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Sample records for carbitols

  1. Algunos análisis numéricos sobre la solubilidad de la vainillina en mezclas cosolventes Carbitol® + agua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleming Martínez

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available En esta comunicación se presenta la correlación de algunos valores de solubilidad de vainillina (componente 3 en mezclas 2-(2-etoxietoxietanol (Carbitol®, componente 1 + agua (componente 2 reportados previamente en la literatura a cinco temperaturas desde 298,15 hasta 313,15 K mediante el modelo de Jouyban-Acree combinado con las ecuaciones de van’t Hoff y de Apelblat. En el análisis se obtuvieron modelos de segundo orden respecto a la composición de las mezclas disolventes. Las desviaciones porcentuales promedio fueron cercanas al 6,0%. Por otro lado, mediante las integrales inversas de Kirkwood-Buff se demostró que la vainillina es solvatada preferencialmente por el agua en mezclas ricas en agua (con un valor mínimo de δx1,3 igual a –4,29 x 10–2 obtenido en la mezcla de composición x1 = 0,05 pero preferencialmente solvatada por el cosolvente en mezclas con composiciones 0,12 < x1 < 1,00 (con un valor máximo de δx1,3 igual a 3,61 x 10–2 obtenido en la mezcla de composición x1 = 0,25. Se podría conjeturar que la hidratación hidrofóbica juega un papel relevante en el primer caso, mientras que en el segundo caso, la vainillina estaría actuando como ácido de Lewis frente a las moléculas de Carbitol®.

  2. Fire Fighter Trainer Environmental Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-08

    concentrate (mil. spec. type) - 75 percent water - 14 percent butyl carbitol - 5 percent urea - ɝ percent synthetic detergents - ɝ percent fluoroalkyl...Carbitol 112-34-5 15 Not Established Synthetic Detergents ɝ Not Established Fluoroalkyl Surfactants ɝ Not Established Urea 57-13-6 5 2. PHYSICAL DATA

  3. Electrode and solid electrolyte thin films for secondary lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. H.; Kelder, E. M.; Schoonman, J.

    Electrostatic spray deposition (ESD) was employed to prepare thin layers of Li 1.2Mn 2O 4 (nominal composition) and BPO 4:0.035Li 2O for all-solid-state thin film lithium-ion batteries. The relationships between layer morphologies and deposition conditions such as solvent composition of the precursor solutions and substrate temperature were investigated. It was found that a low substrate temperature and/or high boiling point of the solvent may lead to a relatively dense structure. Reticular porous structures are formed, if films were deposited at 250°C and a mixture of 85 vol.% butyl carbitol and 15 vol.% ethanol was used as the solvent. The Li 1.2Mn 2O 4 layers, formed in the 250-400°C temperature range, were amorphous or micro-crystalline. After annealing beyond 600 °C, they could be crystallized into a spinel-structured material. Glassy BPO 4:0.035Li 2O layers could fill the pores of porous Li 1.2Mn 2O 4 layers to form a dense intermediate electrolyte layer. Thin-film rocking-chair batteries, Li 1.2Mn 2O 4|BPO 4:0.035Li 2O|Li 1.2Mn 2O 4|Al, were prepared and revealed an open-circuit voltage of about 1.2 V after charging.

  4. Formulation and development of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of irbesartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaydeep Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Irbesartan (IRB is an angiotensin II receptor blocker antihypertensive agent. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB. The solubility of IRB in various oils was determined to identify the oil phase of SNEDDS. Various surfactants and co-surfactants were screened for their ability to emulsify the selected oil. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. The optimized SNEDDS formulation contained IRB (75 mg, Cremophor® EL (43.33%, Carbitol® (21.67% and Capryol® 90 (32%. SNEDDS was further evaluated for its percentage transmittance, emulsification time, drug content, phase separation, dilution, droplet size and zeta potential. The optimized formulation of IRB-loaded SNEDDS exhibited complete in vitro drug release in 15 min as compared with the plain drug, which had a limited dissolution rate. It was also compared with the pure drug solution by oral administration in male Wister rats. The in vivo study exhibited a 7.5-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of IRB from SNEDDS compared with the pure drug solution. These results suggest the potential use of SNEDDS to improve dissolution and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB.

  5. Formulation and development of a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system of irbesartan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jaydeep; Patel, Anjali; Raval, Mihir; Sheth, Navin

    2011-01-01

    Irbesartan (IRB) is an angiotensin II receptor blocker antihypertensive agent. The aim of the present investigation was to develop a self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) to enhance the oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB. The solubility of IRB in various oils was determined to identify the oil phase of SNEDDS. Various surfactants and co-surfactants were screened for their ability to emulsify the selected oil. Pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the efficient self-emulsifying region. The optimized SNEDDS formulation contained IRB (75 mg), Cremophor(®) EL (43.33%), Carbitol(®) (21.67%) and Capryol(®) 90 (32%). SNEDDS was further evaluated for its percentage transmittance, emulsification time, drug content, phase separation, dilution, droplet size and zeta potential. The optimized formulation of IRB-loaded SNEDDS exhibited complete in vitro drug release in 15 min as compared with the plain drug, which had a limited dissolution rate. It was also compared with the pure drug solution by oral administration in male Wister rats. The in vivo study exhibited a 7.5-fold increase in the oral bioavailability of IRB from SNEDDS compared with the pure drug solution. These results suggest the potential use of SNEDDS to improve dissolution and oral bioavailability of poorly water-soluble IRB.

  6. RF plasma based selective modification of hydrophilic regions on super hydrophobic surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaehyun; Hwang, Sangyeon; Cho, Dae-Hyun; Hong, Jungwoo; Shin, Jennifer H.; Byun, Doyoung

    2017-02-01

    Selective modification and regional alterations of the surface property have gained a great deal of attention to many engineers. In this paper, we present a simple, a cost-effective, and amendable reforming method for disparate patterns of hydrophilic regions on super-hydrophobic surfaces. Uniform super-hydrophobic layer (Contact angle; CA > 150°, root mean square (RMS) roughness ∼0.28 nm) can be formed using the atmospheric radio frequency (RF) plasma on top of the selective hydrophilic (CA ∼ 70°, RMS roughness ∼0.34 nm) patterns imprinted by electrohydrodynamic (EHD) jet printing technology with polar alcohols (butyl carbitol or ethanol). The wettability of the modified surface was investigated qualitatively utilizing scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and wavelength scanning interferometer (WSI). Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis showed that the alcohol addiction reaction changed the types of radicals on the super-hydrophobic surface. The wettability was found to depend sensitively on chemical radicals on the surface, not on surface morphology (particle size and surface roughness). Furthermore, three different kinds of representative hydrophilic samples (polystyrene nano-particle aqueous solution, Salmonella bacteria medium, and poly(3,4-ethylenediocythiophene) ink) were tested for uniform deposition onto the desired hydrophilic regions. This simple strategy would have broad applications in various research fields that require selective deposition of target materials.

  7. Development and characterization of cinnamon leaf oil nanocream for topical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N A Zainol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamon leaf oil contains a high percentage of eugenol and has antimicrobial, antioxidant and antiinflammatory properties. However, the undiluted oil can cause irritation to the skin. Therefore, the aims of this study were to develop and evaluate cinnamon leaf oil nanocream using palm oil. Nanocream base was prepared using different ratios of oil, surfactants and water. The surfactant used were mixture of Tween 80:Carbitol or Tween 80:Span 65 at different hydrophile-lipophile balance values. The pseudoternary phase diagrams were constructed to identify the nanocream base areas and the results showed that the nanocream bases using Span 65 as co-surfactant produced bigger cream area. Fifteen formulations using mixtures of Tween 80:Span 65 were further evaluated for accelerated stability test, droplet size, zeta potential, rheological properties and apparent viscosity. The nanocream base which had an average droplet size of 219 nm and had plastic flow with thixotropic behavior was selected for incorporation of 2% cinnamon leaf oil. The nanocream containing cinnamon leaf oil had the average size of 286 nm and good rheological characteristics. Thein vitro release study demonstrated that eugenol as the main constituent of cinnamon leaf oil was released for about 81% in 10 h. The short-term stability study conducted for 6 months showed that the cinnamon leaf oil nanocream was stable at a temperature of 25° and thus, cinnamon leaf oil nanocream is a promising natural based preparation to be used for topical application.

  8. Tools for Early Prediction of Drug Loading in Lipid-Based Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Identification of the usefulness of lipid-based formulations (LBFs) for delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs is at date mainly experimentally based. In this work we used a diverse drug data set, and more than 2,000 solubility measurements to develop experimental and computational tools to predict the loading capacity of LBFs. Computational models were developed to enable in silico prediction of solubility, and hence drug loading capacity, in the LBFs. Drug solubility in mixed mono-, di-, triglycerides (Maisine 35-1 and Capmul MCM EP) correlated (R2 0.89) as well as the drug solubility in Carbitol and other ethoxylated excipients (PEG400, R2 0.85; Polysorbate 80, R2 0.90; Cremophor EL, R2 0.93). A melting point below 150 °C was observed to result in a reasonable solubility in the glycerides. The loading capacity in LBFs was accurately calculated from solubility data in single excipients (R2 0.91). In silico models, without the demand of experimentally determined solubility, also gave good predictions of the loading capacity in these complex formulations (R2 0.79). The framework established here gives a better understanding of drug solubility in single excipients and of LBF loading capacity. The large data set studied revealed that experimental screening efforts can be rationalized by solubility measurements in key excipients or from solid state information. For the first time it was shown that loading capacity in complex formulations can be accurately predicted using molecular information extracted from calculated descriptors and thermal properties of the crystalline drug. PMID:26568134