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Sample records for carbides fazovye prevrashzheniya

  1. Silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-bonded silicon carbide body produced by siliconising a preformed mixture of particles (shaped by means other than slip-casting) of carbon and silicon carbide in the beta form has a mean grain size in the range of 0.1 to 5 microns. Such a body may be produced using silicon carbide particles having a mean surface area in the range 0.5 to 20 square metres per gram. The silicon carbide particles may be produced by heating a mixture of silica and silicon to generate silicon monoxide vapour and passing the vapour through a bed of particulate carbon. (author)

  2. Zirconium carbide recrystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanin, A.G.; Erin, O.N.; Sul' Yanov, S.N.; Turchin, V.N.

    1986-02-01

    This paper studies the primary recrystallization process of the sintered polycrystalline zirconium carbide with a composition of ZrC /SUB 0.98/ . The properties of zirconium carbide samples deformed under compression are presented; the selected degree of deformation ensures a lower scatter of grain sizes at relative error of +/- 5% in the final deformation measurement. The established mechanisms of structural changes in zirconium carbide during plastic deformation and subsequent high temperature treatment indicate the possibility of using thermomechanical methods for the direct control of the structure of these mechanical methods for the direct control of the structure of these and obviously othe group IV and V carbides obtained by powder metallurgical methods.

  3. Silicon carbide thyristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  4. Recrystallization of zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature and deformation rate are studied for their effect on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline sintered zirconium carbide. A decrease of the deformation rate from 10-2 to 5x10-4 s-1 and an increase of the deformation temperature from 0.5 Tsub(melt.) to 0.65 Tsub(melt.) are shown to activate a formation of integranular cavities and to decrease a degree of the structure distortion due to the diminishing intragranular deformation. Kinetics of the initial recrystallization in zirconium carbide is studied after plastic deformation and subsequent high-temperature annealing beginning from 0.72 Tsub(melt.)

  5. Hafnium carbide cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Dong-Ik, Ch.; Eun-Pyo, K.

    Praha: Czechoslovak association for crystal growth, 2008 - (Nitsch, K.; Rodová, M.), s. 8-9 ISBN 978-80-254-0864-3. [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education/18th./. Hnanice (CZ), 02.09.2008-05.09.2008] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Hafnium carbide * tungsten * cermets * plasma spraying * hot pressing, Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  6. Vliyanie razmernykh effektov na fazovye perekhody v sistemakh s nanoobjektami

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Levdansky, V.V.; Smolík, Jiří; Ždímal, Vladimír; Moravec, Pavel

    Minsk: Institut teplo- i massoobmena A.V.Lykova NAN Belarusi, 2012, s. 637-638. ISBN 978-985-6456-82-7. [Minskii mezhunarodnyi forum po teplo- i massoobmenu /14./. Minsk (BY), 10.09.2012-13.09.2012] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1633; GA AV ČR IAA200760905 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : nanoobjects * evaporation * liquid droplet-catalyst Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics

  7. Sintered silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sintered silicon carbide body having a predominantly equiaxed microstructure consists of 91 to 99.85% by weight of silicon carbide at least 95% of which is the alpha phase, up to 5.0% by weight carbonized organic material, 0.15 to 3.0% of boron, and up to 1.0% by weight additional carbon. A mixture of 91 to 99.85 parts by weight silicon carbide having a surface area of 1 to 100 m2/g, 0.67 to 20 parts of a carbonizable organic binder with a carbon content of at least 33% by weight, 0.15 to 5 parts of a boron source containing 0.15 to 3.0 parts by weight boron and up to 15 parts by weight of a temporary binder is mixed with a solvent, the mixture is then dried, shaped to give a body with a density of at least 1.60 g/cc and fired at 1900 to 22500C to obtain an equiaxed microstructure. (author)

  8. Process for microwave sintering boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of microwave sintering boron carbide comprises leaching boron carbide powder with an aqueous solution of nitric acid to form a leached boron carbide powder. The leached boron carbide powder is coated with a glassy carbon precursor to form a coated boron carbide powder. The coated boron carbide powder is consolidated in an enclosure of boron nitride particles coated with a layer of glassy carbon within a container for microwave heating to form an enclosed coated boron carbide powder. The enclosed coated boron carbide powder is sintered within the container for microwave heating with microwave energy

  9. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  10. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  11. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  12. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties. PMID:19687534

  13. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could be...... delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  14. Sliding wear of cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemented carbides are known to be very hard and wear resistant and are therefor often used in applications involving surface damage and wear. The wear rate of cemented carbides is often measured in abrasion. In such tests it has been shown that the wear rate is inversely dependent on the material hardness. The sliding wear is even more of a surface phenomenon than a abrasion, making it difficult to predict friction and wear from bulk properties. This paper concentrates on the sliding wear of cemented carbides and elucidates some wear mechanisms. It is especially shown that a fragmenting wear mechanism of WC is very important for the description of wear of cemented carbides. (author)

  15. Wettability of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wettability of boron carbide has been examined by means of the sessile drop method, using the following candidate alloys: (96wt%AG-4wt%Ti), (Ag-26.5wt%Cu-3wt%Ti), (Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti), Sn(99.95wt%) and Al(99.99wt%). The results show that B4C is completely wetted by the Ag-based alloys. Sn-10wt%Ag-4wt%Ti alloy and pure Al partly wet the B4C surface, while pure Sn does not wet B4C at all. For all the alloys used, except pure Sn, a reaction layer was observed at the interface between the ceramic part and the metal drop. Although the spreading kinetics of the Al-drop was much slower compared with the Ti-containing alloys, the reaction rate was considerably higher in the former case. This suggests that aluminium is an attractive candidate material for brazing of B4C. Formation of the low melting B2O3 at the B4C surface may cause oxidation of the filler metal during joining, which, in turn, leads to a low bond strength

  16. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation

  17. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, M., E-mail: Marialuisa.Gentile@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Abram, T. [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd{sub 3}Si and SiO{sub 2} phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd{sub 2}Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO{sub 2} phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiC{sub x}O{sub y} phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  18. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  19. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  20. The ternary iron aluminum carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Carbides present in ternary Fe-Al-C were investigated. → Presence of carbides Fe3C, M23C6, and/or κ-Fe3AlC depends on the Al and C concentration. → The existence of M23C6 ternary carbide in the Fe-Al-C system is recognized for first time. → Solubility of Al in M23C6 is low and negligible in the cementite. - Abstract: Carbides present in ternary Fe-Al-C were investigated by the combined utilization of an X-ray diffractometer and a scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer. The alloys were prepared by arc melting and the microstructure was homogenised by a solution annealing treatment in the temperature range 950-1050 deg. C for 15 min. The diffraction patterns of resulting materials were analysed using a multiphase Rietveld refinement. The steel is composed of a ferritic matrix with carbides Fe3C, M23C6, and/or κ-Fe3AlC depending on the Al and C concentration. It is the first time that the existence of M23C6 ternary carbide in the Fe-Al-C system is recognized. Microprobe analyses performed revealed that the solubility of Al in M23C6 is low, with an Fe/Al ratio (in at.%) higher than 15. On the other hand, the amount of Al in the cementite is negligible and hence its lattice parameters do not depend on the Al concentration of the alloy.

  1. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  2. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu;

    Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting and...

  3. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    M. Gentile, P. Xiao, T. Abram

    2015-01-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide...

  4. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  5. Ultrasonic characterization of microwave joined silicon carbide/silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High frequency (50--150 MHz), ultrasonic immersion testing has been used to characterize the surface and interfacial joint conditions of microwave bonded, monolithic silicon carbide (SiC) materials. The high resolution ultrasonic C-scan images point to damage accumulation after thermal cycling. Image processing was used to study the effects of the thermal cycling on waveform shape, amplitude and distribution. Such information is useful for concurrently engineering material fabrication processes and suitable nondestructive test procedures

  6. Preparation and application of cellular and nanoporous carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Lars; Hoffmann, Claudia; Oschatz, Martin; Mammitzsch, Lars; Petasch, Uwe; Herrmann, Mathias; Kaskel, Stefan

    2012-08-01

    A tutorial review on cellular as well as nanoporous carbides covering their structure, synthesis and potential applications. Especially new carbide materials with a hierarchical pore structure are in focus. As a central theme silicon carbide based materials are picked out, but also titanium, tungsten and boron carbides, as well as carbide-derived carbons, are part of this review. PMID:22344324

  7. Laser micromachining of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciti, D.; Bellosi, A. [CNR-IRTEC, Faenza (Italy). Research Inst. for Ceramics Technology

    2002-07-01

    Two different laser processing procedures on silicon carbide are studied: i) surface treatment through a pulsed KrF excimer laser, with the aim of evaluating the surface microstructure modifications and variation the surface roughness in function of the processing parameters. In all the cases, the presence of a thin scale due to melting and solidification, crack formation and surface pores closure were observed. ii) A pulsed CO{sub 2} laser was used to form a micro-holes texture on the surface of silicon carbide. Holes dimensions in the range 80-100 {mu}m were obtained using a laser power of 0.5 kW and pulse duration of 1 ms. The possibility of producing a regular array of microholes was demonstrated. (orig.)

  8. Thermally Sprayed Silicon Carbide Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Mubarok, Fahmi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal spraying of silicon carbide (SiC) material is a challenging task since SiC tends to decompose during elevated temperature atmospheric spraying process. The addition of metal or ceramic binders as a matrix phase is necessary to facilitate the bonding of SiC particles, allowing SiC coatings to be deposited. In the conventional procedure, the matrix phase is added through mechanical mixing or mechanical alloying of the powder constituents, making it difficult to achieve homogeneous distr...

  9. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  10. Sintering behavior of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressureless sintering behavior of boron carbide (B4C) in argon was studied, with change in time and temperature, using carbon as sintering aid. Carbon was added via fenolic resin, acting also as a binder. After isostatic pressing the specimens were sintered in a graphite furnace at 19600C/1h, 21600C/15 minutes and 1h and 22000C/1h. The achieved density was 97% of the theoretical. Some mechanical properties and microstructural aspects have been evaluated. (author)

  11. Microwave sintering of boron carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is an important ceramic material because of its high hardness and low specific gravity. it is used for applications involving impact and wear resistance. The disadvantages of boron carbide materials are difficulty in fabrication and sensitivity to brittle fracture. These problems are significantly reduced by production of cermets based on boron carbide and aluminum or aluminum alloys. Microwave heating of boron carbide materials results in ultrarapid heating and high temperatures. Therefore, a finer microstructure is obtained. The objective of this work was to define a technology that would allow the manufacture of boron carbide ceramics having mechanical properties similar to those exhibited by hot-pressed specimens. microwave heating would be used for the densification step. Mixtures of boron carbide and aluminum were considered for this research because aluminum simultaneously acts as a sintering aid and introduces phases that contribute to toughness enhancement

  12. Method to manufacture tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patent deals with an improved method of manufacturing tungsten carbide. An oxide is preferably used as initial product whose particle size and effective surface approximately corresponds to that of the endproduct. The known methods for preparing the oxide are briefly given. Carbon monoxide is passed over the thus obtained oxide particles whereby the reaction mixture is heated to a temperature at which tungsten oxide and carbon monoxide react and tungsten carbide is formed, however, below that temperature at which the tungsten-containing materials are caked or sintered together. According to the method the reaction temperature is about below 9000C. The tungsten carbide produced has a particle size of under approximately 100 A and an active surface of about 20 m2/g. It has sofar not been possible with the usual methods to obtain such finely divided material with such a large surface. These particles may be converted back to the oxide by heating in air at low temperature without changing particle size and effective surface. One thus obtains a tungsten oxide with smaller particle size and larger effective surface than the initial product. (IHOE)

  13. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution. PMID:22945740

  14. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    OpenAIRE

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu; Liu, Xinyu; Løvvik, Ole Martin; Ou, Haiyan; Wellmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting and solar cells, and further pursue concepts in materials for thermoelectrics, biofuel cells and supercapacitor research proposals. In fact, there are a number of energy applications which can be based on...

  15. Crystallization of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a crystallization process of nodular cast iron with carbides having a different chemical composition have been presented. It have been found, that an increase of molybdenum above 0,30% causes the ledeburutic carbides crystallization after (γ+ graphite eutectic phase crystallization. When Mo content is lower, these carbides crystallize as a pre-eutectic phase. In this article causes of this effect have been given.

  16. Boron carbide nanolumps on carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, J. Y.; Li, W. Z.; Wen, J. G.; Ren, Z. F.

    2002-01-01

    Boron carbide nanolumps are formed on the surface of multiwall carbon nanotubes by a solid-state reaction between boron and carbon nanotubes. The reaction is localized so that the integrity of the structure of carbon nanotubes is maintained. Inner layers of multiwall carbon nanotubes are also bonded to boron carbide nanolumps. These multiwall carbon nanotubes with boron carbide nanolumps are expected to be the ideal reinforcing fillers for high-performance composites because of the favorable morphology.

  17. Shock-wave strength properties of boron carbide and silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved velocity interferometry measurements have been made on boron carbide and silicon carbide ceramics to assess dynamic equation-of-state and strength properties of these materials. Hugoniot precursor characteristics, and post-yield shock and release wave properties, indicated markedly different dynamic strength and flow behavior for the two carbides. (orig.)

  18. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  19. Polytype distribution in circumstellar silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, T L; Bernatowicz, T J; Lewis, R S; Messenger, S; Stadermann, F J; Amari, S

    2002-06-01

    The inferred crystallographic class of circumstellar silicon carbide based on astronomical infrared spectra is controversial. We have directly determined the polytype distribution of circumstellar SiC from transmission electron microscopy of presolar silicon carbide from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. Only two polytypes (of a possible several hundred) were observed: cubic 3C and hexagonal 2H silicon carbide and their intergrowths. We conclude that this structural simplicity is a direct consequence of the low pressures in circumstellar outflows and the corresponding low silicon carbide condensation temperatures. PMID:12052956

  20. Dispersion of boron carbide in a tungsten carbide/cobalt matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particles of boron carbide (105-125 microns) were coated with a layer (10-12 microns) of titanium carbide in a fluidized bed. These coated particles have been successfully incorporated in a tungsten carbide--cobalt matrix by hot pressing at 1 tonf/in2, (15.44 MN/m2) at 13500C. Attempts to produce a similar material by a cold pressing and sintering technique were unsuccessful because of penetration of the titanium carbide layer by liquid cobalt. Hot-pressed material containing boron carbide had a static strength in bend of approximately 175,000 lbf/in2, (1206MN/m2) which compares favorably with the strength of conventionally produced tungsten carbide/cobalt. The impact strength of the material containing boron carbide was however considerably lower than tungsten carbide/cobalt. In rock drilling tests on Darley Dale sandstone at low speeds and low loads, the material containing boron carbide drilled almost ten times as far without seizure as tungsten carbide/cobalt. In higher speed and higher load rotary drilling tests conducted by the National Coal Board, the material containing boron carbide chipped badly compared with normal NCB hardgrade material

  1. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  2. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first exam...

  3. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, Bulent; Beril Tugrul, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide-silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites.

  4. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  5. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  6. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 oC. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  7. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping. PMID:25427850

  8. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron (10B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of 10B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron

  9. Ni doping of semiconducting boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide band gap, temperature stability, high resistivity, and robustness of semiconducting boron carbide make it an attractive material for device applications. Undoped boron carbide is p type; Ni acts as a n-type dopant. Here we present the results of controlled doping of boron carbide with Ni on thin film samples grown using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The change in the dopant concentration within the thin film as a function of the dopant flow rate in the precursor gas mixture was confirmed by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements; with increasing dopant concentration, current-voltage (I-V) curves clearly establish the trend from p-type to n-type boron carbide.

  10. High temperature thermoelectric properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbides are refractory solids with potential for application as very high temperature p-type thermoelectrics in power conversion applications. The thermoelectric properties of boron carbides are unconventional. In particular, the electrical conductivity is consistent with the thermally activated hopping of a high density (∼1021/cm3) of bipolarons; the Seebeck coefficient is anomalously large and increases with increasing temperature; and the thermal conductivity is surprisingly low. In this paper, these unusual properties and their relationship to the unusual structure and bonding present in boron carbides are reviewed. Finally, the potential for utilization of boron carbides at very high temperatures (up to 2200 degrees C) and for preparing n-type materials is discussed

  11. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J. E.; Bhakhri, V.; Hao, R.; Prior, T. J.; Scheler, T.; Gregoryanz, E.; Chhowalla, M.; Giulani, F.

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  12. Modelling Precipitation of Carbides in Martensitic Steels

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Shingo

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to model carbide precipitation in steels of a quaternary system which includes two substitutional elements. The work focuses on secondary hardening steels which are used for high-strength components, where hydrogen embrittlement is one of the major factors responsible for failure. It is believed that carbide particles can act as hydrogen trapping sites, thus reducing the risk of embrittlement. The thesis begins with a review of the physical metallurgy of secondary...

  13. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nb1-xTaxC Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; Tc correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Growth Simulation of Spheroidized Carbide in the Carbide-Dispersed Carburizing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kouji; Ikehata, Hideaki; Nakanishi, Koukichi; Nishikawa, Tomoaki

    2008-06-01

    A simulation method that combines one-dimensional (1-D) diffusion models has been proposed for predicting the behaviors of carbide particles dispersed in the carburizing layer of high-carbon chromium steels. The first simulation was set for the heating stage prior to carburizing, using a microscopic model of a spherical carbide and surrounding austenite matrix. This revealed the undissolved status of the carbide even at carburizing temperatures, which was stored as the starting condition of the second simulation. Separately, in a planar model, the macroscopic carbon diffusion during the isothermal carburizing stage was calculated, and time functions of carbon activity were evaluated at the depth of interest. The change in activities was assumed to represent the boundary conditions of the local carbide/austenite region, and thus input to the restored spherical model to do the second simulation of carburizing stage. The simulation method linking these double-scale diffusion calculations has first been implemented using the DICTRA package, and applied to the carbide in multicomponent model steels. The carbide radius as well as volume fraction were successfully predicted for all stages in the carbide-dispersed carburizing (CDC) process. However, minor corrections were necessary because of the decrease in the number density of carbide particles and the discontinuity in carbon activity caused by the use of two different models.

  15. Plasma spraying of zirconium carbide – hafnium carbide – tungsten cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-64. ISSN 1335-8987 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * cermet coatings * microhardness * zirconium carbide * hafnium carbide * tungsten * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  16. Plasma Spraying of Zirconium Carbide – Hafnium Carbide – Tungsten Cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    Vol. 3. Reutte: PlanseeGroup, 2009, s. 1-3. (GT49). ISBN N. [Plansee Seminar on High Performance PM Materials /17th./. Reutte (AT), 25.05.2009-29.05.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Hafnium carbide * zirconium carbide * tungsten cermets * plasma spraying * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  17. Compatibility studies of irradiated carbide fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the free energies of formation of mixed (U, Pu) monocarbide and sesquicarbide, the phases present in as-manufactured carbide fuel, are plotted on an Ellingham type diagram along with the free energies of formation of the carbides of the three main constituent elements of austenitic stainless steel, that is nickel, iron and chromium, it can readily be seen that chromium forms the most stable carbide. Mixed (U,Pu) carbides, therefore, are thermodynamically unstable in contact with stainless steel. In consequence, when mixed (U,Pu) carbides are heated in contact with stainless steel, carbon transfer from the fuel to the clad should occur at a rate dependent upon the kinetics of the actual mechanism of carbon transfer. The rate of carbon transfer increases in the presence of a medium such as a sodium bond, which can act as a transfer agent. In this instance the wetting of the steel surface provides a greater area of contact compared to the condition prevailing in the absence of such a bond and may explain the effectiveness of the transfer agent. The mixed (U,Pu) carbide as currently manufactured is less pure, is less well characterised and much less stable than oxide fuel. It is possible, therefore, to control stoichiometry only within broad limits and the method of manufacture, by carbon reduction of oxide, leaves an appreciable amount of residual oxygen in the lattice or as discrete particles of oxide. During fuel preparation, localised reaction between oxide (or oxygen) and carbide may lead to the appearance of free (U,Pu) metal which could in a fuel pin react with the clad. It has further been postulated that similar reactions occur in mixed (U, Pu) carbide pins of high centre temperature in the reactor and that although the free (U,Pu) metal so formed is mainly concentrated at the 1200 deg. C fuel isotherm, some of the free metal together with the carbon monoxide produced in the reaction migrates to the clad surface and reacts. The occurrence of these two

  18. Influence of Rare Earth on Carbide in Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan-Bin; REN Deng-Yi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of rare earths (RE) on carbides in high carbon steel weld metal was studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). It is found that rare earth markedly affects the quantity, morphology and distribution of carbides. The precipitating mechanism of carbides was proposed in which rare earth compounds with high surface energy serve as the nucleation sites for carbides in superheated liquid metal and the induced carbides are precipitated extensively and distributed evenly. The preferential precipitation of carbides decreases the carbon content in matrix, which is transformed into low carbon lath martensite after welds are chilled to room temperature.

  19. Joining of boron carbide using nickel interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbide ceramics such as boron carbide due to their unique properties such as low density, high refractoriness, and high strength to weight ratio have many applications in different industries. This study focuses on direct bonding of boron carbide for high temperature applications using nickel interlayer. The process variables such as bonding time, temperature, and pressure have been investigated. The microstructure of the joint area was studied using electron scanning microscope technique. At all the bonding temperatures ranging from 1150 to 1300degC a reaction layer formed across the ceramic/metal interface. The thickness of the reaction layer increased by increasing temperature. The strength of the bonded samples was measured using shear testing method. The highest strength value obtained was about 100 MPa and belonged to the samples bonded at 1250 for 75 min bonding time. The strength of the joints decreased by increasing the bonding temperature above 1250degC. The results of this study showed that direct bonding technique along with nickel interlayer can be successfully utilized for bonding boron carbide ceramic to itself. This method may be used for bonding boron carbide to metals as well.

  20. Wear and wear transition in silicon carbide ceramics during sliding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wear and wear transition in silicon carbide ceramics during sliding have been investigated. Three different microstructures, i.e., solid-state-sintered silicon carbide, liquid-phase-sintered silicon carbide, and a liquid-phase-sintered SiC-TiB2 composite, were produced by hot pressing. Wear data and examinations of worn surfaces showed that the wear behavior of these silicon carbide ceramics was significantly different. In the solid-state-sintered silicon carbide, the wear occurred by a grooving process. In the liquid-phase-sintered silicon carbide and composite, on the other hand, an abrupt transition in the wear mechanism from an initial grooving process to a grain pullout process occurred during the test. The transition occurred significantly earlier in the composite than in the carbide. The different wear behavior in these silicon carbide ceramics is discussed in relation to the grain or interphase boundary strength

  1. Method of fabricating porous silicon carbide (SiC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  2. Boron carbide whisker and platelet reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide whisker and platelet-reinforced alumina and boron-carbide-whisker-reinforced silicon carbide composites were prepared by hot-pressing. The mechanical properties of hot-pressed boron carbide platelet and whisker-reinforced composites are better than the inherent ceramic matrix. A maximum fracture toughness, K(lc), of 9.5 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide whisker composites, 8.6 MPa sq rt m is achieved for alumina/boron carbide platelet composites, and 3.8 MPa sq rt m is achieved for silicon carbide/boron carbide whisker composites. The fracture toughness is dependent on the volume fraction of the platelets and whiskers. 12 refs

  3. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  4. The diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide using refractory metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joining is an enabling technology for the application of structural ceramics at high temperatures. Metal foil diffusion bonding is a simple process for joining silicon carbide or boron carbide by solid-state, diffusive conversion of the metal foil into carbide and silicide compounds that produce bonding. Metal diffusion bonding trials were performed using thin foils (5 microm to 100 microm) of refractory metals (niobium, titanium, tungsten, and molybdenum) with plates of silicon carbide (both α-SiC and β-SiC) or boron carbide that were lapped flat prior to bonding. The influence of bonding temperature, bonding pressure, and foil thickness on bond quality was determined from metallographic inspection of the bonds. The microstructure and phases in the joint region of the diffusion bonds were evaluated using SEM, microprobe, and AES analysis. The use of molybdenum foil appeared to result in the highest quality bond of the metal foils evaluated for the diffusion bonding of silicon carbide and boron carbide. Bonding pressure appeared to have little influence on bond quality. The use of a thinner metal foil improved the bond quality. The microstructure of the bond region produced with either the α-SiC and β-SiC polytypes were similar

  5. CALPHAD study of cubic carbide systems with Cr

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhangting

    2015-01-01

    Cubic carbides (titanium, tantalum, niobium, and zirconium carbides) can constitute a significant proportion of so-called cubic and cermet grades, where it is added to substitute a portion of tungsten carbide. It is thus critical to understand and be able to thermodynamically model the cubic carbide systems. In order to do this, the thermodynamic descriptions of lower order systems, such as the Ti-Cr-C system, need to be well studied. To approach this goal, an extensive literature survey of t...

  6. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  7. Anomalous electronic transport in boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, D.; Samara, G. A.; Wood, C.

    The boron carbides are composed of icosahedral units, B12 and B11C1, linked together by strong intericosahedral bonds. With such distributions of icosahedral and intericosahedral compositions, boron carbides, B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/, are single phase over 0.1 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 0.2. The electronic transport properties of the boron carbides were examined within this single-phase region. Results are inconsistent with conventional analyses of both itinerant and hopping transport. Most striking are Seebeck coefficients which are both large and rapidly increasing functions of temperature despite thermally activated dc conductivities. These results manifest the hopping of small bipolaronic holes between carbon-containing icosahedral that are inequivalent in energy and electron-lattice coupling strength. Under hydrostatic pressures up to approx. 25 kbar, the dc conductivities increase with pressure. This anomalous behavior for hopping conduction reflects the distinctive structure and bonding of these materials.

  8. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  9. Tool steel for cold worck niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tool steel was designed so as to have a microstructure with the matrix similar a cold work tool steel of D series, containing a dispersion of Niobium carbides, with no intention of putting Niobium in solution on the matrix. The alloy was cast, forged and heat treated. The alloy was easily forged; the primary carbide morfology, after forging, was faceted, tending to equiaxed. The hardness obtained was equivalent to the maximum hardness of a D-3 sttel when quenched from any temperature between 9500C, and 12000, showing a very small sensitivy to the quenching temperature. (Author)

  10. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  11. Sintering of boron carbide (B4C)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) is used as a control element in different types of reactors due to the high fast and thermal neutron absorption cross-section of B-10. Requirements of the Advanced Reactor Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center triggered the study of the possibilities of fabricating B4C pellets by cold-pressing and sintering. The results of essays of sinterability of two different commercial boron carbide powders, sintered at temperatures between 1200 and 2200 deg C, are given. Characterizations of the samples were made to determine the evolution of density, porosity, microstructure and boron content as a function of sintering temperature. (Author)

  12. Thermal conductivity behavior of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Zoltan, A.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1983-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbides is necessary to evaluate its potential for high temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. The thermal diffusivity of hot pressed boron carbide B/sub 1-x/C/sub x/ samples as a function of composition, temperature and temperature cycling was measured. These data in concert with density and specific heat data yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results in terms of a structural model to explain the electrical transport data and novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are discussed.

  13. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallance, Simon R. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Round, David M. [School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Cussen, Edmund J. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kingman, Sam [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H. [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-26

    Nb{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}C Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; T{sub c} correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  14. Synthesis and properties of low-carbon boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the production of boron carbides of low carbon content (3 and CCl4 at 1273-1673 K in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that phase separation had occurred, and tetragonal boron carbide was formed along with β-boron or α-boron carbide under carbon-depleted gas-phase conditions. At temperatures greater than 1390 degrees C, graphite substrates served as a carbon source, affecting the phases present. A microstructure typical of CVD-produced α-boron carbide was observed. Plan view TEM of tetragonal boron carbide revealed a blocklike structure

  15. Boron carbide-based ceramics via polymer route synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a ceramic material with excellent high temperature physical properties. As compared to conventional techniques, the preparation of boron carbide from polymeric precursors is attractive as this technique offers a number of unique advantages. In this paper, the screening of polymeric precursors to boron carbide will be discussed. Two promising boron carbide, carborane containing polymeric precursors have resulted in 60-70 wt.% ceramic yields. The chemistry of polymer synthesis and the transformations from the polymer to amorphous and crystalline boron carbide were investigated with infrared spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and x-ray diffraction

  16. Determination of carbon and sulphur in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is used in control rods of nuclear power reactors. The chemical specification for carbon in boron carbide ranges between 15 - 24 wt.% depending upon the grade of boron carbide. Hence carbon in boron carbide is to be determined accurately to find out the stoichiometry. Sulphur, which is present in trace quantities, is also to be determined to find out the purity of boron carbide. Carbon is determined by combustion followed by (i) thermal conductivity detection and (ii) infrared detection. Sulphur is determined by (i) combustion followed by infrared detection and (ii) vacuum combustion extraction - quadrupole mass spectrometry. The results are compared. (author)

  17. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of fr

  18. Composites of titanium carbide with scandium matrix

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Pala, Zdeněk; Vilémová, Monika; Kubatík, Tomáš František; Mušálek, Radek; Nevrlá, Barbara; Mastný, L.

    Ostrava: Tanger Ltd, 2014, s. 1181-1186. ISBN 978-80-87294-54-3. [METAL 2014,International Conference on Metallurgy and Materials/23./. Brno (CZ), 21.05.2014-23.05.2014] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : hard compounds * titanium carbide * scandium oxycarbide * spark plasma sintering Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry www.metal.2014.com

  19. Evidence of hydrogen embrittlement of tungsten carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, G C

    1978-02-01

    Tungsten carbide vessels containing materials at high temperature and high pressure are used in many laboratories. We note that any oils at medium to high temperature which can break down and liberate hydrogen cause rapid failure of the pressure vessel, whereas perfluorated kerosenes used as lubricants inside a pressure vessel give sharply increased life of the vessel. PMID:18699072

  20. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  1. Direct plasmadynamic synthesis of ultradisperse silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Nikitin, D. S.; Pak, A. Ya.; Rakhmatullin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultradisperse cubic silicon carbide (β-SiC) has been obtained by direct plasmadynamic synthesis in pulsed supersonic carbon-silicon plasma jet incident on a copper obstacle in argon atmosphere. The powdered product has a high content of β-SiC in the form of single crystals with average size of about 100 nm and nearly perfect crystallographic habit.

  2. Boron carbide morphology changing under purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullin, I. A.; Sivkov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Boron carbide synthesized by using coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with graphite electrodes was purified by two different ways. XRD-investigations showed content changing and respectively powder purification. Moreover TEM-investigations demonstrated morphology changing of product under purification that was discussed in the work.

  3. Boron carbide synthesis at plasma spray process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.

    Bari : Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, 2003 - (d'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.; Fracassi, F.; Palumbo, F.). s. 631 [International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry/16th./. 22.06.2003-27.06.2003, Taormina] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide , plasma spray process Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  4. Boron Carbides As Thermo-electric Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles

    1988-01-01

    Report reviews recent theoretical and experimental research on thermoelectric materials. Recent work with narrow-band semiconductors demonstrated possibility of relatively high thermoelectric energy-conversion efficiencies in materials withstanding high temperatures needed to attain such efficiencies. Among promising semiconductors are boron-rich borides, especially boron carbides.

  5. Low temperature CVD deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coating of graphite on silicon carbide from the gaseous phase in a hot-well, open flow reactor at 1150degC is described. This study constitutes the first part of an investigation of the process for the coating of nuclear fuel by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

  6. The manufacturing method of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new method for manufacturing of boron carbide as powder with controlled purity and surface development has been described. The suspension of boric acid aqueous solution and carbon black in alcohol has been homogenized mechanically. Water and alcohol are then evaporated during mixing. After drying homogenous mixture is heated in temperature range of 1270-1870 C during one hour

  7. Growth and structure of carbide nanorods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research on the growth and structure of carbide nanorods is reviewed. Carbide nanorods have been prepared by reacting carbon nanotubes with volatile transition metal and main group oxides and halides. Using this approach it has been possible to obtain solid carbide nanorods of TiC, SiC, NbC, Fe3C, and BCx having diameters between 2 and 30 nm and lengths up to 20 microm. Structural studies of single crystal TiC nanorods obtained through reactions of TiO with carbon nanotubes show that the nanorods grow along both [110] and [111] directions, and that the rods can exhibit either smooth or saw-tooth morphologies. Crystalline SiC nanorods have been produced from reactions of carbon nanotubes with SiO and Si-iodine reactants. The preferred growth direction of these nanorods is [111], although at low reaction temperatures rods with [100] growth axes are also observed. The growth mechanisms leading to these novel nanomaterials have also been addressed. Temperature dependent growth studies of TiC nanorods produced using a Ti-iodine reactant have provided definitive proof for a template or topotactic growth mechanism, and furthermore, have yielded new TiC nanotube materials. Investigations of the growth of SiC nanorods show that in some cases a catalytic mechanism may also be operable. Future research directions and applications of these new carbide nanorod materials are discussed

  8. Micromachining of Silicon Carbide using femtosecond lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farsari, M [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, PO Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Filippidis, G [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, PO Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Zoppel, S [Vienna University of Technology, Photonics Institute, Gusshausstr. 27-29/387, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Reider, G A [Vienna University of Technology, Photonics Institute, Gusshausstr. 27-29/387, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Fotakis, C [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology - Hellas, PO Box 1527, 71110 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2007-04-15

    We have demonstrated micromachining of bulk 3C silicon carbide (3C- SiC) wafers by employing 1028nm wavelength femtosecond laser pulses of energy less than 10 nJ directly from a femtosecond laser oscillator, thus eliminating the need for an amplified system and increasing the micromachining speed by more than four orders of magnitude.

  9. Micromachining of Silicon Carbide using femtosecond lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have demonstrated micromachining of bulk 3C silicon carbide (3C- SiC) wafers by employing 1028nm wavelength femtosecond laser pulses of energy less than 10 nJ directly from a femtosecond laser oscillator, thus eliminating the need for an amplified system and increasing the micromachining speed by more than four orders of magnitude

  10. Boron carbide nanowires: Synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhe

    Bulk boron carbide has been widely used in ballistic armored vest and the property characterization has been heavily focused on mechanical properties. Even though boron carbides have also been projected as a promising class of high temperature thermoelectric materials for energy harvesting, the research has been limited in this field. Since the thermal conductivity of bulk boron carbide is still relatively high, there is a great opportunity to take advantage of the nano effect to further reduce it for better thermoelectric performance. This dissertation work aims to explore whether improved thermoelectric performance can be found in boron carbide nanowires compared with their bulk counterparts. This dissertation work consists of four main parts. (1) Synthesis of boron carbide nanowires. Boron carbide nanowires were synthesized by co-pyrolysis of diborane and methane at low temperatures (with 879 °C as the lowest) in a home-built low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD) system. The CVD-based method is energy efficient and cost effective. The as-synthesized nanowires were characterized by electron microscopy extensively. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show the nanowires are single crystalline with planar defects. Depending on the geometrical relationship between the preferred growth direction of the nanowire and the orientation of the defects, the as-synthesized nanowires could be further divided into two categories: transverse fault (TF) nanowires grow normal to the defect plane, while axial fault (AF) ones grow within the defect plane. (2) Understanding the growth mechanism of as-synthesized boron carbide nanowires. The growth mechanism can be generally considered as the famous vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. TF and AF nanowires were found to be guided by Ni-B catalysts of two phases. A TF nanowire is lead by a hexagonal phase catalyst, which was proved to be in a liquid state during reaction. While an AF nanowires is catalyzed by a

  11. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  12. HCl removal using cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Cycled carbide slag from calcium looping cycles is used to remove HCl. • The optimum temperature for HCl removal of cycled carbide slag is 700 °C. • The presence of CO2 restrains HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • CO2 capture conditions have important effects on HCl removal of cycled carbide slag. • HCl removal capacity of carbide slag drops with cycle number rising from 1 to 50. - Abstract: The carbide slag is an industrial waste from chlor-alkali plants, which can be used to capture CO2 in the calcium looping cycles, i.e. carbonation/calcination cycles. In this work, the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping cycles for CO2 capture was proposed to remove HCl in the flue gas from the biomass-fired and RDFs-fired boilers. The effects of chlorination temperature, HCl concentration, particle size, presence of CO2, presence of O2, cycle number and CO2 capture conditions in calcium looping cycles on the HCl removal behavior of the carbide slag experienced carbonation/calcination cycles were investigated in a triple fixed-bed reactor. The chlorination product of the cycled carbide slag from the calcium looping after absorbing HCl is not CaCl2 but CaClOH. The optimum temperature for HCl removal of the cycled carbide slag from the carbonation/calcination cycles is 700 °C. The chlorination conversion of the cycled carbide slag increases with increasing the HCl concentration. The cycled carbide slag with larger particle size exhibits a lower chlorination conversion. The presence of CO2 decreases the chlorination conversions of the cycled carbide slag and the presence of O2 has a trifling impact. The chlorination conversion of the carbide slag experienced 1 carbonation/calcination cycle is higher than that of the uncycled calcined sorbent. As the number of carbonation/calcination cycles increases from 1 to 50, the chlorination conversion of carbide slag drops gradually. The high calcination temperature and high CO2 concentration in the

  13. Sliding wear behavior of carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wear rates of sliding surfaces under starved lubrication conditions are frequently controlled by the onset of scuffing or adhesive transfer resulting in scratching or galling damage mechanisms. Thermally sprayed coatings containing a high volume fraction of hard phases, such as carbides, generally exhibit good abrasion resistance. However, during sliding contact with ferrous materials, the onset of adhesive transfer can occur at relatively low combinations of temperature, sliding speed and contact pressure. Improvements may be obtained when appropriate additions of solid lubricating phases are distributed within the coating. These additions are usually accompanied by an increase in the coating porosity which may itself alter the sliding wear behavior by modifying the distribution of lubricating oil. This paper describes an investigation of the influence of coating porosity on the sliding wear behavior of two conventional carbide coatings

  14. An improved method of preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of preparing silicon carbide is described which comprises forming a desired shape from a polysilane of the average formula:[(CH3)2Si][CH3Si]. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent (CH3)2Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent CH3Si units. The remaining bonds on the silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a halogen atom in such manner that the average ratio of halogen to silicon in the polysilane is from 0.3:1 to 1:1. The polysilane has a melt viscosity at 1500C of from 0.005 to 500 Pa.s and an intrinsic viscosity in toluene of from 0.0001 to 0.1. The shaped polysilane is heated in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum to an elevated temperature until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. (author)

  15. Hadfield steels with Nb and Ti carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hadfield Steels and the mechanisms responsible for its high strain hardening rate were reviewed. Addition of carbide forming alloying elements to the base compostion was discussed, using the matrix sttel concept. Three experimental crusher jaws were cast, with Nb and Nb + Ti added to the usual Hadfiedl compostion, with enough excess carbon to allow the formation of MC carbides. Samples for metallographic analysis were prepared from both as cast and worn out castings. The carbic morphology was described. Partition of alloying elements was qualitatively studied, using Energy Dispersive Espectroscopy in SEM. The structure of the deformed layer near the worn surface was studied by optical metalography and microhardness measurements. The results showed that fatigue cracking is one of the wear mechanisms is operation in association with the ciclic work hardening of the surface of worn crusher jaws. (Author)

  16. Sputtering behavior of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtering yields of boron were measured with D+ and B+ ions for normal and oblique angles of incidence. Self-sputtering data of boron carbide were simulated in the experiment by using Ne+ ions. The energies of the impinging ions were between 20 eV and 10 keV. The measured data are compared with computer simulated values calculated with the TRIMSP program. The boron data for normal ion impact are higher than the calculated values, whereas those for oblique ion incidence are smaller than the calculation predicts. This discrepancy is explained by the surface roughness and supported by SEM micrographs. The comparison of the boron carbide data with TRIMSP calculations shows much better agreement than the boron data. In this case the target surface was much smoother. (orig.)

  17. Reliable Breakdown Obtained in Silicon Carbide Rectifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensor (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensor and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines.

  18. Behavior of Disordered Boron Carbide under Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W.; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-01

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6GPa≈P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2 3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  19. Free electron laser annealing of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the application of FEL for the semiconductor processing on the practical device fabrication. FEL annealing at a variety of wavelengths (10.0-13.0 μm) have been performed under room temperature for amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) and Nitrogen implanted cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) films. Infrared absorption spectroscopy indicated that the annealing at 12.6 μm, corresponding to the absorption peak of Si-C stretch mode, was effective for recrystallization. On the other hand, Hall effect measurements showed the increase of carrier density for N-implanted 3C-SiC films at around 10.4 μm, whereas the absorption was weak at this wavelength. The present results demonstrated that the direct excitation of the lattice vibration with FEL can induce the reconstruction of disordered atoms and activating dopants even at room temperature. (author)

  20. Hydrolysis of hafnium nitrides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrolysis of Hafnium Nitrides and Carbides. The hydrolytic behavior of Hafnium mononitride and monocarbide has been studied and compared with that of Titanium and Zirconium nitrides and carbides. In the case of hydrolysis of HfN the gaseous products were H2, N2 and a small amount of NO, and the liquid product was NH3, as in the case of TiN and ZrN. In isothermal hydrolysis the principal product was NH3 at temperatures lower than 8000C, which was replaced by N2 at temperatures higher than 9000C. In this respect HfN was similar to ZrN, but not to TiN which produced mainly N2 even by hydrolysis at 8000C. The products of hydrolysis of HfC were found to be CO, CO2, H2 and a small amount of CH4 also as in the case of TiC and ZrC. In the isothermal hydrolysis of HfC it was observed that a large amount of H2 evolved at the early stage of the hydrolysis while CO2 continued to evolve with some amount of H2 even after the ceasing of CO evolution. From analysis of the hydrolytic behavior the solid residue after the hydrolysis of HfC was considered to contain some waxes (Csub(n)Hsub(m)). It was suggested that the carbide of the element of smaller atomic number (Ti) would tend to form oxygen compounds (CO, CO2) while the carbide of the element of larger atomic number (Zr, Hf) hydrogen compounds(Csub(n)Hsub(m)), since ThC and UC formed only hydrocarbons and H2 by hydrolysis. This suggestion was also valid to nitride. (auth.)

  1. Interaction of energetic tritium with silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the physical and chemical interactions of energetic hydrogen isotope species with silicon carbide, recoil tritium from the 3He(n,p)T reaction has been allowed to react with K-T silicon carbide and silicon carbide powder. The results show that if the silicon carbide has been degassed and annealed at 14000C prior to tritium bombardment, a considerable fraction of the tritium (ca. 40%) is released as HTO from the SiC upon heating to 13500C under vacuum conditions. Most of the remaining tritium is retained in SiC, e.g., the retention of the tritium in the K-T SiC was found to be 62 and 22% upon heating to 600 and 13500C, respectively. This is in direct contrast to graphite samples in which the tritium is not released to any significant extent even when heated to 13500C. Samples which were exposed to H2O and H2 prior to tritium bombardment were heated to 6000C after the irradiation. The results obtained indicate that a total of 38.7 and 2.49% of the tritium is released in the form of HT and CH3T in the case of H2 or H2O exposure, respectively. Treatment of degassed samples after tritium bombardment with H2O and H2 at temperatures up to 10000C leads to the release of up to 44.9% of the tritium as HT and CH3T. 42 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  2. Boron carbide synthesis by plasma spray process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.

    Bari : Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, 2003 - (d'Agostino, R.; Favia, P.; Fracassi, F.; Palumbo, F.), s. - [International Symposium on Plasma Chemistry/16th./. Taormina (IT), 22.06.2003-27.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide , plasma spray, synthesis Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  3. Plasma Spray Deposition of Boron Carbide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Hofman, R.; Ctibor, Pavel; Hrabovský, Milan

    Praha : MAXDORF, s.r.o., 2002 - (Nitsch, K.; Rodová, M.). s. 11-12 [Development of Materials Science in Research and Education.. 10.09.2002-12.09.2002, Ostravice] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149; GA ČR GA202/01/1563 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma spray, boron carbide Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  4. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  5. Magnetism of hydrogen-irradiated silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin-polarized density functional theory is used to study two-hydrogen defect complexes in silicon carbide. We find that the magnetism depends on the distances of the two hydrogen atoms. Magnetism appears when the two hydrogen defects are distant from each other, and magnetism cancels out if they are close to each other. The critical distance between the two hydrogen defects is determined.

  6. Compressive creep of hot pressed silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide has a good match of chemical, mechanical and thermal properties and therefore is considered an excellent structural ceramic for high temperature applications. The aim of the present work is compressive creep evaluation of liquid phase sintered silicon carbide with aluminum and rare earth oxide as sintering aids. Rare earth oxides are possible additives considering their highly refractory remnant grain-boundary phase and lower synthesis costs compared to high purity rare earth. Samples were prepared with silicon carbide powder (90 wt%) and aluminum oxide (5 wt%) plus rare earth oxide (5 wt%) additions. Powders were mixed, milled and hot pressed at 1800 deg. C in argon atmosphere. Compressive creep tests were carried out under stress from 150 to 300 MPa and temperatures from 1300 to 1400 deg. C. At lower creep test temperatures, the obtained stress exponent values were correlated to mechanisms based on diffusion. At intermediate temperatures, grain-boundary sliding becomes operative, accommodated by diffusion. At higher temperatures cavities are discernible. Oxidation reactions and ionic diffusion result on surface oxidized layer, grain-boundary amorphous and intergranular crystalline Al6Si2O13, δ-Y2Si2O7 and YAG phases. In this case cavitation and amorphous phases redistribution enhance grain-boundary sliding, not accommodated by diffusion. Coalescence occurs at triple point and multigrain-junctions, with subsequent strain rate acceleration and cavitational creep.

  7. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  8. Nuclear fuel management and boron carbide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years one way of introducing burnable absorber is to coat the fuel pellets by a thin layer of burnable absorber so called integral fuel burnable absorber (IFBA). In this method the fuel is coated with boron nitride or boron carbide. Boron has low absorption cross-section and when it exists on the surface of the fuel, it interacts with thermalized neutron. B4C is a boron compound, which can be used for coating the nuclear fuel. It has high thermal stability and withstands high pressure and temperatures. High technology product of boron carbide has different ratio of B: C. But in nuclear reactor when boron carbide is used, it must be rich with boron. In this research chemical vapor decomposition (CVD) has been using boron trichloride and carbon tetra chloride for reactant materials. The experiments were carried out at high temperatures (1050 degree Celsius, 1225 degree Celsius and 1325 degree Celsius). The coated samples were analyzed using X-Ray diffractometer (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and will be presented in this paper. It was seen that decreasing the reaction temperature caused an increase on the quality and thickness of the coating

  9. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  10. Tungsten carbide platelet-containing cemented carbide with yttrium containing dispersed phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; CHEN Shu; WANG Yuan-jie; YU Xian-wang; XIONG Xiang-jun

    2008-01-01

    A fine and platelet tungsten carbide patterned structure with fine yttrium containing dispersed phase was observed in liquid phase sintered WC-20%Co-1%Y2O3 cemented carbide with ultrafine tungsten carbide and nano yttrium oxide as starting materials. By comparing the microstructures of the alloy prepared by hot-press at the temperature below the eutectic melting temperature and by conventional liquid phase sintering, it is shown that hexagonal and truncated trigonal plate-like WC grains are formed through the mechanism of dissolution-precipitation (recrystallization) at the stage of liquid phase sintering. Yttrium in the addition form of oxide exhibits good ability in inhibiting the discontinuous or inhomogeneous WC grain growth in the alloy at the stage of solid phase sintering.

  11. Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide by doping with boron carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Datta; A K Bandyopadhyay; B Chaudhuri

    2002-06-01

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together with carbon of 1 wt% at 2050°C at vacuum (3 mbar) for 15 min. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. This study shows that the mechanism is a solid-state sintering process. Polytype transformation from 6H to 4H was observed.

  12. Silicon carbide for chemical application prepared by SPS method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Kubatík, Tomáš František; Vilémová, Monika; Mušálek, Radek; Mastný, L.

    Prague: Czech Society of Industrial Chemistry, 2014 - (Kalenda, P.; Lubojacký, J.), s. 129-134 ISBN 978-80-86238-64-7. [Mezinárodní chemicko-technologická konference/2./. Mikulov (CZ), 07.04.2014-09.04.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : silicon carbide * spark plasma sintering * silicon carbide corrosion * impurities in silicon carbide Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy www.icct.cz

  13. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  14. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  15. Microstructural and Mechanical characterization of WC-Co cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Zakia, Rizki

    2013-01-01

    WC-Co cemented carbides are ceramic-metal composite materials made of carbides embedded in a metal phase that acts as a binder. They exhibit an exceptional combination of strength, toughness and wear resistance as a result of the extremely different properties of their two constitutive phases. Consequently, cemented carbides have been positioned as suitable options when selecting materials for tribomechanical applications, and their implementation continues to gain a place in t...

  16. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  17. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  18. Transformations of Carbides During Tempering of D3 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykiel, Tadeusz; Hryniewicz, Tadeusz

    2014-06-01

    The studies were performed on D3 tool steel hardened after austenitizing at 1050 °C during 30 min and tempering at 200-700 °C. Based on the diffraction studies performed from the extraction replicas, using electron microscopy, it was found that after 120-min tempering in the consecutive temperatures, the following types of carbides occur: Apart from higher mentioned carbides, there are also big primary carbides and fine secondary M7C3 carbides occurring, which did not dissolve during austenitizing.

  19. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of uranium carbide pyrophoricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis concerns the development of nuclear reactors of fourth generation, and more particularly the use of carbide fuels instead of oxide fuels. An experimental part allows the investigation of mechanisms resulting in the pyrophoric reaction of a powder of uranium carbide, and addresses the determination of kinetic parameters intrinsic to the oxidation of powdered uranium carbide. Experimental results are then used to develop models of oxidation of powders of carbide uranium which are applied to a simplified mono-dispersed powder, and then introduced in a computation code. Simulation results are compared with experimental results

  1. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  2. Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: The electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical components of the nanocomposite, and is also affected by the property of electrolyte. A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. Highlights: → Electrocatalytic activity of tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite with core-shell structure. → Activity is related to the structure, crystal phase and chemical component of the nanocomposite. → The property of electrolyte affects the electrocatalytic activity. → A synergistic effect exists between tungsten carbide and titania of the composite. -- Abstract: Tungsten carbide and titania nanocomposite was prepared by combining a reduced-carbonized approach with a mechanochemical approach. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope under scanning mode and X-ray energy dispersion spectrum. The results show that the crystal phases of the samples are composed of anatase, rutile, nonstoichiometry titanium oxide, monotungsten carbide, bitungsten carbide and nonstoichiometry tungsten carbide, and they can be controlled by adjusting the parameters of the reduced-carbonized approach; tungsten carbide particles decorate on the surface of titania support, the diameter of tungsten carbide particle is smaller than 20 nm and that of titania is around 100 nm; the chemical components of the samples are Ti, O, W and C. The electrocatalytic activity of the samples was measured by a cyclic voltammetry with three electrodes. The results indicate that the electrocatalytic activities of the samples are related to their crystal phases and the property of electrolyte in aqueous solution. A synergistic effect between titania and tungsten carbide is reported for the first time.

  3. Critically coupled surface phonon-polariton excitation in silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Burton; Korobkin, Dmitriy; Fietz, Chris; Carole, Davy; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-09-01

    We observe critical coupling to surface phonon-polaritons in silicon carbide by attenuated total reflection of mid-IR radiation. Reflectance measurements demonstrate critical coupling by a double scan of wavelength and incidence angle. Critical coupling occurs when prism coupling loss is equal to losses in silicon carbide and the substrate, resulting in maximal electric field enhancement. PMID:19724526

  4. Brazed boron-silicon carbide/aluminum structural panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, W. E., Jr.; Bales, T. T.; Brooks, T. G.; Lawson, A. G.; Mitchell, P. D.; Royster, D. M.; Wiant, R.

    1978-01-01

    Fluxless brazing process minimizes degradation of mechanical properties composite material of silicon carbide coated boron fibers in an aluminum matrix. Process is being used to fabricate full-scale Boron-Silicon Carbide/Aluminum-Titanium honeycomb core panels for flight testing and ground testing.

  5. Mass spectrometric determination of boron isotope in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron isotopes in boron carbide are measured by thermionic ionization mass spectrometry with no prior chemical separation. Boron is converted to sodium borate by fusion of the boron carbide with sodium hydroxide (or sodium carbonate) directly on the rhenium filament. The boron isotopic ratios are measured by using the Na2BO2+ ion

  6. Combustion synthesis of boron carbide - a spectroscopic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron Carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. It is the hardest material produced in tonnage quantities. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. Nuclear applications of boron carbide include shielding, control rod and shut down pellets. Within control rods, boron carbide is often powdered, to increase its surface area. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR). Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using electron microscope (SEM). The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variation in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property result discussed in details. (author)

  7. Determination of boron and silicon in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sodium carbonate fusion technique for the dissolution of boron carbide followed by the determination of boron by alkalimetric titration and silicon impurity by spectrophotometry is described. The elemental boron content in the commercially available boron carbide ranged from 77.2 to 77.60 % and the silicon in the range 1170 to 2500 ppm. (author)

  8. Preliminary fabrication studies of alternative LMFBR carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary fabrication studies were made of various compositions of thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets that were prepared using the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750 and 20000C were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800 and 20000C were used to prepare fuel pellets of low (87%) and high (> 94%) theoretical densities

  9. Properties of titanium carbide and vanadium carbide mixtures as first wall coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikama, T.; Sakai, Y.; Fukutomi, M.; Okada, M.

    1985-08-01

    Mixtures of titanium carbide(TiC) and vanadium carbide(VC) were deposited onto molybdenum at 870 K by a planar magnetron sputtering method. Molybdenum coated with the mixtures of (Ti 1-xV x) 0.6C 0.4(0 ≲ x $ˇ0.7) was tensile-deformed to rupture at a strain rate of 7×10 -4 s -1 at 300 K. During the deformation of the molybdenum substrate, crack formation and exfoliation of the deposited film of the mixture were monitored by acoustic emission (AE) and by optical observation. The mixtures of titanium carbide and vanadium carbide have larger fracture strengths than their parent carbides. Mixtures in the composition range, (Ti 0.6V 0.4) 0.6C 0.4-(Ti 0.5V 0.5) 0.6C 0.4 had the largest fracture strengths. The larger fracture strength of the film of the mixture decreased the resistance of the film to exfoliation. However, film in the composition ranges. (Ti 0.95V 0.05) 0.6C 0.4-(Ti 0.8V 0.2) 0.6C 0.4 and (Ti 0.4V 0.6) 0.6C 0.4-(Ti 0.3V 0.7) 0.6C 0.4 showed good resistance against exfoliation. The detection of AE from the deposits suggested that these films might have the ability to deform plastically to a small extent.

  10. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  11. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mandal; A Seal; S K Dalui; A K Dey; S Ghatak; A K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-04-01

    The present work deals with the sintering of SiC with a low melting additive by microwave technique. The mechanical characteristics of the products were compared with that of conventionally sintered products. The failure stress of the microwave sintered products, in biaxial flexure, was superior to that of the products made by conventional sintering route in ambient condition. In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  12. An improved method for preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A desired shape is formed from a polysilane and the shape is heated in an inert atmosphere or under vacuum to 1150 to 16000C until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent of (CH3)2Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent of CH3Si units. The remaining bonds on silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a chlorine or bromine atom, such that the polysilane contains from 10 to 43 weight percent of hydrolyzable chlorine or from 21 to 63 weight percent of hydrolyzable bromine. (author)

  13. Deep reactive ion etching of silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, S.; Rajanna, K.; Abe, T.(High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 305-0801, Tsukuba, Japan); Esashi, M

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we describe more than 100-\\mu m-deep reactive ion etching (RIE) of silicon carbide (SiC) in oxygen-added sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) plasma. We used a homemade magnetically enhanced, inductively coupled plasma reactive ion etcher (ME-ICP-RIE) and electroplated nickel masks. First, 5 h etching experiments using etching gases with 0%, 5%, 10% and 20% oxygen were performed by supplying rf power of 150 and 130 W to an ICP antenna and a sample stage, respectively. They demonstrated ...

  14. Nitride and carbide preforms for infiltration process

    OpenAIRE

    A. Twardowska; Nowak, R; P. Kurtyka; B. Smuk; M. Podsiadło; L. Jaworska; N. Sobczak

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Infiltration of molten metals into porous ceramic preforms is the only technique suitable for the fabrication of high volume fraction of ceramic materials in MMCs. The most popular material for porous preforms is Al2O3 because of its low cost. Infiltration process generates thermal stresses in the Al2O3 preforms. The thermal shock resistance of Al2O3 is lower than for Si3N4 or Al2O3/TiC+TiN materials. The aim of this study is to obtain the nitride and carbide base preforms material f...

  15. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions

  16. Structural relaxation of amorphous silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimaru, Manabu; Bae, In-Tae; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Matsumura, Syo; Sickafus, Kurt E

    2002-07-29

    We have examined amorphous structures of silicon carbide (SiC) using both transmission electron microscopy and a molecular-dynamics approach. Radial distribution functions revealed that amorphous SiC contains not only heteronuclear (Si-C) bonds but also homonuclear (Si-Si and C-C) bonds. The ratio of heteronuclear to homonuclear bonds was found to change upon annealing, suggesting that structural relaxation of the amorphous SiC occurred. Good agreement was obtained between the simulated and experimentally measured radial distribution functions. PMID:12144449

  17. Analysis of tungsten carbides by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinson, K; Knott, A C; Belcher, C B

    Five sample presentation techniques were examined for the X-ray fluorescence spectrometric analysis of tungsten carbide alloys in powder and cemented forms. Powder samples may be oxidized by air at 600 degrees before fusion (I), or preferably by lithium nitrate during fusion (II); the fusion is effected with lithium-lanthanum tetraborate followed by briquetting with graphite. Powder samples may also be blended with wax and briquetted (III). Cemented carbides are surface-prepared with silicon carbide before analysis (V). Briquettes prepared by blending carbide powder, lithium-lanthanum tetraborate and graphite (IV), give poor reproducibility, however, owing to micro-absorption effects the technique is not recommended. The determination of eight common elements in tungsten carbide is discussed and the relative standard deviations are 0.002-0.004 for major and 0.008-0.01 for minor elements. PMID:18961988

  18. Synthesis and photoluminescence property of boron carbide nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large scale, high density boron carbide nanowires have been synthesized by using an improved carbothermal reduction method with B/B2O3/C powder precursors under an argon flow at 1100°C. The boron carbide nanowires are 5–10 μm in length and 80–100 nm in diameter. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations show that the boron carbide nanowire has a B4C rhombohedral structure with good crystallization. The Raman spectrum of the as-grown boron carbide nanowires is consistent with that of a B4C structure consisting of B11C icosahedra and C-B-C chains. The room temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the boron carbide nanowires exhibits a visible range of emission centred at 638 nm. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  19. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca;

    2013-01-01

    carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide......Molybdenum carbide supported on active carbon, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide, and promoted by K2CO3, has been prepared and tested for methanol and higher alcohol synthesis from syngas. At optimal conditions, the activity and selectivity to alcohols (methanol and higher alcohols) over...... supported molybdenum carbide are significantly higher compared to the bulk carbide. The CO conversion reaches a maximum, when about 20wt% Mo2C is loaded on active carbon. The selectivity to higher alcohols increases with increasing Mo2C loading on active carbon and reaches a maximum over bulk molybdenum...

  20. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  1. Silicon Carbide: The Problem with Laboratory Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, A. K.; Hofmeister, A. M.; Barlow, M. J.

    2000-03-01

    The interpretation of astronomical observations of infrared (IR) silicon carbide (SiC) features in the spectra of carbon stars have revealed discrepancies between the work of astronomers and that of meteoriticists. The silicon carbide observed around carbon stars has been attributed to one type of SiC (α) while meteoritic samples believed to have formed around such stars are of another type of SiC (β). The key to solving this problem has been to understand the sources of laboratory data used by astronomers in order to interpret the IR spectra. Through comparison of thin film IR absorption spectra and spectra taken using finely ground samples dispersed in potassium bromide (KBr) pellets we show that the previously invoked ``KBr matrix-correction'' is unnecessary for powder dispersions obtained from very fine grain sizes of SiC. Comparison of our data and previous measurements show that dust around carbon stars is β-SiC, consistent with laboratory studies of presolar grains in meteorites. The implications of these findings affect twenty years of work. The IR spectroscopic laboratory data used by astronomers to identify dust species in space must be carefully scrutinized to ensure that the KBr correction is not responsible for further misattributions of minerals in astronomical dust features.

  2. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  3. Electronic properties of disordered silicon carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The disorder effects on the electronic properties of silicon carbide were studied at the atomic or micro-structural scale. We have investigated a great variety of materials: silicon carbide fibers, carbonated amorphous silicon films, single crystals and amorphous or crystalline SiC powders. The DC and AC conductivity measurements on the SiC fibers point out the major role of their micro-structure at the nanometric scale, which leads to large dielectric constants. Hopping of polaronic carriers is the dominant conduction mechanism. An electrons spin resonance study of all the materials was performed: sp2 hybridized carbon is always present, in diluted form in the amorphous systems or as free carbon in the crystalline one. Some irradiation defects of SiC were identified: silicon or carbon vacancy and carbon complexes with sp2 hybridization. Such a carbon is responsible of the low paramagnetic stability of the silicon dangling bonds. It is believed to induce the polaronic behavior of the localized carriers. (Author). refs., figs., tabs

  4. ELECTROCHEMICAL MACHINING OF CARBIDES AND BORIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissaux, Bernard Antoine; Muller, Rolf H.; Tobias, Charles W.

    1978-07-01

    The use of high rate anodic dissolution (electrochemical machining) for shaping titanium carbide, zirconium carbide, titanium boride and zirconium boride has been investigated in 2N potassium nitrate and 3N sodium chloride under current densities ranging from 20 to 120 A/cm{sup 2} (corresponding to cutting rates of 0.3 to 1.8 mm/min). The dissolution stoichiometry for all these materials is independent of the current density in the range 20 to 120 A/cm{sup 2}. Both titanium and zirconium appear to dissolve in the +4 state, boron in the +3 state and the weight loss measurements indicate that carbon is oxidized to CO and CO{sub 2}. The current voltage curves permit to establish that, over the entire current density and flow range investigated, dissolution occurs in the transpassive state. The surface roughness obtained on TiC and ZrC is within 3-5 {micro}m and is independent of current density, applied voltage or flow rate.

  5. High temperature intermetallic binders for HVOF carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas turbines technology has a long history of employing the desirable high temperature physical attributes of ceramic-metallic (cermet) materials. The most commonly used coatings incorporate combinations of WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr, which have also been successfully utilized in other non-turbine coating applications. Increased turbine operating temperatures and other high temperature service conditions have made apparent the attractive notion of increasing the temperature capability and corrosion resistance of these coatings. In this study the intermetallic binder NiAl has been used to replace the cobalt and NiCr constituents of conventional WC and Cr3C2 cermet powders. The composite carbide thermal spray powders were fabricated for use in the HVOF coating process. The structure of HVOF deposited NiAl-carbide coatings are compared directly to the more familiar WC-Co and Cr3C2-NiCr coatings using X-ray diffraction, back-scattered electron imaging (BEI) and electron dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Hardness variations with temperature are reported and compared between the NiAl and Co/NiCr binders

  6. Pressureless sintering of beta silicon carbide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Green blended compounds made of SiC nano-sized powder, a fugitive binder and a sintering agent (boron carbide, B4C), have been prepared. The binder is removed at low temperature (e.g. 800 degrees C) and the pressureless sintering studied between 1900 and 2100 degrees C. The nearly theoretical density (98% relative density) was obtained after 30 min at 2100 degrees C. The structural and microstructural evolutions during the heat treatment were characterised. The high temperatures needed for the sintering result in the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation which is revealed by the change of the composite microstructure. From 1900 degrees C, dense samples are composed of β-SiC grains surrounding α-SiC platelets in a well-defined orientation. TEM investigations and calculation of the activation energy of the sintering provided insight to the densification mechanism. (authors)

  7. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  8. Dominant factors in carbide fuel swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identification of the dominant factors involved in carbide fuel fission gas swelling and release behaviour has been attempted by comparison between experimental data and the results predicted by means of a physical model. The model assumes that fission gas release occurs entirely through gas atom migration in the matrix solid and that fission gas bubbles, intra and intergranular, grow as the net result of gas atom precipitation into the bubbles and gas atom re-solution from the bubbles. Further, it is assumed that local gas atom redistribution process in the immediate neighbourhood of a bubble is so rapid that the bubble size always corresponds to the equilibrium size that maintains exact balance between the rate of resolution and that of precipitation. Computation runs performed with the model using carefully chosen combination of physical parameters have successfully reproduced the spread of experimental gas release and swelling data. Comparisons between the predicted results and the experimental data readily identify the grain size, and not the temperature, as the dominant factor affecting fission gas behaviour. The effect of other fuel design parameters such as fission rate density, hydrostatic pressure, etc. is generally shown to be minor. Further study, however, indicates that the external fuel dimensional changes resulting from fuel cracking very often overshadow that from fission gas swelling alone. It is concluded that efforts to control carbide fuel swelling should be directed towards the control of fuel microstructure rather than the control of fuel porosity as has been generally practiced so far. (author)

  9. Sol–gel processing of carbidic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Manocha; E Yasuda; Y Tanabe; S Manocha; D Vashistha

    2000-02-01

    Carbon incorporation into the silicate network results in the formation of rigid carbidic glasses with improved physical, mechanical and thermal properties. This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. In the present studies, sol–gel processing has been used to prepare silicon based glasses, especially oxycarbides through organic–inorganic hybrid gels by hydrolysis–condensation reactions in silicon alkoxides, 1,4-butanediol and furfuryl alcohol with an aim to introduce Si–C linkages in the precursors at sol level. The incorporation of these linkages has been studied using IR and NMR spectroscopy. These bonds, so introduced, are maintained throughout the processing, especially during pyrolysis to high temperatures. In FFA–TEOS system, copolymerization with optimized mol ratio of the two results in resinous mass. This precursor on pyrolysis to 1000°C results in Si–O–C type amorphous solid black mass. XRD studies on the materials heated to 1400°C exhibit presence of crystalline Si–C and cristobalites in amorphous Si–O–C mass. In organic–inorganic gel system, the pyrolysed mass exhibits phase stability up to much higher temperatures. The carbidic materials so produced have been found to exhibit good resistance against oxidation at 1000°C.

  10. Radiation Damage Effects in Uranium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the results of research into the irradiation behaviour of cast uranium carbide following that reported in another paper by Childs et al. The main conclusions are as follows: 1. The saturation resistivity and lattice parameter increases for hypostoichiometric specimens irradiated at 80oC vary systematically with the excess concentration of uranium present in solution in the UC phase. 2. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (measured over the range 77 - 293oK), unlike the resistivity itself, is not significantly affected by irradiation. 3. A small resistivity annealing stage, additional to those at 150 and 510oC, occurs between 1000 and 1200oC. The annealing-out of the lattice parameter change also occurs in two main stages at 150 and 510oC (5-h anneals). A careful survey of the range 400 - 800oC has failed to reveal the stage postulated by other workers to occur at about 710oC. The significance of the results in determining the defect structure of irradiated uranium carbide is discussed. (author)

  11. Production process for boron carbide coated carbon material and boron carbide coated carbon material obtained by the production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide coated carbon material is used for a plasma facing material of a thermonuclear reactor. The surface of a carbon material is chemically reacted with boron oxide to convert it into boron carbide. Then, it is subjected to heat treatment at a temperature of not lower than 1600degC in highly evacuated or inactive atmosphere to attain a boron carbide coated carbon material. The carbon material used is an artificial graphite or a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite material. In the heat treatment, when the atmosphere is in vacuum, it is highly evacuated to less than 10Pa. Alternatively, in a case of inactive atmosphere, argon or helium gas each having oxygen and nitrogen content of not more than 20ppm is used. With such procedures, there can be obtained a boron carbide-coated carbon material with low content of oxygen and nitrogen impurities contained in the boron carbide coating membrane thereby hardly releasing gases. (I.N.)

  12. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (∼100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides

  13. Effect of strong carbide forming elements in hardfacing weld metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin Zhang; Dengyi Ren

    2004-01-01

    To achieve high carbon hard-facing weld metals with both high hardness and crack resistance, strong carbide forming elements Ti, Nb and V were alloyed into the weld metals, and their effect on the formation of carbides and the matrix microstructure were studied. Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy(EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy(TEM) were adopted to investigate the microstructure, then thermodynamics of the formation of carbides was calculated and their effect on the matrix was further discussed. It is revealed that Nb, Ti and V influence strongly the distribution and existing state of carbon, inducing precipitation of carbides accompanying with the depletion of carbon in matrix. But when only V are alloyed as carbide forming element, the carbides are scarce and distributed along grain boundaries, and the hard-facing alloy is too hard, while the using of only Nb or Ti could not reinforce the weld metals effectively. The hard-facing alloy reinforced with Nb, V and Ti can form dispersive fine carbides and low carbon martensite matrix.

  14. Uranium-plutonium carbide as an LMFBR advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium-plutonium carbide offers an improved fuel system for advanced breeder reactors. The high thermal conductivity and density of carbide fuels permit superior breeding performance and high specific power operation. These advantages combine to increase plutonium production, reduce fuel cycle and power costs, and lower plant capital costs. The carbide advantages are obtained at conservative fuel sytem design and operating conditions. Carbide fabrication technology has been demonstrated by the production of quality-assured fuel elements for irradiation testing. The carbide irradiation test program has demonstrated that high burnup can be achieved with several designs and that the consequences of postulated off-normal operating events are benign. Design bases to support helium- and sodium-bonded carbide fuel pin test irradiations in the Fast Flux Test Facility have been developed in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and the Transient Reactor irradiation experiments. Important issues regarding safety, reprocessing, and commercial-scale fabrication remain to be addressed in the continuing development of carbide fuels. Fiscal and historical circumstances have combined to preclude this development. This report reviews these circumstances and the state of the technology in general and advances a rationale for why development should be continued

  15. Boron carbide/carbon composite material and production process therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boron carbide/carbon composite material of the present invention comprises from 15 to 40% by volume of graphite and the balance of two kinds of powdery boron carbides X and Y having different average grain sizes. The average grain size of the powdery boron carbide X is less than 1/2 of the average grain size of the boron carbide Y, and the composite material comprises more than 10% by volume of the powdery boron carbide X and more than 30% by volume of the powdery boron carbide Y. They are press-molded under heating at a temperature range of 480 to 600degC, followed by sintering. A binder pitch of less evaporation ingredient melting upon heating is used as a binder. Since the pitch of satisfactory melting property is used, there is no worry that binding property lacks to reduce the lowering of the strength even if a great amount of powdery boron carbide is added. Further, since a carbonization yield is improved due to less evaporation content, density and strength of the composite material can be increased. (T.M.)

  16. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  17. The atomic configuration of graphene/vanadium carbide interfaces in vanadium carbide-encapsulating carbon nanocapsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazaki, Gaku; Matsuura, Daisuke; Kizuka, Tokushi

    2014-03-01

    Carbon nanocapsules (CNCs) encapsulating vanadium carbide (VC) nanocrystals with a NaCI structure were synthesized by a gas-evaporation method using arc-discharge heating. The CNCs were observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The VC nanocrystals within the nanospaces of CNCs were truncated by low-index facets and were coated with several graphene layers, forming graphene/VC interfaces. The atomic configuration and interlayer spacings at the interfaces were found. PMID:24745251

  18. Exposure to Fibres, Crystalline Silica, Silicon Carbide and Sulphur Dioxide in the Norwegian Silicon Carbide Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Føreland, S.; Bye, E; Bakke, B.; Eduard, W

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess personal exposure to fibres, crystalline silica, silicon carbide (SiC) and sulphur dioxide in the Norwegian SiC industry. Methods: Approximately 720 fibre samples, 720 respirable dust samples and 1400 total dust samples were collected from randomly chosen workers from the furnace, processing and maintenance departments in all three Norwegian SiC plants. The respirable dust samples were analysed for quartz, cristobalite and non-fibrous SiC conten...

  19. Strength degradation of cemented carbides due to thermal shock

    OpenAIRE

    Tarragó Cifre, Jose María; Dorvlo, Selassie; Al-Dawery, Ihsan; Llanes Pitarch, Luis Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Despite the recognition of thermal shock and thermal fatigue as common failure modes in cemented carbide applications, the information on the influence of the microstructure on the resistance of hardmetals to abrupt temperature changes is rather scarce. In this paper, the strength behaviour of cemented carbides after severe thermal shock damage is investigated. In doing so, cemented carbides were subjected to thermal shock at two temperature ranges (¿T of 400ºC and 550ºC) and their retained s...

  20. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process

  1. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  2. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  3. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  4. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  5. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  6. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  7. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 x 1025 n/m2. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C

  8. Understanding the sintering of cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solidification structures of the Co--W--C system are discussed; the work was undertaken to clarify cooling reactions in cobalt-bonded tungsten carbide alloys. Alloys were prepared by induction melting Co, C, W, and WC in an alumina crucible and cooling at the rate of 100 C per minute. Liquidus surfaces for the primary precipitation of (Co,W)6C, fcc-Co, and the mu phase, Co7W6, were established. The phase diagram presented shows the basal projection of the liquidus surface in the Co-rich part of the Co--W--C system. The diagram indicates three tested alloys, five eutectics, and five peritectic reactions. The solidification of the alloys is discussed. 5 figures

  9. Nanoporous Silicon Carbide for Nanoelectromechanical Systems Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, T.; Khan, F.; Adesida, I.; Bohn, P.; Rittenhouse, T.; Lienhard, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    A major goal of this project is to produce porous silicon carbide (PSiC) via an electroless process for eventual utilization in nanoscale sensing platforms. Results in the literature have shown a variety of porous morphologies in SiC produced in anodic cells. Therefore, predictability and reproducibility of porous structures are initial concerns. This work has concentrated on producing morphologies of known porosity, with particular attention paid toward producing the extremely high surface areas required for a porous flow sensor. We have conducted a parametric study of electroless etching conditions and characteristics of the resulting physical nanostructure and also investigated the relationship between morphology and materials properties. Further, we have investigated bulk etching of SiC using both photo-electrochemical etching and inductively-coupled-plasma reactive ion etching techniques.

  10. Gas emission from ultradispersed carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of gas emission from the ultra-dispersed carbides (B4C, SiC, TiC) powders formed by pulsed plasma synthesis technology (condensator discharge) in the environment of corresponding chlorides and methan with the additions of H2 and Ar was investigated. The emitted gases consisted of CH4, H2O, Co(N2), CO2. Calculated heats of gas emission processes (less than 200 kJ/mol) for different components show their adsorption nature up to 700 deg C. The emission of components having mass numbers 28 and 44 raises at higher temperatures that can be considered as a consequence of high temperature reactions between oxygen and carbon containing phases in synthesized powders

  11. Microwave hybrid synthesis of silicon carbide nanopowders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosized silicon carbide powders were synthesised from a mixture of silica gel and carbon through both the conventional and microwave heating methods. Reaction kinetics of SiC formation were found to exhibit notable differences for the samples heated in microwave field and furnace. In the conventional method SiC nanopowders can be synthesised after 105 min heating at 1500 deg. C in a coke-bed using an electrical tube furnace. Electron microscopy studies of these powders showed the existence of equiaxed SiC nanopowders with an average particle size of 8.2 nm. In the microwave heating process, SiC powders formed after 60 min; the powder consisted of a mixture of SiC nanopowders (with two average particle sizes of 13.6 and 58.2 nm) and particles in the shape of long strands (with an average diameter of 330 nm)

  12. Mechanic-chemistry of tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the current work results on tungsten carbide nanocrystalline structure generation study under high-energy deformation and W-C with Ni mechanical alloying are presented. Mechanical alloying of W and C was worked out in planetary ball mill with water cooling in argon environment. X-ray diffraction examination of these samples were carried out in diffractometer DRON-3.0 with application of CoKα- and CuKα- radiations. With help of X-ray phase analysis in the examined time range of mechanical activation (1-10 min) of powder mixtures with content (W-C)-70 mass. % Ni the WC phase does not found. The observed broadening of W reflexes on diffract-grams in the course of activation time is explaining by reagents' grain size decrease, micro-tensions accumulation under deformations, concentration heterogeneousness generation

  13. Preparation of Silicon Carbide with High Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to prepare silicon carbide with high properties, three kinds of SiC powders A, B, and C with different composition and two kinds of additives, which were Y2O3-Al2O3 system and Y2O3-La2O3 system, were used in this experiment. The properties of hot-pressed SiC ceramics were measured. With the same additives, different SiC powder resulted in different properties. On the other hand, with the same SiC powder, increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-Al2O3 improved properties of SiC ceramics at room temperature, and increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-La2O3 improved property SiC ceramics at elevated temperature. In addition, the microstructure of SiC ceramics was studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  14. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Pirouz

    1999-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as an enabling electronic technology for many aerospace applications. The Lewis team is focusing on the chemical vapor deposition of the thin, single-crystal SiC films from which devices are fabricated. These films, which are deposited (i.e., epitaxially "grown") on commercial wafers, must consist of a single crystal with very few structural defects so that the derived devices perform satisfactorily and reliably. Working in collaboration (NASA grant) with Professor Pirouz of Case Western Reserve University, we developed a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) technique for removing the subsurface polishing damage prior to epitaxial growth of the single-crystal SiC films.

  15. Production of titanium carbide from ilmenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutham Niyomwas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of titanium carbide (TiC powders from ilmenite ore (FeTiO3 powder by means of carbothermal reduction synthesis coupled with hydrochloric acid (HCl leaching process was investigated. A mixture of FeTiO3 and carbon powders was reacted at 1500oC for 1 hr under flowing argon gas. Subsequently, synthesized product of Fe-TiC powders were leached by 10% HCl solutions for 24 hrs to get final product of TiC powders. The powders were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. The product particles were agglomerated in the stage after the leaching process, and the size of this agglomerate was 12.8 μm with a crystallite size of 28.8 nm..

  16. Carboloy grade 370 (sintered cemented carbide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboloy Grade 370 containing 72.0 WC, 8.0 TiC, 11.5 TaC, 8.5 Co is a tough, wear-resistant grade of cemented carbide for heavy duty roughing cuts of steels, ferrous castings, stainless steels, and some high-temperature alloys. It successfully withstands those high temperatures encountered in heavy duty machining. It is used as the as-sintered condition, without further heat treatment. It cannot be machined, but can be ground to final size by use of SiC and diamonds as abrasives. Carbology 370 is rarely applied where corrosive environments exist. Safety note is given to ensure protection for personnel and equipment from flying fragments and sharp edges when working with these materials, and an adequate ventilation in grinding operation to avoid pulmonary problems. Microstructure and hardness vs. temperature curves for Carboloy 370 are presented and its physical and mechanical properties are tabulated

  17. Tunable plasticity in amorphous silicon carbide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Yusuke; Kim, Namjun; King, Sean W; Bielefeld, Jeff; Stebbins, Jonathan F; Dauskardt, Reinhold H

    2013-08-28

    Plasticity plays a crucial role in the mechanical behavior of engineering materials. For instance, energy dissipation during plastic deformation is vital to the sufficient fracture resistance of engineering materials. Thus, the lack of plasticity in brittle hybrid organic-inorganic glasses (hybrid glasses) often results in a low fracture resistance and has been a significant challenge for their integration and applications. Here, we demonstrate that hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide films, a class of hybrid glasses, can exhibit a plasticity that is even tunable by controlling their molecular structure and thereby leads to an increased and adjustable fracture resistance in the films. We decouple the plasticity contribution from the fracture resistance of the films by estimating the "work-of-fracture" using a mean-field approach, which provides some insight into a potential connection between the onset of plasticity in the films and the well-known rigidity percolation threshold. PMID:23876200

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Nitride and Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szpunar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic thermal conductivity of alternative fuels like uranium nitride and uranium carbide. We evaluate the electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, by combining first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations with semiclassical correlations. The electronic structure of UN and UC was calculated using Quantum Espresso code. The spin polarized calculations were performed for a ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments on uranium lattice and magnetic moment in UC was lower than in UN due to stronger hybridization between 2p electrons of carbon and 5f electrons of uranium. The nonmagnetic electronic structure calculations were used as an input to BolzTrap code that was used to evaluate the electronic thermal conductivity. It is predicted that the thermal conductivity should increase with the temperature increase, but to get a quantitative agreement with the experiment at higher temperatures the interaction of electrons with phonons (and electron-electron scattering needs to be included.

  19. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  20. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  1. Properties of cemented carbides alloyed by metal melt treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the results of investigations into the influence of alloying elements introduced by metal melt treatment (MMT-process) on properties of WC-Co and WC-Ni cemented carbides. Transition metals of the IV - VIll groups (Ti, Zr, Ta, Cr, Re, Ni) and silicon were used as alloying elements. It is shown that the MMT-process allows cemented carbides to be produced whose physico-mechanical properties (bending strength, fracture toughness, total deformation, total work of deformation and fatigue fracture toughness) are superior to those of cemented carbides produced following a traditional powder metallurgy (PM) process. The main mechanism and peculiarities of the influence of alloying elements added by the MMT-process on properties of cemented carbides have been first established. The effect of alloying elements on structure and substructure of phases has been analyzed. (author)

  2. On the singularity of high temperature carbidization of niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of specific behavior of niobium carbidization process at high temperature non-isothermal conditions depending of heating rates of samples are presented. Experiments were carried out by High Speed Scanning Electrothermography method in a wide temperature range (1000-2300 oC) using gaseous methane as a source of carbon. It was established that at heating rates of samples more than 10,000 oC/s and T ≥ 2200 oC sharp increase of carbidization rate occurs which were registered by three independent methods: by weight gain, carbide layers growth and heat release rate. Based on SEM examinations of reacted samples the abnormal dependence of carbidization rate vs. heating rate was caused by the formation of non-equilibrium liquid phase at temperatures noticeably lower than the melting point of the lowest eutectic in Nb-C system.

  3. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  4. Microwave synthesis of phase-pure, fine silicon carbide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, monophasic silicon carbide powder has been synthesized by direct solid-state reaction of its constituents namely silicon and carbon in a 2.45 GHz microwave field. Optimum parameters for the silicon carbide phase formation have been determined by varying reaction time and reaction temperature. The powders have been characterized for their particle size, surface area, phase composition (X-ray diffraction) and morphology (scanning electron microscope). Formation of phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at 1300 deg. C in less than 5 min of microwave exposure, resulting in sub-micron-sized particles. The free energy values for Si + C → SiC reaction were calculated for different temperatures and by comparing them with the experimental results, it was determined that phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at around 1135 deg. C

  5. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-01

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications. PMID:21386312

  6. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  7. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  8. Chemical vapour deposition: Transition metal carbides go 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogotsi, Yury

    2015-11-01

    The unique properties of 2D materials, such as graphene or transition metal dichalcogenides, have been attracting much attention in the past decade. Now, metallically conductive and even superconducting transition metal carbides are entering the game.

  9. Synthesis of high quality superfine structural powders of silicium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have synthesized and studied the experimental samples of silicium carbide, which were produced of mechanically activized elemental fine-disperse silicium and pyrolitical soot according to the technology developed by the authors. We have shown that, as a result of synthesis, it is possible to produce the powder of silicium carbide (α- and β-phases) with high purity, nanodimensional fractional composition, and silicium dioxide content not more then 1- 2 mass %

  10. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  11. Impact of pressure on Sintering of Cemented Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Owais, Tariq Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    In this Master Thesis work, the effect of pressure on sintering of cemented carbides is investigated. Special focus hasbeen given to the residual porosity after sintering. It is well known that sintering shrinkage depends on binder phasecontent, grain size, temperature and pressure. Thus 4 different cemented carbides grades were selected. The gradeswere pressed into standard products and TRS (Tensile Rupture Strength) rods with two different shrinkage factors.These were then sintered at diffe...

  12. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  13. ADHERENCE AND PROPERTIES OF SILICON CARBIDE BASED FILMS ON STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Lelogeais, M.; Ducarroir, M.; Berjoan, R.

    1991-01-01

    Coatings of silicon carbide with various compositions have been obtained in a r.f plasma assisted process using tetramethylsilane and argon as input gases. Some properties against mechanical applications of such deposits on steel have been investigated. Residual stresses and hardness are reported and discussed in relation with plasma parameters and deposit composition. By scratch testing, it was shown that the silicon carbide films on steel denote a good adherence when compared with previous ...

  14. Synthesis of carbides of metals by electrodischarge method

    OpenAIRE

    Tsolin, Pavlo L.; Terekhov, Anatolii Yu.; Kuskova, Nataliia I.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation by electric discharge of plasma-chemical reaction which is accompanied by the erosion of electrodes material and by synthesis corresponding carbides is discussed. The object of the research is to establish possibility of synthesis of metal carbides during electrodischarge treatment of hydrocarbon liquid. Electrical discharge in the liquid hydrocarbons is studied experimentally using various materials of electrodes (titanium, aluminum, copper, niobium) as a method of synthesis of me...

  15. Structure and single-phase regime of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, David

    1988-09-01

    The boron carbides are composed of twelve-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom intericosahedral chains. The boron carbides are known to exist as a single phase with carbon concentrations from about 8 to about 20 at. %. This range of carbon concentrations is made possible by the substitution of boron and carbon atoms for one another within both the icosahedra and intericosahedral chains. The most widely accepted structural model for B4C (the boron carbide with nominally 20% carbon) has B11C icosahedra with C-B-C intericosahedral chains. Here, the free energy of the boron carbides is studied as a function of carbon concentration by considering the effects of replacing carbon atoms within B4C with boron atoms. It is concluded that entropic and energetic considerations both favor the replacement of carbon atoms with boron atoms within the intericosahedral chains, C-B-C-->C-B-B. Once the carbon concentration is so low that the vast majority of the chains are C-B-B chains, near B13C2, subsequent substitutions of carbon atoms with boron atoms occur within the icosahedra, B11C-->B12. Maxima of the free energy occur at the most ordered compositions: B4C,B13C2,B14C. This structural model, determined by studying the free energy, agrees with that previously suggested by analysis of electronic and thermal transport data. These considerations also provide an explanation for the wide single-phase regime found for boron carbides. The significant entropies associated with compositional disorder within the boron carbides, the high temperatures at which boron carbides are formed (>2000 K), and the relatively modest energies associated with replacing carbon atoms with boron atoms enable the material's entropy to be usually important in determining its composition. As a result, boron carbides are able to exist in a wide range of compositions.

  16. Rapid Wolff–Kishner reductions in a silicon carbide microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Stephen G.; Gu, Lei; Lesniak, Christoph; Victor, Georg; Meschke, Frank; Abahmane, Lahbib; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2013-01-01

    Wolff–Kishner reductions are performed in a novel silicon carbide microreactor. Greatly reduced reaction times and safer operation are achieved, giving high yields without requiring a large excess of hydrazine. The corrosion resistance of silicon carbide avoids the problematic reactor compatibility issues that arise when Wolff–Kishner reductions are done in glass or stainless steel reactors. With only nitrogen gas and water as by-products, this opens the possibility of performing selective, l...

  17. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan Y.; Lu, Xiyuan; Lin, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 104 with mode volume ˜ 0.60 ( λ / n ) 3 at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ˜104 is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  18. Synthesis and Characterization of Amorphous Carbide-based Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Folkenant, Matilda

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, research on synthesis, structure and characterization of amorphous carbide-based thin films is presented. Crystalline and nanocomposite carbide films can exhibit properties such as high electrical conductivity, high hardness and low friction and wear. These properties are in many cases structure-related, and thus, within this thesis a special focus is put on how the amorphous structure influences the material properties. Thin films within the Zr-Si-C and Cr-C-based systems hav...

  19. Silicon nano-carbide in strengthening and ceramic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudneva, V. V.; Galevsky, G. V.; Kozyrev, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    Technological advantages and conditions of new quality assurance of coatings and products, provided by silicon nano-carbide, have been ascertained in the course of composite electrodeposition of coatings, structural ceramics patterning, and surface hardening of steels via electro-explosive alloying. Silicon nano-carbide has been recommended to be used as a component of wear and corrosion resistant chromium carbide electrodeposited coatings, which can be operated at high temperatures and used for strengthening tools and equipment including those with a complex microrelief of functional surfaces. Silicon nano-carbide as a component of composite “silicon carbide - boron - carbon” can be applied to produce ceramic half products via solid phase sintering in argon under pressure of 0.1 MPa and temperature 2273 K. Application of silicon nano-carbide in technology of tool steel surface hardening via electroexplosive alloying ensures obtaining of a high micro-hard, wear and heat resistant shielding layer which is about 20 μm deep.

  20. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B4C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compácted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author)

  1. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  2. Conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides: Softening bipolaron hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aselage, T. L.; Emin, D.; McCready, S. S.

    2001-08-01

    The electrical conductivities and Seebeck coefficients of boron carbides B12+xC3-x with 0.06function of the composition x. This strong sensitivity to composition indicates that percolation effects, arising from boron carbides having carbon atoms in inequivalent locations, influence the conductivity at low temperature. With x holes per unit cell, boron carbides have very large Seebeck coefficients that depend only weakly on x. The magnitudes and temperature dependences of the Seebeck coefficients are consistent with large contributions from carrier-induced softening of local vibrations. Softening effects can be exceptionally large when singlet bipolarons are stabilized among degenerate electronic energy levels by their softening of symmetry-breaking vibrations: ``softening bipolarons.'' The boron carbide transport properties are generally consistent with those expected of softening bipolarons. Finally, two high-temperature effects are observed in the boron carbide conductivities. The conductivities of samples having high carrier densities, x~1, are suppressed above 700 K. This suppression can arise when the rapid hopping of nearby carriers disrupts the energy coincidence required for a carrier's hop. At even higher temperatures, a sharp increase in the boron carbide conductivities (σ~T4) suggests a radiation-induced excitation of mobile charge carriers.

  3. Superplastic behavior and cavitation for WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, H.; Shimojima, K. [Inst. for Structural and Engineering Materials, National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan); Kawakami, M.; Terada, O. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Hadano, Kanagawa (Japan); Sano, S. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mabuchi, M. [Dept. of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Superplastic behavior and cavitation were investigated for WC-15 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.7 {mu}m (A) and 5.2 {mu}m (B), WC-10 mass% Co cemented carbide with the WC grain size of 1.5 {mu}m (C) and WC-5 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.5 {mu}m (D) and 2.5 {mu}m (E) by tensile tests at 1473 K. WC contiguity were 0.51, 0.31, 0.27, 0.56 and 0.49, respectively. The large elongations about 200% were obtained for the B and the C having smaller values of WC contiguity compared to the other cemented carbides. The values of cavity volume fraction for them were less for the other cemented carbides, furthermore, cavities formed at WC/WC interfaces. Therefore, it is noted that the distribution of the Co phase is important for superplasticity of the cemented carbides. (orig.)

  4. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal a new carbide-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimizes the loss of uranium, and retains...

  5. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  6. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450ee)C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800ee)C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  7. Production and characterization of nanostructured silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Kendra Lee

    Nanostructured materials continue to attract attention because of their new and interesting properties, which are very different from their macrostructured equivalents. Since the size of grain and surface differs, a better understanding of the microstructure, the mechanism of formation, and methods of controlling surface properties is necessary. In this study, nanostructured silicon carbide has been produced from the solid-solid reaction of a mixture of silicon nanopowder and carbon multiwalled nanotubes (MWNT) sintered by induction. A study of the reaction rate at different temperatures has yielded a value for the activation energy of 254 +/- 36 kJ/mol, and has led to the conclusion that the reaction is diffusion-controlled. A second method produced pure silicon carbide nanowires using a procedure which kept the solid reactants, silicon powder and MWNT, separated while sintering at a constant temperature of 1200°C. Silicon in the vapor-phase reacted at the surface of the MWNTs followed by diffusion of both precursors through the product phase boundary. The reaction time was varied, and a morphological study has been done describing changes in shape and size as a function of time. The initial reaction produced a layer of SiC providing the outer shell of coaxial structures with carbon nanotubes inside. As Si and C diffused through the product phase to react at the interface, the tube became filled with SiC to form solid SiC nanowires, and the outer diameter of the nanowires grew continuously as reaction time increased. After long sintering times, growth continued in two dimensions, fusing nanowires together into planar structures. In addition, the precursor form of carbon was varied, and nanowires produced by two different types of nanotubes have been studied. The produced SiC nanowires show cubic crystal structure. After a few hours of sintering, stacking faults began to occur inside the wires, and the frequency of occurrence of the stacking faults increased as

  8. The growth of cubic silicon carbide on a compliant substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharanda; Soward, Ida

    1995-01-01

    Research has shown that silicon carbide grown on silicon and 6H silicon carbide has problems associated with these substrates. This is because silicon and silicon carbide has a 20% lattice mismatch and cubic silicon carbide has not been successfully achieved on 6H silicon carbide. We are investigating the growth of silicon carbide on a compliant substrate in order to grow defect free silicon carbide. This compliant substrate consists of silicon/silicon dioxide with 1200 A of single crystal silicon on the top layer. We are using this compliant substrate because there is a possibility that the silicon dioxide layer and the carbonized layer will allow the silicon lattice to shrink or expand to match the lattice of the silicon carbide. This would improve the electrical properties of the film for the use of device fabrication. When trying to grow silicon carbide, we observed amorphous film. To investigate, we examined the process step by step using RHEED. RHEED data showed that each step was amorphous. We found that just by heating the substrate in the presence of hydrogen it changed the crystal structure. When heated to 1000 C for 2 minutes, RHEED showed that there was an amorphous layer on the surface. We also heated the substrate to 900 C for 2 minutes and RHEED data showed that there was a deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We assumed that the presence of oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. Therefore, we evaporated 2500 A of silicon to all four edges of the wafer to try to enclose the oxygen. When heating the evaporated wafer to 900 C the RHEED data showed single crystalline structure however at 1000 C the RHEED data showed deterioration of the single crystalline structure. We conclude that the substrate itself is temperature dependent and that the oxygen was coming from the sides of the silicon dioxide layer. We propose to evaporate more silicon on the edges of the wafer to eliminate the escape of oxygen. this will allow

  9. Silicon Carbide Technology for Grid Integrated Photovoltaic Applications: Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Carbide Transistors.

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Subhadra

    2011-01-01

    For the endorsement of the study of potential utilization of the emerging silicon carbide (SiC) devices, three SiC active switches, namely SJEP120R063 (1200V, 63 mohm) SiC JFET manufactured by Semisouth, BT1206AC-P1 (1200V, 125 mohm) SiC BJT by TranSiC and CMF20120 (1200V, 80 mohm, 33A) SiC MOSFET by Cree have been investigated systematically in this thesis work.The four layer PCB board with the smart layouts like the drain and gate traces are either perpendicular to each other or run into di...

  10. Performance of FBTR mixed carbide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed carbide fuel of 70% PuC content is being used as driver fuel in the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) for the first time in the world. When it was first proposed for FBTR small core, its performance potential had to be assessed based upon extrapolated data. High Pu content of the fuel reduces the thermal conductivity and melting point. Also, small diameter of FBTR fuel results in high heat flux at fuel-clad gap. A conservative initial estimate limited the linear power to 250 W/cm and the burnup to 25,000 MWd/t. Subsequently, detailed analyses were performed with the use of measured as well as data from literature. Based on this, the linear power has been upgraded to 320 W/cm. Also analyses indicate that the fuel is capable of sustaining a peak burnup of 50,000 MWd/t. Recently, the central fuel subassembly was unloaded for post irradiation examination (PIE) after the initial target burnup of 25,000 MWd/t. Preliminary results from PIE indicate that the analysis is well supported by the results. (author)

  11. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  12. Hafnium carbide nanocrystal chains for field emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hafnium carbide (HfC) nanostructure, i.e., HfC nanocrystal chain, was synthesized by a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. X-ray diffractometer, field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer were employed to characterize the product. The synthesized one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with many faceted octahedral nanocrystals possess diameters of tens of nanometers to 500 nm and lengths of a few microns. The chain-like structures possess a single crystalline structure and preferential growth direction along the [1 0 0] crystal orientation. The growth of the chains occurred through the vapor–liquid–solid process along with a negative-feedback mechanism. The field emission (FE) properties of the HfC nanocrystal chains as the cold cathode emitters were examined. The HfC nanocrystal chains display good FE properties with a low turn-on field of about 3.9 V μm−1 and a high field enhancement factor of 2157, implying potential applications in vacuum microelectronics.

  13. Oxidation of vanadium carbide in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied the samples oxidation of vanadium carbide (V8C7), synterized and in powder, in order to know the temperature influence and the aggregation state in the kinetics and the oxidation products. The assays were realized in static air, at temperature between 600 y 750 Centigrade, between 6 and 24 hours periods. The gaseous products were analyzed through gas chromatography while the condensates ones were analyzed through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence analysis. It was found that in the V8C7 oxidation occurs two basic processes: the gaseous oxides production which results of the carbon oxidation, fundamentally CO2, and the vanadium condensate oxides production, fundamentally V2O5. In the synterized samples assayed under 650 Centigrade, the kinetics is lineal with loss of mass, suggesting a control by the formation of gaseous products in the sample surface, while in the synterized samples assayed over 650 Centigrade, it occurs a neat gain of mass, which is attributed to vanadium pentoxide fusion. These processes produce stratified layers of V2O5 although at higher temperatures also it was detected V2O4. The superficial area effect is revealed in what the powder samples always experiment a mass neat increase in all essay temperatures, being the condensate oxidation products, fundamentally V2O5 and V6O13. (Author)

  14. Thermal equation of state of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhi T. Y.; Khare, Sanjay V.; Collins, Sean Andrew; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-02-01

    A large volume press coupled with in-situ energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray was used to probe the change of silicon carbide (SiC) under high pressure and temperature (P-T) up to 8.1 GPa and 1100 K. The obtained pressure-volume-temperature data were fitted to a modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, yielding values of a series of thermo-elastic parameters, such as the ambient bulk modulus KTo = 237(2) GPa, temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant pressure (∂K/∂T)P = -0.037(4) GPa K-1, volumetric thermal expansivity α(0, T) = a + bT with a = 5.77(1) × 10-6 K-1 and b = 1.36(2) × 10-8 K-2, and pressure derivative of the thermal expansion at a constant temperature (∂α/∂P)T = 6.53 ± 0.64 × 10-7 K-1 GPa-1. Furthermore, we found the temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant volume, (∂KT/∂T)V, equal to -0.028(4) GPa K-1 by using a thermal pressure approach. In addition, the elastic properties of SiC were determined by density functional theory through the calculation of Helmholtz free energy. The computed results generally agree well with the experimentally determined values.

  15. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  16. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  17. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  18. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  19. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  20. Polymeric synthesis of silicon carbide with microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Juan; Urueta, Luis; Valdez, Zarel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is conducting polymeric synthesis with microwaves for producing beta-SiC. A polymeric precursor was prepared by means of hydrolysis and condensation reactions from pheniltrimethoxysilane, water, methanol, ammonium hydroxide and chloride acid. The precursor was placed into a quartz tube in vacuum; pyrolysis was carried out conventionally in a tube furnace, and by microwaves at 2.45 GHz in a multimode cavity. Conventional tests took place in a scheme where temperature was up to 1500 degrees C for 120 minutes. Microwave heating rate was not controlled and tests lasted 60 and 90 minutes, temperature was around 900 degrees C. Products of the pyrolysis were analyzed by means of x-ray diffraction; in the microwave case the diffraction patterns showed a strong background of either very fine particles or amorphous material, then infrared spectroscopy was also employed for confirming carbon bonds. In both processes beta-SiC was found as the only produced carbide. PMID:17645205

  1. Structural relaxation in amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High purity single crystal and chemically vapor deposited (CVD) silicon carbide have been amorphized under fast neutron irradiation. The gradual transition in physical properties from the as-amorphized state to a more relaxed amorphous state prior to crystallization is studied. For the three bulk properties studied: density, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity, large property changes occur upon annealing between the amorphization temperature and the point of crystallization. These physical property changes occur in the absence of crystallization and are attributed to short and perhaps medium range ordering during annealing. It is demonstrated that the physical properties of amorphous SiC (a-SiC) can vary greatly and are likely a function of the irradiation state producing the amorphization. The initiation of crystallization as measured using bulk density and in situ TEM is found to be ∼875 deg. C, though the kinetics of crystallization above this point are seen to depend on the technique used. It is speculated that in situ TEM and other thin-film approaches to study crystallization of amorphous SiC are flawed due to thin-film effects

  2. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26394207

  3. Structural Evolution of Molybdenum Carbides in Hot Aqueous Environments and Impact on Low-Temperature Hydroprocessing of Acetic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Soon Choi; Viviane Schwartz; Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez; Mark Crocker; Samuel A. Lewis; Michael J. Lance; Meyer, Harry M.; More, Karren L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the structural evolution of molybdenum carbides subjected to hot aqueous environments and their catalytic performance in low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid. While bulk structures of Mo carbides were maintained after aging in hot liquid water, a portion of carbidic Mo sites were converted to oxidic sites. Water aging also induced changes to the non-carbidic carbon deposited during carbide synthesis and increased surface roughness, which in turn affected carbide pore...

  4. Effect of carbide on hydrogen environment embrittlement of Inconel 718

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tensile properties of Inconel 718 Ni-base superalloy were investigated in high-pressure hydrogen and in argon at room temperature. The effect of Nb-Ti carbide on hydrogen environment embrittlement (HEE) of the superalloy was also examined. The results obtained are as follows: (1) Hydrogen decreased elongation, reduction of area and ultimate tensile strength of the superalloy. HEE increased with decreasing the strain rate. Dimple rupture was mainly observed in argon, but brittle transgranular and intergranular fracture were observed in hydrogen. The crack initiation occurred at carbides both in argon and in hydrogen. Then the crack propagated in the matrix with ductile fracture in argon and with brittle fracture in hydrogen, respectively. (2) The finite element analysis (FEA) was applied to the crack initiation of the superalloy during the monotonic tensile process with the FEA model, which contained one particle at the center surrounded by the matrix. The effect of the shape of the particle on the maximum effective stress in the particle was simulated. The maximum effective stress in the particle increased markedly with increasing the average stress above the proof stress. The increasing order of the maximum effective stress depended on the shape of the particle. It was reasonable that the maximum effective stress in the carbide is high enough to break the carbide itself. It was also expected that the control of the shape of the carbide could improve HEE of the superalloy. (author)

  5. Optical characterisation of cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The varied properties of Silicon Carbide (SiC) are helping to launch the material into many new applications, particularly in the field of novel semiconductor devices. In this work, the cubic form of SiC is of interest as a basis for developing integrated optical components. Here, the formation of a suitable SiO2 buried cladding layer has been achieved by high dose oxygen ion implantation. This layer is necessary for the optical confinement of propagating light, and hence optical waveguide fabrication. Results have shown that optical propagation losses of the order of 20 dB/cm are obtainable. Much of this loss can be attributed to mode leakage and volume scattering. Mode leakage is a function of the effective oxide thickness, and volume scattering related to the surface layer damage. These parameters have been shown to be controllable and so suggests that further reduction in the waveguide loss is feasible. Analysis of the layer growth mechanism by RBS, XTEM and XPS proves that SiO2 is formed, and that the extent, of formation depends on implant dose and temperature. The excess carbon generated is believed to exit the oxide layer by a number of varying mechanisms. The result of this appears to be a number of stable Si-C-O intermediaries that, form regions to either depth extreme of the SiO2 layer. Early furnace tests suggest a need to anneal at, temperatures approaching the melting point of the silicon substrate, and that the quality of the virgin material is crucial in controlling the resulting oxide growth. (author)

  6. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  7. Investigation on the Effects of Titanium Diboride Particle Size on Radiation Shielding Properties of Titanium Diboride Reinforced Boron Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Addemir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion

  8. Reverse Flotation of Titanium Carbide from Garnet Mineral Using Cationic Surfactants

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. Abdel Khalek; B.K. Parekh

    2013-01-01

    For cutting garnet rocks Titanium carbide (TiC) blades are used, which produces a fine waste material, a mixture of garnet and a few percent of Titanium carbide. In the present study, a reverse flotation technique was developed to recover the valuable Titanium carbide as tailings from the waste mixture using cationic surfactants such as, DA-1618 (Diethyl Amine ether) or DDAB (Dioctyl Dimethyl Ammonium Bromide) and poly-propylenimine (PPI) as a depressant for Titanium carbide. The effect of co...

  9. Carbides crystalline structure of AISI M2 high-speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to identify the crystallographic structure of the extracted carbides of AISI M2 steel spray formed The structure determination of these carbides. The structure determination of these carbides is a very hard work. Since these structures were formed by atom migration it is not possible to reproduce them by a controlled process with a determined chemical composition. The solution of this problem is to obtain the carbide by chemical extraction from the steel. (Author)

  10. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  11. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic

  12. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K.; Staňková, A.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  13. Fabrication of Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles from Refluxing Derived Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jiqiu; LI Yongdi; MENG Xiaopeng; YIN Guangfu; YAO Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) nanoparticles were fabricated from a novel refluxing-derived precursor. The precursor was prepared by acid hydrolysis of Na2WO4 with concentrated HCl in water followed by refluxing with ethanol and n-Dedocane, respectively. Then it was heat-treated to 1 200℃for 2 h in vacuum to obtain WC nanoparticles. X-ray studies reveal the formation of hexagonal tungsten carbide and the grain size of 24.3 nm. SEM image shows WC nanoparticles with particle size of 20-60 nm. Long time refluxing results in alkane dehydrogenation and coke formation. The coke is the carbon source in the carbothermal reduction reaction. The novel route of two-stage refluxing is quite general and can be applied in the synthesis of similar carbides.

  14. Hydrogen adsorption on zirconium carbide and its alloys with rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen adsorption on zirconium carbide and ZrC-Re84at%, ZrC-Re21.7at% alloys was studied by the themodesorption method. Hydrogen thermodesorption curves were taken after various exposures, at the temperature increase from 300 up to 1450 K, or up to 2500 K. Determined were the initial hydrogen adhesion coefficient of S0=0.03+-0.02, and desorption temperature of 750-1000 K. The initial hydrogen coefficient of adhesion to carbides is less than to metals of their composition. Thermoemission and adsorption properties of two-phase alloys are close to those for ZrC. The soluted hydrogen deposition proceeded in zirconium carbide at 750-1500 K slower than thermodesorption

  15. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguan [University of Delaware

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  16. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross...... sections. The specimens were made of Böhler P/M steel grade 390s and 690s in both micro-clean and conventional grades. The results show that the content of non-metallic inclusions are higher in the conventionalgrades than in the microclean grades, but there were found to be no link between non......-metallic inclusions and the crack initiation. Surprisingly, no differences were found between the carbide size distributions of the micro-clean and conventional grades.Also, the distribution of the fractured carbides was found to be the same regardless of steel type, manufacturing method or location on the specimen....

  17. Implanted bottom gate for epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a technique to tune the charge density of epitaxial graphene via an electrostatic gate that is buried in the silicon carbide substrate. The result is a device in which graphene remains accessible for further manipulation or investigation. Via nitrogen or phosphor implantation into a silicon carbide wafer and subsequent graphene growth, devices can routinely be fabricated using standard semiconductor technology. We have optimized samples for room temperature as well as for cryogenic temperature operation. Depending on implantation dose and temperature we operate in two gating regimes. In the first, the gating mechanism is similar to a MOSFET, the second is based on a tuned space charge region of the silicon carbide semiconductor. We present a detailed model that describes the two gating regimes and the transition in between. (paper)

  18. Electrical properties of vanadium carbide in the homogeneity region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savin, V.I.; Spivak, I.I.; Topil' skij, N.D.; Rystsov, V.N.

    1983-07-01

    The results of investigations into electric, thermoelectric and galvanomagnetic properties in the region of vanadium carbide homogeneity in the 300-1500 K range are presented. The character of conductivity in the region of vanadium carbide homogeneity is not shown to be uniform: samples of VCsub(0.88), VCsub(0.84), VCsub(0.75) have metallic type of conductivity, the VCsub(0.75) sample displays semiconductor properties. Extrema conditioned by the effect of V/sub 8/C/sub 7/, V/sub 6/C/sub 5/, V/sub 4/C/sub 3/ carbide phase ordering are observed on concentration dependences of electric resistance, thermo-e. m.f., Hall constant. Temperature of order-disorder transformation by temperature dependences of electric resistance and thermo-e.m.f. makes up 1370-1420 K.

  19. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses. PMID:24052052

  20. Optimum Design of Lightweight Silicon Carbide Mirror Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yuanyuan; ZHANG Yumin; HAN Jiecai; ZHANG Jianhan; YAO Wang; ZHOU Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    According to the design requirement and on the basis of the principle that the thermal expansion coefficient of the support structure should match with that of the mirror, a lightweight silicon carbide primary mirror assembly was designed. Finite element analysis combined with the parameter-optimized method was used during the design. Lightweight cell and rigid rib structure were used for the mirror assembly. The static, dynamic and thermal properties of the primary mirror assembly were analyzed. It is shown that after optimization, the lightweight ratio of the silicon carbide mirror is 52.5%, and the rigidity of the silicon carbide structure is high enough to support the required mirror. When temperature changes, the deformation of the mirror surface is in proportion to the temperature difference.

  1. A study of silicon carbide synthesis from waste serpentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, T W; Hsu, C W

    2006-06-01

    There are 60000 tons of serpentine wastes produced in year 2004 in Taiwan. This is due to the well-developed joints in the serpentine ore body as well as the stringent requirements of the particle size and chemical composition of serpentine by iron making company. The waste also creates considerable environmental problems. The purpose of this study is reutilization of waste serpentine to produce a high value silica powder after acid leaching. These siliceous microstructure products obtained from serpentine would be responsible for high reactivity and characteristic molecular sieving effect. In this study, the amorphous silica powder was then synthesized to silicon carbide with the C/SiO(2) molar ratio of 3. The experiment results show that silicon carbide can be synthesized in 1550 degrees C. The formed silicon carbide was whisker beta type SiC which can be used as raw materials for industry. PMID:16405956

  2. APT analysis of WC-Co based cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidow, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.weidow@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Andren, Hans-Olof [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    A method for quickly producing sharp and site-specific atom probe specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides was developed using a combination of electropolishing, controlled back-polishing and FIB milling. Also, a method for measuring the amount of segregated atoms to an interface between two phases with a big difference in field needed for field evaporation was developed. Using atom probe tomography, the interface chemistry of WC/WC grain boundaries, WC/(M,W)C phase boundaries and WC/binder phase boundaries was analysed. In addition, the transition metal solubility in WC was determined. -- Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method for producing specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides. {yields} Measure segregated atoms to an interface between phases with different field evaporation field. {yields} The interface chemistry in cemented carbides. {yields} The transition metal solubility in WC.

  3. APT analysis of WC-Co based cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for quickly producing sharp and site-specific atom probe specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides was developed using a combination of electropolishing, controlled back-polishing and FIB milling. Also, a method for measuring the amount of segregated atoms to an interface between two phases with a big difference in field needed for field evaporation was developed. Using atom probe tomography, the interface chemistry of WC/WC grain boundaries, WC/(M,W)C phase boundaries and WC/binder phase boundaries was analysed. In addition, the transition metal solubility in WC was determined. -- Research highlights: → We develop a method for producing specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides. → Measure segregated atoms to an interface between phases with different field evaporation field. → The interface chemistry in cemented carbides. → The transition metal solubility in WC.

  4. Evolution of carbides in cold-work tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hoyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun-Yun, E-mail: firice@kims.re.kr [Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Dongmin [Seah Changwon Special Steel, 147 Jeokhyeon-ro, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-370 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Mox, E-mail: chokm@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to present the complete history of carbide evolution in a cold-work tool steel along its full processing route for fabrication and application. A sequence of processes from cast to final hardening heat treatment was conducted on an 8% Cr-steel to reproduce a typical commercial processing route in a small scale. The carbides found at each process step were then identified by electron diffraction with energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning or transmission electron microscope. After solidification, MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 2}C carbides were identified and the last one dissolved during hot compression at 1180 °C. In a subsequent annealing at 870 °C followed by slow cooling, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were added, while they were dissolved in the following austenitization at 1030 °C. After the final tempering at 520 °C, fine M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitated again, thus the final microstructure was the tempered martensite with MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. The transient M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C originated from the segregation of Mo and finally disappeared due to attenuated segregation and the consequent thermodynamic instability. - Highlights: • The full processing route of a cold-work tool steel was simulated in a small scale. • The carbides in the tool steel were identified by chemical–crystallographic analyses. • MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 2}C, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were found during the processing of the steel. • M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C finally disappeared due to thermodynamic instability.

  5. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The hydrogen evolution activity (HER) on five transition metal carbides was studied in concentrated phosphoric acid at different temperatures. • Carbides of Group 6 metals (Cr, Mo, W) showed significant HER activity; the Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism was proposed for the HER reaction on these materials. • The electrochemical stability towards oxidation was studied in concentrated phosphoric acid, with Cr, Ta and W carbides showing passivating behavior, while Nb and Mo carbides showed corrosion. - Abstract: Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170 °C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides, attributable to the different electronic structures. Tungsten carbide among the studied electrode samples exhibited the highest HER activity. Upon anodic potential scans in the presence of oxygen, chromium, tantalum and tungsten carbides displayed passivation due to the formation of stable surface layers whereas niobium and molybdenum carbides seemed to undergo corrosion

  6. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.;

    2014-01-01

    phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170°C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides...

  7. Formation of mesostructure in WC-Co cemented carbides: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Lisovsky A.F.

    2011-01-01

    The author considers potential lines in the formation of mesostructures in cemented carbides, analyzes the existing technologies of the formation thereof, describes physical and mechanical properties of cemented carbides with mesostructure and shows the efficiency of such cemented carbides in metal working and rock destruction tools.

  8. Formation of mesostructure in WC-Co cemented carbides: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisovsky A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The author considers potential lines in the formation of mesostructures in cemented carbides, analyzes the existing technologies of the formation thereof, describes physical and mechanical properties of cemented carbides with mesostructure and shows the efficiency of such cemented carbides in metal working and rock destruction tools.

  9. Surface reactions of tetraneopentyl zirconium on zirconium carbide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmeter, J.E. (Department 1126, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Smith, D.C.; Healy, M.D. (INC-1, MS-C346, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87105 (United States))

    1994-07-01

    Interest has arisen recently in the use of metal alkyl compounds as precursors in the chemical vapor deposition of metal carbides. This paper presents results of a study of the surface chemistry of one such precursor, tetraneopentyl zirconium (ZrNp[sub 4]), on zirconium carbide thin films. Decomposition of the precursor leads to the desorption of both methane and a larger hydrocarbon species that is tentatively identified as neopentane. The desorption of large amounts of methane may help to explain the fact that ZrC films grown to date with this precursor are not stoichiometric but rather contain excess carbon.

  10. Process for forming silicon carbide films and microcomponents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Alex V.; Balooch, Mehdi; Moalem, Mehran

    1999-01-01

    Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C.sub.60 precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C.sub.60 with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C.sub.60 on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K.

  11. Determination of soluble carbon in nuclear grade boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work describes two different techniques (manometric and wet chemical) for the soluble carbon determination in nuclear grade boron carbide. The techniques are based on the reaction of the boron carbide with a sulfocromic mixture, generating CO2. The techniques differ on the mode they do the measurement of CO2 produced. By wet chemical technique the CO2 is absorved in a barium hydroxide solution and is determinated by titration. In the manometric technique the CO2 gas is measured using a McLeod gauge. The gas produced by the latter technique is analysed by mass spectrometry. The details of the analytical technique and the data obtained are discussed. (author)

  12. Determination of oxygen in mixed uranium-plutonium carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of oxygen in mixed uranium-plutonium carbide fuels is made by inert gas fusion-coulometry. To minimize oxygen contamination during sample preparation, the sample is crushed, weighted and sealed air-tight in a platinum capsule in an argon gas atmosphere glove box. The true oxygen content is estimated by subtracting the oxygen contamination from the oxygen determined. Routine analysis of 32 samples of mixed uranium-plutonium carbides is performed with a coefficient of variation of 1.6%. (author)

  13. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 16000C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  14. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 μm in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 μm in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process

  15. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  16. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 104 with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n)3 at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼104 is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics

  17. Flaw imaging and ultrasonic techniques for characterizing sintered silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.; Abel, P.B.

    1987-08-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus x-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  18. Magnetron sputter deposition of boron and boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication of X-ray optical coatings with greater reflectivity required the development of sputter deposition processes for boron and boron carbide. The use of high density boron and boron carbide (B4C) and a vacuum-brazed target design was required to achieve the required sputter process stability and resistance to the thermal stress created by high rate sputtering. Our results include a description of the target fabrication procedures and sputter process parameters necessary to fabricate B4C and boron modulated thin film structures. (orig.)

  19. Thermodynamic Calculation of Carbide Precipitate in Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bo; YU Yong-mei; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of regular solution sublattice model, thermodynamic equilibrium of austenite/carbide in Fe-Nb-C ternary system was investigated. The equilibrium volume fraction, chemical driving force of carbide precipitates and molar fraction of niobium and carbon in solution at different temperatures were evaluated respectively. The volume fraction of precipitates increases, molar fraction of niobium dissolved in austenite decreases and molar fraction of carbon increases with decreasing the niobium content. The driving force increases with the decrease of temperature, and then comes to be stable at relatively low temperatures. The predicted ratio of carbon in precipitates is in good agreement with the measured one.

  20. Optical contrast in ion-implanted amorphous silicon carbide nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topographic and optical contrasts formed by Ga+ ion irradiation of thin films of amorphous silicon carbide have been investigated with scanning near-field optical microscopy. The influence of ion-irradiation dose has been studied in a pattern of sub-micrometre stripes. While the film thickness decreases monotonically with ion dose, the optical contrast rapidly increases to a maximum value and then decreases gradually. The results are discussed in terms of the competition between the effects of ion implantation and surface milling by the ion beam. The observed effects are important for uses of amorphous silicon carbide thin films as permanent archives in optical data storage applications

  1. High-Q silicon carbide photonic-crystal cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jonathan Y. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lu, Xiyuan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Lin, Qiang, E-mail: qiang.lin@rochester.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Institute of Optics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    We demonstrate one-dimensional photonic-crystal nanobeam cavities in amorphous silicon carbide. The fundamental mode exhibits intrinsic optical quality factor as high as 7.69 × 10{sup 4} with mode volume ∼0.60(λ/n){sup 3} at wavelength 1.5 μm. A corresponding Purcell factor value of ∼10{sup 4} is the highest reported to date in silicon carbide optical cavities. The device exhibits great potential for integrated nonlinear photonics and cavity nano-optomechanics.

  2. Hot-press fabrication and joining of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed for fabricating long, cylindrical rubber-mill rolls of boron carbide for use with abrasive materials. The technique consisted of initially hot pressing the boron carbide (to 90% of the theoretical density) to short, hollow cylinders having a length-to-diameter ratio of about one. This initial hot-press operation was followed by a second hot press to join or bond, and further densify, the short sections into a final compact having a length-to-diameter ratio of three. Flexural-strength data show that the integrity of the bond is comparable to that of the base material

  3. Carbothermic synthesis of carbides of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial pressures of carbon monoxide, uranium and plutonium over different phase regions relevant to the carbothermic synthesis of carbides of uranium and plutonium are calculated using recent models and thermodynamic data for the compounds in U-C-O and Pu-C-O systems. The experimental parameters for the preparation of uranium carbides and a two step synthesis involving carbothermic reduction of the oxide to the dicarbide followed by hydrogen stripping of carbon to produce uranium monocarbide are discussed. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  4. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide and graphene reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Ajith Kumar

    Tantalum carbide (TaC), an ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC), is well known for its exceptional properties such as high hardness (15-19 GPa), melting point (3950 °C), elastic modulus (537 GPa), chemical resistance, and thermal shock resistance. To make TaC to be the future material for hypersonic vehicles, it is required to improve its thermal conductivity, strength, and fracture toughness. Researchers have previously reinforced TaC ceramic with carbides of silicon and boron as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, these reinforcements either undergo chemical changes or induce defects in the matrix during processing. In addition, these reinforcements exhibit a very minimal improvement in the properties. In the present work, we attempted to improve TaC fracture toughness by reinforcing with graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and processing through spark plasma sintering at high temperature of 2000 °C, pressure of 70 MPa, and soaking time of 10 min. In addition, we investigated the active densification mechanism during SPS of TaC powder and the effect of ball milling time on mechanical properties of sintered TaC. A relative density of >96% was achieved using SPS of monolithic TaC (Grain boundary sliding is proposed as active densification mechanism based on these calculations. Reinforcing GNPs (2-6 vol.% ) in the TaC matrix improved relative density (99.8% for TaC-6 vol.% GNP). Also ˜150% and ˜180% increase in flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively, was observed for TaC-6 vol.% GNP composite. The significant improvement in these properties is attributed to improved densification and toughening mechanisms such as sheet pull-out and crack deflection due to reinforcement of graphene. Uniform dispersion of GNPs in the TaC matrix is observed from microstructural analysis. Raman spectroscopy analysis also indicated that GNPs are successfully retained in sintered TaC-GNP composites without any damage.

  5. Nitride and carbide preforms for infiltration process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Twardowska

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Infiltration of molten metals into porous ceramic preforms is the only technique suitable for the fabrication of high volume fraction of ceramic materials in MMCs. The most popular material for porous preforms is Al2O3 because of its low cost. Infiltration process generates thermal stresses in the Al2O3 preforms. The thermal shock resistance of Al2O3 is lower than for Si3N4 or Al2O3/TiC+TiN materials. The aim of this study is to obtain the nitride and carbide base preforms material for the infiltration process of molten aluminium alloys.Design/methodology/approach: The method of obtaining the silicon nitride and oxide-carbonitride porous preform for the infiltration process is the free sintering process. Some of selected properties of this material are presented. The preforms were produced by the mixing of ceramic powders with organic binders, followed by forming, drying and firing. Ceramic preforms of 65% porosity were produced. Microscopic investigations revealed good joints between the ceramic particles.Findings: The material consist of the base component (90 wt.% of α-Si3N4, 5 wt.% of Al2O3, 5 wt.% of Y2O3, which were mixed with 40 wt.% of polyethylene glycol 6000 (mixed in Turbula porosity is 25.7 %. The higher value of porosity 66.6% was obtained for material with 20 wt.% tylose. The grain size of Si3N4 and method of the mixtures preparing (mixing with or without milling have the significant influence on compacts’ porosity. For 68 wt.% Al2O3, 2 wt.% ZrO2 and 30 wt.% Ti(C,N with addition of glycol 6000, the value of porosity is 67%. α-Si3N4 material produced shows strong bonding with aluminium and AlSi11 aluminium alloy.Practical implications: Pressureless infiltration of molten metals into ceramics is the most cost-effective approach to liquid-metal processing of MMCs. Metal matrix composites are applied widely in aircraft production technologies and defence technology.Originality/value: Compared to widely used alumina

  6. PECVD silicon carbide surface micromachining technology and selected MEMS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Yang, H.; French, P.J.; Sarro, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Attractive material properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon carbide (SiC) when combined with CMOS-compatible low thermal budget processing provides an ideal technology platform for developing various microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and merging them with

  7. Growth of Vanadium Carbide by Halide-Activated Pack Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter;

    The present work investigates growth of vanadium carbide (VC) layers by the pack diffusion method on a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The VC layers were produced by pack diffusion at 1000°C for 1, 4 and 16 hours. The VC layers were characterized with optical and electron microscopy, Vickers hardness tests...

  8. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  9. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GEORGE PELIN; CRISTINA-ELISABETA PELIN; ADRIANA STEFAN; ION DINC\\u{A}; ANTON FICAI; ECATERINA ANDRONESCU; ROXANA TRUSC\\u{A}

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based composites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ensure uniform dispersion of the nanopowder, followed by heat curing of the phenolic-based materials at controlled temperature profile up to 120$^{\\circ}$C. The obtained nanocomposites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis and evaluated in terms of mechanical, tribological and thermal stability under load. The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric silicon carbide content. The results indicate that these materials could be effectively used to obtain ablative or carbon–carbon composites in future studies.

  10. Modification of optical surfaces employing CVD boron carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-reflective or high emissivity optical surfaces require materials with given roughness or surface characteristics wherein interaction with incident radiation results in the absorption and dissipation of a specific spectrum of radiation. Coatings have been used to alter optical properties, however, extreme service environments, such as experienced by satellite systems and other spacecraft, necessitate the use of materials with unique combinations of physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Thus, ceramics such as boron carbide are leading candidates for these applications. Boron carbide was examined as a coating for optical baffle surfaces. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on graphite substrates from BCl3, CH4, and H2 gases employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Parameters including temperature, reactant gas compositions and flows, and pressure were explored. The structures of the coatings were characterized using electron microscopy and compositions were determined using x-ray diffraction. The optical properties of the boron carbide coatings were measured, and relationships between processing conditions, deposit morphology, and optical properties were determined

  11. Behavior of tungsten carbide in water stabilized plasma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2007), s. 213-220. ISSN 1335-8987 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/0540 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : water stabilized plasma * tungsten carbide * tungsten hemicarbide * decarburization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  12. Method of making metallic oxide or carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is claimed of making metallic oxide or carbide particles of uranium, which comprises fuels or breeder materials for nuclear reactors. An aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate or chloride and, if necessary, colloidal carbon is added dropwise into an organic ketone or ketone mixture phase which is located above an aqueous ammonia solution. The thereupon formed particles are sintered

  13. The synthesis of titanium carbide-reinforced carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pinwen; Hong, Youliang; Liu, Bingbing; Zou, Guangtian

    2009-06-01

    Tailoring hard materials into nanoscale building blocks can greatly extend the applications of hard materials and, at the same time, also represents a significant challenge in the field of nanoscale science. This work reports a novel process for the preparation of carbon-based one-dimensional hard nanomaterials. The titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are prepared by an electrospinning technique and a high temperature pyrolysis process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium sources is first electrospun into the composite nanofibers, which are subsequently pyrolyzed to produce the desired products. The x-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The Raman analyses show that the composite nanofibers have low graphite clusters in comparison with the pure carbon nanofibers originating from the electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers. The mechanical property tests demonstrate that the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes have four times higher tensile strength than the carbon nanofiber membranes, and the Young's modulus of the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes increases in direct proportion to the titanium quantity.

  14. The synthesis of titanium carbide-reinforced carbon nanofibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tailoring hard materials into nanoscale building blocks can greatly extend the applications of hard materials and, at the same time, also represents a significant challenge in the field of nanoscale science. This work reports a novel process for the preparation of carbon-based one-dimensional hard nanomaterials. The titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are prepared by an electrospinning technique and a high temperature pyrolysis process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium sources is first electrospun into the composite nanofibers, which are subsequently pyrolyzed to produce the desired products. The x-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The Raman analyses show that the composite nanofibers have low graphite clusters in comparison with the pure carbon nanofibers originating from the electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofibers. The mechanical property tests demonstrate that the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes have four times higher tensile strength than the carbon nanofiber membranes, and the Young's modulus of the titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber membranes increases in direct proportion to the titanium quantity.

  15. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbücher, C.; Hildebrandt, E.; Szot, K.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Breuer, U.; Waser, R.; Alff, L.

    2016-06-01

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO2-x) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfCx) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfCx surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO2 thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfCx was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  16. Standard specification for nuclear-Grade boron carbide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to boron carbide pellets for use as a control material in nuclear reactors. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  17. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  18. Multifunctional composites containing molybdenum carbides as potential electrocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigert, Erich C. [Center for Catalytic Science and Technology, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); South, Joseph [Army Research Laboratory, Building 4600, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Rykov, Sergey A.; Chen, Jingguang G. [Center for Catalytic Science and Technology, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

    2005-01-30

    The aim of the current study is to determine the feasibility of introducing fuel cell functionality on the surfaces of carbon-based composite materials. This can potentially be achieved by the synthesis of molybdenum carbides on the surfaces of carbon foam, which is a light and rigid material that can be used as structural components in aircrafts and vehicles. The current study employed physical vapor deposition (PVD) to deposit molybdenum on the carbon foam substrate. The ratio of surface molybdenum and surface carbon was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The combination of PVD and in situ XPS allowed for the synthesis of molybdenum-coated carbon foam samples with desirable and reproducible Mo/C ratios. The coated films were then heated in vacuum to promote the reaction between molybdenum and carbon foam to produce surface molybdenum carbides. The carbide-coated samples were further characterized using XPS, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Platinum metal was also deposited via PVD on carbon foam, both with and without the presence of molybdenum carbide on the foam surface. The electrochemical stability of Pt-coated foams was evaluated using cyclic voltammetry (CV)

  19. Metallographic studies of eutectics carbides in high niobium microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantity, distribution and effectiveness of eutectic carbides was studied in high niobium microalloyed steels. The particles showed extremely inhomogenuous distributions and seemed to be ineffective in promoting refinement of either an austenitic, ferritic or perlitic microstructure. There is a definite need for better quantitative data about the fraction of Nb 'lost' to eutectic particles in these steels. (Author)

  20. Anticorrosion surface alloying of ferrous metal by carbide formers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown theoretically and experimentally that in cases of surface chromizing and titanizing of ferrous metal, proper carbon of the latter plays an important positive role, providing the formation of exclusively dense surface carbide layers with high and durable corrosion and mechanic stability. In the future surface alloying must become a more effective method of anticorrosion alloying

  1. Friction and wear behavior of chromium carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium carbides, tungsten carbide, and chromium oxide have been tested and evaluated as coatings to protect high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam generator and other HTGR components from adhesion, galling associated with sliding wear or from fretting. Tests were performed in commercially-pure helium and in helium doped with various gaseous impurities (H2, H2O, CH4, CO) to simulate the primary coolant of an HTGR. Several types of chromium carbide coatings including Cr3C2, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, were tested for wear resistance and resistance to long-term spalling. Tungsten carbide and chromium oxide coatings were tested in sliding wear tests. Cr23C6-NiCr coatings showed the best performance (from 400 to 8160C) whether they were applied by detonation gun or plasma gun spraying methods. The presence of the Cr23C6-NiCr coatings did not affect the creep rupture properties of Alloy 800H substrates at temperatures up to 7600C. Low-cycle fatigue life of similar specimens at 5930C was reduced to 10 to 20% when tested in the 1 to 0.6% strain range

  2. Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide is estimated by the hydrostatic weighing. The open porosity value dependence on the distance of spraying, depth of the charge, ratio and volume of the detonator barrie filing with gas components is established. Pore distribution in the cross section of a specimen tested for porosity is studied by the methods of metallographic analysis

  3. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process. PMID:27596718

  4. The valve effect of the carbide interlayer of an electric resistance plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The welded electric resistance plug (ERP) usually contains a carbide interlayer at the plug-carbon material interface. The interlayer forms during welding the contact metallic alloy with the carbon material when the oxide films of the alloy are reduced on the interface surface by carbon to the formation of carbides and the surface layer of the plug material dissolves carbon to saturation. Subsequently, during solidification of the plug material it forms carbides with the alloy components. The structural composition of the carbide interlayer is determined by the chemical composition of the contact alloy. In alloys developed by the author and his colleagues the carbide forming elements are represented in most cases by silicon and titanium and, less frequently, by chromium and manganese. Therefore, the carbide interlayers in the ERP consisted mainly of silicon and titanium carbides

  5. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice

  6. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu; Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia; Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  7. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu, E-mail: subhash@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia [Program Executive Office—Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment, US Army, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 (United States); Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K. [M-Cubed Technologies, Inc., Newark, Delaware 19711 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  8. Coarsening of carbides during different heat treatment conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Kai, E-mail: miaok21@126.com; He, Yanlin, E-mail: ylhe@staff.shu.edu.cn; Zhu, Naqiong; Wang, Jingjing; Lu, Xiaogang; Li, Lin

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Coarsening of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} carbides was quantitatively described in detail. • Cooling mode is a key factor to the simulation for the coarsening of carbides. • Coarsening of above spherical carbides can be calculated by Ostwald ripening model. • The interfacial energy between the γ matrix with M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} carbides are 0.7 J/m{sup 2}. - Abstract: Coarsening of carbides in 1# Fe-5.96Cr-0.35C (wt.%) alloy and 2# Fe-0.5V-0.53C (wt.%) alloy during different heat treatment conditions was investigated by carbon replica, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) , X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM techniques. The equilibrium phases at 850 °C constitute of austenitic matrix (γ) + M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and austenite matrix (γ) + V{sub 4}C{sub 3} for 1# and 2# alloy respectively. Morphology of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} carbides was mainly determined by cooling mode due to the different nucleation sites and growth mechanisms. Under directly aging condition, most carbides nucleate in the grain boundaries and grow into rod-shaped or flake-shaped particles by discontinuous growth mechanism. These particles turn out to be excluded during coarsening simulation using Oswald ripening model to give a more reasonable result. In addition, interfacial energy between M{sub 7}C{sub 3}/γ and V{sub 4}C{sub 3}/γ for the coarsening of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} during aging at 850 °C is evaluated by fitting experimental data using thermodynamic and kinetic calculations. The interfacial energy is determined to be 0.7 J/m{sup 2} for the coarsening of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} in austenitic matrix.

  9. Fabrication and properties of silicon carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyun Woo

    2008-12-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC), with excellent electrical, thermal, and mechanical properties, is a promising material candidate for future devices such as high-temperature electronics and super-strong lightweight structures. Combined with superior intrinsic properties, the nanomaterials of SiC show further advantages thanks to nanoscale effects. This thesis reports the growth mechanism, the self-integration, and the friction of SiC nanowires. The study involves nanowires fabrication using thermal evaporation, structure characterization using electron microscopy, friction measurement, and theoretical modeling. The study on nanowire growth mechanism requires understanding of the surfaces and interfaces of nanowire crystal. The catalyzed growth of SiC nanowires involves interfaces between source vapor, catalytic liquid, and nanowire solid. Our experimental observation includes the periodical twinning in a faceted SiC nanowire and three stage structure transitions during the growth. The proposed theoretical model shows that such phenomenon is the result of surface energy minimization process during the catalytic growth. Surface interactions also exist between nanowires, leading to their self-integration. Our parametric growth study reveals novel self-integration of SiC-SiO 2 core-shell nanowires as a result of SiO2 joining. Attraction between nanowires through van der Waals force and enhanced SiO2 diffusion at high temperature transform individual nanowires to the integrated nanojunctions, nanocables, and finally nanowebs. We also show that such joining process becomes effective either during growth or by annealing. The solid friction is a result of the interaction between two solid surfaces, and it depends on the adhesion and the deformation of two contacting solids among other factors. Having strong adhesion as shown from gecko foot-hairs, nanostructured materials should also have strong friction; this study is the first to investigate friction of nanostructures under

  10. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  11. Selective-area laser deposition (SALD) Joining of silicon carbide with silicon carbide filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Shay Llewellyn

    Selective Area Laser Deposition (SALD) is a gas-phase, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) process that utilizes a laser-driven, pyrolytic gas reaction to form a desired solid product. This solid product only forms in the heated zone of the laser beam and thus can be selectively deposited by control of the laser position. SALD Joining employs the SALD method to accomplish 'welding' of ceramic structures together. The solid reaction product serves as a filler material to bond the two parts. The challenges involved with ceramic joining center around the lack of a liquid phase, little plastic deformation and diffusivity and poor surface wetting for many ceramic materials. Due to these properties, traditional metal welding procedures cannot be applied to ceramics. Most alternative ceramic welding techniques use some form of a metal addition to overcome these material limitations. However, the metal possesses a lower ultimate use temperature than the ceramic substrate and therefore it decreases the temperature range over which the joined part can be safely used. SALD Joining enjoys several advantages over these ceramic welding procedures. The solid filler material chemistry can be tailored to match the type of ceramic substrate and therefore fabricate monolithic joints. The SALD filler material bonds directly to the substrate and the joined structure is made in a one step process, without any post-processing. The research documented in this dissertation focused on SALD Joining of silicon carbide structures with silicon carbide filler material. A historical progression of gas-phase SFF research and a literature review of the most prominent ceramic joining techniques are provided. A variety of SiC substrates were examined, as were various conditions of gas precursor pressures and mixtures, laser beam scan speed and joint configuration. The SALD material was characterized for composition and structure by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic

  12. Carbide and nitride fuels for advanced burner reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Under the U.S. fast reactor program, reference and alternative 1000 MWth Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts were developed using ternary metallic (U-TRU-Zr) and mixed oxide (UO2+TRUO2) fuels. Recently, mixed carbide and nitride fuels have been considered as fast reactor fuels on the basis of their high density, compatibility with coolant, high melting temperature, and excellent thermal conductivity although they are ceramic fuel like a mixed oxide fuel. Thus, the performance of the ABR core loaded with carbide and nitride fuels was evaluated in this study with an expectation that the carbide and nitride fuels can mitigate disadvantages of both metallic and oxide fuels in the ABR: favorable passive safety features in a severe accident compared to the oxide core, a higher discharge burnup compared to the metallic core, and a potential to increase thermal efficiency. All calculations performed in this study were focused on the neutronics characteristics, although the fabrication and irradiation experiences for carbide and nitride fuels are limited and some problems were observed in the reprocessing and irradiation of these fuels. The mixed monocarbide and mixed mononitride fuels were selected as the alternative fuel forms and the ABR core concepts with these fuels were developed based on the reference 1000 MWth ABR core concepts. For consistency, the potential design goals used in the reference ABR core concepts were also employed in this study: a 1000 MWth power rating, medium TRU conversion ratio of ∼0.75, a compact core, one-year operational cycle length at least with a capacity factor of 90%, sufficient shutdown margin with a limited maximum single control assembly fault, and possible use of either metallic or any ceramic fuels in the same core layout. The core layout and outer assembly dimensions of the reference 1000 MWth ABR core were kept, but the intra assembly design parameters were varied to maximize the discharge burnup within the

  13. Photoluminescent properties of silicon carbide and porous silicon carbide after annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photoluminescent (PL) p-type 6H porous silicon carbides (PSCs), which showed a strong blue-green photoluminescence band centered at approximately 490 nm, were annealed in Ar and vacuum conditions. The morphological, optical, and chemical states after annealing are reported on electrochemically etched SiC semiconductors. The thermal treatments in the Ar and vacuum environments showed different trends in the PL spectra of the PSC. In particular, in the case of annealing in a vacuum, the PL spectra showed both a weak red PL peak near 630 nm and a relatively intense PL peak at around 430 nm in the violet region. SEM images showed that the etched surface had spherical nanostructures, mesostructures, and islands. With increasing annealing temperature it changes all spherical nanostructures. The average pore size observed at the surface of the PSC before annealing was of the order of approximately 10 nm. In order to investigate the surface of a series of samples in detail, both the detection of a particular chemical species and the electronic environments at the surface are examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The chemical states from each XPS spectrum depend differently before and after annealing the surface at various temperatures. From these results, the PL spectra could be attributed not only to the quantum size effects but also to the oxide state.

  14. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  15. Deformation site-specific nature of transgranular carbide precipitation in 304 stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research was developed to identify the nature of transgranular carbide precipitation and chromium-depletion in heavily deformed 304 SS, and to examine the correlation between carbide precipitation and strain-induced martensite in the SS. Observations have indicated that: (1) Transgranular carbides form on twin-fault intersections in 304 SS. This causes linear-TG attack within the SS. (2) There was no observed correlation between strain-induced martensite and TG carbides in this work, except that both form at micro-shear band intersections, but not at the same intersection. (3) Lath martensite and fine-austenite form during heat treatment of deformed, 304 SS. (4) Transgranular carbides precipitate on martensite lath/fine-austenite boundaries in 304 SS, and produce extensive, random TG attack in the SS. (5) Lattice imaging of carbides has shown the presence of dislocations within the carbides and at the carbide-matrix interface, and changes in the carbide lattice orientation across a boundary, which may be indicators of key mechanisms of carbide nucleation on grain boundaries in SS

  16. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  17. A Study of the High Temperature on Chromium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation rates of chromium carbide have been measured at 900 to 1300 .deg. C and oxygen pressures between 2x10-2 8 x 10-2 Pa using thermogravimetric analysis method. Oxidation behavior of chromium carbide appeared to change very sensitively with both temperature and oxygen pressure. In case with the oxygen pressure lower than 8 x 10-2 Pa, the weight gain in the specimen due to the formation of chromium oxide occurred linearly with time at the every temperature studied, but when the oxygen pressure was increased up to 8 x 10-2Pa, the weight gain behavior versus time showed entirely different tendency. That is, in the temperature range of 900 .deg. C to 1000 .deg. C weight gain occurred, however in the range of 1000 .deg. C to 1300 .deg. C weight lost was observed. The reason for the observed linear kinetics could be inferred as follows. As the oxidation of carbide proceeded carbon monoxide would build up at the interface of the chromium oxide and carbide. If the equilibrium pressure of carbon monoxide at the interface exceeds the gas pressure at the outer specimen surface, the oxide scale formed on it might be cracked exposing new carbide sites on which oxidation could occur successively. Through a thermodynamic consideration it was judged that the above deduction was reasonable. On the other hand, the weight lost mentioned above was explained that it could occur mainly due to the further oxidation of Cr2O3 to the volatile CrO3 at the corresponding experimental conditions. Weight loss phenomenon mentioned before which was observed in the oxidation of chromium carbide was also clearified by X-ray diffraction method and SEM. That is, at 900 .deg. C stable oxide of chromium, (Cr2O3) was identified easily on the specimen surface. However, at 1300 .deg. C, only a few amount of this stable oxide could be found on to specimen surface, indicating Cr2O3 had been evaporated to CrO3 gas

  18. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  19. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm-3 (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  20. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed

  1. Determination of thorium in plutonium-thorium oxides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium is determined in (PuTh)C and (PuTh)O2 by complexometric titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) following separation on anion-exchange resin. Carbides are first oxidized by ignition in air at about 8000C. Oxide or oxidized carbide samples are dissolved in acids by the sealed-reflux technique or by heating in beakers. The plutonium is selectively sorbed from the 12M hydrochloric acid solution of the fuel on a Bio-Rad AG1-X2 anion-exchange resin column, and the eluted thorium is titrated with EDTA using xylenol orange as the indicator. The average recovery of thorium in 20 samples is 99.98% with a relative standard deviation of 0.07%

  2. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  3. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-04-01

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker’s microhardness tester at various loads in the range 1–20 N. Subsequently, the gradual evolution of the damage was characterized using an optical microscope in conjunction with the image analysing technique. The materials were classified in the order of the decreasing resistance against repeated indentation fatigue at the highest applied load of 20 N. It was further shown that there was a strong influence of grain size on the development of resistance against repeated indentation fatigue on the same spot. Finally, the poor performance of the sintered silicon carbide was found out to be linked to its previous thermal history.

  4. Thermal boundary conductance between refractory metal carbides and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) between thin films of Cr, Mo, Nb and W and diamond substrates has been measured using time domain thermoreflectance before and after a high-vacuum heat treatment at 800 °C for 2 h. While no signs of carbide formation could be detected in as-deposited layers by scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis, the heat treatment led to partial (W, Mo) or full conversion (Cr, Nb) of the film into carbide. The measured TBC values on as-deposited samples of 315, 220, 220 and 205 MW m-2K-1 measured for, respectively, the Cr, Mo, Nb and W samples, were found to not be significantly altered by the heat treatment

  5. Combinatorial optimization of carbide-free bainitic nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermodynamic calculations in combination with a neural network model are employed to predict the conditions under which nanostructured carbide-free bainite can be formed. The method recovers well the conditions under which the alloys reported in the literature display such features. Aluminium and silicon are shown to be equally effective in suppressing cementite. Manganese reduction appears to be the most effective means to accelerate bainite formation at low temperatures. A new low-manganese high-chromium steel grade capable of transforming into a nanostructured carbide-free structure is proposed, in which thermokinetic calculation and experiment show that low-temperature bainite forms faster and displays greater hardness than the alloys previously reported in the literature

  6. Experimental study of vanadium carbide and carbonitride coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chicco, B.; Summerville, E. (CSIRO Manufacturing Science and Technology, Woodville (Australia). Adelaide Lab.); Borbidge, W.E. (CSIRO Manufacturing Science and Technology, Melbourne Laboratory, Private Bag 33, Rosebank MDC, Clayton, Victoria, 3169 (Australia))

    1999-06-30

    Previous authors have established that prior nitriding or nitrocarburising will enhance the thickness of the vanadised coating formed on tool steels by the thermal diffusion (TD) process. However, whereas the single TD treatment produces a uniform surface layer of vanadium carbide, the combined treatments result in a complex vanadium carbonitride coating. Such a coating can be expected to exhibit a hardness that is lower overall and decreases away from the surface with increasing nitrogen to carbon ratio. An experimental study was undertaken to assess the relative merits of nitriding, nitrocarburising and carburising prior to TD vanadising on the steel AISI H13. The study demonstrates the specific advantages of carburising, previously untried as a pre-treatment. It produces the thickest coating (about twice as thick as that due to vanadising alone) and, perhaps more importantly, the coating is essentially vanadium carbide and exhibits a uniform high hardness across its entire span. (orig.) 30 refs.

  7. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hydrogenation on the microstructure of a pressureless sintered silicon carbide was studied. Samples which were annealed in a 40:60 mole % H2:Ar atmosphere at 14000C for 50 hours were microstructurally compared with unannealed samples and samples that had been annealed in a similar manner but using an argon atmosphere. The results were also compared with microstructural results obtained from in situ studies using both hydrogen and argon atmospheres. These results were compared with a thermodynamic model which was constructed using a free energy minimization technique. The observed effects of hydrogenation were surface decarburization and amorphization throughout the silicon carbide material. Other observations include the thermally induced growth of microcrystalline silicon and accelerated amorphization around the silicon microcrystals in samples used in hydrogen in situ studies. An analysis of the microstructure of the reference material was also performed

  8. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  9. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.; Hansen, T.; Jensen, M. R.; Gundersen, Hans Jørgen Gottlieb; Bjørnholm, T.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with...... boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  10. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V.; Begrambekov, L.; Buzhinsky, O.; Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A.; Klimov, N.; Kurnaev, V.; Mazul, I.; Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  11. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; An, Qi; Toksoy, M. Fatih; McCauley, James W.; Haber, Richard A.; Goddard, William A.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2015-10-01

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B4C (i.e., B12C3 ) but not in B13C2 . TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B4C is B11C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B13C2 because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  12. CALCIUM CARBIDE: AN EFFICIENT ALTERNATIVE TO THE USE OF ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton Carlos Pinheiro Cardoso Filho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The steel demand for fine applications have increased considerably in the last years, and the criteria for its production are even stricter, mainly in relation to the residual elements content and cleanness required. In relation to the steel cleanness, the main problem faced is the control of the amount and morphology of alumina inclusions, generated in the steel deoxidation with aluminum. Besides harming the products quality, the presence of non metallic inclusions can originate nozzle clogging, and consequently interruptions in the process flux. Aiming to improve the steel cleanness and to minimize nozzle clogging, this study is developed to evaluate the partial substitution of aluminum by calcium carbide in the steel deoxidation. Along the operational procedures, the calcium carbide was applied to 397 heats, through what the improvement in steel cleanness is confirmed, with consequent reduction in the nozzle clogging occurrence.

  13. Effect of alumina on silicon carbide bodies with clay bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Components made of silicon carbide are very important ceramic products due to their good resistance against thermal shocks. Home made of such products having silicate bonding usually have various defects in their structures. In this research effects of alumina addition on the components made of silicon carbide with clay bonding have been investigated, in order to see its effects on mechanical and structural properties such as blistering. Addition of up to 15 weights %. Al2O3 improved thermal shock resistance and increased bending strength from 25 MPa to 32 MPa due to Al2O3 transformation to mullite. However, when the amounts of alumina exceed 15 weights % mechanical strength as well as resistance to thermal shock reduced due to reman ing of Al2O3 in the components after sintering

  14. Pressureless sintered silicon carbide tailored with aluminium nitride sintering agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the influence of aluminium nitride on the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Pressureless sintering was achieved at 2000 degrees C for 5 min with the additions of boron carbide together with carbon of 1 wt% and 6 wt%, respectively, and a content of aluminium nitride between 0 and 10 wt%. Sintered samples present relative densities higher than 92%. The sintered microstructure was found to be greatly modified by the introduction of aluminium nitride, which reflects the influence of nitrogen on the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation. The toughness of sintered sample was not modified by AlN incorporation and is relatively low (around 2.5 MPa m1/2). Materials exhibited transgranular fracture mode, indicating a strong bonding between SiC grains. (authors)

  15. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOUZA C. P.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  16. Preparation of tantalum carbide from an organometallic precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2 O5 nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, Ta C, in the powder form at 1000 deg C. The natural sintering of Ta C powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400 deg C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to density the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value. (author)

  17. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B4C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B4C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  18. Carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbide designed from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay, Antoine; Vast, Nathalie; Sjakste, Jelena; Duparc, Olivier Hardouin [Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, CNRS UMR 7642, F-91120 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-07-21

    The carbon-rich boron-carbide (B{sub 11}C)C-C has been designed from first principles within the density functional theory. With respect to the most common boron carbide at 20% carbon concentration B{sub 4}C, the structural modification consists in removing boron atoms from the chains linking (B{sub 11}C) icosahedra. With C-C instead of C-B-C chains, the formation of vacancies is shown to be hindered, leading to enhanced mechanical strength with respect to B{sub 4}C. The phonon frequencies and elastic constants turn out to prove the stability of the carbon-rich phase, and important fingerprints for its characterization have been identified.

  19. Evaporation behaviour of the ternary uranium plutonium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaporation behaviour of uranium plutonium carbides (Usub(0.80)Psub(0.20)Csub(1+-x) was studied by a combined application of mass spectrometry, using the uranium isotope U-233, and the Knudsen effusion target collection technique in the temperature range from 15000C to the liquids temperature measured at 24580C and the composition range from C/M = 0.95 to 1.4. High temperature compatibility tests were made with W-cells, carburized Ta and TaC-liners up to 25000C. The influence of oxygen and nitrogen impurities on vapour pressure, and composition changes in continued evaporation of the the mixed carbides were investigated. The effects of plutonium depletion and segregation were studied. (Auth.)

  20. Preparation and electrocatalytic properties of tungsten carbide electrocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马淳安; 张文魁; 成旦红; 周邦新

    2002-01-01

    The tungsten carbide(WC) electrocatalysts with definite phase components and high specific surface area were prepared by gas-solid reduction method. The crystal structure, phase components and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, BET(Brunauer Emmett and Teller Procedure) and electrochemical test techniques. It is shown that the tungsten carbide catalysts with definite phase components can be obtained by controlling the carburizing conditions including temperature, gas flowing rate and duration time. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of W2C show higher electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of WC are suitable to be used as the anodic electrocatalyst for hydrogen anodic oxidation, which exhibit higher hydrogen anodic oxidation electrocatalytic properties in HCl solutions.

  1. The local structure of transition metal doped semiconducting boron carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jing; Dowben, P A [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PO Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Luo Guangfu; Mei Waining [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182-0266 (United States); Kizilkaya, Orhan [J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy., Baton Rouge LA 70806 (United States); Shepherd, Eric D; Brand, J I [College of Engineering, and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, N209 Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th and Vine Streets, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)

    2010-03-03

    Transition metal doped boron carbides produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of orthocarborane (closo-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) and 3d metal metallocenes were investigated by performing K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements. The 3d transition metal atom occupies one of the icosahedral boron or carbon atomic sites within the icosahedral cage. Good agreement was obtained between experiment and models for Mn, Fe and Co doping, based on the model structures of two adjoined vertex sharing carborane cages, each containing a transition metal. The local spin configurations of all the 3d transition metal doped boron carbides, Ti through Cu, are compared using cluster and/or icosahedral chain calculations, where the latter have periodic boundary conditions.

  2. Progress in Studies on Carbon and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide nanofiber and carbon nanotubes are introduced. The structure and application of nanotubers (nanofibers) in carbon/carbon composites are emphatically presented. Due to the unique structure of nanotubers (nanofibers), they can modify the microstructure of pyrocarbon and induce the deposition of pyrocarbon with high text in carbon/carbon composites. So the carbon/carbon composites modified by CNT/CNF have more excellent properties.

  3. Silicon Carbide Technologies for High Temperature Motor Drives

    OpenAIRE

    Snefjellå, Øyvind Holm

    2011-01-01

    Many applications benefit from using converters which can operate at high temperatures among them; down-hole drilling, hybrid vehicles and space craft. The theoretical performance of transistors made of Silicon Carbide (SiC) is investigated in this work. It is shown that their properties at high temperatures are superior compared to Silicon (Si) devices. Two half-bridge converters, using SiC normally-off Junction Field Effect Transistors (JFET) and SiC Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT), are ...

  4. Chromium carbide coatings obtained by the hybrid PVD methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Richert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the use of the Arc-PVD and Arc-EB PVD hybrid method, the chromium carbide coatings were deposited on steel substrate. Two kinds of coatings were obtained. The nanostructure coatings were formed by deposition of chromium carbide films by Arc PVD evaporation technique. The multilayer coatings were produced by Arc-EB PVD hybrid technology. In the second case the amorphous phase in majority was found in samples, identified by X-ray investigations.Design/methodology/approach: The Arc PVD and combination Arc-EB PVD methods were used for carbide coatings deposition. The special hybrid multisource device, produced in the Institute for Sustainable Technologies – National Research Institute (ITeE –PIB in Radom, was used for sample deposition. The microstructures of coatings were investigated by JEM 20101 ARP transmission electron microscopy (TEM, TESLA BS500 scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Olympus GX50 optical microscopy (MO. The X-ray diffraction was utilized to identify phase configuration in coatingsFindings: The microstructure of deposited coatings differs depending on the deposition method used. The Arc PVD deposition produced nanometric coatings with the Cr3C2, Cr23C6, Cr7C3 and CrC carbides built from nanometric in size clusters. In the case of the Arc-EB PVD hybrid technology in majority of cases the amorphous microstructure of coatings was found. The hybrid coatings consist of alternating layers of Ni/Cr-Cr3C2.Practical implications: The performed investigations provide information, which could be useful in the industrial practice for the production of wear resistant coatings on different equipments and tools.Originality/value: It was assumed that by using different kinds of PVD methods the different microstructures of coatings could be formed.

  5. Anisotropic electronic conduction in stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Tao Hu; Hui Zhang; Jiemin Wang; Zhaojin Li; Minmin Hu; Jun Tan; Pengxiang Hou; Feng Li; Xiaohui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Stacked two-dimensional titanium carbide is an emerging conductive material for electrochemical energy storage which requires an understanding of the intrinsic electronic conduction. Here we report the electronic conduction properties of stacked Ti3C2 T 2 (T = OH, O, F) with two distinct stacking sequences (Bernal and simple hexagonal). On the basis of first-principles calculations and energy band theory analysis, both stacking sequences give rise to metallic conduction with Ti 3d electrons c...

  6. Ballistic behaviour of explosively shattered alumina and silicon carbide targets

    OpenAIRE

    Nanda, H.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D.C.; Hazell, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    The resistance offered by three ceramic materials of varying strength that have been subjected to explosive loading has been investigated by depth-of- penetration testing. Each material was completely penetrated by a tungsten carbide cored projectile and the residual penetration into a ductile aluminium alloy backing material was measured. The resulting ballistic performance of each damaged ceramic was found to be similar implying that the resistance offered to the projectil...

  7. Refractory ceramics to silicon carbide. 5. tot. rev. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvers, B. (ed.); Hawkins, S. (ed.); Russey, W. (ed.); Schulz, G. (ed.)

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains 28 contributions to the following topics: Refractory Ceramics, Reinforced Plastics; Release Agents; Resins, Natural; Resins, Synthetic; Resorcinol; Resources of Oil and Gas; Rhenium and Rhenium Compounds; Rodenticides; Rubber (1. Survey, 2. Natural, 3. Synthetic, 4. Chemicals, 5. Technology, 6. Testing); Rubidium and Rubidium Compounds; Salicylic Acid; Saponins; Sealing Materials; Seasonings; Sedatives; Selenium and Selenium Compounds; Semiconductors; Shoe Polishes; Silica; Silicates; Silicon; Silicon Carbide. (orig.)

  8. An electrochemical process for the recycling of tungsten carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the development of a number of designs for electrochemical cells, and the subsequent construction and operation of a vibrating-plate cell capable of oxidizing 15 kilograms of tungsten carbide a day to a crude tungstic acid precipitate, with similtaneous recovery of cobalt metal on the cathode. The effects on the process of the reagent concentration, temperature, current density, and cathode material are discussed

  9. Cubic Silicon Carbide: a promising material for automotive application

    OpenAIRE

    Attolini, Giovanni; Bosi, Matteo; Rossi, Francesca; Watts, Bernard Enrico; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    carbide is a material that possesses properties that make it desirable in electronic, structural and sensor applications. As a wide band gap semiconductor it can be used in high power, high temperature electronics and harsh environments. Its hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and thermal conductivity find uses ranging from disc brakes to micron scale sensors and actuators. The automotive industry faces some important challenges since it has obligations to manufacture safe, clean, ...

  10. Final design review of boron carbide safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this paper discusses the design review of the boron carbide safety rod for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This paper reviewed information presented by personnel of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Equipment Engineering Section, SRL Materials Technology Section and Reactor Materials Engineering and Technology. From this report, views, opinions and recommendations were made on the safety rod from materials testing to production

  11. Simulation in Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous Silicon Carbide Pin Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Dora; Fernandes, Miguel; Louro, Paula; Fantoni, Alessandro; Vieira, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Part 21: Electronics: Devices International audience Photodiodes are devices used as image sensors, reactive to polychromatic light and subsequently color detecting, and they are also used in optical communication applications. To improve these devices performance it is essential to study and control their characteristics, in fact their capacitance and spectral and transient responses. This study considers two types of diodes, an amorphous silicon pin and an amorphous silicon carbide pi...

  12. Rheology of silicon carbide/vinyl ester nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles with no surface treatment raise the viscosity of a vinyl ester resin much more intensely than micrometer-size SiC particles. An effective dispersant generally causes a reduction in the resin viscosity attributed to its surface-active properties and thereby increases the maximum fraction of particles that can be introduced. This article assesses the rheological behavior of SiC-nanoparticle-filled vinyl ester resin systems with the Bingham, power-law, Hersche...

  13. Nanoindentation testing of boron carbide thin film at elevated temperature

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čtvrtlík, Radim; Stranyánek, Martin; Boháč, Petr

    Leoben : Montanuniversität, 2009 - (Eichlseder, W.), s. 29-30 ISBN 978-3-902544-02-5. [Danubia-Adria Symposium on Advances in Experimental Mechanics /26/. Leoben (AT), 23.09.2009-26.09.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN301370701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : boron carbide * nanoindentation testing * elastic modulus Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. Micro-homogeneity studies of boron carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the micro-homogeneity of boron carbide powders by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) using slurry sampling. To get information on the particle size distributions of the powders, the stabilized slurries of boron carbide powders were nebulized, the aerosols were transported into a Batelle impactor and the droplets were collected on the impactor stages bearing TXRF sample holders. In a first series of measurements, parameters of the impaction like the duration of the impaction and the use of glutinous substance on the sample holders were optimized. The different mass size fractions for industrial boron carbide powders were determined by weight measurements of the fractions collected on the different stages. The established particle size distributions were in the range of 0.5 to >16 μm and found similar to those determined by laser diffraction reported elsewhere. Analyses of the mass fractions by slurry sampling TXRF showed that Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni and Cu within the measurements errors were homogeneously distributed over the mass fractions between 0.5 and 4 μm and that their concentrations agreed with the bulk composition, as determined with ICP-OES subsequent to digestion. However, light underestimates were found at the 5 (Mn) up to 150 μg g-1 (Fe) level. Finally, boron carbide powders were washed out with nitric acid with different concentrations and leaching solutions and the residues were analyzed by ICP-OES and TXRF respectively. It is shown that up to 60% of the residual trace impurities in the powder studied can be removed by leaching with 34% (v/v) of nitric acid. (author)

  15. First principle study of hydrogen behavior in hexagonal tungsten carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Xiang-Shan; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, C. S.; Q. F. Fang; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of hydrogen in hexagonal tungsten carbide (WC) is of particular interest for fusion reactor design due to the presence of WC in the divertor of fusion reactors. Therefore, we use first-principles calculations to study the hydrogen behavior in WC. The most stable interstitial site for the hydrogen atom is the projection of the octahedral interstitial site on tungsten basal plane, followed by the site near the projection of the octahedral interstitial site on carbon b...

  16. Anodic etching of p-type cubic silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G. L.; Fekade, K.; Wongchotigul, K.

    1992-01-01

    p-Type cubic silicon carbide was anodically etched using an electrolyte of HF:HCl:H2O. The etching depth was determined versus time with a fixed current density of 96.4 mA/sq cm. It was found that the etching was very smooth and very uniform. An etch rate of 22.7 nm/s was obtained in a 1:1:50 HF:HCl:H2O electrolyte.

  17. Silicon carbide materials for LWR application: current status and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a very attractive engineering ceramic in particular for high-temperature use and nuclear application due to its high-temperature strength, oxygen resistance, chemical stability, low activation, radiation resistance, etc. Silicon carbide composites have pseudo ductile behaviour by de-bonding and sliding at fiber/matrix interphase. Fundamental mechanical properties of highly crystalline nuclear grade SiC composites are stable following neutron irradiation. Silicon carbide composites are promising materials for accident-tolerant fuel. The sophistication of the technology infrastructure for safety has been requested by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) in Japan. The research and development of fuel such as SiC cladding are expected to be described in a new road map by METI. Silicon carbide is a promising material for LWR application in terms of excellent stability of dimension and strength under neutron irradiation and excellent resistance to high-temperature steam. Fundamental fabrication technique and joining technique have been established. Current SiC/SiC composites have C interphase and environmental coating is required to prevent oxidation. Novel porous SiC/SiC composites do not have C interphase and have excellent oxidation resistance, although hermetic coating is required. The issues of SiC composite development for LWR application are as follows: The SiC/SiC composites have impurities depending on fabrication methods. It is important to understand the effect of impurities on the resistance to high-temperature water under normal operation and the resistance to high-temperature steam in the case of severe accident. The synergetic effect of irradiation and high-temperature water is also important. The reaction with fuel under neutron irradiation needs to be clarified. As for material development, coating, joining technique and large scale fabrication should be considered as important issues. Material cost should be

  18. Co-TiC CEMENTED CARBIDES. STRUCTURAL ASPECT

    OpenAIRE

    Volikova, A.; National Aviation University, Kyiv

    2012-01-01

     To increase wear resistance of turbine blades top shrouds plates made of different cast alloys are used. For this task current paper proposes Co-TiC cemented carbides. To evaluate prospective of their use in gas turbines it is necessary analize their microstructure and compare it with other alloys, particularly with industrial cast eutectic alloy XTH-62 and alloy P-69 [1].

  19. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement

  20. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Swastik Mondal; Elena Bykova; Somnath Dey; Sk. Imran Ali; Natalia Dubrovinskaia; Leonid Dubrovinsky; Gleb Parakhonskiy; Sander van Smaalen

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichio...

  1. Grain boundary resistance to amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Chen; Fei Gao; Bo Liu

    2015-01-01

    Under the C displacement condition, we have used molecular dynamics simulation to examine the effects of grain boundaries (GBs) on the amorphization of nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) by point defect accumulation. The results show that the interstitials are preferentially absorbed and accumulated at GBs that provide the sinks for defect annihilation at low doses, but also driving force to initiate amorphization in the nc-SiC at higher doses. The majority of surviving defects are C in...

  2. Progress in Studies on Carbon and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposite Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Xiao; Jie Chen; Xian-feng Xu

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanofiber and carbon nanotubes are introduced. The structure and application of nanotubers (nanofibers) in carbon/carbon composites are emphatically presented. Due to the unique structure of nanotubers (nanofibers), they can modify the microstructure of pyrocarbon and induce the deposition of pyrocarbon with high text in carbon/carbon composites. So the carbon/carbon composites modified by CNT/CNF have more excellent properties.

  3. WSP-Sprayed Boron Carbide Coatings for Fusion Applications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Neufuss, Karel; Ctibor, Pavel; Rohan, Pavel; Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil

    Düsseldorf: DVS, 2002 - (Lugscheider, E.; Berndt, C.), s. 1-5 ISBN 3-87155-783-8. [International Thermal Spray Conference.. Essen (DE), 04.03.2002-06.03.2002] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/01/0149 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : thermal spray coatings, boron carbide, fusion reactor materials Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials

  4. Investigation on the Performance of Supported Molybdenum Carbide for the Partial Oxidation of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanli Zhu; Jian Yang; Jiaxin Wang; Shengfu Ji; Hanqing Wang

    2003-01-01

    The performance of supported and unsupported molybdenum carbide for the partial oxida-tion of methane (POM) to syngas was investigated. An evaluation of the catalysts indicates that bulkmolybdenum carbide has a higher methane conversion during the initial stage but a lower selectivity toCO and H2/CO ratio in the products. The rapid deactivation of the catalyst is also a significant problem.However, the supported molybdenum carbide catalyst shows a much higher methane conversion, increasedselectivity and significantly improved catalytic stability. The characterization by XRD and BET specificarea measurements depict an improved dispersion of molybdenum carbide when using alumina as a carrier.The bulk or the supported molybdenum carbide exists in the β-Mo2C phase, while it is transformed intomolybdenum dioxide postcatalysis which is an important cause of molybdenum carbide deactivation.

  5. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aniruddha A Gadhikar; Ashok Sharma; D B Goel; C P Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Microstructure is one of the most important parameters influencing erosion behaviour of materials. The role of carbides in the matrix is very complicated in controlling the erosion rate of the materials. Conflicting results have been reported in the literature about the effect of carbides on erosion resistance. Carbides are of great importance especially as obstacles against the penetration of erosive particles into the material surface. However, they are susceptible to cracking and causing matrix decohesion which may increase the overall erosion rate. In 23-8-N nitronic steel, carbides present in the form of bands are observed to accelerate the erosion rate. Coarse carbides cause depletion of carbon in the austenite matrix which adversely affects the strain hardening tendency thus causing deterioration in erosion resistance of the bulk material. The dissolution of carbides in the austenitic matrix after solution annealing is observed to improve the erosion resistance of 23-8-N nitronic steel.

  6. Recent advances in the production of mixed, single-phase sintered carbides (U-Pu)C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbides sintered with nickel as a sintering aid are dense but contain around 10 per cent M2C3. The carbides sintered without nickel are less dense but contain nearly no M2C3. For dense carbides, it is known that the existence of M2C3 is linked to the oxygen and nitrogen content of the carbides. For less dense carbides, M2C3 is eliminated through the reaction: 2M2C3 + MO → 5MC + CO. CO can escape due to the presence of the porosities, The difference between the two types of carbides is due to the fact that the accelerated densification observed when nickel is used as a sintering aid does not allow CO to escape. (authors)

  7. Friction and surface chemistry of implantation-modified metal-carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry sliding friction measurements were performed on model carbide-metal composite samples containing 24-42 vol.% carbide. Wear debris, located preferentially on the carbides, were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analysis and Auger scanning microscopy. The friction and wear of the composite samples were found to be influenced by the compatibility (degree of mutual solubility) of the carbides with the steel counterface, as well as by local inhomogeneities in the carbide distribution. Friction tests were also made on the samples following high fluence titanium implantation. Implantation resulted in increased friction and wear, possibly owing to an implantation-induced softening or degradation of the carbides. (orig.)

  8. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  9. Carbide and Nitride Fuels for Advanced Burner Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impacts of the mixed carbide and nitride fuels on the core performances and passive safety features of TRU burner were assessed and comapred with the metallic and oxide fuels. Targeting the potential design goals adopted in the Advanced Burner Reactor core concepts, the alternative TRU burner concepts were developed by loading carbide and nitride fuels. The neutron spectrum is softer than that of the metal core, but harder than that of the oxide core, and the core performance parameters such as fuel residence time, discharge burnup, flux level, etc are generally between the values of the metal and oxide cores. The margin to fuel melt was significantly increased because of the high thermal conductivity and high melting temperature, and hence there is an additional room to improve the thermal efficiency by increasing the operating temperature. The changed fuel composition affected the kinetics parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients, but the variations were minimal. The reduced core height decreases the sodium void worth, and the high thermal conductivity decreases the fuel temperature and Doppler constant. As a result, both carbide and nitride cores have favorable passive safety features without additional design fixes that are required in the oxide core concepts. (author)

  10. Reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of uranium and plutonium carbides with austenitic steels has been studied between 650 and 1050 deg. C using UC, steel and (UPu)C, steel diffusion couples. The steels are of the type CN 18.10 with or without addition of molybdenum. The carbides used are hyper-stoichiometric. Tests were also carried out with UCTi, UCMo, UPuCTi and UPuCMo. Up to 800 deg. C no marked diffusion of carbon into stainless steel is observed. Between 800 and 900 deg. C the carbon produced by the decomposition of the higher carbides diffuses into the steel. Above 900 deg. C, decomposition of the monocarbide occurs according to a reaction which can be written schematically as: (U,PuC) + (Fe,Ni,Cr) → (U,Pu) Fe2 + Cr23C6. Above 950 deg. C the behaviour of UPuCMo and that of the titanium (CN 18.12) and nickel (NC 38. 18) steels is observed to be very satisfactory. (author)

  11. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu, E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui [Institute for Computational Materials Science, School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B{sub 5}C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B{sub 5}C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B{sub 4}C, BC, and BC{sub 4}, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  12. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  13. Method for the production of a silicon carbide body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For an improved method of producing silicon carbide elements of complex shape (gas turbine engines), selected fractions of silicon carbide particles (65 to 75% by weight particle size 40 to 0C to 4550C in an atmosphere with 10 to 30vol.% of oxygen removes the excess carbon at the surface of the body and provides it with an open pore structue. Silication is started by heating to at least 15400C in an oxygen-free atmosphere which consits mostly of nitrogen and 0 to 10vol% hydrogen. The hydrogen is active in removing enough carbon and, possibly, graphite from the body to obtain a sufficiently free volume for the subsequent conversion of the residual carbon into silicon carbide. The nitrogen converts oxidic impurities of the initial material into silicon nitride. After removing the nitrogen-hydrogen atmosphere, the body is kept in a vacuum lower than the steam pressure of silicon at silication temperature, with nitrogen being removed from the silicon nitride and transferred into silicon metal. The thus cleaned formed piece, which is now highly porous, is then silicated at temperatures between 14250C and 17650C in a nitrogen-charged environment. (IHOE)

  14. Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole composites; preparation and physicochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole (SiC/PPy) conducting composites were prepared using silicon carbide as inorganic substrate. The surface modification of SiC was performed in aqueous solution by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ferric chloride as oxidant. Elemental analysis was used to determine the mass loading of polypyrrole in the SiC/PPy composites. Scanning electron microscopy showed the surface modification of SiC by PPy. PPy in composites was confirmed by the presence of PPy bands in the infrared spectra of SiC/PPy containing various amounts of conducting polymer. The conductivity of SiC/PPy composites depends on PPy content on the surface. The composite containing 35 wt.% PPy showed conductivity about 2 S cm-1, which is in the same range as the conductivity of pure polypyrrole powder prepared under the same conditions using the same oxidant. PPy in the composites was clearly detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements by its N1s and Cl2p peaks. High resolution scans of the C1s regions distinguished between silicon carbide and polypyrrole carbons. The fraction of polypyrrole at the composite surface was estimated from the silicon and nitrogen levels. The combination of XPS and conductivity measurements suggests that the surface of the SiC/PPy composites is polypyrrole-rich for a conducting polymer mass loading of at least 12.6 wt.%

  15. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  16. Calcium Carbide: A Unique Reagent for Organic Synthesis and Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodygin, Konstantin S; Werner, Georg; Kucherov, Fedor A; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2016-04-01

    Acetylene, HC≡CH, is one of the primary building blocks in synthetic organic and industrial chemistry. Several highly valuable processes have been developed based on this simplest alkyne and the development of acetylene chemistry has had a paramount impact on chemical science over the last few decades. However, in spite of numerous useful possible reactions, the application of gaseous acetylene in everyday research practice is rather limited. Moreover, the practical implementation of high-pressure acetylene chemistry can be very challenging, owing to the risk of explosion and the requirement for complex equipment; special safety precautions need to be taken to store and handle acetylene under high pressure, which limit its routine use in a standard laboratory setup. Amazingly, recent studies have revealed that calcium carbide, CaC2 , can be used as an easy-to-handle and efficient source of acetylene for in situ chemical transformations. Thus, calcium carbide is a stable and inexpensive acetylene precursor that is available on the ton scale and it can be handled with standard laboratory equipment. The application of calcium carbide in organic synthesis will bring a new dimension to the powerful acetylene chemistry. PMID:26898248

  17. Characterization of a boron carbide-based polymer neutron sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuting; James, Robinson; Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Downing, Greg; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-12-01

    Boron is used widely in thin-film solid-state devices for neutron detection. The film thickness and boron concentration are important parameters that relate to a device's detection efficiency and capacitance. Neutron depth profiling was used to determine the film thicknesses and boron-concentration profiles of boron carbide-based polymers grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-B10C2H12), resulting in a pure boron carbide film, or of meta-carborane (1,7-B10C2H12) and pyridine (C5H5N), resulting in a pyridine composite film, or of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) resulting in a pure pyrimidine film. The pure boron carbide film had a uniform surface appearance and a constant thickness of 250 nm, whereas the thickness of the composite film was 250-350 nm, measured at three different locations. In the meta-carborane and pyridine composite film the boron concentration was found to increase with depth, which correlated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)-derived atomic ratios. A proton peak from 14N (n,p)14C reaction was observed in the pure pyrimidine film, indicating an additional neutron sensitivity to nonthermal neutrons from the N atoms in the pyrimidine.

  18. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide. PMID:24929411

  19. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: A first-principles study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide

  20. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  1. Boron carbide nitride derived from amine-boranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that amine-boranes such as pyridine- or piperazine-borane can be converted into infusible polymers by thermal crosslinking at temperatures up to 420 degrees C. Further rise of the temperature up to 1050 degrees C in argon results in transformation of the polymers into black residues. Microstructural (TEM/EELS, ESCA) and chemical investigations indicate the presence of single phase boron carbide nitrides which exhibit a graphite-like, turbostratic structure with a homogeneous distribution of the elements B, N, and C. Subsequent annealing at 2200 degrees C in argon gives rise to crystallization of the pyrolytic material generating the thermodynamically stable phases BN, C, and B4C. The semiconducting properties of the X-ray amorphous boron carbide nitride synthesized at 1050 degrees C depend on the B/N/C-ratio which can be influenced by the type of amine-borane-precursor and by the applied atmosphere (Ar or NH3) during pyrolysis. The amine-boranes can be converted into boron carbide nitride- and BN-monoliths at 1050 degrees C under argon or reactive gas (NH3), respectively. The monoliths are transformed into composites with 91% rel. density containing BN, C, and B4C when heated up to 2200 degrees C

  2. Gravimetric determination of carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gravimetric method for determining carbon in uranium-plutonium carbide materials was developed to analyze six samples simultaneously. The samples are burned slowly in an oxygen atmosphere at approximately 9000C, and the gases generated are passed through Schuetze's oxidizing reagent (iodine pentoxide on silica gel) to assure quantitative oxidation of the CO to CO2. The CO2 is collected on Ascarite and weighed. This method was tested using a tungsten carbide reference material (NBS-SRM-276) and a (U,Pu)C sample. For 42 analyses of the tungsten carbide, which has a certified carbon content of 6.09%, an average value of 6.09% was obtained with a standard deviation of 0.017% or a relative standard deviation of 0.28%. For 17 analyses of the (U,Pu)C sample, an average carbon content of 4.97% was found with a standard deviation of 0.012% or a relative standard deviation of 0.24%

  3. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  4. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  5. Properties of boron-carbide based nanotubular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: One of the most important areas of search for a new generation of superconductors is amongst layered A1B2-type systems. One such structure, LiBC, which is isovalent with, and structurally similar to, the superconductor MgB2, has recently attracted attention due to the nature of its electronic structure. It was found by Rosner et al., that the character of the Fermi surface of hole-doped LiBC is very similar to the features which lead to superconductivity in MgB2 at TC ∼ 40 K. Exploration of the novel properties of tubular analogues of layered and crystalline structures is another promising trend in the search for novel superconductors. Carbon nanotubes, for example, have been found tp have a superconducting transition temperature, TC, of approximately 0.55 K. A number of interesting attempts to model the properties of hypothetical nanotubular modifications of layered A1B2 and A1B2 - type ternary suicides have also been performed recently. We have proposed a new class of charged Boron-Carbide nanotubes (BC(-)) which correspond to a charged backbone structure for the hypothetical LiBC nanotubes. In the present work we discuss the energetics and electronic structure of these charged Boron-Carbide nanotubes, and the effects of hole-doping of these structures. We also present some preliminary results of calculations of the vibrational properties of charged and hole-doped Boron-Carbide nanotubes

  6. Visible-blind ultraviolet photodetectors on porous silicon carbide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Highly reliable UV detectors are fabricated on porous silicon carbide substrates. • The optical properties of samples are enhanced by increasing the current density. • The optimized sample exhibits enhanced sensitivity to the incident UV radiation. - Abstract: Highly reliable visible-blind ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors were successfully fabricated on porous silicon carbide (PSC) substrates. High responsivity and high photoconductive gain were observed in a metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetector that was fabricated on an optimized PSC substrate. The PSC samples were prepared via the UV-assisted photo-electrochemical etching of an n-type hexagonal silicon carbide (6H-SiC) substrate using different etching current densities. The optical results showed that the current density is an outstanding etching parameter that controls the porosity and uniformity of PSC substrates. A highly porous substrate was synthesized using a suitable etching current density to enhance its light absorption, thereby improving the sensitivity of UV detector with this substrate. The electrical characteristics of fabricated devices on optimized PSC substrates exhibited enhanced sensitivity and responsivity to the incident radiation

  7. Determination of carbides generation parameters in corium ant its effect on meltdown removing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object of examination in the work is chemical reactions velocities of uranium dioxide with graphite under high temperatures. The method of study is conducting of calculations complex by numerical techniques and comparison its results with experimental data. Result of this study is mathematical model of uranium carbides and zirconium carbides formation in accidental processes courses. Results of study are allowing to create conditions for development or prevention of carbides formation reactions, so this methodics is suitable for ensuring of nuclear reaction safety

  8. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Il’yashchenko, D. P.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  9. Electrophysical properties and structure of niobium and tantalum carbide coatings on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variation of electric resistance and thermoelectromotive force of tantalum and niobium carbides depending on composition and temperature is studied. Electric resistance of carbides is shown to grow with increase of carbon deficit, while thermoelectromotive force - accepts more negative values. Electro- and thermophysical properties are determined to be closely interrelated with electron structure of carbide coatings. In particular, results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy prove the fact

  10. Mechanical properties and structure of niobium and tantalum carbide coatings on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculiarities of preparation of niobium and tantalum nonstoichiometric carbides have been studied by the method of gas-phase - diffusion crystallization. Mechanical properties of nonstoichiometric carbides are mainly determined by the concentration of carbon in them. Strength characteristics increase with carbon deficiency and reach the maximum at the ratios C:Me=0.8-0.85. However, futher increase in carbon vacancies in carbon sublattice causes a sharp decrease in mechanical properties of carbide coatings

  11. Influence of Eta-Phase on Wear Behavior of WC-Co Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    A. Formisano; Capece Minutolo, F.; Caraviello, A.; Carrino, L.; DURANTE, M.; Langella, A.

    2016-01-01

    Cemented carbides, also known as Widia, are hard metals produced by sintering process and widely used in mechanical machining. They show high cutting capacity and good wear resistance; consequently, they result to be excellent materials for manufacturing cutting tools and sandblast nozzles. In this work, the wear resistance of WC-Co carbides containing Eta-phase, a secondary phase present in the hard metals when a carbon content deficiency occurs, is analyzed. Different mixtures of carbide ar...

  12. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Xiaogang; Ma Wenhui; Zhou Yang; Liu Dachun; Yang Bin; Dai Yongnian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core–shell structure and gr...

  13. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  14. Formation Energies and Electronic Properties of Vanadium Carbides Found in High Strength Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Krista; Medvedeva, Julia

    2013-03-01

    Carbide formation and stabilization in steels is of great interest owing to its effect on the microstructure and properties of the Fe-based alloys. The appearance of carbides with different metal/C ratios strongly depends on the carbon concentration, alloy composition as well as the heat treatment. Strong carbide-forming elements such as Ti, V, and Nb have been used in microalloyed steels; with VC showing an increased solubility in the iron matrix as compared with TiC and NbC. This allows for dissolution of the VC into the steel during heating and fine precipitation during cooling. In addition to VC, the primary vanadium carbide with cubic structure, a wide range of non-stoichiometric compositions VCy with y varying from 0.72 to 0.88, has been observed. This range includes two ordered compounds, V8C7 and V6C5. In this study, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is employed to examine the stability of the binary carbides by calculating their formation energies. We compare the local structures (atomic coordination, bond distances and angles) and the density of states in optimized geometries of the carbides. Further, the effect of alloying additions, such as niobium and titanium, on the carbide stabilization is investigated. We determine the energetically preferable substitutional atom location in each carbide and study the impurity distribution as well as its role in the carbide formation energy and electronic structure.

  15. High Carbon Alloy Steels with Multiple Types of Ultra-fine Carbides and Their Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yong-qing; GAO Hong-tao; QI Yu-hong; ZHANG Zhan-ping; DAI Yu-mei; LIU Yan-xia

    2004-01-01

    Under normal forging and annealing conditions, there are different ultra fine carbides (M3C, M23C6, M7C3, M6C and MC) in high carbon alloy steels when alloy composition design is carried out properly. On the basis of carbides transformation orderliness, the alloy composition design of the high carbon alloy steels is conducted by phase-equilibrium thermodynamic calculation for Fe-Cr-W-Mo-V-C system. The nucleation and growth of new carbides, dissolution of previous partial carbides in these steels during annealing process, all these lead to ultra-fine distribution of carbides. Due to different crystal structures of carbides and different thermodynamics as well dynamics parameters of the carbides dissolution and precipitation, the range of quenching temperature of these steels is widened, and the good temper-resistance is obtained. The characteristics of heat treatment process and microstructure variance, and the carbides transformation for different temperature are explained by the phase-equilibrium component satisfactorily. Their bend and yield strength,flexibility and toughness all are advanced markedly comparing with that of kindred steels. Results of the applications have proved that the microstructure of ultra-fine carbides in these steels played importance roles in the enhancement of edginess and fatigue crack resistance of the die and knives.

  16. Phase stability of chrome-carbide Ni--Cr coatings in low-oxygen environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal stability of the phases in chrome-carbide-based, wear-resistant coatings, applied by plasma and detonation gun (D-gun) devices, was investigated for applications in low-oxygen environments. It was found that current coatings using the Cr3C2 carbide in a Ni--Cr binder decomposed to lower carbides, and consumed Cr from the binder upon long-term exposure at elevated temperature. Two new coatings based on the Cr23C6 carbide were found to have excellent thermal stability, as well as excellent wear properties

  17. Kinetics of niobium carbide coating produced on AISI 1040 steel by thermo-reactive deposition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are a lot of technologically interesting characteristics of niobium carbide coating deposited by pack method which is the production of hard, wear-resistant, oxidation and corrosion resistant coating layer on the steel substrates. In the present study, the growth kinetics of niobium carbide layer deposited by thermo-reactive diffusion techniques in a solid medium on steel samples was reported. Niobium carbide coating treatment was performed on AISI 1040 steels in the powder mixture consisting of ferro-niobium, ammonium chloride and alumina at 1073, 1173 and 1273 K for 1-4 h. The presence of NbC and Nb2C phases formed on the surface of the steel substrates was confirmed by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction analyses. Niobium carbide layer thickness ranges from 3.42±0.52 to 11.78±2.29 μm depending upon the treatment time and temperature. Layer growth kinetics was analyzed by measuring the depth of niobium carbide layer as a function of time and temperature. The kinetics of niobium carbide coating by pack method shows a parabolic relationship between carbide layer thickness and treatment time, and the activation energy for the process is estimated to be 91.257 kJ mol-1. Moreover, an attempt was made to investigate the possibility of predicting the contour diagram of niobium carbide layer variation and to establish some empirical relationships between process parameters and niobium carbide layer thickness

  18. Electrical and optical properties of amorphous silicon carbide, silicon nitride and germanium carbide prepared by the glow discharge technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous specimens of silicon carbide, silicon nitride and germanium carbide have been prepared by decomposition of suitable gaseous mixtures in a r.f. glow discharge. Substrates were held at a temperature Tsub(d) between 400 and 800 K during deposition. In all three of the above materials the results of optical absorption and of d.c. conductivity measurements show a systematic variation with Tsub(d) and with the volume ratio of the gases used. Electron microprobe results on silicon carbide specimens indicate that a wide range of film compositions can be prepared. The optical gap has a pronounced maximum at the composition Sisub(0.32)Csub(0.68) where it is 2.8 eV for a sample deposited at Tsub(d) = 500 K, but shifts to lower energies with increasing Tsub(d). The conductivity above about 400 K has a single activation energy approximately equal to half the optical gap and extended state conduction predominates if the silicon content exceeds 32%. If the latter is reduced, hopping transport takes over and it is suggested that the excess carbon in the network tends to bond in three-fold graphic coordination. Absence of any obvious feature in the electronic properties at the stoichiometric composition SiC implies that there is little tendency towards compound formation in the glow discharge films. The present results are discussed in relation to measurements on specimens prepared by different methods. (author)

  19. Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The method to prepare Carbon steel/High chromium iron is totally new. • High chromium iron can achieve small plastic deformation during hot rolling process. • Carbides in high chromium irons are crushed, refined obviously and becoming isolated, which is benefit to improve the impact toughness. • The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. - Abstract: A sandwich-structured composite containing a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) and low carbon steel (LCS) claddings was newly fabricated by centrifugal casting, then the blank was hot-rolled into composite plate. The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. During hot rolling, significant refinement of carbides was discovered in hot-rolled HCCI specimens. The carbides were broken and partly dissolved into the austenite matrix. The results show that carbides are firstly dissolved under the action of stress. There are grooves appeared at the boundaries of the carbides. The grooves reduce the cross section of the carbide. When the cross section of the carbide reaches to the required minimum critical cross section, the carbide breaks through the tensile force. After break, carbides continue to dissolve since more interfaces between the matrix and carbides are generated. The secondary carbides precipitated due to the dissolution are index as fcc and stacking faults parallel to the {1 1 1} are observed

  20. Study on fragmentation and dissolution behavior of carbide in a hot-rolled hypereutectic high chromium cast iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Fei; Jiang, Yehua, E-mail: jiangyehua@kmust.edu.cn; Xiao, Han; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The method to prepare Carbon steel/High chromium iron is totally new. • High chromium iron can achieve small plastic deformation during hot rolling process. • Carbides in high chromium irons are crushed, refined obviously and becoming isolated, which is benefit to improve the impact toughness. • The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. - Abstract: A sandwich-structured composite containing a hypereutectic high chromium cast iron (HCCI) and low carbon steel (LCS) claddings was newly fabricated by centrifugal casting, then the blank was hot-rolled into composite plate. The carbide fragmentation and dissolution behavior of the hot-rolled HCCI were analyzed. During hot rolling, significant refinement of carbides was discovered in hot-rolled HCCI specimens. The carbides were broken and partly dissolved into the austenite matrix. The results show that carbides are firstly dissolved under the action of stress. There are grooves appeared at the boundaries of the carbides. The grooves reduce the cross section of the carbide. When the cross section of the carbide reaches to the required minimum critical cross section, the carbide breaks through the tensile force. After break, carbides continue to dissolve since more interfaces between the matrix and carbides are generated. The secondary carbides precipitated due to the dissolution are index as fcc and stacking faults parallel to the {1 1 1} are observed.

  1. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiCR process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  2. Evolution of defects in silicon carbide implanted with helium ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chonghong; Song, Yin; Yang, Yitao; Zhou, Chunlan; Wei, Long; Ma, Hongji

    2014-05-01

    Effects of accumulation of radiation damage in silicon carbide are important concerns for the use of silicon carbide in advanced nuclear energy systems. In the present work lattice damage in silicon carbide crystal (4H type) implanted with 100 keV 4He+ ions was investigated with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in channeling geometry (RBS/c) and positron beam Doppler broadening spectrometry (PBDB). Helium implantation was performed at the specimen temperature of 510 K to avoid amorphization of the SiC crystal. Fluences of helium ions were selected to be in the range from 1 × 1016 to 3 × 1016 ions cm-2, around the dose threshold for the formation of observable helium bubbles under transmission electron microscopes (TEM). The RBS/c measurements show distinctly different annealing behavior of displaced Si atoms at doses below or above the threshold for helium bubble formation. The RBS/c yield in the peak damage region of the specimen implanted to 3 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 shows an increase on the subsequently thermal annealing above 873 K, which is readily ascribed to the extra displacement of Si atoms due to helium bubble growth. The RBS/c yield in the specimen implanted to a lower ion fluence of 1.5 × 1016 He-ions cm-2 decreases monotonously on annealing from ambient temperatures up to 1273 K. The PBDB measurements supply evidence of clustering of vacancies at temperatures from 510 to 1173 K, and dissociation of vacancy clusters above 1273 K. The similarity of annealing behavior in PBDB profiles for helium implantation to 1 × 1016 and 3 × 1016 ions cm-2 is ascribed to the saturation of trapping of positrons in vacancy type defects in the damaged layers in the specimens helium-implanted to the two dose levels.

  3. Heat-treatment of WC-Fe/Co/Ni cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of heat-treatment on the properties of various WC-Fe/Co/Ni cemented carbides was studied. Though heat-treatment modifies the properties of the cemented carbides, it does not however lead to alloys superior those that show optimal properties in the as-sintered state. (orig.)

  4. Fuzzy Pattern Recognition in Atlas and Images of the Unevenness of Carbide in Tool Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Fuzzy pattern recognition has been employed to identify some atlas and images of the unevenness of carbide in tool steel. Three mo dels have been constructed. These models were based on fuzzy mathemati cs theory, as well as fuzzy pattern recognition method. Distribution r ule of the unevenness of eutectic carbide in ledeburite steel is propo sed in these models respectively.

  5. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  6. Bainitic nodular cast iron with carbides obtaining with use of Inmold method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gumienny

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper bainitic nodular cast iron with carbides as-cast obtaining has been presented. This cast iron has been obtained with use of Inmold method. It was shown, that there is the possibility of bainite and carbides obtaining in cast iron with Mo and Ni for studied chemical composition.

  7. Carbide Transformation in Haynes 230 during Long-term Exposure at High Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Hyunmyung; Hong, Sunghoon; Jang, Changheui [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Long-term aging behaviors of a solid solution hardened Ni-base superalloy, Haynes 230 at high temperature have not been fully investigated yet. In this study, long-term aging tests of Haynes 230 was carried out to evaluate microstructure changes especially in carbide evolution. In addition, its consequential effects on tensile property such as tensile strength and elongation were discussed. In Haynes 230, a nucleation of the secondary carbides was dominant at 800 .deg. C ageing while growth at 900 .deg. C ageing. In addition, after aging at 800 .deg. C, transition of primary W-rich M{sub 6}C carbides (break down) were observed and it showed high W content (up to 70 at.% W) compared to un-aged W-rich M{sub 6}C carbides (around 30 at.% W). Coarsened Cr- and Ni-rich phase surrounded by carbide depleted region and high W-rich M{sub 6}C carbide along the grain boundary were formed only at 900 .deg. C after long-term exposure above 10000 h. Tensile strength of aged Haynes 230 increased at 800 .deg. C while decreased at 900 .deg. C due to the formation of secondary carbide within the grains at 800 .deg. C. Decrease in elongation would be resulted from the coarsened and continuous carbides at the grain boundary as well as Cr- and Ni-rich phase along the grain boundary.

  8. Carbide Transformation in Haynes 230 during Long-term Exposure at High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term aging behaviors of a solid solution hardened Ni-base superalloy, Haynes 230 at high temperature have not been fully investigated yet. In this study, long-term aging tests of Haynes 230 was carried out to evaluate microstructure changes especially in carbide evolution. In addition, its consequential effects on tensile property such as tensile strength and elongation were discussed. In Haynes 230, a nucleation of the secondary carbides was dominant at 800 .deg. C ageing while growth at 900 .deg. C ageing. In addition, after aging at 800 .deg. C, transition of primary W-rich M6C carbides (break down) were observed and it showed high W content (up to 70 at.% W) compared to un-aged W-rich M6C carbides (around 30 at.% W). Coarsened Cr- and Ni-rich phase surrounded by carbide depleted region and high W-rich M6C carbide along the grain boundary were formed only at 900 .deg. C after long-term exposure above 10000 h. Tensile strength of aged Haynes 230 increased at 800 .deg. C while decreased at 900 .deg. C due to the formation of secondary carbide within the grains at 800 .deg. C. Decrease in elongation would be resulted from the coarsened and continuous carbides at the grain boundary as well as Cr- and Ni-rich phase along the grain boundary

  9. Stereological parameters of carbides on section of casting made from modified chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of stereological parameters of carbides on the section of the model castingmade from modified (the mixture FeNb+FeV+RE wear resistance chromium cast iron was introduced in the article. The jump change of some stereological parameters of carbides in certain distance from the surface of the casting was observed.

  10. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis. (plasma technology)

  11. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy characterization of boron- and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Yiyu; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Liu, Chuan; Berg, Rolf W.; Linnarsson, Margareta; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Lu, Zhaoyue; Yakimova, Rositza; Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan

    2011-01-01

    Boron - and nitrogen-doped 6H silicon carbide epilayers grown on low off-axis 6H silicon carbide substrates have been characterized by photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopy. Combined with secondary ion mass spectrometry results, preferable doping type and optimized concentration could be...

  12. Survey of post-irradiation examinations made of mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-irradiation examinations on mixed carbide, nitride and carbonitride fuels irradiated in fast flux reactors Rapsodie and DFR were carried out during the seventies and early eighties. In this report, emphasis was put on the fission gas release, cladding carburization and head-end gaseous oxidation process of these fuels, in particular, of mixed carbides. (author). 8 refs, 16 figs, 3 tabs

  13. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  14. The influence of chosen modifiers on stereological parameters of carbides of chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    A. Studnicki; J. Suchoń

    2011-01-01

    The results of investigations of stereological carbides in the modified wear resistance chromium cast iron resistant were introduced in the article. There were following elements: boron, niobium, vanadium, cerium and lanthanum (RE), nitrogen in the composition of modifiers. The influence of used modifiers on such stereological parameters of carbides as: size, perimeter, shape coefficient and volume fraction was showed in tables and on diagrams.

  15. Molecular dynamics investigation of the interaction of dislocations with carbides in BCC Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, F.; Terentyev, D.; Nordlund, K.

    2015-06-01

    Different types of carbides are present in many steels used as structural materials. To safely use steel in demanding environments, like nuclear power plants, it is important to know how defects will affect the mechanical properties of the material. In this study, the effect of carbide precipitates on the edge dislocation movement is investigated. Three different types of carbides were investigated by means of molecular dynamics, with a Tersoff-like bond order interatomic potential by Henriksson et al. The obstacles were 4 nm in diameter and were of Fe3C- (cementite-), Fe23C6- and Cr23C6-type. The critical unpinning stress was calculated for each type at different temperatures, to get the temperature-dependent obstacle strength. The results showed a decreasing critical stress with increasing temperature, consistent with previous studies. The critical unpinning stress was seen to be dependent on the type of carbide, but the differences were small. A difference was also observed between the obstacles with the same structure, but with different composition. This study shows the relation between the existing Cr23C6 carbide and the experimentally non-existing Fe23C6 carbide, which needs to be used as a model system for investigations with interatomic potentials not able to describe the interaction of Cr in the Fe-C-system. We found the difference to be a between 7% and 10% higher critical unpinning stress for the chromium carbide, than for the iron carbide of the same type.

  16. Method of enhanced lithiation of doped silicon carbide via high temperature annealing in an inert atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersam, Mark C.; Lipson, Albert L.; Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna; Karmel, Hunter J; Bedzyk, Michael J

    2014-05-27

    A method for enhancing the lithium-ion capacity of a doped silicon carbide is disclosed. The method utilizes heat treating the silicon carbide in an inert atmosphere. Also disclosed are anodes for lithium-ion batteries prepared by the method.

  17. Investigation of electronic structure of hexagonal vanadium and niobium carbides and nitrides by MO LCAO method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By the MO LCAO cluster method calculations of vanadium and niobium h.c.p. - carbides nitrides are performed. The problems of chemical bonds formation in these phases are investigated, the results are compared with the available spectra of X-ray emission of hexagonal V, Nb carbides and nitrides

  18. Certain properties of thin-film niobium carbide coatings on carbon steels obtained in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niobium carbide coatings have been deposited by means of a currentless transfer of electronegative niobium metal to a more electropositive substratum made of carbon steel in molten salts containing niobium compounds. Corrosion resistance of niobium carbide coated products is studied, wear resistance and tribological characteristics of the coatings are determined

  19. Molybdenum isotopic composition of single silicon carbides from supernovae.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, S.; Clayton, R. N.; Davis, A. M.; Lewis, R. S.; Pellin, M. J.

    1999-02-03

    Presolar silicon carbide grains form in a variety of types of stars, including asymptotic giant branch red giant stars and supernovae. The dominant mechanisms of heavy element nucleosynthesis, the s-process and r-process, are thought to occur in AGB stars and supernovae, respectively. We have previously reported that mainstream SiC grains have strong enrichments in the s-process isotopes of Sr, Zr and Mo. We report here the first measurements of Mo isotopes in X-type SiC grains, which have previously been identified as having formed from supernova ejecta.

  20. Electronic properties of finite-length silicon carbide nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfieri, G. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan); Kimoto, T. [Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan); Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center (PESEC), Kyoto University, Kyotodaigaku-katsura, Nishikyo, Kyoto (Japan)

    2009-02-15

    The electronic properties of silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNT) as a function of length, were investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT). We found that the increasing nanotube length yields a higher localization of the lowest unoccupied and highest occupied molecular orbitals (LUMO and HOMO), thus affecting the behavior of the band gap and chemical reactivity of the SiCNTs. It is also found that structural stability increases for longer and larger nanotubes. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Effect of Constituents of Silicon Carbide Composites on Oxidation Behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) composites consist with SiC fibers, SiC matrix and fiber/matrix interphase. SiC composites and monolithic SiC ceramics which are the reference materials for the SiC composite matrices were exposed in air or steam environment up to 1400°C. Significant degradation was observed for the composites with C interphase after exposure in air or steam. Oxidation behaviour was also affected by impurities in SiC. (author)

  2. Planar carbon defect in the structure of cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two phases of silicon carbide characterized by close lattice parameters are distinguished in the solid solution of carbon in β-SiC by high-resolution XRD. They transformed into one phase after high-pressure sintering. 29Si NMR data on the initial SiC-C solid solution powder and that sintered at high pressure confirmed the high-resolution XRD data completely. The inhomogeneous structure of the SiC-C solid solution characterized by the existence of thin diamond layers inside β-SiC crystals is established by transmission electron microscopy

  3. Hydrogen storage in pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Xiaojun; Gao, Yi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio density-functional theory study suggests that pillared Li-dispersed boron carbide nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen with a mass density higher than 6.0 weight% and a volumetric density higher than 45 g/L. The boron substitution in carbon nanotube greatly enhances the binding energy of Li atom to the nanotube, and this binding energy (~ 2.7 eV) is greater than the cohesive energy of lithium metal (~1.7 eV), preventing lithium from aggregation (or segregation) at high lithium d...

  4. Two-Dimensional Scandium Carbide Monolayer and its Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing; Ma, Hong-Man; Liu, Ying(College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, 100875, Beijing, China)

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional scandium carbide monolayer with a Sc3C10 primitive cell (Sc3C10 sheet) has been identified using first-principles density functional theory. In the Sc3C10 sheet, there is a similar basic structure to the one in the Volleyballene Sc20C60, the Sc8C10 subunit, in which two connected carbon pentagons are surrounded by one scandium octagon. The hybridization between Sc d orbitals and C s-p orbitals is crucial for stabilizing the Sc3C10 sheet. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulati...

  5. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-01

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals. PMID:21403227

  6. Depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, X Q; Tang, Z; Zhang, L; Guo, J J; Jin, C Q; Zhang, Y; Goto, T; McCauley, J W; Chen, M W

    2009-02-20

    We report depressurization amorphization of single-crystal boron carbide (B4C) investigated by in situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy. It was found that localized amorphization of B4C takes place during unloading from high pressures, and nonhydrostatic stresses play a critical role in the high-pressure phase transition. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the depressurization amorphization results from pressure-induced irreversible bending of C-B-C atomic chains cross-linking 12 atom icosahedra at the rhombohedral vertices. PMID:19257688

  7. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Koláček, Karel; Schmidt, Jiří; Štraus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, A.; Kasuya, K.

    Meieki, Nakamura-ku, Nagoya: Japan Society of Applied Physics, 2015 - (Toyoda, H.; Vukovic, M.), GT1.00124-GT1.00124. (APS Meeting). ISBN 978-4-86348-529-7. [International Conference on Reactive Plasmas, 68th Gaseous Electronics Conference and 33rd Symposium on Plasma Processing/9./. Honolulu, Hawaii (US), 12.10.2015-16.10.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13029; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-29772S Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : EUV laser * laser ablation * tungsten * silicon carbide * molybdenum * surface modification * capillary discharge Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  8. Decoding the message from meteoritic stardust silicon carbide grains

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Karen M.; Lugaro, Maria; Gibson, Brad K.; Pilkington, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analysed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analysed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carry the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of thei...

  9. Temperature Induced Voltage Offset Drifts in Silicon Carbide Pressure Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okojie, Robert S.; Lukco, Dorothy; Nguyen, Vu; Savrun, Ender

    2012-01-01

    We report the reduction of transient drifts in the zero pressure offset voltage in silicon carbide (SiC) pressure sensors when operating at 600 C. The previously observed maximum drift of +/- 10 mV of the reference offset voltage at 600 C was reduced to within +/- 5 mV. The offset voltage drifts and bridge resistance changes over time at test temperature are explained in terms of the microstructure and phase changes occurring within the contact metallization, as analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The results have helped to identify the upper temperature reliable operational limit of this particular metallization scheme to be 605 C.

  10. Boron carbide synthesis by carbothermic reduction of boron oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a ceramic material of technological applications due to its extreme hardness and high chemical as well as thermal stability. Some parameters of the process for obtaining B4C by carbothermic reduction of B2O3 have been determined. The starting powders and the final products have been analysed by chemical, spectrographic and X-ray diffraction methods. The results show that the B4C obtained by the carbothermic reduction process is suitable for applications with a definite determination of the free carbon content. (author)

  11. Characterisation of silicon carbide layers formed during BNCD deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, Andrew; Ashcheulov, Petr; Čada, Martin; Drahokoupil, Jan; Fekete, Ladislav; Klimša, Ladislav; Olejníček, Jiří; Remeš, Zdeněk; Čtvrtlík, R.; Tomáštík, J.; Janíček, P.; Mistrík, J.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Mortet, Vincent

    Coventry: University of Warwick, 2015. P6.1-P6.3 [De Beers Diamond Conference 2015. 06.07.2015-09.07.2015, Warwick] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-31783S; GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Grant ostatní: OP VK(XE) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0306 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : silicon carbide * nano-crystalline diamond Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  12. APT analysis of WC-Co based cemented carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidow, Jonathan; Andrén, Hans-Olof

    2011-05-01

    A method for quickly producing sharp and site-specific atom probe specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides was developed using a combination of electropolishing, controlled back-polishing and FIB milling. Also, a method for measuring the amount of segregated atoms to an interface between two phases with a big difference in field needed for field evaporation was developed. Using atom probe tomography, the interface chemistry of WC/WC grain boundaries, WC/(M,W)C phase boundaries and WC/binder phase boundaries was analysed. In addition, the transition metal solubility in WC was determined. PMID:21664543

  13. Carbide precipitation in nickel-base model alloys and its influence on the ductility and fracture bahaviour at room temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of carburization with internal carbide formation on the room temperature tensile properties was determined for nickel-base model alloys of different composition. The relationship between carbide volume fraction and the loss of ductility was systematically investigated. The embrittlement was found to be severe for volume fractions greater than about 0.03 if the carbides were formed principally on grain and twin boundaries. Cracks were propagated unhindered in the continuous, grain boundary carbide films formed in alloys containing Cr or Mo and caused intergranular fracture with rupture elongations of similar magnitude to that of the carbide phase itself. Grain boundary carbide precipitates which were not continuous led to less severe ductility loss. Intracrystalline carbide precipitates as found in the W or Nb containing alloys reduced the ductility only slightly compared with grain boundary carbides in alloys of similar carbon content because the linkage of pores was prevented by the presence of ductile matrix between the pores. The fracture of individual intragranular carbides as well as of connected carbide plates was interpreted using the parallel loaded, two phase structure model. The form of the relationship between the 0.2% proof stress and the carbide volume fraction was qualitatively described using a rule of mixtures. The rule of mixtures could not however satisfactorily describe the tensile strength and the true rupture elongation without consideration of crack growth by linkage of pores between fractured carbide particles. (orig.)

  14. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation of 1.2343 tool steel by induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouhý, J.; Kövér, M.

    2015-12-01

    Tool steels undergo spheroidisation or soft annealing to enhance machinability and cold formability. Conventional soft annealing takes several hours. The final microstructure is composed of globular carbides in a ferritic matrix. We present an alternative process of carbide spheroidisation and steel softening. Accelerated carbide spheroidisation and refinement (ASR) was achieved by induction heating at temperatures close to the A1 temperature. The spheroidised structure was obtained in less than 5 minutes. The carbide particles that formed during the ASR were significantly finer than for the conventional soft annealing. The hardness after ASR was higher than the hardness after soft annealing because of the dispersion strengthening by finer and more densely distributed carbide particles. On the other hand, the fine structure is favourable for hardening. It enables smaller austenite grains and martensite laths to be obtained.

  15. Critical cooling rate on carbide precipitation during quenching of austenitic manganese steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Soo Ham

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Critical cooling rate to avoid carbide precipitation during quenching of austenitic manganese steel was investigated by means of optical microscopy, image analyzer and numerical analysis. An efficient heat treatment analysis program including temperature-dependent material properties was developed for the prediction of cooling rate and probability of carbide precipitation during quenching by finite difference method. Time-dependent heat transfer coefficient was adopted to achieve more precise results. Area ratio of carbide precipitation was measured by image analyzer to determine the critical point of carbide precipitation. Temperature-dependent critical cooling rate at that point was calculated by the developed numerical program. Finally, the probability of carbide precipitation on the whole area of specimen can be predicted by the proposed numerical program and the numerical result of a specimen was compared with the experimental result.

  16. 13C NMR spectroscopy of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the 13C NMR spectrum of amorphous hydrogenated carbon and boron carbide. The amorphous hydrogenated carbon spectra consist primarily of an sp3 line at 40 ppm and an sp2 line at 140 ppm and are in reasonable agreement with the recent theoretical calculations of Mauri, Pfrommer, and Louie, but there are some notable discrepancies. The amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide spectra are very different from those of amorphous hydrogenated carbon, being dominated by one line at 15 ppm. We interpret this line as due to carbon bound in boron carbide icosahedra, because polycrystalline boron carbide with boron carbide icosahedra as the unit cell gives very similar NMR spectra. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  17. Structural and mechanical properties of activated sintered boron carbide-based materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide based materials (B4C-MexIV-VIBy) were obtained by pressureless sintering at 2150--2250 C in the presence of some transition metal (IV-VI group) carbides (MexIV-VICy, where Me is Ti, V, Cr, and W). The structural and mechanical (micro hardness, abrasive wear resistance) properties of these materials were studied. Changes of the boron carbide lattice parameters were observed after sintering. EDS analysis showed the presence of a transition metal phase in the boron carbide structure. A considerable increase in microhardness (76 GPa) and abrasive wear resistance values of the sintered materials (1.8 times as compared to pure hot-pressed B4C) was registered. A new class of superhard boron carbide-based materials was obtained by pressureless sintering. The materials processed by this method are promising for high performance applications

  18. TEM investigation of aluminium containing precipitates in high aluminium doped silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Silicon carbide is a promising semiconductor material for applications in high temperature and high power devices. The successful growth of good quality epilayers in this material has enhanced its potential for device applications. As a novel semiconductor material, there is a need for studying its basic physical properties and the role of dopants in this material. In this study, silicon carbide epilayers were grown on 4H-SiC wafers of (0001) orientation with a miscut angle of 8 deg at a temperature of 1550 deg C. The epilayers contained regions of high aluminium doping well above the solubility of aluminium in silicon carbide. High temperature annealing of this material resulted in the precipitation of aluminium in the wafers. The samples were analysed by secondary ion mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Selected area diffraction studies show the presence of aluminium carbide and aluminium silicon carbide phases. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  19. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaogang; Ma, Wenhui; Zhou, Yang; Liu, Dachun; Yang, Bin; Dai, Yongnian

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 degrees C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core-shell structure and grow along direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50-200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor-solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core-shell interface. PMID:20651911

  20. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Xiaogang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core–shell structure and grow along <111> direction. The diameter of silicon carbide nanowires is about 50–200 nm and the length from tens to hundreds of micrometers. The vapor–solid mechanism is proposed to elucidate the growth process. The photoluminescence of the synthesized silicon carbide nanowires shows significant blueshifts, which is resulted from the existence of oxygen defects in amorphous layer and the special rough core–shell interface.

  1. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinoki, Tatsuya; Snead, Lance L.; Blue, Craig A.

    2005-12-01

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m 2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m 2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing.

  2. Development of refractory armored silicon carbide by infrared transient liquid phase processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo) were coated on silicon carbide (SiC) for use as a refractory armor using a high power plasma arc lamp at powers up to 23.5 MW/m2 in an argon flow environment. Both tungsten powder and molybdenum powder melted and formed coating layers on silicon carbide within a few seconds. The effect of substrate pre-treatment (vapor deposition of titanium (Ti) and tungsten, and annealing) and sample heating conditions on microstructure of the coating and coating/substrate interface were investigated. The microstructure was observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM). The mechanical properties of the coated materials were evaluated by four-point flexural tests. A strong tungsten coating was successfully applied to the silicon carbide substrate. Tungsten vapor deposition and pre-heating at 5.2 MW/m2 made for a refractory layer containing no cracks propagating into the silicon carbide substrate. The tungsten coating was formed without the thick reaction layer. For this study, small tungsten carbide grains were observed adjacent to the interface in all conditions. In addition, relatively large, widely scattered tungsten carbide grains and a eutectic structure of tungsten and silicon were observed through the thickness in the coatings formed at lower powers and longer heating times. The strength of the silicon carbide substrate was somewhat decreased as a result of the processing. Vapor deposition of tungsten prior to powder coating helped prevent this degradation. In contrast, molybdenum coating was more challenging than tungsten coating due to the larger coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch as compared to tungsten and silicon carbide. From this work it is concluded that refractory armoring of silicon carbide by Infrared Transient Liquid Phase Processing is possible. The tungsten armored silicon carbide samples proved uniform, strong, and capable of withstanding thermal fatigue testing

  3. Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy of transition-metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) was applied to several problems dealing with the transition-metal carbides. First, narrow (200A) precipitates of TiC were identified in a single crystal of titanium diboride. Second, the carbon concentration in individual stacking faults of TaC was determined to be less than in the surrounding matrix, and the implications of this finding for crystal structure and mechanical properties were discussed. Next, thin films of amorphous carbon and TiO were studied with EELS. Experimental cross sections for C and Ti were obtained from these spectra and used for quantitative analysis of a material of known stoichiometry, V6C5 (by assuming V and Ti cross sections equal), and one of unknown stoichiometry, a cemented carbide composed of 1 to 5 μm grains of TiC/sub x/ embedded in a Ni-Mo binder. These experimental cross sections gave a C/V ratio of 0.84, very close to the expected value of 0.833, and a C/Ti ratio of 0.81 for a grain of TiC/sub x/, a reasonable value of x in these materials. Two other methods of determining cross sections were applied: calculated cross sections based on a hydrogenic model gave inaccurate results, perhaps due to the inadequacy of the model for these transition metals; and efficiency factors applied to the Bethe cross section gave reasonable results, but inferior to those from the experimental cross sections

  4. Development of the SOFIA silicon carbide secondary mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit, Michel; Antoine, Pascal; Varin, Jean-Luc; Bittner, Hermann; Erdmann, Matthias

    2003-02-01

    The SOFIA telescope is ajoint NASA-DLR project for a 2.5 m airborne Stratospheric Observatory for IR Astronomy to be flown in a specially adapted Boeing 747 SP plane, Kayser-Threde being resopinsible for the development of the Telescope Optics. The φ 352 mm Secondary Mirror is mounted ona chopping mechanism to allow avoidance of background noise during IR observations. Stiffness associated to lightness is a major demand for such a mirror to achieve high frequency chopping. This leads to select SIlicon Carbide for the mirror blank. Its development has been run by the ASTRIUM/BOOSTEC joint venture SiCSPACE, taking full benefit of the instrinsic properties of the BOOSTEC SiC-100 sintered material, associated to qualified processes specifically developed for space borne mirrors by ASTRIUM. Achieved performances include a low mass of 1.97 kg, a very high stiffness with a first resonant frequency of 1865 Hz and a measured optical surface accuracy of 39 nm rms, using Ion Beam Figuring. It is proposed here to present the major design features of the SOFIA Secondary Mirror, highlighting the main advantages of using Silicon Carbide, the main steps of its development and the achieved optomechanical performances of the developed mirror.

  5. Hydrogen chemisorption and oxidation of transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was made of the catalytic activity of WC, focusing on the possible influence of point defects. The chemisorption of H on WC and titanium oxycarbides was studied with differential scanning calorimetry. The catalytic activity of these materials for oxidation of H was determined by potentiostatic steady-state and potentiodynamic measurements in acid electrolyte. Compositions of WC surfaces were determined by x-ray photoemission and related to the catalytic behavior. Titanium oxycarbide surfaces were analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. Of the carbides tested only one WC preparation was able to chemisorb H. Both WC powders investigated catalyzed H oxidation with similar specific activities. Spectroscopic studies showed that the active surface of WC was a mixture of WO3 and a carbon-deficient WC phase. This result indicates that carbon vacancies are the active sites in tungsten carbide. Theoretical models of a carbon vacancy surrounded by metal atoms suggested by calculations by other workers support this assignment and identify the important role of the W6s level. The measured value of the heat of chemisorption is consistent with the proposed model

  6. Ablation properties of carbon/carbon composites with tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ablation properties and morphologies of carbon/carbon (C/C) composites with tungsten carbide (WC) filaments were investigated by ablation test on an arc heater and scanning electron microscopy. And the results were compared with those without tungsten carbide (WC) filaments tested under the same conditions. It shows that there is a big difference between C/C composites with and without WC filaments on both macroscopic and microscopic ablation morphologies and the ablation rates of the former are higher than the latter. It is found that the ablation process of C/C composites with WC filaments includes oxidation of carbon fibers, carbon matrices and WC, melting of WC and WO3, and denudation of WC, WO3 and C/C composites. Oxidation and melting of WC leads to the formation of holes in z directional carbon fiber bundles, which increases the coarseness of the ablation surfaces of the composites, speeds up ablation and leads to the higher ablation rate. Moreover, it is further found that the molten WC and WO3 cannot form a continuous film on the ablation surface to prevent further ablation of C/C composites.

  7. Electron microscopy study of radiation effects in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbide is a disordered non-stoechiometric material with a strongly microtwinned polycristallyne microstructure. This ceramic is among the candidate materials for the first wall coating in fusion reactor and is used as a neutron absorber in the control rods of fast breeder reactors. The present work deals with the nature of radiation damage in this solid. Because of helium internal production, neutron irradiated boron carbide is affected by swelling and by a strong microcracking which can break up a pellet in fine powder. These processes are rather intensitive to the irradiation parameters (temperature, flux and even neutron spectrum). Transmission electron microscopy of samples irradiated by the fast neutrons of a reactor, the electrons of a high voltage electron microscope and of samples implanted with helium ions was used to understand the respective roles of helium and point defects in the processes of swelling and microcracking. The design of an irradiation chamber for helium implantation at controlled temperature from 600 to 17000C was an important technical part of this work

  8. Structure and properties of phosphorus-carbide thin solid films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorus-carbide (CPx) thin solid films have been deposited by unbalanced reactive magnetron sputtering from a compound C-P target and investigated by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, elastic recoil detection analysis, Raman scattering spectroscopy, nanoindentation, and four-point electrical probe techniques. CPx films with x = 0.1 deposited at 300 °C exhibit a structure with elements of short-range ordering in the form of curved and inter-locked fullerene-like fragments. The films have a hardness of 34.4 GPa, elastic recovery of 72% and surface roughness of 0.5 nm. Higher deposition temperatures yield CPx films with an increasingly amorphous structure, and reduced hardness. - Highlights: • Phosphorus-carbide (CPx) thin solid films have been deposited by magnetron sputtering. • Structural and chemical bonding properties were investigated. • CPx thin solid films show high mechanical resiliency. • Low temperature favors fullerene-like structural properties

  9. Fatigue behavior of continuous fiber silicon-carbide-aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. S.; Wallis, R. R.

    1984-01-01

    Four lay-ups of continuous fiber silicon carbide (SCS2) fiber/aluminum matrix composites were tested to assess fatigue mechanisms including stiffness loss when cycled below their respective fatigue limits. The lay-ups were 0 (sub 8), 0(sub 2)/ + or - 45 (sub 2s), 0/90 (sub 2s),and 0/ + or 45/90 (subs). The data were compared with predictions from the author's previously published shakedown model which predicts fatigue-induced stiffness loss in metal matrix composites. A fifth lay-up, + or - 45 (sub 2s), was tested to compare shakedown and fatigue limits. The particular batch of silicon-carbide fibers tested in this program had a somewhat lower modulus (340 GPa) than expected and displayed poor bonding to the aluminum matrix. Good agreement was obtained between the stiffness loss model and the test data. The fatigue damage below the fatigue limit was primarily in the form of matrix cracking. The fatigue limit corresponded to the laminate shakedown for the + or - 45 (sub 2s) laminate.

  10. Stress envelope of silicon carbide composites at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify a comprehensive stress envelope, i.e., strength anisotropy map, of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (SiC/SiC composite) for practical component design, tensile and compressive tests were conducted using the small specimen test technique specifically tailored for high-temperature use. In-plane shear properties were, however, estimated using the off-axial tensile method and assuming that the mixed mode failure criterion, i.e., Tsai–Wu criterion, is valid for the composites. The preliminary test results indicate no significant degradation to either proportional limit stress (PLS) or fracture strength by tensile loading at temperatures below 1000 °C. A similarly good tolerance of compressive properties was identified at elevated temperatures, except for a slight degradation in PLS. With the high-temperature test data of tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties, the stress envelopes at elevated temperatures were finally obtained. A slight reduction in the design limit was obvious at elevated temperatures when the compressive mode is dominant, whereas a negligibly small impact on the design is expected by considering the tensile loading case

  11. Frequency mixing in boron carbide laser ablation plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oujja, M.; Benítez-Cañete, A.; Sanz, M.; Lopez-Quintas, I.; Martín, M.; Nalda, R. de, E-mail: r.nalda@iqfr.csic.es; Castillejo, M.

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Two-color frequency mixing has been studied in a laser ablation boron carbide plasma. • A space- and time-resolved study mapped the nonlinear optical species in the plasma. • The nonlinear process maximizes when charge recombination is expected to be completed. • Neutral atoms and small molecules are the main nonlinear species in this medium. • Evidence points to six-wave mixing as the most likely process. - Abstract: Nonlinear frequency mixing induced by a bichromatic field (1064 nm + 532 nm obtained from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser) in a boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) plasma generated through laser ablation under vacuum is explored. A UV beam at the frequency of the fourth harmonic of the fundamental frequency (266 nm) was generated. The dependence of the efficiency of the process as function of the intensities of the driving lasers differs from the expected behavior for four-wave mixing, and point toward a six-wave mixing process. The frequency mixing process was strongly favored for parallel polarizations of the two driving beams. Through spatiotemporal mapping, the conditions for maximum efficiency were found for a significant delay from the ablation event (200 ns), when the medium is expected to be a low-ionized plasma. No late components of the harmonic signal were detected, indicating a largely atomized medium.

  12. Pressure cycling induced modification of a cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wear of cemented carbide rock drill buttons is due to a complex mixture of mechanisms. One important of such mechanism is the surface fatigue that occurs due to the percussive conditions of rock drilling. To isolate the effects of this mechanism, a mechanical pressure cycling test has been performed on a cemented carbide with 11 % Co and 2 μm WC grain size. The test was ended after 60000 pressure cycles. No signs of fatigue crack nucleation were found. The changes in hardness, fracture toughness, erosion resistance, magnetical coercivity and thermal shock resistance were measured. The microstructure of the sample was investigated with x-ray diffraction, plus scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The fracture toughness decreased 14 % due to the pressure cycling while the hardness did not change. In addition, the thermal shock resistance and the erosion resistance decreased. The magnetical coercivity increased 90 % indicating significant phase transformations or high defect density in the Co binder phase. The TEM revealed no deformation of the WC phase, but important alterations of the Co phase. The Co phase was transformed from fcc into a new unidentified phase, characterized by atomic inter planar distance present in fcc and hcp plus an unfamiliar distance of 2.35 Aa. This phase is suggested to be due to a more complex stacking sequence of the close-packed planes than in hcp or fcc. (author)

  13. Boron carbide neutron screen for GRR-1 neutron spectrum tailoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactor concepts (such as Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, new generation Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor, Lead Fast Reactor, Accelerator Driven System and nuclear Fusion Reactors) is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials (e.g. steels), nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials (e.g. beryllium) and tritium breeding materials (for fusion reactors). Therefore, effective operation of these reactors will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Depending on the material, the requirements of a test irradiation can vary. In this work preliminary studies were performed to observe the behavior of the neutron spectrum within a boron carbide neutron screen inserted in a hypothetical reflector test hole of the Greek Research Reactor. Four different screen configurations were simulated with Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4. The obtained data showed that the insertion of boron carbide caused not only elimination of the thermal (E < 1 eV) component of the neutron energy spectrum but also absorption of a considerable proportion of the intermediate energy neutrons (1x10-6 MeV < E < 1 MeV). (author)

  14. Genesis Silicon Carbide Concentrator Target 60003 Preliminary Ellipsometry Mapping Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; Rodriquez, M. C.; Stansbery, E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Genesis concentrator was custom designed to focus solar wind ions primarily for terrestrial isotopic analysis of O-17/O-16 and O-18/O-16 to +/-1%, N-15/N-14 to +/-1%, and secondarily to conduct elemental and isotopic analysis of Li, Be, and B. The circular 6.2 cm diameter concentrator target holder was comprised of four quadrants of highly pure semiconductor materials that included one amorphous diamond-like carbon, one C-13 diamond, and two silicon carbide (SiC). The amorphous diamond-like carbon quadrant was fractured upon impact at Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR), but the remaining three quadrants survived fully intact and all four quadrants hold an important collection of solar wind. The quadrants were removed from the target holder at NASA Johnso n Space Center Genesis Curation Laboratory in April 2005, and have been housed in stainless steel containers under continual nitrogen purge since time of disintegration. In preparation for allocation of a silicon carbide target for oxygen isotope analyses at UCLA, the two SiC targets were photographed for preliminary inspection of macro particle contamination from the hard non-nominal landing as well as characterized by spectroscopic ellipsometry to evaluate thin film contamination. This report is focused on Genesis SiC target sample number 60003.

  15. Influence of radiation damage on krypton diffusion in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, E.; Hlatshwayo, T. T.; van der Berg, N. G.; Mabena, M. C.

    2015-07-01

    Diffusion of krypton in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide is investigated and compared with the previously obtained results for xenon, which pointed to a different diffusion mechanism than observed for chemically active elements. For this purpose 360 keV krypton ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and krypton retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1400 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channeling. Little diffusion and no krypton loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature thermal etching of the implanted surface became increasingly important. No diffusion or krypton loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC. The results seem to indicate, that the chemically inert noble gas atoms do not form defect-impurity complexes, which strongly influence the diffusion behavior of other diffusors in silicon carbide.

  16. Influence of radiation damage on krypton diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diffusion of krypton in poly and single crystalline silicon carbide is investigated and compared with the previously obtained results for xenon, which pointed to a different diffusion mechanism than observed for chemically active elements. For this purpose 360 keV krypton ions were implanted in commercial 6H-SiC and CVD-SiC wafers at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C. Width broadening of the implantation profiles and krypton retention during isochronal and isothermal annealing up to temperatures of 1400 °C was determined by RBS-analysis, whilst in the case of 6H-SiC damage profiles were simultaneously obtained by α-particle channeling. Little diffusion and no krypton loss was detected in the initially amorphized and eventually recrystallized surface layer of cold implanted 6H-SiC during annealing up to 1200 °C. Above that temperature thermal etching of the implanted surface became increasingly important. No diffusion or krypton loss is detected in the hot implanted 6H-SiC samples during annealing up to 1400 °C. Radiation damage dependent grain boundary diffusion is observed at 1300 °C in CVD-SiC. The results seem to indicate, that the chemically inert noble gas atoms do not form defect-impurity complexes, which strongly influence the diffusion behavior of other diffusors in silicon carbide

  17. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  18. Boron carbide composite carbon material, method of manufacturing the same and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide composite material of the present invention is formed by compositing boron carbide, which is a material suitable as a plasma facing material especially for a thermonuclear reactor. Boron carbide is filled in open cells of a carbon fiber-carbon composite material containing carbon fibers and a carbon matrix. In addition, a boron carbide film is formed on the surface of the composite material. A CVD method and a plasma flaming method are generally known, but they involve problems of occurrence of cracks and peeling of coating film due to thermal stresses. Then, a boron compound is chemically reacted with the surface of a carbon material to convert the carbon on the surface to boron carbide. The composite material contains carbon fibers oriented in one direction, and a boron carbide coating film is formed on the plasma facing surface. With such a constitution, there can be obtained a useful plasma facing material which has excellent strength especially in the direction of the fibers and having heat resistance, chemical stability and ware resistance even after the boron carbide coating film is exhausted and the base material is exposed. (T.M.)

  19. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide–silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide–silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide–silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide–silicon carbide composites. - Highlights: • Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of B4C–SiC composites were investigated. • Reinforcing titanium diboride causes higher linear attenuation coefficients. • Decreasing titanium diboride particle size increases linear and mass attenuation coefficients. • Nano particle sized samples much closer to the theoretical results than micro sized ones

  20. SOLID SOLUTION CARBIDES ARE THE KEY FUELS FOR FUTURE NUCLEAR THERMAL PROPULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.; Shah, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion uses nuclear energy to directly heat a propellant (such as liquid hydrogen) to generate thrust for space transportation. In the 1960 s, the early Rover/Nuclear Engine for Rocket Propulsion Application (NERVA) program showed very encouraging test results for space nuclear propulsion but, in recent years, fuel research has been dismal. With NASA s renewed interest in long-term space exploration, fuel researchers are now revisiting the RoverMERVA findings, which indicated several problems with such fuels (such as erosion, chemical reaction of the fuel with propellant, fuel cracking, and cladding issues) that must be addressed. It is also well known that the higher the temperature reached by a propellant, the larger the thrust generated from the same weight of propellant. Better use of fuel and propellant requires development of fuels capable of reaching very high temperatures. Carbides have the highest melting points of any known material. Efforts are underway to develop carbide mixtures and solid solutions that contain uranium carbide, in order to achieve very high fuel temperatures. Binary solid solution carbides (U, Zr)C have proven to be very effective in this regard. Ternary carbides such as (U, Zr, X) carbides (where X represents Nb, Ta, W, and Hf) also hold great promise as fuel material, since the carbide mixtures in solid solution generate a very hard and tough compact material. This paper highlights past experience with early fuel materials and bi-carbides, technical problems associated with consolidation of the ingredients, and current techniques being developed to consolidate ternary carbides as fuel materials.

  1. Fabrication and characterization of carbon and boron carbide nanostructured materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Sara

    Carbon is present in nature in a variety of allotropes and chemical compounds. Due to reduced dimensionality, nanostructured carbon materials, i.e. single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), are characterized by unique physical and chemical properties. There is a potential for SWNTs use as biological probes and assists for tunable tissue growth in biomedical applications. However, the presumed cytotoxicity of SWNTs requires investigation of the risks of their incorporation into living systems. Boron is not found in nature in elementary form. Boron based materials are chemically complex and exist in various polymorphic forms, i.e. boron carbide (BC). Because BC is a lightweight material with exceptional mechanical and elastic properties, it is the ideal candidate for armor and ballistic applications. However, practical use of BC as armor material is limited because of its anomalous glass-like behaviour at high velocity impacts, which has been linked to stress-induced structural instability in one of BC polymorphs, B12(CCC). Theoretical calculations suggest that formation of B12(CCC) in BC could be suppressed by silicon doping. In the first part of this thesis, biocompatibility of SWNTs is investigated. It is shown that under normal cell implantation conditions, the electrical conductivity of the SWNTs decreases due to an increase in structural disorder. This research suggests that SWNTs can be functionalized by protein and biological cells reducing the risk of cytotoxicity. In the second part of this thesis, boron carbide nanostructured materials are synthesized and investigated. Radio frequency sputtering deposition technique is employed for fabrication of BC (Si free) and BC:Si thin films. Variation of plasma conditions and temperature are found to affect chemical composition, adhesion to the substrate and morphology of the films. It is shown that BC films are predominantly amorphous and a small addition of Si largely improves their mechanical properties. In addition

  2. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  3. Trends in the chemical properties in early transition metal carbide surfaces: A density functional study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kitchin, J.R.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Barteau, M.A.;

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present density functional theory (DFT) investigations of the physical, chemical and electronic structure properties of several close-packed surfaces of early transition metal carbides, including beta-Mo2C(0 0 0 1), and the (1 1 1) surfaces of TiC, VC, NbC, and TaC. The results are...... closest-packed pure metal surfaces, due to the tensile strain induced in the carbide surfaces upon incorporation of carbon into the lattice. Hydrogen atoms were found to adsorb more weakly on carbide surfaces than on the corresponding closest-packed pure metal surfaces only when there were surface carbon...

  4. Production of iron carbide using the metastable Fe-C-H-O system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conejo, A.N.; Estrada, R.S.; Rodriguez, R.A. [Instituto Tecnologico Morelia (Mexico)

    2003-04-01

    The production of iron carbide without the formation of free carbon was explored using a metastable thermodynamic approach. Phase stability diagrams, at constant pressure and constant temperature, indicating the phase fields for the condensed phases in total equilibrium with a reactant gas phase were employed as the initial point analysis of the present study. With the aid of this information it was possible to identify the phase fields corresponding to metastable iron carbide in a ternary diagram (C-H-O). Experimental evidence confirms the validity of this information. The metastable diagrams are proposed to be used as a method to control the production of iron carbide in the industrial practice. (orig.)

  5. Note on thermodynamic instability of M4C3-type carbides of gallium group metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with thermodynamic stability of hypothetical solid binary M4C3 carbides of gallium, indium and thallium. Heats of formation whose contribution to the stability of these compounds is dominant, were estimated by two independent methods: semiempirical theory of Miedema and empirical trends in the heats of formation of nitrides and carbides of Group III elements. Entropies were calculated with the use of the Cantor equation. The estimated values suggest that M4C3 carbides of gallium, indium and thallium are thermodynamically unstable with regard to their decomposition of elements. (Author)

  6. Effect of boron carbide on primary crystallization of chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Studnicki

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available In the paper results of the influence of boron carbide (B4C as inoculant of abrasion-resisting chromium cast iron (about 2,8% carbon and 18% chromium on primary crystallization researches are presented. Boron carbide dispersion was introduced at the bottom of pouring ladle before tap of liquid cast iron. In this investigations were used three different quantities of inoculant in amounts 0,1%; 0,2% and 0,3% with relation to bath weight. It has been demonstrated that such small additions of boron carbide change primary crystallization parameters, particularly temperature characteristic of process, their time and kinetics.

  7. Priority compositions of boron carbide crystals obtained by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, V. I.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Kovalev, I. D.; Vershinnikov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Splitting of reflections from boron carbide has been found for the first time by an X-ray diffraction study of polycrystalline mixture of boron carbide В15- х С х , (1.5 ≤ x ≤ 3) and its magnesium derivative C4B25Mg1.42. An analysis of reflection profiles shows that this splitting is due to the presence of boron carbide phases of different compositions in the sample, which are formed during crystal growth. The composition changes from В12.9С2.1 to В12.4С2.6.

  8. Raman spectra of silicon carbide small particles and nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieligor, Monika; Wang, Yuejian; Zerda, T. W.

    2005-04-01

    Two manufacturing protocols of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires are discussed. The Raman spectra of produced SiC nanowires are compared with spectra of SiC powders of various grain sizes. The temperature and pressure dependence of the Raman spectra for powders is similar to that of bulk crystals, but is different for nanowires. Frequency shifts, band broadenings and the presence of shoulders are discussed in terms of crystal size, character of defects and their population. The concentration of defects in synthesized nanowires depends on the sintering method. Raman intensity enhancement of the LO phonon was observed when the wavelength of the excitation laser was changed from 780 to 514 nm.

  9. Distribution and characterization of iron in implanted silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical electron microscopy (AEM) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy-ion channeling (RBS-C) have been used to characterize single crystal α-silicon carbide implanted at room temperature with 160 keV 57Fe ions to fluences of 1, 3, and 6 x 1016 ions/cm2. Best correlations among AEM, RBS, and TRIM calculations were obtained assuming a density of the amorphized implanted regions equal to that of crystalline SiC. No iron-rich precipitates or clusters were detected by AEM. Inspection of the electron energy loss fine structure for iron in the implanted specimens suggests that the iron is not metallically-bonded, supporting conclusions from earlier conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) studies. In-situ annealing surprisingly resulted in crystallization at 600 degrees C with some redistribution of the implanted iron

  10. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  11. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, G.

    1991-12-31

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC{sub 0.88} in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V{sub 8}C{sub 7} superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  12. ELABORATION OF AN EPOXY COATING REINFORCED WITH ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE NANOSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia G. Díaz-Barriga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the preparation of a transparent epoxy coating reinforced with 200 PPM of zirconium carbide nanostructures. The nanostructures of ZrC were prepared by mechanosynthesis. The additive characteristics analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were presented. Epoxy coating adhesion on a steel plate was analyzed using MEB. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was performed to the reinforced paints between 20-700 °C. The reinforced enamel was compared with an enamel without nanostructures. There is not vaporization of reinforced enamel at a 95 y 100 °C with ZrC particles size of 10 µm y 120 nm respectively. The final enamel degradation is slower when there is a 14% by weight of the residue and 426 °C with 120nm diameter particles.

  13. Carbide Coating Preparation of Hot Forging Die by Plasma Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Wenhua; DU Cong; WANG Huachang; WANG Hongfu; WANG Junyuan

    2012-01-01

    To meet the performance requirements of hot forging die heat resistant layer,the Ni60-SiC coating,Ni60-Cr3C2 coating,and Ni60-WC coating were prepared using W6Mo5Cr4V2 as substrate material with 30%SiC,10%Cr3C2,30%WC powder by means of plasma spraying and plasma spray re-melting and plasma spray welding,respectively.Microstructure of each carbide coating was analyzed,micro-hardness was tested,and mainly thermal parameters of coating were detected.The experimental results show that using plasma spray welding,the performance of 70%Ni60/30%SiC powder is the best,and its micro-hardness can achieved 1100HV,showing good thermal-physical property.

  14. A review of oxide, silicon nitride, and silicon carbide brazing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing interest in using ceramics for structural applications, many of which require the fabrication of components with complicated shapes. Normal ceramic processing methods restrict the shapes into which these materials can be produced, but ceramic joining technology can be used to overcome many of these limitations, and also offers the possibility for improving the reliability of ceramic components. One method of joining ceramics is by brazing. The metallic alloys used for bonding must wet and adhere to the ceramic surfaces without excessive reaction. Alumina, partially stabilized zirconia, and silicon nitride have high ionic character to their chemical bonds and are difficult to wet. Alloys for brazing these materials must be formulated to overcome this problem. Silicon carbide, which has some metallic characteristics, reacts excessively with many alloys, and forms joints of low mechanical strength. The brazing characteristics of these three types of ceramics, and residual stresses in ceramic-to-metal joints are briefly discussed

  15. High Strength Silicon Carbide Foams and Their Deformation Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) foams with a continuously connected open-cell structure were prepared and characterized for their mechanical performance. The apparent densities of SiC foams were controlled between about 0.4 and 1.3 g/cm3, with corresponding compressive strengths ranging from about 13 to 60 MPa and flexural strengths from about 8 to 30 MPa. Compressive testing of the SiC foams yielded stress-strain curves with only one linear-elastic region, which is different from those reported on ceramic foams in literature. This can possibly be attributed to the existence of filaments with fine, dense and high strength microstructures. The SiC and the filaments respond homogeneously to applied loading.

  16. Preparation of porous silicon carbide by combustion synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-min; ZHANG Jian-han; HAN Jie-cai

    2005-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide ceramics were prepared by combustion synthesis technique. SiC/TiC composite was gained by combustion reaction of Si, C and Ti. Thermodynamics analysis of Si-C-Ti system indicates that the content of TiC in products should be larger than 30%. The experimental results show that the content of Ti+C should be larger than 25% to achieve a complete combustion reaction. The X-ray diffractometry results show that the final products with a relative density of 45%-64% are composed of α-SiC, β-SiC, TiC and a small quantity of Si. The images of scanning electron microscopy show that the structures of grain in SiC based porous ceramics consist of particles with a few microns in size.

  17. Application of silicon carbide to synchrotron-radiation mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damage to conventional mirror materials exposed to the harsh synchrotron radiation (SR) environment has prompted the SR user community to search for more suitable materials. Next-generation insertion devices, with their attendant flux increases, will make the problem of mirror design even more difficult. A parallel effort in searching for better materials has been underway within the laser community for several years. The technology for dealing with high thermal loads is highly developed among laser manufacturers. Performance requirements for laser heat exchangers are remarkably similar to SR mirror requirements. We report on the application of laser heat exchanger technology to the solution of typical SR mirror design problems. The superior performance of silicon carbide for laser applications is illustrated by various material trades studies, and its superior performance for SR applications is illustrated by means of model calculations

  18. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  19. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  20. Silicon Carbide Sensors and Electronics for Harsh Environment Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Laura J.

    2007-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor has been studied for electronic and sensing applications in extreme environment (high temperature, extreme vibration, harsh chemical media, and high radiation) that is beyond the capability of conventional semiconductors such as silicon. This is due to its near inert chemistry, superior thermomechanical and electronic properties that include high breakdown voltage and wide bandgap. An overview of SiC sensors and electronics work ongoing at NASA Glenn Research Center (NASA GRC) will be presented. The main focus will be two technologies currently being investigated: 1) harsh environment SiC pressure transducers and 2) high temperature SiC electronics. Work highlighted will include the design, fabrication, and application of SiC sensors and electronics, with recent advancements in state-of-the-art discussed as well. These combined technologies are studied for the goal of developing advanced capabilities for measurement and control of aeropropulsion systems, as well as enhancing tools for exploration systems.

  1. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2014-11-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  2. Band Anticrossing in Dilute Germanium Carbides Using Hybrid Density Functionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Chad A.; O'brien, William A.; Qi, Meng; Penninger, Michael; Schneider, William F.; Wistey, Mark A.

    2016-04-01

    Dilute germanium carbides (Ge1- x C x ) offer a direct bandgap for compact silicon photonics, but widely varying properties have been reported. This work reports improved band structure calculations for Ge1- x C x using ab initio simulations that employ the HSE06 exchange-correlation density functional. Contrary to Vegard's law, the conduction band minimum at Γ is consistently found to decrease with increasing C content, while L and X valleys change much more slowly. The calculated Ge bandgap is within 11% of experimental values. A decrease in energy at the Γ conduction band valley of (170 meV ± 50)/%C is predicted, leading to a direct bandgap for x > 0.008. These results indicate a promising material for Group IV lasers.

  3. THz saturable absorption in turbostratic multilayer graphene on silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Federica; Miseikis, Vaidotas; Convertino, Domenica; Xu, Ji-Hua; Castellano, Fabrizio; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Vitiello, Miriam S; Tredicucci, Alessandro; Coletti, Camilla

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the room-temperature Terahertz (THz) response as saturable absorber of turbostratic multilayer graphene grown on the carbon-face of silicon carbide. By employing an open-aperture z-scan method and a 2.9 THz quantum cascade laser as source, a 10% enhancement of transparency is observed. The saturation intensity is several W/cm2, mostly attributed to the Pauli blocking effect in the intrinsic graphene layers. A visible increase of the modulation depth as a function of the number of graphene sheets was recorded as consequence of the low nonsaturable losses. The latter in turn revealed that crystalline disorder is the main limitation to larger modulations, demonstrating that the THz nonlinear absorption properties of turbostratic graphene can be engineered via a proper control of the crystalline disorder and the layers number. PMID:25969255

  4. New method for synthesis of metal carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, R.; Folmer, J.S.; Kodambaka, S.K. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a novel synthesis method using a carbothermic reduction reaction of carbon coated precursors for producing high purity, submicron, non-agglomerated powders of metal carbide, metal nitride and metal boride systems. The authors also want to demonstrate the advantages of the process and provide information on the applicability of the process for synthesizing related advanced ceramic powders (e.g. SiC, WC, TiN, TiB{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). During the FY96 of the project, steps are taken to investigate the reaction mechanisms and phase evolution during the formation of TiC from carbon coated titania precursors and to produce submicron TiC powders with desired stoichiometries. Depending on the carbon content in the coated titania precursor, TiC powder was produced with different stoichiometries (different amount of oxygen and free carbon).

  5. Low temperature synthesis and photoluminescence of cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cubic silicon carbide (3C-SiC) powder was synthesized at 460 deg. C in the ScCO2-metallic Na system, using cheap industrial FeSiδ alloy (≤500 mesh) and CO2, as silicon and carbon sources, respectively. The products were characterized by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectrum analysis. The results show that increasing the heating-up rate, adding a metallic sodium dose and prolonging the heating time favour the formation of 3C-SiC. A very strong photoluminescence band peaking at 436 nm was observed, showing a blue shift compared with the blue-green luminescence from films of 3C-SiC. A possible mechanism behind the blue shift is discussed

  6. Fabrication of silicon nitride-silicon carbide nanocomposite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon nitride-silicon carbide nanocomposites have so far been fabricated by hot-pressing fine amorphous Si-C-N powder produced by CVD. This composite exhibited excellent strength and fracture toughness and maintained high strength to temperatures above 1200 C. The current work deals with the fabrication of nanocomposites produced using mixtures of Si3N4 and nanosize SiC powders. Conventional processing techniques were used to optimise the dispersion of the SiC particles. Densification was achieved by pressureless sintering, gas pressure sintering and sinter/HIPping. Mechanical properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and strength at room temperature were assessed. The nanocomposites produced were compared with composites produced using alternative starting materials. (orig.)

  7. Raman spectra of silicon carbide small particles and nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two manufacturing protocols of silicon carbide (SiC) nanowires are discussed. The Raman spectra of produced SiC nanowires are compared with spectra of SiC powders of various grain sizes. The temperature and pressure dependence of the Raman spectra for powders is similar to that of bulk crystals, but is different for nanowires. Frequency shifts, band broadenings and the presence of shoulders are discussed in terms of crystal size, character of defects and their population. The concentration of defects in synthesized nanowires depends on the sintering method. Raman intensity enhancement of the LO phonon was observed when the wavelength of the excitation laser was changed from 780 to 514 nm

  8. Silicon carbide nanowires synthesized with phenolic resin and silicon powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongsheng; Shi, Limin; Li, Ziqiang; Tang, Chunhe

    2009-02-01

    Large-scale silicon carbide nanowires with the lengths up to several millimeters were synthesized by a coat-mix, moulding, carbonization, and high-temperature sintering process, using silicon powder and phenolic resin as the starting materials. Ordinary SiC nanowires, bamboo-like SiC nanowires, and spindle SiC nanochains are found in the fabricated samples. The ordinary SiC nanowire is a single-crystal SiC phase with a fringe spacing of 0.252 nm along the [1 1 1] growth direction. Both of the bamboo-like SiC nanowires and spindle SiC nanochains exhibit uniform periodic structures. The bamboo-like SiC nanowires consist of amorphous stem and single-crystal knots, while the spindle SiC nanochains consist of uniform spindles which grow uniformly on the entire nanowires.

  9. Zirconium and niobium carbide sintering with carbon additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zirconium and niobium carbide sintering with carbon additives in the form of diamond and graphite was studied within a temperature range of 1000-2700 deg C. It is shown that for ZrC-C, NbC-C compositions within the temperature range of diamond polymorphous transformation the shrinkage either completely stops or loss of compaction is observed depending on the diamond content. ZrC and NbC samples with diamond additives are compressed to greater finite compactness as compared with the ZrC and NbC samples containing graphite as a second phase. Sintering of ZrC-C and NbC-C compositions was controlled primarily by the processes of boundary diffusion up to sintering temperatures 1300-1400 deg C. It is determined that at higher temperatures the role of volume diffusion in sintering kinetics becomes more noticeable

  10. Growth Mechanism of Silicon Carbide (SIC) on Clean Silicon Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An understanding of the growth mechanisms of silicon carbide (SiC) on the silicon surfaces is important not only for technological applications but also from the point of view of fundamental research. Due to the great lattice (20%) mismatch as well as to the high reaction temperature (above 1000 degrees for standard thermal techniques), rough silicon carbide surfaces with high density of defects and voids have been generally obtained. The voids are related to the low diffusion coefficient of silicon in SiC, which should enhance the Si diffusion mechanism throughout the silicon layers. Therefore, in order to improve the crystalline quality several types of precursors have been used with the aim to lower the silicon carbide temperature formation. Among the several growth processes investigated, the exposure of a hot silicon substrate to C60, acetylene, ethylene and graphite has been reported to produce cubic SiC films at temperatures in the range between 600 degrees and 900 degrees. Acetylene, in doses between 3600 and 30000 Langmuir (1 L= 1x1O-6 Torr.s), has been found to strongly react with Si(111)7x7 reconstructed substrate kept at temperature ranging between 6000C and 8000C and to form cubic silicon carbide nanostructures. They grow following the heteroepitaxial relationship SiC[111]//Si[111] and are characterized, for the highest acetylene doses, by a good crystalline quality with a rather flat morphology. A scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) study performed on Si(111)7x7 reconstructed surface imaged in real time, during low acetylene exposures (less than 600 L) while keeping the silicon surface at 6000C, has shown that this surface technique allows to image in real space the local modifications of the system and to identify the starting point of the reaction process together with its time evolution. Besides we investigated the role played by the temperature of Si(111)7x7 surface during different acetylene exposures in the morphology modification of the reacted

  11. A first principles study of palladium in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. Silicon carbide has been used in nuclear industry and is still considered as a coating material for nuclear fuel. Its main role should be to retain fission products. It has been observed, however, that some fission products, like palladium and silver, attack the SiC layer and are supposed to be responsible for corrosion of the material, which could facilitate fission products release. We used first principles calculations based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) in order to investigate the energetic, structural, and kinetic properties of Pd impurities inside beta-SiC; we obtained solution and migration energies in pure SiC and discuss some basic thermodynamical issues of the corrosion process. Moreover we consider some possible effects of the disorder, which is known to be induced by irradiation in the form of amorphized regions, on Pd kinetics, and we will mention some issues related to the recombination of intrinsic defects created by irradiation. (author)

  12. Superconductivity in heavily boron-doped silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kriener, Takahiro Muranaka, Junya Kato, Zhi-An Ren, Jun Akimitsu and Yoshiteru Maeno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond in 2004 and silicon in 2006 have renewed the interest in the superconducting state of semiconductors. Charge-carrier doping of wide-gap semiconductors leads to a metallic phase from which upon further doping superconductivity can emerge. Recently, we discovered superconductivity in a closely related system: heavily boron-doped silicon carbide. The sample used for that study consisted of cubic and hexagonal SiC phase fractions and hence this led to the question which of them participated in the superconductivity. Here we studied a hexagonal SiC sample, free from cubic SiC phase by means of x-ray diffraction, resistivity, and ac susceptibility.

  13. Structural phase transitions in boron carbide under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaev, P.; Pokatashkin, P.; Yanilkin, A.

    2016-01-01

    Structural transitions in boron carbide B4C under stress were studied by means of first-principles molecular dynamics in the framework of density functional theory. The behavior depends strongly on degree of non-hydrostatic stress. Under hydrostatic stress continuous bending of the three-atom C-B-C chain was observed up to 70 GPa. The presence of non-hydrostatic stress activates abrupt reversible chain bending, which is displacement of the central boron atom in the chain with the formation of weak bonds between this atom and atoms in the nearby icosahedra. Such structural change can describe a possible reversible phase transition in dynamical loading experiments. High non-hydrostatic stress achieved in uniaxial loading leads to disordering of the initial structure. The formation of carbon chains is observed as one possible transition route.

  14. Microalloying Boron Carbide with Silicon to Achieve Dramatically Improved Ductility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Qi; Goddard, William A

    2014-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a hard material whose value for extended engineering applications such as body armor; is limited by its brittleness under impact. To improve the ductility while retaining hardness, we used density functional theory to examine modifying B4C ductility through microalloying. We found that replacing the CBC chain in B4C with Si-Si, denoted as (B11Cp)-Si2, dramatically improves the ductility, allowing a continuous shear to a large strain of 0.802 (about twice of B4C failure strain) without brittle failure. Moreover, (B11C)-Si2 retains low density and high hardness. This ductility improvement arises because the Si-Si linkages enable the icosahedra accommodate additional shear by rotating instead of breaking bonds. PMID:26278950

  15. Thermal conductivity of boron carbide-boron nitride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their preferred orientation, the addition of boron nitride dispersions to hot-pressed boron carbide was found to result in a considerable degree of anisotropy in thermal conductivity of the resulting composite, indicated by an increase in the thermal conductivity perpendicular to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 3 at the highest boron nitride volume fractions of this study, and a decrease in the thermal conductivity parallel to the hot-pressing direction by as much as a factor of 2. The composite data were found to be below the values expected from composite theory, which may represent indirect evidence for the existence of an interfacial thermal barrier

  16. Dynamical conductivity of boron carbide: heavily damped plasma vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Gerlach, Guido

    2014-10-22

    The FIR reflectivity spectra of boron carbide, measured down to ω~10 cm(-1) between 100 and 800 K, are essentially determined by heavily damped plasma vibrations. The spectra are fitted applying the classical Drude-Lorentz theory of free carriers. The fitting Parameter Π=ωp/ωτ yields the carrier densities, which are immediately correlated with the concentration of structural defects in the homogeneity range. This correlation is proved for band-type and hopping conductivity. The effective mass of free holes in the valence band is estimated at m*/me~2.5. The mean free path of the free holes has the order of the cell parameters. PMID:25273152

  17. Decoding the message from meteoritic stardust silicon carbide grains

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, Karen M; Gibson, Brad K; Pilkington, Kate

    2013-01-01

    Micron-sized stardust grains that originated in ancient stars are recovered from meteorites and analysed using high-resolution mass spectrometry. The most widely studied type of stardust is silicon carbide (SiC). Thousands of these grains have been analysed with high precision for their Si isotopic composition. Here we show that the distribution of the Si isotopic composition of the vast majority of stardust SiC grains carry the imprints of a spread in the age-metallicity distribution of their parent stars and of a power-law increase of the relative formation efficiency of SiC dust with the metallicity. This result offers a solution for the long-standing problem of silicon in stardust SiC grains, confirms the necessity of coupling chemistry and dynamics in simulations of the chemical evolution of our Galaxy, and constrains the modelling of dust condensation in stellar winds as function of the metallicity.

  18. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure

  19. Silicon carbide, a semiconductor for space power electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. A.; Matus, Lawrence G.

    1991-01-01

    After many years of promise as a high temperature semiconductor, silicon carbide (SiC) is finally emerging as a useful electronic material. Recent significant progress that has led to this emergence has been in the area of crystal growth and device fabrication technology. High quality of single-crystal SiC wafers, up to 25 mm in diameter, can now be produced routinely from boules grown by a high temperature (2700 K) sublimation process. Device fabrication processes, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD), in situ doping during CVD, reactive ion etching, oxidation, metallization, etc. have been used to fabricate p-n junction diodes and MOSFETs. The diode was operated to 870 K and the MOSFET to 770 K.

  20. Microstructural characterisation of silicon nitride-bonded silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microstructure of a commercial silicon nitride-bonded silicon carbide ceramic composite, formed via the nitridation of Si powder-SiC preforms, has been characterised by transmission electron microscopy. A mechanism combining reaction bonding and liquid-phase sintering is proposed to describe the development and observed morphology of the microstructure of the bonding matrix, which comprises predominantly phases based on Si2N2O and β-Si3N4 and an amorphous phase. Qualitative microanalysis of amorphous matrix regions has revealed significant concentrations of oxygen, aluminium and calcium, with Al also being detected in both of the surrounding cyrstalline phases. It is thus suggested that the principal constituents of the matrix are in fact O' and β' sialons. (orig.)

  1. Ion-beam-induced amorphous structures in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomistic structure of ion-beam-induced amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) has been investigated by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. The electron intensities of halo patterns recorded on imaging plates were digitized quantitatively to extract reduced interference functions. We demonstrated the relationship between maximum scattering vector (Qmax) measured in scattering experiments and the resolution of the corresponding pair-distribution function by changing Qmax values from 160 to 230 nm-1. The results revealed that the C-C peak becomes broadened and eventually a shoulder as the Qmax value becomes shorter, indicating that Qmax values of -1 measured in previous studies are not enough to detect C-C homonuclear bonds in a-SiC. We are the first to reveal the existence of C-C and Si-Si homonuclear bonds in a-SiC using a diffraction technique

  2. Subsurface damage of single crystalline silicon carbide in nanoindentation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jiwang; Gai, Xiaohui; Harada, Hirofumi

    2010-11-01

    The response of single crystalline silicon carbide (SiC) to a Berkovich nanoindenter was investigated by examining the indents using a transmission electron microscope and the selected area electron diffraction technique. It was found that the depth of indentation-induced subsurface damage was far larger than the indentation depth, and the damaging mechanism of SiC was distinctly different from that of single crystalline silicon. For silicon, a broad amorphous region is formed underneath the indenter after unloading; for SiC, however, no amorphous phase was detected. Instead, a polycrystalline structure with a grain size of ten nanometer level was identified directly under the indenter tip. Micro cracks, basal plane dislocations and possible cross slips were also found around the indent. These finding provide useful information for ultraprecision manufacturing of SiC wafers. PMID:21138038

  3. Ion beam irradiation of relaxed amorphous silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ transmittance measurements at λ=633 nm are used during ion irradiation to probe the defect generation in relaxed amorphous silicon carbide (SiC). The optical constants of amorphous SiC are strongly correlated to the thermal history of the material and the transmittance of ion implanted amorphous SiC (unrelaxed amorphous) increases after annealing in the temperature range 100-700 deg. C. The transmittance of annealed amorphous SiC (relaxed) during subsequent implantation decreases and saturates to the value of unrelaxed amorphous. In-situ transmittance measurements allow to follow directly the defect generation and to measure the fluence at which the transmittance saturates (derelaxation fluence). The effect of different ions (He and Ar) on these phenomena is explored. The obtained results are compared and discussed with similar measurements performed on amorphous silicon

  4. Amorphous silicon carbide films prepared using vaporized silicon ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Takashi; Shen, Zhongrong; Takagishi, Hideyuki; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    The deposition of wide-band-gap silicon films using nonvacuum processes rather than conventional vacuum processes is of substantial interest because it may reduce cost. Herein, we present the optical and electrical properties of p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) films prepared using a nonvacuum process in a simple chamber with a vaporized silicon ink consisting of cyclopentasilane, cyclohexene, and decaborane. The incorporation of carbon into the silicon network induced by the addition of cyclohexene to the silicon ink resulted in an increase in the optical band gap (Eg) of films from 1.56 to 2.11 eV. The conductivity of films with Eg 1.9 eV show lower conductivity than expected because of the incorporation of excess carbon without the formation of Si-C bonds.

  5. Development of Processing Windows for HVOF Carbide-Based Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Andrew Siao Ming; Howse, Hugo; Wade, Scott A.; Berndt, Christopher C.

    2016-01-01

    Optimized processing windows for spraying high-quality metal carbide-based coatings are developed using particle diagnostic technology. The cermet coatings were produced via the high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray process and are proposed for service applications such as marine hydraulics. The traditional "trial and error" method for developing coating process parameters is not technically robust, as well as being costly and time consuming. Instead, this contribution investigated the use of real-time monitoring of parameters associated with the HVOF flame jets and particles using in-flight particle diagnostics. Subsequently, coatings can be produced with knowledge concerning the molten particle size, temperature, and velocity profile. The analytical results allow identification of optimized coating process windows, which translate to coatings of lower porosity and improved mechanical performance.

  6. Nanoporous Carbide-Derived Carbon Material-Based Linear Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janno Torop

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Devices using electroactive polymer-supported carbon material can be exploited as alternatives to conventional electromechanical actuators in applications where electromechanical actuators have some serious deficiencies. One of the numerous examples is precise microactuators. In this paper, we show for first time the dilatometric effect in nanocomposite material actuators containing carbide-derived carbon (CDC and polytetrafluoroetylene polymer (PTFE. Transducers based on high surface area carbide-derived carbon electrode materials are suitable for short range displacement applications, because of the proportional actuation response to the charge inserted, and high Coulombic efficiency due to the EDL capacitance. The material is capable of developing stresses in the range of tens of N cm-2. The area of an actuator can be dozens of cm2, which means that forces above 100 N are achievable. The actuation mechanism is based on the interactions between the high-surface carbon and the ions of the electrolyte. Electrochemical evaluations of the four different actuators with linear (longitudinal action response are described. The actuator electrodes were made from two types of nanoporous TiC-derived carbons with surface area (SA of 1150 m2 g-1 and 1470 m2 g-1, respectively. Two kinds of electrolytes were used in actuators: 1.0 M tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEABF4 solution in propylene carbonate and pure ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (EMITf. It was found that CDC based actuators exhibit a linear movement of about 1% in the voltage range of 0.8 V to 3.0 V at DC. The actuators with EMITf electrolyte had about 70% larger movement compared to the specimen with TEABF4 electrolyte.

  7. The current understanding on the diamond machining of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Glenn Research Centre of NASA, USA (www.grc.nasa.gov/WWW/SiC/, silicon carbide electronics) is in pursuit of realizing bulk manufacturing of silicon carbide (SiC), specifically by mechanical means. Single point diamond turning (SPDT) technology which employs diamond (the hardest naturally-occurring material realized to date) as a cutting tool to cut a workpiece is a highly productive manufacturing process. However, machining SiC using SPDT is a complex process and, while several experimental and analytical studies presented to date aid in the understanding of several critical processes of machining SiC, the current knowledge on the ductile behaviour of SiC is still sparse. This is due to a number of simultaneously occurring physical phenomena that may take place on multiple length and time scales. For example, nucleation of dislocation can take place at small inclusions that are of a few atoms in size and once nucleated, the interaction of these nucleations can manifest stresses on the micrometre length scales. The understanding of how these stresses manifest during fracture in the brittle range, or dislocations/phase transformations in the ductile range, is crucial to understanding the brittle–ductile transition in SiC. Furthermore, there is a need to incorporate an appropriate simulation-based approach in the manufacturing research on SiC, owing primarily to the number of uncertainties in the current experimental research that includes wear of the cutting tool, poor controllability of the nano-regime machining scale (effective thickness of cut), and coolant effects (interfacial phenomena between the tool, workpiece/chip and coolant), etc. In this review, these two problems are combined together to posit an improved understanding on the current theoretical knowledge on the SPDT of SiC obtained from molecular dynamics simulation. (topical review)

  8. Metal-carbide multilayers for molten Pu containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilayers composed of nine or ten alternating layers of Ta or W and TaC were studied for the feasibility of their use in containing molten plutonium (Pu) at 1200 degrees C. Single layers of W and TaC were also investigated. A two-source electron beam evaporation process was developed to deposit these coatings onto the inside surface of hemispherical Ta cups about 38 mm in diameter. Pu testing was done by melting Pu in the coated hemispherical cups and holding them under vacuum at 1200 degrees C for two hours. Metallographic examination and microprobe analysis of cross sections showed that Pu had penetrated to the Ta substrate in all cases to some extent. Full penetration to the outer surface of the Ta substrate, however, occurred in only a few of the samples. The fact that full penetration occurred in any of the samples suggests that it would have occurred in uncoated Ta under these testing conditions which in turn suggests that the multilayer coatings do afford some protection against Pu attack. The TaC used for these specimens was wet by Pu under these testing conditions, and following testing, Pu was found uniformly distributed throughout the carbide layers which appeared to be rather porous. Pu was seen in the W and Ta layers only when exposed directly to molten Pu during testing or near defects suggesting that Pu penetrated the multilayers at defects in the coating and traveled parallel to the layers along the carbide layers. These results indicate that the use of alternating metal and ceramic layers for Pu containment should be possible through the use of nonporous ceramic that is not wet by molten Pu and defect-free films

  9. Expanding the versatility of silicon carbide thin films and nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Lunet

    Silicon carbide (SiC) based electronics and sensors hold promise for pushing past the limits of current technology to achieve small, durable devices that can function in high-temperature, high-voltage, corrosive, and biological environments. SiC is an ideal material for such conditions due to its high mechanical strength, excellent chemical stability, and its biocompatibility. Consequently, SiC thin films and nanowires have attracted interest in applications such as micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, biological sensors, field emission cathodes, and energy storage devices. However to fully realize SiC in such technologies, the reliability of metal contacts to SiC at high temperatures must be improved and the nanowire growth mechanism must be understood to enable strict control of nanowire crystal structure and orientation. Here, we present a novel metallization scheme, utilizing solid-state graphitization of SiC, to improve the long-term reliability of Pt/Ti contacts to polycrystalline n-type SiC films at high temperature. The metallization scheme includes an alumina protection layer and exhibits low, stable contact resistivity even after long-term (500 hr) testing in air at 450 ºC. We also report the crystal structure and growth mechanism of Ni-assisted silicon carbide nanowires using single-source precursor, methyltrichlorosilane. The effects of growth parameters, such as substrate and temperature, on the structure and morphology of the resulting nanowires will also be presented. Overall, this study provides new insights towards the realization of novel SiC technologies, enabled by advanced electron microscopy techniques located in the user facilities at the Molecular Foundry in Berkeley, California. This work was performed in part at the Molecular Foundry, supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  10. Electronic and vibrational properties of vanadium-carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Poorva; Nautiyal, Tashi; Auluck, Sushil

    2012-09-01

    We have made an effort to understand the properties of transition metal carbide nanowires (NWs) and studied vanadium-carbide (VC) nanowires as a specific case. Different structures have been considered and their electronic and vibrational properties studied employing density functional theory. The effect of dimensionality is very well brought forth by these NWs, narrow/thinner structures have clear preference for magnetic state with sizeable magnetic moment at the V sites. As the thickness/width increases, the margin decreases and the magnetic moment disappears altogether for structures like square and rectangular NWs. The cohesive energy per atom increases with the increase in lateral dimensions of the NW, and it is about 88% of the bulk value for the rectangular NW, while it is only 50% for the linear chain. All the wires are conducting in nature, with the linear and zigzag wires having half-metallic character. Our calculations show that the V atoms decide the electronic and magnetic properties in these while compressibility, a mechanical property, is governed by the C atoms. The electron localization function beautifully illustrates the closeness of thicker/wider NWs to the bulk. It also reveals that electrons are highly localized around C atoms; however, the amount of charge transferred depends strongly on the structure of wire. The optical properties unfurl the impact of different spatial expanse in the cross section of NW in a nice way, e.g., ɛ2xx > ɛ2yy (ɛ2 is imaginary part of dielectric function) for all those with a larger expanse along X compared to Y and vice-versa. Thicker nanowires seem to be more suitable for optical applications. Site-resolved phonon density of states shows that presence of C atoms is responsible for high frequency branches. The heat capacity variation for various structures closely follows the magnitude of respective phonon density of states.

  11. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  12. Structural Evolution of Molybdenum Carbides in Hot Aqueous Environments and Impact on Low-Temperature Hydroprocessing of Acetic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Soon Choi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the structural evolution of molybdenum carbides subjected to hot aqueous environments and their catalytic performance in low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid. While bulk structures of Mo carbides were maintained after aging in hot liquid water, a portion of carbidic Mo sites were converted to oxidic sites. Water aging also induced changes to the non-carbidic carbon deposited during carbide synthesis and increased surface roughness, which in turn affected carbide pore volume and surface area. The extent of these structural changes was sensitive to the initial carbide structure and was lower under actual hydroprocessing conditions indicating the possibility of further improving the hydrothermal stability of Mo carbides by optimizing catalyst structure and operating conditions. Mo carbides were active in acetic acid conversion in the presence of liquid water, their activity being comparable to that of Ru/C. The results suggest that effective and inexpensive bio-oil hydroprocessing catalysts could be designed based on Mo carbides, although a more detailed understanding of the structure-performance relationships is needed, especially in upgrading of more complex reaction mixtures or real bio-oils.

  13. Microstructure and properties of an ultra-fine grained reaction-bonded β-silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Very fine β-silicon carbide powder has been fabricated into dense reaction-bonded material by mixing with fine carbon powder and siliconising. The product has a very small (approximately 0.5 μm) grain size although much larger grains are sometimes observed which appear to have formed through discontinuous grain growth. The microhardness behaviour of the material differs from that of a REFEL silicon carbide containing 10 μm α-silicon carbide grains in that it exhibits higher hardness at low indentation loads, a greater dependence of hardness on load and, most significantly, far less tendency to microcracking at high loads. Possible reasons for this behaviour are discussed. Provided that proper control of density and microstructure is exercised, then high strength levels may be attained. The new material should represent a useful complement to more conventional reaction-bonded silicon carbide. (author)

  14. Raman and FTIR Studies of Silicon Carbide Surface Damage from Palladium Implantation in Presence of Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntele, I.; Ila, D.; Muntele, C. J.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The ion implantation in a crystal such as silicon carbide will cause both damage in the ion track and in the substrate at the end of the ion track. We used both keV, and MeV Pd ions in fabricating electronic chemical sensors in silicon carbide, which can operate at elevated temperatures. In order to study the feasibility of fabricating an optical chemical sensor (litmus sensor), we need to understand the optical behavior of the embedded damage in the presence of hydrogen, as well as the potential chemical interaction of silicon carbide broken lattice bonds with the hydrogen dissociated from gas by palladium. Implanted samples of silicon carbide were studied using both Raman spectroscopy and FTIR (Fourier Transform-Infrared). The results of this work will be presented during the meeting.

  15. Some physical properties of compacted specimens of highly dispersed boron carbide and boron suboxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structure, shear modulus and internal friction (IF) of compacted specimens of boron carbide and boron suboxide have been investigated. Microtwins and stacking faults were observed along the {100} plane systems of polycrystalline specimens of boron carbide. Electrical conductivity of the specimens was that of p-type. Concentration of holes varied from 1017 to 1019 cm-3. The IF was measured in the temperature range 80-300 K. It was shown that the IF of boron carbide and that of boron suboxide were characterized with a set of similar relaxation processes. Mechanisms of the relaxation processes in boron carbide and boron suboxide are discussed in terms of the Hasiguti model of interaction between dislocations and point defects

  16. Mechanical analysis of a boron carbide control rod for pressurized water reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control rod using boron carbide as the neutron poison was analyzed for use in a pressurized water reactor. The motivation for this study stems from the increasing use of boron carbide in control rod elements for large commercial nuclear power stations and the potential safety hazard related to excessive inelastic cladding deformation due to pellet-cladding interaction. As such, the radiation induced dilatation of the boron carbide pellets and the ensuing pellet-cladding interaction phenomena were the dominant concerns of this investigation. Based on the small deformation theory of linear elasticity, the method developed herein can be used to predict that rod burnup which initiates the yielding of the cladding. The details of the physical properties of boron carbide and related design data required for the analysis are included

  17. Silicon Carbide Lightweight Optics With Hybrid Skins for Large Cryo Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) has developed new silicon carbide (SiC) foam-based optics with hybrid skins that are composite, athermal and lightweight (FOCAL) that...

  18. TRANSFORMATIONS IN NANO-DIAMONDS WITH FORMATION OF NANO-POROUS SILICON CARBIDE AT HIGH PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains investigations on regularities of diamond - silicon carbide composite structure formation at impact-wave excitation. It has been determined that while squeezing a porous blank containing Si (SiC nano-diamond by explosive detonation products some processes are taking place such as diamond nano-particles consolidation, reverse diamond transition into graphite, fragments formation from silicon carbide. A method for obtaining high-porous composites with the presence of ultra-disperse diamond particles has been developed. Material with three-dimensional high-porous silicon-carbide structure has been received due to nano-diamond graphitation at impact wave transmission and plastic deformation. The paper reveals nano-diamonds inverse transformation into graphite and its subsequent interaction with the silicon accompanied by formation of silicon-carbide fragments with dimensions of up to 100 nm.

  19. Silicon Carbide Lightweight Optics With Hybrid Skins for Large Cryo Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) proposes to manufacture new silicon carbide (SiC) foam-based optics that are composite, athermal and lightweight (FOCAL) that provide...

  20. Surface roughness analysis after machining of direct laser deposited tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojciechowski, S.; Twardowski, P.; Chwalczuk, T.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, an experimental surface roughness analysis in machining of tungsten carbide is presented. The tungsten carbide was received using direct laser deposition technology (DLD). Experiments carried out included milling of tungsten carbide samples using monolithic torus cubic boron nitride (CBN) tool and grinding with the diamond cup wheel. The effect of machining method on the generated surface topography was analysed. The 3D surface topographies were measured using optical surface profiler. The research revealed, that surface roughness generated after the machining of tungsten carbide is affected by feed per tooth (fz) value related to kinematic-geometric projection only in a minor extent. The main factor affecting machined surface roughness is the occurrence of micro grooves and protuberances on the machined surface, as well as other phenomena connected, inter alia, with the mechanism for material removal.