WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbide fueled square-lattice

  1. Skyrmions in square-lattice antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesman, Rick; Raaijmakers, Mark; Baerends, A. E.; Barkema, G. T.; Duine, R. A.

    2016-08-01

    The ground states of square-lattice two-dimensional antiferromagnets with anisotropy in an external magnetic field are determined using Monte Carlo simulations and compared to theoretical analysis. We find a phase in between the spin-flop and spiral phase that shows strong similarity to skyrmions in ferromagnetic thin films. We show that this phase arises as a result of the competition between Zeeman and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction energies of the magnetic system. Moreover, we find that isolated (anti-)skyrmions are stabilized in finite-sized systems, even at higher temperatures. The existence of thermodynamically stable skyrmions in square-lattice antiferromagnets provides an appealing alternative over skyrmions in ferromagnets as data carriers.

  2. Emotional agents at the square lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Czaplicka, Agnieszka; Holyst, Janusz A

    2010-01-01

    We introduce and investigate by numerical simulations a number of models of emotional agents at the square lattice. Our models describe the most general features of emotions such as the spontaneous emotional arousal, emotional relaxation, and transfers of emotions between different agents. Group emotions in the considered models are periodically fluctuating between two opposite valency levels and as result the mean value of such group emotions is zero. The oscillations amplitude depends strongly on probability ps of the individual spontaneous arousal. For small values of relaxation times tau we observed a stochastic resonance, i.e. the signal to noise ratio SNR is maximal for a non-zero ps parameter. The amplitude increases with the probability p of local affective interactions while the mean oscillations period increases with the relaxation time tau and is only weakly dependent on other system parameters. Presence of emotional antenna can enhance positive or negative emotions and for the optimal transition p...

  3. Fractional excitations in the square-lattice quantum antiferromagnet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piazza, B. Dalla; Mourigal, M.; Christensen, Niels Bech;

    2015-01-01

    characterize the magnetic fluctuations in the metal-organic compound Cu(DCOO)(2)center dot 4D(2)O, a known realization of the quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet model. Our experiments reveal an isotropic excitation continuum at the anomaly, which we analyse theoretically using Gutzwiller...

  4. Majority-vote model with heterogeneous agents on square lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Lima, F W S

    2013-01-01

    We study a nonequilibrium model with up-down symmetry and a noise parameter $q$ known as majority-vote model of M.J. Oliveira 1992 with heterogeneous agents on square lattice. By Monte Carlo simulations and finite-size scaling relations the critical exponents $\\beta/\

  5. Status of advanced carbide fuels: Past, present, and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Knight, Travis

    2002-01-01

    Solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C, so called ternary carbide or tri-carbide fuels have great potential for applications in next generation advanced nuclear power reactors. Because of their high melting points, high thermal conductivity, improved resistance to hot hydrogen corrosion, and good fission product retention, these advanced nuclear fuels have great potential for high performance reactors with increased safety margins. Despite these many benefits, some concerns regarding carbide fuels include compatibility issues with coolant and/or cladding materials and their endurance under the extreme conditions associated with nuclear thermal propulsion. The status of these fuels is reviewed to characterize their performance for space nuclear power applications. Results of current investigations are presented and as well as future directions of study for these advanced nuclear fuels. .

  6. Lattice Boltzmann Model for Compressible Fluid on a Square Lattice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Cheng-Hai

    2000-01-01

    A two-level four-direction lattice Boltzmann model is formulated on a square lattice to simulate compressible flows with a high Mach number. The particle velocities are adaptive to the mean velocity and internal energy. Therefore, the mean flow can have a high Mach number. Due to the simple form of the equilibrium distribution, the 4th order velocity tensors are not involved in the calculations. Unlike the standard lattice Boltzmann model, o special treatment is need for the homogeneity of 4th order velocity tensors on square lattices. The Navier-Stokes equations were derived by the Chapman-Enskog method from the BGK Boltzmann equation. The model can be easily extended to three-dimensional cubic lattices. Two-dimensional shock-wave propagation was simulated

  7. Optimized resonating valence bond state in square lattice: correlations & excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nourbakhsh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider RVB state as a variational estimate for the ground state of Heisenberg antiferromagnet in square lattice. We present numerical calculation of energy, spin-spin correlation function and spin excitation spectrum. We show, that the quantum flactuations reduce of magnetization respect to Neel order. Our results are in good agreement with other methods such as spin-wave calculation and series expansions.

  8. Quantum dynamics and entanglement of spins on a square lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Niels Bech; Rønnow, Henrik Moodysson; McMorrow, Desmond Francis;

    2007-01-01

    Bulk magnetism in solids is fundamentally quantum mechanical in nature. Yet in many situations, including our everyday encounters with magnetic materials, quantum effects are masked, and it often suffices to think of magnetism in terms of the interaction between classical dipole moments. Whereas ......, suggesting entanglement of spins at short distances in the simplest of all two-dimensional quantum antiferromagnets, the square lattice Heisenberg system....

  9. Fractional excitations in the square-lattice quantum antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalla Piazza, B.; Mourigal, M.; Christensen, N. B.; Nilsen, G. J.; Tregenna-Piggott, P.; Perring, T. G.; Enderle, M.; McMorrow, D. F.; Ivanov, D. A.; Rønnow, H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum magnets have occupied the fertile ground between many-body theory and low-temperature experiments on real materials since the early days of quantum mechanics. However, our understanding of even deceptively simple systems of interacting spin-1/2 particles is far from complete. The quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet, for example, exhibits a striking anomaly of hitherto unknown origin in its magnetic excitation spectrum. This quantum effect manifests itself for excitations propagating with the specific wavevector (π, 0). We use polarized neutron spectroscopy to fully characterize the magnetic fluctuations in the metal-organic compound Cu(DCOO)2.4D2O, a known realization of the quantum square-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet model. Our experiments reveal an isotropic excitation continuum at the anomaly, which we analyse theoretically using Gutzwiller-projected trial wavefunctions. The excitation continuum is accounted for by the existence of spatially extended pairs of fractional S = 1/2 quasiparticles, 2D analogues of 1D spinons. Away from the anomalous wavevector, these fractional excitations are bound and form conventional magnons. Our results establish the existence of fractional quasiparticles in the high-energy spectrum of a quasi-two-dimensional antiferromagnet, even in the absence of frustration.

  10. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process

  11. Anisotropic square lattice Potts ferromagnet: renormalization group treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of a convenient self-dual cell within a real space renormalization group framework enables a satisfactory treatment of the anisotropic square lattice q-state Potts ferromagnet criticality. The exact critical frontier and dimensionality crossover exponent PHI as well as the expected universality behaviour (renormalization flow sense) are recovered for any linear scaling factor b and all values of q(q -< 4). The b = 2 and b = 3 approximate correlation lenght critical exponent ν is calculated for all values of q and compared with den Nijs conjecture. The same calculation is performed, for all values of b, for the exponent ν(d=1) associated to the one-dimensional limit and the exact result ν (d=1) = 1 is recovered in the limit b → infinite. (Author)

  12. New face-centered photonic square lattices with flat bands

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yiqi; Li, Changbiao; Zhang, Zhaoyang; Zhang, Yanpeng; Xiao, Min

    2016-01-01

    We report two new classes of face-centered photonic square lattices with flat bands which we call the Lieb-I and the Lieb-II lattices. There are 5 and 7 sites in the corresponding unit cells of the simplest Lieb-I and Lieb-II lattices, respectively. The number of flat bands $m$ in the new Lieb lattices is related to the number of sites $N$ in the unit cell by $m=(N-1)/2$. Physical properties of the lattices with even and odd number of flat bands are different. We also consider localization of light in such Lieb lattices. If the input beam excites the flat-band mode, it will not diffract during propagation, owing to the strong localization in the flat-band mode. For the Lieb-II lattice, we also find that the beam will oscillate and still not diffract during propagation, because of the intrinsic oscillating properties of certain flat-band modes. The period of oscillation is determined by the energy difference between the two flat bands. This study provides a new platform for the investigation of flat-band modes...

  13. Square lattice self-avoiding walks and biased differential approximants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Iwan

    2016-10-01

    The model of self-avoiding lattice walks and the asymptotic analysis of power-series have been two of the major research themes of Tony Guttmann. In this paper we bring the two together and perform a new analysis of the generating functions for the number of square lattice self-avoiding walks and some of their metric properties such as the mean-square end-to-end distance. The critical point x c for self-avoiding walks is known to a high degree of accuracy and we utilise this knowledge to undertake a new numerical analysis of the series using biased differential approximants. The new method is major advance in asymptotic power-series analysis in that it allows us to bias differential approximants to have a singularity of order q at x c. When biasing at x c with q≥slant 2 the analysis yields a very accurate estimate for the critical exponent γ =1.343 7500(3) thus confirming the conjectured exact value γ =43/32 to eight significant digits and removing a long-standing minor discrepancy between exact and numerical results. The analysis of the mean-square end-to-end distance yields ν =0.750 0002(4) thus confirming the exact value ν =3/4 to seven significant digits. Dedicated to Tony Guttmann on the occasion of his 70th birthday.

  14. Thermodynamic properties of magnetic strings on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol, Lucas; Oliveira, Denis Da Mata; Bachmann, Michael

    2015-03-01

    In the last years, spin ice systems have increasingly attracted attention by the scientific community, mainly due to the appearance of collective excitations that behave as magnetic monopole like particles. In these systems, geometrical frustration induces the appearance of degenerated ground states characterized by a local energy minimization rule, the ice rule. Violations of this rule were shown to behave like magnetic monopoles connected by a string of dipoles that carries the magnetic flux from one monopole to the other. In order to obtain a deeper knowledge about the behavior of these excitations we study the thermodynamics of a kind of magnetic polymer formed by a chain of magnetic dipoles in a square lattice. This system is expected to capture the main properties of monopole-string excitations in the artificial square spin ice. It has been found recently that in this geometry the monopoles are confined, but the effective string tension is reduced by entropic effects. To obtain the thermodynamic properties of the strings we have exactly enumerated all possible string configurations of a given length and used standard statistical mechanics analysis to calculate thermodynamic quantities. We show that the low-temperature behavior is governed by strings that satisfy ice rules. Financial support from FAPEMIG and CNPq (Brazilian agencies) are gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal a new carbide-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimizes the loss of uranium, and retains...

  16. Development of a Robust Tri-Carbide Fueled Reactor for Multimegawatt Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim Anghaie; Travis W. Knight; Johann Plancher; Reza Gouw

    2004-08-11

    An innovative reactor core design based on advanced, mixed carbide fuels was analyzed for nuclear space power applications. Solid solution, mixed carbide fuels such as (U,Zr,Nb)c and (U,Zr, Ta)C offer great promise as an advanced high temperature fuel for space power reactors.

  17. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S. [Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport (NUWCDIVNPT), 1176 Howell Street, Building 1302/2, Newport, RI 02841 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L{sup -1} and 300 Wh kg{sup -1}, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis. (author)

  18. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S.

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L -1 and 300 Wh kg -1, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis.

  19. Designing convex repulsive pair potentials that favor assembly of kagome and snub square lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, William D.; Baldea, Michael; Truskett, Thomas M.

    2016-08-01

    Building on a recently introduced inverse strategy, isotropic and convex repulsive pair potentials were designed that favor assembly of particles into kagome and equilateral snub square lattices. The former interactions were obtained by a numerical solution of a variational problem that maximizes the range of density for which the ground state of the potential is the kagome lattice. Similar optimizations targeting the snub square lattice were also carried out, employing a constraint that required a minimum chemical potential advantage of the target over select competing structures. This constraint helped to discover isotropic interactions that meaningfully favored the snub square lattice as the ground state structure despite the asymmetric spatial distribution of particles in its coordination shells and the presence of tightly competing structures. Consistent with earlier published results [W. Piñeros et al., J. Chem. Phys. 144, 084502 (2016)], enforcement of greater chemical potential advantages for the target lattice in the interaction optimization led to assemblies with enhanced thermal stability.

  20. SOLID SOLUTION CARBIDES ARE THE KEY FUELS FOR FUTURE NUCLEAR THERMAL PROPULSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.; Shah, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion uses nuclear energy to directly heat a propellant (such as liquid hydrogen) to generate thrust for space transportation. In the 1960 s, the early Rover/Nuclear Engine for Rocket Propulsion Application (NERVA) program showed very encouraging test results for space nuclear propulsion but, in recent years, fuel research has been dismal. With NASA s renewed interest in long-term space exploration, fuel researchers are now revisiting the RoverMERVA findings, which indicated several problems with such fuels (such as erosion, chemical reaction of the fuel with propellant, fuel cracking, and cladding issues) that must be addressed. It is also well known that the higher the temperature reached by a propellant, the larger the thrust generated from the same weight of propellant. Better use of fuel and propellant requires development of fuels capable of reaching very high temperatures. Carbides have the highest melting points of any known material. Efforts are underway to develop carbide mixtures and solid solutions that contain uranium carbide, in order to achieve very high fuel temperatures. Binary solid solution carbides (U, Zr)C have proven to be very effective in this regard. Ternary carbides such as (U, Zr, X) carbides (where X represents Nb, Ta, W, and Hf) also hold great promise as fuel material, since the carbide mixtures in solid solution generate a very hard and tough compact material. This paper highlights past experience with early fuel materials and bi-carbides, technical problems associated with consolidation of the ingredients, and current techniques being developed to consolidate ternary carbides as fuel materials.

  1. Harmonically trapped dipolar fermions in a two-dimensional square lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne-Louise G.; Bruun, Georg

    2012-01-01

    We consider dipolar fermions in a two-dimensional square lattice and a harmonic trapping potential. The anisotropy of the dipolar interaction combined with the lattice leads to transitions between phases with density order of different symmetries. We show that the attractive part of the dipolar...

  2. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    baney, Ronald; Tulenko, James

    2012-11-20

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  3. Square-lattice large-pitch hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couny, F.; Roberts, John; Birks, T.A.;

    2008-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication and characterization of silica square-lattice hollow core photonic crystal fibers optimized for low loss guidance over an extended frequency range in the mid-IR region of the optical spectrum. The fiber's linear optical properties include an ultra-low group ve...... velocity dispersion and a polarization cross-coupling as low as -13.4dB over 10m of fiber....

  4. Loss-of-flow transient characterization in carbide-fueled LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the benefits derived from the use of carbide fuel in advanced Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is a decreased vulnerability to certain accidents. This can be achieved through the combination of advanced fuel performance with the enhanced reactivity feedback effects and passive shutdown cooling systems characteristic of the current 'inherently safe' plant concepts. The calculated core response to an unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) accident has frequently been used as a benchmark test of these designs, and the advantages of a high-conductivity fuel in relation to this type of transient have been noted in previous analyses. To evaluate this benefit in carbide-fueled LMFBRs incorporating representative current plant design features, limited calculations have been made of a ULOF transient in a small ('modular') carbide-fueled LMFBR

  5. Irradiation behavior of FBTR mixed carbide fuel at various burn-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast breeder test reactor at Kalpakkam has completed nearly 25 years of operation and is now operating at 18 MWt capacity with 46 fuel subassemblies (FSA) in the core consisting of 27 Mark-I (70% PuC + 30% UC), 13 Mark-II (55% PuC + 45% UC) and 6 MOX (44% PuO2 + 56% UO2) and one test PFBR FSA. Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) campaigns on FSAs at different burnup levels has provided valuable information about the irradiation behavior of the carbide fuel. This paper gives a summary of the irradiation performance of the carbide fuel evaluated through some of the investigations such as neutron radiography, x-radiography, gamma scanning, fission gas analysis and ceramography. Burnup of the carbide fuel could be enhanced from the initial design burnup limit of 50 GWd/t to 165 GWd/through systematic PIE. (author)

  6. Generalized percolation and renormalization group treatment of the random ising model in square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eithin a framework which combines the Reynolds-Klein-Stanley real space Renormalization Group ideas (for bond percolation) with those contained in a recent Generalized Percolation formalism, the transition line in the T-p space for the random 1/2 spin first-neighbour ferromagnetic Ising model in a square lattice is calculated. Within the smallest-order approximation, the exact limit and assymptotic behaviour for T80 (bond percolation limit) and very satisfactory results in the limit P81 (pure case limit) are obtained

  7. One-dimensional crystal growth model on a square lattice substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi; Lu, Chenxi; Yang, Bo; Tao, Xiangming; Wang, Jianfeng; Ye, Gaoxiang

    2016-08-01

    A one-dimensional crystal growth model along the preferential growth direction is established. The simulation model is performed on a square lattice substrate. First, particles are deposited homogeneously and, as a result, each of the lattice sites is occupied by one particle. In the subsequent stage, N nuclei are selected randomly on the substrate, then the growth process starts by adsorbing the surrounding particles along the preferential growth directions of the crystals. Finally, various one-dimensional crystals with different length and width form. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  8. A model project for reproducible papers: critical temperature for the Ising model on a square lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Dolfi, M; Hehn, A; Imriška, J; Pakrouski, K; Rønnow, T F; Troyer, M; Zintchenko, I; Chirigati, F; Freire, J; Shasha, D

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present a simple, yet typical simulation in statistical physics, consisting of large scale Monte Carlo simulations followed by an involved statistical analysis of the results. The purpose is to provide an example publication to explore tools for writing reproducible papers. The simulation estimates the critical temperature where the Ising model on the square lattice becomes magnetic to be Tc /J = 2.26934(6) using a finite size scaling analysis of the crossing points of Binder cumulants. We provide a virtual machine which can be used to reproduce all figures and results.

  9. Spin-projection orientations in the plane square-lattice Ising model with periodic boundary conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, You-gang

    2005-01-01

    The periodic boundary conditions changed the plane square-lattice Ising model to the torus-lattice system which restricts the spin-projection orientations. Only two of the three important spin-projection orientations, parallel to the x-axis or to the y-axis, are suited to the torus-lattice system. The infinitesimal difference of the free-energies of the systems between the two systems mentioned above makes their critical temperatures infinitely close to each other, but their topological funda...

  10. Sensitivity analysis of a PWR fuel element using zircaloy and silicon carbide claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Cardoso, Fabiano; Salome, Jean A.D.; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini, Angela, E-mail: rochkhudson@ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The alloy composed of zirconium has been used effectively for over 50 years in claddings of nuclear fuel, especially for PWR type reactors. However, to increase fuel enrichment with the aim of raising the burning and maintaining the safety of nuclear plants is of great relevance the study of new materials that can replace safely and efficiently zircaloy cladding. Among several proposed material, silicon carbide (SiC) has a potential to replace zircaloy as fuel cladding material due to its high-temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity. In this paper, the goal is to expand the study with silicon carbide cladding, checking its behavior when submitted to an environment with boron, burnable poison rods, and temperature variations. Sensitivity calculation and the impact in multiplication factor to both claddings, zircaloy and silicon carbide, were performed during the burnup. The neutronic analysis was made using the SCALE 6.0 (Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation) code. (author)

  11. Processing of mixed uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels for high temperature space nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2000-01-01

    Single phase, solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides have been proposed as an advanced nuclear fuel for high performance, next generation space power and propulsion systems. These mixed carbides such as the pseudo-ternary, (U, Zr, Nb)C, hold significant promise because of their high melting points (typically greater than 3200 K), thermochemical stability in a hot hydrogen environment, and high thermal conductivity. However, insufficient test data exist under nuclear thermal propulsion conditions of temperature and hot hydrogen environment to fully evaluate their performance. Various compositions of (U, Zr, Nb)C were processed with 5% and 10% metal mole fraction of uranium. Stoichiometric samples were processed from the constituent carbide powders while hypostoichiometric samples with carbon-to-metal (C/M) ratios of 0.95 were processed from uranium hydride, graphite, and constituent refractory carbide powders. Processing techniques of cold pressing, sintering, and hot pressing were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce dense (low porosity), homogeneous, single phase, solid-solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate and characterize the performance of these mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for space power and propulsion applications. .

  12. Systematic construction of spin liquids on the square lattice from tensor networks with SU(2) symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Mambrini, Matthieu; Poilblanc, Didier

    2016-01-01

    We elaborate a simple classification scheme of all rank-5 SU(2)-spin rotational symmetric tensors according to i) the on-site physical spin-$S$, (ii) the local Hilbert space $V^{\\otimes 4}$ of the four virtual (composite) spins attached to each site and (iii) the irreducible representations of the $C_{4v}$ point group of the square lattice. We apply our scheme to draw a complete list of all SU(2)-symmetric translationally and rotationally-invariant Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS) with bond dimension $D\\leqslant 6$. All known SU(2)-symmetric PEPS on the square lattice are recovered and simple generalizations are provided in some cases. More generally, to each of our symmetry class can be associated a $({\\cal D}-1)$-dimensional manifold of spin liquids (potentially) preserving lattice symmetries and defined in terms of ${\\cal D}$ independent tensors of a given bond dimension $D$. In addition, generic (low-dimensional) families of PEPS explicitly breaking either (i) particular point-group lattice symmetri...

  13. A review of the breeding potentials of carbide, nitride and oxide fueled LMFBRs and GCFRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of design parameters in large variation on compound system doubling time of large advanced-fueled LMFBR are described on the base of recent U.S. results. The fuel element design by Combustion Engineering Inc. in step-by-step substitution of the initial oxide fuel subassemblies with carbide ones is explained. Breeding characteristics of the oxide-fueled LMFBR and its potential design modifications are expounded. The gas cooled fast breeder program in West Germany and in the United States are briefed. Definitions of the breeding ratio and doubling time in overall fuel cycle are given. (auth.)

  14. Co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen for a carbide-based fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreiro, Louis G.; Burke, A. Alan [Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Code 8231, 1176 Howell Street, Newport, RI 02841 (United States); Dubois, Lily [Stonehill College, Department of Chemistry, 320 Washington Street, Easton, MA 02357 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen from the hydrolysis of calcium carbide and calcium hydride was investigated as part of a unique carbide-based fuel system intended for high-temperature fuel cells. To gain better control of this highly energetic reaction, glycerin was used to coat the reactant particles to form slurry prior to their reaction with water. This process was shown to moderate the rate of gas production, as well as to provide a means for preparing slurry that could be pumped into the reactor vessel. It was also observed that the presence of calcium hydroxide, a by-product of hydrolysis, lowered the solubility of acetylene resulting in a higher initial flow rate due to less acetylene being dissolved in solution. However, the buildup of calcium hydroxide with time inhibited the hydrolysis of both calcium carbide and calcium hydride causing the acetylene and hydrogen flow rates to decrease. (author)

  15. Mastery of (U,Pu)C carbide fuel: From raw materials to final characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed uranium plutonium carbide is for many years an advanced and alternative fuel to the mixed oxide being developed for Gas and Sodium Fast Reactors due to its high thermal conductivity and heavy-metal density [1]. Compared to that of oxide fuels, the fabrication of carbide fuels meeting all required specifications (among which are an oxygen content lower than 1000 ppm and a predominant open porosity Po/Pt>50%) is a much more difficult and challenging task. Due to their extreme reactivity with oxygen and moisture, fabrication and handling of carbide fuels are indeed performed in gloveboxes maintained at purity levels needed to provide operational safety and to obtain high-quality fuels, under a dynamic flow of nitrogen (O2 and H2O, each less than 50 ppm). Nevertheless, oxygen pick up during processing of the material seems unavoidable, even at room temperature, and must be thus limited by suitable procedures. A significant loss of plutonium may also be caused by vaporization during the heating steps, especially at high temperatures. Such a loss must be limited for radiological reasons (the evaporated plutonium condenses in the cold parts of furnaces) and since it affects the composition of the carbide. As shown on the simplified flow sheet presented in fig.1, the main steps in the fabrication of carbide fuel pellets are as follows: - Vacuum carbothermic synthesis of carbide fuel in the temperature range of 1450-1650 C from a blend of UO2, PuO2 and graphite powders pressed into compacts, - Crushing and milling of compacted samples, - Consolidation of carbide powders into fuel pellets by cold pressing and sintering at 1750 C under Ar + 5% H2 gas, To achieve specified pellet density (80 %TD) and porosity, a pore former (such as zinc stearate) can be added to the fuel powder. The sintered carbides are mainly composed of a monocarbide phase (U,Pu)C, with traces of a sesqui-carbide phase (U,Pu)2C3. Their density reaches 75% (when pore former is added) to 91% of

  16. Statistical mechanics of directed models of polymers in the square lattice

    CERN Document Server

    Rensburg, J V

    2003-01-01

    Directed square lattice models of polymers and vesicles have received considerable attention in the recent mathematical and physical sciences literature. These are idealized geometric directed lattice models introduced to study phase behaviour in polymers, and include Dyck paths, partially directed paths, directed trees and directed vesicles models. Directed models are closely related to models studied in the combinatorics literature (and are often exactly solvable). They are also simplified versions of a number of statistical mechanics models, including the self-avoiding walk, lattice animals and lattice vesicles. The exchange of approaches and ideas between statistical mechanics and combinatorics have considerably advanced the description and understanding of directed lattice models, and this will be explored in this review. The combinatorial nature of directed lattice path models makes a study using generating function approaches most natural. In contrast, the statistical mechanics approach would introduce...

  17. The square lattice Ising model on the rectangle I: Finite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    The partition function of the square lattice Ising model on the rectangle is calculated exactly for arbitrary system size $L\\times M$ and temperature. We start with the dimer method of Kasteleyn, McCoy & Wu, construct a highly symmetric block transfer matrix and derive a factorization of the involved determinant, effectively decomposing the free energy into two parts, $F(L,M)=F_{\\infty}^{\\leftrightarrow}(L,M)+F_\\mathrm{res}^{\\leftrightarrow}(L,M)$. The residual part $F_\\mathrm{res}^{\\leftrightarrow}(L,M)$ contains the nontrivial finite-size contributions and becomes exponentially small for large $L/M$ and off-critical temperatures. It is given by the determinant of a $\\frac{M}{2}\\times\\frac{M}{2}$ matrix and can be mapped onto an effective spin model with $M$ spins and long-range interactions. The relations to the Casimir potential and the Casimir force scaling functions are discussed.

  18. Magneto-optical response in the arbitrary-Chern number topological phase on square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Xiang

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the magneto-optical response in the arbitrary-Chern number topological phase. Based on the Dirac theory, we derive the analytic expressions for the magneto-optical response. More importantly, we construct the model on the possible square lattice and make the numerical calculations with the exact diagonalization method. We find the analytical and numerical results are in good agreement with each other. For the optical absorption spectrum, the low-energy absorptive peaks and the corresponding hopping processes are distinct in different Chern number phases, heavily depending on the filling factor of the system. While for the optical Hall conductivities, the physical mechanisms are revealed for the dichroism of the absorption peaks in response to the right- and left-circularly polarized light. We discuss the feasibility of these results in experiment.

  19. Phase transitions in systems of magnetic dipoles on a square lattice with quenched disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, Juan J., E-mail: jjalonso@uma.e [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada I, Universidad de Malaga, 29071-Malaga (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    We study by Monte Carlo simulations the effect of quenched orientational disorder in systems of interacting classical dipoles on a square lattice. Each dipole can lie along any of the two perpendicular axes that form an angle psi with the principal axes of the lattice. We choose psi at random and without bias from the interval [-DELTA,DELTA] for each site of the lattice. For 0<=DELTA<=pi/4 we find a thermally driven second order transition between a paramagnetic and a dipolar antiferromagnetic order phase and critical exponents that change continuously with DELTA. Near the case of maximum disorder DELTAapproxpi/4 we still find a second order transition at a finite temperature T{sub c} but our results point to weak instead of strong long-ranged dipolar order for temperatures below T{sub c}.

  20. Thermodynamics of the Hubbard model on stacked honeycomb and square lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imriška, Jakub; Gull, Emanuel; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-07-01

    We present a numerical study of the Hubbard model on simply stacked honeycomb and square lattices, motivated by a recent experimental realization of such models with ultracold atoms in optical lattices. We perform simulations with different interlayer coupling and interaction strengths and obtain Néel transition temperatures and entropies. We provide data for the equation of state to enable comparisons of experiments and theory. We find an enhancement of the short-range correlations in the anisotropic lattices compared to the isotropic cubic lattice, in parameter regimes suitable for the interaction driven adiabatic cooling. Supplementary material in the form of one zip file available from the Jounal web page at http://dx.doi.org/10.1140/epjb/e2016-70146-y

  1. Quantum spin Hall effect in a square-lattice model under a uniform magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Huai-Ming; Feng Shi-Ping

    2012-01-01

    We study a toy square-lattice model under a uniform magnetic field.Using the Landauer-Büttiker formula,we calculate the transport properties of the system on a two-terminal,a four-terminal and a six-terminal device.We find that the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect appears in energy ranges where the spin-up and spin-down subsystems have different filling factors.We also study the robustness of the resulting QSH effect and find that it is robust when the Fermi levels of both spin subsystems are far away from the energy plateaus but is fragile when the Fermi level of any spin subsystem is near the energy plateaus.These results provide an example of the QSH effect with a physical origin other than time-reversal (TR) preserving spin-orbit coupling (SOC).

  2. A review of nuclear thermal propulsion carbide fuel corrosion and key issues. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; El-genk, M.S.

    1994-11-01

    Corrosion (mass loss) of carbide nuclear fuels due to their exposure to hot hydrogen in nuclear thermal propulsion engine systems greatly impacts the performance, thrust-to-weight and life of such systems. This report provides an overview of key issues and processes associated with the corrosion of carbide materials. Additionally, past pertinent development reactor test observations, as well as related experimental work and analysis modeling efforts are reviewed. At the conclusion, recommendations are presented, which provide the foundation for future corrosion modeling and verification efforts.

  3. Silicon carbide TRIPLEX materials for CANDU fuel cladding and pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramic Tubular Products has developed a superior silicon carbide (SiC) material TRIPLEX, which can be used for both fuel cladding and other zirconium alloy materials in light water reactor (LWR) and heavy water reactor (CANDU) systems. The fuel cladding can replace Zircaloy cladding and other zirconium based alloy materials in the reactor systems. It has the potential to provide higher fuel performance levels in currently operating natural UO2 (NEU) fuel design and in advanced fuel designs (UO2(SEU), MOX thoria) at higher burnups and power levels. In all the cases for fuel designs TRIPLEX has increased resistance to severe accident conditions. The interaction of SiC with steam and water does not produce an exothermic reaction to produce hydrogen as occurs with zirconium based alloys. In addition the absence of creep down eliminates clad ballooning during high temperature accidents which occurs with Zircaloy blocking water channels required to cool the fuel. (author)

  4. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. radulescu

    2001-09-28

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report.

  5. GEN IV: Carbide Fuel Elaboration for the 'Futurix Concepts' experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudez, Stephane; Riglet-Martial, Chantal; Paret, Laurent; Abonneau, Eric [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (C.E.A.), Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Centre d' Etudes de Cadarache, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    In order to collect information on the behaviour of the future GFR (Gas Fast Reactor) fuel under fast neutron irradiation, an experimental irradiation program, called 'Futurix-concepts' has been launched at the CEA. The considered concept is a composite material made of a fissile fuel embedded in an inert ceramic matrix. Fissile fuel pellets are made of UPuN or UPuC while ceramics are SiC for the carbide fuel and TiN for the nitride fuel. This paper focuses on the description of the carbide composite fabrication. The UPuC pellets are manufactured using a metallurgical powder process. Fabrication and handling of the fuels are carried out in glove boxes under a nitrogen atmosphere. Carbide fuel is synthesized by carbo-thermic reduction under vacuum of a mixture of actinide oxide and graphitic carbon up to 1550 deg. C. After ball milling, the UPuC powder is pressed to create hexagonal or spherical compacts. They are then sintered up to 1750 deg. C in order to obtain a density of 85 % of the theoretical one. The sintered pellets are inserted into an inert and tight capsule of SiC. In order to control the gap between the fuel and the matrix precisely, the pellets are abraded. The inert matrix is then filled with the pellets and the whole system is sealed by a BRASiC{sup R} process at high temperature under a helium atmosphere. Fabrication of the sample to be irradiated was done in 2006 and the irradiation began in May 2007 in the Phenix reactor. This presentation will detail and discuss the results obtained during this fabrication phase. (authors)

  6. Self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into nanoholes through annealing in the fabrication of square lattices of nanocylinders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinping Zhang; Baoquan Sun; Hongcang Guo; Jinrong Tian; Yanrong Song; Li Wang

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate the self-assembly of solution-processible gold nanoparticles into the nanoholes consisting of patterned substrate through annealing, which facilitates successful fabrication of square lattices of gold nanocylinders with a period of 350 nm, a height of about 200 nm, and an aspect ratio larger than 2.

  7. Preparation of uranium-plutonium carbide-based fuels simulating high burnup by carbothermic reduction and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types, hypostoichiometric, nearly stoichiometric and hyperstoichiometric, of uranium-plutonium carbide fuels simulating 10 at.% burnup were prepared by carbothermic reduction of oxide containing fission product elements. The carbides contained fission product phases such as the UMoC2 and the U2RuC2 type or the RECsub(1.5-2.0) phases (RE:rare earth). Composite theoretical densities of heterogenious carbides containing the UC, U2C3 type and fission product phases were calculated from the proportions and densities of these phases. By comparison of specific volume of the carbide between of 0 at.% and 10 at.% burnup, the solid fission product swelling rate of a carbide-based fuel was estimated to be 0.4-0.5 % per at.% burnup. (author)

  8. Search for the Heisenberg spin glass on rewired square lattices with antiferromagnetic interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surungan, Tasrief; Bansawang B., J.; Tahir, Dahlang

    2016-03-01

    Spin glass (SG) is a typical magnetic system with frozen random spin orientation at low temperatures. The system exhibits rich physical properties, such as infinite number of ground states, memory effect, and aging phenomena. There are two main ingredients considered to be pivotal for the existence of SG behavior, namely, frustration and randomness. For the canonical SG system, frustration is led by the presence of competing interaction between ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AF) couplings. Previously, Bartolozzi et al. [Phys. Rev. B73, 224419 (2006)], reported the SG properties of the AF Ising spins on scale free network (SFN). It is a new type of SG, different from the canonical one which requires the presence of both FM and AF couplings. In this new system, frustration is purely caused by the topological factor and its randomness is related to the irregular connectvity. Recently, Surungan et. al. [Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 640, 012001 (2015)] reported SG bahavior of AF Heisenberg model on SFN. We further investigate this type of system by studying an AF Heisenberg model on rewired square lattices. We used Replica Exchange algorithm of Monte Carlo Method and calculated the SG order parameter to search for the existence of SG phase.

  9. Geometrical parameters dependence towards ultra-flat dispersion square-lattice PCF with selective liquid infiltration

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Partha Sona

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a numerical analysis of the structural dependence of the PCF parameters towards ultra-flat dispersion in the C-band of communication wavelength. The technique is based on regular square-lattice PCF with all the air-hole of same uniform diameter and the effective size of the air-holes are modified with a selective infiltration of the air-holes with liquids. The dependence of the PCF structural parameters namely air-hole diameter and hole-to-hole distance along with the infiltrating liquid has been investigated in details. It is shown that the infiltrating liquid has critical influence on both the slope and value of dispersion, while pitch only changes the dispersion value whereas air-hole diameter modifies the slope of the dispersion. Our numerical investigation establishes dispersion values as small as 0+-0.58ps/(nm-km) over a bandwidth of 622nm in the communication wavelength band (C-band). The proposed design study will be very helpful in high power applications like broadband smooth super...

  10. Realizing non-Abelian gauge potentials in optical square lattices: an application to atomic Chern insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, N.; Gerbier, F.; Lewenstein, M.

    2013-07-01

    We describe a scheme to engineer non-Abelian gauge potentials on a square optical lattice using laser-induced transitions. We emphasize the case of two-electron atoms, where the electronic ground state g is laser-coupled to a metastable state e within a state-dependent optical lattice. In this scheme, the alternating pattern of lattice sites hosting g and e states depicts a chequerboard structure, allowing for laser-assisted tunnelling along both spatial directions. In this configuration, the nuclear spin of the atoms can be viewed as a ‘flavour’ quantum number undergoing non-Abelian tunnelling along nearest-neighbour links. We show that this technique can be useful to simulate the equivalent of the Haldane quantum Hall model using cold atoms trapped in square optical lattices, offering an interesting route to realize Chern insulators. The emblematic Haldane model is particularly suited to investigate the physics of topological insulators, but requires, in its original form, complex hopping terms beyond nearest-neighbouring sites. In general, this drawback inhibits a direct realization with cold atoms, using standard laser-induced tunnelling techniques. We demonstrate that a simple mapping allows us to express this model in terms of matrix hopping operators that are defined on a standard square lattice. This mapping is investigated for two models that lead to anomalous quantum Hall phases. We discuss the practical implementation of such models, exploiting laser-induced tunnelling methods applied to the chequerboard optical lattice.

  11. Ising model on a square lattice with second-neighbor and third-neighbor interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the phase transitions and magnetic properties of the Ising model on a square lattice by the replica Monte Carlo method and by the method of transfer-matrix, the maximum eigenvalue of which was found by Lanczos method. The competing exchange interactions between nearest neighbors J1, second J2, third neighbors J3 and an external magnetic field were taken into account. We found the frustration points and expressions for the frustration fields, at crossing of which cardinal changes of magnetic structures (translational invariance changes discontinuously) take place. A comparative analysis with 1D Ising model was performed and it was shown that the behavior of magnetic properties of the 1D model and the 2D model with J1 and J3 interactions reveals detailed similarity only distinguishing in scales of magnetic field and temperature. - Highlights: • Peculiarities of 1D and 2D Ising model with competing interactions are studied. • All possible structures, frustration points and frustration fields are found. • At appropriate choice of a model, magnetic properties in 1D and 2D cases are alike. • Similarities and dissimilarities between considered models are discussed

  12. Classification of trivial spin-1 tensor network states on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunyong; Han, Jung Hoon

    2016-09-01

    Classification of possible quantum spin liquid (QSL) states of interacting spin-1/2's in two dimensions has been a fascinating topic of condensed matter for decades, resulting in enormous progress in our understanding of low-dimensional quantum matter. By contrast, relatively little work exists on the identification, let alone classification, of QSL phases for spin-1 systems in dimensions higher than one. Employing the powerful ideas of tensor network theory and its classification, we develop general methods for writing QSL wave functions of spin-1 respecting all the lattice symmetries, spin rotation, and time reversal with trivial gauge structure on the square lattice. We find 25 distinct classes characterized by five binary quantum numbers. Several explicit constructions of such wave functions are given for bond dimensions D ranging from two to four, along with thorough numerical analyses to identify their physical characters. Both gapless and gapped states are found. The topological entanglement entropy of the gapped states is close to zero, indicative of topologically trivial states. In D =4 , several different tensors can be linearly combined to produce a family of states within the same symmetry class. A rich "phase diagram" can be worked out among the phases of these tensors, as well as the phase transitions among them. Among the states we identified in this putative phase diagram is the plaquette-ordered phase, gapped resonating valence bond phase, and a critical phase. A continuous transition separates the plaquette-ordered phase from the resonating valence bond phase.

  13. Monte carlo simulation study of the square lattice S=1/2 quantum heisenberg antiferromagnet

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, J K

    1999-01-01

    For the two dimensional S= 1/2 isotopic quantum Heisenberg antiferromagnet on a square lattice, we report our results of an extensive quantum Monte Carlo simulation for various physical observables such as the correlation length xi, the staggered magnetic susceptibility chi sub S sub T , the structure factor peak value S(Q), the internal energy epsilon, and the uniform susceptibility chi sub u. We find that chi sub S sub T approx chi sup 2 T and S(Q) approx xi sup 2 T sup 2 , in agreement with the predictions of the conventional theory but in disagreement with recent experiments. Our estimate of the spin stiffness constant rho sub s and spin wave velocity c, from the low temperature behavior of the chi sub u is shown to be consistent with the theoretical prediction of the low temperature behavior of the epsilon, and of the xi provided an additional correction up to T sup 2. However, our data are definitely inconsistent with the scenario of the crossover for the xi.

  14. Crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations of clusters on square lattice substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi; Zhu, Yu-Hong; Pan, Qi-Fa; Yang, Bo; Tao, Xiang-Ming; Ye, Gao-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    A Monte Carlo study on the crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations of clusters is presented. Based on the traditional cluster-cluster aggregation (CCA) simulation, a modified growth model is proposed. The clusters (including single particles and their aggregates) diffuse with diffusion step length l (1 ≤ l ≤ 7) and aggregate on a square lattice substrate. If the number of particles contained in a cluster is larger than a critical size sc, the particles at the edge of the cluster have a possibility to jump onto the upper layer, which results in the crossover from 2-dimensional to 3-dimensional aggregations. Our simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental findings. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11374082 and 11074215), the Science Foundation of Zhejiang Province Department of Education, China (Grant No. Y201018280), the Fundamental Research Funds for Central Universities, China (Grant No. 2012QNA3010), and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20100101110005).

  15. Extrapolated renormalization group calculation of the surface tension in square-lattice Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using self-dual clusters (whose sizes are characterized by the numbers b=2, 3, 4, 5) within a real space renormalization group framework, the longitudinal surface tension of the square-lattice first-neighbour 1/2-spin ferromagnetic Ising model is calculated. The exact critical temperature T sub(c) is recovered for any value of b; the exact assymptotic behaviour of the surface tension in the limit of low temperatures is analytically recovered; the approximate correlation length critical exponents monotonically tend towards the exact value ν=1 (which, at two dimensions, coincides with the surface tension critical exponent μ) for increasingly large cells; the same behaviour is remarked in what concerns the approximate values for the surface tension amplitude in the limit T→T sub(c). Four different numerical procedures are developed for extrapolating to b→infinite the renormalization group results for the surface tension, and quite satisfactory agreement is obtained with Onsager's exact expression (error varying from zero to a few percent on the whole temperature domain). Furthermore the set of RG surface tensions is compared with a set of biased surface tensions (associated to appropriate misfit seams), and find only fortuitous coincidence among them. (Author)

  16. The compatibility of stainless steels with particles and powders of uranium carbide and low-sulphur UCS fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slightly hyperstoichiometric (U,Pu)C is a potential nuclear fuel for fast breeder reactors. The excess carbon above the stoichiometric amount results in a higher carbon activity in the fuel, and carbon is transferred to the stainless steel cladding, resulting in embrittlement of the cladding. It is with this problem of carbon transfer from the fuel to the cladding that this thesis is concerned. For practical reasons, UC and not (U,Pu)C was used as the fuel. The theory of decarburisation of carbide fuel and the carburisation of stainless steel, the facilities constructed for the project at the Atomic Energy Board, and the experimental techniques used, including preparation of the fuels, are discussed. The effect of a number of variables of uranium carbide fuel on its compatibility behaviour with stainless steels was investigated, as well as the effect om microstructure and type of stainless steel (304, 304 L and 316) on the rate of carburisation. These studies can be briefly summarised under the following headings: powder-particle size; surface oxidation of uranium carbide; preparation temperature of uranium carbide; low sulfur UCS fuels; uranium sulfide and the microstructure and type of steel. The author concludes that: the effect of surface oxidation and particle size must be taken into account when evaluating out-of-pile tests; the possible effects of surface oxidation must be taken into account when considering vibro-compacted carbide fuels; there is no advantage in replacing a fraction of the carbon atoms by sulphur atoms in slightly hyperstoichiometric carbide fuels, and the type and thermo-mechanical treatment of the stainless steel used as cladding material in a fuel pin is not important as far as the rate of carburisation by the fuel is concerned

  17. Fuels for space nuclear power systems. 1. Tri-Carbide Nuclear Fuel Processing and Characterization for Space Nuclear Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tri-carbide fuels fabricated from uranium and refractory metal carbides have been proposed for advanced nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) applications. These fuels are particularly desirable for space nuclear applications because of their high melting points and high thermal conductivity and their thermochemical stability with the flowing hot hydrogen propellant. This study examined the processing methods for fabricating low-porosity, single-phase solid-solution tri-carbides of (U, Zr,Nb)C. Binary carbides of (U, Zr)C for NTP were first studied at the end of the Rover/NERVA program, a joint effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Atomic Energy Commission from 1955 to 1973. This advanced fuel was proposed to reduce the mass losses experienced by earlier graphite matrix and composite fuels due to corrosion by the flowing hot hydrogen propellant. However, insufficient tests were completed before the program was canceled in 1973. Results of this study revealed the difficulty to extrude this very hard material in the desired geometry for NTP applications and a susceptibility to fracture during operation. Preliminary indication of higher melting points and improvements in thermochemical stability led to work on tri-carbides of (U, Zr,Nb)C and (U, Zr, Ta)C in the former Soviet Union. A joint effort with the Russian research institute LUTCH and INSPI from 1993 to 1997 studied the mass losses from these fuels, which were extruded in a simple, twisted-ribbon geometry compatible with Russian core designs. The melting temperature of the tri-carbides is influenced by the carbon-to-metal ratio (C/M) and the uranium metal mole fraction (U/M).A target C/M of 0.88 to 0.95 was maintained during the Rover/NERVA program to avoid the development of a second phase, carbon, which leads to significantly lower, eutectic, melting temperatures. Recent efforts at INSPI have been directed toward optimizing the processing methods and parameters for

  18. Mass spectrometric studies on irradiated (U, Pu) mixed carbide fuel of Fbtr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balasubramanian, R. [Fuel Chemistry Division, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)]. E-mail: rbs@igcar.ernet.in; Darwin Albert Raj, D.; Nalini, S.; Sai Baba, M. [Fuel Chemistry Division, IGCAR, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2005-07-01

    Mass spectrometry was employed to characterise the irradiated mixed carbide fuel of fast breeder test reactor (FBTR) for assessing its performance: thermal ionisation mass spectrometry to determine the isotopic composition, concentrations of U, Pu and Nd in the dissolver solutions and to deduce the burn-up, and a quadrupole mass spectrometric system to obtain the percentage release of fission gases (Kr + Xe). A summary and analysis of the results obtained with the fuel at 25,000 and 50,000 MWd/t in these studies is given in this paper. (author)

  19. Auxiliary-boson and DMFT studies of bond ordering instabilities of t-J-V models on the square lattice

    OpenAIRE

    Allais, Andrea; Bauer, Johannes; Sachdev, Subir(Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA)

    2014-01-01

    We examine the influence of strong on-site Coulomb interactions on instabilities of the metallic state on the square lattice to general forms of bond order. The Mott correlations are accounted for by the auxiliary-boson method, and by dynamical mean field theory calculations, complementing our recent work (arXiv:1402.4807) using Gutzwiller projected variational wavefunctions. By the present methods, we find that the on-site Mott correlations do not significantly modify the structure of the bo...

  20. Percolation and jamming of linear k -mers on a square lattice with defects: Effect of anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasevich, Yuri Yu.; Burmistrov, Andrei S.; Shinyaeva, Taisiya S.; Laptev, Valeri V.; Vygornitskii, Nikolai V.; Lebovka, Nikolai I.

    2015-12-01

    Using the Monte Carlo simulation, we study the percolation and jamming of oriented linear k -mers on a square lattice that contains defects. The point defects with a concentration d are placed randomly and uniformly on the substrate before deposition of the k -mers. The general case of unequal probabilities for orientation of depositing of k -mers along different directions of the lattice is analyzed. Two different relaxation models of deposition that preserve the predetermined order parameter s are used. In the relaxation random sequential adsorption (RRSA) model, the deposition of k -mers is distributed over different sites on the substrate. In the single-cluster relaxation (RSC) model, the single cluster grows by the random accumulation of k -mers on the boundary of the cluster (Eden-like model). For both models, a suppression of growth of the infinite (percolation) cluster at some critical concentration of defects dc is observed. In the zero-defect lattices, the jamming concentration pj (RRSA model) and the density of single clusters ps (RSC model) decrease with increasing length k -mers and with a decrease in the order parameter. For the RRSA model, the value of dc decreases for short k -mers (k RSC model, the growth of clusters with ellipselike shapes is observed for nonzero values of s . The density of the clusters ps at the critical concentration of defects dc depends in a complex manner on the values of s and k . An interesting finding for disordered systems (s =0 ) is that the value of ps tends towards zero in the limits of the very long k -mers, k →∞ , and very small critical concentrations dc→0 . In this case, the introduction of defects results in a suppression of k -mer stacking and in the formation of empty or loose clusters with very low density. On the other hand, denser clusters are formed for ordered systems with ps≈0.065 at s =0.5 and ps≈0.38 at s =1.0 .

  1. Experimental mathematics on the magnetic susceptibility of the square lattice Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukraa, S [LPTHIRM and Departement d' Aeronautique, Universite de Blida (Algeria); Guttmann, A J; Jensen, I [ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematics and Statistics of Complex Systems, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Hassani, S; Zenine, N [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 2 Bd. Frantz Fanon, BP 399, 16000 Alger (Algeria); Maillard, J-M [LPTMC, Universite de Paris, Tour 24, 4eme etage, case 121, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Nickel, B [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada)], E-mail: boukraa@mail.univ-blida.dz, E-mail: tonyg@ms.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: I.Jensen@ms.unimelb.edu.au, E-mail: maillard@lptmc.jussieu.fr, E-mail: maillard@lptl.jussieu.fr, E-mail: njzenine@yahoo.com

    2008-11-14

    We calculate very long low- and high-temperature series for the susceptibility {chi} of the square lattice Ising model as well as very long series for the five-particle contribution {chi}{sup (5)} and six-particle contribution {chi}{sup (6)}. These calculations have been made possible by the use of highly optimized polynomial time modular algorithms and a total of more than 150 000 CPU hours on computer clusters. The series for {chi} (low- and high-temperature regimes), {chi}{sup (5)} and {chi}{sup (6)} are now extended to 2000 terms. In addition, for {chi}{sup (5)}, 10 000 terms of the series are calculated modulo a single prime, and have been used to find the linear ODE satisfied by {chi}{sup (5)} modulo a prime. A diff-Pade analysis of the 2000 terms series for {chi}{sup (5)} and {chi}{sup (6)} confirms to a very high degree of confidence previous conjectures about the location and strength of the singularities of the n-particle components of the susceptibility, up to a small set of 'additional' singularities. The exponents at all the singularities of the Fuchsian linear ODE of {chi}{sup (5)} and the (as yet unknown) ODE of {chi}{sup (6)} are given: they are all rational numbers. We find the presence of singularities at w = 1/2 for the linear ODE of {chi}{sup (5)}, and w{sup 2} = 1/8 for the ODE of {chi}{sup (6)}, which are not singularities of the 'physical' {chi}{sup (5)} and {chi}{sup (6)}, that is to say the series solutions of the ODE's which are analytic at w = 0. Furthermore, analysis of the long series for {chi}{sup (5)} (and {chi}{sup (6)}) combined with the corresponding long series for the full susceptibility {chi} yields previously conjectured singularities in some {chi}{sup (n)}, n {>=} 7. The exponents at all these singularities are also seen to be rational numbers. We also present a mechanism of resummation of the logarithmic singularities of the {chi}{sup (n)} leading to the known power-law critical behaviour occurring in

  2. Deep hydrodesulphurization and hydrogenation of diesel fuels on alumina-supported and bulk molybdenum carbide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Da Costa; Claude Potvin; Jean-Marie Manoli; Benoit Genin; Gerald Djega-Mariadassou [Universite P. et M. Curie, Paris (France). Laboratoire Reactivite de Surface

    2004-09-01

    Deep hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of diesel fuels has been carried out on P (Ni)-promoted or non-promoted Mo{sub 2}2C-supported {gamma}Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and bulk Mo{sub 2}C under standard industrial conditions (613 K, 3 MPa). The effect of the promoter was investigated for different feedstocks on HDS and hydrogenation (HYD) with very low levels of sulfur. The temperature effect was also followed. The HDS conversion indicates that phosphorus promoted alumina supported carbide catalysts are as active as a commercial Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for low levels of sulfur in the feed. Furthermore, the refractory compounds such as 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene are only transformed on molybdenum carbide catalyst in industrial conditions for hydrotreated gas oils. With gas oils with less than 50 wt ppm in sulfur, phosphorus promoted molybdenum carbide catalysts become more active than commercial catalysts for the HYD of the aromatic compounds and the HDS or the HDN of the feedstock. 35 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Durable transition-metal-carbide-supported Pt-Ru anodes for direct methanol fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishanth, K.G.; Sridhar, P.; Pitchumani, S. [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Madras Unit, CSIR Madras Complex, Chennai (India); Shukla, A.K. [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (India)

    2012-02-15

    Molybdenum carbide (MoC) and tungsten carbide (WC) are synthesized by direct carbonization method. Pt-Ru catalysts supported on MoC, WC, and Vulcan XC-72R are prepared, and characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with electrochemistry. Electrochemical activities for the catalysts towards methanol electro-oxidation are studied by cyclic voltammetry. All the electro-catalysts are subjected to accelerated durability test (ADT). The electrochemical activity of carbide-supported electro-catalysts towards methanol electro-oxidation is found to be higher than carbon-supported catalysts before and after ADT. The study suggests that Pt-Ru/MoC and Pt-Ru/WC catalysts are more durable than Pt-Ru/C. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) with Pt-Ru/MoC and Pt-Ru/WC anodes also exhibit higher performance than the DMFC with Pt-Ru/C anode. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. A two-dimensional, finite-difference model of the oxidation of a uranium carbide fuel pellet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, James; Fairweather, Michael; Hanson, Bruce C.; Heggs, Peter J.

    2015-12-01

    The oxidation of spent uranium carbide fuel, a candidate fuel for Generation IV nuclear reactors, is an important process in its potential reprocessing cycle. However, the oxidation of uranium carbide in air is highly exothermic. A model has therefore been developed to predict the temperature rise, as well as other useful information such as reaction completion times, under different reaction conditions in order to help in deriving safe oxidation conditions. Finite difference-methods are used to model the heat and mass transfer processes occurring during the reaction in two dimensions and are coupled to kinetics found in the literature.

  5. Synthesis and Analysis of Alpha Silicon Carbide Components for Encapsulation of Fuel Rods and Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin M. McHugh; John E. Garnier; George W. Griffith

    2011-09-01

    The chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of silicon carbide (SiC) along with its low neutron activation and stability in a radiation field make it an attractive material for encapsulating fuel rods and fuel pellets. The alpha phase (6H) is particularly stable. Unfortunately, it requires very high temperature processing and is not readily available in fibers or near-net shapes. This paper describes an investigation to fabricate a-SiC as thin films, fibers and near-net-shape products by direct conversion of carbon using silicon monoxide vapor at temperatures less than 1700 C. In addition, experiments to nucleate the alpha phase during pyrolysis of polysilazane, are also described. Structure and composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary tensile property analysis of fibers was also performed.

  6. Processing of solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for advanced space nuclear power and propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis Warren

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and space nuclear power are two enabling technologies for the manned exploration of space and the development of research outposts in space and on other planets such as Mars. Advanced carbide nuclear fuels have been proposed for application in space nuclear power and propulsion systems. This study examined the processing technologies and optimal parameters necessary to fabricate samples of single phase, solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides. In particular, the pseudo-ternary carbide, UC-ZrC-NbC, system was examined with uranium metal mole fractions of 5% and 10% and corresponding uranium densities of 0.8 to 1.8 gU/cc. Efforts were directed to those methods that could produce simple geometry fuel elements or wafers such as those used to fabricate a Square Lattice Honeycomb (SLHC) fuel element and reactor core. Methods of cold uniaxial pressing, sintering by induction heating, and hot pressing by self-resistance heating were investigated. Solid solution, high density (low porosity) samples greater than 95% TD were processed by cold pressing at 150 MPa and sintering above 2600 K for times longer than 90 min. Some impurity oxide phases were noted in some samples attributed to residual gases in the furnace during processing. Also, some samples noted secondary phases of carbon and UC2 due to some hyperstoichiometric powder mixtures having carbon-to-metal ratios greater than one. In all, 33 mixed carbide samples were processed and analyzed with half bearing uranium as ternary carbides of UC-ZrC-NbC. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and density measurements were used to characterize samples. Samples were processed from powders of the refractory mono-carbides and UC/UC 2 or from powders of uranium hydride (UH3), graphite, and refractory metal carbides to produce hypostoichiometric mixed carbides. Samples processed from the constituent carbide powders and sintered at temperatures above the melting point of UC

  7. Post irradiation examinations of 84F-10A capsule containing uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two fuel pins filled with uranium-plutonium mixed carbide pellets having different stoichiometry, (U,Pu)C1.0 and (U,Pu)C1.1, were encapsulated in 84F-10A and irradiated in JMTR up to 3.0%FIMA at a peak linear power of 59kW/m. The capsule cooled for ∼4 months was transported to Reactor Fuel Examination Facility and subjected to non-destructive and destructive post irradiation examinations. It was found from the radial cross sections of fuel pins that the helium gap between the pellets and the cladding tube was completely closed. At the central part of the fuel pellets the number of small pores was decreased and the grain growth was observed compared with the outer zone. (U,Pu)C1.1 pellets showed higher fission gas release ratio than (U,Pu)C1.0 pellets because the former had relatively high open porosity. Although slight carburization was observed near the inner surface of cladding tube the interaction did not affect the fuel performance itself. (author)

  8. Near-elliptic core triangular-lattice and square-lattice PCFs: a comparison of birefringence, cut-off and GVD characteristics towards fiber device application

    CERN Document Server

    Maji, Partha Sona

    2014-01-01

    In this work, detailed numerical analysis of the near-elliptic core index-guiding triangular-lattice and square-lattice photonic crystal fiber (PCFs) are reported for birefringence, single mode, cut-off behavior, group velocity dispersion and effective area properties. For the same relative values of d/P, triangular-lattice PCFs show higher birefringence whereas the square-lattice PCFs show a wider range of single-mode operation. Square-lattice PCF was found to be endlessly single-mode for higher air-filling fraction (d/P). Smaller lengths of triangular-lattice PCF are required for dispersion compensation whereas PCFs with square-lattice with nearer relative dispersion slope (RDS) can better compensate the broadband dispersion. Square-lattice PCFs show ZDW red-shifted, making it preferable for mid-IR supercontinuum generation (SCG) with highly non-linear chalcogenide material. Square-lattice PCFs show higher dispersion slope that leads to compression of the broadband, thus accumulating more power in the pulse...

  9. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lumin [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Science

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  10. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  11. A Review of Carbide Fuel Corrosion for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaccio, Dennis G.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Butt, Darryl P.

    1994-07-01

    At the operation conditions of interest in nuclear thermal propulsion reactors, carbide materials have been known to exhibit a number of life limiting phenomena. These include the formation of liquid, loss by vaporization, creep and corresponding gas flow restrictions, and local corrosion and fuel structure degradation due to excessive mechanical and/or thermal loading. In addition, the radiation environment in the reactor core can produce a substantial change in its local physical properties, which can produce high thermal stresses and corresponding stress fractures (cracking). Time-temperature history and cyclic operation of the nuclear reactor can also accelerate some of these processes. The University of New Mexico's Institute for Space Nuclear Power Studies, under NASA sponsorship has recently initiated a study to model the complicated hydrogen corrosion process. In support of this effort, an extensive review of the open literature was performed, and a technical expert workshop was conducted. This paper summarizes the results of this review.

  12. Thermodynamic studies of thorium carbide fuel preparation and fuel/clad compatibility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbothermic reduction of thorium and uranium-thorium dioxide to monocarbide has been assessed. Equilibrium calculations have yielded Th-C-O and U-Th-C-O phase equilibria and CO pressures generated during reduction. The CO pressures were found to be at least five orders of magnitude greater than any of the other 15 gaseous species considered. This confirms that the monocarbide can successfully be prepared by carbothermic reduction. The chemical compatibility of thorium carbides with the Cr-Fe-Ni content of clad alloys has been thermodynamically evaluated. Solid solutions of 5> and 5> and of 7C3> and 7C3> were the principal reaction products. The Cr-Fe-Ni content of 316 stainless steel showed much less reaction product than that of any of the other six alloys considered. (author)

  13. Application of ozone in nuclear fuel reprocessing - studies on destruction of residual carbon in solutions of uranium carbide and uranium plutonium mixed carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved procedure for dissolution of mixed carbide fuel of FBTR using ozone as oxidant was demonstrated with pellets of low burn up. Destruction of soluble organic species formed on dissolution was studied when UC pellets were dissolved in nitric acid of strength 6 M and 11 M. Destruction of residual carbon was quantitative in 10 hours when dissolution of UC is carried out in 11 M nitric acid in presence of ozone while it is only 63% in absence of any oxidant even after boiling the solution for 20 hrs. in 11 M nitric acid. Results of carbon determination in the dissolver solution of mixed carbide fuel pellets irradiated to 25000 and 50000 MWd/t revealed that 20 to 25 percent of carbon was remaining even after the solutions were boiled for 20 hours in absence of any oxidant. These experiments confirm the necessity for a strong oxidant such as ozone for complete destruction of soluble organic species in the dissolver solution before it is taken up for solvent extraction. (author)

  14. PCF Structure with Circular Air Hole and Square Lattice and its High Birefringence and Lower Zero Dispersion Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranaw Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a square lattice Photonic Crystal Fiber (PCF with circular air hole has been designed and the numerical analysis reported a zero dispersion for one of the proposed structure. A very high Birefringence of the order of have been observed. Among all the structures proposed, two structures have shown both increment and decline in the value of confinement loss at the same interval of wavelength. It has also been shown the shifting of zero of dispersion wavelength toward lower wavelength range with increase in the number of circular air holes of large area compared to the number of circular air holes of smaller area. A Full- vector TM, FDTD method has been used

  15. Tuning Pore Size in Square-Lattice Coordination Networks for Size-Selective Sieving of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai-Jie; Madden, David G; Pham, Tony; Forrest, Katherine A; Kumar, Amrit; Yang, Qing-Yuan; Xue, Wei; Space, Brian; Perry, John J; Zhang, Jie-Peng; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Zaworotko, Michael J

    2016-08-22

    Porous materials capable of selectively capturing CO2 from flue-gases or natural gas are of interest in terms of rising atmospheric CO2 levels and methane purification. Size-exclusive sieving of CO2 over CH4 and N2 has rarely been achieved. Herein we show that a crystal engineering approach to tuning of pore-size in a coordination network, [Cu(quinoline-5-carboxyate)2 ]n (Qc-5-Cu) ena+bles ultra-high selectivity for CO2 over N2 (SCN ≈40 000) and CH4 (SCM ≈3300). Qc-5-Cu-sql-β, a narrow pore polymorph of the square lattice (sql) coordination network Qc-5-Cu-sql-α, adsorbs CO2 while excluding both CH4 and N2 . Experimental measurements and molecular modeling validate and explain the performance. Qc-5-Cu-sql-β is stable to moisture and its separation performance is unaffected by humidity. PMID:27439315

  16. Existence and Stability of Two-Dimensional Compact-Like Discrete Breathers in Discrete Two-Dimensional Monatomic Square Lattices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Quan; TIAN Qiang

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers in discrete two-dimensional monatomic square lattices are investigated by discussing a generafized discrete two-dimensional monatomic model.It is proven that the twodimensional compact-like discrete breathers exist not only in two-dimensional soft Ф4 potentials but also in hard two-dimensional Ф4 potentials and pure two-dimensional K4 lattices.The measurements of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breather cores in soft and hard two-dimensional Ф4 potential are determined by coupling parameter K4,while those in pure two-dimensional K4 lattices have no coupling with parameter K4.The stabilities of the two-dimensional compact-like discrete breathers correlate closely to the coupling parameter K4 and the boundary condition of lattices.

  17. Silicon carbide as an inert-matrix for a thermal reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports progress on work to develop methods of fabricating silicon carbide with cerium, as a substitute for plutonium, to achieve high densities at low sintering temperatures. Densities of 97-99% of TD were achieved at 1943 K for cerium oxide concentrations in the starting powders from 5 to 20 wt%. Also reported are: specific heat and thermal conductivity measurements of as-fabricated SiC; compatibility of SiC with coolant and Zircaloy-4; and accelerator emulations of in-reactor fission-fragment damage. The thermal conductivity for as-fabricated SiC with additives was 48 W m-1 K-1 at 298 K decreasing to about 18 W m-1 K-1 at 1773 K. Calculations, based on the measured thermal conductivity, show that the inert-matrix fuel could operate at 55 kW m-1 linear power at a centre-line temperature of only 673 K, i.e., only 100 K above coolant temperature, although it is expected that irradiation-induced degradation of thermal conductivity will lead to higher operating temperatures as burnup accumulates. The increase in central temperatures due to a possible decrease in thermal conductivity caused by fast-neutrons are calculated in the text. SiC appears to be a very promising candidate as an inert-matrix fuel for water-cooled reactors. (author)

  18. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO; Difusion de plata a traves de carburo de silicio en combustibles nucleares microencapsulados TRISO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E., E-mail: Felix.cancino@cinvestav.edu.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalurgica No. 1062, Col. Ramos Arizpe, 25900 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  19. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new carbon-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimize the loss of carbon, and retain fission products for many...

  20. Investigation of silver and iodine transport through silicon carbide layers prepared for nuclear fuel element cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, E.; van der Berg, N. G.; Malherbe, J. B.; Hancke, J. J.; Barry, J.; Wendler, E.; Wesch, W.

    2011-03-01

    Transport of silver and iodine through polycrystalline SiC layers produced by PBMR (Pty) Ltd. for cladding of TRISO fuel kernels was investigated using Rutherford backscattering analysis and electron microscopy. Fluences of 2 × 10 16 Ag + cm -2 and 1 × 10 16 I + cm -2 were implanted at room temperature, 350 °C and 600 °C with an energy of 360 keV, producing an atomic density of approximately 1.5% at the projected ranges of about 100 nm. The broadening of the implantation profiles and the loss of diffusors through the front surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures up to 1400 °C was determined. The results for room temperature implantations point to completely different transport mechanisms for silver and iodine in highly disordered silicon carbide. However, similar results are obtained for high temperature implantations, although iodine transport is much stronger influenced by lattice defects than is the case for silver. For both diffusors transport in well annealed samples can be described by Fickian grain boundary diffusion with no abnormal loss through the surface as would be expected from the presence of nano-pores and/or micro-cracks. At 1100 °C diffusion coefficients for silver and iodine are below our detection limit of 10 -21 m 2 s -1, while they increase into the 10 -20 m 2 s -1 range at 1300 °C.

  1. Ising spins on randomly multi-branched Husimi square lattice: Thermodynamics and phase transition in cross-dimensional range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ran

    2016-10-01

    An inhomogeneous random recursive lattice is constructed from the multi-branched Husimi square lattice. The number of repeating units connected on one vertex is randomly set to be 2 or 3 with a fixed ratio P2 or P3 with P2 +P3 = 1. The lattice is designed to describe complex thermodynamic systems with variable coordinating neighbors, e.g. the asymmetric range around the surface of a bulk system. Classical ferromagnetic spin-1 Ising model is solved on the lattice to achieve an annealed solution via the local exact calculation technique. The model exhibits distinct spontaneous magnetization similar to the deterministic system, with however rigorous thermal fluctuations and significant singularities on the entropy behavior around the critical temperature, indicating a complex superheating frustration in the cross-dimensional range induced by the stochasticity. The critical temperature was found to be exponentially correlated to the structural ratio P with the coefficient fitted as 0.53187, while the ground state energy presents linear correlation to P, implying a well-defined average property according to the structural ratio.

  2. Transfer-matrix study of a hard-square lattice gas with two kinds of particles and density anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Tiago J; Stilck, Jürgen F

    2015-09-01

    Using transfer matrix and finite-size scaling methods, we study the thermodynamic behavior of a lattice gas with two kinds of particles on the square lattice. Only excluded volume interactions are considered, so that the model is athermal. Large particles exclude the site they occupy and its four first neighbors, while small particles exclude only their site. Two thermodynamic phases are found: a disordered phase where large particles occupy both sublattices with the same probability and an ordered phase where one of the two sublattices is preferentially occupied by them. The transition between these phases is continuous at small concentrations of the small particles and discontinuous at larger concentrations, both transitions are separated by a tricritical point. Estimates of the central charge suggest that the critical line is in the Ising universality class, while the tricritical point has tricritical Ising (Blume-Emery-Griffiths) exponents. The isobaric curves of the total density as functions of the fugacity of small or large particles display a minimum in the disordered phase.

  3. First-order transition on the frustrated spin-1/2 Heisenberg ferromagnet on an anisotropic square lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapa, Rodrigo S.; Mendonça, Griffith [Departamento de Fi' sica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, CP 702, 30161-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Fi' sica, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Roberto Viana, J. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Fi' sica, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil); Ricardo de Sousa, J., E-mail: jsousa@ufam.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Fi' sica, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil); National Institute of Science and Technology for Complex Systems, Universidade Federal do Amazonas, Departamento de Fisica, 3000, Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    We have studied the quantum spin-1/2 frustrated Heisenberg model with two ferromagnetic interactions: nearest-neighbor (NN) with different coupling strengths J{sub 1} and J{sub 1}{sup ′} along x and y directions, respectively, competing with a next-nearest-neighbor (NNN) with coupling J{sub 2}. Using the effective-field theory we obtain the ground-state phase diagram in the (λ,α) space, where λ=J{sub 1}{sup ′}/J{sub 1} and α=J{sub 2}/J{sub 1}. Depending on the values of λ and α we observe three different states: ferromagnetic (F), collinear ferromagnetic (CF) and quantum paramagnetic (QP). We observe a QP state between the ordered F and CF phases in the region λ{sub 1}<λ<1 (λ{sub 1}≃0.62). - Highlights: • We study the ferromagnetic J{sub 1}−J{sub 1}{sup ′}−J{sub 2} model on an anisotropic square lattice by using effective-field theory. • We obtain the ground phase diagram in the λ−α plane (λ=J{sub 1}{sup ′}/J{sub 1} and α=J{sub 2}/J{sub 1}). • A comparison with the results of the antiferromagnetic J{sub 1}−J{sub 1}{sup ′}−J{sub 2} model. • We propose a functional for the free energy.

  4. Thermodynamic, critical properties and phase transitions of the Ising model on a square lattice with competing interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramazanov, M. K.; Murtazaev, A. K.; Magomedov, M. A.

    2016-05-01

    The thermodynamic and critical properties, and phase transitions of two-dimensional Ising model on a square lattice with competing interactions are investigated by the Monte Carlo method. Estimations are made for the magnitude relations of the next-nearest-neighbor and nearest-neighbor exchange interactions r=J2/J1 in the value ranges of 0.1≤r≤1.0. The anomalies of thermodynamic observables are shown to be present in this model on the interval 0.45≤r≤0.5. The phase diagram for the dependence of the critical temperature on a value of next-nearest neighbor interaction is plotted. A phase transition for all values in the interval 0.45≤r≤0.5 is shown to be a second order. Our data show that the temperature of the heat capacity maximum at r=0.5 tends to a finite value. The static critical exponents of the heat capacity α, susceptibility γ, order parameter β, correlation length ν, and the Fisher exponent η are calculated by means of the finite-size scaling theory. It is found that the change in next-nearest neighbor interaction value in the range 0.7≤r≤1.0 leads to nonuniversal critical behavior.

  5. Jamming and percolation in generalized models of random sequential adsorption of linear k -mers on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebovka, Nikolai I.; Tarasevich, Yuri Yu.; Dubinin, Dmitri O.; Laptev, Valeri V.; Vygornitskii, Nikolai V.

    2015-12-01

    The jamming and percolation for two generalized models of random sequential adsorption (RSA) of linear k -mers (particles occupying k adjacent sites) on a square lattice are studied by means of Monte Carlo simulation. The classical RSA model assumes the absence of overlapping of the new incoming particle with the previously deposited ones. The first model is a generalized variant of the RSA model for both k -mers and a lattice with defects. Some of the occupying k adjacent sites are considered as insulating and some of the lattice sites are occupied by defects (impurities). For this model even a small concentration of defects can inhibit percolation for relatively long k -mers. The second model is the cooperative sequential adsorption one where, for each new k -mer, only a restricted number of lateral contacts z with previously deposited k -mers is allowed. Deposition occurs in the case when z ≤(1 -d ) zm where zm=2 (k +1 ) is the maximum numbers of the contacts of k -mer, and d is the fraction of forbidden contacts. Percolation is observed only at some interval kmin≤k ≤kmax where the values kmin and kmax depend upon the fraction of forbidden contacts d . The value kmax decreases as d increases. A logarithmic dependence of the type log10(kmax) =a +b d , where a =4.04 ±0.22 ,b =-4.93 ±0.57 , is obtained.

  6. Advanced fuels modeling: Evaluating the steady-state performance of carbide fuel in helium-cooled reactors using FRAPCON 3.4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Luther, Jr.

    Uranium carbide (UC) has long been considered a potential alternative to uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel, especially in the context of Gen IV gas-cooled reactors. It has shown promise because of its high uranium density, good irradiation stability, and especially high thermal conductivity. Despite its many benefits, UC is known to swell at a rate twice that of UO2. However, the swelling phenomenon is not well understood, and we are limited to a weak empirical understanding of the swelling mechanism. One suggested cladding for UC is silicon carbide (SiC), a ceramic that demonstrates a number of desirable properties. Among them are an increased corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength, and irradiation stability. However, with increased temperatures, SiC exhibits an extremely brittle nature. The brittle behavior of SiC is not fully understood and thus it is unknown how SiC would respond to the added stress of a swelling UC fuel. To better understand the interaction between these advanced materials, each has been implemented into FRAPCON, the preferred fuel performance code of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); additionally, the material properties for a helium coolant have been incorporated. The implementation of UC within FRAPCON required the development of material models that described not only the thermophysical properties of UC, such as thermal conductivity and thermal expansion, but also models for the swelling, densification, and fission gas release associated with the fuel's irradiation behavior. This research is intended to supplement ongoing analysis of the performance and behavior of uranium carbide and silicon carbide in a helium-cooled reactor.

  7. Measurement of void volume of a fuel rod and the exchange of occluded gases from mixed carbide fuel with filling gas helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rama Rao, G.A. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Centre, Bombay (India). Fuel Chem. Div.; Kulkarni, S.G. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Centre, Bombay (India). Fuel Chem. Div.; Venugopal, V. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Centre, Bombay (India). Fuel Chem. Div.; Manchanda, V.K. [Radiochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay 400 085 (India); Goswami, G.L. [Atomic Fuels Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay 400 085 (India)

    1995-02-01

    The presence of gaseous impurities in the filling gas of a fuel pin is detrimental to the thermal performance of a nuclear reactor fuel. The composition of the filling gas does not remain constant throughout the life of the fuel pin. The gas exchange phenomena that occur between the cover gas and impurity gases affect the fuel performance more severely in (U, Pu)O{sub 2} fuel pin due to its inherently poor thermal conductivity than in advanced fuels such as mixed carbides and nitrides. In the present study the exchange phenomenon of the occluded gases present in our Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) fuel pellets [(U{sub 0.30}, Pu{sub 0.70})C with 6500 ppm O] with the cover gas helium was observed as a function of time and temperature. Quantitative analysis of the released gases namely H{sub 2}, O{sub 2}+Ar, N{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CO was carried out at subambient pressure by gas chromatography. The void volume of the fuel element is determined experimentally by gas equilibration with known volume. ((orig.))

  8. Measurement of void volume of a fuel rod and the exchange of occluded gases from mixed carbide fuel with filling gas helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, G. A. Rama; Kukarni, S. G.; Venugoopal, V.; Manchanda, V. K.; Goswami, G. L.

    1995-02-01

    The presence of gaseous impurities in the filling gas of a fuel pin is detriental to the thermal performance of a nuclear reactor fuel. The composition of the filling gas does not remain constant throughout the life of the fuel pin. The gas exchange phenomena that occur between the cover gas and impurity gases affect the fuel performance more severely in (U, Pu)O 2 fuel pin due to its inherently poor thermal conductivity than in advanced fuels such as mixed carbides and nitrides. In the present study the exchange phenomenon of the occluded gases present in our Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) fuel pellets [(U 0.30, Pu 0.70)C with 6500 ppm o] with the cover gas helium was observed as a function of time and temperature. Quantitative analysis of the released gases namely H 2, O 2 + Ar, N 2, CH 4 and CO was carried out at subambient pressure by gas chromatography. The void volume of the fuel element is determined experimentally by gas equilibration with known volume.

  9. Surface science and electrochemical studies of metal-modified carbides for fuel cells and hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas Glenn

    Carbides of the early transition metals have emerged as low-cost catalysts that are active for a wide range of reactions. The surface chemistry of carbides can be altered by modifying the surface with small amounts of admetals. These metal-modified carbides can be effective replacements for Pt-based bimetallic systems, which suffer from the drawbacks of high cost and low thermal stability. In this dissertation, metal-modified carbides were studied for reactions with applications to renewable energy technologies. It is demonstrated that metal-modified carbides possess high activity for alcohol reforming and electrochemical hydrogen production. First, the surface chemistry of carbides towards alcohol decomposition is studied using density functional theory (DFT) and surface science experiments. The Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) was used to calculate the binding energies of alcohols and decomposition intermediates on metal-modified carbides. The calculated binding energies were then correlated to reforming activity determined experimentally using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the case of methanol decomposition, it was found that tungsten monocarbide (WC) selectively cleaved the C-O bond to produce methane. Upon modifying the surface with a single layer of metal such as Ni, Pt, or Rh, the selectivity shifted towards scission of the C-H bonds while leaving the C-O bond intact, producing carbon monoxide (CO) and H2. High resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to examine the bond breaking sequence as a function of temperature. From HREELS, it was shown that the surfaces followed an activity trend of Rh > Ni > Pt. The Au-modified WC surface possessed too low of a methanol binding energy, and molecular desorption of methanol was the most favorable pathway on this surface. Next, the ability of Rh-modified WC to break the C-C bond of C2 and C3 alcohols was demonstrated. HREELS showed that ethanol decomposed through an acetaldehyde

  10. Comment on ``Multicritical behavior of a square-lattice-gas model with anisotropic repulsive interactions: A transfer-matrix scaling study''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caflisch, Robert G.

    1988-09-01

    An argument is given that the model of Buda, Florio, and Giaquinta (BFG)[Phys. Rev. B 35, 2021 (1987)] for anisotropic molecules on a square lattice is inappropriate in that context, because it confuses anisotropy of the lattice with the anisotropy of the molecule. The importance of this is made clear by noting the absence (in BFG) of a dilute isotropic phase. Such a phase is unavoidable on very general grounds. Comments are made about an alternative realization of their results and an alternative class of models for anisotropic molecules.

  11. Influence of the Boundary Condition on the Short-Time Dynamic Behaviour of the Ising-Like Phase Transition in Square-Lattice Fully Frustrated XY Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗孟波; 陈庆虎; 焦正宽

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the boundary condition on the short-time dynamic behaviour of the Ising-like phase transition in square-lattice fully frustrated (FF) XY models with periodic and fluctuating twist boundary conditions. The transition temperature Tc and the dynamic and static critical exponents z, 2β/v and v are estimated for both cases using short-time dynamic scaling analysis. The results show that both models have the same critical exponents, indicating that the boundary condition has nearly no effect on the short-time dynamic behaviour of the FFXY model.

  12. Effects of thermal treatment on the mechanical integrity of silicon carbide in HTR fuel up to 2200 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohbeck, Nadia; Xiao, Ping

    2014-08-01

    Achieving inherent safety of the High Temperature Reactor relies on the exceptional performance of its fuel. The design foresees complete encapsulation of all fissionable material by layers of carbon and silicon carbide (SiC) forming the tristructural-isotropic fuel particle. Its mechanical integrity and ability to fully retain fission products even in the event of an accident is a vital safety concern. The present study investigates the effect of post-deposition annealing on the SiC coating at design-based accident temperatures and beyond. Therefore, samples of simulated fuel have been fabricated by fluidized bed chemical vapour deposition and thermally treated in inert atmosphere up to 2200 °C. Nanoindentation and crush test measurements showed only minor reductions of elastic modulus and fracture strength up to 2000 °C. Substantial weight loss and crystal growth were observed at annealing temperatures of 2100 °C and above. Raman spectroscopy identified the formation of a multi-layered graphene film covering the SiC grains after annealing and scanning electron microscopy revealed significant porosity formation within the coating from 1800 °C onwards. These observations were attributed towards an evaporation-precipitation mechanism of SiC at very elevated temperatures that only slightly diminishes the hardness, elastic modulus or fracture strength, but might still be problematic in respect to fission product retention of the SiC layer.

  13. Cluster dynamical mean field theory study of antiferromagnetic transition in the square-lattice Hubbard model: Optical conductivity and electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Toshihiro; Tsunetsugu, Hirokazu

    2016-08-01

    We numerically study optical conductivity σ (ω ) near the "antiferromagnetic" phase transition in the square-lattice Hubbard model at half filling. We use a cluster dynamical mean field theory and calculate conductivity including vertex corrections and, to this end, we have reformulated the vertex corrections in the antiferromagnetic phase. We find that the vertex corrections change various important details in temperature and ω dependencies of conductivity in the square lattice, and this contrasts sharply the case of the Mott transition in the frustrated triangular lattice. Generally, the vertex corrections enhance variations in the ω dependence, and sharpen the Drude peak and a high-ω incoherent peak in the paramagnetic phase. They also enhance the dip in σ (ω ) at ω =0 in the antiferromagnetic phase. Therefore, the dc conductivity is enhanced in the paramagnetic phase and suppressed in the antiferromagnetic phase, but this change occurs slightly below the transition temperature. We also find a temperature region above the transition temperature in which the dc conductivity shows an insulating behavior but σ (ω ) retains the Drude peak, and this region is stabilized by the vertex corrections. We also investigate which fluctuations are important in the vertex corrections and analyze momentum dependence of the vertex function in detail.

  14. Magnesium carbide synthesis from methane and magnesium oxide - a potential methodology for natural gas conversion to premium fuels and chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, A.F.; Modestino, A.J.; Howard, J.B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Diversification of the raw materials base for manufacturing premium fuels and chemicals offers U.S. and international consumers economic and strategic benefits. Extensive reserves of natural gas in the world provide a valuable source of clean gaseous fuel and chemical feedstock. Assuming the availability of suitable conversion processes, natural gas offers the prospect of improving flexibility in liquid fuels and chemicals manufacture, and thus, the opportunity to complement, supplement, or displace petroleum-based production as economic and strategic considerations require. The composition of natural gas varies from reservoir to reservoir but the principal hydrocarbon constituent is always methane (CH{sub 4}). With its high hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, methane has the potential to produce hydrogen or hydrogen-rich products. However, methane is a very chemically stable molecule and, thus, is not readily transformed to other molecules or easily reformed to its elements (H{sub 2} and carbon). In many cases, further research is needed to augment selectivity to desired product(s), increase single-pass conversions, or improve economics (e.g. there have been estimates of $50/bbl or more for liquid products) before the full potential of these methodologies can be realized on a commercial scale. With the trade-off between gas conversion and product selectivity, a major challenge common to many of these technologies is to simultaneously achieve high methane single-pass conversions and high selectivity to desired products. Based on the results of the scoping runs, there appears to be strong indications that a breakthrough has finally been achieved in that synthesis of magnesium carbides from MgO and methane in the arc discharge reactor has been demonstrated.

  15. Highly dispersed molybdenum carbide as non-noble electrocatalyst for PEM fuel cells: Performance for CO electrooxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guil-Lopez, R.; Martinez-Huerta, M.V.; Pena, M.A.; Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Marie Curie 2, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Guillen-Villafuerte, O.; Pastor, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad de La Laguna, Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, E-38071 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    CO electrooxidation on nanocrystalline molybdenum carbide has been studied through CO stripping measurements using cyclic voltammetry. The active molybdenum carbide was obtained from the carbothermic reduction of really very small molybdenum oxide particles supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (CB). In order to obtain highly dispersed molybdenum carbide particles, low molybdenum loading and control of the carbothermic reduction conditions of CB-supported molybdenum oxide were employed to avoid Mo sintering during the carburization process. This work provides experimental evidence on the CO electrooxidation capability of the Mo carbide phase, which to the best of our knowledge is reported for the first time. The small particle size of carbide electrocatalyst exhibited better performance for CO electrooxidation than the commercial bulk molybdenum carbide sample. (author)

  16. Finite-volume energy spectrum, fractionalized strings, and low-energy effective field theory for the quantum dimer model on the square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, D.; Bögli, M.; Hofmann, C. P.; Jiang, F.-J.; Widmer, P.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2016-09-01

    We present detailed analytic calculations of finite-volume energy spectra, mean-field theory, as well as a systematic low-energy effective field theory for the square lattice quantum dimer model. An emergent approximate spontaneously broken SO(2 ) symmetry gives rise to a pseudo-Goldstone boson. Remarkably, this soft phononlike excitation, which is massless at the Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) point, exists far beyond this point. The Goldstone physics is captured by a systematic low-energy effective field theory. We determine its low-energy parameters by matching the analytic effective field theory with exact diagonalization results. This confirms that the model exists in the columnar (and not in a plaquette or mixed) phase all the way to the RK point.

  17. Magnetic excitation spectrum of the square lattice S=1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet K2V3O8

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lumsden, M.D.; Nagler, S.E.; Sales, B.C.;

    2006-01-01

    We have explored the magnetic excitation spectrum of the S=1/2 square lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet, K2V3O8, using both triple-axis and time-of-flight inelastic neutron scattering. The long-wavelength spin waves are consistent with the previously determined Hamiltonian for this material....... A small energy gap of 72 +/- 9 mu eV is observed at the antiferromagnetic zone center and the near-neighbor exchange constant is determined to be 1.08 +/- 0.03 meV. A finite ferromagnetic interplanar coupling is observed along the crystallographic c axis with a magnitude of J(c)=-0.0036 +/- 0.0006 me...

  18. Heterogeneous trench-assisted few-mode multi-core fiber with graded-index profile and square-lattice layout for low differential mode delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jiajing; Saitoh, Kunimasa; Amma, Yoshimichi; Takenaga, Katsuhiro; Matsuo, Shoichiro

    2015-07-13

    We propose a kind of heterogeneous trench-assisted graded-index few-mode multi-core fiber with square-lattice layout. For each core in the fiber, effective area (A(eff)) of LP(01) mode and LP(11) mode can achieve about 110 μm(2) and 220 μm(2). Absolute value of differential mode delay (|DMD|) is smaller than 100 ps/km over C + L bands, which can decrease the complexity of digital signal processing at the receiver end. Considering the upper limit of cladding diameter (D(cl)) and cable cutoff wavelength of LP(21) mode in the cores located at the inner layer, we set core pitch (Λ) as 43 μm. In this case, D(cl) is about 220.4 μm, inter-core crosstalk (XT) is lower than -40 dB/500 km and the relative core multiplicity factor (RCMF) reaches 15.93.

  19. Enhanced thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide-silicon carbide composite fuel pellets prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, S.; Mckenna, E.; Baney, R.; Subhash, G.; Tulenko, J.

    2013-02-01

    Uranium dioxide (UO2)-10 vol% silicon carbide (SiC) composite fuel pellets were produced by oxidative sintering and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) at a range of temperatures from 1400 to 1600 °C. Both SiC whiskers and SiC powder particles were utilized. Oxidative sintering was employed over 4 h and the SPS sintering was employed only for 5 min at the highest hold temperature. It was noted that composite pellets sintered by SPS process revealed smaller grain size, reduced formation of chemical products, higher density, and enhanced interfacial contact compared to the pellets made by oxidative sintering. For given volume of SiC, the pellets with powder particles yielded a smaller grain size than pellets with SiC whiskers. Finally thermal conductivity measurements at 100 °C, 500 °C, and 900 °C revealed that SPS sintered UO2-SiC composites exhibited an increase of up to 62% in thermal conductivity compared to UO2 pellets, while the oxidative sintered composite pellets revealed significantly inferior thermal conductivity values. The current study points to the improved processing capabilities of SPS compared to oxidative sintering of UO2-SiC composites.

  20. Enhanced thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide–silicon carbide composite fuel pellets prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide (UO2)–10 vol% silicon carbide (SiC) composite fuel pellets were produced by oxidative sintering and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) at a range of temperatures from 1400 to 1600 °C. Both SiC whiskers and SiC powder particles were utilized. Oxidative sintering was employed over 4 h and the SPS sintering was employed only for 5 min at the highest hold temperature. It was noted that composite pellets sintered by SPS process revealed smaller grain size, reduced formation of chemical products, higher density, and enhanced interfacial contact compared to the pellets made by oxidative sintering. For given volume of SiC, the pellets with powder particles yielded a smaller grain size than pellets with SiC whiskers. Finally thermal conductivity measurements at 100 °C, 500 °C, and 900 °C revealed that SPS sintered UO2–SiC composites exhibited an increase of up to 62% in thermal conductivity compared to UO2 pellets, while the oxidative sintered composite pellets revealed significantly inferior thermal conductivity values. The current study points to the improved processing capabilities of SPS compared to oxidative sintering of UO2–SiC composites

  1. Enhanced thermal conductivity of uranium dioxide–silicon carbide composite fuel pellets prepared by Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, S.; Mckenna, E.; Baney, R. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Subhash, G., E-mail: Subhash@ufl.edu [Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Tulenko, J. [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2})–10 vol% silicon carbide (SiC) composite fuel pellets were produced by oxidative sintering and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) at a range of temperatures from 1400 to 1600 °C. Both SiC whiskers and SiC powder particles were utilized. Oxidative sintering was employed over 4 h and the SPS sintering was employed only for 5 min at the highest hold temperature. It was noted that composite pellets sintered by SPS process revealed smaller grain size, reduced formation of chemical products, higher density, and enhanced interfacial contact compared to the pellets made by oxidative sintering. For given volume of SiC, the pellets with powder particles yielded a smaller grain size than pellets with SiC whiskers. Finally thermal conductivity measurements at 100 °C, 500 °C, and 900 °C revealed that SPS sintered UO{sub 2}–SiC composites exhibited an increase of up to 62% in thermal conductivity compared to UO{sub 2} pellets, while the oxidative sintered composite pellets revealed significantly inferior thermal conductivity values. The current study points to the improved processing capabilities of SPS compared to oxidative sintering of UO{sub 2}–SiC composites.

  2. Tungsten carbide modified high surface area carbon as fuel cell catalyst support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Minhua; Merzougui, Belabbes; Shoemaker, Krista; Stolar, Laura; Protsailo, Lesia; Mellinger, Zachary J.; Hsu, Irene J.; Chen, Jingguang G.

    Phase pure WC nanoparticles were synthesized on high surface area carbon black (800 m 2 g -1) by a temperature programmed reaction (TPR) method. The particle size of WC can be controlled under 30 nm with a relatively high coverage on the carbon surface. The electrochemical testing results demonstrated that the corrosion resistance of carbon black was improved by 2-fold with a surface modification by phase pure WC particles. However, the WC itself showed some dissolution under potential cycling. Based on the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, most of the WC on the surface was lost or transformed to oxides after 5000 potential cycles in the potential range of 0.65-1.2 V. The Pt catalyst supported on WC/C showed a slightly better ORR activity than that of Pt/C, with the Pt activity loss rate for Pt/WC/C being slightly slower compared to that of Pt/C. The performance and decay rate of Pt/WC/C were also evaluated in a fuel cell.

  3. 无限个吸收态方点阵模型中激活位的临界扩散%Critical Spreading of Active Site in a square lattice Model Possessing Infinite Absorbing States

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    乔文华

    2008-01-01

    The spreading of active sites of the square lattice model is simulated. Finite-time scaling behaviors are observed in the vicinity of the critical point.%采用计算机模拟了方点阵模型中激活位的扩散.观察和讨论了临界点附近的有限时间的扩散行为.

  4. New processing methods to produce silicon carbide and beryllium oxide inert matrix and enhanced thermal conductivity oxide fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, K. H.; Fourcade, J.; Lee, S.-G.; Solomon, A. A.

    2006-06-01

    For inert matrix fuels, SiC and BeO represent two possible matrix phase compounds that exhibit very high thermal conductivity, high melting points, low neutron absorption, and reasonably high radiation stability. BeO is chemically compatible with UO2, PuO2 and Zircaloy to very high temperatures, but SiC reacts with all three at somewhat lower temperatures. We have developed the Polymer Impregnation and Pyrolysis or PIP method, making use of a commercial SiC polymeric precursor, to consolidate both particulate fuels like 'TRISO' microsphere fuels, and to impregnate UO2 fuels with pure stoichiometric SiC to improve their thermal conductivity. This method was employed to fabricate Enhanced Conductivity Oxide fuels, or ECO fuels with 5-10 vol.% of the high conductivity phase, and with 50 vol.% for TRISO dispersion fuels. For ECO fuels, a new 'slug/bisque' method of fabricating the UO2 fuel granules was necessary to produce sintered fuel with open pore structures, allowing almost complete impregnation of the continuous SiC phase. The advantages of the PIP process are that it is a non-damaging consolidation process for particulates (TRU, UC or TRISO microspheres), forms a continuous, pure β-SiC phase at temperatures as low as 1573 K, and allows the maximum in fissile atom density. However, several PIP impregnation cycles and high crystallization temperatures are necessary to obtain high thermal conductivity SiC. For producing IMF fuels using the PIP process, the fissile PuC and/or TRU actinides can be added in small concentrations along with SiC 'filler particles' and consolidated with the SiC precursor for either open or closed fuel cycles. For BeO, a second approach was developed for ECO fuels that involves a 'co-sintering' route to produce high density fuels with a continuous BeO phase of 5-10 vol.%. Special granulation and mixing techniques were developed, but only one normal sintering cycle is required. For BeO matrix IMF fuels, PuO2 granules and TRU actinides or

  5. New processing methods to produce silicon carbide and beryllium oxide inert matrix and enhanced thermal conductivity oxide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For inert matrix fuels, SiC and BeO represent two possible matrix phase compounds that exhibit very high thermal conductivity, high melting points, low neutron absorption, and reasonably high radiation stability. BeO is chemically compatible with UO2, PuO2 and Zircaloy to very high temperatures, but SiC reacts with all three at somewhat lower temperatures. We have developed the Polymer Impregnation and Pyrolysis or PIP method, making use of a commercial SiC polymeric precursor, to consolidate both particulate fuels like 'TRISO' microsphere fuels, and to impregnate UO2 fuels with pure stoichiometric SiC to improve their thermal conductivity. This method was employed to fabricate Enhanced Conductivity Oxide fuels, or ECO fuels with 5-10 vol.% of the high conductivity phase, and with 50 vol.% for TRISO dispersion fuels. For ECO fuels, a new 'slug/bisque' method of fabricating the UO2 fuel granules was necessary to produce sintered fuel with open pore structures, allowing almost complete impregnation of the continuous SiC phase. The advantages of the PIP process are that it is a non-damaging consolidation process for particulates (TRU, UC or TRISO microspheres), forms a continuous, pure β-SiC phase at temperatures as low as 1573 K, and allows the maximum in fissile atom density. However, several PIP impregnation cycles and high crystallization temperatures are necessary to obtain high thermal conductivity SiC. For producing IMF fuels using the PIP process, the fissile PuC and/or TRU actinides can be added in small concentrations along with SiC 'filler particles' and consolidated with the SiC precursor for either open or closed fuel cycles. For BeO, a second approach was developed for ECO fuels that involves a 'co-sintering' route to produce high density fuels with a continuous BeO phase of 5-10 vol.%. Special granulation and mixing techniques were developed, but only one normal sintering cycle is required. For BeO matrix IMF fuels, PuO2 granules and TRU actinides or

  6. 350 nm Broadband Supercontinuum Generation Using Dispersion Engineered Near Zero Ultraflat Square-Lattice PCF around 1.55 μm and Fabrication Tolerance Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Maji, Partha Sona; Roy Chaudhuri, Partha

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a new design of ultraflat dispersion PCF based on square-lattice geometry with all uniform air holes towards broadband smooth SCG around the C-band of wavelength has been presented. The air hole of the inner ring was infiltrated with liquid of certain refractive indices. Numerical investigations establish a near zero ultraflattened dispersion of 0 ± 0.78 ps/nm/km in a wavelength range of 1496 nm to 2174 nm (678 nm bandwidth) covering most of the communications bands with the fir...

  7. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  8. The effects of oxygen, carbon dioxide and water vapor on reprocessing silicon carbide inert matrix fuels by corrosion in molten potassium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molten salt reaction/dissolution method for reprocessing silicon carbide based inert matrix fuels (IMF) is further developed in this paper through comparison of the corrosion rate in multiple gases and gas mixtures. Water vapor was firstly introduced in the SiC/K2CO3 corrosion system. The SiC corrosion rate in the H2O atmosphere was dramatically enhanced 3-4-fold compared to the rate under an O2 atmosphere. The corrosion rates in different atmospheres of O2, CO2, O2/CO2, H2O, O2/H2O and CO2/H2O with various partial pressures were compared in order to determine the optimal reaction atmosphere and to better understand the reaction mechanism. The SiC pellets with 5 wt.% of CeO2, a surrogate for PuO2 were fabricated. CeO2 was successfully separated from the SiC matrix by using the molten salt reaction/dissolution strategy.

  9. Nano-molybdenum carbide/carbon nanotubes composite as bifunctional anode catalyst for high-performance Escherichia coli-based microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaqiong; Li, Bin; Cui, Dan; Xiang, Xingde; Li, Weishan

    2014-01-15

    A novel electrode, carbon felt-supported nano-molybdenum carbide (Mo2C)/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite, was developed as platinum-free anode of high performance microbial fuel cell (MFC). The Mo2C/CNTs composite was synthesized by using the microwave-assisted method with Mo(CO)6 as a single source precursor and characterized by using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The activity of the composite as anode electrocatalyst of MFC based on Escherichia coli (E. coli) was investigated with cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and cell discharge test. It is found that the carbon felt electrode with 16.7 wt% Mo Mo2C/CNTs composite exhibits a comparable electrocatalytic activity to that with 20 wt% platinum as anode electrocatalyst. The superior performance of the developed platinum-free electrode can be ascribed to the bifunctional electrocatalysis of Mo2C/CNTs for the conversion of organic substrates into electricity through bacteria. The composite facilitates the formation of biofilm, which is necessary for the electron transfer via c-type cytochrome and nanowires. On the other hand, the composite exhibits the electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of hydrogen, which is the common metabolite of E. coli.

  10. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of uranium carbide pyrophoricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis concerns the development of nuclear reactors of fourth generation, and more particularly the use of carbide fuels instead of oxide fuels. An experimental part allows the investigation of mechanisms resulting in the pyrophoric reaction of a powder of uranium carbide, and addresses the determination of kinetic parameters intrinsic to the oxidation of powdered uranium carbide. Experimental results are then used to develop models of oxidation of powders of carbide uranium which are applied to a simplified mono-dispersed powder, and then introduced in a computation code. Simulation results are compared with experimental results

  11. Development and characterization of solid solution tri-carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2001-02-01

    Solid-solution, binary uranium/refractory metal carbide fuels have been shown to be capable of performing at high temperatures for nuclear thermal propulsion applications. More recently, tri-carbide fuels such as (U, Zr, Nb)C1+x with less than 10% metal mole fraction uranium have been studied for their application in ultra-high temperature, high performance space nuclear power systems. These tri-carbide fuels require high processing temperatures greater than 2600 K owing to their high melting points in excess of 3600 K. This paper presents the results of recent studies involving hypostoichiometric, single-phase tri-carbide fuels. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing and sintering were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. Scanning electron microscopy and xray diffraction were used to analyze samples. Liquid phase sintering with UC1+x at temperatures near 2700 K was shown to be instrumental in achieving good densification in hyper- and near-stoichiometric mixed carbides. Hypostoichiometric carbides require even higher processing temperatures greater than 2800 K in order to achieve liquid phase sintering with a UC liquid phase and good densification of the final solid solution, tri-carbide fuel. .

  12. 350 nm Broadband Supercontinuum Generation Using Dispersion Engineered Near Zero Ultraflat Square-Lattice PCF around 1.55 μm and Fabrication Tolerance Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Partha Sona; Roy Chaudhuri, Partha

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a new design of ultraflat dispersion PCF based on square-lattice geometry with all uniform air holes towards broadband smooth SCG around the C-band of wavelength has been presented. The air hole of the inner ring was infiltrated with liquid of certain refractive indices. Numerical investigations establish a near zero ultraflattened dispersion of 0 ± 0.78 ps/nm/km in a wavelength range of 1496 nm to 2174 nm (678 nm bandwidth) covering most of the communications bands with the first zero dispersion wavelength around 1.54 μm. With the optimized ultraflattened fiber, we have achieved a broadband SC spectrum with FWHM of 350 nm with the central wavelength of 1550 nm with less than a meter long of the fiber by using a picosecond pulse laser. We have also analyzed the sensitivity of the optimized dispersion design by small variations from the optimum value of the geometrical structural parameters. Our investigations establish that for a negative change of PCF parameters, the profile retains the smooth and flat SCG spectra; however, for a positive change, the smooth and a flat spectrum is lost. The new design of the fiber will be capable of covering huge diverse field of DWDM sources, spectroscopy, meteorology, optical coherence tomography, and optical sensing. PMID:27355018

  13. Thermally-induced single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformations from a 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer to a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework and its application in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Fan, Rui Qing; Wang, Xin Ming; Wei, Li Guo; Song, Yang; Du, Xi; Xing, Kai; Wang, Ping; Yang, Yu Lin

    2016-07-28

    In this work, a rare 2D → 3D single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation (SCSC) is observed in metal-organic coordination complexes, which is triggered by thermal treatment. The 2D two-fold interpenetrating square lattice layer [Cd(IBA)2]n (1) is irreversibly converted into a 3D four-fold interpenetrating diamond framework {[Cd(IBA)2(H2O)]·2.5H2O}n (2) (HIBA = 4-(1H-imidazol-1-yl)benzoic acid). Consideration is given to these two complexes with different interpenetrating structures and dimensionality, and their influence on photovoltaic properties are studied. Encouraged by the UV-visible absorption and HOMO-LUMO energy states matched for sensitizing TiO2, the two complexes are employed in combination with N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) to compensate absorption in the ultraviolet and blue-violet region, offset competitive visible light absorption of I3(-) and reducing charge the recombination of injected electrons. After co-sensitization with 1 and 2, the device co-sensitized by 1/N719 and 2/N719 to yield overall efficiencies of 7.82% and 8.39%, which are 19.94% and 28.68% higher than that of the device sensitized only by N719 (6.52%). Consequently, high dimensional interpenetrating complexes could serve as excellent co-sensitizers and have application in DSSCs. PMID:27356177

  14. The measurement of silver diffusivity in zirconium carbide to study the release behavior of 110mAg in the ZrC TRISO-coated nuclear fuel particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Young-Ki; Allen, Todd R.

    2016-03-01

    The tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel has been developed and used for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). It provides a unique robustness of the first barrier for the fission products. The TRISO fuel particle has typically consisted of a UO2 or UCO kernel, surrounded by successive layers of porous carbon, dense inner pyrocarbon, silicon carbide, and dense outer pyrocarbon. During operation, however, the SiC layer has been known to release radioactive silver 110mAg which makes maintenance more difficult and thus costly. Zirconium carbide has been considered as a promising alternative to the SiC fission product barrier. ZrC exhibits high temperature stability and possibly possesses superior Pd resistance, while the retention properties especially for silver have not been adequately studied. To help elucidate the diffusive behavior of silver in the ZrC coating of the TRISO-coated particle, a new diffusion experimental technique, called the encapsulating source method, has been developed by constructing a constant source diffusion couple between ZrC and Ag gas originated from Zr-Ag solid solution. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and optical methods were used to analyze the diffusion couple annealed at 1500 °C. The resultant diffusion coefficient of Ag in single-crystalline ZrC0.84 at 1500 °C was experimentally determined to be about 2.8 (±1.2) × 10-17 m2/s.

  15. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picklesimer, M.L.; Thurber, W.C.

    1961-01-01

    A chemically nonreactive fuel composition for incorporation in aluminum- clad, plate type fuel elements for neutronic reactors is described. The composition comprises a mixture of aluminum and uranium carbide particles, the uranium carbide particles containing at least 80 wt.% UC/sub 2/.

  16. Silicon carbide thyristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, John A. (Inventor); Palmour, John W. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The SiC thyristor has a substrate, an anode, a drift region, a gate, and a cathode. The substrate, the anode, the drift region, the gate, and the cathode are each preferably formed of silicon carbide. The substrate is formed of silicon carbide having one conductivity type and the anode or the cathode, depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the substrate and has the same conductivity type as the substrate. A drift region of silicon carbide is formed adjacent the anode or cathode and has an opposite conductivity type as the anode or cathode. A gate is formed adjacent the drift region or the cathode, also depending on the embodiment, and has an opposite conductivity type as the drift region or the cathode. An anode or cathode, again depending on the embodiment, is formed adjacent the gate or drift region and has an opposite conductivity type than the gate.

  17. Microstructure evolution and diffusion of ruthenium in silicon carbide, and the implications for structural integrity of SiC layer in TRISO coated fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munthali, Kinnock V., E-mail: kvmunthali@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa); Department of Electrical Engineering, Polytechnic of Namibia, P/Bag 13388, Windhoek (Namibia); Theron, Chris; Danie Auret, F.; Coelho, Sergio M.M.; Prinsloo, Linda; Njoroge, Eric [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

    2014-05-01

    A thin film of ruthenium (Ru) was deposited on n-type 4H–SiC and 6H–SiC by electron beam deposition technique so as to study interface reaction of ruthenium with silicon carbide at various annealing temperatures, and in two annealing environments namely vacuum and air. The Ru–4H–SiC and Ru–6H–SiC films were both annealed isochronally in a vacuum furnace at temperatures ranging from 500 to 1000 °C, and the second set of samples were also annealed in air for temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 600 °C. After each annealing temperature, the films were analysed by Rutherford Backscattering spectrometry (RBS). Raman analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis were also used to analyse some of the samples. RBS analysis of 4H–SiC annealed in a vacuum showed evidence of formation of ruthenium silicide (Ru{sub 2}Si{sub 3}) and diffusion of Ru into SiC starting from annealing temperature of 700 °C going upwards. In the case of Ru–6H–SiC annealed in a vacuum, RBS analysis showed formation of Ru{sub 2}Si{sub 3} at 600 °C, in addition to the diffusion of Ru into SiC at 800 °C. Raman analysis of the Ru–4H–SiC and Ru–6H–SiC samples that were annealed in a vacuum at 1000 °C showed clear D and G carbon peaks which was evidence of formation of graphite. As for the samples annealed in air ruthenium oxidation started at a temperature of 400 °C and diffusion of Ru into SiC commenced at temperatures of 500 °C for both Ru–4H–SiC and Ru–6H–SiC. X-ray diffraction analysis of samples annealed in air at 600 °C showed evidence of formation of ruthenium silicide in both 4H and 6H–SiC but this was not corroborated by RBS analysis.

  18. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  19. Reliable Breakdown Obtained in Silicon Carbide Rectifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1997-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensor (HTIES) Program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is currently developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far-ranging variety of applications and systems. These range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensor and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines.

  20. Method of making metallic oxide or carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is claimed of making metallic oxide or carbide particles of uranium, which comprises fuels or breeder materials for nuclear reactors. An aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate or chloride and, if necessary, colloidal carbon is added dropwise into an organic ketone or ketone mixture phase which is located above an aqueous ammonia solution. The thereupon formed particles are sintered

  1. A structural model for multi-layered ceramic cylinders and its application to silicon carbide cladding of light water reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youho; Kazimi, Mujid S.

    2015-03-01

    A thermo-mechanical model for stress distribution and Weibull statistical fracture of a multi-layered SiC cladding for LWR fuel is developed. The model is validated by comparing its results to those of the Finite Element Analysis (FEA) code ANSYS. In steady-state operation, the temperature sensitive swelling may lead to undesirable tensile stresses which is anticipated to challenge the structural integrity of the fission-gas retaining inner layer of CVD-SiC monolith in a triple layer design with the composite being the middle layer. The stress distribution is sensitive to potential differences in the swelling of the monolith from that of the composite layer. The sensitivity is discussed in this work. A double-layered SiC cladding that employs the inner SiCf /SiC composite layer, and the outer CVD-SiC layer has also been analyzed. This SiC cladding design significantly reduces failure probability as it appropriately allocates peak tensile stresses in the inner composite while significantly reducing tensile stress levels of the CVD-SiC monolith.

  2. Fuel cycle of the AVR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All the stages of development were secured by irradiation tests and by the use of the elements concerned in the AVR. Summarising, these were: The first charge with fuel elements from Union Carbide, with U-Th mixed carbide particles, wallpaper variants, U-Th mixed carbide particles, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed carbide particles, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed oxide particles, with an intermediate boundary layer; the present THTR element, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed oxide particles and low temperature PyC coating, the pressed fuel element with U-Th mixed oxide particles, with PyC and SiC layers, i.e.: TRISO particles, the pressed fuel element with pure uranium oxide particles for the low enrichment cycle, one coated only by 2 PyC layers, the other coated with PyC and SiC, i.e.: TRISO coating. (orig.)

  3. Sintered silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sintered silicon carbide body having a predominantly equiaxed microstructure consists of 91 to 99.85% by weight of silicon carbide at least 95% of which is the alpha phase, up to 5.0% by weight carbonized organic material, 0.15 to 3.0% of boron, and up to 1.0% by weight additional carbon. A mixture of 91 to 99.85 parts by weight silicon carbide having a surface area of 1 to 100 m2/g, 0.67 to 20 parts of a carbonizable organic binder with a carbon content of at least 33% by weight, 0.15 to 5 parts of a boron source containing 0.15 to 3.0 parts by weight boron and up to 15 parts by weight of a temporary binder is mixed with a solvent, the mixture is then dried, shaped to give a body with a density of at least 1.60 g/cc and fired at 1900 to 22500C to obtain an equiaxed microstructure. (author)

  4. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  5. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  6. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  7. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  8. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  9. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  10. Dependence of silicon carbide coating properties on deposition parameters: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain a layer of pyrolytic silicon carbide, which acts as a pressure vessel and provides containment of metallic fission products. The silicon carbide (SiC) is deposited by the thermal decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (CH3SiCl3 or MTS) in an excess of hydrogen. The purpose of the current study is to determine how the deposition variables affect the structure and properties of the SiC layer

  11. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  12. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  13. Transition under noise in the Sznajd model on square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2016-08-01

    In order to describe the formation of a consensus in human opinion dynamics, in this paper, we study the Sznajd model with probabilistic noise in two dimensions. The time evolution of this system is performed via Monte Carlo simulations. This social behavior model with noise presents a well defined second-order phase transition. For small enough noise q < 0.33 most agents end up sharing the same opinion.

  14. Direction Estimation Using Square Lattice and Cadastral Map Assembling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yusuke; Fei, Liu; Ohyama, Wataru; Wakabayashi, Tetsushi; Kimura, Fumitaka

    This paper proposes a technique for direction estimation by means of square grid points in order to improve the performance of cadastral map assembling technique based on Merlin-Farber (MF) algorithm. The MF algorithm requires direction normalization of the segments (of cadastral map) preceding the assembling. Proposed direction estimation technique is based on the spatial frequency analysis of autocorrelation by MF algorithm for the square grid points regularly drawn with constant intervals on the segments. Since many square grid points are drawn over entire area of the segments the direction can be estimated more accurately with those points when compared the direction is estimated with single north arrow. To assemble two adjacent segments the longest common boundary is detected by MF algorithm. Evaluation experiments are performed to compare the accuracy and the success rate of map assembling when the direction is estimated and normalized based on the square grid points and when estimated and normalized based on the north arrow. Total of 324 map segments of 47 district provided by Institut Geographique National France are used in the experiments. While the map assembling based on the north arrow tends to form inaccurate cadastral maps the proposed technique assembles the map more accurately. The results of experiments shows that the proposed technique achieves sufficient success rate and accuracy so that it effectively reduces the labor cost and time of the cadastral map assembling.

  15. Larkin-Ovchinnikov phases in two-dimensional square lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baarsma, J. E.; Törmä, P.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a two-component gas of fermions in optical lattices in the presence of a population imbalance within a mean-field theory. We study phase transitions from a normal gas of unpaired fermions to a superfluid phase of Bose-condensed Cooper pairs. The possibility of Cooper pairs with a nonzero centre-of-mass momentum is included, which corresponds to a so-called Fulde-Ferrel-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state. We find that for population-imbalanced systems such states can form the ground state. The FF and LO state are compared and it is shown that actually the LO state is energetically more favourable. We complete the mean-field phase diagram for the LO phase and show that it is qualitatively in excellent agreement with recent diagrammatic Monte Carlo calculations. Subsequently, we calculate the atomic density modulations in the LO phase.

  16. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  17. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation

  18. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, M., E-mail: Marialuisa.Gentile@manchester.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Xiao, P. [Materials Science Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Abram, T. [Centre for Nuclear Energy Technology (C-NET), School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC–5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd{sub 3}Si and SiO{sub 2} phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd{sub 2}Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO{sub 2} phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiC{sub x}O{sub y} phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  19. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, M.; Xiao, P.; Abram, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide reaction. Thermoscans of α-SiC pellets containing 5 at.%Pd show that during differential calorimetry scans three exothermic peaks occurred at 773 K, 1144 K and 1615 K, while thermoscans of β-SiC pellets containing 3 at.%Pd and 5 at.%Pd do not show peaks. For the pellet α-SiC-5 at.%Pd XRD spectra reveal that the first peak is associated with the formation of Pd3Si and SiO2 phases, while the second peak and the third peak are correlated with the formation of Pd2Si phase and the active oxidation of silicon carbide respectively. Thermogravimetry scans show weight gain and weight loss peaks due to the SiO2 phase formation and the active oxidation. Additionally XPS fittings reveal the development of SiCxOy phase during the first exothermic peak up to the temperature of 873 K. The experimental data reveals that alpha silicon carbide is attacked by palladium at lower temperatures than beta silicon carbide and the reaction mechanism between silicon carbide and palladium is strongly affected by silicon carbide oxidation.

  20. Thermal Conductivity of Uranium Nitride and Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Szpunar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the electronic thermal conductivity of alternative fuels like uranium nitride and uranium carbide. We evaluate the electronic contribution to the thermal conductivity, by combining first-principles quantum-mechanical calculations with semiclassical correlations. The electronic structure of UN and UC was calculated using Quantum Espresso code. The spin polarized calculations were performed for a ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic ordering of magnetic moments on uranium lattice and magnetic moment in UC was lower than in UN due to stronger hybridization between 2p electrons of carbon and 5f electrons of uranium. The nonmagnetic electronic structure calculations were used as an input to BolzTrap code that was used to evaluate the electronic thermal conductivity. It is predicted that the thermal conductivity should increase with the temperature increase, but to get a quantitative agreement with the experiment at higher temperatures the interaction of electrons with phonons (and electron-electron scattering needs to be included.

  1. Plutonium fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project is concerned with developing an advanced method to produce nuclear reactor fuels. Since 1968 EIR has worked successfully on the production of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide using wet gelation chemistry. An important part of the development is irradiating the fuel in materials test reactors and evaluating its performance. During 1979 the programme continued with principal activities of fuel fabrication development, preparation for irradiation testing, performance evaluation, and modelling and plant engineering. (Auth.)

  2. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  3. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu;

    Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting...

  4. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  5. Palladium interaction with silicon carbide

    OpenAIRE

    M. Gentile, P. Xiao, T. Abram

    2015-01-01

    In this work the palladium interaction with silicon carbide is investigated by means of complementary analytical techniques such as thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thermoscans were carried out on pellets of palladium, α-SiC and β-SiC high purity powders in the temperature range comprised between 293 K and 1773 K, in order to study the effect of temperature on the palladium-silicon carbide...

  6. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  7. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-14

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed. PMID:27609195

  8. Determination of thorium in plutonium-thorium oxides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorium is determined in (PuTh)C and (PuTh)O2 by complexometric titration with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) following separation on anion-exchange resin. Carbides are first oxidized by ignition in air at about 8000C. Oxide or oxidized carbide samples are dissolved in acids by the sealed-reflux technique or by heating in beakers. The plutonium is selectively sorbed from the 12M hydrochloric acid solution of the fuel on a Bio-Rad AG1-X2 anion-exchange resin column, and the eluted thorium is titrated with EDTA using xylenol orange as the indicator. The average recovery of thorium in 20 samples is 99.98% with a relative standard deviation of 0.07%

  9. Plutonium fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work of the project Fuel Development in 1976 was marked by three important developments. Firstly, the reproduceability of the process to produce sphere pac carbide fuel by a gelation process was established. Secondly, in the post irradiation examination of the fuel pins from the BR-2 reactor, the fuel reached approximately 5.5% FIMA without failure. Thirdly, outside interest in sphere pac material became more apparent. These developments are discussed, and plans to construct a fuel pilot plant to go into operation in the 1980's are revealed. (Auth.)

  10. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  11. Thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near-infrared range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I.; Lemberg, Vladimir F.

    2016-09-01

    The knowledge of thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of uranium and plutonium carbides under extreme conditions is essential for designing a new metallic fuel materials for next generation of a nuclear reactor. The present work is devoted to the study of the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at their melting/freezing temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and normal total emissivity are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range. It is shown that the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of uranium carbide have a slight difference during liquid-to-solid transition. Unlike UC, such a difference between these functions have not been established for plutonium carbide. The calculated values for the normal total emissivity of uranium and plutonium carbides at their melting temperatures is in good agreement with experimental data. The obtained results allow to calculate the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides for any size of samples. Based on the model of Hagen-Rubens and the Wiedemann-Franz law, a new method to determine the thermal conductivity of metals and carbides at the melting points is proposed.

  12. Testing Boron Carbide and Silicon Carbide under Triaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Charles; Chocron, Sidney; Nicholls, Arthur

    2011-06-01

    Boron Carbide (B4C) and silicon carbide (SiC-N) are extensively used as armor materials. The strength of these ceramics depends mainly on surface defects, hydrostatic pressure and strain rate. This article focuses on the pressure dependence and summarizes the characterization work conducted on intact and predamaged specimens by using compression under confinement in a pressure vessel and in a thick steel sleeve. The techniques used for the characterization will be described briefly. The failure curves obtained for the two materials will be presented, although the data are limited for SiC. The data will also be compared to experimental data from Wilkins (1969), and Meyer and Faber (1997). Additionally, the results will be compared with plate-impact data.

  13. Chemical compatibility of uranium carbides with Cr-Fe-Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the chemical compatibility of uranium carbides and Cr-Fe-Ni alloys, which has been evaluated by thermodynamic modeling and experimental phase studies. Two reaction temperatures, 973 and 1273 K, were used to simulate normal and overtemperature operation of advanced liquid-metal fast breeder reactor fuel-cladding couples. 27 refs

  14. [Calcium carbide of different crystal formation synthesized by calcium carbide residue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong-yuan; Kang, Ming; Jiang, Cai-rong; Tu, Ming-jing

    2006-04-01

    To recycle calcium carbide residue effectively, calcium carbide of different crystal form, including global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide was synthesized. Both the influence of pretreatment in the purity of calcium carbide, and the influence of temperatures of carbonization reaction, release velocity of carbon dioxide in the apparition of calcium carbide of different crystal form were studied with DTA-TG and SEM. The result shows that calcium carbide residue can take place chemistry reaction with ammonia chlorinate straight. Under the condition that pH was above 7, the purity of calcium carbide was above 97%, and the whiteness was above 98. Once provided the different temperatures of carbonization reaction and the proper release velocity of carbon dioxide, global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide were obtained.

  15. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  16. Thermally Sprayed Silicon Carbide Coating

    OpenAIRE

    Mubarok, Fahmi

    2014-01-01

    Thermal spraying of silicon carbide (SiC) material is a challenging task since SiC tends to decompose during elevated temperature atmospheric spraying process. The addition of metal or ceramic binders as a matrix phase is necessary to facilitate the bonding of SiC particles, allowing SiC coatings to be deposited. In the conventional procedure, the matrix phase is added through mechanical mixing or mechanical alloying of the powder constituents, making it difficult to achieve homogeneous distr...

  17. Investigations of the fabrication of spherical carbide containing uranium dioxide particles by the hydrolysis process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations to adapt the Hydrolysis Process for the fabrication of carbide containing uranium oxide kernels for advanced coated fuel particles are described. From five different carbon black varieties the best suitable carbon black is selected and a method developed to get a homogeneous dispersion of the carbon black in a surfactant-free solution with C/U atomic ratios between 0,38 and 1,5. The process steps degassing, reduction, presintering and carbothermic reduction of the spherical particles are investigated in detail for a reproducible fabrication of carbide containing uranium oxide kernels. Methodes are developed for a continuous control of the carbothermic reduction by measuring the CO release rate, for the graphical determination of the oxygen content in the carbide phase from measured C/U and O/U ratios and for determining the amount of carbide phase in the kernels by quantitative X-ray analysis. To explain the observed characteristics spherically symmetric carbide phase distribution in the kernels a possible mechanism is proposed. Finally, the fuel kernels are compared with kernels which were subjected to the same heat treatment program but prepared by other wet chemical fabrication processes. (orig.)

  18. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  19. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution.

  20. Method to manufacture tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The patent deals with an improved method of manufacturing tungsten carbide. An oxide is preferably used as initial product whose particle size and effective surface approximately corresponds to that of the endproduct. The known methods for preparing the oxide are briefly given. Carbon monoxide is passed over the thus obtained oxide particles whereby the reaction mixture is heated to a temperature at which tungsten oxide and carbon monoxide react and tungsten carbide is formed, however, below that temperature at which the tungsten-containing materials are caked or sintered together. According to the method the reaction temperature is about below 9000C. The tungsten carbide produced has a particle size of under approximately 100 A and an active surface of about 20 m2/g. It has sofar not been possible with the usual methods to obtain such finely divided material with such a large surface. These particles may be converted back to the oxide by heating in air at low temperature without changing particle size and effective surface. One thus obtains a tungsten oxide with smaller particle size and larger effective surface than the initial product. (IHOE)

  1. Fast breeder fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic elements of the ex-reactor part of the fuel cycle (reprocessing, fabrication, waste handling and transportation) are described. Possible technical and proliferation measures are evaluated, including current methods of accountability, surveillance and protection. The reference oxide based cycle and advanced cycles based on carbide and metallic fuels are considered utilizing conventional processes; advanced nonaqueous reprocessing is also considered. This contribution provides a comprehensive data base for evaluation of proliferation risks

  2. Bonding and Integration Technologies for Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding, titanium interlayers (PVD and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness (10, 20, and 50 microns), processing time and temperature, and cooling rates were investigated. Microprobe analysis was used to identify the phases in the bonded region. For bonds that were not fully reacted an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner titanium interlayers and/or longer processing times resulted in stable and compatible phases that did not contribute to microcracking and resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Non-destructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  3. Structural prediction for scandium carbide monolayer sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hong-Man; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Hui-Yan; Zhang, Dong-Bo; Liu, Ying

    2016-09-01

    A two-dimensional tetragonal scandium carbide monolayer sheet has been constructed and studied using density functional theory. The results show that the scandium carbide sheet is stable and exhibits a novel tetracoordinated quasiplanar structure, as favored by the hybridization between Sc-3d orbitals and C-2p orbitals. Calculations of the phonon dispersion as well as molecular dynamics simulations also demonstrate the structural stability of this scandium carbide monolayer sheet. Electronic properties show that the scandium carbide monolayer sheet is metallic and non-magnetic.

  4. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  5. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  6. Polytype distribution in circumstellar silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daulton, T L; Bernatowicz, T J; Lewis, R S; Messenger, S; Stadermann, F J; Amari, S

    2002-06-01

    The inferred crystallographic class of circumstellar silicon carbide based on astronomical infrared spectra is controversial. We have directly determined the polytype distribution of circumstellar SiC from transmission electron microscopy of presolar silicon carbide from the Murchison carbonaceous meteorite. Only two polytypes (of a possible several hundred) were observed: cubic 3C and hexagonal 2H silicon carbide and their intergrowths. We conclude that this structural simplicity is a direct consequence of the low pressures in circumstellar outflows and the corresponding low silicon carbide condensation temperatures. PMID:12052956

  7. In situ ion irradiation of zirconium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Christopher J.; Motta, Arthur T.; Kirk, Mark A.

    2015-11-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is a candidate material for use in one of the layers of TRISO coated fuel particles to be used in the Generation IV high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, and thus it is necessary to study the effects of radiation damage on its structure. The microstructural evolution of ZrCx under irradiation was studied in situ using the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM) at Argonne National Laboratory. Samples of nominal stoichiometries ZrC0.8 and ZrC0.9 were irradiated in situ using 1 MeV Kr2+ ions at various irradiation temperatures (T = 20 K-1073 K). In situ experiments made it possible to continuously follow the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation using diffraction contrast imaging. Images and diffraction patterns were systematically recorded at selected dose points. After a threshold dose during irradiations conducted at room temperature and below, black-dot defects were observed which accumulated until saturation. Once created, the defect clusters did not move or get destroyed during irradiation so that at the final dose the low temperature microstructure consisted only of a saturation density of small defect clusters. No long-range migration of the visible defects or dynamic defect creation and elimination were observed during irradiation, but some coarsening of the microstructure with the formation of dislocation loops was observed at higher temperatures. The irradiated microstructure was found to be only weakly dependent on the stoichiometry.

  8. Dispersion of boron carbide in a tungsten carbide/cobalt matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Particles of boron carbide (105-125 microns) were coated with a layer (10-12 microns) of titanium carbide in a fluidized bed. These coated particles have been successfully incorporated in a tungsten carbide--cobalt matrix by hot pressing at 1 tonf/in2, (15.44 MN/m2) at 13500C. Attempts to produce a similar material by a cold pressing and sintering technique were unsuccessful because of penetration of the titanium carbide layer by liquid cobalt. Hot-pressed material containing boron carbide had a static strength in bend of approximately 175,000 lbf/in2, (1206MN/m2) which compares favorably with the strength of conventionally produced tungsten carbide/cobalt. The impact strength of the material containing boron carbide was however considerably lower than tungsten carbide/cobalt. In rock drilling tests on Darley Dale sandstone at low speeds and low loads, the material containing boron carbide drilled almost ten times as far without seizure as tungsten carbide/cobalt. In higher speed and higher load rotary drilling tests conducted by the National Coal Board, the material containing boron carbide chipped badly compared with normal NCB hardgrade material

  9. Avaliação de quatro alternativas de análise de experimentos em látice quadrado, quanto à estimação de componentes de variância Evaluation of four alternatives of analysis of experiments in square lattice, with emphasis on estimate of variance component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HEYDER DINIZ SILVA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se, no presente trabalho, a eficiência das seguintes alternativas de análise de experimentos realizados em látice quanto à precisão na estimação de componentes de variância, através da simulação computacional de dados: i análise intrablocos do látice com tratamentos ajustados (primeira análise; ii análise do látice em blocos casualizados completos (segunda análise; iii análise intrablocos do látice com tratamentos não-ajustados (terceira análise; iv análise do látice como blocos casualizados completos, utilizando as médias ajustadas dos tratamentos, obtidas a partir da análise com recuperação da informação interblocos, tendo como quadrado médio do resíduo a variância efetiva média dessa análise do látice (quarta análise. Os resultados obtidos mostram que se deve utilizar o modelo de análise intrablocos de experimentos em látice para se estimarem componentes de variância sempre que a eficiência relativa do delineamento em látice, em relação ao delineamento em Blocos Completos Casualizados, for superior a 100% e, em caso contrário, deve-se optar pelo modelo de análise em Blocos Casualizados Completos. A quarta alternativa de análise não deve ser recomendada em qualquer das duas situações.The efficiency of fur alternatives of analysis of experiments in square lattice, related to the estimation of variance components, was studied through computational simulation of data: i intrablock analysis of the lattice with adjusted treatments (first analysis; ii lattices analysis as a randomized complete blocks design (second analysis; iii; intrablock analysis of the lattice with non-adjusted treatments (third analysis; iv lattice analysis as a randomized complete blocks design, using the adjusted means of treatments, obtained through the analysis of lattice with recuperation of interblocks information, having as the residual mean square, the average effective variance of this same lattice analysis

  10. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  11. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This techn

  12. Particle fuel bed tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-cooled reactors, using packed beds of small diameter coated fuel particles have been proposed for compact, high-power systems. The particulate fuel used in the tests was 800 microns in diameter, consisting of a thoria kernel coated with 200 microns of pyrocarbon. Typically, the bed of fuel particles was contained in a ceramic cylinder with porous metallic frits at each end. A dc voltage was applied to the metallic frits and the resulting electric current heated the bed. Heat was removed by passing coolant (helium or hydrogen) through the bed. Candidate frit materials, rhenium, nickel, zirconium carbide, and zirconium oxide were unaffected, while tungsten and tungsten-rhenium lost weight and strength. Zirconium-carbide particles were tested at 2000 K in H2 for 12 hours with no visible reaction or weight loss

  13. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.;

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... example of a cationic terminal carbide complex, [RuC(Cl)(CH3CN)(PCy3)2]+, is described and characterized by NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and computational studies. The experimentally observed irregular variation of the carbide 13C chemical shift is shown to be accurately reproduced by DFT, which also...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...

  14. Thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of solid and liquid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range

    CERN Document Server

    Fisenko, Anatoliy I

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of uranium and plutonium carbides under extreme conditions is essential for designing a new metallic fuel materials for next generation of a nuclear reactor. The present work is devoted to the study of the thermal radiative and thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides at their melting/freezing temperatures. The Stefan-Boltzmann law, total energy density, number density of photons, Helmholtz free energy density, internal energy density, enthalpy density, entropy density, heat capacity at constant volume, pressure, and normal total emissivity are calculated using experimental data for the frequency dependence of the normal spectral emissivity of liquid and solid uranium and plutonium carbides in the visible-near infrared range. It is shown that the thermal radiative and thermodynamic functions of uranium carbide have a slight difference during liquid-to-solid transition. Unlike UC, such a difference between these ...

  15. Nitrogen-doped Graphene-Supported Transition-metals Carbide Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Minghua; Liu, Jilei; Zhou, Weijiang; Lin, Jianyi; Shen, Zexiang

    2015-05-01

    A novel and facile two-step strategy has been designed to prepare high performance bi-transition-metals (Fe- and Mo-) carbide supported on nitrogen-doped graphene (FeMo-NG) as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR). The as-synthesized FeMo carbide -NG catalysts exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activities for ORR in alkaline solution, with high onset potential (-0.09 V vs. saturated KCl Ag/AgCl), nearly four electron transfer number (nearly 4) and high kinetic-limiting current density (up to 3.5 mA cm-2 at -0.8 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Furthermore, FeMo carbide -NG composites show good cycle stability and much better toxicity tolerance durability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst, paving their application in high-performance fuel cell and lithium-air batteries.

  16. An investigation on gamma attenuation behaviour of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buyuk, Bulent; Beril Tugrul, A.

    2014-04-01

    In this study, titanium diboride (TiB2) reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were investigated against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. The composite materials include 70% boron carbide (B4C) and 30% silicon carbide (SiC) by volume. Titanium diboride was reinforced to boron carbide-silicon carbide composites as additive 2% and 4% by volume. Average particle sizes were 3.851 µm and 170 nm for titanium diboride which were reinforced to the boron carbide silicon carbide composites. In the experiments the gamma transmission technique was used to investigate the gamma attenuation properties of the composite materials. Linear and mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were determined. Theoretical mass attenuation coefficients were calculated from XCOM computer code. The experimental results and theoretical results were compared and evaluated with each other. It could be said that increasing the titanium diboride ratio causes higher linear attenuation values against Cs-137 and Co-60 gamma radioisotope sources. In addition decreasing the titanium diboride particle size also increases the linear and mass attenuation properties of the titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites.

  17. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis of xonotlite from carbide slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Cao; Fei Liu; Qian Lin; Yu Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Carbide slag was used as the calcareous materials for the first time to prepare xonotlite via dynamic hydrothermal synthesis.The effects of influential factors including different calcination temperatures,pretreatment methods of the carbide slag and process param-eters of hydrothermal synthesis on the microstructure and morphology of xonotlite were explored using XRD and SEM techniques.The results indicate that the carbide slag after proper calcination could be used to prepare pure xonotlite;and different calcination tern-peratures have little effect on the crystallinity of synthesized xonotlitc,but have great impact on the morphology of secondary particles.The different pretreatment methods of the carbide slag pose great impact on the crystallinity and morphology of secondary particles of xonotlite.Xonotlite was also synthesized from pure CaO under the salne experimental conditions as that prepared from calcined carbide slag for comparison.Little amount of impurities in carbide slag has no effect on the mechanism of hydrothermal synthesizing xonotlite from carbide slag.

  19. Precipitating Mechanism of Carbide in Cold-Welding Surfacing Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin ZHANG; Dengyi REN

    2004-01-01

    Carbides in a series of cold-welding weld metals were studied by means of SEM, TEM and EPMA, and the forming mechanism of carbide was proposed according to their distribution and morphology. Due to their different carbide-forming tendency, Nb and Ti could combine with C to form particulate carbide in liquid weld metal and depleted the carbon content in matrix, while V induced the carbide precipitated along grain boundary. But too much Nb or Ti alone resulted in coarse carbide and poor strengthened matrix. When suitable amount of Nb, Ti and V coexisted in weld metal, both uniformly distributed particulate carbide and well strengthened matrix could be achieved. It was proposed that the carbide nucleated on the oxide which dispersed in liquid weld metal, and then grew into multi-layer complex carbide particles by epitaxial growth. At different sites, carbide particles may present as different morphologies.

  20. Thermal-hydraulics and neutronics studies on the FP7 CP-ESFR oxide and carbide cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the the Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP-ESFR) two core designs that are currently being proposed for the 3600 MWth sodium-cooled reactor concept: one is based on oxide fuel and the other on carbide fuel. Using the European Safety Assessment Platform (ESAP), JRC-IE has conducted static calculation on neutronics (incl. reactivity coefficients) and thermal-hydraulic characteristics for both oxide and carbide reference cores. The quantities evaluated include: keff, coolant heat-up, void, and Doppler reactivity coefficients, axial and radial expansion reactivity coefficients, pin-by-pin calculated power profiles, average and peak channel temperatures. This paper presents the ESAP models applied in the study together with the relevant results for the oxide and carbide core. (author)

  1. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  2. Structural diversity in lithium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yangzheng; Strobel, Timothy A.; Cohen, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    The lithium-carbon binary system possesses a broad range of chemical compounds, which exhibit fascinating chemical bonding characteristics, which give rise to diverse and technologically important properties. While lithium carbides with various compositions have been studied or suggested previously, the crystal structures of these compounds are far from well understood. In this work, we present the first comprehensive survey of all ground state (GS) structures of lithium carbides over a broad range of thermodynamic conditions, using ab initio density functional theory (DFT) crystal structure searching methods. Thorough searches were performed for 29 stoichiometries ranging from Li12C to LiC12 at 0 and 40 GPa. Based on formation enthalpies from optimized van der Waals density functional calculations, three thermodynamically stable phases (Li4C3 , Li2C2 , and LiC12) were identified at 0 GPa, and seven thermodynamically stable phases (Li8C , Li6C , Li4C , Li8C3 , Li2C , Li3C4 , and Li2C3 ) were predicted at 40 GPa. A rich diversity of carbon bonding, including monomers, dimers, trimers, nanoribbons, sheets, and frameworks, was found within these structures, and the dimensionality of carbon connectivity existing within each phase increases with increasing carbon concentration. We find that the well-known composition LiC6 is actually a metastable one. We also find a unique coexistence of carbon monomers and dimers within the predicted thermodynamically stable phase Li8C3 , and different widths of carbon nanoribbons coexist in a metastable phase of Li2C2 (Imm2). Interesting mixed sp2-sp3 carbon frameworks are predicted in metastable phases with composition LiC6.

  3. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  4. Electroextraction of boron from boron carbide scrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Ashish [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Anthonysamy, S., E-mail: sas@igcar.gov.in [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ghosh, C. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Ravindran, T.R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India); Divakar, R.; Mohandas, E. [Physical Metallurgy Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603102 (India)

    2013-10-15

    Studies were carried out to extract elemental boron from boron carbide scrap. The physicochemical nature of boron obtained through this process was examined by characterizing its chemical purity, specific surface area, size distribution of particles and X-ray crystallite size. The microstructural characteristics of the extracted boron powder were analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Raman spectroscopic examination of boron powder was also carried out to determine its crystalline form. Oxygen and carbon were found to be the major impurities in boron. Boron powder of purity ∼ 92 wt. % could be produced by the electroextraction process developed in this study. Optimized method could be used for the recovery of enriched boron ({sup 10}B > 20 at. %) from boron carbide scrap generated during the production of boron carbide. - Highlights: • Recovery of {sup 10}B from nuclear grade boron carbide scrap • Development of process flow sheet • Physicochemical characterization of electroextracted boron • Microscopic examination of electroextracted boron.

  5. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 oC. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  6. High temperature thermoelectric properties of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron carbides are refractory solids with potential for application as very high temperature p-type thermoelectrics in power conversion applications. The thermoelectric properties of boron carbides are unconventional. In particular, the electrical conductivity is consistent with the thermally activated hopping of a high density (∼1021/cm3) of bipolarons; the Seebeck coefficient is anomalously large and increases with increasing temperature; and the thermal conductivity is surprisingly low. In this paper, these unusual properties and their relationship to the unusual structure and bonding present in boron carbides are reviewed. Finally, the potential for utilization of boron carbides at very high temperatures (up to 2200 degrees C) and for preparing n-type materials is discussed

  7. Calcium carbide poisoning via food in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Per, Hüseyin; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Yağmur, Fatih; Gümüş, Hakan; Kumandaş, Sefer; Poyrazoğlu, M Hakan

    2007-02-01

    The fast ripening of fruits means they may contain various harmful properties. A commonly used agent in the ripening process is calcium carbide, a material most commonly used for welding purposes. Calcium carbide treatment of food is extremely hazardous because it contains traces of arsenic and phosphorous. Once dissolved in water, the carbide produces acetylene gas. Acetylene gas may affect the neurological system by inducing prolonged hypoxia. The findings are headache, dizziness, mood disturbances, sleepiness, mental confusion, memory loss, cerebral edema and seizures. We report the case of a previously healthy 5 year-old girl with no chronic disease history who was transferred to our Emergency Department with an 8-h history of coma and delirium. A careful history from her father revealed that the patient ate unripe dates treated with calcium carbide.

  8. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nb1-xTaxC Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; Tc correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  10. Boron carbide neutron screen for GRR-1 neutron spectrum tailoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of fast neutron spectra in new reactor concepts (such as Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, new generation Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor, Lead Fast Reactor, Accelerator Driven System and nuclear Fusion Reactors) is expected to induce a strong impact on the contained materials, including structural materials (e.g. steels), nuclear fuels, neutron reflecting materials (e.g. beryllium) and tritium breeding materials (for fusion reactors). Therefore, effective operation of these reactors will require extensive testing of their components, which must be performed under neutronic conditions representative of those expected to prevail inside the reactor cores when in operation. Depending on the material, the requirements of a test irradiation can vary. In this work preliminary studies were performed to observe the behavior of the neutron spectrum within a boron carbide neutron screen inserted in a hypothetical reflector test hole of the Greek Research Reactor. Four different screen configurations were simulated with Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4. The obtained data showed that the insertion of boron carbide caused not only elimination of the thermal (E < 1 eV) component of the neutron energy spectrum but also absorption of a considerable proportion of the intermediate energy neutrons (1x10-6 MeV < E < 1 MeV). (author)

  11. Hydrogen adsorption in metal-decorated silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ram Sevak; Solanki, Ankit

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen storage for fuel cell is an active area of research and appropriate materials with excellent hydrogen adsorption properties are highly demanded. Nanotubes, having high surface to volume ratio, are promising storage materials for hydrogen. Recently, silicon carbide nanotubes have been predicted as potential materials for future hydrogen storage application, and studies in this area are ongoing. Here, we report a systematic study on hydrogen adsorption properties in metal (Pt, Ni and Al) decorated silicon carbide nanotubes (SiCNTs) using first principles calculations based on density functional theory. The hydrogen adsorption properties are investigated by calculations of adsorption energy, electronic band structure, density of states (DOS) and Mulliken charge population analysis. Our findings show that hydrogen adsorptions on Pt, Ni and Al-decorated SiCNTs undergo spontaneous exothermic reactions with significant modulation of electronic structure of SiCNTs in all cases. Importantly, according to the Mulliken charge population analysis, dipole-dipole interaction causes chemisorptions of hydrogen in Pt, Ni and Al decorated SiCNTs with formation of chemical bonds. The study is a platform for the development of metal decorated SiCNTs for hydrogen adsorption or hydrogen storage application.

  12. Influence of Rare Earth on Carbide in Weld Metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yuan-Bin; REN Deng-Yi

    2003-01-01

    The influence of rare earths (RE) on carbides in high carbon steel weld metal was studied by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). It is found that rare earth markedly affects the quantity, morphology and distribution of carbides. The precipitating mechanism of carbides was proposed in which rare earth compounds with high surface energy serve as the nucleation sites for carbides in superheated liquid metal and the induced carbides are precipitated extensively and distributed evenly. The preferential precipitation of carbides decreases the carbon content in matrix, which is transformed into low carbon lath martensite after welds are chilled to room temperature.

  13. Fuel-cladding chemical interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemistry of the nuclear fuel is very complex. Its chemical composition changes with time due to the formation of fission products and depends on the temperature level history within the fuel pellet and the clad during operation. Firstly, in thermal reactors, zircaloy oxidation from reaction with UO2 fuel under high-temperature conditions will be addressed. Then other fuel-cladding interaction phenomena occurring in fast reactors will be described. Large thermal gradients existing between the centre and the periphery of the pellet induce the radial redistribution of the fuel constituents. The fuel pellet can react with the clad by different corrosion processes which can involve actinide and/or fission product transport via gas, liquid or/and solid phases. All these phenomena are briefly described in the case of different kinds of fuels (oxide, carbide, nitride, metallic) to be used in fast reactors. The way these phenomena are taken into account in fuel performance codes is presented. (authors)

  14. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Daroca, D.; Jaroszewicz, S.; Llois, A. M.; Mosca, H. O.

    2014-11-01

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors' knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  15. First-principles study of point defects in thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas, (1033) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. General Paz 1499, (1650) San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-11-15

    Thorium-based materials are currently being investigated in relation with their potential utilization in Generation-IV reactors as nuclear fuels. One of the most important issues to be studied is their behavior under irradiation. A first approach to this goal is the study of point defects. By means of first-principles calculations within the framework of density functional theory, we study the stability and formation energies of vacancies, interstitials and Frenkel pairs in thorium carbide. We find that C isolated vacancies are the most likely defects, while C interstitials are energetically favored as compared to Th ones. These kind of results for ThC, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been obtained previously, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. For this reason, we compare with results on other compounds with the same NaCl-type structure.

  16. Damages induced by heavy ions in titanium silicon carbide: Effects of nuclear and electronic interactions at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappe, J.C. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, SPIN/PMMC, LPMG UMR CNRS 5148, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France)], E-mail: nappe@emse.fr; Grosseau, Ph. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, SPIN/PMMC, LPMG UMR CNRS 5148, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France); Audubert, F. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA/LTEC, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Guilhot, B. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, Centre CIS, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France); Beauvy, M. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA/LTEC, Cadarache, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Benabdesselam, M. [Universite de Nice - Sophia Antipolis, LPMC UMR CNRS 6622, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France); Monnet, I. [GANIL/CIMAP/CIRIL, bd. Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen cedex 5 (France)

    2009-03-31

    Thanks to their refractoriness, carbides are sensed as fuel coating for the IVth generation of reactors. Among those studied, the Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} ternary compound can be distinguished for its noteworthy mechanical properties: the nanolamellar structure imparts to this material some softness as well as better toughness than other classical carbides such as SiC or TiC. However, under irradiation, its behaviour is still unknown. In order to understand this behaviour, specimens were irradiated with heavy ions of different energies, then characterised. The choice of energies used allowed separation of the effects of nuclear interactions from those of electronic ones.

  17. Advanced fuels for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In addition to traditional fast reactor fuels that contain Uranium and Plutonium, the advanced fast reactor fuels are likely to include the minor actinides [Neptunium (Np), Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm)]. Such fuels are also referred to as transmutation fuels. The goal of transmutation fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a traditional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. Oxide, metal, nitride, and carbide fuels are candidates under consideration for this application, based on historical knowledge of fast reactor fuel development and specific fuel tests currently being conducted in international transmutation fuel development programs. Early fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high density and potential for breeder operation. The focus of pressurized water reactor development on oxide fuel and the subsequent adoption by the commercial nuclear power industry, however, along with early issues with low burnup potential of metal fuel (now resolved), led later fast reactor development programs to favor oxide fuels. Carbide and nitride fuels have also been investigated but are at a much lower state of development than metal and oxide fuels, with limited large scale reactor irradiation experience. Experience with both metal and oxide fuels has established that either fuel type will meet performance and reliability goals for a plutonium fueled fast spectrum test reactor, both demonstrating burnup capability of up to 20 at.% under normal operating conditions, when clad with modified austenitic or ferritic martensitic stainless steel alloys. Both metal and oxide fuels have been shown to exhibit sufficient margin to failure under transient conditions for successful reactor operation. Summary of selected fuel material properties taken are provided in the paper. The main challenge for the development of transmutation fast reactor

  18. Modeling of point defects and rare gas incorporation in uranium mono-carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, A.; Van Brutzel, L.

    2007-02-01

    An embedded atom method (EAM) potential has been established for uranium mono-carbide. This EAM potential was fitted on structural properties of metallic uranium and uranium mono-carbide. The formation energies of point defects, as well as activation energies for self migration, have been evaluated in order to cross-check the suitability of the potential. Assuming that the carbon vacancies are the main defects in uranium mono-carbide compounds, the migration paths and energies are consistent with experimental data selected by Catlow[C.R.A. Catlow, J. Nucl. Mater. 60 (1976) 151]. The insertion and migration energies for He, Kr and Xe have also been evaluated with available inter-atomic potentials [H.H. Andersen, P. Sigmund, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. B 38 (1965) 238]. Results show that the most stable defect configuration for rare gases is within uranium vacancies. The migration energy of an interstitial Xe is 0.5 eV, in agreement with the experimental value of 0.5 eV [Hj. Matzke, Science of advanced LMFBR fuels, Solid State Physics, Chemistry and Technology of Carbides, Nitrides and Carbonitrides of Uranium and Plutonium, North-Holland, 1986].

  19. CALPHAD study of cubic carbide systems with Cr

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhangting

    2015-01-01

    Cubic carbides (titanium, tantalum, niobium, and zirconium carbides) can constitute a significant proportion of so-called cubic and cermet grades, where it is added to substitute a portion of tungsten carbide. It is thus critical to understand and be able to thermodynamically model the cubic carbide systems. In order to do this, the thermodynamic descriptions of lower order systems, such as the Ti-Cr-C system, need to be well studied. To approach this goal, an extensive literature survey of t...

  20. Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2010-02-23

    Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  1. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  2. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  3. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  4. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  5. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  6. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallance, Simon R. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Round, David M. [School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Cussen, Edmund J. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kingman, Sam [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H. [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-26

    Nb{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}C Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; T{sub c} correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  8. Ultra-rapid processing of refractory carbides; 20 s synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Simon R; Kingman, Sam; Gregory, Duncan H

    2007-02-21

    The microwave synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo(2)C, from carbon and either molybdenum metal or the trioxide has been achieved on unprecedented timescales; Ex- and in-situ characterisation reveals key information as to how the reaction proceeds.

  9. Synthesis and properties of low-carbon boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the production of boron carbides of low carbon content (3 and CCl4 at 1273-1673 K in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactor. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that phase separation had occurred, and tetragonal boron carbide was formed along with β-boron or α-boron carbide under carbon-depleted gas-phase conditions. At temperatures greater than 1390 degrees C, graphite substrates served as a carbon source, affecting the phases present. A microstructure typical of CVD-produced α-boron carbide was observed. Plan view TEM of tetragonal boron carbide revealed a blocklike structure

  10. Boron carbide morphology changing under purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmatullin, I. A.; Sivkov, A. A.

    2015-10-01

    Boron carbide synthesized by using coaxial magnetoplasma accelerator with graphite electrodes was purified by two different ways. XRD-investigations showed content changing and respectively powder purification. Moreover TEM-investigations demonstrated morphology changing of product under purification that was discussed in the work.

  11. Ceramic Fabric Coated With Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Smith, M.; Goldstein, H.; Zimmerman, N.

    1988-01-01

    Material used as high-temperature shell. Ceramic fabric coated with silicon carbide (SiC) serves as tough, heat-resistant covering for other refractory materials. Developed to protect reusable insulating tiles on advanced space transportation systems. New covering makes protective glaze unnecessary. Used on furnace bricks or on insulation for engines.

  12. Direct plasmadynamic synthesis of ultradisperse silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivkov, A. A.; Nikitin, D. S.; Pak, A. Ya.; Rakhmatullin, I. A.

    2013-01-01

    Ultradisperse cubic silicon carbide (β-SiC) has been obtained by direct plasmadynamic synthesis in pulsed supersonic carbon-silicon plasma jet incident on a copper obstacle in argon atmosphere. The powdered product has a high content of β-SiC in the form of single crystals with average size of about 100 nm and nearly perfect crystallographic habit.

  13. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of fr

  14. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-01-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold-coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was mea

  15. High-temperature carbidization of carboniferous rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldin, B. A.; Grass, V. E.; Nadutkin, A. V.; Nazarova, L. Yu.

    2009-08-01

    Processes of thermal metamorphism of carboniferous rocks have been studied experimentally. The conditions of high-temperature interaction of shungite carbon with components of the contained rocks, leading to formation of carbide compounds, have been determined. The results of this investigation contribute to the works on searching for new raw material for prospective material production.

  16. Bioactivation of biomorphous silicon carbide bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Julia; Hoppe, Alexander; Müller, Frank A; Raya, Carmen T; Fernández, Julián M; Greil, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Wood-derived silicon carbide (SiC) offers a specific biomorphous microstructure similar to the cellular pore microstructure of bone. Compared with bioactive ceramics such as calcium phosphate, however, silicon carbide is considered not to induce spontaneous interface bonding to living bone. Bioactivation by chemical treatment of biomorphous silicon carbide was investigated in order to accelerate osseointegration and improve bone bonding ability. Biomorphous SiC was processed from sipo (Entrandrophragma utile) wood by heating in an inert atmosphere and infiltrating the resulting carbon replica with liquid silicon melt at 1450°C. After removing excess silicon by leaching in HF/HNO₃ the biomorphous preform consisted of β-SiC with a small amount (approximately 6wt.%) of unreacted carbon. The preform was again leached in HCl/HNO₃ and finally exposed to CaCl₂ solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared analyses proved that oxidation of the residual carbon at the surface induced formation of carboxyl [COO⁻] groups, which triggered adsorption of Ca(2+), as confirmed by XPS and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy measurements. A local increase in Ca(2+) concentration stimulated in vitro precipitation of Ca₅(PO₄)₃OH (HAP) on the silicon carbide preform surface during exposure to simulated body fluid, which indicates a significantly increased bone bonding activity compared with SiC.

  17. Structural changes induced by heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappe, J.C., E-mail: jc.nappe@yahoo.fr [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, SPIN/PMMC, LPMG UMR CNRS 5148, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France); Monnet, I. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen cedex 5 (France); Grosseau, Ph. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, SPIN/PMMC, LPMG UMR CNRS 5148, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France); Audubert, F. [CEA, DEN, DEC/SPUA/LTEC, Cadarache, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Guilhot, B. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS/B2M, 158 cours Fauriel, 42023 Saint-Etienne cedex 2 (France); Beauvy, M. [CIMAP, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN-Universite de Caen Basse Normandie, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen cedex 5 (France); Benabdesselam, M. [Universite de Nice - Sophia Antipolis, LPMC UMR CNRS 6622, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice cedex 2 (France); Thome, L. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, CNRS-IN2P3-Universite Paris Sud, UMR 8609, Bat. 108, 91405 Orsay (France)

    2011-02-01

    Carbide-type ceramics, which have remarkable thermomechanical properties, are sensed to manufacture the fuel cladding of Generation IV reactors that should work at high temperature. The MAX phases, and more particularly titanium silicon carbide, are distinguished from other materials by their ability to have some plasticity, even at room temperature. For this study, polycrystalline Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} was irradiated with ions of different energies, which allow to discriminate the effect of both electronic and nuclear interactions. After characterization by low-incidence X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, it appears that Ti{sub 3}SiC{sub 2} is not sensitive to electronic excitations while nuclear shocks damage its structure. The results show the creation of many defects and disorder in the structure, an expansion of the hexagonal close-packed lattice along the c axis, and an increase in the microstrain yield.

  18. Structural changes induced by heavy ion irradiation in titanium silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappé, J. C.; Monnet, I.; Grosseau, Ph.; Audubert, F.; Guilhot, B.; Beauvy, M.; Benabdesselam, M.; Thomé, L.

    2011-02-01

    Carbide-type ceramics, which have remarkable thermomechanical properties, are sensed to manufacture the fuel cladding of Generation IV reactors that should work at high temperature. The MAX phases, and more particularly titanium silicon carbide, are distinguished from other materials by their ability to have some plasticity, even at room temperature. For this study, polycrystalline Ti 3SiC 2 was irradiated with ions of different energies, which allow to discriminate the effect of both electronic and nuclear interactions. After characterization by low-incidence X-ray diffraction and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, it appears that Ti 3SiC 2 is not sensitive to electronic excitations while nuclear shocks damage its structure. The results show the creation of many defects and disorder in the structure, an expansion of the hexagonal close-packed lattice along the c axis, and an increase in the microstrain yield.

  19. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    Nonprecious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction are the ultimate materials and the foremost subject for low‐temperature fuel cells. A novel type of catalysts prepared by high‐pressure pyrolysis is reported. The catalyst is featured by hollow spherical morphologies consisting of...... uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). As...... a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  20. Qualification of pebble fuel for HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, Karl [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; Allelein, Hans-Josef [Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany). IEK-6; RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Reaktorsicherheit und -technik (LRST)

    2016-05-15

    The German HTGR fuel development program for the HTR-Modul concept has resulted in a reference design based on LEU UO2 TRISO coated particle fuel in a spherical fuel element. The coated particles consist of minute uranium particle kernels coated with layers of carbon and silicon carbide. Analyses on quality of as-manufactured fuel, its behavior under HTR-Modul relevant operating and accident conditions have demonstrated excellent performance. Coated particles can withstand high internal gas pressure without releasing their fission products to the environment. International efforts are on-going for further improvement of coated particle fuel to meet the needs of future generation-IV HTR concepts.

  1. Interim development report: engineering-scale HTGR fuel particle crusher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the reprocessing of HTGR fuel, a double-roll crusher is used to fracture the silicon carbide coatings on the fuel particles. This report describes the development of the roll crusher used for crushing Fort-St.Vrain type fissile and fertile fuel particles, and large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (LHTGR) fissile fuel particles. Recommendations are made for design improvements and further testing

  2. The post irradiation examination of two instrumented (UPu)C sphere-pac fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the Post Irradiation Examination of two mixed carbide fuel pins irradiated in the SAPHIR reactor at Wuerenlingen to approximately 6000 MWd/t (fuel) are reported. Fuel for the experiment was hyperstoichiometric mixed carbide microspheres with a maximum oxygen content of approximately 0.5%. No fuel sintering or restructuring occurred with peak fuel centre temperatures up to approximately 1200 0C at ratings approximately 400 W.cm-1. Under these conditions, no cladding carburisation occurred with inner cladding temperatures up to approximately 600 0C. (Auth.)

  3. Matrix member for containing fuel cell acid electrolyte

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A matrix member for carrying the acid electrolyte of a fuel cell comprised of a first layer containing a carbon material and a second layer containing a silicon carbide material. A further matrix member is disclosed wherein the mean pore size of the member is substantially equal to or less than that mean pore size of at least one of the fuel cell electrodes

  4. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  5. METHOD OF MAKING FUEL BODIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeddel, W.V.; Simnad, M.T.

    1963-04-30

    This patent relates to a method of making a fuel compact having a matrix of carbon or graphite which carries the carbides of fissile material. A nuclear fuel material selected from the group including uranium and thorium carbides, silicides, and oxides is first mixed both with sufficient finely divided carbon to constitute a matrix in the final product and with a diffusional bonding material selected from the class consisting of zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, titanium, nickel, chromium, and silicon. The mixture is then heated at a temperature of 1500 to 1800 nif- C while maintaining it under a pressure of over about 2,000 pounds per square inch. Preferably, heating is accomplished by the electrical resistance of the compact itself. (AEC)

  6. Interim design report: fuel particle crushing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double-roll fuel particle crusher was developed to fracture the silicon carbide coatings of Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fertile and fissile and large high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (LHTGR) fissile fuel particles. The report details the design task for the fuel particle crusher, including historical test information on double-roll crushers for carbide-coated fuels and the design approach selected for the cold pilot plant crusher, and shows how the design addresses the equipment goals and operational objectives. Design calculations and considerations are included to support the selection of crusher drive and gearing, the materials chosen for crushing rolls and housing, and the bearing selection. The results of the initial testing for compliance with design objectives and operational capabilities are also presented. 8 figures, 4 tables

  7. Probing Field Emission from Boron Carbide Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ji-Fa; GAO Hong-Jun; BAO Li-Hong; WANG Xing-Jun; HUI Chao; LIU Fei; LI Chen; SHEN Cheng-Min; WANG Zong-Li; GU Chang-Zhi

    2008-01-01

    High density boron carbide nanowires are grown by an improved carbon thermal reduction technique. Transmission electron microscopy and electron energy lose spectroscopy of the sample show that the synthesized nanowires are B4 C with good crystallization. The field emission measurement for an individual boron nanowire is performed by using a Pt tip installed in the focused ion beam system. A field emission current with enhancement factor of 106 is observed and the evolution process during emission is also carefully studied. Furthermore, a two-step field emission with stable emission current density is found from the high-density nanowire film. Our results together suggest that boron carbide nanowires are promising candidates for electron emission nanodevices.

  8. Behavior of disordered boron carbide under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanchini, Giovanni; McCauley, James W; Chhowalla, Manish

    2006-07-21

    Gibbs free-energy calculations based on density functional theory have been used to determine the possible source of failure of boron carbide just above the Hugoniot elastic limit (HEL). A range of B4C polytypes is found to be stable at room pressure. The energetic barrier for shock amorphization of boron carbide is by far the lowest for the B12(CCC) polytype, requiring only 6 GPa approximately = P(HEL) for collapse under hydrostatic conditions. The results clearly demonstrate that the collapse of the B12(CCC) phase leads to segregation of B12 and amorphous carbon in the form of 2-3 nm bands along the (113) lattice direction, in excellent agreement with recent transmission electron microscopy results.

  9. Hadfield steels with Nb and Ti carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hadfield Steels and the mechanisms responsible for its high strain hardening rate were reviewed. Addition of carbide forming alloying elements to the base compostion was discussed, using the matrix sttel concept. Three experimental crusher jaws were cast, with Nb and Nb + Ti added to the usual Hadfiedl compostion, with enough excess carbon to allow the formation of MC carbides. Samples for metallographic analysis were prepared from both as cast and worn out castings. The carbic morphology was described. Partition of alloying elements was qualitatively studied, using Energy Dispersive Espectroscopy in SEM. The structure of the deformed layer near the worn surface was studied by optical metalography and microhardness measurements. The results showed that fatigue cracking is one of the wear mechanisms is operation in association with the ciclic work hardening of the surface of worn crusher jaws. (Author)

  10. An improved method of preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of preparing silicon carbide is described which comprises forming a desired shape from a polysilane of the average formula:[(CH3)2Si][CH3Si]. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent (CH3)2Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent CH3Si units. The remaining bonds on the silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a halogen atom in such manner that the average ratio of halogen to silicon in the polysilane is from 0.3:1 to 1:1. The polysilane has a melt viscosity at 1500C of from 0.005 to 500 Pa.s and an intrinsic viscosity in toluene of from 0.0001 to 0.1. The shaped polysilane is heated in an inert atmosphere or in a vacuum to an elevated temperature until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. (author)

  11. Electron-Spin Resonance in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Charles; Venturini, Eugene L.; Azevedo, Larry J.; Emin, David

    1987-01-01

    Samples exhibit Curie-law behavior in temperature range of 2 to 100 K. Technical paper presents studies of electron-spin resonance of samples of hot pressed B9 C, B15 C2, B13 C2, and B4 C. Boron carbide ceramics are refractory solids with high melting temperatures, low thermal conductives, and extreme hardnesses. They show promise as semiconductors at high temperatures and have unusually large figures of merit for use in thermoelectric generators.

  12. Magnetism of hydrogen-irradiated silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spin-polarized density functional theory is used to study two-hydrogen defect complexes in silicon carbide. We find that the magnetism depends on the distances of the two hydrogen atoms. Magnetism appears when the two hydrogen defects are distant from each other, and magnetism cancels out if they are close to each other. The critical distance between the two hydrogen defects is determined.

  13. Interaction of energetic tritium with silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the physical and chemical interactions of energetic hydrogen isotope species with silicon carbide, recoil tritium from the 3He(n,p)T reaction has been allowed to react with K-T silicon carbide and silicon carbide powder. The results show that if the silicon carbide has been degassed and annealed at 14000C prior to tritium bombardment, a considerable fraction of the tritium (ca. 40%) is released as HTO from the SiC upon heating to 13500C under vacuum conditions. Most of the remaining tritium is retained in SiC, e.g., the retention of the tritium in the K-T SiC was found to be 62 and 22% upon heating to 600 and 13500C, respectively. This is in direct contrast to graphite samples in which the tritium is not released to any significant extent even when heated to 13500C. Samples which were exposed to H2O and H2 prior to tritium bombardment were heated to 6000C after the irradiation. The results obtained indicate that a total of 38.7 and 2.49% of the tritium is released in the form of HT and CH3T in the case of H2 or H2O exposure, respectively. Treatment of degassed samples after tritium bombardment with H2O and H2 at temperatures up to 10000C leads to the release of up to 44.9% of the tritium as HT and CH3T. 42 references, 2 figures, 2 tables

  14. Diamond-silicon carbide composite and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2011-06-14

    Uniformly dense, diamond-silicon carbide composites having high hardness, high fracture toughness, and high thermal stability are prepared by consolidating a powder mixture of diamond and amorphous silicon. A composite made at 5 GPa/1673K had a measured fracture toughness of 12 MPam.sup.1/2. By contrast, liquid infiltration of silicon into diamond powder at 5 GPa/1673K produces a composite with higher hardness but lower fracture toughness.

  15. Fast reactor parameter optimization taking into account changes in fuel charge type during reactor operation time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formulation and solution of optimization problem for parameters determining the layout of the central part of sodium cooled power reactor taking into account possible changes in fuel charge type during reactor operation time are performed. The losses under change of fuel composition type for two reactor modifications providing for minimum doubling time for oxide and carbide fuels respectively, are estimated

  16. Cutting Performance and Mechanism of RE Carbide Tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The research of rare earth elements (RE), added into cemented carbide tools, is one of the recent developments of new types of tool materials in China. Systematic experiments about RE carbides YG8R (K30), YT14R (P20) and YW1R (M10) were made to study on the cutting performance in comparison with non-RE carbides YG8, YT14 and YW1. The cutting experiments were as follows: tool life, cutting force, tool-chip friction coefficient and interrupted machining. The action of RE on the carbide materials and the cutting mechanism of the RE carbide tools in the cutting process were verified with the aid of SEM and energy spectrum analysis. Experimental results show that the RE carbide tools have a good overall performance.

  17. Nonlinear optical imaging of defects in cubic silicon carbide epilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristu, Radu; Stanciu, Stefan G; Tranca, Denis E; Matei, Alecs; Stanciu, George A

    2014-06-11

    Silicon carbide is one of the most promising materials for power electronic devices capable of operating at extreme conditions. The widespread application of silicon carbide power devices is however limited by the presence of structural defects in silicon carbide epilayers. Our experiment demonstrates that optical second harmonic generation imaging represents a viable solution for characterizing structural defects such as stacking faults, dislocations and double positioning boundaries in cubic silicon carbide layers. X-ray diffraction and optical second harmonic rotational anisotropy were used to confirm the growth of the cubic polytype, atomic force microscopy was used to support the identification of silicon carbide defects based on their distinct shape, while second harmonic generation microscopy revealed the detailed structure of the defects. Our results show that this fast and noninvasive investigation method can identify defects which appear during the crystal growth and can be used to certify areas within the silicon carbide epilayer that have optimal quality.

  18. Doping of silicon carbide by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It appeared that in some fields, as the hostile environments (high temperature or irradiation), the silicon compounds showed limitations resulting from the electrical and mechanical properties. Doping of 4H and 6H silicon carbide by ion implantation is studied from a physicochemical and electrical point of view. It is necessary to obtain n-type and p-type material to realize high power and/or high frequency devices, such as MESFETs and Schottky diodes. First, physical and electrical properties of silicon carbide are presented and the interest of developing a process technology on this material is emphasised. Then, physical characteristics of ion implantation and particularly classical dopant implantation, such as nitrogen, for n-type doping, and aluminium and boron, for p-type doping are described. Results with these dopants are presented and analysed. Optimal conditions are extracted from these experiences so as to obtain a good crystal quality and a surface state allowing device fabrication. Electrical conduction is then described in the 4H and 6H-SiC polytypes. Freezing of free carriers and scattering processes are described. Electrical measurements are carried out using Hall effect on Van der Panw test patterns, and 4 point probe method are used to draw the type of the material, free carrier concentrations, resistivity and mobility of the implanted doped layers. These results are commented and compared to the theoretical analysis. The influence of the technological process on electrical conduction is studied in view of fabricating implanted silicon carbide devices. (author)

  19. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  20. Characterization of boron carbide with an electron microprobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matteudi, G.; Ruste, J.

    1983-01-01

    Within the framework of a study of heterogeneous materials (Matteudi et al., 1971: Matteudi and Verchery, 1972) thin deposits of boron carbide were characterized. Experiments using an electronic probe microanalyzer to analyze solid boron carbide or boron carbide in the form of thick deposits are described. Quantitative results on boron and carbon are very close to those obtained when applying the Monte Carlo-type correction calculations.

  1. Microstructural and Mechanical characterization of WC-Co cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Zakia, Rizki

    2013-01-01

    WC-Co cemented carbides are ceramic-metal composite materials made of carbides embedded in a metal phase that acts as a binder. They exhibit an exceptional combination of strength, toughness and wear resistance as a result of the extremely different properties of their two constitutive phases. Consequently, cemented carbides have been positioned as suitable options when selecting materials for tribomechanical applications, and their implementation continues to gain a place in t...

  2. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    OpenAIRE

    J. Suchoń; A. Studnicki; M. Przybył

    2010-01-01

    In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C), ferroniobium (FeNb) and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE). The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  3. Delivering carbide ligands to sulfide-rich clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Anders; Herbst, Konrad; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-02-01

    The propensity of the terminal ruthenium carbide Ru(C)Cl2(PCy3)2 (RuC) to form carbide bridges to electron-rich transition metals enables synthetic routes to metal clusters with coexisting carbide and sulfide ligands. Electrochemical experiments show the Ru≡C ligand to exert a relatively large electron-withdrawing effect compared with PPh3, effectively shifting redox potentials.

  4. Sintering of nano crystalline silicon carbide by doping with boron carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M S Datta; A K Bandyopadhyay; B Chaudhuri

    2002-06-01

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together with carbon of 1 wt% at 2050°C at vacuum (3 mbar) for 15 min. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. This study shows that the mechanism is a solid-state sintering process. Polytype transformation from 6H to 4H was observed.

  5. Tungsten carbide platelet-containing cemented carbide with yttrium containing dispersed phase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; CHEN Shu; WANG Yuan-jie; YU Xian-wang; XIONG Xiang-jun

    2008-01-01

    A fine and platelet tungsten carbide patterned structure with fine yttrium containing dispersed phase was observed in liquid phase sintered WC-20%Co-1%Y2O3 cemented carbide with ultrafine tungsten carbide and nano yttrium oxide as starting materials. By comparing the microstructures of the alloy prepared by hot-press at the temperature below the eutectic melting temperature and by conventional liquid phase sintering, it is shown that hexagonal and truncated trigonal plate-like WC grains are formed through the mechanism of dissolution-precipitation (recrystallization) at the stage of liquid phase sintering. Yttrium in the addition form of oxide exhibits good ability in inhibiting the discontinuous or inhomogeneous WC grain growth in the alloy at the stage of solid phase sintering.

  6. Silicon carbide sintered body manufactured from silicon carbide powder containing boron, silicon and carbonaceous additive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hidehiko

    1987-01-01

    A silicon carbide powder of a 5-micron grain size is mixed with 0.15 to 0.60 wt% mixture of a boron compound, i.e., boric acid, boron carbide (B4C), silicon boride (SiB4 or SiB6), aluminum boride, etc., and an aluminum compound, i.e., aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum hydroxide, aluminum carbide, etc., or aluminum boride (AlB2) alone, in such a proportion that the boron/aluminum atomic ratio in the sintered body becomes 0.05 to 0.25 wt% and 0.05 to 0.40 wt%, respectively, together with a carbonaceous additive to supply enough carbon to convert oxygen accompanying raw materials and additives into carbon monoxide.

  7. Electrochemical behaviour and surface conductivity of niobium carbide-modified austenitic stainless steel bipolar plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixia; Sun, Juncai; Kang, Bin; Li, Song; Ji, Shijun; Wen, Zhongsheng; Wang, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    A niobium carbide diffusion layer with a cubic NbC phase surface layer (∼6 μm) and a Nb and C diffusion subsurface layer (∼1 μm) is fabricated on the surface of AISI 304 stainless steel (304 SS) bipolar plate in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) using plasma surface diffusion alloying. The electrochemical behaviour of the niobium carbide diffusion-modified 304 SS (Nb-C 304 SS) is investigated in simulated PEMFC environments (0.5 M H2SO4 and 2 ppm HF solution at 80 °C). Potentiodynamic, potentiostatic polarisation and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that the niobium carbide diffusion layer considerably improves the corrosion resistance of 304 SS compared with untreated samples. The corrosion current density of Nb-C 304 SS is maintained at 0.058 μA cm-2 and 0.051 μA cm-2 under simulated anodic and cathodic conditions, respectively. The interfacial contact resistance of Nb-C 304 SS is 8.47 mΩ cm2 at a compaction force of 140 N cm-2, which is significantly lower than that of the untreated sample (100.98 mΩ cm2). Moreover, only a minor increase in the ICR of Nb-C 304 SS occurs after 10 h potentiostatic tests in both cathodic and anodic environments.

  8. Evolution of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel is the primary energy source for sustaining the nuclear fission chain reactions in a reactor. The fuels in the reactor cores are exposed to highly aggressive environment and varieties of advanced fuel materials with improved nuclear properties are continuously being developed to have optimum performance in the existing core conditions. Fabrications of varieties of nuclear fuels used in diverse forms of reactors are mainly based on two naturally occurring nuclear source elements, uranium as fissile 235U and fertile 238U, and thorium as fertile 232Th species. The two metals in the forms of alloys with specific elements, ceramic oxides like MOX and ceramic non-oxide as mixed carbide and nitride with suitable nuclear properties like higher metal density, thermal conductivity, etc. are used as fuels in different reactor designs. In addition, efficiency of various advanced fuels in the forms of dispersion, molten salt and other types are also under investigations. The countries which have large deposits of thorium but limited reserves of uranium, are trying to give special impetus on the development of thorium-based fuels for both thermal and fast reactors in harnessing nuclear energy for peaceful uses of atomic energy. (author)

  9. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  10. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  11. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  12. In Situ Synthesis of Uranium Carbide and its High Temperature Cubic Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiche, Helmut Matthias [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vogel, Sven C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-25

    New in situ data for the U-C system are presented, with the goal of improving knowledge of the phase diagram to enable production of new ceramic fuels. The none quenchable, cubic, δ-phase, which in turn is fundamental to computational methods, was identified. Rich datasets of the formation synthesis of uranium carbide yield kinetics data which allow the benchmarking of modeling, thermodynamic parameters etc. The order-disorder transition (carbon sublattice melting) was observed due to equal sensitivity of neutrons to both elements. This dynamic has not been accurately described in some recent simulation-based publications.

  13. Molybdenum carbide as a highly selective deoxygenation catalyst for converting furfural to 2-methylfuran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Lee, Wen-Sheng; Bhan, Aditya; Chen, Jingguang G

    2014-08-01

    Selectively cleaving the C=O bond outside the furan ring of furfural is crucial for converting this important biomass-derived molecule to value-added fuels such as 2-methylfuran. In this work, a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, surface science studies, and reactor evaluation identified molybdenum carbide (Mo2 C) as a highly selective deoxygenation catalyst for converting furfural to 2-methylfuran. These results indicate the potential application of Mo2 C as an efficient catalyst for the selective deoxygenation of biomass-derived oxygenates including furanics and aromatics.

  14. Silicon carbide thin films as nuclear ceramics grown by laser ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipescu, M., E-mail: morarm@nipne.ro [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 16, RO 77125, Magurele - Bucharest (Romania); Velisa, G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.BOX MG-6, Bucharest - Magurele (Romania); Ion, V.; Andrei, A. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 16, RO 77125, Magurele - Bucharest (Romania); Scintee, N.; Ionescu, P. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.BOX MG-6, Bucharest - Magurele (Romania); Stanciu, S.G. [Center for Microscopy- Microanalysis and Information Processing, University ' POLITEHNICA' of Bucharest, Bucharest (Romania); Pantelica, D. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O.BOX MG-6, Bucharest - Magurele (Romania); Dinescu, M. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, P.O. Box MG 16, RO 77125, Magurele - Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-09-01

    Silicon carbide has been identified as a potential inert matrix candidate for advanced fuel. In this work, the growth of SiC thin films by pulsed laser deposition is reported. The stoicheometry and thickness of deposited films was investigated by non-Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The influence of the deposition parameters, i.e. substrate temperature and laser fluence on the structure, morphology and optical properties of the deposited thin layers was studied. It was found that polycrystalline SiC thin films with uniform surface morphology were obtained at 873 K.

  15. Part 3. Status of LMFBR fuels and materials development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of development of the candidate LMFBR fuel type oxide, carbide and metal, cladding/duct alloys, and absorber material is reviewed. The three-fuel types are discussed for the reference breeder cycle, transmuter cycle, denatured cycle, and blanket fuel applications. The preferred design concepts for each fuel type are identified, with discussion of the more significant factors that control burnup and thermal performance for each design and fuel type. The key technical issues for each fuel and material are reviewed and the required effort to resolve the key issues is identified

  16. Investigation on Interface Structure and Wear-resistant Properties of HVOF Sprayed Carbides Coating onto Copper Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Li-feng; ZHANG Heng-jin; WEI Ying-hui; YAN Kai; HU Lan-qing; XU Bing-she

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we deposited carbides on copper substrate by High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying. The structure of the coating and microstructure of the substrate-coating interface have been investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We observed the worn surface of the coating and investigated the wear mechanism. The results show that the microstructure of the interface between HVOF sprayed coating and substrate which consists of the amorphous layers, nanocrystalls in the coating and dislocation cells in copper substrate,etc. is complex. The amorphous layers are formed from heated adhesion after rapidly cooling, while the nanocrystalls come from the fragmentation of half-molten carbides. At the same time we found that the wear-resistant properties of the WC-Co coating is better than that of Cr3C2-NiCr coating at room temperature. The early wear-resistance of the HVOF sprayed coating is poor because of the roughness of its surface or bad bond of hard composite particles. The high velocity of molten droplets is propitious to fill up the interspaces between carbides, so as to make the coating more compact and reduce its porosities, thus the wear-resistance of carbides coatings is improved.

  17. Investigation on Interface Structure and Wear-resistant Properties of HVOF Sprayed Carbides Coating onto Copper Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOULi-feng; ZHANGHeng-jin; WEIYing-hui; YANKai; HULan-qing; XUBing-she

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we deposited carbides on copper substrate by High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying. The structure of the coating and microstructure of the substrate-coating interface have been investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We observed the worn surface of the coating and investigated the wear mechanism. The results show that the microstructure of the interface between HVOF sprayed coating and substrate which consists of the amorphous layers, nanocrystalls in the coating and dislocation cells in copper substrate, etc. is complex. The amorphous layers are formed from heated adhesion after rapidly cooling, while the nanocrystalls come from the fragmentation of half-molten carbides. At the same time we found that the wear-resistant properties of the WC-Co coating is better than that of Cr3C2-NiCr coating at room temperature. The early wear-resistance of the HVOF sprayed coating is poor because of the roughness of its surface or bad bond of hard composite particles. The high velocity of molten droplets is propitious to fill up the interspaces between carbides, so as to make the coating more compact and reduce its porosities, thus the wear-resistance of carbides coatings is improved.

  18. Structural evolution of zirconium carbide under ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosset, D.; Dollé, M.; Simeone, D.; Baldinozzi, G.; Thomé, L.

    2008-02-01

    Zirconium carbide is one of the candidate materials to be used for some fuel components of the high temperature nuclear reactors planned in the frame of the Gen-IV project. Few data exist regarding its behaviour under irradiation. We have irradiated ZrC samples at room temperature with slow heavy ions (4 MeV Au, fluence from 10 11 to 5 × 10 15 cm -2) in order to simulate neutron irradiations. Grazing incidence X-Ray diffraction (GIXRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis have been performed in order to study the microstructural evolution of the material versus ion fluence. A high sensitivity to oxidation is observed with the formation of zirconia precipitates during the ion irradiations. Three damage stages are observed. At low fluence (high micro-strains appear together with small faulted dislocation loops. At the highest fluence (>10 14 cm -2), the micro-strains saturate and the loops coalesce to form a dense dislocation network. No other structural modification is observed. The material shows a moderate cell parameter increase, corresponding to a 0.6 vol.% swelling, which saturates around 10 14 ions/cm 2, i.e., a few Zr dpa. As a result, in spite of a strong covalent bonding component, ZrC seems to have a behaviour under irradiation close to cubic metals.

  19. Further Studies on Uranium Carbide at the JEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest of JEN (Junta de Energia Nuclear) in uranium monocarbide derives chiefly from its use as a fuel for heavy-water-moderated organic-cooled reactors. Uranium carbide is produced either from uranium metal for small quantities - a few kilograms per day - or from UO2 for ton quantities. In the metallic uranium process, uranium turnings are first reduced to finely divided powder by hydriding and decomposing in vacuum the UH3. This powder is then mixed with graphite powder, pressed into pellets and either sintered or fed directly to the arc melting furnace. One melting is enough to give a uniform UC slug. Reduction of UO2 with carbon is the process followed for bulk production of UC as feed material for the arc melting furnaces. The main problem is the reproducibility of the carbon content. The influence of the characteristics of the UO2 powders, mixing, pressing, and the sintering.cycle are discussed. UC bodies are prepared by arc melting and casting UC feed stock. Equipment used for this process is described. Some of the problems related with the method are discussed. A reference is also made to the problems involved in the handling and storage of UC and its relation with the gas content in the case of sintered UC. (author)

  20. Fluidized bed dip coated silicon carbide on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) coatings hold great promise in high temperature applications by virtue of their excellent physical and chemical properties. They are produced by techniques ranging from chemical vapor deposition to reaction bonding by melt infiltration. Reaction bonded SiC finds importance in nuclear applications as high temperature, thermally conducting coatings with good abrasion resistance. Additionally, they also possess the ability to withstand high neutron fluence, and thereby find importance as a protective layer in the graphite fuel tubes used in the compact high temperature reactor. The current work explores the deposition of SiC on graphite cylinders by dip-coating a heated graphite rod in a fluidized bed of silicon. The solid state reaction of silicon and carbon under vacuum/inert atmosphere and elevated temperatures is explored. A novel idea of immersing a heated graphite sample in a bed of fluidized silicon powder is presented. The graphite sample is heated to 1450-1550 deg C prior to dipping in the fluidized bed of silicon. The technique presents advantages of quick heating and lower deposition times, and reasonably uniform coatings. Importantly, the setup does not require effluent treatment nor does it involve the use of corrosive precursors leading to higher operational safety as opposed to other vapor deposition methods. The method is well adapted for three-dimensional surfaces as well. Initial experimental results are presented along with the design details of the perforated distributor plate for the coating unit, and the feasibility of the technique is explored. (author)

  1. The diffusion of cesium, strontium, and europium in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwaraknath, S. S.; Was, G. S.

    2016-08-01

    A novel multi-layer diffusion couple was used to isolate the diffusion of strontium, europium and cesium in SiC without introducing radiation damage to SiC and at concentrations below the solubility limit for the fission products in SiC. Diffusion occurred by both bulk and grain boundary pathways for all three fission products between 900∘ C and 1 ,300∘ C. Cesium was the fastest diffuser below 1 ,100∘ C and the slowest above this temperature. Strontium and europium diffusion tracked very closely as a function of temperature for both bulk and grain boundary diffusion. Migration energies ranged from 1.0 eV to 5.7 eV for bulk diffusion and between 2.2 eV and 4.7 eV for grain boundary diffusion. These constitute the first measurements of diffusion of cesium, europium, and strontium in silicon carbide, and the magnitude of the cesium diffusion coefficient supports the premise that high quality TRISO fuel should have minimal cesium release.

  2. Critically coupled surface phonon-polariton excitation in silicon carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner, Burton; Korobkin, Dmitriy; Fietz, Chris; Carole, Davy; Ferro, Gabriel; Shvets, Gennady

    2009-09-01

    We observe critical coupling to surface phonon-polaritons in silicon carbide by attenuated total reflection of mid-IR radiation. Reflectance measurements demonstrate critical coupling by a double scan of wavelength and incidence angle. Critical coupling occurs when prism coupling loss is equal to losses in silicon carbide and the substrate, resulting in maximal electric field enhancement. PMID:19724526

  3. Preparation and Electrocatalytic Activity of Tungsten Carbide Nanorod Arrays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High density tungsten carbide nanorod arrays have been prepared by magnetron sputtering (MS) using the aluminum lattice membrane (ALM) as template. Electrocatalytic properties of nitromethane electroreduction on the tungsten carbide nanorod arrays electrode were investigated by electrochemical method, and their electrocatalytic activity is approached to that of the Pt foil electrode.

  4. Silicon Carbide Tiles for Sidewall Lining in Aluminium Electrolysis Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RUANBo; ZHAOJunguo; 等

    1999-01-01

    The paper introduces the nitride bonded silicon carbide used for sidewall lining in aluminium eletrolysis cells ,including technical process,main properties and application results.Comparison tests on various physical properties of silicon carbide products made by LIRR and other producers worldwide have also been conducted in an independent laboratory.

  5. Mechanical properties of Silicon Carbide Nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhateeb, Abdullah; Zhang, Daqing; McIlroy, David; Aston, David Eric

    2004-05-01

    Silicon carbide nanowires could be potentially useful for high strength materials which lead to the interest in understanding their mechanical properties. In this report we use the digital pulse force microscopy to analyze the mechanical properties of SiC nanowires .Stiffness and adhesion images of SiC nanowires on silicon grating were obtained and calibrated force-distance curves were plotted along the wire which spans on a 1.5 micron trench. Moreover, spring constant and Young's modules have been calculated from the linear part of the force-distance curves.

  6. Novel Polymer Nanocomposite With Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona I. Wozniak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyimides are ranked among the most heat-resistant polymers and are widely used in high temperature plastics, adhesives, dielectrics, photoresistors, nonlinear optical materials, membrane materials for gasseparation, and Langmuir–Blodgett (LB films, among others. While there is a variety of high temperature stable polyimides, there is a growing demand for utilizing these materials at higher temperatures in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Therefore, we sought to use oxidation-resistant materials to enhance properties of the polyimide composition maintaining polyimide weights and processing advantages. In this paper we introduced results of utilizing inorganic nanostructured silicon carbide particles to produce an inorganic particle filled polyimide materials.

  7. An improved method for preparing silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A desired shape is formed from a polysilane and the shape is heated in an inert atmosphere or under vacuum to 1150 to 16000C until the polysilane is converted to silicon carbide. The polysilane contains from 0 to 60 mole percent of (CH3)2Si units and from 40 to 100 mole percent of CH3Si units. The remaining bonds on silicon are attached to another silicon atom or to a chlorine or bromine atom, such that the polysilane contains from 10 to 43 weight percent of hydrolyzable chlorine or from 21 to 63 weight percent of hydrolyzable bromine. (author)

  8. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Mandal; A Seal; S K Dalui; A K Dey; S Ghatak; A K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-04-01

    The present work deals with the sintering of SiC with a low melting additive by microwave technique. The mechanical characteristics of the products were compared with that of conventionally sintered products. The failure stress of the microwave sintered products, in biaxial flexure, was superior to that of the products made by conventional sintering route in ambient condition. In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  9. Synthesis and photoluminescence property of boron carbide nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Li-Hong; Li Chen; Tian Yuan; Tian Ji-Fa; Hui Chao; Wang Xing-Jun; Shen Cheng-Min; Gao Hong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    Large scale, high density boron carbide nanowires have been synthesized by using an improved carbothermal reduction method with B/B2O3/C powder precursors under an argon flow at 1100~C. The boron carbide nanowires are 5-10 μm in length and 80-100 nm in diameter. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) characterizations show that the boron carbide nanowire has a B4C rhombohedral structure with good crystallization. The Raman spectrum of the as-grown boron carbide nanowires is consistent with that of a B4C structure consisting of B11C icosahedra and C-B-C chains. The room temperature photoluminescence spectrum of the boron carbide nanowires exhibits a visible range of emission centred at 638 nm.

  10. Deep HDS on doped molybdenum carbides. From probe molecules to real feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, Patrick; Manoli, Jean-Marie; Potvin, Claude; Djega-Mariadassou, Gerald [Laboratoire Reactivite de Surface, CNRS UMR 7609, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, Case 178, Tour 54-55, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2005-10-30

    Deep HDS on phosphorus and nickel-alumina-supported molybdenum oxycarbides was studied, first, with probe molecules then with real feedstocks. Catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, CO chemisorption, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and infrared spectroscopy. Propene and tetralin hydrogenation were used to probe the activity of the doped materials. Hydrodesulfurization of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene was investigated as a probe for the deep HDS of diesel fuel. For contact times ranging from 0 to 0.4s, the HDS of 4,6-DMDBT is zeroth-order with respect to the reactant and proceeds via two parallel routes, direct desulfurization and hydrogenation pathways, the former being preponderant. Phosphorus and nickel modify the catalytic behaviour and induce the highest HDS activity. Deep hydrodesulphurization (HDS) of diesel fuels was carried out on promoted or non-promoted Mo{sub 2}C-supported {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and on bulk Mo{sub 2}C under standard industrial conditions. The effect of the promoter was investigated for different feedstocks on HDS and hydrogenation (HDA) with very low levels of sulfur. The HDS conversion indicated that P-doped alumina supported carbide catalysts were as active as a commercial Co-Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for low level of sulfur in the feed. Furthermore, the refractory compounds, such as 4,6-DMDBT were only transformed on molybdenum carbide catalyst under industrial conditions for hydrotreated gas oils. For feeds containing less than 50wt.ppm in sulfur, P-doped carbides were more active than commercial catalysts for HDA, as well as deep HDS or HDN.

  11. Silicon Carbide High-Temperature Power Rectifiers Fabricated and Characterized

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) for use in harsh conditions where silicon, the semiconductor used in nearly all of today's electronics, cannot function. Silicon carbide's demonstrated ability to function under extreme high-temperature, high power, and/or high-radiation conditions will enable significant improvements to a far ranging variety of applications and systems. These improvements range from improved high-voltage switching for energy savings in public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, to more powerful microwave electronics for radar and cellular communications, to sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. In the case of jet engines, uncooled operation of 300 to 600 C SiC power actuator electronics mounted in key high-temperature areas would greatly enhance system performance and reliability. Because silicon cannot function at these elevated temperatures, the semiconductor device circuit components must be made of SiC. Lewis' HTIES group recently fabricated and characterized high-temperature SiC rectifier diodes whose record-breaking characteristics represent significant progress toward the realization of advanced high-temperature actuator control circuits. The first figure illustrates the 600 C probe-testing of a Lewis SiC pn-junction rectifier diode sitting on top of a glowing red-hot heating element. The second figure shows the current-versus voltage rectifying characteristics recorded at 600 C. At this high temperature, the diodes were able to "turn-on" to conduct 4 A of current when forward biased, and yet block the flow of current ($quot;turn-off") when reverse biases as high as 150 V were applied. This device represents a new record for semiconductor device operation, in that no previous semiconductor electronic device has ever simultaneously demonstrated 600 C functionality

  12. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  13. Modification of σ-Donor Properties of Terminal Carbide Ligands Investigated Through Carbide-Iodine Adduct Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholdt, Anders; Vosch, Tom; Bendix, Jesper

    2016-09-26

    The terminal carbide ligands in [(Cy3 P)2 X2 Ru≡C] complexes (X=halide or pseudohalide) coordinate molecular iodine, affording charge-transfer complexes rather than oxidation products. Crystallographic and vibrational spectroscopic data show the perturbations of iodine to vary with the auxiliary ligand sphere on ruthenium, demonstrating the σ-donor properties of carbide complexes to be tunable.

  14. Irradiation-induced effects of proton irradiation on zirconium carbides with different stoichiometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Huang; B.R. Maier; T.R. Allen

    2014-10-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in deep burn TRISO fuel particles for hightemperature, gas-cooled reactors. Zirconium carbide has a cubic B1 type crystal structure along with a very high melting point (3420 ?C), exceptional hardness and good thermal and electrical conductivities. Understanding the ZrC irradiation response is crucial for establishing ZrC as an alternative component in TRISO fuel. Until now, very few studies on irradiation effects on ZrC have been released and fundamental aspects of defect evolution and kinetics are not well understood although some atomistic simulations and phenomenological studies have been performed. This work was carried out to understand the damage evolution in float-zone refined ZrC with different stoichiometries. Proton irradiations at 800 ?C up to doses of 3 dpa were performed on ZrCx (where x ranges from 0.9 to 1.2) to investigate the damage evolution. The irradiation-induced defects, such as density of dislocation loops, at different stoichiometries and doses which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented and discussed.

  15. External costs of silicon carbide fusion power plants compared to other advanced generation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechon, Y. E-mail: yolanda.lechon@ciemat.es; Cabal, H.; Saez, R.M.; Hallberg, B.; Aquilonius, K.; Schneider, T.; Lepicard, S.; Ward, D.; Hamacher, T.; Korhonen, R

    2003-09-01

    This study was performed in the framework of the Socio-Economic Research on Fusion (SERF3), which is jointly conducted by Euratom and the fusion associations. Assessments of monetarized external impacts of the fusion fuel-cycle were previously performed (SERF1 and SERF2). Three different power plant designs were studied, with the main difference being the structural materials and cooling system used. In this third phase of the SERF project the external costs of three additional fusion power plant models using silicon carbide as structural material have been analysed. A comparison with other advanced generation technologies expected to be in use around 2050, when the first fusion power plant would be operative, has also been performed. These technologies include advanced fossil technologies, such as Natural Gas Combined Cycle, Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion and Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle with carbon sequestration technologies; fuel cells and renewable technologies including geothermal energy, wind energy and photovoltaic systems with energy storage devices. Fusion power plants using silicon carbide as structural material have higher efficiencies than plants using steel and this fact has a very positive effect on the external costs per kW h. These external costs are in the lowest range of the external costs of advanced generation technologies indicating the outstanding environmental performance of fusion power.

  16. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  17. Radiation Damage Effects in Uranium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the results of research into the irradiation behaviour of cast uranium carbide following that reported in another paper by Childs et al. The main conclusions are as follows: 1. The saturation resistivity and lattice parameter increases for hypostoichiometric specimens irradiated at 80oC vary systematically with the excess concentration of uranium present in solution in the UC phase. 2. The temperature coefficient of resistivity (measured over the range 77 - 293oK), unlike the resistivity itself, is not significantly affected by irradiation. 3. A small resistivity annealing stage, additional to those at 150 and 510oC, occurs between 1000 and 1200oC. The annealing-out of the lattice parameter change also occurs in two main stages at 150 and 510oC (5-h anneals). A careful survey of the range 400 - 800oC has failed to reveal the stage postulated by other workers to occur at about 710oC. The significance of the results in determining the defect structure of irradiated uranium carbide is discussed. (author)

  18. Sol–gel processing of carbidic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Manocha; E Yasuda; Y Tanabe; S Manocha; D Vashistha

    2000-02-01

    Carbon incorporation into the silicate network results in the formation of rigid carbidic glasses with improved physical, mechanical and thermal properties. This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. In the present studies, sol–gel processing has been used to prepare silicon based glasses, especially oxycarbides through organic–inorganic hybrid gels by hydrolysis–condensation reactions in silicon alkoxides, 1,4-butanediol and furfuryl alcohol with an aim to introduce Si–C linkages in the precursors at sol level. The incorporation of these linkages has been studied using IR and NMR spectroscopy. These bonds, so introduced, are maintained throughout the processing, especially during pyrolysis to high temperatures. In FFA–TEOS system, copolymerization with optimized mol ratio of the two results in resinous mass. This precursor on pyrolysis to 1000°C results in Si–O–C type amorphous solid black mass. XRD studies on the materials heated to 1400°C exhibit presence of crystalline Si–C and cristobalites in amorphous Si–O–C mass. In organic–inorganic gel system, the pyrolysed mass exhibits phase stability up to much higher temperatures. The carbidic materials so produced have been found to exhibit good resistance against oxidation at 1000°C.

  19. Pressureless sintering of beta silicon carbide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Green blended compounds made of SiC nano-sized powder, a fugitive binder and a sintering agent (boron carbide, B4C), have been prepared. The binder is removed at low temperature (e.g. 800 degrees C) and the pressureless sintering studied between 1900 and 2100 degrees C. The nearly theoretical density (98% relative density) was obtained after 30 min at 2100 degrees C. The structural and microstructural evolutions during the heat treatment were characterised. The high temperatures needed for the sintering result in the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation which is revealed by the change of the composite microstructure. From 1900 degrees C, dense samples are composed of β-SiC grains surrounding α-SiC platelets in a well-defined orientation. TEM investigations and calculation of the activation energy of the sintering provided insight to the densification mechanism. (authors)

  20. ELECTROCHEMICAL MACHINING OF CARBIDES AND BORIDES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dissaux, Bernard Antoine; Muller, Rolf H.; Tobias, Charles W.

    1978-07-01

    The use of high rate anodic dissolution (electrochemical machining) for shaping titanium carbide, zirconium carbide, titanium boride and zirconium boride has been investigated in 2N potassium nitrate and 3N sodium chloride under current densities ranging from 20 to 120 A/cm{sup 2} (corresponding to cutting rates of 0.3 to 1.8 mm/min). The dissolution stoichiometry for all these materials is independent of the current density in the range 20 to 120 A/cm{sup 2}. Both titanium and zirconium appear to dissolve in the +4 state, boron in the +3 state and the weight loss measurements indicate that carbon is oxidized to CO and CO{sub 2}. The current voltage curves permit to establish that, over the entire current density and flow range investigated, dissolution occurs in the transpassive state. The surface roughness obtained on TiC and ZrC is within 3-5 {micro}m and is independent of current density, applied voltage or flow rate.

  1. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  2. Production process for boron carbide coated carbon material and boron carbide coated carbon material obtained by the production process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A boron carbide coated carbon material is used for a plasma facing material of a thermonuclear reactor. The surface of a carbon material is chemically reacted with boron oxide to convert it into boron carbide. Then, it is subjected to heat treatment at a temperature of not lower than 1600degC in highly evacuated or inactive atmosphere to attain a boron carbide coated carbon material. The carbon material used is an artificial graphite or a carbon fiber reinforced carbon composite material. In the heat treatment, when the atmosphere is in vacuum, it is highly evacuated to less than 10Pa. Alternatively, in a case of inactive atmosphere, argon or helium gas each having oxygen and nitrogen content of not more than 20ppm is used. With such procedures, there can be obtained a boron carbide-coated carbon material with low content of oxygen and nitrogen impurities contained in the boron carbide coating membrane thereby hardly releasing gases. (I.N.)

  3. Characterisation of TRISO fuel particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez H, E. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Carretera Saltillo-Monterrey Km 13.5, 25900 Ramos Arizpe, Coahuila (Mexico); Yang, D., E-mail: eddie.lopez@cinvestav.edu.mx [The Academy of Armoured Forces Engineering, Science and Technology on Remanufacturing Laboratory, 100072 Beijing (China)

    2012-10-15

    The TRISO (tri structural isotropic) coated fuel particle is a key component contributing to the inherent safety of the High Temperature Reactor. A uranium kernel is coated with three layers of pyrolytic carbon and one of silicon carbide. The purpose of these coatings is to work as a miniature fission product containment vessel capable of enclosing all important radio nuclei under normal and off-normal reactor operating conditions. Due to the importance of these coatings, is of great interest to establish characterisation techniques capable of providing a detailed description of their microstructure and physical properties. Here we describe the use of Raman spectroscopy and two modulator generalised ellipsometry to study the anisotropy and thermal conductivity of pyrolytic carbon coatings, as well as the stoichiometry of the silicon carbide coatings and fibres. (Author)

  4. Robustness of cooperation in memory-based prisoner’s dilemma game on a square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guangming; Wang, Xingyuan

    2014-08-01

    Cooperation in prisoner’s dilemma game can be promoted significantly by introducing memory effects. In this work, we assume that the changing probability of strategy is determined by the agents’ accumulative payoff in all time steps. We have numerically investigated robustness of cooperation by introducing an attack probability, with which an individual in cooperation clusters becomes a defector. It is found that the density of cooperators at stable states decreases with the attack probability in traditional memoryless models. However, in the memory-based model, the density of cooperators cannot reach a stable state even if the attack probability is very small. The more the increase of the attack probability, the faster the vanishment of the cooperators. Our work could be helpful to understand the emergence of cooperation in systems consisting of selfish individuals. It suggests a new method to study whether cooperation can be maintained in noisy environments.

  5. Evaluation of CHF experimental data for non-square lattice 7-rod bundles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Yoo, Y. J.; Kim, K. K.; Zee, S. Q

    2001-01-01

    A series of CHF experiments are conducted for 7-rod hexagonal test bundles in order to investigate the CHF characteristics of self-sustained square finned (SSF) rod bundles. The experiments are performed in the freon-loop and water-loop located at IPPE in Russia, and 609 data of freon-12 and 229 data of water are obtained from 7 kinds of test bundles classified by the combination of heated length and axial/radial power distributions. As the result of the evaluation of four representative CHF correlations, the EPRI-1 correlation reveals good prediction capability for SSF test bundles. The inlet parameter CHF correlation suggested by IPPE calculates the mean and the standard deviation of P/M for uniformly heated test bundles as 1.002 and 0.049, respectively. In spite of its excellent accuracy, the correlation has a discontinuity point at the boundary between the low velocity and high velocity conditions. KAERI's inlet parameter correlation eliminates this defect by introducing the complete evaporation model at low velocity condition, and calculates the mean and standard deviation of P/M as 0.095 and 0.062 for uniformly heated 496 data points, respectively. The mean/standard deviation of local parameter CHF correlations suggested by IPPE and KAERI are evaluated as 1.023/0.178 and 1.002/0.158, respectively. The inlet parameter correlation developed from uniformly heated test bundles tends to under-predict CHF about 3% for axially non-uniformly heated test bundles. On the other hand, the local parameter correlation reveals large scattering of P/M, and requires re-optimization of the correlation for non-uniform axial power distributions. As the result of the analysis of experimental data, it reveals that the correction model of axial power shapes suggested by IPPE is applicable to the inlet parameter correlations. For the test bundle of radial non-uniform power distribution, the physically unexpected results are obtained at some experimental conditions. In addition, it reveals that a correction factor model is required in order to taking into account the influence of radial power distribution on CHF.

  6. Multidimensional washboard ratchet potentials for frustrated two-dimensional Josephson junctions arrays on square lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangel, Rafael; Negruz, Marcos

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we derive an analytical procedure that allows us to write the multidimensional washboard ratchet potential (MDWBP) U f for a two-dimensional Josephson junction array. The array has an applied perpendicular magnetic field. The magnetic field is given in units of the quantum flux per plaquette or frustration of the form {f}=\\frac{{M}}{{N}}[{{{Φ }}}0], where Φ0 is the flux quantum. The derivation is done under the assumption that the checkerboard pattern ground state or unit cell of a two-dimensional Josephson junction array is preserved under current biasing. The resistively and capacitively shunted Josephson junction model with a white noise term describes the dynamics for each junction in the array. The multidimensional potential is the unique expression of the collective effects that emerge from the array in contrast to the single junction. The first step in the procedure is to write the equation for the phases for the unit cell. In doing this, one takes into account the constraints imposed for the gauge invariant phases due to frustration. Second, and the key idea of the procedure, is to perform a variable transformation from the original systems of stochastic equations to a system of variables where the condition for the equality of mixed second partial happens. This is achieved via Poincaré's theorem for differential forms. In this way, we find to a nonlinear matrix equation (equation (9) in the text), that permits us to find the new coordinate variables x f where the potential exists. The transformation matrix also permits the correct transformation of the original white noise terms of each junction to the intensities in the x f variables. The commensurate symmetries of the ground state pinned vortex lattice leads to discrete symmetries to the part of the washboard potential that does not contain a tilt due to the external bias current (equation (11) in the text). In this work we apply the procedure for the important cases f=\\frac{1}{2},\\frac{1}{3}. For f=\\frac{1}{2}, we show that previously efforts for finding the potential are restricted, leading to a reduced dimension of the potential. The correct potential is given in equation (21). We examine this issue in detail. New physics emerge when currents are applied in the x and y directions, in particular, we confirm analytically previous numerical work for f=\\frac{1}{2}, concerning the border of stationary states, a landmark of the potential. For f=\\frac{1}{3}, we give a generalization of previous work, in which we include both the currents in the x and y directions as well the noise terms. We find the MDWBP realizes tilted ratchets analogous to a combustion motor.

  7. Thermodynamic model of social influence on two-dimensional square lattice: Case for two features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genzor, Jozef; Bužek, Vladimír; Gendiar, Andrej

    2015-02-01

    We propose a thermodynamic multi-state spin model in order to describe equilibrial behavior of a society. Our model is inspired by the Axelrod model used in social network studies. In the framework of the statistical mechanics language, we analyze phase transitions of our model, in which the spin interaction J is interpreted as a mutual communication among individuals forming a society. The thermal fluctuations introduce a noise T into the communication, which suppresses long-range correlations. Below a certain phase transition point Tt, large-scale clusters of the individuals, who share a specific dominant property, are formed. The measure of the cluster sizes is an order parameter after spontaneous symmetry breaking. By means of the Corner transfer matrix renormalization group algorithm, we treat our model in the thermodynamic limit and classify the phase transitions with respect to inherent degrees of freedom. Each individual is chosen to possess two independent features f = 2 and each feature can assume one of q traits (e.g. interests). Hence, each individual is described by q2 degrees of freedom. A single first-order phase transition is detected in our model if q > 2, whereas two distinct continuous phase transitions are found if q = 2 only. Evaluating the free energy, order parameters, specific heat, and the entanglement von Neumann entropy, we classify the phase transitions Tt(q) in detail. The permanent existence of the ordered phase (the large-scale cluster formation with a non-zero order parameter) is conjectured below a non-zero transition point Tt(q) ≈ 0.5 in the asymptotic regime q → ∞.

  8. Realization of uniform synthetic magnetic fields by periodically shaking an optical square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creffield, C. E.; Pieplow, G.; Sols, F.; Goldman, N.

    2016-09-01

    Shaking a lattice system, by modulating the location of its sites periodically in time, is a powerful method to create effective magnetic fields in engineered quantum systems, such as cold gases trapped in optical lattices. However, such schemes are typically associated with space-dependent effective masses (tunneling amplitudes) and non-uniform flux patterns. In this work we investigate this phenomenon theoretically, by computing the effective Hamiltonians and quasienergy spectra associated with several kinds of lattice-shaking protocols. A detailed comparison with a method based on moving lattices, which are added on top of a main static optical lattice, is provided. This study allows the identification of novel shaking schemes, which simultaneously provide uniform effective mass and magnetic flux, with direct implications for cold-atom experiments and photonics.

  9. Tax evasion dynamics and nonequilibrium Zaklan model with heterogeneous agents on square lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, F. W. S.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we use the version of the nonequilibrium Zaklan model via agent-based Monte-Carlo simulations to study the problem of the fluctuations of the tax evasion on a heterogeneous agents community of honest and tax evaders citizens. The time evolution of this system is performed by a nonequilibrium model known as majority-vote model, but with a different probability for each agent to disobey the majority vote of its neighbors.

  10. Real-Time Blood Flow Estimation Using a Recursive Least-Squares Lattice Filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1997-01-01

    Proceedings, p. 1221-4, 1996), the authors demonstrated that a recursive lattice filter can yield results much closer to the correct velocity distribution. They have now implemented it in real time on a system with sixteen ADSP-21060 processors, interfaced to a commercial scanner. The system can perform real......-time processing for both the periodogram and lattice-filter approaches and displays both results on a PC for comparison. Results are shown for phantom data and for demodulated data from the aorta and hepatic vein of a healthy subject. This demonstrates under clinical conditions that the lattice filter gives...

  11. Effect of strong carbide forming elements in hardfacing weld metal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin Zhang; Dengyi Ren

    2004-01-01

    To achieve high carbon hard-facing weld metals with both high hardness and crack resistance, strong carbide forming elements Ti, Nb and V were alloyed into the weld metals, and their effect on the formation of carbides and the matrix microstructure were studied. Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy(EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy(TEM) were adopted to investigate the microstructure, then thermodynamics of the formation of carbides was calculated and their effect on the matrix was further discussed. It is revealed that Nb, Ti and V influence strongly the distribution and existing state of carbon, inducing precipitation of carbides accompanying with the depletion of carbon in matrix. But when only V are alloyed as carbide forming element, the carbides are scarce and distributed along grain boundaries, and the hard-facing alloy is too hard, while the using of only Nb or Ti could not reinforce the weld metals effectively. The hard-facing alloy reinforced with Nb, V and Ti can form dispersive fine carbides and low carbon martensite matrix.

  12. Salt flux synthesis of single and bimetallic carbide nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Brian M.; Waetzig, Gregory R.; Clouser, Dale A.; Schmuecker, Samantha M.; Harris, Daniel P.; Stacy, John M.; Duffee, Kyle D.; Wan, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Metal carbide compounds have a broad range of interesting properties and are some of the hardest and highest melting point compounds known. However, their high melting points force very high reaction temperatures and thus limit the formation of high surface area nanomaterials. To avoid the extreme synthesis temperatures commonly associated with these materials, a new salt flux technique has been employed to reduce reaction temperatures and form these materials in the nanometer regime. Additionally, the use of multiwall carbon nanotubes as a reactant further reduces the diffusion distance and provides a template for the final carbide materials. The metal carbide compounds produced through this low temperature salt flux technique maintain the nanowire morphology of the carbon nanotubes but increase in size to ˜15-20 nm diameter due to the incorporation of metal in the carbon lattice. These nano-carbides not only have nanowire like shape but also have much higher surface areas than traditionally prepared metal carbides. Finally, bimetallic carbides with composition control can be produced with this method by simply using two metal precursors in the reaction. This method provides the ability to produce nano sized metal carbide materials with size, morphology, and composition control and will allow for these compounds to be synthesized and studied in a whole new size and temperature regime.

  13. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  14. Investigation of the Corrosion Behaviors of HVOF-Sprayed Carbide Cernet Coatings in Molten Al-Zn-Si Alloy Bath

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhen-hua; TAN Xing-hai; ZHANG Yue-gang; SUN Jia-shu

    2004-01-01

    In continuous hot-dip galvanization process the corrosion and chemical stability of the sink roll in the galvanizing bath are important problem which effects on the quality and productivity. In order to protect the sink roll the carbide cermet and/or ceramic coatings were deposited on the surface of the sink roll. The WC-, Cr3 C2-cermet coatings were deposited by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) spray, respectively. The coating samples were immersed in molten Zn-alloy containing 50 wt % aluminum at 833 K for 24 hr and 144 hr, respectively. The inter-diffusion and inter-reaction of Zn, Al and elements in coating and corrosion behaviors of these coatings were investigated by XRD, SEM and EPMA etc. The corrosion mechanisms of the carbide cermet coatings and ceramic coatings in molten High Al-Zn-alloy were approached.

  15. Porous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons synthesized via confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks for efficient hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao Bin; Xia, Bao Yu; Yu, Le; Yu, Xin-Yao; Lou, Xiong Wen David

    2015-03-11

    Electrochemical water splitting has been considered as a promising approach to produce clean and sustainable hydrogen fuel. However, the lack of high-performance and low-cost electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction hinders the large-scale application. As a new class of porous materials with tunable structure and composition, metal-organic frameworks have been considered as promising candidates to synthesize various functional materials. Here we demonstrate a metal-organic frameworks-assisted strategy for synthesizing nanostructured transition metal carbides based on the confined carburization in metal-organic frameworks matrix. Starting from a compound consisting of copper-based metal-organic frameworks host and molybdenum-based polyoxometalates guest, mesoporous molybdenum carbide nano-octahedrons composed of ultrafine nanocrystallites are successfully prepared as a proof of concept, which exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic performance for hydrogen production from both acidic and basic solutions. The present study provides some guidelines for the design and synthesis of nanostructured electrocatalysts.

  16. Optimization of uranium carbide fabrication by carbothermic reduction with limited oxygen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed carbides (U, Pu)C, are good fuel candidate for generation IV reactors because of their high fissile atoms density and excellent thermal properties for economical (more compact and efficient cores) and safety reasons (high melting margin). UC can be imagine as a surrogate material ror R and D studies on (U,Pu)C fuel behavior, because of their similar structures. The carbothermic reaction was used because it is the most studied and now consider for industrial process. However, it involves powders manipulation: in air, carbide can strongly react at room temperature and under controlled atmosphere it can absorb impurities. An inerted installation under Ar, BaGCARA, was therefore used. Process improvements were carried out, including the sintering atmosphere in order to evaluate the impact on the sample purity (about oxygen content). The original method by ion beam analysis was used to determine the surface composition (oxygen in-depth profiles in the first microns and stoichiometry). This oxygen analysis was set for the first time in carbonaceous materials. XRD analysis showed the formation of an intermediate compound during the carbothermic reaction and a better crystallization of the samples fabricated in BaGCARA. They also have a better microstructure, density, and visual appearance if compared to former samples. Vacuum sintering leads to a denser UC with fewer second phases if compared to Ar, Ar/H2 or controlled PC atmospheres. However, it was not possible to analyze carbides without air contact which may impact their lattice parameter and lead to their deterioration. When the carbide is initially free of oxygen, it oxidizes faster, more intensely and heterogeneously. The mechanical stress induced between the grains lead to fracturing the material, to corrosion cracking and then a de-bonding of the material. A study of oxidation mechanisms would be interesting to validate and understand the evolution of the material in contact with oxygen. A study of the

  17. Microstructure and Properties of Plasma Spraying Boron Carbide Coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Microstructure of plasma spray boron carbide coating was studied by SEM and TEM. Its physical,mechanical and electrical properties were measured. The results showed that high microhardness,modulus and Iow porosity of B4C coating were manufactured by plasma spray. It was lamellar packing and dense. The B4C coating examined here contained two principal structures and two impurity phase besides major phase. The relatively small value of Young′s modulus, comparing with that of the bulk materials, is explained by porosity. The Fe impurity phase could account for the relatively high electrical conductivity of boron carbide coating by comparing with the general boron carbide materials.

  18. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Dennis E.

    2015-04-01

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20-60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable mechanistic

  19. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  20. Plasma metallurgical production of nanocrystalline borides and carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Galevsky, S. G.; Efimova, K. A.

    2016-09-01

    he experience in production and study of properties of nanocrystalline borides and chromium carbides, titanium, silicon was summarized. The design and features of the vertical three-jet once-through reactor with power 150 kW, used in the plasma metallurgical production, was described. The technological, thermotechnical and resource characteristics of the reactor were identified. The parameters of borides and carbides synthesis, their main characteristics in the nanodispersed state and equipment-technological scheme of production were provided. Evaluation of engineering-and-economical performance of the laboratory and industrial levels of borides and carbides production and the state corresponding to the segment of the world market was carried out.

  1. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  2. Material properties of silicon and silicon carbide foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Marc T.; Goodman, William A.

    2005-08-01

    Silicon and silicon carbide foams provide the lightweighting element for Schafer Corporation's silicon and silicon carbide lightweight mirror systems (SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM). SLMSTM and SiC-SLMSTM provide the enabling technology for manufacturing lightweight, athermal optical sub-assemblies and instruments. Silicon and silicon carbide foam samples were manufactured and tested under a Schafer-funded Internal Research and Development program in various configurations to obtain mechanical and thermal property data. The results of the mechanical tests that are reported in this paper include Young's modulus, compression strength, tensile strength, Poisson's ratio and vibrational damping. The results of the thermal tests include thermal conductivity and coefficient of thermal expansion.

  3. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross......-metallic inclusions and the crack initiation. Surprisingly, no differences were found between the carbide size distributions of the micro-clean and conventional grades.Also, the distribution of the fractured carbides was found to be the same regardless of steel type, manufacturing method or location on the specimen....

  4. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  5. Reaction Kinetics of Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Kendra; Zerda, T. W.

    2006-10-01

    Nanostructured silicon carbide (SiC) is of interest particularly for use in nanocomposites that demonstrate high hardness as well as for use in semiconductor applications. Reaction kinetics studies of solid-solid reactions are relatively recent and present a method of determining the reaction mechanism and activation energy by measuring reaction rates. We have used induction heating to heat quickly, thus reducing the error in reaction time measurements. Data will be presented for reactions using silicon nanopowder (melting point of silicon. Using the well-known Avrami-Erofeev model, a two-parameter chi- square fit of the data provided a rate constant (k) and parameter (n), related to the reaction mechanism, for each temperature. From these data, an activation energy of 138 kJ/mol was calculated. In addition, the parameter n suggests the reaction mechanism, which will also be discussed. Experiments are continuing at higher temperatures to consider the liquid- solid reaction as well.

  6. Radiation damage of transition metal carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixon, G.

    1991-01-01

    In this grant period we have investigated electrical properties of transition metal carbides and radiation-induced defects produced by low-temperature electron irradiation in them. Special attention has been given to the composition VC[sub 0.88] in which the vacancies on the carbon sublattice of this fcc crystal order to produce a V[sub 8]C[sub 7] superlattice. The existence of this superlattice structure was found to make the crystal somewhat resistant to radiation damage at low doses and/or at ambient temperature. At larger doses significant changes in the resistivity are produced. Annealing effects were observed which we believe to be connected with the reconstitution of the superlattice structure.

  7. Carboloy grade 370 (sintered cemented carbide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carboloy Grade 370 containing 72.0 WC, 8.0 TiC, 11.5 TaC, 8.5 Co is a tough, wear-resistant grade of cemented carbide for heavy duty roughing cuts of steels, ferrous castings, stainless steels, and some high-temperature alloys. It successfully withstands those high temperatures encountered in heavy duty machining. It is used as the as-sintered condition, without further heat treatment. It cannot be machined, but can be ground to final size by use of SiC and diamonds as abrasives. Carbology 370 is rarely applied where corrosive environments exist. Safety note is given to ensure protection for personnel and equipment from flying fragments and sharp edges when working with these materials, and an adequate ventilation in grinding operation to avoid pulmonary problems. Microstructure and hardness vs. temperature curves for Carboloy 370 are presented and its physical and mechanical properties are tabulated

  8. Stored energy in irradiated silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    This report presents a short review of the phenomenon of Wigner stored energy release from irradiated graphite and discusses it in relation to neutron irradiation of silicon carbide. A single published work in the area of stored energy release in SiC is reviewed and the results are discussed. It appears from this previous work that because the combination of the comparatively high specific heat of SiC and distribution in activation energies for recombining defects, the stored energy release of SiC should only be a problem at temperatures lower than those considered for fusion devices. The conclusion of this preliminary review is that the stored energy release in SiC will not be sufficient to cause catastrophic heating in fusion reactor components, though further study would be desirable.

  9. Gas emission from ultradispersed carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process of gas emission from the ultra-dispersed carbides (B4C, SiC, TiC) powders formed by pulsed plasma synthesis technology (condensator discharge) in the environment of corresponding chlorides and methan with the additions of H2 and Ar was investigated. The emitted gases consisted of CH4, H2O, Co(N2), CO2. Calculated heats of gas emission processes (less than 200 kJ/mol) for different components show their adsorption nature up to 700 deg C. The emission of components having mass numbers 28 and 44 raises at higher temperatures that can be considered as a consequence of high temperature reactions between oxygen and carbon containing phases in synthesized powders

  10. Microwave hybrid synthesis of silicon carbide nanopowders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosized silicon carbide powders were synthesised from a mixture of silica gel and carbon through both the conventional and microwave heating methods. Reaction kinetics of SiC formation were found to exhibit notable differences for the samples heated in microwave field and furnace. In the conventional method SiC nanopowders can be synthesised after 105 min heating at 1500 deg. C in a coke-bed using an electrical tube furnace. Electron microscopy studies of these powders showed the existence of equiaxed SiC nanopowders with an average particle size of 8.2 nm. In the microwave heating process, SiC powders formed after 60 min; the powder consisted of a mixture of SiC nanopowders (with two average particle sizes of 13.6 and 58.2 nm) and particles in the shape of long strands (with an average diameter of 330 nm)

  11. Thermal Oxidation of Silicon Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufang Chen; Li'na Ning; Yingmin Wang; Juan Li; Xiangang Xu; Xiaobo Hu; Minhua Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Thermal oxidation was used to remove the subsurface damage of silicon carbide (SiC) surfaces. The anisotrow of oxidation and the composition of oxide layers on Si and C faces were analyzed. Regular pits were observed on the surface after the removal of the oxide layers, which were detrimental to the growth of high quality epitaxial layers. The thickness and composition of the oxide layers were characterized by Rutherford backscat-tering spectrometry (RBS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Epitaxial growth was performed in a metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) system. The substrate surface morphol-ogy after removing the oxide layer and gallium nitride (GaN) epilayer surface were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results showed that the GaN epilayer grown on the oxidized substrates was superior to that on the unoxidized substrates.

  12. Preparation of Silicon Carbide with High Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to prepare silicon carbide with high properties, three kinds of SiC powders A, B, and C with different composition and two kinds of additives, which were Y2O3-Al2O3 system and Y2O3-La2O3 system, were used in this experiment. The properties of hot-pressed SiC ceramics were measured. With the same additives, different SiC powder resulted in different properties. On the other hand, with the same SiC powder, increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-Al2O3 improved properties of SiC ceramics at room temperature, and increasing the amount of the additive Y2O3-La2O3 improved property SiC ceramics at elevated temperature. In addition, the microstructure of SiC ceramics was studied by scanning electron microscopy.

  13. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 x 1025 n/m2. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C

  14. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  15. Chemical Mechanical Polishing of Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. Anthony; Pirouz

    1999-01-01

    The High Temperature Integrated Electronics and Sensors (HTIES) team at the NASA Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as an enabling electronic technology for many aerospace applications. The Lewis team is focusing on the chemical vapor deposition of the thin, single-crystal SiC films from which devices are fabricated. These films, which are deposited (i.e., epitaxially "grown") on commercial wafers, must consist of a single crystal with very few structural defects so that the derived devices perform satisfactorily and reliably. Working in collaboration (NASA grant) with Professor Pirouz of Case Western Reserve University, we developed a chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) technique for removing the subsurface polishing damage prior to epitaxial growth of the single-crystal SiC films.

  16. An ex-situ and in-situ evaluation of carbides as potential electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigert, Erich

    One of the most prominent challenges facing the commercialization of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of its electrocatalyst components, particularly the anode. The anode typically requires a high loading of precious metal electrocatalyst (Pt-Ru) to obtain a useful amount of electrical energy from the electrooxidation of methanol (CH3OH). The complete electrooxidation of methanol on these catalysts produces strongly adsorbed CO on the surface, which reduces the activity of Pt. The presence of Ru in these electrocatalysts assists with the decomposition of H2O to more efficiently remove the poisoning CO species as CO2(g). The primary disadvantage of these electrocatalyst components is the scarcity and consequently high price of both Pt and Ru. A series of surface science studies ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) have identified molybdenum and tungsten carbide materials as potential alternative DMFC anode electrocatalysts. Both of these materials demonstrated activity towards the decomposition of methanol and water molecules. The purpose of this research was to extend these investigations by the synthesis and characterization of more realistic carbide materials. This was accomplished by a combination of surface science and electrochemical experiments. The electrochemical studies were performed both in-situ and ex-situ in order to better address the "materials gap" and "pressure gap" that often separate findings in UHV studies from results in more realistic environments. Thin film surfaces of molybdenum carbide could be produced on various carbon substrates in a vacuum system by physical vapor deposition (PVD). When modified with low coverages of Pt, MoC phase molybdenum carbides were found to be more active towards the electrooxidation of hydrogen in an acidic electrolyte than Ptmodified carbon substrates in cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies. These surfaces demonstrated a limited range of electrochemical stability in this acid solution. Mo2C surfaces have

  17. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  18. Thorium fuel cycle studies: fuel fabrication process and cost estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early in 1976 a study was made to assess the relative economics and fuel utilization of thorium and uranium fuel cycles in various types of reactors. It was to be completed in approximately two months, so all component parts had to be developed in a short time with a high degree of dependence on existing information. One of the components required for the study was a consistent set of relatively accurate fuel fabrication costs for the various reactor-fuel combinations. A report documents the rationale used in generating these cost estimates and presents in some detail the basis and methodology employed. Since three types of thermal flux reactors (LWR, HWR, and HTGR) and two types of fast flux reactors (liquid metal and gas cooled) together with three fuel forms (oxides, carbides, and metal) were included in the study with various combinations of the fissionable metals U, Th, and Pu, it was necessary to define a methodology that would permit a rapid relative estimate for each case. Existing cost studies were chosen for a Light-Water Reactor with low-enriched uranium fuel and for a High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with highly enriched uranium and thorium fuel as the reference cases which could be compared with other reactor-fuel combinations

  19. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  20. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  1. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  2. Radial furnace shows promise for growing straight boron carbide whiskers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feingold, E.

    1967-01-01

    Radial furnace, with a long graphite vaporization tube, maintains a uniform thermal gradient, favoring the growth of straight boron carbide whiskers. This concept seems to offer potential for both the quality and yield of whiskers.

  3. On surface Raman scattering and luminescence radiation in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Filipov, V; Schwarz, U; Armbrüster, M; Leithe-Jasper, A; Tanaka, T; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-02-01

    The discrepancy between Raman spectra of boron carbide obtained by Fourier transform Raman and conventional Raman spectrometry is systematically investigated. While at photon energies below the exciton energy (1.560 eV), Raman scattering of bulk phonons of boron carbide occurs, photon energies exceeding the fundamental absorption edge (2.09 eV) evoke additional patterns, which may essentially be attributed to luminescence or to the excitation of Raman-active processes in the surface region. The reason for this is the very high fundamental absorption in boron carbide inducing a very small penetration depth of the exciting laser radiation. Raman excitations essentially restricted to the boron carbide surface region yield spectra which considerably differ from bulk phonon ones, thus indicating structural modifications.

  4. Microwave synthesis of phase-pure, fine silicon carbide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine, monophasic silicon carbide powder has been synthesized by direct solid-state reaction of its constituents namely silicon and carbon in a 2.45 GHz microwave field. Optimum parameters for the silicon carbide phase formation have been determined by varying reaction time and reaction temperature. The powders have been characterized for their particle size, surface area, phase composition (X-ray diffraction) and morphology (scanning electron microscope). Formation of phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at 1300 deg. C in less than 5 min of microwave exposure, resulting in sub-micron-sized particles. The free energy values for Si + C → SiC reaction were calculated for different temperatures and by comparing them with the experimental results, it was determined that phase-pure silicon carbide can be achieved at around 1135 deg. C

  5. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca;

    2013-01-01

    supported molybdenum carbide are significantly higher compared to the bulk carbide. The CO conversion reaches a maximum, when about 20wt% Mo2C is loaded on active carbon. The selectivity to higher alcohols increases with increasing Mo2C loading on active carbon and reaches a maximum over bulk molybdenum...... carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide...... clusters. Unpromoted, active carbon supported Mo2C exhibits a high activity for CO conversion with hydrocarbons as the dominant products. The K2CO3 promoter plays an essential role in directing the selectivity to alcohols rather than to hydrocarbons. The optimum selectivity toward higher alcohols and total...

  6. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  7. Process for preparing fine grain silicon carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    Method of producing fine-grain silicon carbide powder comprises combining methyltrimethoxysilane with a solution of phenolic resin, acetone and water or sugar and water, gelling the resulting mixture, and then drying and heating the obtained gel.

  8. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  9. Dynamic compaction of boron carbide by a shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzyurkin, Andrey E.; Kraus, Eugeny I.; Lukyanov, Yaroslav L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents experiments on explosive compaction of boron carbide powder and modeling of the stress state behind the shock front at shock loading. The aim of this study was to obtain a durable low-porosity compact sample. The explosive compaction technology is used in this problem because the boron carbide is an extremely hard and refractory material. Therefore, its compaction by traditional methods requires special equipment and considerable expenses.

  10. Platinum group metal nitrides and carbides: synthesis, properties and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanovskii, Alexander L [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Urals Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2009-04-30

    Experimental and theoretical data on new compounds, nitrides and carbides of the platinum group 4d and 5d metals (ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum), published over the past five years are summarized. The extreme mechanical properties of platinoid nitrides and carbides, i.e., their high strength and low compressibility, are noted. The prospects of further studies and the scope of application of these compounds are discussed.

  11. Impact of pressure on Sintering of Cemented Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Owais, Tariq Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    In this Master Thesis work, the effect of pressure on sintering of cemented carbides is investigated. Special focus hasbeen given to the residual porosity after sintering. It is well known that sintering shrinkage depends on binder phasecontent, grain size, temperature and pressure. Thus 4 different cemented carbides grades were selected. The gradeswere pressed into standard products and TRS (Tensile Rupture Strength) rods with two different shrinkage factors.These were then sintered at diffe...

  12. ADHERENCE AND PROPERTIES OF SILICON CARBIDE BASED FILMS ON STEEL

    OpenAIRE

    Lelogeais, M.; Ducarroir, M.; Berjoan, R.

    1991-01-01

    Coatings of silicon carbide with various compositions have been obtained in a r.f plasma assisted process using tetramethylsilane and argon as input gases. Some properties against mechanical applications of such deposits on steel have been investigated. Residual stresses and hardness are reported and discussed in relation with plasma parameters and deposit composition. By scratch testing, it was shown that the silicon carbide films on steel denote a good adherence when compared with previous ...

  13. Rapid Wolff–Kishner reductions in a silicon carbide microreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Stephen G.; Gu, Lei; Lesniak, Christoph; Victor, Georg; Meschke, Frank; Abahmane, Lahbib; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2013-01-01

    Wolff–Kishner reductions are performed in a novel silicon carbide microreactor. Greatly reduced reaction times and safer operation are achieved, giving high yields without requiring a large excess of hydrazine. The corrosion resistance of silicon carbide avoids the problematic reactor compatibility issues that arise when Wolff–Kishner reductions are done in glass or stainless steel reactors. With only nitrogen gas and water as by-products, this opens the possibility of performing selective, l...

  14. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  15. Process for preparing fine-grain metal carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Jeffers, F.P.

    Fine-grain metal carbide powder suitable for use in the fabrication of heat resistant products is prepared by coating bituminous pitch on SiO/sub 2/ or Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ particles, heating the coated particles to convert the bituminous pitch to coke, and then heating the particles to a higher temperature to convert the particles to a carbide by reaction of said coke therewith.

  16. Synthesis of carbides of metals by electrodischarge method

    OpenAIRE

    Tsolin, Pavlo L.; Terekhov, Anatolii Yu.; Kuskova, Nataliia I.

    2014-01-01

    Initiation by electric discharge of plasma-chemical reaction which is accompanied by the erosion of electrodes material and by synthesis corresponding carbides is discussed. The object of the research is to establish possibility of synthesis of metal carbides during electrodischarge treatment of hydrocarbon liquid. Electrical discharge in the liquid hydrocarbons is studied experimentally using various materials of electrodes (titanium, aluminum, copper, niobium) as a method of synthesis of me...

  17. Superplastic behavior and cavitation for WC-Co cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosokawa, H.; Shimojima, K. [Inst. for Structural and Engineering Materials, National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) (Japan); Kawakami, M.; Terada, O. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Hadano, Kanagawa (Japan); Sano, S. [Fuji Die Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Mabuchi, M. [Dept. of Energy Science and Technology, Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Superplastic behavior and cavitation were investigated for WC-15 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.7 {mu}m (A) and 5.2 {mu}m (B), WC-10 mass% Co cemented carbide with the WC grain size of 1.5 {mu}m (C) and WC-5 mass% Co cemented carbides with the WC grain sizes of 0.5 {mu}m (D) and 2.5 {mu}m (E) by tensile tests at 1473 K. WC contiguity were 0.51, 0.31, 0.27, 0.56 and 0.49, respectively. The large elongations about 200% were obtained for the B and the C having smaller values of WC contiguity compared to the other cemented carbides. The values of cavity volume fraction for them were less for the other cemented carbides, furthermore, cavities formed at WC/WC interfaces. Therefore, it is noted that the distribution of the Co phase is important for superplasticity of the cemented carbides. (orig.)

  18. Design, Fabrication and Performance of Boron-Carbide Control Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A control blade design, incorporating boron-carbide (B4C) in stainless-steel tubes, was introduced into service in boiling water reactors in April 1961. Since that time this blade has become the standard reference control element in General Electric boiling-water reactors, replacing the 2% boron-stainless-steel blades previously used. The blades consist of a sheathed, cruciform array of small vertical stainless-steel tubes filled with compácted boron-carbide powder. The boron-carbide powder is confined longitudinally into several independent compartments by swaging over ball bearings located inside the tubes. The development and use of boron-carbide control rods is discussed in five phases: 1. Summary of experience with boron-steel blades and reasons for transition to boron-carbide control; 2. Design of the boron-carbide blade, beginning with developmental experiments, including early measurements performed in the AEC ''Control Rod Material and Development Program'' at the Vallecitos Atomic Laboratory, through a description of the final control blade configuration; 3. Fabrication of the blades and quality control procedures; 4. Results of confirmatory pre-operational mechanical and reactivity testing; and 5. Post-operational experience with the blades, including information on the results of mechanical inspection and reactivity testing after two years of reactor service. (author)

  19. Assessment of Silicon Carbide Composites for Advanced Salt-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept that uses a liquid fluoride salt coolant and a solid high-temperature fuel. Several alternative fuel types are being considered for this reactor. One set of fuel options is the use of pin-type fuel assemblies with silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. This report provides (1) an initial viability assessment of using SiC as fuel cladding and other in-core components of the AHTR, (2) the current status of SiC technology, and (3) recommendations on the path forward. Based on the analysis of requirements, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix (CVI SiC/SiC) composites are recommended as the primary option for further study on AHTR fuel cladding among various industrially available forms of SiC. Critical feasibility issues for the SiC-based AHTR fuel cladding are identified to be (1) corrosion of SiC in the candidate liquid salts, (2) high dose neutron radiation effects, (3) static fatigue failure of SiC/SiC, (4) long-term radiation effects including irradiation creep and radiation-enhanced static fatigue, and (5) fabrication technology of hermetic wall and sealing end caps. Considering the results of the issues analysis and the prospects of ongoing SiC research and development in other nuclear programs, recommendations on the path forward is provided in the order or priority as: (1) thermodynamic analysis and experimental examination of SiC corrosion in the candidate liquid salts, (2) assessment of long-term mechanical integrity issues using prototypical component sections, and (3) assessment of high dose radiation effects relevant to the anticipated operating condition.

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

  1. Solid-state formation of titanium carbide and molybdenum carbide as contacts for carbon-containing semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, W. P.; Detavernier, C.; van Meirhaeghe, R. L.; Kellock, A. J.; Lavoie, C.

    2006-03-01

    Metal carbides are good candidates to contact carbon-based semiconductors (SiC, diamond, and carbon nanotubes). Here, we report on an in situ study of carbide formation during the solid-state reaction between thin Ti or Mo films and C substrates. Titanium carbide (TiC) was previously reported as a contact material to diamond and carbon nanotubes. However, the present study shows two disadvantages for the solid-state reaction of Ti and C. First, because Ti reacts readily with oxygen, a capping layer should be included to enable carbide formation. Second, the TiC phase can exist over a wide range of composition (about 10%, i.e., from Ti0.5C0.5 to Ti0.6C0.4), leading to significant variations in the properties of the material formed. The study of the Mo-C system suggests that molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) is a promising alternative, since the phase shows a lower resistivity (about 45% lower than for TiC), the carbide forms below 900 °C, and its formation is less sensitive to oxidation as compared with the Ti-C system. The measured resistivity for Mo2C is ρ=59 μΩ cm, and from kinetic studies an activation energy for Mo2C formation of Ea=3.15+/-0.15 eV was obtained.

  2. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene ®) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amado, J. M.; Tobar, M. J.; Alvarez, J. C.; Lamas, J.; Yáñez, A.

    2009-03-01

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene ® powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase ®). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed.

  3. Laser cladding of tungsten carbides (Spherotene) hardfacing alloys for the mining and mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The abrasive nature of the mechanical processes involved in mining and mineral industry often causes significant wear to the associated equipment and derives non-negligible economic costs. One of the possible strategies to improve the wear resistance of the various components is the deposition of hardfacing layers on the bulk parts. The use of high power lasers for hardfacing (laser cladding) has attracted a great attention in the last decade as an alternative to other more standard methods (arc welding, oxy-fuel gas welding, thermal spraying). In laser cladding the hardfacing material is used in powder form. For high hardness applications Ni-, Co- or Fe-based alloys containing hard phase carbides at different ratios are commonly used. Tungsten carbides (WC) can provide coating hardness well above 1000 HV (Vickers). In this respect, commercially available WC powders normally contain spherical micro-particles consisting of crushed WC agglomerates. Some years ago, Spherotene powders consisting of spherical-fused monocrystaline WC particles, being extremely hard, between 1800 and 3000 HV, were patented. Very recently, mixtures of Ni-based alloy with Spherotene powders optimized for laser processing were presented (Technolase). These mixtures have been used in our study. Laser cladding tests with these powders were performed on low carbon steel (C25) substrates, and results in terms of microstructure and hardness will be discussed

  4. Production and characterization of nanostructured silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Kendra Lee

    Nanostructured materials continue to attract attention because of their new and interesting properties, which are very different from their macrostructured equivalents. Since the size of grain and surface differs, a better understanding of the microstructure, the mechanism of formation, and methods of controlling surface properties is necessary. In this study, nanostructured silicon carbide has been produced from the solid-solid reaction of a mixture of silicon nanopowder and carbon multiwalled nanotubes (MWNT) sintered by induction. A study of the reaction rate at different temperatures has yielded a value for the activation energy of 254 +/- 36 kJ/mol, and has led to the conclusion that the reaction is diffusion-controlled. A second method produced pure silicon carbide nanowires using a procedure which kept the solid reactants, silicon powder and MWNT, separated while sintering at a constant temperature of 1200°C. Silicon in the vapor-phase reacted at the surface of the MWNTs followed by diffusion of both precursors through the product phase boundary. The reaction time was varied, and a morphological study has been done describing changes in shape and size as a function of time. The initial reaction produced a layer of SiC providing the outer shell of coaxial structures with carbon nanotubes inside. As Si and C diffused through the product phase to react at the interface, the tube became filled with SiC to form solid SiC nanowires, and the outer diameter of the nanowires grew continuously as reaction time increased. After long sintering times, growth continued in two dimensions, fusing nanowires together into planar structures. In addition, the precursor form of carbon was varied, and nanowires produced by two different types of nanotubes have been studied. The produced SiC nanowires show cubic crystal structure. After a few hours of sintering, stacking faults began to occur inside the wires, and the frequency of occurrence of the stacking faults increased as

  5. Nanostructured carbide catalysts for the hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ram Seshadri, Susannah Scott, Juergen Eckert

    2008-07-21

    The above quote, taken from the executive summary of the Report from the US DOE Basic Energy Sciences Workshop held August 6–8, 2007,[1] places in context the research carried out at the University of California, Santa Barbara, which is reported in this document. The enormous impact of heterogeneous catalysis is exemplified by the Haber process for the synthesis of ammonia, which consumes a few % of the world’s energy supply and natural gas, and feeds as many as a third of the world’s population. While there have been numerous advances in understanding the process,[2] culminating in the awarding of the Nobel Prize to Gerhard Ertl in 2007, it is interesting to note that the catalysts themselves have changed very little since they were discovered heuristically in the the early part of the 20th century. The thesis of this report is that modern materials chemistry, with all the empirical knowledge of solid state chemistry, combined with cutting edge structural tools, can help develop and better heterogeneous catalysis. The first part of this report describes research in the area of early transition metal carbides (notably of Mo and W), potentially useful catalysts for water gas shift (WGS) and related reactions of use to the hydrogen economy. Although these carbides have been known to be catalytically useful since the 1970s,[3] further use of these relatively inexpensive materials have been plagued by issues of low surface areas and ill-defined, and often unreactive surfaces, in conjunction with deactivation. We have employed for the first time, a combination of constant-wavelength and time-of-flight neutron scattering, including a total scattering analysis of the latter data, to better understand what happens in these materials, in a manner that for the first time, reveals surface graphitic carbon in these materials in a quantitative manner. Problems of preparation, surface stability, and irreversible reactivity have become manifest in this class of materials

  6. Acetylene bubble-powered autonomous capsules: towards in situ fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moo, James Guo Sheng; Wang, Hong; Pumera, Martin

    2014-12-28

    A fuel-free autonomous self-propelled motor is illustrated. The motor is powered by the chemistry of calcium carbide and utilising water as a co-reactant, through a polymer encapsulation strategy. Expulsion of acetylene bubbles powers the capsule motor. This is an important step, going beyond the toxic hydrogen peroxide fuel used normally, to find alternative propellants for self-propelled machines.

  7. Silicon Carbide Technology for Grid Integrated Photovoltaic Applications: Dynamic Characterization of Silicon Carbide Transistors.

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Subhadra

    2011-01-01

    For the endorsement of the study of potential utilization of the emerging silicon carbide (SiC) devices, three SiC active switches, namely SJEP120R063 (1200V, 63 mohm) SiC JFET manufactured by Semisouth, BT1206AC-P1 (1200V, 125 mohm) SiC BJT by TranSiC and CMF20120 (1200V, 80 mohm, 33A) SiC MOSFET by Cree have been investigated systematically in this thesis work.The four layer PCB board with the smart layouts like the drain and gate traces are either perpendicular to each other or run into di...

  8. Thermal properties of wood-derived silicon carbide and copper-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappecena, Kristen E.

    Wood-derived ceramics and composites have been of interest in recent years due to their unique microstructures, which lead to tailorable properties. The porosity and pore size distribution of each wood type is different, which yields variations in properties in the resultant materials. The thermal properties of silicon carbide ceramics and copper-silicon carbide composites derived from wood were studied as a function of their pore structures. Wood was pyrolyzed at temperatures ranging from 300-2400°C to yield porous carbon. The progression toward long-range order was studied as a function of pyrolyzation temperature. Biomorphic silicon carbide (bioSiC) is a porous ceramic material resulting from silicon melt infiltration of these porous carbon materials. BioSiC has potential applicability in many high temperature environments, particularly those in which rapid temperature changes occur. To understand the behavior of bioSiC at elevated temperatures, the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. The thermal conductivity of bioSiC from five precursors was determined using flash diffusivity at temperatures up to 1100°C. Thermal conductivity results varied with porosity, temperature and orientation, and decreased from 42-13 W/mK for porosities of 43-69%, respectively, at room temperature. The results were compared with to object-oriented finite-element analysis (OOF). OOF was also used to model and understand the heat-flow paths through the complex bioSiC microstructures. The thermal shock resistance of bioSiC was also studied, and no bioSiC sample was found to fail catastrophically after up to five thermal shock cycles from 1400°C to room temperature oil. Copper-silicon carbide composites have potential uses in thermal management applications due to the high thermal conductivity of each phase. Cu-bioSiC composites were created by electrodeposition of copper into bioSiC pores. The detrimental Cu-SiC reaction was avoided by using this room temperature

  9. Crystal structural and diffusion property in titanium carbides: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanan; Gao, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    Titanium carbides were studied via molecular dynamics simulation to characterize TiCx structures with respect to the carbon diffusion properties in this study. The effect of carbon concentration on atomic structures of titanium carbides was investigated through discussing the structure variation and the radial distribution functions of carbon atoms in titanium carbides. The carbon diffusion in titanium carbides was also analyzed, focusing on the dependence on carbon concentration and carbide structure. Carbon diffusivity with different carbon concentrations was determined by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations and compared with the available experimental data. The simulation results showed an atomic exchange mechanism for carbon diffusion in titanium carbide.

  10. Development and Characterization of the Bonding and Integration Technologies Needed for Fabricating Silicon Carbide Based Injector Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig,Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2008-01-01

    Advanced ceramic bonding and integration technologies play a critical role in the fabrication and application of silicon carbide based components for a number of aerospace and ground based applications. One such application is a lean direct injector for a turbine engine to achieve low NOx emissions. Ceramic to ceramic diffusion bonding and ceramic to metal brazing technologies are being developed for this injector application. For the diffusion bonding technology, titanium interlayers (coatings and foils) were used to aid in the joining of silicon carbide (SiC) substrates. The influence of such variables as surface finish, interlayer thickness, and processing time were investigated. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases. In the diffusion bonds, an intermediate phase, Ti5Si3Cx, formed that is thermally incompatible in its thermal expansion and caused thermal stresses and cracking during the processing cool-down. Thinner interlayers of pure titanium and/or longer processing times resulted in an optimized microstructure. Tensile tests on the joined materials resulted in strengths of 13-28 MPa depending on the SiC substrate material. Nondestructive evaluation using ultrasonic immersion showed well formed bonds. For the joining technology of brazing Kovar fuel tubes to silicon carbide, preliminary development of the joining approach has begun. Various technical issues and requirements for the injector application are addressed.

  11. Yarlongite:A New Metallic Carbide Mineral

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Nicheng; BAI Wenji; LI Guowu; XIONG Ming; FANG Qingsong; YANG Jingsui; MA Zhesheng; RONG He

    2009-01-01

    Yarlongite occurs in ophiolitic chromitite at the Luobusha mine(29°5'N 92°,5'E,about 200 km ESE of Lhasa),Qusum County,Shannan Prefecture,Tibet Autonomous Region,People'S Republic of China.Associated minerals are:diamond,moissanite,wiistite,iridium("osmiridium"), osmium("iridosmine"),periclase,chromite,native irun,native nickel,native chromium,forsterite. Cr-rich diopside,intermetallic compounds Ni-Fe-Cr,Ni-Cr,Cr-C,etc.Yariongite and its associated minerals were handpicked from a large heavy mineral sample of chromitite.The metallic carbides associated with yarlongite are cohenite,tongbaite,khamrabaevite and qusongite(IMA2007.034). Yarlongite occurs as irregular grains,with a size between 0.02 and 0.06 mm,steel-grey colour,H Mohs:5 1/2-6.Tenacity:brittle.Cleavage:{0 0 1}perfect.Fracture:conchoidal.Chemical formula: (Cr4Fe4Ni)∑9C4,or(Cr,Fe,Ni)∑9C4,Crystal system:Hexagonal,Space Group:P63/mc,a=18.839(2)A,C =4.4960(9)A,V=745.7(2)A3,Z=6,Density(calc.)=7.19 g/cm3(with simplified formula).Yarlongite has been approved as a new mineral by the CNMNC(IMA2007-035).Holotype material is deposited at the Geological Museum of China(No.M11650).

  12. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  13. Palladium Implanted Silicon Carbide for Hydrogen Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muntele, C. I.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R. L.; Muntele, L.; Poker, D. B.; Hensley, D. K.; Larkin, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Silicon carbide is intended for use in fabrication of high-temperature, efficient hydrogen sensors. Traditionally, when a palladium coating is applied on the exposed surface of SiC, the chemical reaction between palladium and hydrogen produces a detectable change in the surface chemical potential. We have produced both a palladium coated SiC as well as a palladium, ion implanted SiC sensor. The palladium implantation was done at 500 C into the Si face of 6H, N-type SiC at various energies, and at various fluences. Then, we measured the hydrogen sensitivity response of each fabricated sensor by exposing them to hydrogen while monitoring the current flow across the p-n junction(s), with respect to time. The sensitivity of each sensor was measured at temperatures between 27 and 300 C. The response of the SiC sensors produced by Pd implantation has revealed a completely different behaviour than the SiC sensors produced by Pd deposition. In the Pd-deposited SiC sensors as well as in the ones reported in the literature, the current rises in the presence of hydrogen at room temperature as well as at elevated temperatures. In the case of Pd-implanted SiC sensors, the current decreases in the presence of hydrogen whenever the temperature is raised above 100 C. We will present the details and conclusions from the results obtained during this meeting.

  14. Oxidation of vanadium carbide in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was studied the samples oxidation of vanadium carbide (V8C7), synterized and in powder, in order to know the temperature influence and the aggregation state in the kinetics and the oxidation products. The assays were realized in static air, at temperature between 600 y 750 Centigrade, between 6 and 24 hours periods. The gaseous products were analyzed through gas chromatography while the condensates ones were analyzed through optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis by X-ray fluorescence analysis. It was found that in the V8C7 oxidation occurs two basic processes: the gaseous oxides production which results of the carbon oxidation, fundamentally CO2, and the vanadium condensate oxides production, fundamentally V2O5. In the synterized samples assayed under 650 Centigrade, the kinetics is lineal with loss of mass, suggesting a control by the formation of gaseous products in the sample surface, while in the synterized samples assayed over 650 Centigrade, it occurs a neat gain of mass, which is attributed to vanadium pentoxide fusion. These processes produce stratified layers of V2O5 although at higher temperatures also it was detected V2O4. The superficial area effect is revealed in what the powder samples always experiment a mass neat increase in all essay temperatures, being the condensate oxidation products, fundamentally V2O5 and V6O13. (Author)

  15. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines is studied. Injection molding was the forming method selected for the program because it is capable of forming complex parts adaptable for mass production on an economically sound basis. The goals were to reach a Weibull characteristic strength of 550 MPa (80 ksi) and a Weibull modulus of 16 for bars tested in four-point loading. Statistically designed experiments were performed throughout the program and a fluid mixing process employing an attritor mixer was developed. Compositional improvements in the amounts and sources of boron and carbon used and a pressureless sintering cycle were developed which provided samples of about 99 percent of theoretical density. Strengths were found to improve significantly by annealing in air. Strengths in excess of 550 MPa (80 ksi) with Weibull modulus of about 9 were obtained. Further improvements in Weibull modulus to about 16 were realized by proof testing. This is an increase of 86 percent in strength and 100 percent in Weibull modulus over the baseline data generated at the beginning of the program. Molding yields were improved and flaw distributions were observed to follow a Poisson process. Magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance spectra were found to be useful in characterizing the SiC powder and the sintered samples. Turbocharger rotors were molded and examined as an indication of the moldability of the mixes which were developed in this program.

  16. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-05-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of frequencies. The samples show significant far-infrared absorption due to concentration of charge carriers and a sharp surface phonon-polariton peak. The Casimir interaction of SiC with different materials is calculated and discussed. As a result of the infrared structure and beyond to low frequencies, the Casimir force for SiC-SiC and SiC-Au approaches very slowly the limit of ideal metals, while it saturates significantly below this limit if interaction with insulators takes place (SiC-SiO2). At short separations (<10 nm) analysis of the van der Waals force yielded Hamaker constants for SiC-SiC interactions lower but comparable to those of metals, which is of significance to adhesion and surface assembly processes. Finally, bifurcation analysis of microelectromechanical system actuation indicated that SiC can enhance the regime of stable equilibria against stiction.

  17. Casimir force measurements from silicon carbide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, M.; Svetovoy, V. B.; Palasantzas, G.

    2016-02-01

    Using an atomic force microscope we performed measurements of the Casimir force between a gold- coated (Au) microsphere and doped silicon carbide (SiC) samples. The last of these is a promising material for devices operating under severe environments. The roughness of the interacting surfaces was measured to obtain information for the minimum separation distance upon contact. Ellipsometry data for both systems were used to extract optical properties needed for the calculation of the Casimir force via the Lifshitz theory and for comparison to the experiment. Special attention is devoted to the separation of the electrostatic contribution to the measured total force. Our measurements demonstrate large contact potential V0(≈0.67 V ) , and a relatively small density of charges trapped in SiC. Knowledge of both Casimir and electrostatic forces between interacting materials is not only important from the fundamental point of view, but also for device applications involving actuating components at separations of less than 200 nm where surface forces play dominant role.

  18. Thermal equation of state of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuejian; Liu, Zhi T. Y.; Khare, Sanjay V.; Collins, Sean Andrew; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wang, Liping; Zhao, Yusheng

    2016-02-01

    A large volume press coupled with in-situ energy-dispersive synchrotron X-ray was used to probe the change of silicon carbide (SiC) under high pressure and temperature (P-T) up to 8.1 GPa and 1100 K. The obtained pressure-volume-temperature data were fitted to a modified high-T Birch-Murnaghan equation of state, yielding values of a series of thermo-elastic parameters, such as the ambient bulk modulus KTo = 237(2) GPa, temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant pressure (∂K/∂T)P = -0.037(4) GPa K-1, volumetric thermal expansivity α(0, T) = a + bT with a = 5.77(1) × 10-6 K-1 and b = 1.36(2) × 10-8 K-2, and pressure derivative of the thermal expansion at a constant temperature (∂α/∂P)T = 6.53 ± 0.64 × 10-7 K-1 GPa-1. Furthermore, we found the temperature derivative of the bulk modulus at a constant volume, (∂KT/∂T)V, equal to -0.028(4) GPa K-1 by using a thermal pressure approach. In addition, the elastic properties of SiC were determined by density functional theory through the calculation of Helmholtz free energy. The computed results generally agree well with the experimentally determined values.

  19. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics. PMID:26394207

  20. Analysis of boron carbides' electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Iris A.; Beckel, Charles L.

    1986-01-01

    The electronic properties of boron-rich icosahedral clusters were studied as a means of understanding the electronic structure of the icosahedral borides such as boron carbide. A lower bound was estimated on bipolaron formation energies in B12 and B11C icosahedra, and the associated distortions. While the magnitude of the distortion associated with bipolaron formation is similar in both cases, the calculated formation energies differ greatly, formation being much more favorable on B11C icosahedra. The stable positions of a divalent atom relative to an icosahedral borane was also investigated, with the result that a stable energy minimum was found when the atom is at the center of the borane, internal to the B12 cage. If incorporation of dopant atoms into B12 cages in icosahedral boride solids is feasible, novel materials might result. In addition, the normal modes of a B12H12 cluster, of the C2B10 cage in para-carborane, and of a B12 icosahedron of reduced (D sub 3d) symmetry, such as is found in the icosahedral borides, were calculated. The nature of these vibrational modes will be important in determining, for instance, the character of the electron-lattice coupling in the borides, and in analyzing the lattice contribution to the thermal conductivity.

  1. Predicting Two-Dimensional Silicon Carbide Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhiming; Zhang, Zhuhua; Kutana, Alex; Yakobson, Boris I

    2015-10-27

    Intrinsic semimetallicity of graphene and silicene largely limits their applications in functional devices. Mixing carbon and silicon atoms to form two-dimensional (2D) silicon carbide (SixC1-x) sheets is promising to overcome this issue. Using first-principles calculations combined with the cluster expansion method, we perform a comprehensive study on the thermodynamic stability and electronic properties of 2D SixC1-x monolayers with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1. Upon varying the silicon concentration, the 2D SixC1-x presents two distinct structural phases, a homogeneous phase with well dispersed Si (or C) atoms and an in-plane hybrid phase rich in SiC domains. While the in-plane hybrid structure shows uniform semiconducting properties with widely tunable band gap from 0 to 2.87 eV due to quantum confinement effect imposed by the SiC domains, the homogeneous structures can be semiconducting or remain semimetallic depending on a superlattice vector which dictates whether the sublattice symmetry is topologically broken. Moreover, we reveal a universal rule for describing the electronic properties of the homogeneous SixC1-x structures. These findings suggest that the 2D SixC1-x monolayers may present a new "family" of 2D materials, with a rich variety of properties for applications in electronics and optoelectronics.

  2. Structural Evolution of Molybdenum Carbides in Hot Aqueous Environments and Impact on Low-Temperature Hydroprocessing of Acetic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Soon Choi; Viviane Schwartz; Eduardo Santillan-Jimenez; Mark Crocker; Samuel A. Lewis; Michael J. Lance; Meyer, Harry M.; More, Karren L.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the structural evolution of molybdenum carbides subjected to hot aqueous environments and their catalytic performance in low-temperature hydroprocessing of acetic acid. While bulk structures of Mo carbides were maintained after aging in hot liquid water, a portion of carbidic Mo sites were converted to oxidic sites. Water aging also induced changes to the non-carbidic carbon deposited during carbide synthesis and increased surface roughness, which in turn affected carbide pore...

  3. A US perspective on fast reactor fuel fabrication technology and experience. Part II: Ceramic fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is Part II of a review focusing on the United States experience with oxide, carbide, and nitride fast reactor fuel fabrication. Over 60 years of research in fuel fabrication by government, national laboratories, industry, and academia has culminated in a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate these fuel types. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies in the United States for each of these fuel types, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  4. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO2 as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO2-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined

  5. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-20

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

  6. Detection of a leaking boron-carbide control rod in a TRIGA Mark I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During a routine quarterly inspection of the boron-carbide control rods of the Omaha Veterans Administration Hospital 18 kW Triga Mark I reactor, a pin hole leak was detected approximately 3 mm from the chamfered edge. The leak was found by observing bubbles when the rod was withdrawn from the reactor tank for visual observation, and could not be seen with the naked eye. This suggests that pin hole leaks could occur and not be visually detected in control rods and fuel elements examined underwater. A review of the rod calibrations showed that the leak had not caused a loss in rod worth. Slides will be presented showing the bubbles observed during the inspection, together with an unmagnified and magnified view of the pin hole. (author)

  7. Selective deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols on molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ke; Yu, Weiting; Chen, Jingguang G.

    2014-12-01

    The selective deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols without cleaving the Csbnd C bond is crucial for upgrading bio-oil and other biomass-derived molecules to useful fuels and chemicals. In this work, propanal, 1-propanol, furfural and furfuryl alcohol were selected as probe molecules to study the deoxygenation of aldehydes and alcohols on molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) prepared over a Mo(1 1 0) surface. The reaction pathways were investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). The deoxygenation of propanal and 1-propanol went through a similar intermediate (propoxide or η2(C,O)-propanal) to produce propene. The deoxygenation of furfural and furfuryl alcohol produced a surface intermediate similar to adsorbed 2-methylfuran. The comparison of these results revealed the promising deoxygenation performance of Mo2C, as well as the effect of the furan ring on the selective deoxygenation of the Cdbnd O and Csbnd OH bonds.

  8. History of fast reactor fuel development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, J. H.; Frost, B. R. T.; Mustelier, J. P.; Bagley, K. Q.; Crittenden, G. C.; Van Dievoet, J.

    1993-09-01

    The first fast breeder reactors, constructed in the 1945-1960 time period, used metallic fuels composed of uranium, plutonium, or their alloys. They were chosen because most existing reactor operating experience had been obtained on metallic fuels and because they provided the highest breeding ratios. Difficulties in obtaining adequate dimensional stability in metallic fuel elements under conditions of high fuel burnup led in the 1960s to the virtual worldwide choice of ceramic fuels. Although ceramic fuels provide lower breeding performance, this objective is no longer an important consideration in most national programs. Mixed uranium and plutonium dioxide became the ceramic fuel that has received the widest use. The more advanced ceramic fuels, mixed uranium and plutonium carbides and nitrides, continue under development. More recently, metal fuel elements of improved design have joined ceramic fuels in achieving goal burnups of 15 to 20 percent. Low-swelling fuel cladding alloys have also been continuously developed to deal with the unexpected problem of void formation in stainless steels subjected to fast neutron irradiation, a phenomenon first observed in the 1960s.

  9. Converting a carbon preform object to a silicon carbide object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A process for converting in depth a carbon or graphite preform object to a silicon carbide object, silicon carbide/silicon object, silicon carbide/carbon-core object, or a silicon carbide/silicon/carbon-core object, by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time in a reaction chamber. In the process, a stream comprised of a silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a coreactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into the reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. Thus, the precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. Any stream of decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from the reaction chamber is removed. A carbon or graphite preform object placed in the reaction chamber is contacted with the silicon. The carbon or graphite preform object is recovered from the reactor chamber after it has been converted to a desired silicon carbide, silicon and carbon composition.

  10. Benzene hydrogenation catalysed by molybdenum carbide supported on Y zeolite; Hidrogenacao de benzeno catalisada por especies do tipo carbeto de molibdenio suportado em zeolita Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Angela Sanches; Faro Junior, Arnaldo da Costa [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Dept. de Fisico-Quimica]. E-mail: asrocha@iq.ufrj.br; farojr@iq.ufrj.br; Silva, Victor Teixeira da [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica]. E-mail: dasilva@aquarius.ime.eb.br

    2003-07-01

    Besides increasingly severe environmental legislation that limits the amount of aromatic hydrocarbons present in diesel fuels , improvement of the cetane number stimulates the development of hydrodesaromatization (HDA) catalysts. The present work investigates zeolite-supported molybdenum carbide catalysts , as an alternative for deep HDA. The transition metal carbides display catalytic activity similar to that of the noble metals catalysts used for this purpose, but they show larger thiotolerance, and have a lower price. Molybdenum carbide supported on Y zeolite with different silica/alumina ratios (SAR) and sodium contents were prepared starting from Mo(CO){sub 6} adsorbed on the zeolites and decomposed under different gaseous atmospheres, at high temperatures. The obtained materials were tested in benzene hydrogenation at 90 deg C, showing significant activity at atmospheric pressure, which characterizes the formation of carbides species. Strong dependence of the activity of the catalysts was also observed in relation to SAR and to the quantity of sodium of the zeolite supports. FTIR results show that the presence of protons in the zeolites dis favors the formation active molybdenum species. (author)

  11. Irradiation-induced effects of proton irradiation on zirconium carbides with different stoichiometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Y., E-mail: na.huang@materials.ox.ac.uk [Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Maier, B.R. [Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Allen, T.R. [Engineering Physics Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • ZrC{sub x} with four different stoichiometries (x = 0.9–1.2 with 0.1 step) were studied. • Proton irradiation at 800 °C introduced large amount of dislocation loops. • No voids were found before or after irradiation. • Dislocation loops size distribution and density varied with stoichiometry. - Abstract: Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in deep burn TRISO fuel particles for high-temperature, gas-cooled reactors. Zirconium carbide has a cubic B1 type crystal structure along with a very high melting point (3420 °C), exceptional hardness and good thermal and electrical conductivities. Understanding the ZrC irradiation response is crucial for establishing ZrC as an alternative component in TRISO fuel. Until now, very few studies on irradiation effects on ZrC have been released and fundamental aspects of defect evolution and kinetics are not well understood although some atomistic simulations and phenomenological studies have been performed. This work was carried out to understand the damage evolution in float-zone refined ZrC with different stoichiometries. Proton irradiations at 800 °C up to doses of 3 dpa were performed on ZrC{sub x} (where x ranges from 0.9 to 1.2) to investigate the damage evolution. The irradiation-induced defects, such as density of dislocation loops, at different stoichiometries and doses which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented and discussed.

  12. Computational Design of Advanced Nuclear Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savrasov, Sergey [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Kotliar, Gabriel [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Haule, Kristjan [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-03

    The objective of the project was to develop a method for theoretical understanding of nuclear fuel materials whose physical and thermophysical properties can be predicted from first principles using a novel dynamical mean field method for electronic structure calculations. We concentrated our study on uranium, plutonium, their oxides, nitrides, carbides, as well as some rare earth materials whose 4f eletrons provide a simplified framework for understanding complex behavior of the f electrons. We addressed the issues connected to the electronic structure, lattice instabilities, phonon and magnon dynamics as well as thermal conductivity. This allowed us to evaluate characteristics of advanced nuclear fuel systems using computer based simulations and avoid costly experiments.

  13. Kinetics of niobium carbide precipitation in ferrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to develop a NbC precipitation modelling in ferrite. This theoretical study is motivated by the fact it considers a ternary system and focus on the concurrence of two different diffusion mechanisms. An experimental study with TEP, SANS and Vickers micro-hardening measurements allows a description of the NbC precipitation kinetics. The mean radius of the precipitates is characterized by TEM observations. To focus on the nucleation stage, we use the Tomographic Atom Probe that analyses, at an atomistic scale, the position of the solute atoms in the matrix. A first model based on the classical nucleation theory and the diffusion-limited growth describes the precipitation of spherical precipitates. To solve the set of equations, we use a numerical algorithm that furnishes an evaluation of the precipitated fraction, the mean radius and the whole size distribution of the particles. The parameters that are the interface energy, the solubility product and the diffusion coefficients are fitted with the data available in the literature and our experimental results. It allows a satisfactory agreement as regards to the simplicity of the model. Monte Carlo simulations are used to describe the evolution of a ternary alloy Fe-Nb-C on a cubic centred rigid lattice with vacancy and interstitial mechanisms. This is realized with an atomistic description of the atoms jumps and their related frequencies. The model parameters are fitted with phase diagrams and diffusion coefficients. For the sake of simplicity, we consider that the precipitation of NbC is totally coherent and we neglect any elastic strain effect. We can observe different kinetic paths: for low supersaturations, we find an expected precipitation of NbC but for higher supersaturations, the very fast diffusivity of carbon atoms conducts to the nucleation of iron carbide particles. We establish that the occurrence of this second phenomenon depends on the vacancy arrival kinetics and can be related

  14. The behaviour of fission products in fuel elements of the AVR-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel elements of the THTR-1-type-, THTR-2-type-, and CFB-2-type reactor have an extraordinary retention capacity for all fission products. Pressed-carbide fuel elements, however, at a temperature above 3000C release considerable Sr- and Eu-activities as a result of diffusion through intact PyC-layers. For GLE-1 and GFB-1 fuel elements a considerable release of cesium has been observed which is caused by defective coated particles. (DG)

  15. Investigation on the Effects of Titanium Diboride Particle Size on Radiation Shielding Properties of Titanium Diboride Reinforced Boron Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Addemir

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion power plants. Titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites which were produced from different titanium diboride particle sizes and ratios were studied for searching of the behaviour against the gamma ray. Cs-137 gamma radioisotope was used as gamma source in the experiments which has a single gamma-peak at 0.662 MeV. Gamma transmission technique was used for the measurements. The effects of titanium diboride particle size on radiation attenuation of titanium diboride reinforced boron carbide-silicon carbide composites were evaluated in related with gamma transmission and the results of the experiments were interpreted and compared with each other. Composite materials have wide application areas in industry. Boron Carbide is an important material for nuclear technology. Silicon carbide is a candidate material in the first wall and blankets of fusion

  16. Active carbon supported molybdenum carbides for higher alcohols synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Chiarello, Gian Luca; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt;

    This work provides an investigation of the high pressure CO hydrogenation to higher alcohols on K2CO3 promoted active carbon supported molybdenum carbide. Both activity and selectivity to alcohols over supported molybdenum carbides increased significantly compared to bulk carbides in literatures....... spectroscopy were applied for determining the carburization temperature and evaluating the composition of the carbide clusters of different samples through determinations of the Mo-C and Mo-Mo coordination numbers....

  17. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K.; Staňková, A.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  18. Atomic structure of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K Madhav; Liu, P; Hirata, A; Fujita, T; Chen, M W

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous shear bands are the main deformation and failure mode of super-hard boron carbide subjected to shock loading and high pressures at room temperature. Nevertheless, the formation mechanisms of the amorphous shear bands remain a long-standing scientific curiosity mainly because of the lack of experimental structure information of the disordered shear bands, comprising light elements of carbon and boron only. Here we report the atomic structure of the amorphous shear bands in boron carbide characterized by state-of-the-art aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Distorted icosahedra, displaced from the crystalline matrix, were observed in nano-sized amorphous bands that produce dislocation-like local shear strains. These experimental results provide direct experimental evidence that the formation of amorphous shear bands in boron carbide results from the disassembly of the icosahedra, driven by shear stresses.

  19. APT analysis of WC-Co based cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidow, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.weidow@chalmers.se [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Andren, Hans-Olof [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2011-05-15

    A method for quickly producing sharp and site-specific atom probe specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides was developed using a combination of electropolishing, controlled back-polishing and FIB milling. Also, a method for measuring the amount of segregated atoms to an interface between two phases with a big difference in field needed for field evaporation was developed. Using atom probe tomography, the interface chemistry of WC/WC grain boundaries, WC/(M,W)C phase boundaries and WC/binder phase boundaries was analysed. In addition, the transition metal solubility in WC was determined. -- Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method for producing specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides. {yields} Measure segregated atoms to an interface between phases with different field evaporation field. {yields} The interface chemistry in cemented carbides. {yields} The transition metal solubility in WC.

  20. APT analysis of WC-Co based cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for quickly producing sharp and site-specific atom probe specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides was developed using a combination of electropolishing, controlled back-polishing and FIB milling. Also, a method for measuring the amount of segregated atoms to an interface between two phases with a big difference in field needed for field evaporation was developed. Using atom probe tomography, the interface chemistry of WC/WC grain boundaries, WC/(M,W)C phase boundaries and WC/binder phase boundaries was analysed. In addition, the transition metal solubility in WC was determined. -- Research highlights: → We develop a method for producing specimens from WC-Co based cemented carbides. → Measure segregated atoms to an interface between phases with different field evaporation field. → The interface chemistry in cemented carbides. → The transition metal solubility in WC.

  1. Optimum Design of Lightweight Silicon Carbide Mirror Assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Yuanyuan; ZHANG Yumin; HAN Jiecai; ZHANG Jianhan; YAO Wang; ZHOU Yufeng

    2008-01-01

    According to the design requirement and on the basis of the principle that the thermal expansion coefficient of the support structure should match with that of the mirror, a lightweight silicon carbide primary mirror assembly was designed. Finite element analysis combined with the parameter-optimized method was used during the design. Lightweight cell and rigid rib structure were used for the mirror assembly. The static, dynamic and thermal properties of the primary mirror assembly were analyzed. It is shown that after optimization, the lightweight ratio of the silicon carbide mirror is 52.5%, and the rigidity of the silicon carbide structure is high enough to support the required mirror. When temperature changes, the deformation of the mirror surface is in proportion to the temperature difference.

  2. Fabrication of Tungsten Carbide Nanoparticles from Refluxing Derived Precursor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Jiqiu; LI Yongdi; MENG Xiaopeng; YIN Guangfu; YAO Yadong

    2015-01-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) nanoparticles were fabricated from a novel refluxing-derived precursor. The precursor was prepared by acid hydrolysis of Na2WO4 with concentrated HCl in water followed by refluxing with ethanol and n-Dedocane, respectively. Then it was heat-treated to 1 200℃for 2 h in vacuum to obtain WC nanoparticles. X-ray studies reveal the formation of hexagonal tungsten carbide and the grain size of 24.3 nm. SEM image shows WC nanoparticles with particle size of 20-60 nm. Long time refluxing results in alkane dehydrogenation and coke formation. The coke is the carbon source in the carbothermal reduction reaction. The novel route of two-stage refluxing is quite general and can be applied in the synthesis of similar carbides.

  3. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguan [University of Delaware

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  4. Formation of mesostructure in WC-Co cemented carbides: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Lisovsky A.F.

    2011-01-01

    The author considers potential lines in the formation of mesostructures in cemented carbides, analyzes the existing technologies of the formation thereof, describes physical and mechanical properties of cemented carbides with mesostructure and shows the efficiency of such cemented carbides in metal working and rock destruction tools.

  5. Formation of mesostructure in WC-Co cemented carbides: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisovsky A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The author considers potential lines in the formation of mesostructures in cemented carbides, analyzes the existing technologies of the formation thereof, describes physical and mechanical properties of cemented carbides with mesostructure and shows the efficiency of such cemented carbides in metal working and rock destruction tools.

  6. Monolayer Iron Carbide Films on Au(111) as a Fischer–Tropsch Model Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannie, Gilbère; Lammich, Lutz; Li, Yong-Wang;

    2014-01-01

    Using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we characterize the atomic-scale details of ultrathin films of iron carbide (FexCy) on Au(111) synthesized as a potential model system for the active iron carbide phase in iron Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS) catalysts. The experiments show that room...... carbide surfaces present under FTS conditions....

  7. 40 CFR 415.30 - Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbide production subcategory. 415.30 Section 415.30 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Calcium Carbide Production Subcategory § 415.30 Applicability; description of the calcium carbide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to discharges resulting...

  8. 40 CFR 424.50 - Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. 424.50 Section 424.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Other Calcium Carbide Furnaces Subcategory § 424.50 Applicability; description of the other calcium carbide furnaces subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  9. Evolution of carbides in cold-work tool steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hoyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Jun-Yun, E-mail: firice@kims.re.kr [Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Dongmin [Seah Changwon Special Steel, 147 Jeokhyeon-ro, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-370 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, 797 Changwon-daero, Seongsan-gu, Changwon, Gyeongnam 642-831 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung-Mox, E-mail: chokm@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pusan National University, 2 Busandaehak-ro 63beon-gil, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    This study aimed to present the complete history of carbide evolution in a cold-work tool steel along its full processing route for fabrication and application. A sequence of processes from cast to final hardening heat treatment was conducted on an 8% Cr-steel to reproduce a typical commercial processing route in a small scale. The carbides found at each process step were then identified by electron diffraction with energy dispersive spectroscopy in a scanning or transmission electron microscope. After solidification, MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 2}C carbides were identified and the last one dissolved during hot compression at 1180 °C. In a subsequent annealing at 870 °C followed by slow cooling, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} were added, while they were dissolved in the following austenitization at 1030 °C. After the final tempering at 520 °C, fine M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitated again, thus the final microstructure was the tempered martensite with MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. The transient M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C originated from the segregation of Mo and finally disappeared due to attenuated segregation and the consequent thermodynamic instability. - Highlights: • The full processing route of a cold-work tool steel was simulated in a small scale. • The carbides in the tool steel were identified by chemical–crystallographic analyses. • MC, M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 2}C, M{sub 6}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were found during the processing of the steel. • M{sub 2}C and M{sub 6}C finally disappeared due to thermodynamic instability.

  10. Combined Photoemission Spectroscopy and Electrochemical Study of a Mixture of (Oxy)carbides as Potential Innovative Supports and Electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvillo, Laura; Valero-Vidal, Carlos; Agnoli, Stefano; Sezen, Hikmet; Rüdiger, Celine; Kunze-Liebhäuser, Julia; Granozzi, Gaetano

    2016-08-01

    Active and stable non-noble metal materials, able to substitute Pt as catalyst or to reduce the Pt amount, are vitally important for the extended commercialization of energy conversion technologies, such as fuel cells and electrolyzers. Here, we report a fundamental study of nonstoichiometric tungsten carbide (WxC) and its interaction with titanium oxycarbide (TiOxCy) under electrochemical working conditions. In particular, the electrochemical activity and stability of the WxC/TiOxCy system toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction (EOR) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are investigated. The chemical changes caused by the applied potential are established by combining photoemission spectroscopy and electrochemistry. WxC is not active toward the ethanol electrooxidation reaction at room temperature but it is highly stable under these conditions thanks to the formation of a passive thin film on the surface, consisting mainly of WO2 and W2O5, which prevents the full oxidation of WxC. In addition, WxC is able to adsorb ethanol, forming ethoxy groups on the surface, which constitutes the first step for the ethanol oxidation. The interaction between WxC and TiOxCy plays an important role in the electrochemical stability of WxC since specific orientations of the substrate are able to stabilize WxC and prevent its corrosion. The beneficial interaction with the substrate and the specific surface chemistry makes tungsten carbide a good electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for direct ethanol fuel cells. However, WxC is active toward the HER and chemically stable under hydrogen reduction conditions, since no changes in the chemical composition or dissolution of the film are observed. This makes tungsten carbide a good candidate as electrocatalyst support or cocatalyst for the electrochemical production of hydrogen. PMID:27399154

  11. The development of CVR coatings for PBR fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, R. E.; Vanier, P. E.; Dowell, M. B.; Lennartz, J. A.

    Particle bed reactors (PBR's) are being developed for both space power and propulsion applications. These reactors operate with exhaust gas temperatures of 2500 to 3000 K and fuel temperatures hundreds of degrees higher. One fuel design for these reactors consists of uranium carbide encapsulated in either carbon or graphite. This fuel kernel must be protected from the coolant gas, usually H2, both to prevent attack of the kernel and to limit fission product release. Refractory carbide coatings have been proposed for this purpose. The typical coating process used for this is a chemical vapor deposition. Testing of other components have indicated the superiority of refractory carbide coatings applied using a chemical vapor reaction (CVR) process, however technology to apply these coatings to large numbers of fuel particles with diameters on the order of 500 pm were not readily available. A process to deposit these CVR coatings on surrogate fuel consisting of graphite particles is described. Several types of coatings have been applied to the graphite substrate: NbC in various thicknesses and a bilayer coating consisting of NbC and TaC with a intermediate layer of pyrolytic graphite. These coated particles have been characterized prior to test; results are presented.

  12. Shock-induced localized amorphization in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mingwei; McCauley, James W; Hemker, Kevin J

    2003-03-01

    High-resolution electron microscope observations of shock-loaded boron carbide have revealed the formation of nanoscale intragranular amorphous bands that occur parallel to specific crystallographic planes and contiguously with apparent cleaved fracture surfaces. This damage mechanism explains the measured, but not previously understood, decrease in the ballistic performance of boron carbide at high impact rates and pressures. The formation of these amorphous bands is also an example of how shock loading can result in the synthesis of novel structures and materials with substantially altered properties.

  13. Comparative sinterability of combustion synthesized and commercial titanium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of various parameters on the sinterability of combustion synthesized titanium carbide was investigaged. Titanium carbide powders, prepared by the combustion synthesis process, were sintered in the temperature range 1150 to 16000C. Incomplete combustion and high oxygen contents were found to be the cause of reduced shrinkage during sintering of the combustion syntheized powders when compared to the shrinkage of commercial TiC. Free carbon was shown to inhibit shrinkage. The activation energy for sintering was found to depend on stoichiometry (C/Ti). With decreasing C/Ti, the rate of sintering increased. 29 references, 16 figures, 13 tables

  14. Flaw imaging and ultrasonic techniques for characterizing sintered silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.; Abel, P.B.

    1987-08-01

    The capabilities were investigated of projection microfocus x-radiography, ultrasonic velocity and attenuation, and reflection scanning acoustic microscopy for characterizing silicon carbide specimens. Silicon carbide batches covered a range of densities and different microstructural characteristics. Room temperature, four point flexural strength tests were conducted. Fractography was used to identify types, sizes, and locations of fracture origins. Fracture toughness values were calculated from fracture strength and flaw characterization data. Detection capabilities of radiography and acoustic microscopy for fracture-causing flaws were evaluated. Applicability of ultrasonics for verifying material strength and toughness was examined.

  15. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  16. Thermodynamic Calculation of Carbide Precipitate in Niobium Microalloyed Steels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yun-bo; YU Yong-mei; LIU Xiang-hua; WANG Guo-dong

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of regular solution sublattice model, thermodynamic equilibrium of austenite/carbide in Fe-Nb-C ternary system was investigated. The equilibrium volume fraction, chemical driving force of carbide precipitates and molar fraction of niobium and carbon in solution at different temperatures were evaluated respectively. The volume fraction of precipitates increases, molar fraction of niobium dissolved in austenite decreases and molar fraction of carbon increases with decreasing the niobium content. The driving force increases with the decrease of temperature, and then comes to be stable at relatively low temperatures. The predicted ratio of carbon in precipitates is in good agreement with the measured one.

  17. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded...

  18. Carbothermic synthesis of carbides of uranium and plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial pressures of carbon monoxide, uranium and plutonium over different phase regions relevant to the carbothermic synthesis of carbides of uranium and plutonium are calculated using recent models and thermodynamic data for the compounds in U-C-O and Pu-C-O systems. The experimental parameters for the preparation of uranium carbides and a two step synthesis involving carbothermic reduction of the oxide to the dicarbide followed by hydrogen stripping of carbon to produce uranium monocarbide are discussed. (author). 31 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs

  19. In-situ HRTEM study of the reactive carbide phase of Co/MoS{sub 2} catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, Manuel, E-mail: manuel.ramos@uacj.mx [Departamento de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto de Ingeniería y Tecnología, UACJ, 32310 Ciudad Juárez, México (Mexico); Materials Research and Technology Institute, UT-El Paso, El Paso, TX 79902 (United States); Ferrer, Domingo [Microelectronics Research Laboratory, UT-Austin, Austin, TX 78758 (United States); Martinez-Soto, Eduan [Departamento de Química, Universidad Metropolitana, San Juan, PR 00926-2602 (United States); Lopez-Lippmann, Hugo; Torres, Brenda [Materials Research and Technology Institute, UT-El Paso, El Paso, TX 79902 (United States); Berhault, Gilles [Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l’Environnement, IRCELYON, CNRS, Université de Lyon, Villeurbanne 69100 (France); Chianelli, Russell R. [Materials Research and Technology Institute, UT-El Paso, El Paso, TX 79902 (United States)

    2013-04-15

    Hydrotreatment catalytic operations are commonly performed industrially by layered molybdenum sulfide promoted by cobalt or nickel in order to remove heteroelements (S, N, O) from fossil fuels and biofuels. Indeed, these heteroelements are responsible of the emission of pollutants when these fuels are used in vehicles. In this respect, previous studies made by our research group have shown that the active phase under steady state conditions is partially carbided while strong bending effects of MoS{sub 2} slabs were also observed. However, up to now, the morphology of the resulting Co/MoS{sub x}C{sub y} carbided catalyst has not been fully characterized. In the present study, for the first time, a chemical reaction between the carbon content of a TEM Cu/C grid and a freshly sulfide Co/MoS{sub 2} catalyst was in situ observed at 300 °C and 450 °C by HRTEM experimental techniques at ∼10 nm of resolution. Results indicate that bending of MoS{sub 2} layers occurred due to carbon addition on MoS{sub 2} edge sites, as observed in stabilized catalysts after HDS reaction. Using a silicon grid, only cracks of MoS{sub 2} slabs were observed without bending effect confirming the role of structural-carbon in this change of morphology.

  20. Neutronics Study on LEU Nuclear Thermal Rocket Fuel Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venneri, Paolo; Kim, Yong Hee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Howe, Steven [CSNR, Idaho (United States)

    2014-10-15

    This has resulted in a non-trivial simplification of the tasks needed to develop such an engine and the quick initial development of the concept. There are, however, a series of key core-design choices that are currently under scrutiny in the field that have to be resolved in order for the LEU-NTR to be fully developed. The most important of these is the choice of fuel: carbide composite or tungsten cermet. This study presents a first comparison of the two fuel types specifically in the neutronic application to the LEU-NTR, keeping in mind the unique neutronic environment and the system requirements of the system. The scope of the study itself is limited to a neutronics study of the two fuels and only a cursory overview of the material properties of the fuels themselves... The results of this study have led to two major conclusions. First of all is that the carbide composite fuel is, from a neutronics standpoint, a much better fuel. It has a low absorption cross-section, is inherently a strong moderator, is able to achieve a higher reactivity using smaller amounts of fissile material, and can potentially enable a smaller reactor. Second is that despite its neutronic difficulties (high absorption, inferior moderating abilities, and lower k-infinity values) the tungsten cermet fuel is still able to perform satisfactorily in an LEU-NTR, largely due to its ability to have an extremely high fuel loading.

  1. Friction and wear behavior of chromium carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium carbides, tungsten carbide, and chromium oxide have been tested and evaluated as coatings to protect high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) steam generator and other HTGR components from adhesion, galling associated with sliding wear or from fretting. Tests were performed in commercially-pure helium and in helium doped with various gaseous impurities (H2, H2O, CH4, CO) to simulate the primary coolant of an HTGR. Several types of chromium carbide coatings including Cr3C2, Cr7C3, and Cr23C6, were tested for wear resistance and resistance to long-term spalling. Tungsten carbide and chromium oxide coatings were tested in sliding wear tests. Cr23C6-NiCr coatings showed the best performance (from 400 to 8160C) whether they were applied by detonation gun or plasma gun spraying methods. The presence of the Cr23C6-NiCr coatings did not affect the creep rupture properties of Alloy 800H substrates at temperatures up to 7600C. Low-cycle fatigue life of similar specimens at 5930C was reduced to 10 to 20% when tested in the 1 to 0.6% strain range

  2. Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porosity of detonation coatings on the base of chromium carbide is estimated by the hydrostatic weighing. The open porosity value dependence on the distance of spraying, depth of the charge, ratio and volume of the detonator barrie filing with gas components is established. Pore distribution in the cross section of a specimen tested for porosity is studied by the methods of metallographic analysis

  3. Dynamic strength of reaction-sintered boron carbide ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savinykh, A. S.; Garkushin, G. V.; Razorenov, S. V.; Rumyantsev, V. I.

    2015-06-01

    The shock compression wave profiles in three modifications of boron carbide ceramic are studied in the compressive stress range 3-19 GPa. The Hugoniot elastic limit and the spall strength of the materials are determined. It is confirmed that the spall strength of high-hardness ceramic changes nonmonotonically with the compressive stress in a shock wave.

  4. Standard specification for nuclear-Grade boron carbide pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This specification applies to boron carbide pellets for use as a control material in nuclear reactors. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only.

  5. PECVD silicon carbide surface micromachining technology and selected MEMS applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajaraman, V.; Pakula, L.S.; Yang, H.; French, P.J.; Sarro, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Attractive material properties of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposited (PECVD) silicon carbide (SiC) when combined with CMOS-compatible low thermal budget processing provides an ideal technology platform for developing various microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) devices and merging them with

  6. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GEORGE PELIN; CRISTINA-ELISABETA PELIN; ADRIANA STEFAN; ION DINC\\u{A}; ANTON FICAI; ECATERINA ANDRONESCU; ROXANA TRUSC\\u{A}

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based composites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ensure uniform dispersion of the nanopowder, followed by heat curing of the phenolic-based materials at controlled temperature profile up to 120$^{\\circ}$C. The obtained nanocomposites were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis and evaluated in terms of mechanical, tribological and thermal stability under load. The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric silicon carbide content. The results indicate that these materials could be effectively used to obtain ablative or carbon–carbon composites in future studies.

  7. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodenbücher, C.; Hildebrandt, E.; Szot, K.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Breuer, U.; Waser, R.; Alff, L.

    2016-06-01

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO2-x) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfCx) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfCx surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO2 thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfCx was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  8. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  9. Modification of optical surfaces employing CVD boron carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Non-reflective or high emissivity optical surfaces require materials with given roughness or surface characteristics wherein interaction with incident radiation results in the absorption and dissipation of a specific spectrum of radiation. Coatings have been used to alter optical properties, however, extreme service environments, such as experienced by satellite systems and other spacecraft, necessitate the use of materials with unique combinations of physical, chemical, and mechanical properties. Thus, ceramics such as boron carbide are leading candidates for these applications. Boron carbide was examined as a coating for optical baffle surfaces. Boron carbide coatings were deposited on graphite substrates from BCl3, CH4, and H2 gases employing chemical vapor deposition (CVD) techniques. Parameters including temperature, reactant gas compositions and flows, and pressure were explored. The structures of the coatings were characterized using electron microscopy and compositions were determined using x-ray diffraction. The optical properties of the boron carbide coatings were measured, and relationships between processing conditions, deposit morphology, and optical properties were determined

  10. Fluorescent silicon carbide materials for white LEDs and photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan; Wellmann, Peter

    in cubic silicon carbide. The impurity photovoltaic effect could lead to devices with efficiencies comparable to those of tandem systems, and could open a new road for very-high-efficiency solar cells. Such high performance can be reached only if the host material has a large energy gap, like cubic silicon...

  11. Metallographic studies of eutectics carbides in high niobium microalloyed steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quantity, distribution and effectiveness of eutectic carbides was studied in high niobium microalloyed steels. The particles showed extremely inhomogenuous distributions and seemed to be ineffective in promoting refinement of either an austenitic, ferritic or perlitic microstructure. There is a definite need for better quantitative data about the fraction of Nb 'lost' to eutectic particles in these steels. (Author)

  12. Growth of Vanadium Carbide by Halide-Activated Pack Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter;

    The present work investigates growth of vanadium carbide (VC) layers by the pack diffusion method on a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The VC layers were produced by pack diffusion at 1000°C for 1, 4 and 16 hours. The VC layers were characterized with optical and electron microscopy, Vickers hardness tests...

  13. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  14. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-09-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process.

  15. Growth characteristics of primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Zhou, Yefei; Xing, Xiaolei; Wang, Jibo; Ren, Xuejun; Yang, Qingxiang

    2016-01-01

    The microstructure of the hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is observed by optical microscopy (OM). The initial growth morphology, the crystallographic structure, the semi-molten morphology and the stacking faults of the primary M7C3 carbide are observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The in-suit growth process of the primary M7C3 carbide was observed by confocal laser microscope (CLM). It is found that the primary M7C3 carbide in hypereutectic Fe-Cr-C alloy is irregular polygonal shape with several hollows in the center and gaps on the edge. Some primary M7C3 carbides are formed by layers of shell or/and consist of multiple parts. In the initial growth period, the primary M7C3 carbide forms protrusion parallel to {} crystal planes. The extending and revolving protrusion forms the carbide shell. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) maps show that the primary M7C3 carbide consists of multiple parts. The semi-molten M7C3 carbide contains unmelted shell and several small-scale carbides inside, which further proves that the primary M7C3 carbide is not an overall block. It is believed that the coalescence of the primary M7C3 carbides is ascribed to the growing condition of the protrusion and the gap filling process. PMID:27596718

  16. Raman spectroscopic characterization of the core-rim structure in reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannotti, Phillip; Subhash, Ghatu, E-mail: subhash@ufl.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Zheng, James Q.; Halls, Virginia [Program Executive Office—Soldier Protection and Individual Equipment, US Army, Fort Belvoir, Virginia 22060 (United States); Karandikar, Prashant G.; Salamone, S.; Aghajanian, Michael K. [M-Cubed Technologies, Inc., Newark, Delaware 19711 (United States)

    2015-01-26

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the microstructure of reaction bonded boron carbide ceramics. Compositional and structural gradation in the silicon-doped boron carbide phase (rim), which develops around the parent boron carbide region (core) due to the reaction between silicon and boron carbide, was evaluated using changes in Raman peak position and intensity. Peak shifting and intensity variation from the core to the rim region was attributed to changes in the boron carbide crystal structure based on experimental Raman observations and ab initio calculations reported in literature. The results were consistent with compositional analysis determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The Raman analysis revealed the substitution of silicon atoms first into the linear 3-atom chain, and then into icosahedral units of the boron carbide structure. Thus, micro-Raman spectroscopy provided a non-destructive means of identifying the preferential positions of Si atoms in the boron carbide lattice.

  17. The valve effect of the carbide interlayer of an electric resistance plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The welded electric resistance plug (ERP) usually contains a carbide interlayer at the plug-carbon material interface. The interlayer forms during welding the contact metallic alloy with the carbon material when the oxide films of the alloy are reduced on the interface surface by carbon to the formation of carbides and the surface layer of the plug material dissolves carbon to saturation. Subsequently, during solidification of the plug material it forms carbides with the alloy components. The structural composition of the carbide interlayer is determined by the chemical composition of the contact alloy. In alloys developed by the author and his colleagues the carbide forming elements are represented in most cases by silicon and titanium and, less frequently, by chromium and manganese. Therefore, the carbide interlayers in the ERP consisted mainly of silicon and titanium carbides

  18. Mullite Coating on Recrytallized Silicon Carbide and Its Cycling Oxidation Behavior

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Mullite coating on recrystallized silicon carbide was successfully prepared by the sol-gel route. The cycling oxidation of coated recrystallized silicon carbide was performed at 1500℃. For comparison, the oxidation of uncoated recrystallized silicon carbide was also carried out at the same condition. The results indicated that a layer of compact, adhesive and crack free mullite coating was found on the recrystallized silicon carbide. After oxidation, the new coatings exhibit adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1500℃, therefore the oxidation resistance capability of silicon carbide was enhanced. With the increase of the dipping frequencies, namely, the increase of the thickness of mullite coating, the oxidation resistance of silicon carbide would be further improved. The formation mechanism of mullite coating was analyzed and discussed and the oxidation dynamics model of coatedmullite silicon carbide has been also proposed.

  19. Heat-Resistance of the Powder Cobalt Alloys Reinforced by Niobium or Titanium Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherepova, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of heat-resistance of powder cobalt alloys at 1100 °C were investigated. These alloys were developed for the protection of workers banding shelves GTE blades from wear. The alloys were prepared by hot pressing powders of cobalt, chromium, aluminum, iron and niobium or titanium carbides. The values of heat resistance alloys containing carbides between 30 and 70% (vol. depend on the type made of carbide alloys: alloys with titanium carbide superior in heat-resistant alloy of niobium carbide. The most significant factor affecting on the heat-resistant alloys, is porosity: with its increase the parameters decline regardless of the type and content of carbide. The optimum composition of powder heat resisting alloys of titanium carbide with a melting point above 1300 °C were determined for use in the aircraft engine.

  20. Coarsening of carbides during different heat treatment conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Kai, E-mail: miaok21@126.com; He, Yanlin, E-mail: ylhe@staff.shu.edu.cn; Zhu, Naqiong; Wang, Jingjing; Lu, Xiaogang; Li, Lin

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Coarsening of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} carbides was quantitatively described in detail. • Cooling mode is a key factor to the simulation for the coarsening of carbides. • Coarsening of above spherical carbides can be calculated by Ostwald ripening model. • The interfacial energy between the γ matrix with M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} carbides are 0.7 J/m{sup 2}. - Abstract: Coarsening of carbides in 1# Fe-5.96Cr-0.35C (wt.%) alloy and 2# Fe-0.5V-0.53C (wt.%) alloy during different heat treatment conditions was investigated by carbon replica, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) , X-ray diffraction (XRD) and SEM techniques. The equilibrium phases at 850 °C constitute of austenitic matrix (γ) + M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and austenite matrix (γ) + V{sub 4}C{sub 3} for 1# and 2# alloy respectively. Morphology of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} carbides was mainly determined by cooling mode due to the different nucleation sites and growth mechanisms. Under directly aging condition, most carbides nucleate in the grain boundaries and grow into rod-shaped or flake-shaped particles by discontinuous growth mechanism. These particles turn out to be excluded during coarsening simulation using Oswald ripening model to give a more reasonable result. In addition, interfacial energy between M{sub 7}C{sub 3}/γ and V{sub 4}C{sub 3}/γ for the coarsening of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} during aging at 850 °C is evaluated by fitting experimental data using thermodynamic and kinetic calculations. The interfacial energy is determined to be 0.7 J/m{sup 2} for the coarsening of M{sub 7}C{sub 3} and V{sub 4}C{sub 3} in austenitic matrix.

  1. Failed fuel identification techniques for liquid-metal cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, J.D.B.; Gross, K.C.; Mikaili, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Frank, S.M.; Cutforth, D.C.; Angelo, P.L. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-06-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), located in Idaho and operated for the US Department of Energy by Argonne National Laboratory, has been used as an irradiation testbed for LMR fuels and components for thirty years. During this time many endurance tests have been carried out with experimental LMR metal, oxide, carbide and nitride fuel elements, in which cladding failures were intentionally allowed to occur. This paper describes methods that have been developed for the detection, identification and verification of fuel failures.

  2. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  3. Effects of space exposure on ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide and boron-carbide coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keski-Kuha, R A; Blumenstock, G M; Fleetwood, C M; Schmitt, D R

    1998-12-01

    Two recently developed optical coatings, ion-beam-deposited silicon carbide and ion-beam-deposited boron carbide, are very attractive as coatings on optical components for instruments for space astronomy and earth sciences operating in the extreme-UV spectral region because of their high reflectivity, significantly higher than any conventional coating below 105 nm. To take full advantage of these coatings in space applications, it is important to establish their ability to withstand exposure to the residual atomic oxygen and other environmental effects at low-earth-orbit altitudes. The first two flights of the Surface Effects Sample Monitor experiments flown on the ORFEUS-SPAS and the CRISTA-SPAS Shuttle missions provided the opportunity to study the effects of space exposure on these materials. The results indicate a need to protect ion-beam-deposited silicon-carbide-coated optical components from environmental effects in a low-earth orbit. The boron-carbide thin-film coating is a more robust coating able to withstand short-term exposure to atomic oxygen in a low-earth-orbit environment.

  4. Spark plasma sintering of tantalum carbide and graphene reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Ajith Kumar

    Tantalum carbide (TaC), an ultra-high temperature ceramic (UHTC), is well known for its exceptional properties such as high hardness (15-19 GPa), melting point (3950 °C), elastic modulus (537 GPa), chemical resistance, and thermal shock resistance. To make TaC to be the future material for hypersonic vehicles, it is required to improve its thermal conductivity, strength, and fracture toughness. Researchers have previously reinforced TaC ceramic with carbides of silicon and boron as well as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, these reinforcements either undergo chemical changes or induce defects in the matrix during processing. In addition, these reinforcements exhibit a very minimal improvement in the properties. In the present work, we attempted to improve TaC fracture toughness by reinforcing with graphene nano-platelets (GNPs) and processing through spark plasma sintering at high temperature of 2000 °C, pressure of 70 MPa, and soaking time of 10 min. In addition, we investigated the active densification mechanism during SPS of TaC powder and the effect of ball milling time on mechanical properties of sintered TaC. A relative density of >96% was achieved using SPS of monolithic TaC (<3 μm). Ball milling improved the sintering kinetics and improved the mechanical properties (microhardness, bi-axial flexural strength, and indentation fracture toughness). Activation energy (100 kJ/mol) and stress exponent (1.2) were obtained using the analytical model developed for power-law creep. Grain boundary sliding is proposed as active densification mechanism based on these calculations. Reinforcing GNPs (2-6 vol.% ) in the TaC matrix improved relative density (99.8% for TaC-6 vol.% GNP). Also ˜150% and ˜180% increase in flexural strength and fracture toughness, respectively, was observed for TaC-6 vol.% GNP composite. The significant improvement in these properties is attributed to improved densification and toughening mechanisms such as sheet pull-out and crack

  5. Selective-area laser deposition (SALD) Joining of silicon carbide with silicon carbide filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Shay Llewellyn

    Selective Area Laser Deposition (SALD) is a gas-phase, solid freeform fabrication (SFF) process that utilizes a laser-driven, pyrolytic gas reaction to form a desired solid product. This solid product only forms in the heated zone of the laser beam and thus can be selectively deposited by control of the laser position. SALD Joining employs the SALD method to accomplish 'welding' of ceramic structures together. The solid reaction product serves as a filler material to bond the two parts. The challenges involved with ceramic joining center around the lack of a liquid phase, little plastic deformation and diffusivity and poor surface wetting for many ceramic materials. Due to these properties, traditional metal welding procedures cannot be applied to ceramics. Most alternative ceramic welding techniques use some form of a metal addition to overcome these material limitations. However, the metal possesses a lower ultimate use temperature than the ceramic substrate and therefore it decreases the temperature range over which the joined part can be safely used. SALD Joining enjoys several advantages over these ceramic welding procedures. The solid filler material chemistry can be tailored to match the type of ceramic substrate and therefore fabricate monolithic joints. The SALD filler material bonds directly to the substrate and the joined structure is made in a one step process, without any post-processing. The research documented in this dissertation focused on SALD Joining of silicon carbide structures with silicon carbide filler material. A historical progression of gas-phase SFF research and a literature review of the most prominent ceramic joining techniques are provided. A variety of SiC substrates were examined, as were various conditions of gas precursor pressures and mixtures, laser beam scan speed and joint configuration. The SALD material was characterized for composition and structure by x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and nuclear magnetic

  6. Investigations on the mechanical interaction between fuel and cladding (FCMI) in fast breeder reactor fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between FCMI and plastic cladding distensions of Fast-Breeder pins with oxide as well as carbide fuel was analyzed theoretically and experimentally. This resulted in the possibility of plastic cladding straining caused by differential swelling of fuel and cladding material under stationary power conditions or differential thermal expansion at power changes. At stationary operating conditions the FCMI in oxide pins is limited by an irradiation-induced creep deformation into inner void volume and thus the fuel swelling pressure will never cause clad distensions worth mentioning. However, the cladding of carbide pins can be strained under stationary conditions because of the comparatively low fuel plastification under irradiation. Plastic straining of oxide pins may follow from differential thermal expansion at power changes. The amount of strain is primarily dependent upon magnitude and rate of the power increase, the starting conditions, and the clad material strength. The parameter dependence of the strains and the limiting conditions for their avoidance are reported. The model calculations are carried out by means of a special computer code which was developed following closely the results of irradiation experiments. It was proved experimentally that a considerably high geometrical swelling occurs after a power reduction until the fuel has come into contact with the cladding again. (orig.)

  7. Role of alloying elements and carbides in the chlorine-induced corrosion of steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Jürgen Grabke

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature corrosion of steels and Ni-base alloys in oxidizing and chloridizing environments is of practical interest in relation to problems in waste incineration plants and power plants using Cl containing fuels. The behaviour of the most important alloying elements Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo, Mn, Si, Al upon corrosion in an oxidizing and chloridizing atmosphere was elucidated: the reactions and kinetics can be largely understood on the base of thermodynamic data, i.e. free energy of chloride formation, vapor pressure of the chlorides and oxygen pressure pO2 needed for the conversion chlorides -> oxides. The mechanism is described by 'active oxidation', comprising inward penetration of chlorine into the scale, formation of chlorides at the oxide/metal interface, evaporation of the chlorides and conversion of the evaporating chlorides into oxides, which occurs in more or less distance from the surface (depending on pO2. This process leads to loose, fragile, multilayered oxides which are unprotective (therefore: active oxidation. Fe and Cr are rapidly transferred into such scale, Ni and Mo are relatively resistant. In many cases, the grain boundaries of the materials are strongly attacked, this is due to a susceptibility of chromium carbides to chloridation. In contrast the carbides Mo2C, TiC and NbC are less attacked than the matrix. Alloys on the basis Fe-Cr-Si proved to be rather resistant, and the alloying elements Ni and Mo clearly retard the attack in an oxidizing and chloridizing environment.

  8. Fuels for Advanced Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors in the Russian Federation: State of the Art and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different fuels (i.e. PuO2, UO2 (pellet, vibro), UPuO2 (pellet, vibro), UC, UN, UPuC, UPuN, oxide, nitride and carbide inert matrix fuels, alloyed and non-alloyed metallic fuels) have been studied in BN reactors. Recently, experiments with UPuN, MgO and ZrN based fuels have been completed in the BOR-60 reactor. The paper presents an overview of the principal results of fuel investigations. The problems of reliable fuel performance in the BN-800 and BN-K reactors are discussed. (author)

  9. Advanced methods for fabrication of PHWR and LMFBR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For self-reliance in nuclear power, the Department of Atomic Energy (DAE), India is pursuing two specific reactor systems, namely the pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR) and the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR). The reference fuel for PHWR is zircaloy-4 clad high density (≤ 96 per cent T.D.) natural UO2 pellet-pins. The advanced PHWR fuels are UO2-PuO2 (≤ 2 per cent), ThO2-PuO2 (≤ 4 per cent) and ThO2-U233O2 (≤ 2 per cent). Similarly, low density (≤ 85 per cent T.D.) (UPu)O2 pellets clad in SS 316 or D9 is the reference fuel for the first generation of prototype and commercial LMFBRs all over the world. However, (UPu)C and (UPu)N are considered as advanced fuels for LMFBRs mainly because of their shorter doubling time. The conventional method of fabrication of both high and low density oxide, carbide and nitride fuel pellets starting from UO2, PuO2 and ThO2 powders is 'powder metallurgy (P/M)'. The P/M route has, however, the disadvantage of generation and handling of fine powder particles of the fuel and the associated problem of 'radiotoxic dust hazard'. The present paper summarises the state-of-the-art of advanced methods of fabrication of oxide, carbide and nitride fuels and highlights the author's experience on sol-gel-microsphere-pelletisation (SGMP) route for preparation of these materials. The SGMP process uses sol gel derived, dust-free and free-flowing microspheres of oxides, carbide or nitride for direct pelletisation and sintering. Fuel pellets of both low and high density, excellent microhomogeneity and controlled 'open' or 'closed' porosity could be fabricated via the SGMP route. (author). 5 tables, 14 figs., 15 refs

  10. Electric Heating Property from Butyl Rubber-Loaded Boron Carbide Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Dechuan; WANG Ninghui; LI Guofeng

    2014-01-01

    We researched the electric heating property from butyl rubber-loaded boron carbide composite. The effects of boron carbide content on bulk resistivity, voltage-current characteristic, thermal conductivity and thermal stability of boron carbide/butyl rubber (IIR) polymer composite were introduced. The analysis results indicated that the bulk resistivity decreased greatly with increasing boron carbide content, and when boron carbide content reached to 60%, the bulk resistivity achieved the minimum. Accordingly, electric heating behavior of the composite is strongly dependent on boron carbide content as well as applied voltage. The content of boron carbide was found to be effective in achieving high thermal conductivity in composite systems. The thermal conductivity of the composite material with added boron carbide was improved nearly 20 times than that of the pure IIR. The thermal stability test showed that, compared with pure IIR, the thermal stable time of composites was markedly extended, which indicated that the boron carbide can significantly improve the thermal stability of boron carbide/IIR composite.

  11. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  12. A Study of the High Temperature on Chromium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation rates of chromium carbide have been measured at 900 to 1300 .deg. C and oxygen pressures between 2x10-2 8 x 10-2 Pa using thermogravimetric analysis method. Oxidation behavior of chromium carbide appeared to change very sensitively with both temperature and oxygen pressure. In case with the oxygen pressure lower than 8 x 10-2 Pa, the weight gain in the specimen due to the formation of chromium oxide occurred linearly with time at the every temperature studied, but when the oxygen pressure was increased up to 8 x 10-2Pa, the weight gain behavior versus time showed entirely different tendency. That is, in the temperature range of 900 .deg. C to 1000 .deg. C weight gain occurred, however in the range of 1000 .deg. C to 1300 .deg. C weight lost was observed. The reason for the observed linear kinetics could be inferred as follows. As the oxidation of carbide proceeded carbon monoxide would build up at the interface of the chromium oxide and carbide. If the equilibrium pressure of carbon monoxide at the interface exceeds the gas pressure at the outer specimen surface, the oxide scale formed on it might be cracked exposing new carbide sites on which oxidation could occur successively. Through a thermodynamic consideration it was judged that the above deduction was reasonable. On the other hand, the weight lost mentioned above was explained that it could occur mainly due to the further oxidation of Cr2O3 to the volatile CrO3 at the corresponding experimental conditions. Weight loss phenomenon mentioned before which was observed in the oxidation of chromium carbide was also clearified by X-ray diffraction method and SEM. That is, at 900 .deg. C stable oxide of chromium, (Cr2O3) was identified easily on the specimen surface. However, at 1300 .deg. C, only a few amount of this stable oxide could be found on to specimen surface, indicating Cr2O3 had been evaporated to CrO3 gas

  13. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  14. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm-3 (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  15. State-of-the-art Report on Innovative Fuels for Advanced Nuclear Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of innovative fuels such as homogeneous and heterogeneous fuels, ADS fuels, and oxide, metal, nitride and carbide fuels is an important stage in the implementation process of advanced nuclear systems. Several national and international R and D programmes are investigating minor actinide-bearing fuels due to their ability to help reduce the radiotoxicity of spent fuel and therefore decrease the burden on geological repositories. Minor actinides can be converted into a suitable fuel form for irradiation in reactor systems where they are transmuted into fission products with a significantly shorter half-life. This report compares recent studies of fuels containing minor actinides for use in advanced nuclear systems. The studies review different fuels for several types of advanced reactors by examining various technical issues associated with fabrication, characterisation, irradiation performance, design and safety criteria, as well as technical maturity. (authors)

  16. Evaporation behaviour of the ternary uranium plutonium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaporation behaviour of uranium plutonium carbides (Usub(0.80)Psub(0.20)Csub(1+-x) was studied by a combined application of mass spectrometry, using the uranium isotope U-233, and the Knudsen effusion target collection technique in the temperature range from 15000C to the liquids temperature measured at 24580C and the composition range from C/M = 0.95 to 1.4. High temperature compatibility tests were made with W-cells, carburized Ta and TaC-liners up to 25000C. The influence of oxygen and nitrogen impurities on vapour pressure, and composition changes in continued evaporation of the the mixed carbides were investigated. The effects of plutonium depletion and segregation were studied. (Auth.)

  17. Process for coating an object with silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Harry (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A process for coating a carbon or graphite object with silicon carbide by contacting it with silicon liquid and vapor over various lengths of contact time. In the process, a stream of silicon-containing precursor material in gaseous phase below the decomposition temperature of said gas and a co-reactant, carrier or diluent gas such as hydrogen is passed through a hole within a high emissivity, thin, insulating septum into a reaction chamber above the melting point of silicon. The thin septum has one face below the decomposition temperature of the gas and an opposite face exposed to the reaction chamber. The precursor gas is decomposed directly to silicon in the reaction chamber. A stream of any decomposition gas and any unreacted precursor gas from said reaction chamber is removed. The object within the reaction chamber is then contacted with silicon, and recovered after it has been coated with silicon carbide.

  18. Boron carbide (B4C) coating. Deposition and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizov, E.; Barsuk, V.; Begrambekov, L.; Buzhinsky, O.; Evsin, A.; Gordeev, A.; Grunin, A.; Klimov, N.; Kurnaev, V.; Mazul, I.; Otroshchenko, V.; Putric, A.; Sadovskiy, Ya.; Shigin, P.; Vergazov, S.; Zakharov, A.

    2015-08-01

    Boron carbide was proposed as a material of in-situ protecting coating for tungsten tiles of ITER divertor. To prove this concept the project including investigation of regimes of plasma deposition of B4C coating on tungsten and tests of boron carbide layer in ITER-like is started recently. The paper contends the first results of the project. The results of B4C coating irradiation by the plasma pulses of QSPU-T plasma accelerator are presented. The new device capable of B4C film deposition on tungsten and testing of the films and materials with ITER-like heat loads and ion- and electron irradiation is described. The results of B4C coating deposition and testing of both tungsten substrate and coating are shown and discussed.

  19. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y.; An, Qi; Toksoy, M. Fatih; McCauley, James W.; Haber, Richard A.; Goddard, William A.; Hemker, Kevin J.

    2015-10-01

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B4C (i.e., B12C3 ) but not in B13C2 . TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B4C is B11C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B13C2 because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  20. Single crystalline boron carbide nanobelts:synthesis and characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Li-Hong; Li Chen; Tian Yuan; Tian Ji-Fa; Hui Chao; Wang Xing-Jun; Shen Cheng-Min; Gao Hong-Jun

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports that the large-scale single crystalline boron carbide nanobelts have been fabricated through a simple carbothermal reduction method with B/B203/C/Fe powder as precursors at ll00~C.Transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction characterizations show that the boron carbide nanobelt has a B4C rhomb-centred hexagonal structure with good crystallization.Electron energy loss spectroscopy analysis indicates that the nanobelt contains only B and C,and the atomic ratio of B to C is close to 4:1.High resolution transmission electron microscopy results show that the preferential growth direction of the nanobelt is [101].A possible growth mechanism is also discussed.

  1. Diffusion Bonding of Silicon Carbide for MEMS-LDI Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Singh, Mrityunjay; Shpargel, Tarah P.; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2007-01-01

    A robust joining approach is critically needed for a Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems-Lean Direct Injector (MEMS-LDI) application which requires leak free joints with high temperature mechanical capability. Diffusion bonding is well suited for the MEMS-LDI application. Diffusion bonds were fabricated using titanium interlayers between silicon carbide substrates during hot pressing. The interlayers consisted of either alloyed titanium foil or physically vapor deposited (PVD) titanium coatings. Microscopy shows that well adhered, crack free diffusion bonds are formed under optimal conditions. Under less than optimal conditions, microcracks are present in the bond layer due to the formation of intermetallic phases. Electron microprobe analysis was used to identify the reaction formed phases in the diffusion bond. Various compatibility issues among the phases in the interlayer and substrate are discussed. Also, the effects of temperature, pressure, time, silicon carbide substrate type, and type of titanium interlayer and thickness on the microstructure and composition of joints are discussed.

  2. Thermal boundary conductance between refractory metal carbides and diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal boundary conductance (TBC) between thin films of Cr, Mo, Nb and W and diamond substrates has been measured using time domain thermoreflectance before and after a high-vacuum heat treatment at 800 °C for 2 h. While no signs of carbide formation could be detected in as-deposited layers by scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy elemental analysis, the heat treatment led to partial (W, Mo) or full conversion (Cr, Nb) of the film into carbide. The measured TBC values on as-deposited samples of 315, 220, 220 and 205 MW m-2K-1 measured for, respectively, the Cr, Mo, Nb and W samples, were found to not be significantly altered by the heat treatment

  3. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.

  4. Carbon-rich icosahedral boron carbide designed from first principles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay, Antoine; Vast, Nathalie; Sjakste, Jelena; Duparc, Olivier Hardouin [Ecole Polytechnique, Laboratoire des Solides Irradiés, CEA-DSM-IRAMIS, CNRS UMR 7642, F-91120 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-07-21

    The carbon-rich boron-carbide (B{sub 11}C)C-C has been designed from first principles within the density functional theory. With respect to the most common boron carbide at 20% carbon concentration B{sub 4}C, the structural modification consists in removing boron atoms from the chains linking (B{sub 11}C) icosahedra. With C-C instead of C-B-C chains, the formation of vacancies is shown to be hindered, leading to enhanced mechanical strength with respect to B{sub 4}C. The phonon frequencies and elastic constants turn out to prove the stability of the carbon-rich phase, and important fingerprints for its characterization have been identified.

  5. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of hydrogenation on the microstructure of a pressureless sintered silicon carbide was studied. Samples which were annealed in a 40:60 mole % H2:Ar atmosphere at 14000C for 50 hours were microstructurally compared with unannealed samples and samples that had been annealed in a similar manner but using an argon atmosphere. The results were also compared with microstructural results obtained from in situ studies using both hydrogen and argon atmospheres. These results were compared with a thermodynamic model which was constructed using a free energy minimization technique. The observed effects of hydrogenation were surface decarburization and amorphization throughout the silicon carbide material. Other observations include the thermally induced growth of microcrystalline silicon and accelerated amorphization around the silicon microcrystals in samples used in hydrogen in situ studies. An analysis of the microstructure of the reference material was also performed

  6. Amorphous silicon carbide coatings for extreme ultraviolet optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortright, J. B.; Windt, David L.

    1988-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide films formed by sputtering techniques are shown to have high reflectance in the extreme ultraviolet spectral region. X-ray scattering verifies that the atomic arrangements in these films are amorphous, while Auger electron spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy show that the films have composition close to stoichiometric SiC, although slightly C-rich, with low impurity levels. Reflectance vs incidence angle measurements from 24 to 1216 A were used to derive optical constants of this material, which are presented here. Additionally, the measured extreme ultraviolet efficiency of a diffraction grating overcoated with sputtered amorphous silicon carbide is presented, demonstrating the feasibility of using these films as coatings for EUV optics.

  7. Preparation and electrocatalytic properties of tungsten carbide electrocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马淳安; 张文魁; 成旦红; 周邦新

    2002-01-01

    The tungsten carbide(WC) electrocatalysts with definite phase components and high specific surface area were prepared by gas-solid reduction method. The crystal structure, phase components and electrochemical properties of the as-prepared materials were characterized by XRD, BET(Brunauer Emmett and Teller Procedure) and electrochemical test techniques. It is shown that the tungsten carbide catalysts with definite phase components can be obtained by controlling the carburizing conditions including temperature, gas flowing rate and duration time. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of W2C show higher electrocatalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrocatalysts with the major phase of WC are suitable to be used as the anodic electrocatalyst for hydrogen anodic oxidation, which exhibit higher hydrogen anodic oxidation electrocatalytic properties in HCl solutions.

  8. Preparation of tantalum carbide from an organometallic precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, C.P. [Rio Grande do Norte Univ., Natal, RN (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Geoquimica. Lab. de Termodinamica e Reatores]. E-mail: carlson at ufrnet.ufrn.br; Favotto, C.; Satre, P.; L' Honore, A.; Roubin, M. [Universite du Toulon et de Var B.P. (France). Equipe der Materiaux a Finalite Specifique. Lab. de Physicochimie du Materiaux et du Milieu Marin]. E-mail: roubin at univ-tln.fr

    1999-03-01

    In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta{sub 2} O{sub 5} nH{sub 2}O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, Ta C, in the powder form at 1000 deg C. The natural sintering of Ta C powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400 deg C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to density the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value. (author)

  9. The local structure of transition metal doped semiconducting boron carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jing; Dowben, P A [Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, PO Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Luo Guangfu; Mei Waining [Department of Physics, University of Nebraska at Omaha, Omaha, NE 68182-0266 (United States); Kizilkaya, Orhan [J. Bennett Johnston Sr. Center for Advanced Microstructures and Devices, Louisiana State University, 6980 Jefferson Hwy., Baton Rouge LA 70806 (United States); Shepherd, Eric D; Brand, J I [College of Engineering, and the Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, N209 Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th and Vine Streets, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)

    2010-03-03

    Transition metal doped boron carbides produced by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition of orthocarborane (closo-1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 10}H{sub 12}) and 3d metal metallocenes were investigated by performing K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements. The 3d transition metal atom occupies one of the icosahedral boron or carbon atomic sites within the icosahedral cage. Good agreement was obtained between experiment and models for Mn, Fe and Co doping, based on the model structures of two adjoined vertex sharing carborane cages, each containing a transition metal. The local spin configurations of all the 3d transition metal doped boron carbides, Ti through Cu, are compared using cluster and/or icosahedral chain calculations, where the latter have periodic boundary conditions.

  10. Synthesis of titanium carbide by induction plasma reactive spray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Xian-Liang(蒋显亮); M.Boulos

    2004-01-01

    A novel method capable of sufficient mixing of titanium powder and methane of carbon source was developed in the synthesis of titanium carbide by induction plasma reactive spray. X-ray diffraction analysis, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and microhardness test were used to characterize the spray-formed deposit.The experimental results show that both primary carburization of the titanium particles inside the plasma flame and secondary carburization of the growing deposit on high temperature substrate contribute to the forming of titanium carbide. The transitional phase of TiC1-x has the same crystal structure as TiC, but has a slightly low lattice constant. The deposit consists of fine grain structure and large grain structure. The fine grain structure, harder than large grain structure, shows grain boundary fracture.

  11. Pressureless sintered silicon carbide tailored with aluminium nitride sintering agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reports the influence of aluminium nitride on the pressureless sintering of cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles (β-SiC). Pressureless sintering was achieved at 2000 degrees C for 5 min with the additions of boron carbide together with carbon of 1 wt% and 6 wt%, respectively, and a content of aluminium nitride between 0 and 10 wt%. Sintered samples present relative densities higher than 92%. The sintered microstructure was found to be greatly modified by the introduction of aluminium nitride, which reflects the influence of nitrogen on the β-SiC to α-SiC transformation. The toughness of sintered sample was not modified by AlN incorporation and is relatively low (around 2.5 MPa m1/2). Materials exhibited transgranular fracture mode, indicating a strong bonding between SiC grains. (authors)

  12. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ceramics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A K Mukhopadhyay

    2001-04-01

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker’s microhardness tester at various loads in the range 1–20 N. Subsequently, the gradual evolution of the damage was characterized using an optical microscope in conjunction with the image analysing technique. The materials were classified in the order of the decreasing resistance against repeated indentation fatigue at the highest applied load of 20 N. It was further shown that there was a strong influence of grain size on the development of resistance against repeated indentation fatigue on the same spot. Finally, the poor performance of the sintered silicon carbide was found out to be linked to its previous thermal history.

  13. Valence electronic structure of tantalum carbide and nitride

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChangZeng

    2007-01-01

    The valence electronic structures of tantalum carbide (TaC) and tantalum nitride (TaN) are studied by using the empirical electronic theory (EET). The results reveal that the bonds of these compounds have covalent, metallic and ionic characters. For a quantitative analysis of the relative strength of these components, their ionicities have been calculated by implanting the results of EET to the PVL model. It has been found that the ionicity of tantalum carbide is smaller than that of tantalum nitride. The EET results also reveal that the covalent electronic number of the strongest bond in the former is larger than that of the latter. All these suggest that the covalent bond of TaC is stronger than that of TaN, which coincides to that deduced from the first-principles method.……

  14. Atomic-Level Understanding of "Asymmetric Twins" in Boron Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kelvin Y; An, Qi; Toksoy, M Fatih; McCauley, James W; Haber, Richard A; Goddard, William A; Hemker, Kevin J

    2015-10-23

    Recent observations of planar defects in boron carbide have been shown to deviate from perfect mirror symmetry and are referred to as "asymmetric twins." Here, we demonstrate that these asymmetric twins are really phase boundaries that form in stoichiometric B(4)C (i.e., B(12)C(3)) but not in B(13)C(2). TEM observations and ab initio simulations have been coupled to show that these planar defects result from an interplay of stoichiometry, atomic positioning, icosahedral twinning, and structural hierarchy. The composition of icosahedra in B(4)C is B(11)C and translation of the carbon atom from a polar to equatorial site leads to a shift in bonding and a slight distortion of the lattice. No such distortion is observed in boron-rich B(13)C(2) because the icosahedra do not contain carbon. Implications for tailoring boron carbide with stoichiometry and extrapolations to other hierarchical crystalline materials are discussed.

  15. CALCIUM CARBIDE: AN EFFICIENT ALTERNATIVE TO THE USE OF ALUMINUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilton Carlos Pinheiro Cardoso Filho

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The steel demand for fine applications have increased considerably in the last years, and the criteria for its production are even stricter, mainly in relation to the residual elements content and cleanness required. In relation to the steel cleanness, the main problem faced is the control of the amount and morphology of alumina inclusions, generated in the steel deoxidation with aluminum. Besides harming the products quality, the presence of non metallic inclusions can originate nozzle clogging, and consequently interruptions in the process flux. Aiming to improve the steel cleanness and to minimize nozzle clogging, this study is developed to evaluate the partial substitution of aluminum by calcium carbide in the steel deoxidation. Along the operational procedures, the calcium carbide was applied to 397 heats, through what the improvement in steel cleanness is confirmed, with consequent reduction in the nozzle clogging occurrence.

  16. PREPARATION OF TANTALUM CARBIDE FROM AN ORGANOMETALLIC PRECURSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. SOUZA

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we have synthesized an organometallic oxalic precursor from tantalum oxide. This oxide was solubilized by heating with potassium hydrogen sulfate. In order to precipitate Ta2O5.nH2O, the fused mass obtained was dissolved in a sulfuric acid solution and neutralized with ammonia. The hydrated tantalum oxide precipitated was dissolved in an equimolar solution of oxalic acid/ammonium oxalate. The synthesis and the characterization of the tantalum oxalic precursor are described. Pyrolysis of the complex in a mixture of hydrogen and methane at atmospheric pressure was studied. The gas-solid reaction made it possible to obtain tantalum carbide, TaC, in the powder form at 1000oC. The natural sintering of TaC powder in an inert atmosphere at 1400°C during 10 hours, under inert atmosphere made it possible to densify the carbide to 96% of the theoretical value.

  17. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  18. Cubic Silicon Carbide: a promising material for automotive application

    OpenAIRE

    Attolini, Giovanni; Bosi, Matteo; Rossi, Francesca; Watts, Bernard Enrico; Salviati, Giancarlo

    2008-01-01

    carbide is a material that possesses properties that make it desirable in electronic, structural and sensor applications. As a wide band gap semiconductor it can be used in high power, high temperature electronics and harsh environments. Its hardness, wear resistance, chemical inertness, and thermal conductivity find uses ranging from disc brakes to micron scale sensors and actuators. The automotive industry faces some important challenges since it has obligations to manufacture safe, clean, ...

  19. Final design review of boron carbide safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this paper discusses the design review of the boron carbide safety rod for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This paper reviewed information presented by personnel of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) Equipment Engineering Section, SRL Materials Technology Section and Reactor Materials Engineering and Technology. From this report, views, opinions and recommendations were made on the safety rod from materials testing to production

  20. Isotopic effects on the phonon modes in boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, H; Kuhlmann, U; Rotter, H W; Shalamberidze, S O

    2010-10-01

    The effect of isotopes ((10)B-(11)B; (12)C-(13)C) on the infrared- and Raman-active phonons of boron carbide has been investigated. For B isotopes, the contributions of the virtual crystal approximation, polarization vector and isotopical disorder are separated. Boron and carbon isotope effects are largely opposite to one another and indicate the share of the particular atoms in the atomic assemblies vibrating in specific phonon modes. Some infrared-active phonons behave as expected for monatomic boron crystals.

  1. Silicon Carbide Technologies for High Temperature Motor Drives

    OpenAIRE

    Snefjellå, Øyvind Holm

    2011-01-01

    Many applications benefit from using converters which can operate at high temperatures among them; down-hole drilling, hybrid vehicles and space craft. The theoretical performance of transistors made of Silicon Carbide (SiC) is investigated in this work. It is shown that their properties at high temperatures are superior compared to Silicon (Si) devices. Two half-bridge converters, using SiC normally-off Junction Field Effect Transistors (JFET) and SiC Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT), are ...

  2. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement

  3. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Swastik Mondal; Elena Bykova; Somnath Dey; Sk. Imran Ali; Natalia Dubrovinskaia; Leonid Dubrovinsky; Gleb Parakhonskiy; Sander van Smaalen

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichio...

  4. Refractory ceramics to silicon carbide. 5. tot. rev. ed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elvers, B. (ed.); Hawkins, S. (ed.); Russey, W. (ed.); Schulz, G. (ed.)

    1993-01-01

    This volume contains 28 contributions to the following topics: Refractory Ceramics, Reinforced Plastics; Release Agents; Resins, Natural; Resins, Synthetic; Resorcinol; Resources of Oil and Gas; Rhenium and Rhenium Compounds; Rodenticides; Rubber (1. Survey, 2. Natural, 3. Synthetic, 4. Chemicals, 5. Technology, 6. Testing); Rubidium and Rubidium Compounds; Salicylic Acid; Saponins; Sealing Materials; Seasonings; Sedatives; Selenium and Selenium Compounds; Semiconductors; Shoe Polishes; Silica; Silicates; Silicon; Silicon Carbide. (orig.)

  5. Simulation in Amorphous Silicon and Amorphous Silicon Carbide Pin Diodes

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, Dora; Fernandes, Miguel; Louro, Paula; Fantoni, Alessandro; Vieira, Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Part 21: Electronics: Devices International audience Photodiodes are devices used as image sensors, reactive to polychromatic light and subsequently color detecting, and they are also used in optical communication applications. To improve these devices performance it is essential to study and control their characteristics, in fact their capacitance and spectral and transient responses. This study considers two types of diodes, an amorphous silicon pin and an amorphous silicon carbide pi...

  6. Chromium carbide coatings obtained by the hybrid PVD methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Richert

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: With the use of the Arc-PVD and Arc-EB PVD hybrid method, the chromium carbide coatings were deposited on steel substrate. Two kinds of coatings were obtained. The nanostructure coatings were formed by deposition of chromium carbide films by Arc PVD evaporation technique. The multilayer coatings were produced by Arc-EB PVD hybrid technology. In the second case the amorphous phase in majority was found in samples, identified by X-ray investigations.Design/methodology/approach: The Arc PVD and combination Arc-EB PVD methods were used for carbide coatings deposition. The special hybrid multisource device, produced in the Institute for Sustainable Technologies – National Research Institute (ITeE –PIB in Radom, was used for sample deposition. The microstructures of coatings were investigated by JEM 20101 ARP transmission electron microscopy (TEM, TESLA BS500 scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Olympus GX50 optical microscopy (MO. The X-ray diffraction was utilized to identify phase configuration in coatingsFindings: The microstructure of deposited coatings differs depending on the deposition method used. The Arc PVD deposition produced nanometric coatings with the Cr3C2, Cr23C6, Cr7C3 and CrC carbides built from nanometric in size clusters. In the case of the Arc-EB PVD hybrid technology in majority of cases the amorphous microstructure of coatings was found. The hybrid coatings consist of alternating layers of Ni/Cr-Cr3C2.Practical implications: The performed investigations provide information, which could be useful in the industrial practice for the production of wear resistant coatings on different equipments and tools.Originality/value: It was assumed that by using different kinds of PVD methods the different microstructures of coatings could be formed.

  7. An electrochemical process for the recycling of tungsten carbide scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the development of a number of designs for electrochemical cells, and the subsequent construction and operation of a vibrating-plate cell capable of oxidizing 15 kilograms of tungsten carbide a day to a crude tungstic acid precipitate, with similtaneous recovery of cobalt metal on the cathode. The effects on the process of the reagent concentration, temperature, current density, and cathode material are discussed

  8. Phonon spectrum, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pérez Daroca, D., E-mail: pdaroca@tandar.cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientı´ficas y Técnicas (Argentina); Jaroszewicz, S. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina); Llois, A.M. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientı´ficas y Técnicas (Argentina); Mosca, H.O. [Gerencia de Investigación y Aplicaciones, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (Argentina); Instituto de Tecnología Jorge A. Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA (Argentina)

    2013-06-15

    In this work, we study, by means of density functional perturbation theory and the pseudopotential method, mechanical and thermophysical properties of thorium carbide. These properties are derived from the lattice dynamics in the quasi-harmonic approximation. The phonon spectrum of ThC presented in this article, to the best authors’ knowledge, have not been studied, neither experimentally, nor theoretically. We compare mechanical properties, volume thermal expansion and molar specific capacities with previous results and find a very good agreement.

  9. Rheology of silicon carbide/vinyl ester nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Virginia; Hahn, H. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles with no surface treatment raise the viscosity of a vinyl ester resin much more intensely than micrometer-size SiC particles. An effective dispersant generally causes a reduction in the resin viscosity attributed to its surface-active properties and thereby increases the maximum fraction of particles that can be introduced. This article assesses the rheological behavior of SiC-nanoparticle-filled vinyl ester resin systems with the Bingham, power-law, Hersche...

  10. First principle study of hydrogen behavior in hexagonal tungsten carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Kong, Xiang-Shan; You, Yu-Wei; Liu, C. S.; Q. F. Fang; Chen, Jun-Ling; Luo, G.-N.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the behavior of hydrogen in hexagonal tungsten carbide (WC) is of particular interest for fusion reactor design due to the presence of WC in the divertor of fusion reactors. Therefore, we use first-principles calculations to study the hydrogen behavior in WC. The most stable interstitial site for the hydrogen atom is the projection of the octahedral interstitial site on tungsten basal plane, followed by the site near the projection of the octahedral interstitial site on carbon b...

  11. Anodic etching of p-type cubic silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, G. L.; Fekade, K.; Wongchotigul, K.

    1992-01-01

    p-Type cubic silicon carbide was anodically etched using an electrolyte of HF:HCl:H2O. The etching depth was determined versus time with a fixed current density of 96.4 mA/sq cm. It was found that the etching was very smooth and very uniform. An etch rate of 22.7 nm/s was obtained in a 1:1:50 HF:HCl:H2O electrolyte.

  12. Effect of carbides on erosion resistance of 23-8-N steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aniruddha A Gadhikar; Ashok Sharma; D B Goel; C P Sharma

    2014-04-01

    Microstructure is one of the most important parameters influencing erosion behaviour of materials. The role of carbides in the matrix is very complicated in controlling the erosion rate of the materials. Conflicting results have been reported in the literature about the effect of carbides on erosion resistance. Carbides are of great importance especially as obstacles against the penetration of erosive particles into the material surface. However, they are susceptible to cracking and causing matrix decohesion which may increase the overall erosion rate. In 23-8-N nitronic steel, carbides present in the form of bands are observed to accelerate the erosion rate. Coarse carbides cause depletion of carbon in the austenite matrix which adversely affects the strain hardening tendency thus causing deterioration in erosion resistance of the bulk material. The dissolution of carbides in the austenitic matrix after solution annealing is observed to improve the erosion resistance of 23-8-N nitronic steel.

  13. Effect of Cement Replacement with Carbide Waste on the Strength of Stabilized Clay Subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muntohar A.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cement is commonly used for soil stabilization and many other ground improvement techniques. Cement is believed to be very good to improve the compressive and split-tensile strength of clay subgrades. In some application cement could be partly or fully replaced with carbide waste. This research is to study the effectiveness of the cement replacement and to find the maximum carbide waste content to be allowed for a clay subgrade. The quantities of cement replaced with the carbide waste were 30, 50, 70, 90, and 100% by its mass. The results show that replacing the cement with carbide waste decreased both the compressive and split tensile strength. Replacing cement content with carbide waste reduced its ability for stabilization. The carbide waste content should be less than 70% of the cement to provide a sufficient stabilizing effect on a clay subgrade.

  14. Investigation on the Performance of Supported Molybdenum Carbide for the Partial Oxidation of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Quanli Zhu; Jian Yang; Jiaxin Wang; Shengfu Ji; Hanqing Wang

    2003-01-01

    The performance of supported and unsupported molybdenum carbide for the partial oxida-tion of methane (POM) to syngas was investigated. An evaluation of the catalysts indicates that bulkmolybdenum carbide has a higher methane conversion during the initial stage but a lower selectivity toCO and H2/CO ratio in the products. The rapid deactivation of the catalyst is also a significant problem.However, the supported molybdenum carbide catalyst shows a much higher methane conversion, increasedselectivity and significantly improved catalytic stability. The characterization by XRD and BET specificarea measurements depict an improved dispersion of molybdenum carbide when using alumina as a carrier.The bulk or the supported molybdenum carbide exists in the β-Mo2C phase, while it is transformed intomolybdenum dioxide postcatalysis which is an important cause of molybdenum carbide deactivation.

  15. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure–high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C–B–C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  16. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: a first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B5C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B5C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B4C, BC, and BC4, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  17. Characterization of a boron carbide-based polymer neutron sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chuting; James, Robinson; Dong, Bin; Driver, M. Sky; Kelber, Jeffry A.; Downing, Greg; Cao, Lei R.

    2015-12-01

    Boron is used widely in thin-film solid-state devices for neutron detection. The film thickness and boron concentration are important parameters that relate to a device's detection efficiency and capacitance. Neutron depth profiling was used to determine the film thicknesses and boron-concentration profiles of boron carbide-based polymers grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) of ortho-carborane (1,2-B10C2H12), resulting in a pure boron carbide film, or of meta-carborane (1,7-B10C2H12) and pyridine (C5H5N), resulting in a pyridine composite film, or of pyrimidine (C4H4N2) resulting in a pure pyrimidine film. The pure boron carbide film had a uniform surface appearance and a constant thickness of 250 nm, whereas the thickness of the composite film was 250-350 nm, measured at three different locations. In the meta-carborane and pyridine composite film the boron concentration was found to increase with depth, which correlated with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)-derived atomic ratios. A proton peak from 14N (n,p)14C reaction was observed in the pure pyrimidine film, indicating an additional neutron sensitivity to nonthermal neutrons from the N atoms in the pyrimidine.

  18. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-01

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials. PMID:26777140

  19. Calcium Carbide: A Unique Reagent for Organic Synthesis and Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodygin, Konstantin S; Werner, Georg; Kucherov, Fedor A; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2016-04-01

    Acetylene, HC≡CH, is one of the primary building blocks in synthetic organic and industrial chemistry. Several highly valuable processes have been developed based on this simplest alkyne and the development of acetylene chemistry has had a paramount impact on chemical science over the last few decades. However, in spite of numerous useful possible reactions, the application of gaseous acetylene in everyday research practice is rather limited. Moreover, the practical implementation of high-pressure acetylene chemistry can be very challenging, owing to the risk of explosion and the requirement for complex equipment; special safety precautions need to be taken to store and handle acetylene under high pressure, which limit its routine use in a standard laboratory setup. Amazingly, recent studies have revealed that calcium carbide, CaC2 , can be used as an easy-to-handle and efficient source of acetylene for in situ chemical transformations. Thus, calcium carbide is a stable and inexpensive acetylene precursor that is available on the ton scale and it can be handled with standard laboratory equipment. The application of calcium carbide in organic synthesis will bring a new dimension to the powerful acetylene chemistry.

  20. Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole composites; preparation and physicochemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole (SiC/PPy) conducting composites were prepared using silicon carbide as inorganic substrate. The surface modification of SiC was performed in aqueous solution by oxidative polymerization of pyrrole using ferric chloride as oxidant. Elemental analysis was used to determine the mass loading of polypyrrole in the SiC/PPy composites. Scanning electron microscopy showed the surface modification of SiC by PPy. PPy in composites was confirmed by the presence of PPy bands in the infrared spectra of SiC/PPy containing various amounts of conducting polymer. The conductivity of SiC/PPy composites depends on PPy content on the surface. The composite containing 35 wt.% PPy showed conductivity about 2 S cm-1, which is in the same range as the conductivity of pure polypyrrole powder prepared under the same conditions using the same oxidant. PPy in the composites was clearly detected by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements by its N1s and Cl2p peaks. High resolution scans of the C1s regions distinguished between silicon carbide and polypyrrole carbons. The fraction of polypyrrole at the composite surface was estimated from the silicon and nitrogen levels. The combination of XPS and conductivity measurements suggests that the surface of the SiC/PPy composites is polypyrrole-rich for a conducting polymer mass loading of at least 12.6 wt.%

  1. Carbide-Derived Carbon Films for Integrated Electrochemical Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heon, Min

    Active RFID tags, which can communicate over tens or even hundreds of meters, MEMS devices of several microns in size, which are designed for the medical and pharmaceutical purposes, and sensors working in wireless monitoring systems, require microscale power sources that are able to provide enough energy and to satisfy the peak power demands in those applications. Supercapacitors have not been an attractive candidate for micro-scale energy storage, since most nanoporous carbon electrode materials are not compatible with micro-fabrication techniques and have failed to meet the requirements of high volumetric energy density and small form factor for power supplies for integrated circuits or microelectronic devices or sensors. However, supercapacitors can provide high power density, because of fast charging/discharging, which can enable self-sustaining micro-modules when combined with energy-harvesting devices, such as solar cell, piezoelectric or thermoelectric micro-generators. In this study, carbide-derived carbon (CDC) films were synthesized via vacuum decomposition of carbide substrates and gas etching of sputtered carbide thin films. This approach allowed manufacturing of porous carbon films on SiC and silicon substrates. CDC films were studied for micro-supercapacitor electrodes, and showed good double layer capacitance. Since the gas etching technique is compatible with conventional micro-device fabrication processes, it can be implemented to manufacture integrated on-chip supercapacitors on silicon wafers.

  2. Predicted boron-carbide compounds: A first-principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, De Yu; Yan, Qian; Wang, Bing; Wang, Yuan Xu, E-mail: wangyx@henu.edu.cn; Yang, Jueming; Yang, Gui [Institute for Computational Materials Science, School of Physics and Electronics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2014-06-14

    By using developed particle swarm optimization algorithm on crystal structural prediction, we have explored the possible crystal structures of B-C system. Their structures, stability, elastic properties, electronic structure, and chemical bonding have been investigated by first-principles calculations with density functional theory. The results show that all the predicted structures are mechanically and dynamically stable. An analysis of calculated enthalpy with pressure indicates that increasing of boron content will increase the stability of boron carbides under low pressure. Moreover, the boron carbides with rich carbon content become more stable under high pressure. The negative formation energy of predicted B{sub 5}C indicates its high stability. The density of states of B{sub 5}C show that it is p-type semiconducting. The calculated theoretical Vickers hardnesses of B-C exceed 40 GPa except B{sub 4}C, BC, and BC{sub 4}, indicating they are potential superhard materials. An analysis of Debye temperature and electronic localization function provides further understanding chemical and physical properties of boron carbide.

  3. Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube - Chromium Carbide Composite Through Laser Sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ze; Gao, Yibo; Liang, Fei; Wu, Benxin; Gou, Jihua; Detrois, Martin; Tin, Sammy; Yin, Ming; Nash, Philip; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2016-03-01

    Ceramics often have high hardness and strength, and good wear and corrosion resistance, and hence have many important applications, which, however, are often limited by their poor fracture toughness. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) may enhance ceramic fracture toughness, but hot pressing (which is one typical approach of fabricating CNT-ceramic composites) is difficult to apply for applications that require localized heat input, such as fabricating composites as surface coatings. Laser beam may realize localized material sintering with little thermal effect on the surrounding regions. However, for the typical ceramics for hard coating applications (as listed in Ref.[1]), previous work on laser sintering of CNT-ceramic composites with mechanical property characterizations has been very limited. In this paper, research work has been reported on the fabrication and characterization of CNT-ceramic composites through laser sintering of mixtures of CNTs and chromium carbide powders. Under the studied conditions, it has been found that laser-sintered composites have a much higher hardness than that for plasma-sprayed composites reported in the literature. It has also been found that the composites obtained by laser sintering of CNTs and chromium carbide powder mixtures have a fracture toughness that is ~23 % higher than the material obtained by laser sintering of chromium carbide powders without CNTs.

  4. Calcium Carbide: A Unique Reagent for Organic Synthesis and Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodygin, Konstantin S; Werner, Georg; Kucherov, Fedor A; Ananikov, Valentine P

    2016-04-01

    Acetylene, HC≡CH, is one of the primary building blocks in synthetic organic and industrial chemistry. Several highly valuable processes have been developed based on this simplest alkyne and the development of acetylene chemistry has had a paramount impact on chemical science over the last few decades. However, in spite of numerous useful possible reactions, the application of gaseous acetylene in everyday research practice is rather limited. Moreover, the practical implementation of high-pressure acetylene chemistry can be very challenging, owing to the risk of explosion and the requirement for complex equipment; special safety precautions need to be taken to store and handle acetylene under high pressure, which limit its routine use in a standard laboratory setup. Amazingly, recent studies have revealed that calcium carbide, CaC2 , can be used as an easy-to-handle and efficient source of acetylene for in situ chemical transformations. Thus, calcium carbide is a stable and inexpensive acetylene precursor that is available on the ton scale and it can be handled with standard laboratory equipment. The application of calcium carbide in organic synthesis will bring a new dimension to the powerful acetylene chemistry. PMID:26898248

  5. Disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Swastik; Bykova, Elena; Dey, Somnath; Ali, Sk Imran; Dubrovinskaia, Natalia; Dubrovinsky, Leonid; Parakhonskiy, Gleb; van Smaalen, Sander

    2016-01-18

    A unique combination of useful properties in boron-carbide, such as extreme hardness, excellent fracture toughness, a low density, a high melting point, thermoelectricity, semi-conducting behavior, catalytic activity and a remarkably good chemical stability, makes it an ideal material for a wide range of technological applications. Explaining these properties in terms of chemical bonding has remained a major challenge in boron chemistry. Here we report the synthesis of fully ordered, stoichiometric boron-carbide B13C2 by high-pressure-high-temperature techniques. Our experimental electron-density study using high-resolution single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction data conclusively demonstrates that disorder and defects are not intrinsic to boron carbide, contrary to what was hitherto supposed. A detailed analysis of the electron density distribution reveals charge transfer between structural units in B13C2 and a new type of electron-deficient bond with formally unpaired electrons on the C-B-C group in B13C2. Unprecedented bonding features contribute to the fundamental chemistry and materials science of boron compounds that is of great interest for understanding structure-property relationships and development of novel functional materials.

  6. Barrier properties of nano silicon carbide designed chitosan nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Gopal C; Dash, Satyabrata; Swain, Sarat K

    2015-12-10

    Nano silicon carbide (SiC) designed chitosan nanocomposites were prepared by solution technique. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used for studying structural interaction of nano silicon carbide (SiC) with chitosan. The morphology of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was investigated by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM). The thermal stability of chitosan was substantially increased due to incorporation of stable silicon carbide nanopowder. The oxygen permeability of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was reduced by three folds as compared to the virgin chitosan. The chemical resistance properties of chitosan were enhanced due to the incorporation of nano SiC. The biodegradability was investigated using sludge water. The tensile strength of chitosan/SiC nanocomposites was increased with increasing percentage of SiC. The substantial reduction in oxygen barrier properties in combination with increased thermal stability, tensile strength and chemical resistance properties; the synthesized nanocomposite may be suitable for packaging applications.

  7. The Development of Silicon Carbide Based Hydrogen and Hydrocarbon Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1994-01-01

    Silicon carbide is a high temperature electronic material. Its potential for development of chemical sensors in a high temperature environment has not been explored. The objective of this study is to use silicon carbide as the substrate material for the construction of chemical sensors for high temperature applications. Sensors for the detection of hydrogen and hydrocarbon are developed in this program under the auspices of Lewis Research Center, NASA. Metal-semiconductor or metal-insulator-semiconductor structures are used in this development. Specifically, using palladium-silicon carbide Schottky diodes as gas sensors in the temperature range of 100 to 400 C are designed, fabricated and assessed. The effect of heat treatment on the Pd-SiC Schottky diode is examined. Operation of the sensors at 400 C demonstrate sensitivity of the sensor to hydrogen and hydrocarbons. Substantial progress has been made in this study and we believe that the Pd-SiC Schottky diode has potential as a hydrogen and hydrocarbon sensor over a wide range of temperatures. However, the long term stability and operational life of the sensor need to be assessed. This aspect is an important part of our future continuing investigation.

  8. Quantitative ion beam analysis of M-C-O systems: application to an oxidized uranium carbide sample

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, G.; Raveu, G.; Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Khodja, H.; Vickridge, I.; Barthe, M. F.; Sauvage, T.

    2014-04-01

    A large variety of materials contain both carbon and oxygen atoms, in particular oxidized carbides, carbon alloys (as ZrC, UC, steels, etc.), and oxycarbide compounds (SiCO glasses, TiCO, etc.). Here a new ion beam analysis methodology is described which enables quantification of elemental composition and oxygen concentration profile over a few microns. It is based on two procedures. The first, relative to the experimental configuration relies on a specific detection setup which is original in that it enables the separation of the carbon and oxygen NRA signals. The second concerns the data analysis procedure i.e. the method for deriving the elemental composition from the particle energy spectrum. It is a generic algorithm and is here successfully applied to characterize an oxidized uranium carbide sample, developed as a potential fuel for generation IV nuclear reactors. Furthermore, a micro-beam was used to simultaneously determine the local elemental composition and oxygen concentration profiles over the first microns below the sample surface. This method is adapted to the determination of the composition of M?C?O? compounds with a sensitivity on elemental atomic concentrations around 1000 ppm.

  9. Synthesis and Photoluminescence Property of Silicon Carbide Nanowires Via Carbothermic Reduction of Silica

    OpenAIRE

    Luo Xiaogang; Ma Wenhui; Zhou Yang; Liu Dachun; Yang Bin; Dai Yongnian

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized at 1400 °C by carbothermic reduction of silica with bamboo carbon under normal atmosphere pressure without metallic catalyst. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silicon carbide nanowires. The results show that the silicon carbide nanowires have a core–shell structure and gr...

  10. A Study of Current Chopping Characteristics in Metal-Carbide Composite Contact Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kusano, Takashi; Okutomi, Tsutomu; Yokokura, Kunio; Homma, Mitsutaka

    To clarify the effect of carbides on current chopping characteristics chopping current was evaluated for various metalcarbide contact materials. As a result, it was found that the chopping current of metal-carbide contacts was related to the vapor pressure of metals and the work function of carbides. It was also found that the chopping current was reduced by the heat treatment when the melting point of contacts is lower than the temperature of heat teatment.

  11. Rapid accurate isotopic measurements on boron in boric acid and boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchateau, N L; Verbruggen, A; Hendrickx, F; De Bièvre, P

    1986-04-01

    A procedure is described whereby rapid and accurate isotopic measurements can be performed on boron in boric acid and boron carbide after fusion of these compounds with calcium carbonate. It allows the determination of the isotopic composition of boron in boric acid and boron carbide and the direct assay of boron or the (10)B isotope in boron carbide by isotope-dilution mass spectrometry.

  12. Influence of Eta-Phase on Wear Behavior of WC-Co Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    A. Formisano; Capece Minutolo, F.; Caraviello, A.; Carrino, L.; DURANTE, M.; Langella, A.

    2016-01-01

    Cemented carbides, also known as Widia, are hard metals produced by sintering process and widely used in mechanical machining. They show high cutting capacity and good wear resistance; consequently, they result to be excellent materials for manufacturing cutting tools and sandblast nozzles. In this work, the wear resistance of WC-Co carbides containing Eta-phase, a secondary phase present in the hard metals when a carbon content deficiency occurs, is analyzed. Different mixtures of carbide ar...

  13. Nanosized Borides and Carbides for Electroplating. Metal-Matrix Coatings: Specifications, Performance Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Galevskiy, S. G.; Il’yashchenko, D. P.; Kartsev, D. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper summarizes experience of application of nano-sized carbides and borides of titanium and chromium, silicon carbide as components of electro-depositable coating compositions based on nickel, zinc, and chromium. Basic physical and mechanical properties of the coatings are determined. Technological and economic evaluation is completed; practicability of high-cost nano-diamonds substitution for nano-sized borides and carbides is justified.

  14. Electrophysical properties and structure of niobium and tantalum carbide coatings on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variation of electric resistance and thermoelectromotive force of tantalum and niobium carbides depending on composition and temperature is studied. Electric resistance of carbides is shown to grow with increase of carbon deficit, while thermoelectromotive force - accepts more negative values. Electro- and thermophysical properties are determined to be closely interrelated with electron structure of carbide coatings. In particular, results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy prove the fact

  15. Mechanical properties and structure of niobium and tantalum carbide coatings on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peculiarities of preparation of niobium and tantalum nonstoichiometric carbides have been studied by the method of gas-phase - diffusion crystallization. Mechanical properties of nonstoichiometric carbides are mainly determined by the concentration of carbon in them. Strength characteristics increase with carbon deficiency and reach the maximum at the ratios C:Me=0.8-0.85. However, futher increase in carbon vacancies in carbon sublattice causes a sharp decrease in mechanical properties of carbide coatings

  16. Steam Reforming on Transition-metal Carbides from Density-functional Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2012-05-11

    A screening study of the steam reforming reaction on clean and oxygen covered early transition-metal carbides surfaces is performed by means of density-functional theory calculations. It is found that carbides provide a wide spectrum of reactivities, from too reactive via suitable to too inert. Several molybdenum-based systems are identified as possible steam reforming catalysts. The findings suggest that carbides provide a playground for reactivity tuning, comparable to the one for pure metals.

  17. Extreme-Environment Silicon-Carbide (SiC) Wireless Sensor Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phase II objectives: Develop an integrated silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite capable of in situ measurements of critical characteristics of NTP engine; Compose silicon-carbide wireless sensor suite of: Extreme-environment sensors center, Dedicated high-temperature (450 deg C) silicon-carbide electronics that provide power and signal conditioning capabilities as well as radio frequency modulation and wireless data transmission capabilities center, An onboard energy harvesting system as a power source.

  18. HTGR fuel particle crusher: Mark 2 design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The double-roll crusher for fracturing the silicon carbide coatings of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel particles has been redesigned to improve the equipment. The housing was simplified and reduced to a two-piece assembly; the bearings were changed to accommodate thermal effects; the bearing protection seals were improved with triple redundancy; the bearing preload arrangement was simplified and improved; and localized wear areas were reinforced with better materials or special treatment. In addition, the crusher drive was changed for impoved characteristics and an increase in power

  19. Complex plasmochemical processing of solid fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Messerle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Technology of complex plasmaochemical processing of solid fuel by Ecibastuz bituminous and Turgay brown coals is presented. Thermodynamic and experimental study of the technology was fulfilled. Use of this technology allows producing of synthesis gas from organic mass of coal and valuable components (technical silicon, ferrosilicon, aluminum and silicon carbide and microelements of rare metals: uranium, molybdenum, vanadium etc. from mineral mass of coal. Produced a high-calorific synthesis gas can be used for methanol synthesis, as high-grade reducing gas instead of coke, as well as energy gas in thermal power plants.

  20. High Carbon Alloy Steels with Multiple Types of Ultra-fine Carbides and Their Characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Yong-qing; GAO Hong-tao; QI Yu-hong; ZHANG Zhan-ping; DAI Yu-mei; LIU Yan-xia

    2004-01-01

    Under normal forging and annealing conditions, there are different ultra fine carbides (M3C, M23C6, M7C3, M6C and MC) in high carbon alloy steels when alloy composition design is carried out properly. On the basis of carbides transformation orderliness, the alloy composition design of the high carbon alloy steels is conducted by phase-equilibrium thermodynamic calculation for Fe-Cr-W-Mo-V-C system. The nucleation and growth of new carbides, dissolution of previous partial carbides in these steels during annealing process, all these lead to ultra-fine distribution of carbides. Due to different crystal structures of carbides and different thermodynamics as well dynamics parameters of the carbides dissolution and precipitation, the range of quenching temperature of these steels is widened, and the good temper-resistance is obtained. The characteristics of heat treatment process and microstructure variance, and the carbides transformation for different temperature are explained by the phase-equilibrium component satisfactorily. Their bend and yield strength,flexibility and toughness all are advanced markedly comparing with that of kindred steels. Results of the applications have proved that the microstructure of ultra-fine carbides in these steels played importance roles in the enhancement of edginess and fatigue crack resistance of the die and knives.