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Sample records for carbocysteine

  1. EUGENOL POLYMER MODIFIED TITANIUM ELECTRODE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CARBOCYSTEINE

    OpenAIRE

    S. EL QOUATLI; R. T. NGONO; R. NAJIH; A. CHTAINI

    2012-01-01

    A eugenol polymer immobilized electrode was developed for the assay of the carbocysteine compound. The electrochemical sensor was made by in situ electropolymerization of eugenol at titanium electrode. Cyclic voltamperometry at prepared electrode permitted to point out a reversible pattern for carbocysteine electrooxidation.

  2. EUGENOL POLYMER MODIFIED TITANIUM ELECTRODE FOR THE ANALYSIS OF CARBOCYSTEINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. EL QOUATLI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A eugenol polymer immobilized electrode was developed for the assay of the carbocysteine compound. The electrochemical sensor was made by in situ electropolymerization of eugenol at titanium electrode. Cyclic voltamperometry at prepared electrode permitted to point out a reversible pattern for carbocysteine electrooxidation.

  3. Drug: D06393 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D06393 Drug Carbocysteine (USAN); Carbocisteine (INN); Mucofan (TN) C5H9NO4S 179.0252 179.1943 D ... assification [BR:br08303] R RESPIRATORY SYSTEM R05 COUGH ... AND COLD PREPARATIONS R05C EXPECTORANTS, EXCL. COM ... BINATIONS WITH COUGH ... SUPPRESSANTS R05CB Mucolytics R05CB03 Carbocistein ...

  4. Development and validation of a stability indicating method for S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and related degradation products in oral syrup formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanigliulo, Ameriga; De Filippis, Piero; Curcuruto, Ornella; Repeto, Paolo; Roveda, Davide; Hartenstein, Matthew; Adams, Erwin; Cabooter, Deirdre

    2015-11-10

    A stability-indicating method for the determination of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine and related degradation impurities in Exputex® 250mg/5mL syrup was developed in anion-exchange liquid chromatography mode. A forced degradation study supported the method development to ensure stability indicating conditions. Aqueous solutions of the active pharmaceutical ingredient and syrup samples at different pH-values were stress-tested in different thermal, light exposure and headspace conditions. One degradation product was detected in thermal stress studies at 60°C and 80°C in the pH range 5.0-7.0 and was identified by mass spectrometry as 5-oxo-thiomorpholine-3-carboxylic acid (lactam of carbocysteine). A second degradation product was only generated in moderately strong oxidizing conditions (0.5% H2O2 aqueous solution) and was identified as S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine-(R/S)-sulphoxide (carbocysteine sulphoxide). The method was developed on a Zorbax SAX column, in isocratic mode. The mobile phase consisted of 200mM phosphate solution at pH 4.0 and acetonitrile (50:50 v/v) and UV detection was performed at a wavelength of 205nm. The method was linear for carbocysteine (R>0.9982) over a concentration range of 2.5-50μg/mL and 0.4-0.6mg/mL. Linearity for the impurities was shown from the LOQ to 50μg/mL. Specificity was verified and accuracy demonstrated for the active ingredient and its degradation products in syrup samples at 3 levels around their respective specification limits. Repeatability, intermediate precision and inter-laboratory reproducibility were assessed on three commercial batches, analyzed in triplicate by two operators at both the transferring and the receiving site and demonstrated a successful method transfer to the manufacturing quality control laboratory. PMID:26159351

  5. Mucoactive therapy in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decramer, M; Janssens, W

    2010-06-01

    It has been shown that mucus hypersecretion is associated with greater susceptibility for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), excess forced expiratory volume in 1 s decline, hospitalisations and excess mortality. The effects of mucoactive drugs on outcomes have been reviewed in several meta-analyses, the largest one including 26 studies. 21 studies were performed in patients with chronic bronchitis and five in patients with COPD. The majority of these trials were performed with N-acetylcysteine (n = 13) and carbocysteine (n = 3). Overall, there was a significant reduction in exacerbations (0.05 per patient per month) and the number of days with disability (0.56 days per patient per month). Mucolytics were well tolerated and the number of adverse events was lower than with placebo (odds ratio 0.78). In the largest and best designed study with N-acetylcysteine in 523 patients with COPD, the reduction in exacerbations was only observed in patients not taking inhaled corticosteroids. In addition, a 374 mL reduction in functional residual capacity was found. A recent large study (n = 709) with high-dose carbocysteine (1,500 mg·day⁻¹) demonstrated a significant effect on exacerbations (25% reduction) and also reported an improvement in health-related quality of life (-4.06 units in St George's Respiratory Questionnaire). It is unclear what the mechanisms underlying these effects may be and which phenotypes benefit from this treatment. On the basis of this evidence mucoactive drugs may deserve consideration in the long-term treatment of COPD. PMID:20956182

  6. Pharmacological and dietary antioxidant therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, S; Hwang, J W; Kirkham, P A; Rahman, I

    2013-01-01

    The progression and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are intimately associated with tobacco smoke/biomass fuel-induced oxidative and aldehyde/carbonyl stress. Alterations in redox signaling proinflammatory kinases and transcription factors, steroid resistance, unfolded protein response, mucus hypersecretion, extracellular matrix remodeling, autophagy/apoptosis, epigenetic changes, cellular senescence/aging, endothelial dysfunction, autoimmunity, and skeletal muscle dysfunction are some of the pathological hallmarks of COPD. In light of the above it would be prudent to target systemic and local oxidative stress with agents that can modulate the antioxidants/ redox system or by boosting the endogenous levels of antioxidants for the treatment and management of COPD. Identification of various antioxidant agents, such as thiol molecules (glutathione and mucolytic drugs, such as N-acetyl-L-cysteine, N-acystelyn, erdosteine, fudosteine, ergothioneine, and carbocysteine lysine salt), dietary natural product-derived polyphenols and other compounds (curcumin, resveratrol, green tea catechins, quercetin sulforaphane, lycopene, acai, alpha-lipoic acid, tocotrienols, and apocynin) have made it possible to modulate various biochemical aspects of COPD. Various researches and clinical trials have revealed that these antioxidants can detoxify free radicals and oxidants, control expression of redox and glutathione biosynthesis genes, chromatin remodeling, and ultimately inflammatory gene expression. In addition, modulation of cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress and related cellular changes have also been reported to be effected by synthetic molecules. This includes specific spin traps like α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone, a catalytic antioxidant (ECSOD mimetic), porphyrins (AEOL 10150 and AEOL 10113), and a superoxide dismutase mimetic M40419, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation blockers/inhibitors, such as edaravone and lazaroids