of the validation tools that are currently available to scientists to evaluate the quality of these structures

  6. Mice lacking pituitary tumor transforming gene show elevated exposure of DGalNAc carbohydrate determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutsyk A. D.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To investigate the influence of pituitary tumor transforming gene (pttg-1 knockout on glycome of parenchimal organs by means of lectin histochemistry. Methods. DGalNAc, DGlcNAc, NeuNAc carbohydrate determinants were labelled with soybean agglutinin (SBA and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA, conjugated to peroxidase, with subsequent visualization of the lectin-binding sites with diaminobenzidine. The testes and kidneys of murine strain BL6/C57 with the pttg-1 gene knockout (PTTG-KO were compared to the wild type (PTTG-WT animals, both groups 1 month of age. Results. Knockout of the pttg-1 gene was accompanied by enhanced exposure of the DGalNAc sugar residues within the Golgi complex of secondary spermatocytes, in a brush border of renal tubules and on the lumenal surface of collecting ducts. Conclusions. This study suggests that knockout of the pttg-1 gene may lead to the changes in carbohydrate processing in mammalian organism.

  7. Brittle Culm1, a COBRA-like protein, functions in cellulose assembly through binding cellulose microfibrils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lifeng Liu

    Full Text Available Cellulose represents the most abundant biopolymer in nature and has great economic importance. Cellulose chains pack laterally into crystalline forms, stacking into a complicated crystallographic structure. However, the mechanism of cellulose crystallization is poorly understood. Here, via functional characterization, we report that Brittle Culm1 (BC1, a COBRA-like protein in rice, modifies cellulose crystallinity. BC1 was demonstrated to be a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchored protein and can be released into cell walls by removal of the GPI anchor. BC1 possesses a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM at its N-terminus. In vitro binding assays showed that this CBM interacts specifically with crystalline cellulose, and several aromatic residues in this domain are essential for binding. It was further demonstrated that cell wall-localized BC1 via the CBM and GPI anchor is one functional form of BC1. X-ray diffraction (XRD assays revealed that mutations in BC1 and knockdown of BC1 expression decrease the crystallite width of cellulose; overexpression of BC1 and the CBM-mutated BC1s caused varied crystallinity with results that were consistent with the in vitro binding assay. Moreover, interaction between the CBM and cellulose microfibrils was largely repressed when the cell wall residues were pre-stained with two cellulose dyes. Treating wild-type and bc1 seedlings with the dyes resulted in insensitive root growth responses in bc1 plants. Combined with the evidence that BC1 and three secondary wall cellulose synthases (CESAs function in different steps of cellulose production as revealed by genetic analysis, we conclude that BC1 modulates cellulose assembly by interacting with cellulose and affecting microfibril crystallinity.

  8. UV-B radiation does not limit carbohydrate level and carbohydrate metabolism in cucumber leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Rybus-Zając

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber is a vegetable exhibiting relatively high sensitivity to environmental stress factors. When it is grown outdoors, from early stages of development there is a real risk of exposure to elevated UV-B radiation. In order to explain the effects of time-dependent UV-B doses on carbohydrate level and metabolism, the photosynthetic activity, accumulation of carbohydrates and activities of carbohydrate-related enzymes were determined in the cucumber leaves. Elevated UV-B radiation led to an increase in the rate of photosynthesis, which was reflected by an increase in SPAD values. Higher photosynthetic activity resulted in an increase in levels of soluble sugars. In view of the above-mentioned results, radiation stress led to a UV-B time-dependent dose increase in the activity of two enzymes decomposing carbohydrate: invertase and glucosidase. Our results suggest that the exposure of cucumber plants to supplemental UV-B doses does not limit the availability of the photoassimilate. Carbohydrates are required to provide not only respiratory energy for protection, maintenance (and repair of plant activity and structure, but also provide biosynthetic carbon skeletons for secondary metabolite synthesis

  9. Global microarray analysis of carbohydrate use in alkaliphilic hemicellulolytic bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajian Song

    Full Text Available The alkaliphilic hemicellulolytic bacterium Bacillus sp. N16-5 has a broad substrate spectrum and exhibits the capacity to utilize complex carbohydrates such as galactomannan, xylan, and pectin. In the monosaccharide mixture, sequential utilization by Bacillus sp. N16-5 was observed. Glucose appeared to be its preferential monosaccharide, followed by fructose, mannose, arabinose, xylose, and galactose. Global transcription profiles of the strain were determined separately for growth on six monosaccharides (glucose, fructose, mannose, galactose, arabinose, and xylose and four polysaccharides (galactomannan, xylan, pectin, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose using one-color microarrays. Numerous genes potentially related to polysaccharide degradation, sugar transport, and monosaccharide metabolism were found to respond to a specific substrate. Putative gene clusters for different carbohydrates were identified according to transcriptional patterns and genome annotation. Identification and analysis of these gene clusters contributed to pathway reconstruction for carbohydrate utilization in Bacillus sp. N16-5. Several genes encoding putative sugar transporters were highly expressed during growth on specific sugars, suggesting their functional roles. Two phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems were identified as candidate transporters for mannose and fructose, and a major facilitator superfamily transporter was identified as a candidate transporter for arabinose and xylose. Five carbohydrate uptake transporter 1 family ATP-binding cassette transporters were predicted to participate in the uptake of hemicellulose and pectin degradation products. Collectively, microarray data improved the pathway reconstruction involved in carbohydrate utilization of Bacillus sp. N16-5 and revealed that the organism precisely regulates gene transcription in response to fluctuations in energy resources.

  10. Photosynthesis down-regulation precedes carbohydrate accumulation under sink limitation in Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebauer, Sergio G; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Guardiola, José Luis; Molina, Rosa-Victoria

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis down-regulation due to an imbalance between sources and sinks in Citrus leaves could be mediated by excessive accumulation of carbohydrates. However, there is limited understanding of the physiological role of soluble and insoluble carbohydrates in photosynthesis regulation and the elements triggering the down-regulation process. In this work, the role of non-structural carbohydrates in the regulation of photosynthesis under a broad spectrum of source-sink relationships has been investigated in the Salustiana sweet orange. Soluble sugar and starch accumulation in leaves, induced by girdling experiments, did not induce down-regulation of the photosynthetic rate in the presence of sinks (fruits). The leaf-to-fruit ratio did not modulate photosynthesis but allocation of photoassimilates to the fruits. The lack of strong sink activity led to a decrease in the photosynthetic rate and starch accumulation in leaves. However, photosynthesis down-regulation due to an excess of total soluble sugars or starch was discarded because photosynthesis and stomatal conductance reduction occurred prior to any significant accumulation of these carbohydrates. Gas exchange and fluorescence parameters suggested biochemical limitations to photosynthesis. In addition, the expression of carbon metabolism-related genes was altered within 24 h when strong sinks were removed. Sucrose synthesis and export genes were inhibited, whereas the expression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was increased to cope with the excess of assimilates. In conclusion, changes in starch and soluble sugar turnover, but not sugar content per se, could provide the signal for photosynthesis regulation. In these conditions, non-stomatal limitations strongly inhibited the photosynthetic rate prior to any significant increase in carbohydrate levels. PMID:21367744

  11. Self-powered wireless carbohydrate/oxygen sensitive biodevice based on radio signal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Magnus; Alcalde, Miguel; Bartlett, Philip N; De Lacey, Antonio L; Gorton, Lo; Gutierrez-Sanchez, Cristina; Haddad, Raoudha; Kilburn, Jeremy; Leech, Dónal; Ludwig, Roland; Magner, Edmond; Mate, Diana M; Conghaile, Peter Ó; Ortiz, Roberto; Pita, Marcos; Pöller, Sascha; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas; Salaj-Kosla, Urszula; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Sebelius, Fredrik; Shao, Minling; Stoica, Leonard; Sygmund, Cristoph; Tilly, Jonas; Toscano, Miguel D; Vivekananthan, Jeevanthi; Wright, Emma; Shleev, Sergey

    2014-01-01

    Here for the first time, we detail self-contained (wireless and self-powered) biodevices with wireless signal transmission. Specifically, we demonstrate the operation of self-sustained carbohydrate and oxygen sensitive biodevices, consisting of a wireless electronic unit, radio transmitter and separate sensing bioelectrodes, supplied with electrical energy from a combined multi-enzyme fuel cell generating sufficient current at required voltage to power the electronics. A carbohydrate/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell was assembled by comparing the performance of a range of different bioelectrodes followed by selection of the most suitable, stable combination. Carbohydrates (viz. lactose for the demonstration) and oxygen were also chosen as bioanalytes, being important biomarkers, to demonstrate the operation of the self-contained biosensing device, employing enzyme-modified bioelectrodes to enable the actual sensing. A wireless electronic unit, consisting of a micropotentiostat, an energy harvesting module (voltage amplifier together with a capacitor), and a radio microchip, were designed to enable the biofuel cell to be used as a power supply for managing the sensing devices and for wireless data transmission. The electronic system used required current and voltages greater than 44 µA and 0.57 V, respectively to operate; which the biofuel cell was capable of providing, when placed in a carbohydrate and oxygen containing buffer. In addition, a USB based receiver and computer software were employed for proof-of concept tests of the developed biodevices. Operation of bench-top prototypes was demonstrated in buffers containing different concentrations of the analytes, showcasing that the variation in response of both carbohydrate and oxygen biosensors could be monitored wirelessly in real-time as analyte concentrations in buffers were changed, using only an enzymatic fuel cell as a power supply. PMID:25310190

  12. Self-powered wireless carbohydrate/oxygen sensitive biodevice based on radio signal transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Falk

    Full Text Available Here for the first time, we detail self-contained (wireless and self-powered biodevices with wireless signal transmission. Specifically, we demonstrate the operation of self-sustained carbohydrate and oxygen sensitive biodevices, consisting of a wireless electronic unit, radio transmitter and separate sensing bioelectrodes, supplied with electrical energy from a combined multi-enzyme fuel cell generating sufficient current at required voltage to power the electronics. A carbohydrate/oxygen enzymatic fuel cell was assembled by comparing the performance of a range of different bioelectrodes followed by selection of the most suitable, stable combination. Carbohydrates (viz. lactose for the demonstration and oxygen were also chosen as bioanalytes, being important biomarkers, to demonstrate the operation of the self-contained biosensing device, employing enzyme-modified bioelectrodes to enable the actual sensing. A wireless electronic unit, consisting of a micropotentiostat, an energy harvesting module (voltage amplifier together with a capacitor, and a radio microchip, were designed to enable the biofuel cell to be used as a power supply for managing the sensing devices and for wireless data transmission. The electronic system used required current and voltages greater than 44 µA and 0.57 V, respectively to operate; which the biofuel cell was capable of providing, when placed in a carbohydrate and oxygen containing buffer. In addition, a USB based receiver and computer software were employed for proof-of concept tests of the developed biodevices. Operation of bench-top prototypes was demonstrated in buffers containing different concentrations of the analytes, showcasing that the variation in response of both carbohydrate and oxygen biosensors could be monitored wirelessly in real-time as analyte concentrations in buffers were changed, using only an enzymatic fuel cell as a power supply.

  13. Characterization of a novel PQQ-dependent quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea classified into auxiliary activities family 12 in carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouta; Matsumura, Hirotoshi; Ishida, Takuya; Samejima, Masahiro; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Yoshida, Makoto; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Nakamura, Nobuhumi

    2015-01-01

    The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper), which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ)-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall. PMID:25679509

  14. Characterization of a novel PQQ-dependent quinohemoprotein pyranose dehydrogenase from Coprinopsis cinerea classified into auxiliary activities family 12 in carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouta Takeda

    Full Text Available The basidiomycete Coprinopsis cinerea contains a quinohemoprotein (CcPDH named as CcSDH in our previous paper, which is a new type of pyrroloquinoline-quinone (PQQ-dependent pyranose dehydrogenase and is the first found among all eukaryotes. This enzyme has a three-domain structure consisting of an N-terminal heme b containing a cytochrome domain that is homologous to the cytochrome domain of cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18 from the wood-rotting basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium, a C-terminal family 1-type carbohydrate-binding module, and a novel central catalytic domain containing PQQ as a cofactor. Here, we describe the biochemical and electrochemical characterization of recombinant CcPDH. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic studies clearly reveal characteristics of a 6-coordinated low-spin heme b in both the ferric and ferrous states, as well as intramolecular electron transfer from the PQQ to heme b. Moreover, the formal potential of the heme was evaluated to be 130 mV vs. NHE by cyclic voltammetry. These results indicate that the cytochrome domain of CcPDH possesses similar biophysical properties to that in CDH. A comparison of the conformations of monosaccharides as substrates and the associated catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km of CcPDH indicates that the enzyme prefers monosaccharides with equatorial C-2, C-3 hydroxyl groups and an axial C-4 hydroxyl group in the 1C4 chair conformation. Furthermore, a binding study shows a high binding affinity of CcPDH for cellulose, suggesting that CcPDH function is related to the enzymatic degradation of plant cell wall.

  15. Regulation of glucose and lipid metabolism by dietary carbohydrate levels and lipid sources in gilthead sea bream juveniles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Carolina; Corraze, Geneviève; Firmino-Diógenes, Alexandre; Larroquet, Laurence; Panserat, Stéphane; Oliva-Teles, Aires

    2016-07-01

    The long-term effects on growth performance, body composition, plasma metabolites, liver and intestine glucose and lipid metabolism were assessed in gilthead sea bream juveniles fed diets without carbohydrates (CH-) or carbohydrate-enriched (20 % gelatinised starch, CH+) combined with two lipid sources (fish oil; or vegetable oil (VO)). No differences in growth performance among treatments were observed. Carbohydrate intake was associated with increased hepatic transcripts of glucokinase but not of 6-phosphofructokinase. Expression of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase was down-regulated by carbohydrate intake, whereas, unexpectedly, glucose 6-phosphatase was up-regulated. Lipogenic enzyme activities (glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, malic enzyme, fatty acid synthase) and ∆6 fatty acyl desaturase (FADS2) transcripts were increased in liver of fish fed CH+ diets, supporting an enhanced potential for lipogenesis and long-chain PUFA (LC-PUFA) biosynthesis. Despite the lower hepatic cholesterol content in CH+ groups, no influence on the expression of genes related to cholesterol efflux (ATP-binding cassette G5) and biosynthesis (lanosterol 14 α-demethylase, cytochrome P450 51 cytochrome P450 51 (CYP51A1); 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase) was recorded at the hepatic level. At the intestinal level, however, induction of CYP51A1 transcripts by carbohydrate intake was recorded. Dietary VO led to decreased plasma phospholipid and cholesterol concentrations but not on the transcripts of proteins involved in phospholipid biosynthesis (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase) and cholesterol metabolism at intestinal and hepatic levels. Hepatic and muscular fatty acid profiles reflected that of diets, despite the up-regulation of FADS2 transcripts. Overall, this study demonstrated that dietary carbohydrates mainly affected carbohydrate metabolism, lipogenesis and LC-PUFA biosynthesis, whereas effects of dietary lipid source were mostly related with tissue fatty acid composition

  16. Export of Extracellular Polysaccharides Modulates Adherence of the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, ML; Allen, R; Luo, YQ; Curtiss, R

    2013-09-10

    The field of cyanobacterial biofuel production is advancing rapidly, yet we know little of the basic biology of these organisms outside of their photosynthetic pathways. We aimed to gain a greater understanding of how the cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC 6803 (Synechocystis, hereafter) modulates its cell surface. Such understanding will allow for the creation of mutants that autoflocculate in a regulated way, thus avoiding energy intensive centrifugation in the creation of biofuels. We constructed mutant strains lacking genes predicted to function in carbohydrate transport or synthesis. Strains with gene deletions of slr0977 (predicted to encode a permease component of an ABC transporter), slr0982 (predicted to encode an ATP binding component of an ABC transporter) and slr1610 (predicted to encode a methyltransferase) demonstrated flocculent phenotypes and increased adherence to glass. Upon bioinformatic inspection, the gene products of slr0977, slr0982, and slr1610 appear to function in O-antigen (OAg) transport and synthesis. However, the analysis provided here demonstrated no differences between OAg purified from wild-type and mutants. However, exopolysaccharides (EPS) purified from mutants were altered in composition when compared to wild-type. Our data suggest that there are multiple means to modulate the cell surface of Synechocystis by disrupting different combinations of ABC transporters and/or glycosyl transferases. Further understanding of these mechanisms may allow for the development of industrially and ecologically useful strains of cyanobacteria. Additionally, these data imply that many cyanobacterial gene products may possess as-yet undiscovered functions, and are meritorious of further study.

  17. Cloning and characterization of two lipopolysaccharide-binding protein/bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (LBP/BPI) genes from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus with diversified function in modulating ROS production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yina; Li, Chenghua; Che, Zhongjie; Zhang, Pengjuan; Zhang, Weiwei; Duan, Xuemei; Li, Ye

    2015-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (LBP/BPI) play crucial role in modulating cellular signals in response to Gram-negative bacteria infection. In the present study, two isoforms of LBP/BPI genes (designated as AjLBP/BPI1 and AjLBP/BPI2, respectively) were cloned from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus by RACE approach. The full-length cDNAs of AjLBP/BPI1 and AjLBP/BPI2 were of 1479 and 1455 bp and encoded two secreted proteins of 492 and 484 amino acid residues, respectively. Signal peptide, two BPI/LBP/CETP and one central domain were totally conserved in the deduced amino acid of AjLBP/BPI1 and AjLBP/BPI2. Phylogentic analysis further supported that AjLBP/BPI1 and AjLBP/BPI2 belonged to new members of invertebrates LBP/BPI family. Spatial expression analysis revealed that both AjLBP/BPI1 and AjLBP/BPI2 were ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues with the larger magnitude in AjLBP/BPI1. The Vibrio splenfidus challenge and LPS stimulation could significantly up-regulate the mRNA expression of both AjLBP/BPI1 and AjLBP/BPI2, with the increase of AjLBP/BPI2 expression occurred earlier than that of AjLBP/BPI1. More importantly, we found that LPS induced ROS production was markedly depressed after AjLBP/BPI1 knock-down, but there was no significant change by AjLBP/BPI2 silencing. Consistently, the expression level of unclassified AjToll, not AjTLR3, was tightly correlated with that of AjLBP/BPI1. Silencing the AjToll also depressed the ROS production in the cultured coelomocytes. All these results indicated that AjLBP/BPI1 and AjLBP/BPI2 probably played distinct roles in bacterial mediating immune response in sea cucumber, and AjLBP/BPI1 depressed coelomocytes ROS production via modulating AjToll cascade. PMID:25956196

  18. Bioluminescence of beetle luciferases with 6'-amino-D-luciferin analogues reveals excited keto-oxyluciferin as the emitter and phenolate/luciferin binding site interactions modulate bioluminescence colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviani, Vadim R; Neves, Deimison Rodrigues; Amaral, Danilo Trabuco; Prado, Rogilene A; Matsuhashi, Takuto; Hirano, Takashi

    2014-08-19

    Beetle luciferases produce different bioluminescence colors from green to red using the same d-luciferin substrate. Despite many studies of the mechanisms and structural determinants of bioluminescence colors with firefly luciferases, the identity of the emitters and the specific active site interactions responsible for bioluminescence color modulation remain elusive. To address these questions, we analyzed the bioluminescence spectra with 6'-amino-D-luciferin (aminoluciferin) and its 5,5-dimethyl analogue using a set of recombinant beetle luciferases that naturally elicit different colors and different pH sensitivities (pH-sensitive, Amydetes vivianii λmax=538 nm, Macrolampis sp2 λmax=564 nm; pH-insensitive, Phrixotrix hirtus λmax=623 nm, Phrixotrix vivianii λmax=546 nm, and Pyrearinus termitilluminans λmax=534 nm), a luciferase-like enzyme (Tenebrionidae, Zophobas morio λmax=613 nm), and mutants of C311 (S314). The green-yellow-emitting luciferases display red-shifted bioluminescence spectra with aminoluciferin in relation to those with D-luciferin, whereas the red-emitting luciferases displayed blue-shifted spectra. Bioluminescence spectra with 5,5-dimethylaminoluciferin, in which enolization is blocked, were almost identical to those of aminoluciferin. Fluorescence probing using 2-(4-toluidino)naphthalene-6-sulfonate and inference with aminoluciferin confirm that the luciferin binding site of the red-shifted luciferases is more polar than in the case of the green-yellow-emitting luciferases. Altogether, the results show that the keto form of excited oxyluciferin is the emitter in beetle bioluminescence and that bioluminescence colors are essentially modulated by interactions of the 6'-hydroxy group of oxyluciferin and basic moieties under the influence of the microenvironment polarity of the active site: a strong interaction between a base moiety and oxyluciferin phenol in a hydrophobic microenvironment promotes green-yellow emission, whereas a more polar

  19. Actin-binding protein regulation by microRNAs as a novel microbial strategy to modulate phagocytosis by host cells: the case of N-Wasp and miR-142-3p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo eBettencourt

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb is a successful intracellular pathogen that thrives in macrophages (Mφs. There is a need to better understand how Mtb hijacks cellular processes like phagolysosome biogenesis, a classical pathogenesis determinant. A central feature to this microbial strategy is the manipulation of actin in Mφs. Here, we examine the role of microRNAs (miRNAs as a potential mechanism in the regulation of actin-mediated events leading to phagocytosis in the context of mycobacteria infection. Given that non-virulent Mycobacterium smegmatis also controls actin filamentation to prolong its instracellular survival inside host cells, our approach was to perform a global transcriptomic approach to assess the modulation of miRNAs upon M. smegmatis infection of the murine Mφ cell line, J774A.1. This approach yielded miR-142-3p as a top candidate to be involved in the regulation of actin dynamics required in phagocytosis. We unequivocally demonstrate miR-142-3p targets N-Wasp, an actin-binding protein required during microbial challenge. A gain-of-function approach for miR-142-3p revealed a down-regulation of N-Wasp expression accompanied by a decrease of mycobacteria intake, while a loss-of-function approach yielded the reciprocal increase of the phagocytosis process. Equally important, we show Mtb induces the early expression of miR-142-3p and down-regulates N-Wasp protein levels in both the murine J774A.1 cell line and primary human Mφs. As proof of principle, the partial siRNA-mediated knock down of N-Wasp resulted in a decrease of Mtb intake by human Mφs, reflected in lower levels of colony-forming units counts over time. We therefore propose the modulation of miRNAs as a novel strategy in mycobacterial infection to control factors involved in actin filamentation and other early events of phagolysosome biogenesis, such as the case presented here for miR-142-3p influencing N-Wasp activity during the phagocytosis process.

  20. Special Attachments. Module 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on special attachments, one in a series dealing with industrial sewing machines, their attachments, and operation, covers four topics: gauges; cording attachment; zipper foot; and hemming, shirring, and binding. For each topic these components are provided: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student…

  1. Designing a binding interface for control of cancer cell adhesion via 3D topography and metabolic oligosaccharide engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jian; Che, Pao-Lin; Wang, Zhi-Yun; Aich, Udayanath; Yarema, Kevin J

    2011-08-01

    This study combines metabolic oligosaccharide engineering (MOE), a technology where the glycocalyx of living cells is endowed with chemical features not normally found in sugars, with custom-designed three-dimensional biomaterial substrates to enhance the adhesion of cancer cells and control their morphology and gene expression. Specifically, Ac(5)ManNTGc, a thiol-bearing analog of N-acetyl-d-mannosamine (ManNAc) was used to introduce thiolated sialic acids into the glycocalyx of human Jurkat T-lymphoma derived cells. In parallel 2D films and 3D electrospun nanofibrous scaffolds were prepared from polyethersulfone (PES) and (as controls) left unmodified or aminated. Alternately, the materials were malemided or gold-coated to provide bio-orthogonal binding partners for the thiol groups newly expressed on the cell surface. Cell attachment was modulated by both the topography of the substrate surface and by the chemical compatibility of the binding interface between the cell and the substrate; a substantial increase in binding for normally non-adhesive Jurkat line for 3D scaffold compared to 2D surfaces with an added degree of adhesion resulting from chemoselective binding to malemidede-derivatived or gold-coated surfaces. In addition, the morphology of the cells attached to the 3D scaffolds via MOE-mediated adhesion was dramatically altered and the expression of genes involved in cell adhesion changed in a time-dependent manner. This study showed that cell adhesion could be enhanced, gene expression modulated, and cell fate controlled by introducing the 3D topograhical cues into the growth substrate and by creating a glycoengineered binding interface where the chemistry of both the cell surface and biomaterials scaffold was controlled to facilitate a new mode of carbohydrate-mediated adhesion. PMID:21549424

  2. ON VASCULAR STENOSIS, RESTENOSIS AND MANNOSE BINDING LECTIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlow, Barbara Stadler; Nery, Rodrigo Araldi; Skare, Thelma L; Ribas, Carmen Australia Paredes Marcondes; Ramos, Gabriela Piovezani; Petisco, Roberta Dombroski

    2016-03-01

    Mannose binding lectin is a lectin instrumental in the innate immunity. It recognizes carbohydrate patterns found on the surface of a large number of pathogenic micro-organisms, activating the complement system. However, this protein seems to increase the tissue damage after ischemia. In this paper is reviewed some aspects of harmful role of the mannose binding lectin in ischemia/reperfusion injury. PMID:27120743

  3. Tailored Presentation of Carbohydrates on a Coiled Coil-Based Scaffold for Asialoglycoprotein Receptor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacco, Elsa; Hütter, Julia; Heier, Jason L; Mortier, Jérémie; Seeberger, Peter H; Lepenies, Bernd; Koksch, Beate

    2015-09-18

    The coiled-coil folding motif represents an ideal scaffold for the defined presentation of ligands due to the possibility of positioning them at specific distances along the axis. We created a coiled-coil glycopeptide library to characterize the distances between the carbohydrate-binding sites of the asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) on hepatocytes. The components of the glycopeptide library vary for the number of displayed ligands (galactose), their position on the peptide sequence, and the space between peptide backbone and carbohydrate. We determined the binding of the glycopeptides to the hepatocytes, and we established the optimal distance and orientation of the galactose moieties for interaction with the ASGPR using flow cytometry. We confirmed that the binding occurs through endocytosis mediated by ASGPR via inhibition studies with cytochalasin D; fluorescence microscopy studies display the uptake of the carrier peptides inside the cell. Thus, this study demonstrates that the coiled-coil motif can be used as reliable scaffold for the rational presentation of ligands.

  4. Carbohydrates/nucleosides/RNA-DNA-ligand interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaptein, R.; McConnell, B.; Serianni, A.S.; Silks, L.A. III

    1994-12-01

    Carbohydrate and nucleotide structural determination using modern spectroscopic techniques is dependent on our ability to label oligonucleotides and oligosaccharides with stable isotopes. Uniform Carbon 13 and Nitrogen 15 labeling of oligonucleotides is important to present-day efforts, which are focused on determining the structure of relatively small oligosaccharides and oligonucleotides, which form the elements of larger structures. Because of the relatively recent interest in three-dimensional structure, the development of techniques used to label them has lagged behind parallel techniques used to label peptides and proteins. Therefore, this group`s discussion focused primarily on problems faced today in obtaining oligonucleotides labeled uniformly with carbon 13 and nitrogen 15.

  5. Multimodal CARS microscopy of structured carbohydrate biopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Ridsdale, Andrew; Pegoraro, Adrian F.; Moffatt, Douglas J.; Stolow, Albert

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy for the study of structured condensed carbohydrate systems. Simultaneous second-harmonic generation (SHG) and spectrally-scanned CARS microscopy was used to elucidate structure, alignment, and density in cellulose cotton fibers and in starch grains undergoing rapid heat-moisture swelling. Our results suggest that CARS response of the O-H stretch region (3000 cm−1–3400 cm−1), together with the commonly-measured C-H stretch (2750 cm−1–2970 cm−1) and SHG provide potentially important structural information and contrast in these materials. PMID:21258555

  6. A high-power carbohydrate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, Ragnar [SuFuCell AB, Bytaregatan 23, SE 222 21 Lund (Sweden); Folkesson, Boerje [Bronsaaldersvaegen 21, SE-226 54 Lund (Sweden); Spaziante, Placido M. [Cellennium Co., Ltd., 14th Floor Gypsum Metropolitan Tower, 539 Sri Ayudhaya Rd., Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Veerasai, Waret [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Exell, Robert H.B. [Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, 91 Prachauthit Rd., Bangmod, Tungkru, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

    2006-04-01

    This paper reports the development of a fuel cell consisting of a vanadium flow battery in which the vanadium ions are reduced by sugar (from a carbohydrate) to oxidation state +3 on one side of a membrane, and are oxidized to state +5 on the other side by oxygen. The theoretical upper limit to the conversion efficiency of the energy in sugar by this method under standard conditions is 54%. We have obtained efficiencies up to 45% in our laboratory tests. This way of using biomass for electricity production avoids the Carnot cycle losses in heat engines. (author)

  7. Immunohistochemical analysis of carbohydrate antigens in chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Motohiro; Nakayama, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Over the last four decades, immunohistochemistry (IHC) has become an invaluable technique to detect antigens in tissue sections. Compared to Western blotting analysis, IHC is advantageous in determining histological distribution and localization of the antigen. Another advantage, if one can access human formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) blocks of disease tissues, is that IHC makes it possible to analyze diseases retrospectively from archived pathological tissue specimens. In this chapter, we describe protocols used for both conventional and multiple immunostainings using FFPE tissue sections, which have been used for quantitative analysis of high endothelial venule (HEV)-like vessels and lymphocyte subsets attached to HEV-like vessels in our studies of chronic inflammatory gastrointestinal diseases. We also describe in detail a protocol using an L-selectinIgM chimera in situ binding assay on FFPE tissue sections for functional detection of L-selectin ligand carbohydrates expressed on HEV-like vessels. After presenting each protocol, we provide practical examples for its use obtained from our studies.

  8. CARBOHYDRATE INGESTION AND EXERCISE: EFFECTS ON METABOLISM AND PERFORMANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@KEY POINTS ■ Carbohydrate is the preferred fuel for most competitive sports;an inadequate supply of carbohydrate in the body often leads to poor performance. ■ Carbohydrate ingestion during exercise increases blood glucose availability and maintains the ability of the body to use carbohydrate as fuel during exercise.When carbohydrate is consumed during exercise,glucose uptake by muscles is increased,and the breakdown of glycogen in the liver into blood glucose is reduced,thus saving liver glycogen until late in exercise.The use of muscle glycogen for energy is generally unaffected by carbohydrate feeding.However,during prolonged running,the breakdown of muscle glycogen may be slowed because the supply of blood glucose is improved when carbohydrate is consumed.These metabolic responses underlie the performance benefit that accompanies carbohydrate ingestion during exercise. ■ There are some minor differences among glucose,sucrose,and maltodextrins in their effects on metabolism,but each of them can enhance performance when ingested in the appropriate quantity during exercise.Fructose alone is not an effective carbohydrate supplement because of its slow absorption and slow conversion by the body to glucose,but when small amounts of fructose are combined with other carbohydrates,fructose can be beneficial. ■ Ingesting carbohydrate at a rate of 30-60 grams per hour can improve exercise erformance.A good way to achieve this carbohydrate intake is to consume 600-to-1200 ml(20-to-40 oz)of a sports drink during each hour of exercise.Consuming carbohydrate in a beverage provides an added benefit of preventing potentially harmful effects of dehydration on performance.

  9. Synthesis and evaluation of novel carbocyclic carbohydrate analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Adamson, Christopher William

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate analogues play an indispensible role in the study of glycan processing enzymes. These compounds have attracted attention as probes of enzyme mechanisms, as chemical tools for the elucidation of enzyme function and as potential pharmaceuticals. The development of organocatalytic aldol chemistry has fundamentally altered the way chemists approach the synthesis of carbohydrate analogues. In this thesis I highlight a novel strategy toward the synthesis of carbocyclic carbohydrate ana...

  10. Serum levels, ontogeny and heritability of chicken mannan-binding lectin (MBL)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, S.B.; Hedemand, J.E.; Nielsen, O.L.;

    1998-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) is a serum lectin found in mammals and recently also in birds. It is thought to play an important role in the innate immune defence through binding to surface carbohydrates on micro-organisms followed by complement activation via the MBL pathway. This results in opsoni...

  11. The least-cost low-carbohydrate diet is expensive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffensperger, John F

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the use of operations research methods to study the minimum possible cost of a low-carbohydrate diet. The study compares this cost to the minimum cost of a diet with no limitation on carbohydrate. The rationale for this study is the popularity of the low-carbohydrate diets and their perceived high cost. The method used was an operations research approach to find a set of least cost diets, varying the required carbohydrate. This method was chosen to avoid potential concerns with real diets that may be nutritionally deficient or could be had for a lower cost. The major finding is that the cheapest possible low-carbohydrate diet costs about triple the cost of the cheapest diet with no constraint on carbohydrate. Furthermore, the minimum cost of a diet low in both carbohydrate and fat is 5 to 10 times the cost of the cheapest diet, depending on the relative amounts of these nutrients. As carbohydrate and fat are constrained, cost increases dramatically and nonlinearly. The study identifies which nutrients had the greatest effect on cost for a low-carbohydrate and low-fat diet.

  12. Renewable Hydrogen Carrier — Carbohydrate: Constructing the Carbon-Neutral Carbohydrate Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-H. Percival Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogen economy presents an appealing energy future but its implementation must solve numerous problems ranging from low-cost sustainable production, high-density storage, costly infrastructure, to eliminating safety concern. The use of renewable carbohydrate as a high-density hydrogen carrier and energy source for hydrogen production is possible due to emerging cell-free synthetic biology technology—cell-free synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB. Assembly of numerous enzymes and co-enzymes in vitro can create complicated set of biological reactions or pathways that microorganisms or catalysts cannot complete, for example, C6H10O5 (aq + 7 H2O (l à 12 H2 (g + 6 CO2 (g (PLoS One 2007, 2:e456. Thanks to 100% selectivity of enzymes, modest reaction conditions, and high-purity of generated hydrogen, carbohydrate is a promising hydrogen carrier for end users. Gravimetric density of carbohydrate is 14.8 H2 mass% if water can be recycled from proton exchange membrane fuel cells or 8.33% H2 mass% without water recycling. Renewable carbohydrate can be isolated from plant biomass or would be produced from a combination of solar electricity/hydrogen and carbon dioxide fixation mediated by high-efficiency artificial photosynthesis mediated by SyPaB. The construction of this carbon-neutral carbohydrate economy would address numerous sustainability challenges, such as electricity and hydrogen storage, CO2 fixation and long-term storage, water conservation, transportation fuel production, plus feed and food production.

  13. CARBOHYDRATE INTAKE CONSIDERATIONS FOR YOUNG ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Montfort-Steiger

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Good nutritional practices are important for exercise performance and health during all ages. Athletes and especially growing children engaged in heavy training have higher energy and nutrient requirements compared to their non-active counterparts. Scientific understanding of sports nutrition for the young athlete is lacking behind the growing number of young athletes engaged in sports. Most of the sports nutrition recommendations given to athletic children and adolescents are based on adult findings due to the deficiency in age specific information in young athletes. Therefore, this review reflects on child specific sports nutrition, particularly on carbohydrate intake and metabolism that distinguishes the child athlete from the adult athlete. Children are characterised to be in an insulin resistance stage during certain periods of maturation, have different glycolytic/metabolic responses during exercise, have a tendency for higher fat oxidation during exercise and show different heat dissipation mechanisms compared to adults. These features point out that young athletes may need different nutritional advice on carbohydrate for exercise to those from adult athletes. Sport drinks for example may need to be adapted to children specific needs. However, more research in this area is warranted to clarify sports nutrition needs of the young athlete to provide better and healthy nutritional guidance to young athletes

  14. Carbohydrate conformation and lipid condensation in monolayers containing glycosphingolipid Gb3: influence of acyl chain structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Erik B; Gao, Haifei; Dennison, Andrew J C; Chopin, Nathalie; Struth, Bernd; Arnold, Thomas; Florent, Jean-Claude; Johannes, Ludger

    2014-09-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), a glycosphingolipid found in the plasma membrane of animal cells, is the endocytic receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. Using x-ray reflectivity (XR) and grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD), lipid monolayers containing Gb3 were investigated at the air-water interface. XR probed Gb3 carbohydrate conformation normal to the interface, whereas GIXD precisely characterized Gb3's influence on acyl chain in-plane packing and area per molecule (APM). Two phospholipids, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DPPE), were used to study Gb3 packing in different lipid environments. Furthermore, the impact on monolayer structure of a naturally extracted Gb3 mixture was compared to synthetic Gb3 species with uniquely defined acyl chain structures. XR results showed that lipid environment and Gb3 acyl chain structure impact carbohydrate conformation with greater solvent accessibility observed for smaller phospholipid headgroups and long Gb3 acyl chains. In general, GIXD showed that Gb3 condensed phospholipid packing resulting in smaller APM than predicted by ideal mixing. Gb3's capacity to condense APM was larger for DSPC monolayers and exhibited different dependencies on acyl chain structure depending on the lipid environment. The interplay between Gb3-induced changes in lipid packing and the lipid environment's impact on carbohydrate conformation has broad implications for glycosphingolipid macromolecule recognition and ligand binding.

  15. Evolutionary bases of carbohydrate recognition and substrate discrimination in the ROK protein family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conejo, Maria S; Thompson, Steven M; Miller, Brian G

    2010-06-01

    The ROK (repressor, open reading frame, kinase) protein family (Pfam 00480) is a large collection of bacterial polypeptides that includes sugar kinases, carbohydrate responsive transcriptional repressors, and many functionally uncharacterized gene products. ROK family sugar kinases phosphorylate a range of structurally distinct hexoses including the key carbon source D: -glucose, various glucose epimers, and several acetylated hexosamines. The primary sequence elements responsible for carbohydrate recognition within different functional categories of ROK polypeptides are largely unknown due to a limited structural characterization of this protein family. In order to identify the structural bases for substrate discrimination in individual ROK proteins, and to better understand the evolutionary processes that led to the divergent evolution of function in this family, we constructed an inclusive alignment of 227 representative ROK polypeptides. Phylogenetic analyses and ancestral sequence reconstructions of the resulting tree reveal a discrete collection of active site residues that dictate substrate specificity. The results also suggest a series of mutational events within the carbohydrate-binding sites of ROK proteins that facilitated the expansion of substrate specificity within this family. This study provides new insight into the evolutionary relationship of ROK glucokinases and non-ROK glucokinases (Pfam 02685), revealing the primary sequence elements shared between these two protein families, which diverged from a common ancestor in ancient times. PMID:20512568

  16. Glycosylation of dengue virus glycoproteins and their interactions with carbohydrate receptors: possible targets for antiviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, Fakhriedzwan; Muharram, Siti Hanna; Diah, Suwarni

    2016-07-01

    Dengue virus, an RNA virus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, affects 50 million individuals annually, and approximately 500,000-1,000,000 of these infections lead to dengue hemorrhagic fever or dengue shock syndrome. With no licensed vaccine or specific antiviral treatments available to prevent dengue infection, dengue is considered a major public health problem in subtropical and tropical regions. The virus, like other enveloped viruses, uses the host's cellular enzymes to synthesize its structural (C, E, and prM/M) and nonstructural proteins (NS1-5) and, subsequently, to glycosylate these proteins to produce complete and functional glycoproteins. The structural glycoproteins, specifically the E protein, are known to interact with the host's carbohydrate receptors through the viral proteins' N-glycosylation sites and thus mediate the viral invasion of cells. This review focuses on the involvement of dengue glycoproteins in the course of infection and the virus' exploitation of the host's glycans, especially the interactions between host receptors and carbohydrate moieties. We also discuss the recent developments in antiviral therapies that target these processes and interactions, focusing specifically on the use of carbohydrate-binding agents derived from plants, commonly known as lectins, to inhibit the progression of infection. PMID:27068162

  17. Acute Effects of Carbohydrate Supplementation on Intermittent Sports Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay B. Baker

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intermittent sports (e.g., team sports are diverse in their rules and regulations but similar in the pattern of play; that is, intermittent high-intensity movements and the execution of sport-specific skills over a prolonged period of time (~1–2 h. Performance during intermittent sports is dependent upon a combination of anaerobic and aerobic energy systems, both of which rely on muscle glycogen and/or blood glucose as an important substrate for energy production. The aims of this paper are to review: (1 potential biological mechanisms by which carbohydrate may impact intermittent sport performance; (2 the acute effects of carbohydrate ingestion on intermittent sport performance, including intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity, sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition; and (3 what recommendations can be derived for carbohydrate intake before/during exercise in intermittent sports based on the available evidence. The most researched intermittent sport is soccer but some sport-specific studies have also been conducted in other sports (e.g., rugby, field hockey, basketball, American football, and racquet sports. Carbohydrate ingestion before/during exercise has been shown in most studies to enhance intermittent high-intensity exercise capacity. However, studies have shown mixed results with regards to the acute effects of carbohydrate intake on sprinting, jumping, skill, change of direction speed, and cognition. In most of these studies the amount of carbohydrate consumed was ~30–60 g/h in the form of a 6%–7% carbohydrate solution comprised of sucrose, glucose, and/or maltodextrin. The magnitude of the impact that carbohydrate ingestion has on intermittent sport performance is likely dependent on the carbohydrate status of the individual; that is, carbohydrate ingestion has the greatest impact on performance under circumstances eliciting fatigue and/or hypoglycemia. Accordingly, carbohydrate ingestion before

  18. Cognitive awareness of carbohydrate intake does not alter exercise‐induced lymphocyte apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    James Wilfred Navalta; Brian Keith McFarlin; Scott Lyons; Scott Wesley Arnett; Mark Anthony Schafer

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether cognitive awareness of carbohydrate beverage consumption affects exercise‐induced lymphocyte apoptosis, independent of actual carbohydrate intake. INTRODUCTION: Carbohydrate supplementation during aerobic exercise generally protects against the immunosuppressive effects of exercise. It is not currently known whether carbohydrate consumption or simply the knowledge of carbohydrate consumption also has that effect. METHODS: E...

  19. Anthrax carbohydrates, synthesis and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Russell W.; Boons, Geert-Jan; Quinn, Conrad; Vasan, Mahalakshmi; Wolfert, Margreet A.; Choudhury, Biswa; Kannenberg, Elmar; Leoff, Christine; Mehta, Alok; Saile, Elke; Rauvolfova, Jana; Wilkins, Patricia; Harvey, Alex J.

    2013-04-16

    The present invention presents the isolation, characterization and synthesis of oligosaccharides of Bacillus anthracis. Also presented are antibodies that bind to such saccharide moieties and various methods of use for such saccharide moieties and antibodies.

  20. Expression, Purification, and Characterization of a Carbohydrate-Active Enzyme: A Research-Inspired Methods Optimization Experiment for the Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbur, Jaime F.; Vail, Justin D.; Mitchell, Lindsey N.; Jakeman, David L.; Timmons, Shannon C.

    2016-01-01

    The development and implementation of research-inspired, discovery-based experiences into science laboratory curricula is a proven strategy for increasing student engagement and ownership of experiments. In the novel laboratory module described herein, students learn to express, purify, and characterize a carbohydrate-active enzyme using modern…