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Sample records for carbide diamond composites

  1. One step deposition of highly adhesive diamond films on cemented carbide substrates via diamond/β-SiC composite interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Tao; Zhuang, Hao; Jiang, Xin, E-mail: xin.jiang@uni-siegen.de

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Novel diamond/beta-silicon carbide composite gradient interlayers were synthesized. • The interlayer features a cross-sectional gradient with increasing diamond content. • Diamond top layers and the interlayers were deposited in one single process. • The adhesion of the diamond film is drastically improved by employing the interlayer. • The stress was suppressed by manipulating the distribution of diamond and silicon carbide. - Abstract: Deposition of adherent diamond films on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide substrates has been realized by application of diamond/beta-silicon carbide composite interlayers. Diamond top layers and the interlayers were deposited in one single process by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique. Two different kinds of interlayers have been employed, namely, gradient interlayer and interlayer with constant composition. The distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide phases was precisely controlled by manipulating the gas phase composition. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were employed to determine the existence of diamond, beta-silicon carbide and cobalt silicides (Co{sub 2}Si, CoSi) phases, as well as the quality of diamond crystal and the residual stress in the films. Rockwell-C indentation tests were carried out to evaluate the film adhesion. It is revealed that the adhesion of the diamond film is drastically improved by employing the interlayer. This is mainly influenced by the residual stress in the diamond top layer, which is induced by the different thermal expansion coefficient of the film and the substrate. It is even possible to further suppress the stress by manipulating the distribution of diamond and beta-silicon carbide in the interlayer. The most adhesive diamond film on cemented carbide is thus obtained by employing a gradient composite interlayer.

  2. Superficial roughness on composite surface, composite enamel and composite dentin junctions after different finishing and polishing procedures. Part I: roughness after treatments with tungsten carbide vs diamond burs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Federico; Conti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate different instruments for finishing composite restorations, as well as examining different surfaces and interfaces of the same restoration. The null hypothesis is represented by the fact that there are no significant differences on roughness of composite restorations finishing between tungsten carbide and diamond burs, furthermore the null hypothesis is that there are no significant differences on roughness between finishing on composite surfaces (C), compositeenamel (CE) and composite-dentin (CD) interfaces. The study was performed on 28 teeth, and class V cavities were prepared on the extracted teeth. Restorations were done in Filtek XTE nanofilled composite (3M Espe) in a standardized method, to then be finished. A comparison was made in the phase 1 between tungsten carbide burs (16 blades), diamond burs (46 μm), with a similar shape by the same manufacturer (Komet). Each surface received 5 bur applications. Consequently, an analysis with a profilometer was performed. Phase 2 involved further confrontation of ulterior finishing with ultrafine tungsten carbide burs (30 blades) and with extra and ultrafine diamond burs (25 and 8 μm) (the same shape as previously mentioned). A second analysis was then performed with a profilometer. All measurements were taken on C surfaces, CE and CD interfaces. Statistical analyses were carried out with c2 test (a = 0.05). The finishing procedures with fine grit or toothing burs gave a better smoothness with tungsten carbide burs compared to diamond burs. While with the ultrafine grit no significant differences were noted between tungsten carbide and diamond burs on the CE and CD interfaces, the diamond bur left less superficial roughness on the C surfaces. With regards to the superficial roughness of the different areas of restoration, it can be concluded that: minor roughness was detected on C surfaces, while the CD interface had the most superficial roughness, regardless of whether the

  3. TRANSFORMATIONS IN NANO-DIAMONDS WITH FORMATION OF NANO-POROUS SILICON CARBIDE AT HIGH PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains investigations on regularities of diamond - silicon carbide composite structure formation at impact-wave excitation. It has been determined that while squeezing a porous blank containing Si (SiC nano-diamond by explosive detonation products some processes are taking place such as diamond nano-particles consolidation, reverse diamond transition into graphite, fragments formation from silicon carbide. A method for obtaining high-porous composites with the presence of ultra-disperse diamond particles has been developed. Material with three-dimensional high-porous silicon-carbide structure has been received due to nano-diamond graphitation at impact wave transmission and plastic deformation. The paper reveals nano-diamonds inverse transformation into graphite and its subsequent interaction with the silicon accompanied by formation of silicon-carbide fragments with dimensions of up to 100 nm.

  4. High pressure sintering (HP-HT) of diamond powders with titanium and titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, L.

    1999-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond compacts for cutting tools are mostly manufactured using high pressure sintering (HP-HT). The standard diamond compacts are prepared by diamond powders sintering with metallic binding phase. The first group of metallic binder are metals able to solve carbon - Co, Ni. The second group of metal binders are carbide forming elements - Ti, Cr, W and others. The paper describes high pressure sintering of diamond powder with titanium and nonstoichiometry titanium carbide for cutting tool application. A type of binding phase has the significant influence on microstructure and mechanical properties of diamond compacts. Very homogeneous structure was achieved in case of compacts obtained from metalized diamond where diamond-TiC-diamond connection were predominant. In the case of compacts prepared by mechanical mixing of diamond with titanium powders the obtained structure was nonhomogeneous with titanium carbide clusters. They had more diamond to diamond connections. These compacts compared to the compact made of metallized diamond have greater wear resistance. In the case of the diamond and TiC 0.92 sintering the strong bonding of TiC diamond grains was obtained. The microstructure observations for diamond with 5% wt. Ti and diamond with 5% wt. TiC 0.92 (the initial composition) compacts were performed in transmission microscope. For two type of compacts the strong bonding phase TiC without defects is creating. (author)

  5. Diamond dispersed cemented carbide produced without using ultra high pressure equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriguchi, H.; Tsuzuki, K.; Ikegaya, A.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a composite material of dispersed diamond particles in cemented carbide without using ultra high pressure equipment. The developed diamond dispersed cemented carbide combines the excellent properties of cemented carbide with diamond and also provides 1.5 times improved fracture toughness over that of cemented carbide. They also show 10 times higher wear resistance over that of cemented carbide in a wear resistance test against bearing steel, and 5 times greater grindability than diamond compacts. Because ultra high pressure equipment is not used to produce the developed material, large compacts over 100 mm in diameter can be manufactured. The developed material showed 10-25 times higher wear resistance in real use as wear-resistant tools such as centerless blades and work-rests. (author)

  6. Influence of high sintering pressure on the microhardness and wear resistance of diamond powder and silicon carbide-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipov Oleksandr Sergueevitch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The work reported on here involved the development of several samples of "diamond-SiC" composite produced under sintering pressures of up to 9.0 GPa at temperatures of up to 1973 7K. The average size of the diamond micropowder crystals used was 40/28 µm. The sintering process was carried out in a 2500-ton hydraulic press equipped with an anvil-type high-pressure device having a toroidal work surface and a central concavity diameter of 20 mm. The microhardness and wear resistance of the samples were found to be dependent on the sintering pressure. The experimental results indicated that the maximum microhardness and minimum wear resistance coefficients of each compact were attained when the pressure applied during sintering exceeded 6.5 GPa. Based on the established values of pressure, this study served to identify the types of devices applicable for the manufacture of composite material inserts for a variety of rock drilling applications.

  7. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  8. Tribological wear behavior of diamond reinforced composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Gunjan, Manoj Kumar; Mondal, D.P.; Pathak, L.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, diamond reinforced composite (DRC) coating has been applied on mild steel substrate using thermal spray coating technique. The composite powder consists of diamond, tungsten carbide, and bronze, which was mixed in a ball mill prior deposition by thermal spray. The microstructure and the distribution of diamond and tungsten carbide particle in the bronze matrix were studied. The DRC-coated mild steel substrates were assessed in terms of their high stress abrasive wear and compared with that of uncoated mild steel substrates. It was observed that when sliding against steel, the DRC-coated sample initially gains weight, but then loses the transferred counter surface material. In case of abrasive wear, the wear rate was greatly reduced due to the coating; wherein the wear rate decreased with increase in diamond content

  9. Study on tribological behavior and cutting performance of CVD diamond and DLC films on Co-cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dongcan; Shen Bin; Sun Fanghong

    2010-01-01

    The tribological behaviors of diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films play a major role on their machining and mechanical applications. In this study, diamond and diamond-like carbon (DLC) films are deposited on the cobalt cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate respectively adopting the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique and the vacuum arc discharge with a graphite cathode, and their friction properties are evaluated on a reciprocating ball-on-plate tribometer with counterfaces of silicon nitride (Si 3 N 4 ) ceramic, cemented tungsten carbide (WC) and ball-bearing steel materials, under the ambient air without lubricating condition. Moreover, to evaluate their cutting performance, comparative turning tests are conducted using the uncoated WC-Co and as-fabricated CVD diamond and DLC coated inserts, with glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) composite materials as the workpiece. The as-deposited HFCVD diamond and DLC films are characterized with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and 3D surface topography based on white-light interferometry. Furthermore, Rocwell C indentation tests are conducted to evaluate the adhesion of HFCVD diamond and DLC films grown onto WC-Co substrates. SEM and 3D surface topography based on white-light interferometry are also used to investigate the worn region on the surfaces of diamond and DLC films. The friction tests suggest that the obtained friction coefficient curves that of various contacts exhibit similar evolution tendency. For a given counterface, DLC films present lower stable friction coefficients than HFCVD diamond films under the same sliding conditions. The cutting tests results indicate that flank wear of the HFCVD diamond coated insert is lower than that of DLC coated insert before diamond films peeling off.

  10. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leparoux, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)], E-mail: susanne.leparoux@empa.ch; Diot, C. [Consultant, allee de Mozart 10, F-92300 Chatillon (France); Dubach, A. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Vaucher, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2007-10-15

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  11. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leparoux, S.; Diot, C.; Dubach, A.; Vaucher, S.

    2007-01-01

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  12. Thermal Conductivity of Diamond Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor M. Shakhov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A major problem challenging specialists in present-day materials sciences is the development of compact, cheap to fabricate heat sinks for electronic devices, primarily for computer processors, semiconductor lasers, high-power microchips, and electronics components. The materials currently used for heat sinks of such devices are aluminum and copper, with thermal conductivities of about 250 W/(m·K and 400 W/(m·K, respectively. Significantly, the thermal expansion coefficient of metals differs markedly from those of the materials employed in semiconductor electronics (mostly silicon; one should add here the low electrical resistivity metals possess. By contrast, natural single-crystal diamond is known to feature the highest thermal conductivity of all the bulk materials studied thus far, as high as 2,200 W/(m·K. Needless to say, it cannot be applied in heat removal technology because of high cost. Recently, SiC- and AlN-based ceramics have started enjoying wide use as heat sink materials; the thermal conductivity of such composites, however, is inferior to that of metals by nearly a factor two. This prompts a challenging scientific problem to develop diamond-based composites with thermal characteristics superior to those of aluminum and copper, adjustable thermal expansion coefficient, low electrical conductivity and a moderate cost, below that of the natural single-crystal diamond. The present review addresses this problem and appraises the results reached by now in studying the possibility of developing composites in diamond-containing systems with a view of obtaining materials with a high thermal conductivity.

  13. Influence of the microstructure of a diamond-containing composite material on the tool cutting ability when grinding a diamond single crystal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kuzei

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Using the methods of electronic scanning microstructure and X-ray analysis, the influence of the structure of diamond-containing composite materials on the cutting ability of the tool for circular grinding of diamond single crystals has been studied. It is shown that the use of an oxide-hydroxide glass with a spreading temperature of 570–590 K as a precursor of the binder leads to the formation of melt films on the surface of silicon carbide and diamond particles at 600–630 K and the glass content in the batch is 10 vol. %. The conversion of oxidehydroxide glass films to oxide films proceeds at 700–775 K during the sintering of the composite material. Depending on the volume content of the glass in the charge, the porosity of the compact, three types of structure of composite materials are distinguished: a volumetric skeleton of glass-clad diamond particles and silicon carbide with pores at the sites of multiple compounds; a frame made of glass-clad diamond particles and silicon carbide with glass pores in places of multiple connections; a matrix of glass and the particles of diamond, silicon carbide and pores located in it. The maximum cutting ability of the tool for circular grinding of diamond is provided by a composite material with a structure of the first type.

  14. Tribological performance of polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond films on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mahtab; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmed, E.; Malik, Abdul Sattar; Shah, Z. A.; Ahmad, Naseeb; Mehtab, Ujala; Raza, Rizwan

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond coatings have been made on unpolished side of Si (100) wafer by hot filament chemical vapor deposition process. Morphology of the coatings has been found to vary from (111) triangular-facetted to predominantly (111) square-faceted by increasing the concentration of tantalum carbide. The results have been compared to those of a diamond reference coating with no tantalum content. An increase in roughness has been observed with the increase of tantalum carbide (TaC) due to change in morphology of the diamond films. It is noticed that roughness of the coatings increases as grains become more square-faceted. It is found that diamond coatings involving tantalum carbide are not as resistant as diamond films with no TaC content and the coefficient of friction for such coatings with microcrystalline grains can be manipulated to 0·33 under high vacuum of 10-7 Torr. Such a low friction coefficient value enhances tribological behavior of unpolished Si substrates and can possibly be used in sliding applications.

  15. Ultrasonically Assisted Single Point Diamond Turning of Optical Mold of Tungsten Carbide

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    Zhanjie Li

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To realize high efficiency, low/no damage and high precision machining of tungsten carbide used for lens mold, a high frequency ultrasonic vibration cutting system was developed at first. Then, tungsten carbide was precisely machined with a polycrystalline diamond (PCD tool assisted by the self-developed high frequency ultrasonic vibration cutting system. Tool wear mechanism was investigated in ductile regime machining of tungsten carbide. The cutter back-off phenomenon in the process was analyzed. The subsequent experimental results of ultra-precision machining with a single crystal diamond tool showed that: under the condition of high frequency ultrasonic vibration cutting, nano-scale surface roughness can be obtained by the diamond tool with smaller tip radius and no defects like those of ground surface were found on the machined surface. Tool wear mechanisms of the single crystal diamond tool are mainly abrasive wear and micro-chipping. To solve the problem, a method of inclined ultrasonic vibration cutting with negative rake angle was put forward according to force analysis, which can further reduce tool wear and roughness of the machined surface. The investigation was important to high efficiency and quality ultra-precision machining of tungsten carbide.

  16. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  17. Copper-micrometer-sized diamond nanostructured composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, D; Livramento, V; Fernandes, H; Silva, C; Carvalho, P A; Shohoji, N; Correia, J B

    2011-01-01

    Reinforcement of a copper matrix with diamond enables tailoring the properties demanded for thermal management applications at high temperature, such as the ones required for heat sink materials in low activated nuclear fusion reactors. For an optimum compromise between thermal conductivity and mechanical properties, a novel approach based on multiscale diamond dispersions is proposed: a Cu-nanodiamond composite produced by milling is used as a nanostructured matrix for further dispersion of micrometer-sized diamondDiamond). A series of Cu-nanodiamond mixtures have been milled to establish a suitable nanodiamond fraction. A refined matrix with homogeneously dispersed nanoparticles was obtained with 4 at.% μDiamond for posterior mixture with microdiamond and subsequent consolidation. Preliminary consolidation by hot extrusion of a mixture of pure copper and μDiamond has been carried out to define optimal processing parameters. The materials produced were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microhardness measurements.

  18. Measurement and model on thermal properties of sintered diamond composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moussa, Tala; Garnier, Bertrand; Peerhossaini, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Thermal properties of sintered diamond used for grinding is studied. ► Flash method with infrared temperature measurement is used to investigate. ► Thermal conductivity increases with the amount of diamond. ► It is very sensitive to binder conductivity. ► Results agree with models assuming imperfect contact between matrix and particles. - Abstract: A prelude to the thermal management of grinding processes is measurement of the thermal properties of working materials. Indeed, tool materials must be chosen not only for their mechanical properties (abrasion performance, lifetime…) but also for thermal concerns (thermal conductivity) for efficient cooling that avoids excessive temperatures in the tool and workpiece. Sintered diamond is currently used for grinding tools since it yields higher performances and longer lifetimes than conventional materials (mineral or silicon carbide abrasives), but its thermal properties are not yet well known. Here the thermal conductivity, heat capacity and density of sintered diamond are measured as functions of the diamond content in composites and for two types of metallic binders: hard tungsten-based and soft cobalt-based binders. The measurement technique for thermal conductivity is derived from the flash method. After pulse heating, the temperature of the rear of the sample is measured with a noncontact method (infrared camera). A parameter estimation method associated with a three-layer nonstationary thermal model is used to obtain sample thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficient and absorbed energy. With the hard metallic binder, the thermal conductivity of sintered diamond increased by up to 64% for a diamond content increasing from 0 to 25%. The increase is much less for the soft binder: 35% for diamond volumes up to 25%. In addition, experimental data were found that were far below the value predicted by conventional analytical models for effective thermal conductivity. A possible explanation

  19. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.K.; Brown, D.W.; Kimock, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  20. Adherent diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide substrates with new Fe/Ni/Co binder phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polini, Riccardo; Delogu, Michele; Marcheselli, Giancarlo

    2006-01-01

    WC-Co hard metals continue to gain importance for cutting, mining and chipless forming tools. Cobalt metal currently dominates the market as a binder because of its unique properties. However, the use of cobalt as a binder has several drawbacks related to its hexagonal close-packed structure and market price fluctuations. These issues pushed the development of pre-alloyed binder powders which contain less than 40 wt.% cobalt. In this paper we first report the results of extensive investigations of WC-Fe/Ni/Co hard metal sintering, surface pretreating and deposition of adherent diamond films by using an industrial hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor. In particular, CVD diamond was deposited onto WC-Fe/Ni/Co grades which exhibited the best mechanical properties. Prior to deposition, the substrates were submitted to surface roughening by Murakami's etching and to surface binder removal by aqua regia. The adhesion was evaluated by Rockwell indentation tests (20, 40, 60 and 100 kg) conducted with a Brale indenter and compared to the adhesion of diamond films grown onto Co-cemented tungsten carbide substrates, which were submitted to similar etching pretreatments and identical deposition conditions. The results showed that diamond films on medium-grained WC-6 wt.% Fe/Ni/Co substrates exhibited good adhesion levels, comparable to those obtained for HFCVD diamond on Co-cemented carbides with similar microstructure

  1. Development of silicon carbide composites for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.

    1993-01-01

    The use of silicon carbide composites for structural materials is of growing interest in the fusion community. However, radiation effects in these materials are virtually unexplored, and the general state of ceramic matrix composites for nonnuclear applications is still in its infancy. Research into the radiation response of the most popular silicon carbide composite, namely, the chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) SiC-carbon-Nicalon fiber system is discussed. Three areas of interest are the stability of the fiber and matrix materials, the stability of the fiber-matrix interface, and the true activation of these open-quotes reduced activityclose quotes materials. Two methods are presented that quantitatively measure the effect of radiation on fiber and matrix elastic modulus as well as the fiber-matrix interfacial strength. The results of these studies show that the factor limiting the radiation performance of the CVD SiC-carbon-Nicalon system is degradation of the Nicalon fiber, which leads to a weakened carbon interface. The activity of these composites is significantly higher than expected and is dominated by impurity isotopes. 52 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  2. GENERAL RULES OF SIC FORMATION IN DIAMOND-CONTAINING COMPOSITION AT LOW PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Zhuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental investigations of structure-formation process of «diamond-carbide silicon» composite at low pressure which is obtained by liquid silicon impregnation of a porous blank made of diamond crystals with nano-coatings have made it possible to establish the following general rules of the process concerning a sintering reaction in the coating and composite material: vacuum magnetronic spraying of composite cathodes leads to formation of nano-coating which is made of silicon and hydrogen atoms or clusters, and their subsequent treatment with plasma of glow discharge is accompanied by formation of α-SiC at low temperatures in a hard phase; silicon impregnation at 1500 °C with given pyrolytic carbon in the charge may result in β-SiC matrix formation.The formed «diamond-carbide silicon» composite material contains a frame structure of diamond crystals with nano-coating impregnated by silicon carbide and is characterized by high physical and mechanical properties. 

  3. Diamond structures grown from polymer composite nanofibers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Potocký, Štěpán; Kromka, Alexander; Babchenko, Oleg; Rezek, Bohuslav; Martinová, L.; Pokorný, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 6 (2013), s. 519-521 ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/12/0910; GA ČR GAP205/12/0908 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : chemical vapour deposition * composite polymer * nanocrystalline diamond * nanofiber sheet * SEM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  4. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Longtao, E-mail: longtaojiang@163.com [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Pingping [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Xiu, Ziyang [Skate Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Chen, Guoqin [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lin, Xiu [Heilongjiang Academy of Industrial Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2015-08-15

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond{sub (111)}/Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond{sub (100)}/Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond{sub (111)}/ aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond{sub (111)}/aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} was analyzed by crystallography theory.

  5. Interfacial characteristics of diamond/aluminum composites with high thermal conductivity fabricated by squeeze-casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Longtao; Wang, Pingping; Xiu, Ziyang; Chen, Guoqin; Lin, Xiu; Dai, Chen; Wu, Gaohui

    2015-01-01

    In this work, aluminum matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (diamond/aluminum composites) were fabricated by squeeze casting method. The material exhibited a thermal conductivity as high as 613 W / (m · K). The obtained composites were investigated by scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope in terms of the (100) and (111) facets of diamond particles. The diamond particles were observed to be homogeneously distributed in the aluminum matrix. The diamond (111) /Al interface was found to be devoid of reaction products. While at the diamond (100) /Al interface, large-sized aluminum carbides (Al 4 C 3 ) with twin-crystal structure were identified. The interfacial characteristics were believed to be responsible for the excellent thermal conductivity of the material. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Squeeze casting method was introduced to fabricate diamond/Al composite. • Sound interfacial bonding with excellent thermal conductivity was produced. • Diamond (111) / aluminum interface was firstly characterized by TEM/HRTEM. • Physical combination was the controlling bonding for diamond (111) /aluminum. • The growth mechanism of Al 4 C 3 was analyzed by crystallography theory

  6. Strain-induced ordered structure of titanium carbide during depositing diamond on Ti alloy substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.J., E-mail: lixj@alum.imr.ac.cn [College of Material Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Advanced Structural Materials, Ministry of Education, Changchun University of Technology, Changchun, 130012 (China); He, L.L., E-mail: llhe@imr.ac.cn [Shenyang National Lab of Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Y.S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon S7N 5A9, SK (Canada); Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada); Yang, Q. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon S7N 5A9, SK (Canada); Hirose, A. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5E2 (Canada)

    2017-01-15

    During the deposition of diamond films on Ti alloy substrates, titanium carbide is a common precipitated phase, preferentially formed at the interfacial region. However, in this case, the precipitation of an ordered structure of titanium carbide has not been reported. In our work, a long periodic ordered structure of TiC has been observed at the deposited diamond film/Ti alloy interface by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The long periodic ordered structure is identified as 6H-type. The formation mechanism is revealed by comparative studies on the different structures of TiC precipitated under different diamond deposition conditions in terms of deposition time, atmosphere and temperature. A large number of carbon vacancies in the interfacial precipitated TiC phase are verified through electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) quantification analysis. However, an ordered arrangement of these carbon vacancies occurs only when the interfacial stress is large enough to induce the precipitation of 6H-type TiC. The supplementary analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) further confirms that additional diffraction peaks presented in the XRD patterns are corresponding to the precipitation of 6H-type TiC. - Highlights: •Different structures of TiC are observed during deposited diamond on Ti alloy. •One is common NaCl structure, the other is periodic structure. •The periodic structure is identified as 6H-type by HRTEM. •Carbon vacancies are verified to always exist in the TiC phase. •The precipitation of 6H-type TiC is mainly affected by interfacial stress.

  7. Strain-induced ordered structure of titanium carbide during depositing diamond on Ti alloy substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.J.; He, L.L.; Li, Y.S.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2017-01-01

    During the deposition of diamond films on Ti alloy substrates, titanium carbide is a common precipitated phase, preferentially formed at the interfacial region. However, in this case, the precipitation of an ordered structure of titanium carbide has not been reported. In our work, a long periodic ordered structure of TiC has been observed at the deposited diamond film/Ti alloy interface by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The long periodic ordered structure is identified as 6H-type. The formation mechanism is revealed by comparative studies on the different structures of TiC precipitated under different diamond deposition conditions in terms of deposition time, atmosphere and temperature. A large number of carbon vacancies in the interfacial precipitated TiC phase are verified through electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) quantification analysis. However, an ordered arrangement of these carbon vacancies occurs only when the interfacial stress is large enough to induce the precipitation of 6H-type TiC. The supplementary analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) further confirms that additional diffraction peaks presented in the XRD patterns are corresponding to the precipitation of 6H-type TiC. - Highlights: •Different structures of TiC are observed during deposited diamond on Ti alloy. •One is common NaCl structure, the other is periodic structure. •The periodic structure is identified as 6H-type by HRTEM. •Carbon vacancies are verified to always exist in the TiC phase. •The precipitation of 6H-type TiC is mainly affected by interfacial stress.

  8. Nucleation and adhesion of diamond films on Co cemented tungsten carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, R.; Santarelli, M.; Traversa, E.

    1999-12-01

    Diamond deposits were grown using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on pretreated Co cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates with an average grain size of 6 {micro}m. Depositions were performed with 0.5 or 1.0% methane concentration and with substrate temperatures ranging from 750 to 1,000 C. Diamond nucleation densities were measured by scanning electron microscopy. Scratched and bias-enhanced nucleation pretreated substrates showed the larger nucleation densities. Etching of the WC performed by Murakami's reagent, followed by surface-Co dissolution (MP pretreatment), led to a roughened but scarcely nucleating surface. The performance of a scratching prior to the MP pretreatment allowed one to increase the nucleation density, due scratching-induced defects, confined in the outermost layer of WC grains, which act as nucleation sites. Smaller nucleation densities were observed with increasing the substrate temperature and reducing the methane concentration, confirming that diamond nucleates via a heterogeneous process. The adhesion of continuous films was evaluated by the reciprocal of the slope of crack radius-indentation load functions. The substrate pretreatments mainly affected the film adhesion, while the influence of CVD process conditions was minor. The two main factors that improve the diamond film adhesion are the coating-substrate contact area and the surface-Co removal.

  9. Study of carbide-forming element interlayers for diamond nucleation and growth on silicon and WC-Co substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Y.; Li, Y.S.; Yang, Q.; Hirose, A.

    2010-01-01

    Diamond nucleation and growth on several typical carbide-forming elements (CFE) (Ti, Cr and W) coated Si and WC-Co substrates were studied. The ion beam sputtered CFE interlayers show an amorphous/nanocrystalline microstructure. The diamond formed on the CFE coated substrates shows higher nucleation density and rate and finer grain structure than on uncoated substrates. Consequently, nanocrystalline diamond thin films can be formed on the CFE coated substrates under conventional microcrystalline diamond growth conditions. Among the three tested CFE interlayers, diamond has the highest nucleation density and rate on W layer and the lowest on Ti layer. The diamond nucleation density and rate on CFE coated WC-Co are much higher than those on widely used metal nitride coated WC-Co.

  10. Synthesis of carbon fibre-reinforced, silicon carbide composites by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    carbon fibre (Cf) reinforced, silicon carbide matrix composites which are ... eral applications, such as automotive brakes, high-efficiency engine systems, ... The PIP method is based on the use of organo metallic pre-ceramic precursors.

  11. Graphite and boron carbide composites made by hot-pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, K.; Hagio, T.; Kobayashi, K.

    1981-01-01

    Composites consisting of graphite and boron carbide were made by hot-pressing mixed powders of coke carbon and boron carbide. The change of relative density, mechanical strength and electrical resistivity of the composites and the X-ray parameters of coke carbon were investigated with increase of boron carbide content and hot-pressing temperature. From these experiments, it was found that boron carbide powder has a remarkable effect on sintering and graphitization of coke carbon powder above the hot-pressing temperature of 2000 0 C. At 2200 0 C, electrical resistivity of the composite and d(002) spacing of coke carbon once showed minimum values at about 5 to 10 wt% boron carbide and then increased. The strength of the composite increased with increase of boron carbide content. It was considered that some boron from boron carbide began to diffuse substitutionally into the graphite structure above 2000 0 C and densification and graphitization were promoted with the diffusion of boron. Improvements could be made to the mechanical strength, density, oxidation resistance and manufacturing methods by comparing with the properties and processes of conventional graphites. (author)

  12. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  13. Neutron detection performance of silicon carbide and diamond detectors with incomplete charge collection properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, M., E-mail: michael.hodgson@becq.co.uk [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Lohstroh, A.; Sellin, P. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Thomas, D. [NPL, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-01

    The benefits of neutron detection and spectroscopy with carbon based, wide band gap, semiconductor detectors have previously been discussed within the literature. However, at the time of writing there are still limitations with these detectors related to availability, cost, size and perceived quality. This study demonstrates that lower quality materials—indicated by lower charge collection efficiency (CCE), poor resolution and polarisation effect—available at wafer scale and lower cost, can fulfil requirements for fast neutron detection and spectroscopy for fluxes over several orders of magnitude, where only coarse energy discrimination is required. In this study, a single crystal diamond detector (D-SC, with 100% CCE), a polycrystalline diamond (D-PC, with ≈4% CCE) and semi-insulating silicon carbide (SiC-SI, with ≈35% CCE) have been compared for alpha and fast neutron performance. All detectors demonstrated alpha induced polarisation effects in the form of a change of both energy peak position and count rate with irradiation time. Despite these operational issues the ability to detect fast neutrons and distinguish neutron energies was observed. This performance was demonstrated over a wide dynamic range (500–40,000 neutrons/s), with neutron induced polarisation being demonstrated in D-PC and SiC-SI at high fluxes.

  14. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Goto, Sumitaka; Saito, Yukio; Jinbo, Ryutaro; Ogiwara, Norio; Saido, Masahiro.

    1996-01-01

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  15. Damage, trapping and desorption at the implantation of helium and deuterium in graphite, diamond and silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, G.A.R.

    1995-07-01

    The production, thermal stability and structure of ion induced defects have been studied by Rutherford backscattering in channeling geometry for the implantation of helium and deuterium in graphite, diamond and silicon carbide with energies of 8 and 20 keV. At the implantation of deuterium and helium ions more defects were measured in graphite than in diamond or silicon carbide at equal experimental conditions. This is due to increased backscattering in graphite, which is caused by the splitting and tilting of crystallites and a local reordering of lattice atoms around defects. At 300 K, Helium produces more defects in all three materials than deuterium with equal depth distribution of defects. The ratio of the defects produced by helium and deuterium agrees very well with the corresponding ratio of the energy deposited in nuclear collisions. In graphite, only small concentrations of deuterium induced defects anneal below 800 K, while in diamond small concentrations of deuterium as well as of helium induced defects anneal mostly below 800 K. This annealing behavior is considered to be due to recombination of point defects. The buildup of helium and deuterium in graphite is different. The trapping of deuterium proceeds until saturation is reached, while in the case of helium trapping is interrupted by flaking. In diamond, deuterium as well as helium are trapped almost completely until at higher fluences reemission starts and saturation is reached. Two desorption mechanisms were identified for the thermal desorption of helium from base-oriented graphite. Helium implanted at low fluences desorbs diffusing to the surface, while for the implantation of high fluences the release of helium due to blistering dominates. The desorption of deuterium from graphite and diamond shows differences. While in graphite the desorption starts already at 800 K, in diamond up to 1140 K only little desorption can be observed. These differences can be explained by the different transport

  16. Boron carbide-carbon composites and composites for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheinberg, H.

    1979-01-01

    Because of its neutronic properties, high hardness, and high melting temperature, boron carbide (B 4 C) is widely used at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. However because of its hardness and mode of manufacture, it is expensive to machine finish to tight dimensional specifictions. For some neutronic applications, a density considerably below the theoretical 2.52 Mg/m 3 was acceptable, and this relaxation in density specification permitted addition of carbon as a second phase to reduce machining costs. We conducted an experimental program to prepare 50.8-mm-diam by 34.8-mm-thick cylinders of B 4 C and B 4 C-C composites with concentrations of carbon varying from 5.5 to 30 volume percent. Additionally we used three forms of carbon, natural flake graphite, synthetic graphite flour, and a fine furnace black as the source of the second phase. We determined the sound velocity, compressive strength, coefficient of thermal expansion, electrical resistivity, and microstructure as functions of composition. Additionally, an enriched boron ( 10 B)-carbon composite was studied as an alternate material

  17. Mechanical characterization of copper-diamond composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerns, J.A.; Makowiecki, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    The main goals of this project were to measure the tensile properties of a copper-diamond composite (CDC) material and to demonstrate that a grinding wheel could be manufactured using the CDC material as the abrasive. Tensile properties have been measured with limited success because of the high failure rate in manufacturing the dog bone test specimens. The basic conclusion of the tensile test is that this material has low ductility and, therefore, the failure mechanism, is not brittle. The second conclusion is that a grinding wheel made using the CDC material is possible. Finally, this project has led to the development of a new concept in making grinding wheels that is the subject of current research and possible technology transfer initiatives

  18. Optically transparent composite diamond/Ti electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ashcheulov, Petr; Taylor, Andrew; More Chevalier, Joris; Kovalenko, A.; Remeš, Zdeněk; Drahokoupil, Jan; Hubík, Pavel; Fekete, Ladislav; Klimša, Ladislav; Kopeček, Jaromír; Remiášová, Jarmila; Kohout, Michal; Frank, Otakar; Kavan, Ladislav; Mortet, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, Aug (2017), s. 179-189 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk LM2015088; GA ČR GA13-31783S Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568; AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně; AV ČR(CZ) MSM100101602 Program:Program na podporu mezinárodní spolupráce začínajících výzkumných pracovníků Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : diamond * transparent film * composite electrode * conductive thin film Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (UFCH-W) OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics, supercond.); Physical chemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  19. Comparison between Silicon-Carbide and diamond for fast neutron detection at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obraztsova O.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron radiation detector for nuclear reactor applications plays an important role in getting information about the actual neutron yield and reactor environment. Such detector must be able to operate at high temperature (up to 600° C and high neutron flux levels. It is worth nothing that a detector for industrial environment applications must have fast and stable response over considerable long period of use as well as high energy resolution. Silicon Carbide is one of the most attractive materials for neutron detection. Thanks to its outstanding properties, such as high displacement threshold energy (20-35 eV, wide band gap energy (3.27 eV and high thermal conductivity (4.9 W/cm·K, SiC can operate in harsh environment (high temperature, high pressure and high radiation level without additional cooling system. Our previous analyses reveal that SiC detectors, under irradiation and at elevated temperature, respond to neutrons showing consistent counting rates as function of external reverse bias voltages and radiation intensity. The counting-rate of the thermal neutron-induced peak increases with the area of the detector, and appears to be linear with respect to the reactor power. Diamond is another semi-conductor considered as one of most promising materials for radiation detection. Diamond possesses several advantages in comparison to other semiconductors such as a wider band gap (5.5 eV, higher threshold displacement energy (40-50 eV and thermal conductivity (22 W/cm·K, which leads to low leakage current values and make it more radiation resistant that its competitors. A comparison is proposed between these two semiconductors for the ability and efficiency to detect fast neutrons. For this purpose the deuterium-tritium neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden with 14 MeV neutron output of 1010 n·s-1 is used. In the present work, we interpret the first measurements and results with both 4H-SiC and chemical vapor deposition (CVD

  20. Comparison between Silicon-Carbide and diamond for fast neutron detection at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obraztsova, O.; Ottaviani, L.; Klix, A.; Döring, T.; Palais, O.; Lyoussi, A.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron radiation detector for nuclear reactor applications plays an important role in getting information about the actual neutron yield and reactor environment. Such detector must be able to operate at high temperature (up to 600° C) and high neutron flux levels. It is worth nothing that a detector for industrial environment applications must have fast and stable response over considerable long period of use as well as high energy resolution. Silicon Carbide is one of the most attractive materials for neutron detection. Thanks to its outstanding properties, such as high displacement threshold energy (20-35 eV), wide band gap energy (3.27 eV) and high thermal conductivity (4.9 W/cm·K), SiC can operate in harsh environment (high temperature, high pressure and high radiation level) without additional cooling system. Our previous analyses reveal that SiC detectors, under irradiation and at elevated temperature, respond to neutrons showing consistent counting rates as function of external reverse bias voltages and radiation intensity. The counting-rate of the thermal neutron-induced peak increases with the area of the detector, and appears to be linear with respect to the reactor power. Diamond is another semi-conductor considered as one of most promising materials for radiation detection. Diamond possesses several advantages in comparison to other semiconductors such as a wider band gap (5.5 eV), higher threshold displacement energy (40-50 eV) and thermal conductivity (22 W/cm·K), which leads to low leakage current values and make it more radiation resistant that its competitors. A comparison is proposed between these two semiconductors for the ability and efficiency to detect fast neutrons. For this purpose the deuterium-tritium neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden with 14 MeV neutron output of 1010 n·s-1 is used. In the present work, we interpret the first measurements and results with both 4H-SiC and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond

  1. Nickel/Diamond Composite Coating Prepared by High Speed Electrodeposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Yan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nickel/diamond composite coatings were prepared on the basis of a new high speed electroplating bath. The influence of additives, plating parameters and diamond concentration on internal stress was investigated in order to find the solution to decrease the stress introduced by high current density; the micro morphology of the coatings were observed by SEM. The bath and depositing parameters were optimized that thick nickel/diamond composite coatings with low internal stress can be high speed electroplated with a high cathode current density of 30A/dm2. The results show that when plated with bath composition and parameters as follows: sodium dodecyl sulfate 0.5g/L, ammonium acetate 3g/L, sodium citrate 1.5g/L, diamond particles 30g/L; pH value 3-4, temperature 50℃, the composite coatings prepared in high speed have the lowest internal stress.

  2. Pyrotechnic Smoke Compositions Containing Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    smoke. Experimentation and thermodynamic modeling were used in conjunction to develop the compositions which were then evaluated both visually and by...fuel to produce thick clouds of white smoke. Experimentation and thermodynamic modeling were used in conjunction to develop the compositions which...Transmittance-based measurements may be used to quantify the effectiveness of screening smokes. The Beer -Lambert law is used to define the figures of merit

  3. Oxidation of mullite-zirconia-alumina-silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, C.; Moya, J.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports the isothermal oxidation of mullite-alumina-zirconia-silicon carbide composites obtained by reaction sintering studied in the temperature interval 800 degrees to 1400 degrees C. The kinetics of the oxidation process was related to the viscosity of the surface glassy layer as well as to the crystallization of the surface film. The oxidation kinetics was halted to T ≤ 1300 degrees C, presumably because of crystallization

  4. Electrical conductivity of silicon carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, R.; Greeff, J. de; Vinche, C.; Frias Rebelo, A.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical conductivity was measured on two SiC/SiC composite materials in the temperature range from room temperature up to 1000degC in order to estimate the magnitude of MHD effects in liquid metal blankets if SiC/SiC composites are used as structural materials. For both types of material, the electrical conductivity increased continuously with temperature. The conductivity values ranged from 350 (Ωm) -1 at room temperature to 550 (Ωm) -1 at 1000degC, indicating that the materials tested cannot be treated as an electrical insulator in a MHD analysis for liquid metal blanket studies. (author)

  5. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  6. Exploration on Wire Discharge Machining Added Powder for Metal-Based Diamond Grinding Wheel on Wire EDM Dressing and Truing of Grinding Tungsten Carbide Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, H. M.; Yang, L. D.; Lin, Y. C.; Lin, C. L.

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the effects of material removal rate and abrasive grain protrusion on the metal-based diamond grinding wheel were studied to find the optimal parameters for adding powder and wire discharge. In addition, this kind of electric discharge method to add powder on the metal-based diamond grinding wheel on line after dressing and truing will be applied on tungsten carbide to study the grinding material removal rate, grinding wheel wear, surface roughness, and surface micro-hardness.

  7. Stress envelope of silicon carbide composites at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Kim, Sunghun; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-01-01

    To identify a comprehensive stress envelope, i.e., strength anisotropy map, of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (SiC/SiC composite) for practical component design, tensile and compressive tests were conducted using the small specimen test technique specifically tailored for high-temperature use. In-plane shear properties were, however, estimated using the off-axial tensile method and assuming that the mixed mode failure criterion, i.e., Tsai–Wu criterion, is valid for the composites. The preliminary test results indicate no significant degradation to either proportional limit stress (PLS) or fracture strength by tensile loading at temperatures below 1000 °C. A similarly good tolerance of compressive properties was identified at elevated temperatures, except for a slight degradation in PLS. With the high-temperature test data of tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties, the stress envelopes at elevated temperatures were finally obtained. A slight reduction in the design limit was obvious at elevated temperatures when the compressive mode is dominant, whereas a negligibly small impact on the design is expected by considering the tensile loading case

  8. Stress envelope of silicon carbide composites at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takashi, E-mail: nozawa.takashi67@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Kim, Sunghun [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Omotedate, Obuchi, Rokkasho, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan)

    2014-10-15

    To identify a comprehensive stress envelope, i.e., strength anisotropy map, of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite (SiC/SiC composite) for practical component design, tensile and compressive tests were conducted using the small specimen test technique specifically tailored for high-temperature use. In-plane shear properties were, however, estimated using the off-axial tensile method and assuming that the mixed mode failure criterion, i.e., Tsai–Wu criterion, is valid for the composites. The preliminary test results indicate no significant degradation to either proportional limit stress (PLS) or fracture strength by tensile loading at temperatures below 1000 °C. A similarly good tolerance of compressive properties was identified at elevated temperatures, except for a slight degradation in PLS. With the high-temperature test data of tensile, compressive and in-plane shear properties, the stress envelopes at elevated temperatures were finally obtained. A slight reduction in the design limit was obvious at elevated temperatures when the compressive mode is dominant, whereas a negligibly small impact on the design is expected by considering the tensile loading case.

  9. Thermodynamic analysis of thermal plasma process of composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide production from zircon concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostic, Z.G.; Stefanovic, P.Lj.; Pavlovic; Pavlovic, Z.N.; Zivkovic, N.V.

    2000-01-01

    Improved zirconium ceramics and composites have been invented in an effort to obtain better resistance to ablation at high temperature. These ceramics are suitable for use as thermal protection materials on the exterior surfaces of spacecraft, and in laboratory and industrial environments that include flows of hot oxidizing gases. Results of thermodynamic consideration of the process for composite zirconium carbide and silicon carbide ultrafine powder production from ZrSiO 4 in argon thermal plasma and propane-butane gas as reactive quenching reagents are presented in the paper. (author)

  10. Investigation of the Mechanical Behaviour of Metal Diamond Composites

    CERN Document Server

    Peroni, L; Bertarelli, A; Dallocchio, A; Mariani, N; Bizzaro, S

    2012-01-01

    Metal-Diamond Composites (Me-CD) are a novel class of materials which has typical applications in the field of thermal management. Usually, due to the high volume fraction of diamonds inside the matrix, the mechanical behavior of such materials is quite brittle with low level of fracture stress and strain. However, with advanced innovations in the sintering processes, it is possible to obtain composite materials with a good level of strength and toughness. The great advantage of these materials is the possibility to combine the high thermal and electrical conductivity of diamonds with the strength of metals. Aim of this work is the investigation of the mechanical behavior of Me-CD from quasi-static to high strain-rate loading conditions. The temperature influence on mechanical properties is also evaluated.

  11. Effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on the wear behavior of hot pressed diamond cutting segments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sintering temperature and boron carbide content on wear behavior of diamond cutting segments. For this purpose, the segments contained 2, 5 and 10 wt.% B4C were prepared by hot pressing process carried out under a pressure of 35 MPa, at 600, 650 and 700 °C for 3 minutes. The transverse rupture strength (TRS of the segments was assessed using a three-point bending test. Ankara andesite stone was cut to examine the wear behavior of segments with boron carbide. Microstructure, surfaces of wear and fracture of segments were determined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDS, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. As a result, the wear rate decreased significantly in the 0-5 wt.% B4C contents, while it increased in the 5-10 wt.% B4C contents. With increase in sintering temperature, the wear rate decreased due to the hard matrix.

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of Silicon Carbide Epoxy Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James

    Nanoscale fillers can significantly enhance the performance of composites by increasing the extent of filler-to-matrix interaction. Thus far, the embedding of nanomaterials into composites has been achieved, but the directional arrangement has proved to be a challenging task. Even with advances in in-situ and shear stress induced orientation, these methods are both difficult to control and unreliable. Therefore, the fabrication of nanomaterials with an ability to orient along a magnetic field is a promising pathway to create highly controllable composite systems with precisely designed characteristics. To this end, the goal of this dissertation is to develop magnetically active nanoscale whiskers and study the effect of the whiskers orientation in a polymer matrix on the nanocomposite's behavior. Namely, we report the surface modification of silicon carbide whiskers (SiCWs) with magnetic nanoparticles and fabrication of SiC/epoxy composite materials. The magnetic nanoparticles attachment to the SiCWs was accomplished using polyelectrolyte polymer-to-polymer complexation. The "grafting to" and adsorption techniques were used to attach the polyelectrolytes to the surface of the SiCWs and magnetic nanoparticles. The anchored polyelectrolytes were polyacrylic acid (PAA) and poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP). Next, the SiC/epoxy composites incorporating randomly oriented and magnetically oriented whiskers were fabricated. The formation of the composite was studied to determine the influence of the whiskers' surface composition on the epoxy curing reaction. After curing, the composites' thermal and thermo-mechanical properties were studied. These properties were related to the dispersion and orientation of the fillers in the composite samples. The obtained results indicated that the thermal and thermo-mechanical properties could be improved by orienting magnetically-active SiCWs inside the matrix. Silanization, "grafting to", adsorption, and complexation were used to modify

  13. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  14. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lkhamsuren Bayarjargal

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p; T stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments.

  15. Synthesis of Binary Transition Metal Nitrides, Carbides and Borides from the Elements in the Laser-Heated Diamond Anvil Cell and Their Structure-Property Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Alexandra; Winkler, Björn; Juarez-Arellano, Erick A.; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides have a high potential for industrial applications as they not only have a high melting point but are generally harder and less compressible than the pure metals. Here we summarize recent advances in the synthesis of binary transition metal nitrides, carbides and borides focusing on the reaction of the elements at extreme conditions generated within the laser-heated diamond anvil cell. The current knowledge of their structures and high-pressure properties like high-(p,T) stability, compressibility and hardness is described as obtained from experiments. PMID:28824101

  16. Silicon carbide composites as fusion power reactor structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L., E-mail: SneadLL@ORNL.gov [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Nozawa, T. [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata Shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ferraris, M. [Politecnico di Torino-DISMIC c. Duca degli Abruzzi, 24I-10129 Torino (Italy); Katoh, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Shinavski, R. [Hypertherm HTC, 18411 Gothard St., Units A/B/C, Huntington Beach, CA 92648 (United States); Sawan, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison 417 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive Madison, WI 53706-1687 (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Silicon carbide was first proposed as a low activation fusion reactor material in the mid 1970s. However, serious development of this material did not begin until the early 1990s, driven by the emergence of composite materials that provided enhanced toughness and an implied ability to use these typically brittle materials in engineering application. In the decades that followed, SiC composite system was successfully transformed from a poorly performing curiosity into a radiation stable material of sufficient maturity to be considered for near term nuclear and non-nuclear systems. In this paper the recent progress in the understanding and of basic phenomenon related to the use of SiC and SiC composite in fusion applications will be presented. This work includes both fundamental radiation effects in SiC and engineering issues such as joining and general materials properties. Additionally, this paper will briefly discuss the technological gaps remaining for the practical application of this material system in fusion power devices such as DEMO and beyond.

  17. Microstructure Characteristics of Fe-Matrix Composites Reinforced by In-Situ Carbide Particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Song, Yanpei

    2017-10-01

    Carbide particulates reinforced iron-matrix composites were prepared by in-situ synthesis reaction between Ti, V and C on liquid alloys surface. The microstructure of the composite was characterized by SEM, TEM and OM. The results showed that the main phases were α-Fe, carbide particulate; besides, there were small amounts of γ-Fe and graphite (G) in the composite. The carbides were TiVC2 and VC in the shape of short bar and graininess. The matrix consisted of martensite and small amounts of retained austenite.

  18. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper presents a preliminary study on obtaining and characterization of phenolic resin-based com- posites modified with nanometric silicon carbide. The nanocomposites were prepared by incorporating nanometric silicon carbide (nSiC) into phenolic resin at 0.5, 1 and 2 wt% contents using ultrasonication to ...

  19. On possibility of fabrication of monolith composite materials on niobium carbide base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ploshkin, V.V.; Ul'yanina, I.Yu.; Filonenko, V.P.

    1984-01-01

    An attempt was made to fabricate the composite material on niobium carbide base possessing the elevated heat resistance, erosion and chemical resistance in special media, as well as capable of withstanding sufficient thermal shocks. Powder of niobium carbide of 10 μm fraction was used as base material, the powder of pure copper of 10...12 μm fraction - as binder. It was shown that samples of composite mateiral on niobium carbide base fabricated by the method of hydrostatic pressing possessed the minimal porosity as compared to samples fabricated by usual methods of powder metallurgy. The basic phases of composite material-copper and niobium carbide - distribute uniformly over sample cross-section and don't interact with each other under any conditions. The fabricated composite material possesses sufficient thermal shock resistance and isn't subjected to brittle fracture

  20. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margarone, D.; Krása, J.; Giuffrida, L.; Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Velyhan, A.; Prokůpek, J.; Láska, L.; Mocek, T.; Ullschmied, J.; Rus, B.

    2011-05-01

    Multi-MeV beams of light ions have been produced using the 300 picosecond, kJ-class iodine laser, operating at the Prague Asterix Laser System facility in Prague. Real-time ion diagnostics have been performed by the use of various time-of-flight (TOF) detectors: ion collectors (ICs) with and without absorber thin films, new prototypes of single-crystal diamond and silicon carbide detectors, and an electrostatic ion mass spectrometer (IEA). In order to suppress the long photopeak induced by soft X-rays and to avoid the overlap with the signal from ultrafast particles, the ICs have been shielded with Al foil filters. The application of large-bandgap semiconductor detectors (>3 eV) ensured cutting of the plasma-emitted visible and soft-UV radiation and enhancing the sensitivity to the very fast proton/ion beams. Employing the IEA spectrometer, various ion species and charge states in the expanding laser-plasma have been determined. Processing of the experimental data based on the TOF technique, including estimation of the plasma fast proton maximum and peak energy, ion beam currents and total charge, total number of fast protons, as well as deconvolution processes, ion stopping power, and ion/photon transmission calculations for the different metallic filters used, are reported.

  1. Single-layer nano-carbon film, diamond film, and diamond/nano-carbon composite film field emission performance comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Jinye; Wang, Lijun

    2016-01-01

    A series of single-layer nano-carbon (SNC) films, diamond films, and diamond/nano-carbon (D/NC) composite films have been prepared on the highly doped silicon substrate by using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques. The films were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and field emission I-V measurements. The experimental results indicated that the field emission maximum current density of D/NC composite films is 11.8–17.8 times that of diamond films. And the field emission current density of D/NC composite films is 2.9–5 times that of SNC films at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm. At the same time, the D/NC composite film exhibits the advantage of improved reproducibility and long term stability (both of the nano-carbon film within the D/NC composite cathode and the SNC cathode were prepared under the same experimental conditions). And for the D/NC composite sample, a high current density of 10 mA/cm"2 at an electric field of 3.0 V/μm was obtained. Diamond layer can effectively improve the field emission characteristics of nano-carbon film. The reason may be due to the diamond film acts as the electron acceleration layer.

  2. Advanced technologies of production of cemented carbides and composite materials based on them

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.; Pavlotskaya, E.; Martynova, L.; Epik, I.

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents new technological processes of production of W, WC and (Ti, W)C powders, cemented carbides having a controlled carbon content, high-strength nonmagnetic nickel-bonded cemented carbides, cemented carbide-based composites having a wear-resistant antifriction working layer as well as processes of regeneration of cemented carbide waste. It is shown that these technological processes permit radical changes in the production of carbide powders and products of VK, TK, VN and KKhN cemented carbides. The processes of cemented carbide production become ecologically acceptable and free of carbon black, the use of cumbersome mixers is excluded, the power expenditure is reduced and the efficiency of labor increases. It becomes possible to control precisely the carbon content within a two-phase region -carbide-metal. A high wear resistance of parts of friction couples which are lubricated with water, benzine, kerosene, diesel fuel and other low-viscosity liquids, is ensured with increased strength and shock resistance. (author)

  3. Evaluation of titanium carbide metal matrix composites deposited via laser cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanaugh, Daniel Thomas

    Metal matrix composites have been widely studied in terms of abrasion resistance, but a particular material system may behave differently as particle size, morphology, composition, and distribution of the hardening phase varies. The purpose of this thesis was to understand the mechanical and microstructural effects of combining titanium carbide with 431 series stainless steel to create a unique composite via laser cladding, particularly regarding wear properties. The most predominant effect in increasing abrasion resistance, measured via ASTM G65, was confirmed to be volume fraction of titanium carbide addition. Macrohardness was directly proportional to the amount of carbide, though there was an overall reduction in individual particle microhardness after cladding. The reduction in particle hardness was obscured by the effect of volume fraction carbide and did not substantially contribute to the wear resistance changes. A model evaluating effective mean free path of the titanium carbide particles was created and correlated to the measured data. The model proved successful in linking theoretical mean free path to overall abrasion resistance. The effects of the titanium carbide particle distributions were limited, while differences in particle size were noticeable. The mean free path model did not correlate well with the particle size, but it was shown that the fine carbides were completely removed by the coarse abrasive particles in the ASTM G65 test. The particle morphology showed indications of influencing the wear mode, but no statistical reduction was observed in the volume loss figures. Future studies may more specifically focus on particle morphology or compositional effects of the carbide particles.

  4. Preparation of fiber reinforced titanium diboride and boron carbide composite bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, L.R.; Riley, R.E.; Sheinberg, H.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for uniformly infiltrating woven carbon cloth with either titanium diboride or boron carbide at reduced pressure (15 to 25 torr). The effects of deposition temperature on the uniformity of penetration and on coating rate are described for temperatures from 750 to 1000 0 C and deposit loadings from 20 to 43 vol. %. For the boron carbides, boron composition is discussed and evidence is presented suggesting that propene is the dominant rate controlling reactant

  5. Associated chemical and carbon isotopic composition variations in diamonds from Finsch and Premier kimberlite, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deines, P.

    1984-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of 66 inclusion-containing diamonds from the Premier kimberlite, South Africa, 93 inclusion-containing diamonds and four diamonds of two diamond-bearing peridotite xenoliths from the Finsch kimberlite, South Africa was measured. The data suggest a relationship between the carbon isotopic composition of the diamonds and the chemical composition of the associated silicates. For both kimberlites similar trends are noted for diamonds containing peridotite-suite inclusions (P-type) and for diamonds containing eclogite-suite inclusions (E-type): Higher delta 13 C P-type diamonds tend to have inclusions lower in SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , MgO, Mg/(Mg + Fe) and higher in FeO and CaO. Higher delta 13 C E-type diamonds tend to have inclusions lower in SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 , MgO, Mg/(Mg + Fe), Na 2 O, K 2 O, TiO 2 and higher in CaO, Ca/(Ca + Mg). Consideration of a number of different models that have been proposed for the genesis of kimberlites, their zenoliths and diamonds shows that they are all consistent with the conclusion that in the mantle, regions exist that are characterized by different mean carbon isotopic compositions. (author)

  6. Fabrication of Ni-Al/diamond composite based on layered and gradient structures of SHS system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jiafeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper layered and gradient structures of Ni-Al SHS system were adopted to manufacture Ni-Al/diamond composites. The effect of the layered and the diamond mesh gradient structures of Ni-Al/diamond on the SHS process and the microstructure of the composites were investigated. It is found that with the increasing of the number of layers, the combustion wave velocity is decreased. The combustion wave velocity for diamond mesh size gradient structure of Ni-Al SHS is faster than that for the layered structure. A well bonding can be formed between diamond and the matrix in layered and gradient structure Ni-Al/diamond composites due to the melt of Ni-Cr brazing alloy.

  7. Non-oxidic nanoscale composites: single-crystalline titanium carbide nanocubes in hierarchical porous carbon monoliths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenburg, Kirstin; Smarsly, Bernd M; Brezesinski, Torsten

    2009-05-07

    We report the preparation of nanoscale carbon-titanium carbide composites with carbide contents of up to 80 wt%. The synthesis yields single-crystalline TiC nanocubes 20-30 nm in diameter embedded in a hierarchical porous carbon matrix. These composites were generated in the form of cylindrical monoliths but can be produced in various shapes using modern sol-gel and nanocasting methods in conjunction with carbothermal reduction. The monolithic material is characterized by a combination of microscopy, diffraction and physisorption. Overall, the results presented in this work represent a concrete design template for the synthesis of non-oxidic nanoscale composites with high surface areas.

  8. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The results highlight the positive effect of the nanometric silicon carbide addition in phenolic resin on mechanical, thermo-mechanical and tribological performance, improving their strength, stiffness and abrasive properties. The best results were obtained for 1 wt% nSiC, proving that this value is the optimum nanometric ...

  9. Structural, optical and mechanical properties of thin diamond and silicon carbide layers grown by low pressure microwave linear antenna plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, Andrew; Drahokoupil, Jan; Fekete, Ladislav; Klimša, Ladislav; Kopeček, Jaromír; Purkrt, Adam; Remeš, Zdeněk; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Tomáštík, Jan; Frank, Otakar; Janíček, P.; Mistrík, J.; Mortet, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 69, Oct (2016), s. 13-18 ISSN 0925-9635 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA TA ČR TA03010743; GA ČR GA13-31783S; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LM2015088 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568; AV ČR(CZ) Fellowship J. E. Purkyně Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : diamond * silicon carbide * adherence * mechanical properties * optical properties Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism; CG - Electrochemistry (UFCH-W) Impact factor: 2.561, year: 2016

  10. Effect of Minor Titanium Addition on Copper/Diamond Composites Prepared by Hot Forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fei; Sun, Wei; Singh, Ajit; Bolzoni, Leandro

    2018-03-01

    Copper/diamond composites have great potential to lead the next generation of advanced heat sink materials for use in high-power electronic devices and high-density integrated circuits because of their potential excellent properties of high thermal conductivity and close thermal expansion to the chip materials (e.g., Si, InP, GaAs). However, the poor wettability between copper and diamond presents a challenge for synthesizing copper/diamond composites with effective metallurgical bonding and satisfied thermal performance. In this article, copper/diamond composites were successfully prepared by hot forging of elemental copper and artificial diamond powders with small amounts (0 vol.%, 3 vol.% and 5 vol.%) of titanium additives. Microstructure observation and mechanical tests showed that adding minor titanium additions in the copper/diamond composite resulted in fewer cracks in the composites' microstructure and significantly improved the bonding between the copper and diamond. The strongest bonding strength was achieved for the copper/diamond composite with 3 vol.% titanium addition, and the possible reasons were discussed.

  11. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  12. Evaluation of mechanical properties of aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide metal matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaya Ramnath, B.; Elanchezhian, C.; Jaivignesh, M.; Rajesh, S.; Parswajinan, C.; Siddique Ahmed Ghias, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Fabrication of MMC with aluminium alloy–alumina–boron carbide is done. • Different proportions of reinforcements are added. • The effects of varying proportions are studied. • Investigation on mechanical properties above composites is performed. • Failure morphology analysis is done using SEM. - Abstract: This paper deals with the fabrication and mechanical investigation of aluminium alloy, alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) and boron carbide metal matrix composites. Aluminium is the matrix metal having properties like light weight, high strength and ease of machinability. Alumina which has better wear resistance, high strength, hardness and boron carbide which has excellent hardness and fracture toughness are added as reinforcements. Here, the fabrication is done by stir casting which involves mixing the required quantities of additives into stirred molten aluminium. After solidification, the samples are prepared and tested to find the various mechanical properties like tensile, flexural, impact and hardness. The internal structure of the composite is observed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM)

  13. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  14. Plasma spraying method for forming diamond and diamond-like coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Cressie E.; Seals, Roland D.; Price, R. Eugene

    1997-01-01

    A method and composition for the deposition of a thick layer (10) of diamond or diamond-like material. The method includes high temperature processing wherein a selected composition (12) including at least glassy carbon is heated in a direct current plasma arc device to a selected temperature above the softening point, in an inert atmosphere, and is propelled to quickly quenched on a selected substrate (20). The softened or molten composition (18) crystallizes on the substrate (20) to form a thick deposition layer (10) comprising at least a diamond or diamond-like material. The selected composition (12) includes at least glassy carbon as a primary constituent (14) and may include at least one secondary constituent (16). Preferably, the secondary constituents (16) are selected from the group consisting of at least diamond powder, boron carbide (B.sub.4 C) powder and mixtures thereof.

  15. Mechanical alloying and sintering of nanostructured tungsten carbide-reinforced copper composite and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff, Mahani; Othman, Radzali; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → W 2 C phase was formed at short milling time while WC only appears after longer milling time. → Cu crystallite size decreased but internal strain increased with increasing milling time. → Increasing milling time induced more WC formation, thus improving the hardness of the composite. → Electrical conductivity is reduced due to powder refinement and the presence of carbide phases. -- Abstract: Elemental powders of copper (Cu), tungsten (W) and graphite (C) were mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill with different milling durations (0-60 h), compacted and sintered in order to precipitate hard tungsten carbide particles into a copper matrix. Both powder and sintered composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and assessed for hardness and electrical conductivity to investigate the effects of milling time on formation of nanostructured Cu-WC composite and its properties. No carbide peak was detected in the powder mixtures after milling. Carbide WC and W 2 C phases were precipitated only in the sintered composite. The formation of WC began with longer milling times, after W 2 C formation. Prolonged milling time decreased the crystallite size as well as the internal strain of Cu. Hardness of the composite was enhanced but electrical conductivity reduced with increasing milling time.

  16. Effect of composition and heat treatment on carbide phases in Ni-Mo alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svistunova, T.V.; Tsvigunov, A.N.; Stegnukhina, L.V.; Sakuta, N.D.

    1984-01-01

    The investigation results of vanadium, iron, carbon and silicon effect and heat treatment regime on the type and composition of carbides in Ni-(26...31)%Mo alloys are presented. It is shown that type, composition and quantity of carbide phases forming in alloys are determined not only by molybdenum and carbon content, but presence of other elements (V, Fe), admixtures (C, Si) and reducers as well as by regime of thermal treatment. In the alloy, containing 26...31% Mo, 0.01...0.03% C ( 12 C type with a=1.083...1.089 nm lattice parameter, in which V and Ti, Fe and Si are presented besides Mo and Ni. In the temperature range of 600-800 deg C high dispersed carbides segregate on grain boundaries. Silicon initiates segregation of the carbide phases among them by grain boundaries at the temperatures of 800 deg C as well as regulates carbide of M 12 C type with a=1.094...1.098 nm lattice parameter

  17. Effects of silicon carbide on the phase developments in mullite-carbon ceramic composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of silicon carbide and sintering temperatures on the phases developed, in sintered ceramic composite produced from kaolin and graphite was investigated. The kaolin and graphite of known mineralogical composition were thoroughly blended with 4 and 8 vol % silicon carbide. From the homogeneous mixture of kaolin, graphite and silicon carbide, standard samples were prepared via uniaxial compaction. The test samples produced were subjected to firing (sintering at 1300°C, 1400°C and 1500°C. The sintered samples were characterized for the developed phases using x‐ray diffractometry analysis, microstructural morphology using ultra‐high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (UHRFEGSEM. It was observed that microstructural morphology of the samples revealed the evolution of mullite, cristobalite and microcline. The kaolinite content of the raw kaolin undergoes transformation into mullite and excess silica, the mullite and the silica phases contents increased with increased sintering temperature. It is also generally observed that the graphite content progressively reduced linearly with increased sintering temperature. It is concluded that silicon carbide acts as anti-oxidant for the graphite, this anti-oxidant effect was more effective at 4 vol % silicon carbide.

  18. An all optical system for studying temperature induced changes in polycrystalline diamond deposited on a tungsten carbide substrate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this poster the authors discussed the ability to heat an industrial diamond sample by means of optical absorption of a CO2 laser beam, and then measure the resulting temperature on the surface of the diamond optically by means of radiometry...

  19. A Study On The Metal Carbide Composite Diffusion Bonding For Mechanical Seal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim D.-K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical Seal use highly efficient alternative water having a great quantity of an aqueous solution and has an advantage no corrosion brine. Metal Carbide composites have been investigated as potential materials for high temperature structural applications and for application in the processing industry. The existing Mechanical seal material is a highly expensive carbide alloy, and it is difficult to take a price advantage. Therefore the study of replacing body area with inexpensive steel material excluding O-ring and contact area which demands high characteristics is needed.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of composite TiO{sub 2} nanotubes/boron-doped diamond electrodes towards enhanced supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobaszek, M. [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics, Gdańsk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Siuzdak, K.; Sawczak, M. [Centre for Plasma and Laser Engineering, The Szewalski Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, 14 Fiszera St., 80-231 Gdansk (Poland); Ryl, J. [Department of Electrochemistry, Corrosion and Material Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, Gdańsk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland); Bogdanowicz, R., E-mail: rbogdan@eti.pg.gda.pl [Department of Metrology and Optoelectronics, Faculty of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics, Gdańsk University of Technology, 11/12 G. Narutowicza St., 80-233 Gdańsk (Poland)

    2016-02-29

    The composite TiO{sub 2} nanotubes/boron-doped diamond electrodes were deposited using Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition resulting in the improved electrochemical performance. This composite electrode can deliver high specific capacitance of 7.46 mF cm{sup −2} comparing to boron-doped diamond (BDD) deposited onto flat Ti plate (0.11 mF cm{sup −2}).The morphology and composition of composite electrode were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. According to XPS and Raman analyses, the structure of TiO{sub 2} was greatly changed during Chemical Vapor Deposition process: formation of Ti{sup 3+} sites, partial anatase to rutile transformation and titanium carbide phase formation. This effect is attributed to the simultaneous presence of activated hydrogen and carbon in the plasma leading to enhanced dehydration of NTs (nanotubes) followed by carbon bonding. The enhanced capacitive effect of TiO{sub 2} NT/BDD could be recognized as: (1) the unique synergistic morphology of NTs and BDD providing more efficient conducting pathway for the diffusion of ions and (2) partial decomposition of NTs and transformation towards to TiC and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions. Finally, highly ordered titania nanotubes produced via simply, quick and controllable method — anodization, could act as promising substrate for conductive BDD layer deposition and further application of such composites for supercapacitor construction. - Highlights: • The TiO{sub 2} nanotube (NT)/diamond electrode delivers capacitance of 7.46 mF cm{sup −2}. • The NTs are not affected by diamond growth process and keep their pristine shape. • The BDD overlayer fully encapsulates TiO{sub 2} NTs exhibiting typical columnar growth. • The activated hydrogen and carbon in the plasma lead to enhanced dehydration of NTs. • The presence of TiC and Ti{sub 2}O{sub 3} fractions introducing additional capacitance.

  1. Quantitative X-ray diffraction analysis of alumina, silicon carbide and zirconium carbide in ceramic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, Sonia M.B.; Bressiani, Jose Carlos; Veiga, Marcello M.; Chaklader, Asoke C.D.

    1995-01-01

    The x-ray diffraction technique has been successfully applied to determine the phases formed in a carbo thermal synthesis of ceramic composites (Al 2 O 3 -Si C and Al 2 O 3 -Si C-Zr C) using kaolinite, cyanite and zircon as precursors. The powder method using fluorite as internal standard has shown reliable results to estimate accurately phases in composites (relative error as low as 5%). In addition, quantitative X-ray analysis allows an indirect evaluation of Si O (gas) losses from the system during the carbo thermal reaction. (author)

  2. Corrosion behaviour of 2124 aluminium alloy-silicon carbide metal matrix composites in sodium chloride environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Nirbhay; Vadera, K.K.; Ramesh Kumar, A.V.; Singh, R.S.; Monga, S.S.; Mathur, G.N.

    1999-01-01

    Aluminium alloy based particle reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) are being considered for a range of applications. Their mechanical properties have been investigated in detail, but more information about their corrosion resistance is needed. In this investigation, the corrosion behaviour of silicon carbide particulates (SiC p )-2124 aluminium metal matrix composites was studied in 3 wt% sodium chloride solution by means of electrochemical technique and optical microscope. The effects of weight percentages and particle size of silicon carbide particulates on corrosion behaviour of the composite were studied in NaCl and it was observed that corrosion rate increases linearly with the increasing weight percentage of SiC p . The corrosion rate of the MMC increases by increasing the size of SiC particles. Anodization improved corrosion resistance of the composites. (author)

  3. Study on drilling induced delamination of woven kenaf fiber reinforced epoxy composite using carbide drills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suhaily, M.; Hassan, C. H. Che; Jaharah, A. G.; Azmi, H.; Afifah, M. A.; Khairusshima, M. K. Nor

    2018-04-01

    In this research study, it presents the influences of drilling parameters on the delamination factor during the drilling of woven kenaf fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminates when using the carbide drill bits. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of drilling parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate and drill sizes on the delamination produced when drilling woven kenaf reinforced epoxy composite using the non-coated carbide drill bits. The damage generated on the woven kenaf reinforced epoxy composite laminates were observed both at the entrance and exit surface during the drilling operation. The experiments were conducted according to the Box Behnken experimental designs. The results indicated that the drill diameter has a significant influence on the delamination when drilling the woven kenaf fiber reinforced epoxy composites.

  4. Composition of eta carbide in Hastelloy N after aging 10,000 hr at 8150C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Potter, G.A.; Bradley, D.J.; Franklin, J.C.; Laing, W.R.

    1977-11-01

    The composition of the eta carbide in Hastelloy N containing 0.7 wt percent Si in the alloy approaches M 12 C, rather than M 6 C as indicated in the alloy literature. The silicon content of the eta phase in this case was about 25 at. percent, much higher than has been observed in less highly alloyed material. The data do not permit a definition of the limiting compositions of the phases

  5. Fabrication of mesoporous and high specific surface area lanthanum carbide-carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biasetto, L.; Carturan, S.; Maggioni, G.; Zanonato, P.; Bernardo, P. Di; Colombo, P.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous lanthanum carbide-carbon nanotube composites were produced by means of carbothermal reaction of lanthanum oxide, graphite and multi-walled carbon nanotube mixtures under high vacuum. Residual gas analysis revealed the higher reactivity of lanthanum oxide towards carbon nanotubes compared to graphite. After sintering, the composites revealed a specific surface area increasing with the amount of carbon nanotubes introduced. The meso-porosity of carbon nanotubes was maintained after thermal treatment.

  6. The Effect of ZrO₂ Nanoparticles on the Microstructure and Properties of Sintered WC-Bronze-Based Diamond Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Wu, Haidong; Li, Meng; Meng, Qingnan; Gao, Ke; Lü, Xiaoshu; Liu, Baochang

    2016-05-06

    Metal matrix-impregnated diamond composites are widely used in diamond tool manufacturing. In order to satisfy the increasing engineering requirements, researchers have paid more and more attention to enhancing conventional metal matrices by applying novel methods. In this work, ZrO₂ nanoparticles were introduced into the WC-bronze matrix with and without diamond grits via hot pressing to improve the performance of conventional diamond composites. The effects of ZrO₂ nanoparticles on the microstructure, density, hardness, bending strength, and wear resistance of diamond composites were investigated. The results indicated that the hardness and relative density increased, while the bending strength decreased when the content of ZrO₂ nanoparticles increased. The grinding ratio of diamond composites increased significantly by 60% as a result of nano-ZrO₂ addition. The enhancement mechanism was discussed. Diamond composites showed the best overall properties with the addition of 1 wt % ZrO₂ nanoparticles, thus paving the way for further applications.

  7. Hot Deformation Behavior and Processing Maps of Diamond/Cu Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongdi; Liu, Yue; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Di; Zhu, Hanxing; Fan, Tongxiang

    2018-06-01

    The hot deformation behaviors of 50 vol pct uncoated and Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites were investigated using hot isothermal compression tests under the temperature and strain rate ranging from 1073 K to 1273 K (800 °C to 1000 °C) and from 0.001 to 5 s-1, respectively. Dynamic recrystallization was determined to be the primary restoration mechanism during deformation. The Cr3C2 coating enhanced the interfacial bonding and resulted in a larger flow stress for the Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites. Moreover, the enhanced interfacial affinity led to a higher activation energy for the Cr-coated diamond/Cu composites (238 kJ/mol) than for their uncoated counterparts (205 kJ/mol). The strain-rate-dependent constitutive equations of the diamond/Cu composites were derived based on the Arrhenius model, and a high correlation ( R = 0.99) was observed between the calculated flow stresses and experimental data. With the help of processing maps, hot extrusions were realized at 1123 K/0.01 s-1 and 1153 K/0.01 s-1 (850 °C/0.01 s-1 and 880 °C/0.01 s-1) for the uncoated and coated diamond/Cu composites, respectively. The combination of interface optimization and hot extrusion led to increases of the density and thermal conductivity, thereby providing a promising route for the fabrication of diamond/Cu composites.

  8. Investigation of iron adsorption on composite transition metal carbides in steel by first-principles calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hui-Hui; Gan, Lei; Tong, Zhi-Fang; Zhang, Heng-Hua; Zhou, Yang

    2018-05-01

    The nucleation potential of transition metal (TM) carbides formed in steel can be predicted by the behavior of iron adsorption on their surface. Therefore, Fe adsorption on the (001) surface of (A1-xmx)C (A = Nb, Ti, m = Mo, V) was investigated by the first-principles method to reveal the initialization of Fe nucleation. The Mulliken population and partial density of state (PDOS) were also calculated and analyzed in this work. The results show that Fe adsorption depends on the composition and configuration of the composite carbides. The adsorption energy (Wads) of Fe on most of (A1-xmx)C is larger than that of Fe on pure TiC or NbC. The maximum Wads is found for Fe on (Nb0.5Mo0.5)C complex carbide, indicating that this carbide has the high nucleation capacity at early stage. The Fe adsorption could be improved by the segregation of Cr and Mn atoms on the surfaces of (Nb0.5Mo0.5)C and (Ti0.5Mo0.5)C. The PDOS analysis of (Cr, Mn)-doped systems further explains the strong interactions between Fe and Cr or Mn atoms.

  9. Controlled surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films for preferential protein adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Yang, Yang; Zhuang, Hao; Schlemper, Christoph; Wesner, Daniel; Schönherr, Holger; Zhang, Wenjun; Jiang, Xin

    2014-02-04

    Diamond and SiC both process extraordinary biocompatible, electronic, and chemical properties. A combination of diamond and SiC may lead to highly stable materials, e.g., for implants or biosensors with excellent sensing properties. Here we report on the controllable surface chemistry of diamond/β-SiC composite films and its effect on protein adsorption. For systematic and high-throughput investigations, novel diamond/β-SiC composite films with gradient composition have been synthesized using the hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the diamond/β-SiC ratio of the composite films shows a continuous change from pure diamond to β-SiC over a length of ∼ 10 mm on the surface. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was employed to unveil the surface termination of chemically oxidized and hydrogen treated surfaces. The surface chemistry of the composite films was found to depend on diamond/β-SiC ratio and the surface treatment. As observed by confocal fluorescence microscopy, albumin and fibrinogen were preferentially adsorbed from buffer: after surface oxidation, the proteins preferred to adsorb on diamond rather than on β-SiC, resulting in an increasing amount of proteins adsorbed to the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. By contrast, for hydrogen-treated surfaces, the proteins preferentially adsorbed on β-SiC, leading to a decreasing amount of albumin adsorbed on the gradient surfaces with increasing diamond/β-SiC ratio. The mechanism of preferential protein adsorption is discussed by considering the hydrogen bonding of the water self-association network to OH-terminated surfaces and the change of the polar surface energy component, which was determined according to the van Oss method. These results suggest that the diamond/β-SiC gradient film can be a promising material for biomedical applications which

  10. Pressure dependence of morphology and phase composition of SiC films deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on cemented carbide substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Shengwang, E-mail: bkdysw@yahoo.cn; Fan Pengwei; Tang Weizhong; Li Xiaojing; Hu Haolin; Hei Hongjun; Zhang Sikai; Lu Fanxiu

    2011-11-01

    SiC films were deposited on cemented carbide substrates by employing microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition method using tetramethylsilane (Si(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) diluted in H{sub 2} as the precursor. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scratching technique were used to characterize morphology, composition, phases present and adhesion of the films. Experimental results show that the deposition pressure has great influence on morphologies and phase composition of the films. In sequence, SiC films with a cauliflower-like microstructure, granular films with terrace-featured SiC particles coexisting with Co{sub 2}Si compound and clusters of nanometer SiC nanoplatelets appear as a function of the deposition pressure. In terms of plasma density and substrate temperature, this sequential appearance of microstructures of SiC films was explained. Adhesion tests showed that among the three types of films studied, the films with the terrace-featured SiC particles have relatively higher adhesion. Such knowledge will be of importance when the SiC films are used as interlayer between diamond films and cemented carbide substrates.

  11. Pressure dependence of morphology and phase composition of SiC films deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition on cemented carbide substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Shengwang; Fan Pengwei; Tang Weizhong; Li Xiaojing; Hu Haolin; Hei Hongjun; Zhang Sikai; Lu Fanxiu

    2011-01-01

    SiC films were deposited on cemented carbide substrates by employing microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition method using tetramethylsilane (Si(CH 3 ) 4 ) diluted in H 2 as the precursor. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scratching technique were used to characterize morphology, composition, phases present and adhesion of the films. Experimental results show that the deposition pressure has great influence on morphologies and phase composition of the films. In sequence, SiC films with a cauliflower-like microstructure, granular films with terrace-featured SiC particles coexisting with Co 2 Si compound and clusters of nanometer SiC nanoplatelets appear as a function of the deposition pressure. In terms of plasma density and substrate temperature, this sequential appearance of microstructures of SiC films was explained. Adhesion tests showed that among the three types of films studied, the films with the terrace-featured SiC particles have relatively higher adhesion. Such knowledge will be of importance when the SiC films are used as interlayer between diamond films and cemented carbide substrates.

  12. Finite Element Analysis of Interfacial Debonding in Copper/Diamond Composites for Thermal Management Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zain-Ul-Abdein, Muhammad; Ijaz, Hassan; Saleem, Waqas; Raza, Kabeer; Mahfouz, Abdullah Salmeen Bin; Mabrouki, Tarek

    2017-07-02

    Copper/diamond (Cu/D) composites are famous in thermal management applications for their high thermal conductivity values. They, however, offer some interface related problems like high thermal boundary resistance and excessive debonding. This paper investigates interfacial debonding in Cu/D composites subjected to steady-state and transient thermal cyclic loading. A micro-scale finite element (FE) model was developed from a SEM image of the Cu/20 vol % D composite sample. Several test cases were assumed with respect to the direction of heat flow and the boundary interactions between Cu/uncoated diamonds and Cu/Cr-coated diamonds. It was observed that the debonding behavior varied as a result of the differences in the coefficients of thermal expansions (CTEs) among Cu, diamond, and Cr. Moreover, the separation of interfaces had a direct influence upon the equivalent stress state of the Cu-matrix, since diamond particles only deformed elastically. It was revealed through a fully coupled thermo-mechanical FE analysis that repeated heating and cooling cycles resulted in an extremely high stress state within the Cu-matrix along the diamond interface. Since these stresses lead to interfacial debonding, their computation through numerical means may help in determining the service life of heat sinks for a given application beforehand.

  13. Silicon carbide whisker reinforced composites and method for making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, G.C.

    1984-02-09

    The present invention is directed to the fabrication of ceramic composites which possess improved mechanical properties, especially increased fracture toughness. In the formation of these ceramic composites, the single-crystal SiC whiskers are mixed with fine ceramic powders of a ceramic material such as Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, mullite, or B/sub 4/C. The mixtures which contain a homogeneous dispersion of the SiC whiskers are hot pressed at pressures in a range of about 28 to 70 MPa and temperatures in the range of about 1600 to 1950/sup 0/C with pressing times varying from about 0.75 to 2.5 hours. The resulting ceramic composites show an increase in fracture toughness of up to about 9 MPa.m/sup 1/2/ which represents as much as a two-fold increase over that of the matrix material.

  14. Effect of copper content on the thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of Al–Cu/diamond composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianhua; Zhang, Hailong; Zhang, Yang; Li, Jianwei; Wang, Xitao

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Al–Cu/diamond composites have been produced by a squeeze casting method. ► Cu alloying is an effective approach to promoting interface bonding between metal matrix and diamond. ► Alloying Cu to Al matrix improves thermal conductivity and reduces coefficient of thermal expansion of the composites. -- Abstract: Al–Cu matrix composites reinforced with diamond particles (Al–Cu/diamond composites) have been produced by a squeeze casting method. Cu content added to Al matrix was varied from 0 to 3.0 wt.% to detect the effect on thermal conductivity and thermal expansion behavior of the resultant Al–Cu/diamond composites. The measured thermal conductivity for the Al–Cu/diamond composites increased from 210 to 330 W/m/K with increasing Cu content from 0 to 3.0 wt.%. Accordingly, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) was tailored from 13 × 10 −6 to 6 × 10 −6 /K, which is compatible with the CTE of semiconductors in electronic packaging applications. The enhanced thermal conductivity and reduced coefficient of thermal expansion were ascribed to strong interface bonding in the Al–Cu/diamond composites. Cu addition has lowered the melting point and resulted in the formation of Al 2 Cu phase in Al matrix. This is the underlying mechanism responsible for the strengthening of Al–Cu/diamond interface. The results show that Cu alloying is an effective approach to promoting interface bonding between Al and diamond.

  15. Microstructure and orientation effects on properties of discontinuous silicon carbide/aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdanels, D. L.; Hoffman, C. A.

    1984-01-01

    Composite panels containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous silicon carbide SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement in several aluminum matrices are commercially fabricated and the mechanical properties and microstructual characteristics are evaluated. The yield and tensile strengths and the ductility are controlled primarily by the matrix alloy, the temper condition, and the reinforcement content. Particulate and nodule reinforcements are as effective as whisker reinforcement. Increased ductility is attributed to purer, more uniform starting materials and to more mechanical working during fabrication. Comparing mechanical properties with those of other aluminum alloys shows that these low cost, lightweight composites demonstrate very good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  16. Beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the deposition process of diamond/Ni60 composite coating with cold spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Jianhua, E-mail: laser@zjut.edu.cn; Yang, Lijing; Li, Bo; Li, Zhihong

    2015-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The hard Ni-based alloy powder as matrix in diamond composite coating was studied. • The influence of laser on diamond distribution of composite coating was analyzed. • The graphitization of diamond was prohibited in supersonic laser deposition process. • The abrasion mechanisms of diamond/Ni60 composite coating were discussed. - Abstract: Although cold spray process has many unique advantages over other coating techniques, it has difficulties in depositing hard materials. This article presents a study in the beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the fabrication process of diamond/Ni60 composite coating using cold spray. The focus of this research is on the comparison between the composite coatings produced with laser cladding (LC) and with supersonic laser deposition (SLD), with respect to diamond graphitization and tribological properties, thus to demonstrate the beneficial effects of laser irradiation on the cold spray process. The influence of deposition temperature on the coating characteristics, such as deposition efficiency, diamond volume fraction, microstructure and phase is also investigated. The tribological properties of the diamond/Ni60 composite coating produced with SLD are determined using a pin-on-disc tribometer, along with the diamond/Ni60 coating produced using LC with the optimal process parameters for comparison. The experimental results show that with the assistance of laser irradiation, diamond/Ni60 composite coating can be successfully deposited using cold spray; the obtained coating is superior to that processed with LC, because SLD can suppress the graphitization of the diamond particles. The diamond/Ni60 composite coating fabricated with SLD has much better tribological properties than the LC coating.

  17. Formation mechanism of a silicon carbide coating for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. C.; Shuford, D. M.; Mueller, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for a study to determine the mechanisms involved in a high-temperature pack cementation process which provides a silicon carbide coating on a carbon-carbon composite. The process and materials used are physically and chemically analyzed. Possible reactions are evaluated using the results of these analytical data. The coating is believed to develop in two stages. The first is a liquid controlled phase process in which silicon carbide is formed due to reactions between molten silicon metal and the carbon. The second stage is a vapor transport controlled reaction in which silicon vapors react with the carbon. There is very little volume change associated with the coating process. The original thickness changes by less than 0.7%. This indicates that the coating process is one of reactive penetration. The coating thickness can be increased or decreased by varying the furnace cycle process time and/or temperature to provide a wide range of coating thicknesses.

  18. Effect of fabrication process on physical and mechanical properties of tungsten carbide - cobalt composite: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahaidin, Ahmad Aswad; Jaafar, Talib Ria; Selamat, Mohd Asri; Budin, Salina; Sulaiman, Zaim Syazwan; Hamid, Mohamad Hasnan Abdul

    2017-12-01

    WC-Co, which is also known as cemented carbide, is widely used in metal cutting industry and wear related application due to their excellent mechanical properties. Manufacturing industries are focusing on improving productivity and reducing operational cost with machining operation is considered as one of the factors. Thus, machining conditions are becoming more severe and required better cutting tool bit with improved mechanical properties to withstand high temperature operation. Numerous studies have been made over the generation for further improvement of cemented carbide properties to meet the constant increase in demand. However, the results of these studies vary due to different process parameters and manufacturing technology. This paper summarizes the studies to improve the properties of WC-Co composite using different consolidation (powder size, mixing method, formulation, etc) and sintering parameters (temperature, time, atmosphere, etc).

  19. Preparation of unidirectional fiber reinforced tantalum carbide composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, L.R.; Riley, R.E.; Sheinberg, H.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for uniformly infiltrating 3000 filament carbon yarn with Ta and subsequent densification by hot pressing. Ta deposition rate is characterized as a function of deposition temperature, reactant flows, yarn pull rate, and coating chamber geometry for yarn pull rates from 2 to 50 m/h and Ta loadings from 40 to 350 wt % gain. Densification procedures for unidirectional pressings are described and data is presented which shows significant improvement in flexure strength over conventional TaC-C powder composites

  20. Self-composite comprised of nanocrystalline diamond and a non-diamond component useful for thermoelectric applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M [Downers Grove, IL

    2009-08-11

    One provides nanocrystalline diamond material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered diamond crystallites that are sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then disposes a non-diamond component within the nanocrystalline diamond material. By one approach this non-diamond component comprises an electrical conductor that is formed at the grain boundaries that separate the diamond crystallites from one another. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the nanocrystalline diamond material.

  1. Composition and microstructure of beryllium carbide films prepared by thermal MOCVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yu-dan; Luo, Jiang-shan; Li, Jia; Meng, Ling-biao; Luo, Bing-chi; Zhang, Ji-qiang; Zeng, Yong; Wu, Wei-dong, E-mail: wuweidongding@163.com

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Non-columnar-crystal Be{sub 2}C films were firstly prepared by thermal MOCVD. • Beryllium carbide was always the dominant phase in the films. • α-Be and carbon existed in films deposited below and beyond 400 °C, respectively. • Morphology evolved with temperatures and no columnar grains were characterized. • The preferred substrate temperature for depositing high quality Be{sub 2}C films was 400 °C. - Abstract: Beryllium carbide films without columnar-crystal microstructures were prepared on the Si (1 0 0) substrate by thermal metal organic chemical vapor deposition using diethylberyllium as precursor. The influence of the substrate temperature on composition and microstructure of beryllium carbide films was systematically studied. Crystalline beryllium carbide is always the dominant phase according to XRD analysis. Meanwhile, a small amount of α-Be phase exists in films when the substrate temperature is below 400 °C, and hydrocarbon or amorphous carbon exists when the temperature is beyond 400 °C. Surfaces morphology shows transition from domes to cylinders, to humps, and to tetraquetrous crystalline needles with the increase of substrate temperature. No columnar grains are characterized throughout the thickness as revealed from the cross-section views. The average densities of these films are determined to be 2.04–2.17 g/cm{sup 3}. The findings indicate the substrate temperature has great influences on the composition and microstructure of the Be{sub 2}C films grown by thermal MOCVD.

  2. Interactions between tungsten carbide (WC) particulates and metal matrix in WC-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou, D.; Hellman, J.; Luhulima, D.; Liimatainen, J.; Lindroos, V.K.

    2003-01-01

    A variety of experimental techniques have been used to investigate the interactions between tungsten carbide (WC-Co 88/12) particulates and the matrix in some new wear resistant cobalt-based superalloy and steel matrix composites produced by hot isostatic pressing. The results show that the chemical composition of the matrix has a strong influence on the interface reaction between WC and matrix and the structural stability of the WC particulates in the composite. Some characteristics of the interaction between matrix and reinforcement are explained by the calculation of diffusion kinetics. The three-body abrasion wear resistance of the composites has been examined based on the ASTM G65-91 standard procedure. The wear behavior of the best composites of this study shows great potential for wear protection applications

  3. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  4. High-temperature mechanical properties of a uniaxially reinforced zircon-silicon carbide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that mechanical properties of a monolithic zircon ceramic and zircon-matrix composites uniaxially reinforced with either uncoated or BN-coated silicon carbide monofilaments were measured in flexure between 25 degrees and 1477 degrees C. Monolithic zircon ceramics were weak and exhibited a brittle failure up to abut 1300 degrees C. An increasing amount of the plastic deformation was observed before failure above about 1300 degrees C. In contrast, composites reinforced with either uncoated or BN-coated Sic filaments were stronger and tougher than the monolithic zircon at all test temperatures between 25 degrees and 1477 degrees. The ultimate strength and work-of-fracture of composite samples decreased with increasing temperature. A transgranular matrix fracture was shown by the monolithic and composite samples tested up to about 1200 degrees C, whereas an increasing amount of the intergranular matrix fracture was displayed above 1200 degrees C

  5. Diamond growth on copper rods from polymer composite nanofibres

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Potocký, Štěpán; Tesárek, P.; Babchenko, Oleg; Davydova, Marina; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 312, SEP (2014), s. 220-225 ISSN 0169-4332 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : linear antenna MWCVD * diamond * copper * polymer nanofibres Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.711, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169433214011003

  6. Effect of processing parameters on Cu-Co-Fe-based diamond impregnated metal matrix composite for stone cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mawani, K.; Shahid, M.; Arshad, S.N.; Hasaini, M.H.; Khan, B.S.

    2005-01-01

    Diamond Impregnated Metal Matrix Composites (DIMMC), manufactured by powder metallurgy route, playa major role in stone cutting tool industry. Unfortunately, these diamond tools are not manufactured locally. Our industry relies heavily on the import of these diamond tools to meet the local demand. This study was undertaken as a first step towards indigenous development of these diamond tools. Most of the diamond tools exist in the form of a composite structure with diamond grits embedded in a metallic matrix. This paper investigates the effect of various processing variables on the properties of DIMMC. Effect of pressure on the compaction behavior, sintering time and temperature has been investigated. Relatively better homogeneity has been observed with dry mixing of individual powders using zinc stearate as lubricant compared to wet mixing. A linear increase in green density has been found by increasing compaction pressure up to 400 MPa. (author)

  7. Full characterization of laser-accelerated ion beams using Faraday cup, silicon carbide, and single-crystal diamond detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margarone, Daniele; Krása, Josef; Giuffrida, L.; Picciotto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Nowak, T.; Musumeci, P.; Velyhan, Andriy; Prokůpek, Jan; Láska, Leoš; Mocek, Tomáš; Ullschmied, Jiří; Rus, Bedřich

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 10 (2011), "103302-1"-"103302-8" ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP205/11/1165; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E09092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : aluminium * chemical sensors * diamond * electrostatics * iodine * ion beams * thin films * lasers * time of flight spectrometers Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.168, year: 2011 http://jap.aip.org/ resource /1/japiau/v109/i10/p103302_s1

  8. Synthesis of microsphere silicon carbide/nanoneedle manganese oxide composites and their electrochemical properties as supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeongjin; Yoo, Youngjae; Kim, Jooheon

    2014-11-01

    Synthesis of microsphere silicon carbide/nanoneedle MnO2 (SiC/N-MnO2) composites for use as high-performance materials in supercapacitors is reported herein. The synthesis procedure involves the initial treatment of silicon carbide (SiC) with hydrogen peroxide to obtain oxygen-containing functional groups to provide anchoring sites for connection of SiC and the MnO2 nanoneedles (N-MnO2). MnO2 nanoneedles are subsequently formed on the SiC surface. The morphology and microstructure of the as-prepared composites are characterized via X-ray diffractometry, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The characterizations indicate that MnO2 nanoneedles are homogeneously formed on the SiC surface in the composite. The capacitive properties of the as-prepared SiC/N-MnO2 electrodes are evaluated using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge/discharge testing, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in a three-electrode experimental setup using a 1-M Na2SO4 aqueous solution as the electrolyte. The SiC/N-MnO2(5) electrode, for which the MnO2/SiC feed ratio is 5:1, displays a specific capacitance as high as 273.2 F g-1 at 10 mV s-1.

  9. Mechanism-Based FE Simulation of Tool Wear in Diamond Drilling of SiCp/Al Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Junfeng; Pang, Siqin; Xie, Lijing; Gao, Feinong; Hu, Xin; Yi, Jie; Hu, Fang

    2018-02-07

    The aim of this work is to analyze the micro mechanisms underlying the wear of macroscale tools during diamond machining of SiC p /Al6063 composites and to develop the mechanism-based diamond wear model in relation to the dominant wear behaviors. During drilling, high volume fraction SiC p /Al6063 composites containing Cu, the dominant wear mechanisms of diamond tool involve thermodynamically activated physicochemical wear due to diamond-graphite transformation catalyzed by Cu in air atmosphere and mechanically driven abrasive wear due to high-frequency scrape of hard SiC reinforcement on tool surface. An analytical diamond wear model, coupling Usui abrasive wear model and Arrhenius extended graphitization wear model was proposed and implemented through a user-defined subroutine for tool wear estimates. Tool wear estimate in diamond drilling of SiC p /Al6063 composites was achieved by incorporating the combined abrasive-chemical tool wear subroutine into the coupled thermomechanical FE model of 3D drilling. The developed drilling FE model for reproducing diamond tool wear was validated for feasibility and reliability by comparing numerically simulated tool wear morphology and experimentally observed results after drilling a hole using brazed polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond coated tools. A fairly good agreement of experimental and simulated results in cutting forces, chip and tool wear morphologies demonstrates that the developed 3D drilling FE model, combined with a subroutine for diamond tool wear estimate can provide a more accurate analysis not only in cutting forces and chip shape but also in tool wear behavior during drilling SiC p /Al6063 composites. Once validated and calibrated, the developed diamond tool wear model in conjunction with other machining FE models can be easily extended to the investigation of tool wear evolution with various diamond tool geometries and other machining processes in cutting different

  10. Diamond/carbon nanotube composites: Raman, FTIR and XPS spectroscopic studies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Varga, Marián; Ižák, Tibor; Vretenár, V.; Kozak, Halyna; Holovský, Jakub; Artemenko, Anna; Hulman, M.; Skákalová, V.; Lee, D. S.; Kromka, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 111, Jan (2016), s. 54-61 ISSN 0008-6223 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-22102J; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14SK037 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : diamond * carbon nanotubes * spectroscopy * Raman * FTIR * XPS Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 6.337, year: 2016

  11. Rectification properties of n-type nanocrystalline diamond heterojunctions to p-type silicon carbide at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Masaki; Amano, Ryo; Shimoda, Naotaka [Graduate School of Automotive Science, Kyushu University, Nishiku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Kato, Yoshimine, E-mail: yoshimine.kato@zaiko.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishiku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Teii, Kungen [Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan)

    2014-04-14

    Highly rectifying heterojunctions of n-type nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films to p-type 4H-SiC substrates are fabricated to develop p-n junction diodes operable at high temperatures. In reverse bias condition, a potential barrier for holes at the interface prevents the injection of reverse leakage current from the NCD into the SiC and achieves the high rectification ratios of the order of 10{sup 7} at room temperature and 10{sup 4} even at 570 K. The mechanism of the forward current injection is described with the upward shift of the defect energy levels in the NCD to the conduction band of the SiC by forward biasing. The forward current shows different behavior from typical SiC Schottky diodes at high temperatures.

  12. Effect of metallic coating on the properties of copper-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, M.; Pietrzak, K.; Teodorczyk, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Jarząbek, D.; Zybała, R.; Bazarnik, P.; Lewandowska, M.; Strojny-Nędza, A.

    2017-11-01

    In the presented paper a coating of SiC particles with a metallic layer was used to prepare copper matrix composite materials. The role of the layer was to protect the silicon carbide from decomposition and dissolution of silicon in the copper matrix during the sintering process. The SiC particles were covered by chromium, tungsten and titanium using Plasma Vapour Deposition method. After powder mixing of components, the final densification process via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) method at temperature 950 °C was provided. The almost fully dense materials were obtained (>97.5%). The microstructure of obtained composites was studied using scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. The microstructural analysis of composites confirmed that regardless of the type of deposited material, there is no evidence for decomposition process of silicon carbide in copper. In order to measure the strength of the interface between ceramic particles and the metal matrix, the micro tensile tests have been performed. Furthermore, thermal diffusivity was measured with the use of the laser pulse technique. In the context of performed studies, the tungsten coating seems to be the most promising solution for heat sink application. Compared to pure composites without metallic layer, Cu-SiC with W coating indicate the higher tensile strength and thermal diffusitivy, irrespective of an amount of SiC reinforcement. The improvement of the composite properties is related to advantageous condition of Cu-SiC interface characterized by well homogenity and low porosity, as well as individual properties of the tungsten coating material.

  13. X-ray diffraction characterization of epitaxial CVD diamond films with natural and isotopically modified compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokhorov, I. A., E-mail: igor.prokhorov@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Space Materials Science Laboratory, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics”, Kaluga Branch (Russian Federation); Voloshin, A. E. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography, Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Ralchenko, V. G.; Bolshakov, A. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Romanov, D. A. [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Kaluga Branch (Russian Federation); Khomich, A. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Sozontov, E. A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Comparative investigations of homoepitaxial diamond films with natural and modified isotopic compositions, grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on type-Ib diamond substrates, are carried out using double-crystal X-ray diffractometry and topography. The lattice mismatch between the substrate and film is precisely measured. A decrease in the lattice constant on the order of (Δa/a){sub relax} ∼ (1.1–1.2) × 10{sup –4} is recorded in isotopically modified {sup 13}C (99.96%) films. The critical thicknesses of pseudomorphic diamond films is calculated. A significant increase in the dislocation density due to the elastic stress relaxation is revealed by X-ray topography.

  14. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  15. Neutron shielding behavior of thermoplastic natural rubber/boron carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mat Zali, Nurazila; Yazid, Hafizal; Megat Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid

    2018-01-01

    Many shielding materials have been designed against the harm of different types of radiation to the human body. Today, polymer-based lightweight composites have been chosen by the radiation protection industry. In the present study, thermoplastic natural rubber (TPNR) composites with different weight percent of boron carbide (B4C) fillers (0% to 30%) were fabricated as neutron shielding through melt blending method. Neutron attenuation properties of TPNR/B4C composites have been investigated. The macroscopic cross section (Σ), half value layer (HVL) and mean free path length (λ) of the composites have been calculated and the transmission curves have been plotted. The obtained results show that Σ, HVL and λ greatly depend on the B4C content. Addition of B4C fillers into TPNR matrix were found to enhance the macroscopic cross section values thus decrease the mean free path length (λ) and half value layer (HVL) of the composites. The transmission curves exhibited that the neutron transmission of the composites decreased with increasing shielding thickness. These results showed that TPNR/B4C composites have high potential for neutron shielding applications.

  16. Controlling Directional Liquid Motion on Micro- and Nanocrystalline Diamond/β-SiC Composite Gradient Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Handschuh-Wang, Stephan; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Jiang, Xin; Kong, Tiantian; Zhang, Wenjun; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhou, Xuechang; Tang, Yongbing

    2018-01-30

    In this Article, we report the synthesis of micro- and nanocrystalline diamond/β-SiC composite gradient films, using a hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) technique and its application as a robust and chemically inert means to actuate water and hazardous liquids. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy, the composition of the surface changed gradually from pure nanocrystalline diamond (hydrophobic) to a nanocrystalline β-SiC surface (hydrophilic). Transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to determine the presence of diamond, graphite, and β-SiC phases. The as-prepared gradient films were evaluated for their ability to actuate water. Indeed, water was transported via the gradient from the hydrophobic (hydrogen-terminated diamond) to the hydrophilic side (hydroxyl-terminated β-SiC) of the gradient surface. The driving distance and velocity of water is pivotally influenced by the surface roughness. The nanogradient surface showed significant promise as the lower roughness combined with the longer gradient yields in transport distances of up to 3.7 mm, with a maximum droplet velocity of nearly 250 mm/s measured by a high-speed camera. As diamond and β-SiC are chemically inert, the gradient surfaces can be used to drive hazardous liquids and reactive mixtures, which was signified by the actuation of hydrochloric acid and sodium hydroxide solution. We envision that the diamond/β-SiC gradient surface has high potential as an actuator for water transport in microfluidic devices, DNA sensors, and implants, which induce guided cell growth.

  17. Preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Quanchao [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yunnan Copper Smelting and Processing Complex, Yunnan Copper (Group) CO., LTD., Kunming 650102 (China); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Peng, Jinghui [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Lei, E-mail: xulei_kmust@aliyun.com [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Srinivasakannan, C. [Chemical Engineering Department, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); and others

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • The Ti-Coated diamond particles have been prepared using by microwave heating. • The uniform and dense coating can be produced, and the TiC species was formed. • With increases the temperature results in the thickness of coating increased. • The coating/diamond interfacial bonding strength increased with temperature increasing until 760 °C, then decreased. - Abstract: Depositing strong carbide-forming elements on diamond surface can dramatically improve the interfacial bonding strength between diamond grits and metal matrix. In the present work, investigation on the preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating has been conducted. The morphology, microstructure, and the chemical composition of Ti-coated diamond particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDX). The thickness of Ti coating was measured and the interfacial binding strength between Ti coating and diamond was analyzed. The results show that the surface of the diamond particles could be successfully coated with Ti, forming a uniform and continuous Ti-coated layer. The TiC was found to form between the surface of diamond particles and Ti-coated layer. The amount of TiC as well as the thickness of coating increased with increasing coating temperature, furthermore, the grain size of the coating also grew gradually. The interfacial bonding strength between coating and diamond was found to be best at the temperature of 760 °C.

  18. Preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu, Quanchao; Peng, Jinghui; Xu, Lei; Srinivasakannan, C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The Ti-Coated diamond particles have been prepared using by microwave heating. • The uniform and dense coating can be produced, and the TiC species was formed. • With increases the temperature results in the thickness of coating increased. • The coating/diamond interfacial bonding strength increased with temperature increasing until 760 °C, then decreased. - Abstract: Depositing strong carbide-forming elements on diamond surface can dramatically improve the interfacial bonding strength between diamond grits and metal matrix. In the present work, investigation on the preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating has been conducted. The morphology, microstructure, and the chemical composition of Ti-coated diamond particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDX). The thickness of Ti coating was measured and the interfacial binding strength between Ti coating and diamond was analyzed. The results show that the surface of the diamond particles could be successfully coated with Ti, forming a uniform and continuous Ti-coated layer. The TiC was found to form between the surface of diamond particles and Ti-coated layer. The amount of TiC as well as the thickness of coating increased with increasing coating temperature, furthermore, the grain size of the coating also grew gradually. The interfacial bonding strength between coating and diamond was found to be best at the temperature of 760 °C.

  19. Boron carbide reinforced aluminium matrix composite: Physical, mechanical characterization and mathematical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirvanimoghaddam, K.; Khayyam, H.; Abdizadeh, H.; Karbalaei Akbari, M.; Pakseresht, A.H.; Ghasali, E.; Naebe, M.

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the manufacturing of aluminium–boron carbide composites using the stir casting method. Mechanical and physical properties tests to obtain hardness, ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and density are performed after solidification of specimens. The results show that hardness and tensile strength of aluminium based composite are higher than monolithic metal. Increasing the volume fraction of B_4C, enhances the tensile strength and hardness of the composite; however over-loading of B_4C caused particle agglomeration, rejection from molten metal and migration to slag. This phenomenon decreases the tensile strength and hardness of the aluminium based composite samples cast at 800 °C. For Al-15 vol% B_4C samples, the ultimate tensile strength and Vickers hardness of the samples that were cast at 1000 °C, are the highest among all composites. To predict the mechanical properties of aluminium matrix composites, two key prediction modelling methods including Neural Network learned by Levenberg–Marquardt Algorithm (NN-LMA) and Thin Plate Spline (TPS) models are constructed based on experimental data. Although the results revealed that both mathematical models of mechanical properties of Al–B_4C are reliable with a high level of accuracy, the TPS models predict the hardness and tensile strength values with less error compared to NN-LMA models.

  20. The effect of fiber microstructure on evolution of residual stresses in silicon carbide/titanium aluminide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Freed, Alan D.

    1992-01-01

    This paper examines the effect of the morphology of the SCS6 silicon carbide fiber on the evolution of residual stresses in SiC/Ti composites. A micromechanics model based on the concentric cylinder concept is presented which is used to calculate residual stresses in a SiC/Ti composite during axisymmetric cooling by a spatially uniform temperature change. The silicon carbide fiber is modeled as a layered material with five distinct transversely isotropic and orthotropic, elastic layers, whereas the titanium matrix is taken to be isotropic, with temperature-dependent elastoplastic properties. The results arc compared with those obtained based on the assumption that the silicon carbide fiber is isotropic and homogeneous.

  1. Chemical vapor deposition of tantalum on graphite cloth for making hot pressed fiber reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Davidson, K.V.; Radosevich, C.L.; Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Conditions for the CVD of a uniform coating of Ta on fibers of a woven graphite cloth were established. The effect of gas composition, pressure, and temperature were investigated, and the conditions that gave the desired results are presented. Several layers of the coated cloth were hot pressed to produce a TaC--C composite having uniformly dispersed, fine-grained TaC in graphite. Three compositions were hot pressed: 15, 25, and 40 volume percent carbide. 8 figures, 2 tables

  2. Effect of carbide particles on the ablation properties of tungsten composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Guiming; Zhou Yu; Wang Yujin

    2003-01-01

    The high temperature ablation behavior of tungsten composites containing carbides produced by vacuum hot pressing is studied as a function of reinforcement chemistry (ZrC and TiC) and content using a self-made oxyacetylene ablation equipment. A dynamic responding multiwavelength pyrometer was employed to measure the temperature of the ablation surface, and a thermocouple was employed to measure the temperature of the back surface during the time that a specimen was being ablated. The mass and linear ablation rates are lower in composites containing ZrC, decreasing with increasing particle content in both composites system. The values of the mass and linear ablation rates were in the order from high to low: W>30TiC/W>40TiC/W>30ZrC/W>40ZrC/W (30TiC/W stands for 30 vol.% TiC particle content in the W matrix, the same below). The important temperature curves of the ablation surfaces of specimens were successfully detected online. Ablated surfaces and vertical sections of the specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermochemical oxidation of tungsten, TiC, and ZrC was the main ablation mechanism of ZrC/W and TiC/W composites. These ablation behaviors are discussed based on the thermophysical and chemical properties of both the composite systems

  3. DC electrical conductivity of silicon carbide ceramics and composites for flow channel insert applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Y.; Kondo, S.; Snead, L.L.

    2009-01-01

    High purity chemically vapor-deposited silicon carbide (SiC) and 2D continuous SiC fiber, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix composites with pyrocarbon interphases were examined. Specifically, temperature dependent (RT to 800 deg. C) electrical conductivity and the influence of neutron irradiation were measured. The influence of neutron irradiation on electrical properties appeared very strong for the SiC of this study, typically resulting in orders lower ambient conductivity and steeper temperature dependency of this conductivity. For the 2D composites, through-thickness (normal to the fiber axis') electrical conductivity was dominated by bypass conduction via interphase network at relatively low temperatures, whereas conduction through SiC constituents dominated at higher temperatures. Through-thickness electrical conductivity of neutron-irradiated 2D SiC composites with thin PyC interphase, currently envisioned for flow channel insert application, will likely in the order of 10 S/m at the appropriate operating temperature. Mechanisms of electrical conduction in the composites and irradiation-induced modification of electrical conductivity of the composites and their constituents are discussed.

  4. Microscopic origin of the composition-dependent change of the thermal conductivity in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.; Howard, I.A.; Green, T.A.; Beckel, C.L.

    1987-01-01

    Large grain polycrystalline boron carbides have a high-temperature thermal conductivity which changes from being characteristic of a crystal to being glass-like as the carbon content is reduced from its maximal value. We relate this phenomenon, to compositional changes within the three-atom intericosahedral chains. With a reduction of the carbon concentration from its maximal concentration (20%), a carbon atom within some of the three-atoms (CBC) intericosahedral chains is replaced by a boron atom, thereby producing CBB chains. We estimate that the CBB chains are significantly softer than the CBC chains. Thus, with this reduction of carbon content the intericosahedral chains are inhomogeneously softened. This suppresses the coherent transport of heat through the chains. The remaining thermal transport occurs incoherently through vibrationally inequivalent structural units, i.e. ''phonon hopping.''

  5. Laser cladding in-situ carbide particle reinforced Fe-based composite coatings with rare earth oxide addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝锋; 马明星; 刘文今; 钟敏霖; 张红军; 张伟明

    2009-01-01

    Particulate reinforced metal matrix composite(PR-MMC) has excellent properties such as good wear resistance,corrosion resistance and high temperature properties.Laser cladding is usually used to form PR-MMC on metal surface with various volume fractions of ceramic particles.Recent literatures showed that laser melting of powder mixture containing carbon and carbide-forming elements,was favorable for the formation of in-situ synthesized carbide particles.In this paper,rare earth oxide(RE2O3) was added into t...

  6. Additive Manufacturing of Silicon Carbide-Based Ceramic Matrix Composites: Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Halbig, Michael C.; Grady, Joseph E.

    2016-01-01

    Advanced SiC-based ceramic matrix composites offer significant contributions toward reducing fuel burn and emissions by enabling high overall pressure ratio (OPR) of gas turbine engines and reducing or eliminating cooling air in the hot-section components, such as shrouds, combustor liners, vanes, and blades. Additive manufacturing (AM), which allows high value, custom designed parts layer by layer, has been demonstrated for metals and polymer matrix composites. However, there has been limited activity on additive manufacturing of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In this presentation, laminated object manufacturing (LOM), binder jet process, and 3-D printing approaches for developing ceramic composite materials are presented. For the laminated object manufacturing (LOM), fiber prepreg laminates were cut into shape with a laser and stacked to form the desired part followed by high temperature heat treatments. For the binder jet, processing optimization was pursued through silicon carbide powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of fibers into the powder bed. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted along with XRD, TGA, and mechanical testing. Various technical challenges and opportunities for additive manufacturing of ceramics and CMCs will be presented.

  7. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar; Greene, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    NARloy-Z (Cu-3Ag-0.5Zr) alloy is state-of-the-art combustion chamber liner material used in liquid propulsion engines such as the RS-68 and RS-25. The performance of future liquid propulsion systems can be improved significantly by increasing the heat transfer through the combustion chamber liner. Prior work1 done at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has shown that the thermal conductivity of NARloy-Z alloy can be improved significantly by embedding high thermal conductivity diamond particles in the alloy matrix to form NARloy-Z-diamond composite (fig. 1). NARloy-Z-diamond composite containing 40vol% diamond showed 69% higher thermal conductivity than NARloy-Z. It is 24% lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 120% better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. The research work consists of (a) developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) of NARloy-Z-D composite, (b) fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and (c) hot-fire testing of the liner to test performance. Initially, NARloy-Z-D composite slabs were made using the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) for the purpose of determining design properties. In the next step, a cylindrical shape was fabricated to demonstrate feasibility (fig. 3). The liner consists of six cylinders which are sintered separately and then stacked and diffusion bonded to make the liner (fig. 4). The liner will be heat treated, finish-machined, and assembled into a combustion chamber and hot-fire tested in the MSFC test facility (TF 115) to determine perform.

  8. Structural models of increasing complexity for icosahedral boron carbide with compositions throughout the single-phase region from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ektarawong, A.; Simak, S. I.; Alling, B.

    2018-05-01

    We perform first-principles calculations to investigate the phase stability of boron carbide, concentrating on the recently proposed alternative structural models composed not only of the regularly studied B11Cp (CBC) and B12(CBC), but also of B12(CBCB) and B12( B4 ). We find that a combination of the four structural motifs can result in low-energy electron precise configurations of boron carbide. Among several considered configurations within the composition range of B10.5C and B4C , we identify in addition to the regularly studied B11Cp (CBC) at the composition of B4C two low-energy configurations, resulting in a new view of the B-C convex hull. Those are [B12 (CBC)]0.67[B12(B4)] 0.33 and [B12 (CBC)]0.67[ B12 (CBCB)]0.33, corresponding to compositions of B10.5C and B6.67C , respectively. As a consequence, B12(CBC) at the composition of B6.5C , previously suggested in the literature as a stable configuration of boron carbide, is no longer part of the B -C convex hull. By inspecting the electronic density of states as well as the elastic moduli, we find that the alternative models of boron carbide can provide a reasonably good description for electronic and elastic properties of the material in comparison with the experiments, highlighting the importance of considering B12(CBCB) and B12( B4 ), together with the previously proposed B11Cp (CBC) and B12(CBC), as the crucial ingredients for modeling boron carbide with compositions throughout the single-phase region.

  9. Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

    2013-10-15

    Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

  10. Determination of isotopic composition of boron in boron carbide by TIMS and PIGE: an inter-comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasibhushan, K.; Rao, R.M.; Parab, A.R.; Alamelu, D.; Aggarwal, S.K.; Acharya, R.; Chhillar, S.; Pujari, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    The paper reports a comparison of results on the determination of isotopic composition of boron in boron carbide (B 4 C) samples by Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) and Particle Induced Gamma ray Spectrometry (PIGE). B 4 C samples having varying boron isotopic composition (natural, enriched with respect to 10 B) and their synthetic mixtures) have been analysed by both the techniques. The 10 B atom% was found to be in the range of 20-67%. (author)

  11. Fabrication and characterization of reaction bonded silicon carbide/carbon nanotube composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thostenson, Erik T; Karandikar, Prashant G; Chou, T.-W.

    2005-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have generated considerable excitement in the scientific and engineering communities because of their exceptional mechanical and physical properties observed at the nanoscale. Carbon nanotubes possess exceptionally high stiffness and strength combined with high electrical and thermal conductivities. These novel material properties have stimulated considerable research in the development of nanotube-reinforced composites (Thostenson et al 2001 Compos. Sci. Technol. 61 1899, Thostenson et al 2005 Compos. Sci. Technol. 65 491). In this research, novel reaction bonded silicon carbide nanocomposites were fabricated using melt infiltration of silicon. A series of multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (NT-CMCs) were fabricated and the structure and properties were characterized. Here we show that carbon nanotubes are present in the as-fabricated NT-CMCs after reaction bonding at temperatures above 1400 deg. C. Characterization results reveal that a very small volume content of carbon nanotubes, as low as 0.3 volume %, results in a 75% reduction in electrical resistivity of the ceramic composites. A 96% decrease in electrical resistivity was observed for the ceramics with the highest nanotube volume fraction of 2.1%

  12. Evaluation of neutron irradiated near-stoichiometric silicon carbide fiber composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Katoh, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Bailey, J.L.; Vaughn, N.L.; Lowden, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Composites have been fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration of silicon carbide (SiC) into SiC-based fiber preforms. Fibers were Ceramic Grade Nicalon TM , Hi-Nicalon TM and Hi-Nicalon TM Type-S. Results are presented for two parallel studies on the effects of neutron irradiation on these materials. In the first study, neutron irradiation induced changes in mechanical properties, as measured by bend testing, for Hi-Nicalon TM fiber materials of varied interphase structures is measured. Results indicate that both the Ceramic Grade Nicalon TM and Hi-Nicalon TM materials degrade substantially under irradiation, though the higher oxygen content Ceramic Grade fiber degrades more rapidly and more substantially. Of the three interfaces studied in the Hi-Nicalon TM system, the multilayer SiC is the most radiation resistant. At a dose of ∼1 dpa the mechanical property degradation of the Hi-Nicalon TM composite is consistent with a fiber densification-induced debonding. At a dose of 10 dpa the properties continue to degrade raising the question of degradation in the CVD SiC matrix as well. Low-dose results on the Hi-Nicalon TM Type-S fabricated material are encouraging, as they appear to not lose, and perhaps slightly increase, in ultimate bend strength. This result is consistent with the supposition that as the oxygen content in SiC-based fibers is reduced, the irradiation stability and hence composite performance under irradiation will improve

  13. The new designs of diamond drill bits for composite polymers tooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruslan Yu. Melentiev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The author explores the drilling operation of some new engineering materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP and other polymers that have an anisotropic structure, high-strength and elastic properties combined with low heat endurance. Such combination of properties makes impossible the simple transfer of the existing technologies for classic materials working to considered new class. At the same time, the existing tools cannot assure the specified quality of tooled products at the current productivity and tool life. Aim: The aim of this research is to increase the process efficiency of diamond drilling in composite polymers by developing the new designs of diamond drill bits. Materials and Methods: One of the most promising directions to solve this problem is the diamond coated abrasive type tool. This paper addresses and classifies the existing types of diamond drill bits according to their application and operation. The literature data analysis of known disadvantages during drilling operation, the quality of surface and joining face was performed. Results: The experimental researches of the author prove the negative meaning of the already known but kept out fact – the drill core blocking. The most important factors and structural features affecting the CFRP drilling process are revealed. The accounting of these factors allowed creating the set of unique designs of diamond drill bits for different purposes. The presented patented models has different allowance distribution schemes and cutting forces, thus satisfy the mechanical requirements of quality, productivity, tool life and hole geometry in the tooling of the specified material class.

  14. Reaction sintering of two-dimensional silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composite by sheet stacking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Katsumi; Mukai, Hideki; Imai, Masamitsu; Hashimoto, Kazuaki; Toda, Yoshitomo; Hyuga, Hideki; Kondo, Naoki; Kita, Hideki; Yano, Toyohiko

    2007-01-01

    Two-dimensionally plain woven SiC fiber-reinforced SiC composite has been developed by reaction sintering using a sheet stacking method in order to further increase mechanical and thermal properties of the composite and to obtain flexibility of manufacturing process of 2D woven SiC/SiC composites which can be applied to the fabrication of larger parts. In addition, sinterability and mechanical properties of the composite were investigated. In this study, relative density of the composites was about 90-93% and a dense composite could be obtained by reaction sintering using the sheet stacking method. The bulk density and maximum bending strength of SiC/SiC composite with a C/SiC weight ratio of 0.6 were higher than that of the composite with C/SiC ratios of 0.5 or 0.7. The values were 2.9 g/cm 3 and 200 MPa, respectively. However, the composites obtained in this study fractured in almost brittle manner due to the lower fiber volume fraction

  15. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  16. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  17. Electrochemical Corrosion Behaviour of Alumina-Al 6061 and Silicon Carbide-Al 6061 Metal-Matrix Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, K.E.; Gad, M.M.A.; El-Sayed, A.A.; Moustafa, O.H.

    2001-01-01

    The electrochemical corrosion behaviour of powder metallurgy-processed metal-matrix composites (MMCs)based on Al alloy 6061 reinforced with particulate Al 2 O 3 or Sic has been studied in chloride-containing environment. Also, the corrosion behaviour of the unrein forced Al 6061 produced by the same route investigated. Electrochemical tests were conducted on composites containing 10 and 20 vo l% of both reinforced particulates. Potentiodynamic polarization tests have been carried out in neutral as well as acidic and alkaline de-aerated 10 -3 M Na CI solution. In the neutral environment, the addition of Al 2 O 3 particulates was found to shift both the corrosion potential (E corr ) and the break down potential (E b ) slightly into the positive direction irrespective of the volume fraction added (10 and 20 vo l%). On the other hand , Sic caused a shift of E corr into the active site while the E b value was slightly ennobled. For both composites, the corrosion current values at the break down potentials were almost the same as the unrein forced alloy. In an attempt to further clarify the role of both particulate addition, cathodic polarization runs were conducted in both acidic (ph 3) and alkaline (ph 9)solutions for 20 vo l% of Al 2 O 3 and 20 vo l% Sic composite specimens. This indicated that cathodic current values for Sic composites were higher than those corresponding to the unrein forced alloy 6061, and those for the Al 2 O 3 composites were lower

  18. SEM Evaluation of Surrounding Enamel after Finishing of Composite Restorations- Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovan, G.; Stoleriu, S.; Solomon, S.; Ghiorghe, A.; Sandu, A. V.; Andrian, S.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the surface characteristics of the enamel adjacent to composite resin after finishing the restoration with different diamond and tungsten carbide burs. The topography of enamel was observed by using a scanning electron microscope. Finishing with extra-/ultra-fine carbide burs, and extra-fine diamond burs resulted in smooth surfaces. In few areas some superficial scratches with no clinical relevance were observed. Deep grooves were observed on the surface of enamel when fine diamond burs were used. Finishing of composite restorations with coarse burs should be avoided when there is a high risk of touching and scratching adjacent enamel during the procedure.

  19. Compositionally modulated multilayer diamond-like carbon coatings with AlTiSi multi-doping by reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wei; Gao, Xiang; Liu, Jingmao; Kwon, Se-Hun; Wang, Qimin

    2017-12-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings with AlTiSi multi-doping were prepared by a reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering with using a gas mixture of Ar and C2H2 as precursor. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, and mechanical property of the as-deposited DLC coatings were studied systemically by using SEM, XPS, TEM, Raman spectrum, stress-tester, and nanoindentation as a function of the Ar fraction. The results show that the doping concentrations of the Al, Ti and Si atoms increased as the Ar fraction increased. The doped Ti and Si preferred to bond with C while the doped Al mainly existed in oxidation state without bonding with C. As the doping concentrations increased, TiC carbide nanocrystals were formed in the DLC matrix. The microstructure of coatings changed from an amorphous feature dominant AlTiSi-DLC to a carbide nanocomposite AlTiSi-DLC with TiC nanoparticles embedding. In addition, the coatings exhibited the compositionally modulated multilayer consisting of alternate Al-rich layer and Al-poor layer due to the rotation of the substrate holder and the diffusion behavior of the doped Al which tended to separate from C and diffuse towards the DLC matrix surface owing to its weak interactions with C. The periodic Al-rich layer can effectively release the compressive stress of the coatings. On the other hand, the hard TiC nanoparticles were conducive to the hardness of the coatings. Consequently, the DLC coatings with relatively low residual stress and high hardness could be acquired successfully through AlTiSi multi-doping. It is believed that the AlCrSi multi-doping may be a good way for improving the comprehensive properties of the DLC coatings. In addition, we believe that the DLC coatings with Al-rich multilayered structure have a high oxidation resistance, which allows the DLC coatings application in high temperature environment.

  20. Ordered hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon derived from mesoporous titanium-carbide/carbon composites and its electrochemical performance in supercapacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hai-Jing; Wang, Jie; Wang, Cong-Xiao; Xia, Yong-Yao [Department of Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Molecular, Catalysis and Innovative Materials, Institute of New Energy, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2011-11-15

    Novel ordered hierarchical mesoporous/microporous carbon (OHMMC) derived from mesoporous titanium-carbide/carbon composites was prepared for the first time by synthesizing ordered mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium-carbide/carbon composites, followed by chlorination of titanium carbides. The mesostructure and microstructure can be conveniently tuned by controlling the TiC contents of mesoporous TiC/C composite precursor, and chlorination temperature. By optimal condition, the OHMMC has a high surface area (1917 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}), large pore volumes (1.24 cm{sup 3}g{sup -1}), narrow mesopore-size distributions (centered at about 3 nm), and micropore size of 0.69 and 1.25 nm, and shows a great potential as electrode for supercapacitor applications: it exhibits a high capacitance of 146 Fg{sup -1} in noaqueous electrolyte and excellent rate capability. The ordered mesoporous channel pores are favorable for retention and immersion of the electrolyte, providing a more favorable path for electrolyte penetration and transportation to achieve promising rate capability performance. Meanwhile, the micropores drilled on the mesopore-walls can increase the specific surface area to provide more sites for charge storage. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Investigation of planetary milling for nano-silicon carbide reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kollo, Lauri, E-mail: lauri.kollo@staff.ttu.e [Laboratory of Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Department of Materials Engineering, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Leparoux, Marc; Bradbury, Christopher R.; Jaeggi, Christian [Laboratory of Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, 3602 Thun (Switzerland); Carreno-Morelli, Efrain; Rodriguez-Arbaizar, Mikel [University of Applied Sciences of Western Switzerland, Design and Materials Unit, 1950 Sion (Switzerland)

    2010-01-21

    High-energy planetary milling was used for mixing aluminium powders with 1 vol.% of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles. A number of milling parameters were modified for constituting the relationship between the energy input from the balls and the hardness of the bulk nanocomposite materials. It was shown that mixing characteristics and reaction kinetics with stearic acid as process control agent can be estimated by normalised input energy from the milling bodies. For this, the additional parameter characterising the vial filling was determined experimentally. Depending on the ball size, a local minimum in filling parameter was found, laying at 25 or 42% filling of the vial volume for the balls with diameter of 10 and 20 mm, respectively. These regions should be avoided to achieve the highest milling efficiency.After a hot compaction, fourfold difference of hardness for different milling conditions was detected. Therewith the hardness of the Al-1 vol.% nanoSiC composite could be increased from 47 HV{sub 0.5} of pure aluminium to 163 HV{sub 0.5} when milling at the highest input energy levels.

  2. Dynamic tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuan; Li Yulong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The dynamic tensile behavior of 2D C/SiC composites was experimentally investigated by means of SHTB. Both the fracture surface and bundle fracture surfaces of composites were observed. The strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface was concluded as the dominant contributor to the strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength. Highlights: → The tensile strength increases with strain rate. → The tensile failure strain remains independent of strain rate. → Macro-structural morphology reveals rough fracture surface under dynamic loading. → SEM morphology reveals integrated bundle pull-out under dynamic loading. → Strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface leads to that of the tensile strength. - Abstract: An investigation has been undertaken to determine the dynamic and quasi-static tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (2D-C/SiC) composites by means of the split Hopkinson tension bar and an electronic universal test machine respectively. The results indicate that the tensile strength of 2D C/SiC composites is increased at high strain rate. Furthermore, coated specimens show not only a 15% improvement in tensile strength but heightened strain rate sensitivity compared with uncoated ones. It is also shown that the tensile failure strain is strain rate insensitive and remains around 0.4%. Optical macrograph of failed specimens under dynamic loading revealed jagged fracture surfaces characterized by delamination and crack deviation, together with obvious fiber pull-out/splitting, in contrast with the smooth fracture surfaces under quasi-static loading. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph of fracture surface under dynamic loading clearly displayed integrated bundle pull-out which implies suppressed in-bundle debonding and enhanced in-bundle interfacial strengthening, in contrast with extensive in-bundle debonding under quasi-static loading. Thus we conclude that, with 2D C

  3. The Influence of Tool Composite's Structure During Process of Diamond Grinding of Ceramic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawlik Józef

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of the tests performed during the grinding process of the ceramic materials: – polycrystalline ceramics (Zirconium ZrO2 and mono-crystalline ceramics (sapphire α-Al2O3 by the diamond tools. Studies have shown that the concentration (thickening of the tool composite changes the tool's pore structure when using suitable wetted adamantine additives. Such modified composite has positive impact on tribological properties of the subsurface layer of the machined components. This is manifested by the reduction of the surface roughness and reduction of the vibration amplitude of the coefficient of friction. The possibilities of the positive effects when using wetted additives on the tool's composite during the pressing (briquetting stage confirm the study results.

  4. Steady State Sputtering Yields and Surface Compositions of Depleted Uranium and Uranium Carbide bombarded by 30 keV Gallium or 16 keV Cesium Ions.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siekhaus, W. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Teslich, N. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Weber, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-10-23

    Depleted uranium that included carbide inclusions was sputtered with 30-keV gallium ions or 16-kev cesium ions to depths much greater than the ions’ range, i.e. using steady-state sputtering. The recession of both the uranium’s and uranium carbide’s surfaces and the ion corresponding fluences were used to determine the steady-state target sputtering yields of both uranium and uranium carbide, i.e. 6.3 atoms of uranium and 2.4 units of uranium carbide eroded per gallium ion, and 9.9 uranium atoms and 3.65 units of uranium carbide eroded by cesium ions. The steady state surface composition resulting from the simultaneous gallium or cesium implantation and sputter-erosion of uranium and uranium carbide were calculated to be U₈₆Ga₁₄, (UC)₇₀Ga₃₀ and U₈₁Cs₉, (UC)₇₉Cs₂₁, respectively.

  5. Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Silicon Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites at Elevated Temperatures Using a Unique Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-10

    that involves individually coated fibers made into a unidirectional prepreg tape, before being laminated into a composite. The process usually...subsequent wet drum winding process, unidirectional tapes are formed. Eight of the tapes are laid up and laminated in [0/90/90/0]s to shape into preforms... convoluted with the consideration of the thermal stress and oxidation. In particular, the non-uniform thermal stress was induced by the directional

  6. Wear Characteristics of Hybrid Composites Based on Za27 Alloy Reinforced With Silicon Carbide and Graphite Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mitrović

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the wear characteristics of a hybrid composite based on zinc-aluminium ZA27 alloy, reinforced with silicon-carbide and graphite particles. The tested sample contains 5 vol.% of SiC and 3 vol.% Gr particles. Compocasting technique has been used to prepare the samples. The experiments were performed on a “block-on-disc” tribometer under conditions of dry sliding. The wear volumes of the alloy and the composite were determined by varying the normal loads and sliding speeds. The paper contains the procedure for preparation of sample composites and microstructure of the composite material and the base ZA27 alloy. The wear surface of the composite material was examined using the scanning electronic microscope (SEM and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS. Conclusions were obtained based on the observed impact of the sliding speed, normal load and sliding distance on tribological behaviour of the observed composite.

  7. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  8. Catalytic growth of carbon nanowires on composite diamond/silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellam, Amine [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département CP2S (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Miska, Patrice [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département P2M (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Ghanbaja, Jaafar [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département CP2S (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France); Barrat, Silvère, E-mail: Silvere.Barrat@ijl.nancy-universite.fr [Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, Département CP2S (UMR CNRS 7198), Parc de Saurupt, F-54042 Nancy Cedex (France)

    2014-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) films and carbon nanowires (CNWs) provide individually highly attractive properties for science and technology applications. The possibility of carbon composite materials made from a combination of these materials remains a potential approach widely discussed in literature but modestly investigated. We report in this work an early attempt to explore this opportunity in the light of some specific experimental considerations. Carbon nanowires (CNWs) are grown at low temperature without the conventional use of external hydrocarbon vapor source on silicon substrates partially covered by a thin film of coalesced micrometric CVD diamond. Composite substrates constituted by PCD on silicon were first cleaned with H{sub 2} plasma then used for the PVD deposition of 5 nm Ni thin films. Then, samples were heat treated in a CVD reactor at 580 °C in the presence of pure H{sub 2} pressure of 60 hPa at different annealing times. Comparative effect of annealing time on the dewetting of Ni thin films and the subsequent CNWs growth process was considered in this work using systematic observations by SEM. Possible mechanisms underlying CNWs growth in pure H{sub 2} gas were proposed. The nature and structure of these CNWs have been investigated by TEM microscopy and by Raman spectroscopy on the sample showing the highest CNWs density.

  9. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  10. Development of diamond coated tool and its performance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India ... chemical inertness of diamond coating towards the work material, did not show any .... CVD diamond coated carbide tools, Ph D Thesis, Indian.

  11. Preparation of Pt-mesoporous tungsten carbide/carbon composites via a soft-template method for electrochemical methanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Chun’an; Kang, Lingzhi; Shi, Meiqin; Lang, Xiaoling; Jiang, Yekun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mesoporous composite Pt-m(WC/C) is prepared by a soft template method. • The structure of phenolic gives a space limitation effect on the growth of WC. • Analysis of the effect of F127 on controlling the structure of composites. • Pt-m(WC/C) exhibits more than three times higher than Pt/C in catalytic activity. -- Abstract: This paper introduces a simple and reproducible chemical process for synthesis of Pt-mesoporous tungsten carbide/carbon composites composites Pt-m(WC/C) by means of a soft-template method. In this process, low-molecular-weight phenolic resol acted as the precursor both for carbon support and also the carbon resource of tungsten carbide. Tungsten hexachloride was used as a tungsten precursor along with different amount of triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 as pore-forming component. The best performance of Pt-m(WC/C) towards methanol oxidation is found when the mass ratios of WCl 6 :F127 is 1:0.6. The composite presents an improved methanol oxidation performance evidenced by a negative shift in onset potential, and increase of peak current density, compared with commercial Pt/C. The difference is explained by the adding of appropriate amount of F127 which facilitates the construction of mesoporous matrix structure of WC/C

  12. Preparation of Pt-mesoporous tungsten carbide/carbon composites via a soft-template method for electrochemical methanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Chun’an, E-mail: science@zjut.edu.cn; Kang, Lingzhi; Shi, Meiqin; Lang, Xiaoling; Jiang, Yekun

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • Mesoporous composite Pt-m(WC/C) is prepared by a soft template method. • The structure of phenolic gives a space limitation effect on the growth of WC. • Analysis of the effect of F127 on controlling the structure of composites. • Pt-m(WC/C) exhibits more than three times higher than Pt/C in catalytic activity. -- Abstract: This paper introduces a simple and reproducible chemical process for synthesis of Pt-mesoporous tungsten carbide/carbon composites composites Pt-m(WC/C) by means of a soft-template method. In this process, low-molecular-weight phenolic resol acted as the precursor both for carbon support and also the carbon resource of tungsten carbide. Tungsten hexachloride was used as a tungsten precursor along with different amount of triblock copolymer Pluronic F127 as pore-forming component. The best performance of Pt-m(WC/C) towards methanol oxidation is found when the mass ratios of WCl{sub 6}:F127 is 1:0.6. The composite presents an improved methanol oxidation performance evidenced by a negative shift in onset potential, and increase of peak current density, compared with commercial Pt/C. The difference is explained by the adding of appropriate amount of F127 which facilitates the construction of mesoporous matrix structure of WC/C.

  13. Assessment of Silicon Carbide Composites for Advanced Salt-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a new reactor concept that uses a liquid fluoride salt coolant and a solid high-temperature fuel. Several alternative fuel types are being considered for this reactor. One set of fuel options is the use of pin-type fuel assemblies with silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. This report provides (1) an initial viability assessment of using SiC as fuel cladding and other in-core components of the AHTR, (2) the current status of SiC technology, and (3) recommendations on the path forward. Based on the analysis of requirements, continuous SiC fiber-reinforced, chemically vapor-infiltrated SiC matrix (CVI SiC/SiC) composites are recommended as the primary option for further study on AHTR fuel cladding among various industrially available forms of SiC. Critical feasibility issues for the SiC-based AHTR fuel cladding are identified to be (1) corrosion of SiC in the candidate liquid salts, (2) high dose neutron radiation effects, (3) static fatigue failure of SiC/SiC, (4) long-term radiation effects including irradiation creep and radiation-enhanced static fatigue, and (5) fabrication technology of hermetic wall and sealing end caps. Considering the results of the issues analysis and the prospects of ongoing SiC research and development in other nuclear programs, recommendations on the path forward is provided in the order or priority as: (1) thermodynamic analysis and experimental examination of SiC corrosion in the candidate liquid salts, (2) assessment of long-term mechanical integrity issues using prototypical component sections, and (3) assessment of high dose radiation effects relevant to the anticipated operating condition.

  14. High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner For Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, David; Singh, Jogender

    2014-01-01

    Advanced high thermal conductivity materials research conducted at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) with state of the art combustion chamber liner material NARloy-Z showed that its thermal conductivity can be increased significantly by adding diamond particles and sintering it at high temperatures. For instance, NARloy-Z containing 40 vol. percent diamond particles, sintered at 975C to full density by using the Field assisted Sintering Technology (FAST) showed 69 percent higher thermal conductivity than baseline NARloy-Z. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40vol. percent D is 30 percent lighter than NARloy-Z and hence the density normalized thermal conductivity is 140 percent better. These attributes will improve the performance and life of the advanced rocket engines significantly. By one estimate, increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power up to 2X and increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and ISP, resulting in an expected 20 percent improvement in engine performance. Follow on research is now being conducted to demonstrate the benefits of this high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite for combustion chamber liner applications in advanced rocket engines. The work consists of a) Optimizing the chemistry and heat treatment for NARloy-Z-D composite, b) Developing design properties (thermal and mechanical) for the optimized NARloy-Z-D, c) Fabrication of net shape subscale combustion chamber liner, and d) Hot fire testing of the liner for performance. FAST is used for consolidating and sintering NARlo-Z-D. The subscale cylindrical liner with built in channels for coolant flow is also fabricated near net shape using the FAST process. The liner will be assembled into a test rig and hot fire tested in the MSFC test facility to determine performance. This paper describes the development of this novel high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-D composite material, and the advanced net shape technology to fabricate the combustion

  15. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  16. Volatile composition of microinclusions in diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, Canada: Implications for chemical and isotopic heterogeneity in the mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Ray; Cartigny, Pierre; Harrison, Darrell; Hobson, Emily; Harris, Jeff

    2009-03-01

    In order to better investigate the compositions and the origins of fluids associated with diamond growth, we have carried-out combined noble gas (He and Ar), C and N isotope, K, Ca and halogen (Cl, Br, I) determinations on fragments of individual microinclusion-bearing diamonds from the Panda kimberlite, North West Territories, Canada. The fluid concentrations of halogens and noble gases in Panda diamonds are enriched by several orders of magnitude over typical upper mantle abundances. However, noble gas, C and N isotopic ratios ( 3He/ 4He = 4-6 Ra, 40Ar/ 36Ar = 20,000-30,000, δ 13C = -4.5‰ to -6.9‰ and δ 15N = -1.2‰ to -8.8‰) are within the worldwide range determined for fibrous diamonds and similar to the mid ocean ridge basalt (MORB) source value. The high 36Ar content of the diamonds (>1 × 10 -9 cm 3/g) is at least an order of magnitude higher than any previously reported mantle sample and enables the 36Ar content of the subcontinental lithospheric mantle to be estimated at ˜0.6 × 10 -12 cm 3/g, again similar to estimates for the MORB source. Three fluid types distinguished on the basis of Ca-K-Cl compositions are consistent with carbonatitic, silicic and saline end-members identified in previous studies of diamonds from worldwide sources. These fluid end-members also have distinct halogen ratios (Br/Cl and I/Cl). The role of subducted seawater-derived halogens, originally invoked to explain some of the halogen ratio variations in diamonds, is not considered an essential component in the formation of the fluids. In contrast, it is considered that large halogen fractionation of a primitive mantle ratio occurs during fluid-melt partitioning in forming silicic fluids, and during separation of an immiscible saline fluid.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of FeNiCr Matrix-TiC Composite for Polishing CVD Diamond Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhuji Jin; Zewei Yuan; Renke Kang; Boxian Dong

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic friction polishing (DFP) is one of the most promising methods appropriate for polishing CVD diamond film with high efficiency and low cost.By this method CVD diamond film is polished through being simply pressed against a metal disc rotating at a high speed utilizing the thermochemical reaction occurring as a result of dynamic friction between them in the atmosphere.However, the relatively soft materials such as stainless steel, cast iron and nickel alloy widely used for polishing CVD diamond film are easy to wear and adhere to diamond film surface, which may further lead to low efficiency and poor polishing quality.In this paper, FeNiCr matrix-TiC composite used as grinding wheel for polishing CVD diamond film was obtained by combination of mechanical alloying (MA) and spark plasma sintering (SPS).The process of ball milling,composition, density, hardness, high-temperature oxidation resistance and wear resistance of the sintered piece were analyzed.The results show that TiC was introduced in MA-SPS process and had good combination with FeNiCr matrix and even distribution in the matrix.The density of composite can be improved by mechanical alloying.The FeNiCr matrix-TiC composite obtained at 1273 K was found to be superior to at 1173 K sintering in hardness, high-temperature oxidation resistance and wearability.These properties are more favorable than SUS304 for the preparation of high-performance grinding wheel for polishing CVD diamond film.

  18. Development of Innovative Accident Tolerant High Thermal Conductivity UO2-Diamond Composite Fuel Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulenko, James [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Subhash, Ghatu [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The University of Florida (UF) evaluated a composite fuel consisting of UO2 powder mixed with diamond micro particles as a candidate as an accident-tolerant fuel (ATF). The research group had previous extensive experience researching with diamond micro particles as an addition to reactor coolant for improved plant thermal performance. The purpose of this research work was to utilize diamond micro particles to develop UO2-Diamond composite fuel pellets with significantly enhanced thermal properties, beyond that already being measured in the previous UF research projects of UO2 – SiC and UO2 – Carbon Nanotube fuel pins. UF is proving with the current research results that the addition of diamond micro particles to UO2 may greatly enhanced the thermal conductivity of the UO2 pellets producing an accident-tolerant fuel. The Beginning of life benefits have been proven and fuel samples are being irradiated in the ATR reactor to confirm that the thermal conductivity improvements are still present under irradiation.

  19. Effect of Milling Condition on the Microstructure and the Properties of Nano structured Copper Tungsten Carbide Composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahani Yusoff; Zuhailawati Hussain

    2011-01-01

    In this work, in-situ Cu-WC composite has been fabricated by high energy milling followed by sintering. Cu, W and C mixture were mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill for 40 h at various milling speeds. Cu-W-C composite powders were cold compacted and sintered in argon ambient. Milled powder and sintered Cu-W-C composite were characterized in terms of Xray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and its properties. The result showed that carbide phases are only detected after sintering process. Greater amount of grain refinement during milling generates very high internal strain which reduced Cu crystallite size. It was found that formation of metastable, W 2 C has taken place before the formation of WC. With the presence of WC, the composite become increasingly harden with the increased of milling speed. Increasing milling speed also found to lower the electrical conductivity. (author)

  20. Composites comprising silicon carbide fibers dispersed in magnesia-aluminate matrix and fabrication thereof and of other composites by sinter forging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Prakash C.; Seydel, Edgar R.; Raj, Rishi

    1989-10-03

    A novel ceramic-ceramic composite of a uniform dispersion of silicon carbide fibers in a matrix of MgO.multidot.nAl.sub.2 O.sub.3 wherein n ranges from about 1 to about 4.5, said composite comprising by volume from 1 to 50% silicon carbide fibers and from 99 to 50% MgO.multidot.nAl.sub.2 O.sub.3. The composite is readily fabricated by forming a powder comprising a uniform dispersion of silicon carbide fibers in poorly crystalline phase comprising MgO and Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in a mole ratio of n and either (a) hot pressing or preferably (b) cold pressing to form a preform and then forging utilizing a temperature in the range of 1100.degree. C. to 1900.degree. C. and a strain rate ranging from about 10.sup.-5 seconds .sup.-1 to about 1 seconds .sup.-1 so that surfaces cracks do not appear to obtain a shear deformation greater than 30%.

  1. Multilayered and composite PVD-CVD coatings in cemented carbides manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, V.N.; Anikeev, A.I.; Anikin, V.N.; Vereshchaka, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Carbide cutting tools with wear-resistant coatings deposited by CVD process are widely employed in mechanical engineering to ensure a substantially longer service life of tool systems. However, the relatively high temperature and long time of the process make the substrate decarburise and, as a result, the bend strength and performance characteristics of a tool decrease. The present study suggests the problem of deteriorated strength of CVD-coated carbide tools be solved by the development of a technology that combines arc-PVD and CVD processes to deposit multilayered coatings of titanium and aluminium compounds. (author)

  2. Fabrication and tribological response of aluminium 6061 hybrid composite reinforced with bamboo char and boron carbide micro-fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chethan, K. N.; Pai, Anand; Keni, Laxmikant G.; Singhal, Ashish; Sinha, Shubham

    2018-02-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) have a wide scope of industrial applications and triumph over conventional materials due to their light weight, higher specific strength, good wear resistance and lower coefficient of thermal expansion. The present study aims at establishing the feasibility of using Bamboo charcoal particulate and boron carbide as reinforcements in Al-6061 alloy matrix and to investigate their effect on the wear of composites taking into consideration the interfacial adhesion of the reinforcements in the alloy. Al-6061 alloy was chosen as a base metallic alloy matrix. Sun-dried bamboo canes were used for charcoal preparation with the aid of a muffle furnace. The carbon content in the charcoal samples was determined by EDS (energy dispersive spectroscopy). In present study, stir casting technique was used to prepare the samples with 1%, 2%, and 3% weight of bamboo charcoal and boron carbide with Al-6061. The fabricated composites were homogenised at 570°C for 6 hours and cooled at room temperature. Wear studies were carried out on the specimens with different speed and loads. It was found that wear rate and coefficient of friction decreased with increase in the reinforcement content.

  3. Re-defining failure envelopes for silicon carbide composites based on damage process analysis by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-01-01

    A silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite is a promising candidate for a fusion DEMO blanket. To develop design codes in practical use of them, strength anisotropy is an important issue to be clarified and therefore this study aimed to evaluate the failure behavior of the SiC/SiC composites to provide a strength map. For this purpose, detailed tensile, compressive and in-plane shear failure behaviors were evaluated by the acoustic emission (AE) technique for a plain–weave (P/W) chemically vapor-infiltration (CVI) SiC/SiC composite. The AE results distinguished damage accumulation processes by separately discussing localized variations of power within a time series by wavelet analysis. Of particular emphasis is that matrix cracking occurred prior to the proportional limit stress (PLS) by both tensile and compressive tests. This is because the rough-surface of SiC fibers resulted in the strong frictional stress at the fiber/matrix (F/M) interface, showing linearity in the stress–strain curve beyond the actual matrix cracking stress (i.e., possibly no sliding of the fibers at the F/M interface). In this paper, an updated failure envelope was provided by referring the true matrix cracking stresses as more realistic and reasonable failure criteria

  4. Re-defining failure envelopes for silicon carbide composites based on damage process analysis by acoustic emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, Takashi, E-mail: nozawa.takashi67@jaea.go.jp; Ozawa, Kazumi; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2013-10-15

    A silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) composite is a promising candidate for a fusion DEMO blanket. To develop design codes in practical use of them, strength anisotropy is an important issue to be clarified and therefore this study aimed to evaluate the failure behavior of the SiC/SiC composites to provide a strength map. For this purpose, detailed tensile, compressive and in-plane shear failure behaviors were evaluated by the acoustic emission (AE) technique for a plain–weave (P/W) chemically vapor-infiltration (CVI) SiC/SiC composite. The AE results distinguished damage accumulation processes by separately discussing localized variations of power within a time series by wavelet analysis. Of particular emphasis is that matrix cracking occurred prior to the proportional limit stress (PLS) by both tensile and compressive tests. This is because the rough-surface of SiC fibers resulted in the strong frictional stress at the fiber/matrix (F/M) interface, showing linearity in the stress–strain curve beyond the actual matrix cracking stress (i.e., possibly no sliding of the fibers at the F/M interface). In this paper, an updated failure envelope was provided by referring the true matrix cracking stresses as more realistic and reasonable failure criteria.

  5. Sputtered tungsten-based ternary and quaternary layers for nanocrystalline diamond deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walock, Michael J; Rahil, Issam; Zou, Yujiao; Imhoff, Luc; Catledge, Shane A; Nouveau, Corinne; Stanishevsky, Andrei V

    2012-06-01

    Many of today's demanding applications require thin-film coatings with high hardness, toughness, and thermal stability. In many cases, coating thickness in the range 2-20 microm and low surface roughness are required. Diamond films meet many of the stated requirements, but their crystalline nature leads to a high surface roughness. Nanocrystalline diamond offers a smoother surface, but significant surface modification of the substrate is necessary for successful nanocrystalline diamond deposition and adhesion. A hybrid hard and tough material may be required for either the desired applications, or as a basis for nanocrystalline diamond film growth. One possibility is a composite system based on carbides or nitrides. Many binary carbides and nitrides offer one or more mentioned properties. By combining these binary compounds in a ternary or quaternary nanocrystalline system, we can tailor the material for a desired combination of properties. Here, we describe the results on the structural and mechanical properties of the coating systems composed of tungsten-chromium-carbide and/or nitride. These WC-Cr-(N) coatings are deposited using magnetron sputtering. The growth of adherent nanocrystalline diamond films by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition has been demonstrated on these coatings. The WC-Cr-(N) and WC-Cr-(N)-NCD coatings are characterized with atomic force microscopy and SEM, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and nanoindentation.

  6. Production of Cu/diamond composites for first-wall heat sinks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunes, D.; Correia, J.B.; Carvalho, P.A.; Shohoji, N.; Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Alves, L.C.; Hanada, K.; Osawa, E.

    2011-01-01

    Due to their suitable thermal conductivity and strength, copper-based materials have been considered appropriate heat sinks for first wall panels in nuclear fusion devices. However, increased thermal conductivity and mechanical strength are demanded and the concept of property tailoring involved in the design of metal matrix composites advocates for the potential of nanodiamond dispersions in copper. Copper-nanodiamond composite materials can be produced by mechanical alloying followed by a consolidation operation. Yet, this powder metallurgy route poses several challenges: nanodiamond presents intrinsically difficult bonding with copper; contamination by milling media must be closely monitored; and full densification and microstructural homogeneity should be obtained with consolidation. The present line of work is aimed at an optimization of the processing conditions of Cu-nanodiamond composites. The challenges mentioned above have been addressed, respectively, by incorporating chromium in the matrix to form a stable carbide interlayer binding the two components; by assessing the contamination originating from the milling operation through particle-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy; and by comparing the densification obtained by spark plasma sintering with hot-extrusion data from previous studies.

  7. The study on diamond-coated insert by DC plasma jet CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Kesong; Dai Mingjiang; Song Jinbing; Kuang Tongchun; Liu Zhengyi

    2001-01-01

    Diamond coating were deposited on cemented carbide inserts by DC plasma jet CVD. The cemented carbide inserts were pretreated by methods including chemical etching of Co, Ar/H 2 plasma etching. The characteristics of diamond film, interface structure, adhesion strength and film stress were analysized by different methods such as SEM, XRD, Raman spectrum etc. A comparing experiment of cutting Al - 22 % Si alloy was carried out with diamond-coated cemented carbide inserts and uncoated cemented carbide inserts. The results show that the diamond-coated cemented carbide insert has a great advantage for cutting abrasive high content Al - Si alloy. (author)

  8. Assessment of thermal shock induced damage in silicon carbide fibre reinforced glass matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boccaccini, A. R.

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of microstructural damage in silicon carbide fibre (Nicalon™ reinforced glass matrix composite samples subjected to thermal shock was investigated by using a nondestructive forced resonance technique and fibre push out indentation tests. Thermal shock testing involved quenching samples in a water bath maintained at room temperature from a high temperature (650ºC. Changes in the Young's modulus and internal friction of the samples with increasing number of shocks were measured accurately by the forced resonance technique. Fibre push-out tests showed no significant changes in the properties of the fibre-matrix interface, indicating that damage in the composite was concentrated mainly in the development of matrix microcracking. It was also shown that the internal friction is a very sensitive parameter by which to detect the onset and development of such microcracking. A simple semi-empirical model is proposed to correlate the internal friction level with the microcracking density in the glass matrix. Finally, the relevance of detecting nondestructively the existence of microcracks in the glass matrix, before any significant interfacial degradation occurs, is emphasized, in conextion with the possibility of inducing a crack healing process by a thermal treatment (annealing, taking advantage of the viscous flow properties of the glass.

    El desarrollo de daño microestructural en materiales compuestos de matriz de vidrio reforzados con fibras de carburo de silicio (Nicalon™ sometidos a choque térmico fue investigado mediante la técnica no-destructiva de resonancia forzada y por mediciones de indentación "push-out" de fibras. Los ensayos de choque térmico involucraron el enfriamiento brusco en un baño de agua a temperatura ambiente de las piezas previamente calentadas a una temperatura elevada (650ºC. La técnica de resonancia forzada permitió medir cambios en el módulo de Young de elasticidad y en la fricci

  9. Design and development of solid carbide step drill K34 for machining of CFRP and GFRP composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, T.; Nagaraja, R.

    2018-04-01

    The Study focused on design and development of solid carbide step drill K34 to drill holes on composite materials such as Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic (CFRP) and Glass Fiber Reinforced Plastic (GFRP). The step drill K34 replaces step wise drilling of diameter 6.5mm and 9 mm holes that reduces the setup time, cutting speed, feed rate cost, delamination and increase the production rate. Several researchers have analyzed the effect of drilling process on various fiber reinforced plastic composites by carrying out using conventional tools and machinery. However, this process operation can lead to different kind of damages such as delamination, fiber pullout, and local cracks. To avoid the problems encountered at the time of drilling, suitable tool material and geometry is essential. This paper deals with the design and development of K34 Carbide step drill used to drill holes on CFRP and GFRP laminates. An Experimental study carried out to investigate the tool geometry, feed rate and cutting speed that avoids delamination and fiber breakage.

  10. Effect of forging on mechanical properties of rice husk ash-silicon carbide reinforced Al1100 hybrid composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanaraja, S.; Gireesha, B. L.; Ravikumar, K. S.; Likith, P.

    2018-04-01

    During the past few years, material design has changed prominence to pursue light weight, environment friendliness, low cost, quality, higher service temperature, higher elastic modulus, improved wear resistance and performance. Straight monolithic materials have limitations in achieving the above decisive factors. To overcome these limitations and to convince the ever increasing demand of modern day technology, Attention has been shifted towards Metal Matrix Composites (MMC). Stir casting route is most hopeful for synthesizing discontinuous reinforcement aluminium matrix composites because of its relative simplicity and easy adaptability with all shape casting process used in metal casting industry. Hybridization of metal matrix composites is the introduction of more than one type/kind, size and shape of reinforcement during processing of composites. It is carried out to obtain synergistic properties of different reinforcements and matrix used, which may not be rea1ised in monolithic alloy or in conventional monocomposites. The present study involves synthesis of hybrid composites by addition of the desired amount of Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Rice Husk Ash (RHA) particles in to the molten Al 1100-Mg alloy through stir casting technique fallowed by hot forging of the cast composites. The influence of increasing in the wt% (3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 wt%) of SiC particles addition (3 wt% Rice husk ash kept constant) on evolution of microstructure is studied through XRD and SEM and their impact on the mechanical properties like hardness and tensile strength of the resulting forged hybrid composites has been investigated.

  11. Effect of pretreatment and deposition parameters on diamond nucleation in CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazim, E.; Izman, S.; Ourdjini, A.; Shaharoun, A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond films on cemented carbide (WC) has aroused great interest in recent years. The combination of toughness from the WC and the high hardness of diamond results in outstanding wear resistance. This will increase the lifetime and better technical performance of the components made of diamond coated carbide. One of the important steps in the growth of diamond film is the nucleation of diamond as its density strongly influences the diamond growth process, film quality and morphology. In this paper the various effects of surface pretreatment and diamond deposition conditions on the diamond nucleation density are reviewed. (author)

  12. High temperature synthesis of ceramic composition by directed reaction of molten titanium or zirconium with boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.B.

    1990-01-01

    Alternative methods of producing ceramics and ceramic composites include sintering, hot pressing and more recently hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and self-propagating high temperature synthesis (SHS). Though each of these techniques has its advantages, each suffers from several restrictions as well. Sintering may require long times at high temperatures and for most materials requires sintering aids to get full density. These additives can, and generally do, change (often degrade) the properties of the ceramic. Hot pressing and hot isostatic pressing are convenient methods to quickly prepare samples of some materials to full density, but generally are expensive and may damage some types of reinforcements during densification. This paper focuses on the preparation and processing of composites prepared by the directed reaction of molten titanium or zirconium with boron carbide. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach when compared to traditional methods are discussed, with reference to specific examples. Examples of microstructure are properties of these materials are reported

  13. The Effect of ZrO2 Nanoparticles on the Microstructure and Properties of Sintered WC–Bronze-Based Diamond Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhong Sun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal matrix-impregnated diamond composites are widely used in diamond tool manufacturing. In order to satisfy the increasing engineering requirements, researchers have paid more and more attention to enhancing conventional metal matrices by applying novel methods. In this work, ZrO2 nanoparticles were introduced into the WC–bronze matrix with and without diamond grits via hot pressing to improve the performance of conventional diamond composites. The effects of ZrO2 nanoparticles on the microstructure, density, hardness, bending strength, and wear resistance of diamond composites were investigated. The results indicated that the hardness and relative density increased, while the bending strength decreased when the content of ZrO2 nanoparticles increased. The grinding ratio of diamond composites increased significantly by 60% as a result of nano-ZrO2 addition. The enhancement mechanism was discussed. Diamond composites showed the best overall properties with the addition of 1 wt % ZrO2 nanoparticles, thus paving the way for further applications.

  14. The Effect of ZrO2 Nanoparticles on the Microstructure and Properties of Sintered WC–Bronze-Based Diamond Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Youhong; Wu, Haidong; Li, Meng; Meng, Qingnan; Gao, Ke; Lü, Xiaoshu; Liu, Baochang

    2016-01-01

    Metal matrix-impregnated diamond composites are widely used in diamond tool manufacturing. In order to satisfy the increasing engineering requirements, researchers have paid more and more attention to enhancing conventional metal matrices by applying novel methods. In this work, ZrO2 nanoparticles were introduced into the WC–bronze matrix with and without diamond grits via hot pressing to improve the performance of conventional diamond composites. The effects of ZrO2 nanoparticles on the microstructure, density, hardness, bending strength, and wear resistance of diamond composites were investigated. The results indicated that the hardness and relative density increased, while the bending strength decreased when the content of ZrO2 nanoparticles increased. The grinding ratio of diamond composites increased significantly by 60% as a result of nano-ZrO2 addition. The enhancement mechanism was discussed. Diamond composites showed the best overall properties with the addition of 1 wt % ZrO2 nanoparticles, thus paving the way for further applications. PMID:28773469

  15. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, S.; Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P.

    2013-01-01

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called “interphase” between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC–TiC) n interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC–TiC) n films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  16. Nanoscale multilayered and porous carbide interphases prepared by pressure-pulsed reactive chemical vapor deposition for ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, S.; Jouanny, I.; Ledain, O.; Maillé, L.; Weisbecker, P.

    2013-06-01

    In Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs) reinforced by continuous fibers, a good toughness is achieved by adding a thin film called "interphase" between the fiber and the brittle matrix, which acts as a mechanical fuse by deflecting the matrix cracks. Pyrocarbon (PyC), with or without carbide sub-layers, is typically the material of choice to fulfill this role. The aim of this work was to study PyC-free nanoscale multilayered carbide coatings as interphases for CMCs. Nanoscale multilayered (SiC-TiC)n interphases were deposited by pressure-Pulsed Chemical Vapor Deposition (P-CVD) on single filament Hi-Nicalon fibers and embedded in a SiC matrix sheath. The thicknesses of the carbide interphase sub-layers could be made as low as a few nanometers as evidenced by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. By using the P-ReactiveCVD method (P-RCVD), in which the TiC growth involves consumption of SiC, it was not only possible to obtain multilayered (SiC-TiC)n films but also TiC films with a porous multilayered microstructure as a result of the Kirkendall effect. The porosity in the TiC sequences was found to be enhanced when some PyC was added to SiC prior to total RCVD consumption. Because the porosity volume fraction was still not high enough, the role of mechanical fuse of the interphases could not be evidenced from the tensile curves, which remained fully linear even when chemical attack of the fiber surface was avoided.

  17. Field assisted sintering of refractory carbide ceramics and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Sean

    The sintering behaviors of silicon carbide (SiC) and boron carbide (B4C) based materials were investigated using an emerging sintering technology known as field assisted sintering technology (FAST), also known as spark plasma sintering (SPS) and pulse electric current sintering (PECS). Sintering by FAST utilizes high density electric current, uniaxial pressure, and relatively high heating rate compared to conventional sintering techniques. This effort investigated issues of scaling from laboratory FAST system (25 ton capacity) to industrial FAST system (250 ton capacity), as well as exploring the difference in sintering behavior of single phase B4C and SiC using FAST and conventional sintering techniques including hot-pressing (HP) and pressure-less sintering (PL). Materials were analyzed for mechanical and bulk properties, including characterization of density, hardness, fracture toughness, fracture (bend) strength, elastic modulus and microstructure. A parallel investigation was conducted in the development of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) using SiC powder impregnation of fiber compacts followed by FAST sintering. The FAST technique was used to sinter several B4C and SiC materials to near theoretical density. Preliminary efforts established optimized sintering temperatures using the smaller 25 ton laboratory unit, targeting a sample size of 40 mm diameter and 8 mm thickness. Then the same B4C and SiC materials were sintered by the larger 250 ton industrial FAST system, a HP system, and PL sintering system with a targeted dense material geometry of 4 x 4 x 0.315 inches3 (101.6 x 101.6 x 8 mm3). The resulting samples were studied to determine if the sintering dynamics and/or the resulting material properties were influenced by the sintering technique employed. This study determined that FAST sintered ceramic materials resulted in consistently higher averaged values for mechanical properties as well as smaller grain size when compared to conventionally sintered

  18. High speed dry machining of MMCs with diamond tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    The increasing use of metal matrix composites (MMCs) has raised new issues in their machining. Industrial demands for higher speed and dry machining of MMCs with improved component production to closer tolerances have driven the development of new tool materials. In particular, the wear characteristics of synthetic diamond tooling satisfy many of the requirements imposed in cutting these highly abrasive workpieces. The use of diamond tool materials, such as polycrystalline diamond (PCD), has resulted in tool life improvements which, allied with environmental considerations, show great potential for the development of dry cutting. This paper explores the wear characteristics of PCD, which is highly suited to the dry machining of particulate silicon carbide MMCs. Also, two further diamond tool materials are evaluated - chemical vapor deposition (CVD) thick layer diamond and synthetic single crystal diamond. Their suitability for the efficient machining of high volume fraction MMC materials is shown and their potential impact an the subsequent acceptance and integration of MMCs into engineering components is discussed. (author)

  19. Microstructural and Mechanical Study of Inconel 625 – Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings Obtained by Powder Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huebner J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the investigation of fine (~0.54 μm tungsten carbide particles effect on structural and mechanical properties of laser cladded Inconel 625-WC composite. Three powder mixtures with different Inconel 625 – WC weight ratio (10, 20 and 30 weight % of WC were prepared. Coatings were made using following process parameters: laser beam diameter ø ≈ 500 μm, powder feeder rotation speed – 7 m/min, scanning velocity – 10 m/min, laser power – 220 W changed to 320 W, distance between tracks – 1 mm changed to 0.8 mm. Microstructure and hardness were investigated. Coatings produced by laser cladding were crack and pore free, chemically and structurally homogenous. High cooling rate during cladding process resulted in fine microstructure of material. Hardness improved with addition of WC from 396.3 ±10.5 HV for pure Inconel 625, to 469.9 ±24.9 HV for 30 weight % of WC. Tungsten carbide dissolved in Inconel 625 which allowed formation of intergranular eutectic that contains TCP phases.

  20. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  1. The preparation and performance of calcium carbide-derived carbon/polyaniline composite electrode material for supercapacitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liping; Wang, Xianyou; Li, Na; An, Hongfang; Chen, Huajie [School of Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Environmentally Friendly Chemistry and Applications of Minister of Education, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Hubei 430073 (China)

    2010-03-15

    Calcium carbide (CaC{sub 2})-derived carbon (CCDC)/polyaniline (PANI) composite materials are prepared by in situ chemical oxidation polymerization of an aniline solution containing well-dispersed CCDC. The structure and morphology of CCDC/PANI composite are characterized by Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} sorption isotherms. It has been found that PANI was uniformly deposited on the surface and the inner pores of CCDC. The supercapacitive behaviors of the CCDC/PANI composite materials are investigated with cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and cycle life measurements. The results show that the CCDC/PANI composite electrodes have higher specific capacitances than the as grown CCDC electrodes and higher stability than the conducting polymers. The capacitance of CCDC/PANI composite electrode is as high as 713.4 F g{sup -1} measured by cyclic voltammetry at 1 mV s{sup -1}. Besides, the capacitance retention of coin supercapacitor remained 80.1% after 1000 cycles. (author)

  2. Influence of Co and W powders on viscosity of composite solders during soldering of specially shaped diamond-abrasive tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, E. G.; Aref’eva, S. A.; Svistun, L. I.

    2018-03-01

    The influence of Co and W powders on the structure and the viscosity of composite solders Sn-Cu-Co-W used for the manufacture of the specially shaped diamond tools has been studied. The solders were obtained by mixing the metallic powders with an organic binder. The mixtures with and without diamonds were applied to steel rollers and shaped substrates. The sintering was carried out in a vacuum at 820 ° C with time-exposure of 40 minutes. The influence of Co and W powders on the viscosity solders was evaluated on the basis of the study of structures and according to the results of sintering specially shaped diamond tools. It was found that to provide the necessary viscosity and to obtain the uniform diamond-containing layers on the complex shaped surfaces, Sn-Cu-Co-W solder should contain 27–35 vol % of solid phase. This is achieved with a total solder content of 24–32 wt % of cobalt powder and 7 wt % of tungsten powder.

  3. Multilayer CVD Diamond Coatings in the Machining of an Al6061-15 Vol % Al2O3 Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadmehdi Shabani

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic cutting inserts coated with ten-fold alternating micro- and nanocrystalline diamond (MCD/NCD layers grown by hot filament chemical vapor deposition (CVD were tested in the machining of an Al based metallic matrix composite (MMC containing 15 vol % Al2O3 particles. Inserts with total coating thicknesses of approximately 12 µm and 24 µm were produced and used in turning: cutting speed (v of 250 to 1000 m·min−1; depth of cut (DOC from 0.5 to 3 mm and feed (f between 0.1 and 0.4 mm·rev−1. The main cutting force increases linearly with DOC (ca. 294 N per mm and with feed (ca. 640 N per mm·rev−1. The thicker coatings work within the following limits: DOC up to 1.5 mm and maximum speeds of 750 m·min−1 for feeds up to 0.4 mm·rev−1. Flank wear is predominant but crater wear is also observed due to the negative tool normal rake. Layer-by-layer wear of the tool rake, and not total delamination from the substrate, evidenced one of the advantages of using a multilayer design. The MCD/NCD multilayer diamond coated indexable inserts have longer tool life than most CVD diamond systems and behave as well as most polycrystalline diamond (PCD tools.

  4. Manufacturing method for boron carbide/carbon composite neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takenori; Ukai, Shigeharu; Maruyama, Tadashi; Suya, Kiyoshi; Sunami, Yoshihiko.

    1994-01-01

    A less volatile binder pitch which is melted upon heating is used as a binder. Raw materials mainly comprising 60 to 85% by volume of a boron carbide powder and 15 to 40% by volume of a binder pitch are mixed, molded under pressure and heating at 480 to 600degC, then baked under non-pressurization, further impregnated with pitch under a reduced pressure and then baked again. The volume percentage of each of the materials is calculated based on the volume obtained by dividing the blending weight for each of raw materials with the intrinsic density respectively. The binding property relative to the boron carbide powder is improved by using a pitch having satisfactory melting performance and reduction of strength is decreased. Moreover, if the binder pitch is baked at about 2,000degC, it is easily converted into a graphitized tissues to have excellent slidability and fabricability. With such procedures, high bending strength and high heat conductivity can be ensured while keeping high boron content and neutron absorbing performance. (T.M.)

  5. Nanostructured diamond film deposition on curved surfaces of metallic temporomandibular joint implant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fries, Marc D; Vohra, Yogesh K [Department of Physics, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2002-10-21

    Microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition of nanostructured diamond films was carried out on curved surfaces of Ti-6Al-4V alloy machined to simulate the shape of a temporomandibular joint (TMJ) dental implant. Raman spectroscopy shows that the deposited films are uniform in chemical composition along the radius of curvature of the TMJ condyle. Thin film x-ray diffraction reveals an interfacial carbide layer and nanocrystalline diamond grains in this coating. Nanoindentation hardness measurements show an ultra-hard coating with a hardness value of 60{+-}5 GPa averaged over three samples. (rapid communication)

  6. Microstructure and Mechanical Behaviour of Stir-Cast Al-Mg-Sl Alloy Matrix Hybrid Composite Reinforced with Corn Cob Ash and Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwagbenga Babajide Fatile

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In this present study, the microstructural and mechanical behaviour of Al-Mg-Si alloy matrix composites reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC and Corn cob ash (An agro‑waste was investigated. This research work was aimed at assessing the suitability of developing low cost- high performance Al-Mg-Si hybrid composite. Silicon carbide (SiC particulates added with 0,1,2,3 and 4 wt% Corn cob ash (CCA were utilized to prepare 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al-Mg-Si alloy as matrix using two-step stir casting method. Microstructural characterization, density measurement, estimated percent porosity, tensile testing, and micro‑hardness measurement were used to characterize the composites produced. From the results obtained, CCA has great potential to serve as a complementing reinforcement for the development of low cost‑high performance aluminum hybrid composites.

  7. Morphological evolution of primary TiC carbide in laser clad TiC reinforced FeAl intermetallic composite coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑶; 王华明

    2003-01-01

    The novel rapidly solidified TiC/FeAl composite coatings were fabricated by laser cladding on the substrate of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel, particular emphasis has been placed on the growth morphologies of TiC carbide and its growth mechanism under a constant solidification conditions. Results show that the growth morphology of TiC carbide strongly depends upon the nucleation process and mass transportation process of TiC forming elements in laser melt pool. With increasing amount of titanium and carbon in melt pool, the growth morphology of TiC carbide changes from block-like to star-like and well-developed dendrite. As the amount of titanium and carbon increases further, TiC carbide particles are found to be irregular polyhedral block. Although the growth morphologies of TiC are various,their advancing fronts are all faceted, illustrating that TiC carbide grows by the mechanism of lateral ledge growth.

  8. Influence of brazing parameters and alloy composition on interface morphology of brazed diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, Ulrich E. [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Joining and Interface Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)], E-mail: klotz@fem-online.de; Liu Chunlei [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Joining and Interface Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Khalid, Fazal A. [Faculty of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, GIK Institute, Topi, NWFP (Pakistan); Elsener, Hans-Rudolf [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory for Joining and Interface Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2008-11-15

    Active brazing is an effective technique for joining diamond or cBN grit to metallic substrates. This technique is currently used to manufacture superabrasive, high-performance tools. The investigation of interface reactions between diamond and active brazing alloys plays an important role in understanding and improving the brazing process and the resultant tool performance. Focused ion beam (FIB) milling enabled the high resolution investigation of these extremely difficult to prepare metal-diamond joints. The interfacial nanostructure is characterized by the formation of two layers of TiC with different morphologies. First a cuboidal layer forms directly on the diamond and reaches a thickness of approximately 70 nm. Then a second layer with columnar TiC crystals grows on the first layer into the brazing filler metal by a diffusion-controlled process. The combined thickness of both TiC layers varies between 50 nm and 600 nm depending on the brazing temperature and holding time.

  9. Preparation of nickel-coated titanium carbide particulates and their use in the production of reinforced iron matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Danqing; Yu, Pengchao; Hu, Bin; Liu, Huiqun; Wang, Bin; Jiang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Ni-coated TiC composite powders were prepared by electroless plating. • Iron-based composites reinforced by TiC particles was prepared by HIP. • Mechanical and wear properties were improved with the addition of Ni-coated TiC. • The nickel coating promotes the formation and growth of sintering neck. - Abstract: Ni-coated titanium carbide (TiC) composite powders were prepared by electroless plating (EP). Further, using hot isostatic pressing (HIP), iron matrix composites reinforced with 4 wt% Ni-coated TiC particulates with relative density close to 100% were prepared. The microstructure and phase composition of the Ni-coated powders and the composites were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the TiC particles were distributed uniformly in the matrix and were free of segregation or coarsening. Compared to the TiC particles without Ni coating, the reinforced iron-based composites containing the Ni-coated particles showed higher relative densities and better mechanical properties. The density, hardness, tensile strength, and elongation were enhanced to 99.98%, 243 HV, 565 MPa, and 11.7%, respectively in composites containing Ni-coated TiC particles from 99.70%, 210 HV, 514 MPa, and 10.3%, respectively in composites that were prepared using particles without Ni coating. In addition, the mass losses in the composites containing the Ni-coated particles were reduced by 32–75% in the abrasive wear test with various vertical loads. We propose that the nickel coatings on the particulates had a beneficial effect on the microstructure and properties of the reinforced iron-based composites is due to promotion of neck formation and growth between TiC and iron powders during sintering, which enhanced the density of the sintered compact and the bonding strength between the TiC particles and the iron matrix

  10. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Liming; Fu, Honggang; Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g −1 Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S BET ) of 457.92 m 2 g −1 . After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g −1 Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance

  11. Tungsten carbide/porous carbon composite as superior support for platinum catalyst toward methanol electro-oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Liming [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Fu, Honggang, E-mail: fuhg@vip.sina.com [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Wang, Lei; Mu, Guang; Jiang, Baojiang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Ruihong [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The WC nanoparticles are well dispersed in the carbon matrix. The size of WC nanoparticles is about 30 nm. It can be concluded that tungsten carbide and carbon composite was successfully prepared by the present synthesis conditions. - Highlights: • The WC/PC composite with high specific surface area was prepared by a simple way. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst has superior performance toward methanol electro-oxidation. • The current density for methanol electro-oxidation is as high as 595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt. • The Pt/WC/PC catalyst shows better durability and stronger CO electro-oxidation. • The performance of Pt/WC/PC is superior to the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide/porous carbon (WC/PC) composites have been successfully synthesized through a surfactant assisted evaporation-induced-assembly method, followed by a thermal treatment process. In particular, WC/PC-35-1000 composite with tungsten content of 35% synthesized at the carbonized temperature of 1000 °C, exhibited a specific surface area (S{sub BET}) of 457.92 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. After loading Pt nanoparticles (NPs), the obtained Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst exhibits the highest unit mass electroactivity (595.93 A g{sup −1} Pt) toward methanol electro-oxidation, which is about 2.6 times as that of the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. Furthermore, the Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst displays much stronger resistance to CO poisoning and better durability toward methanol electrooxidation compared with the commercial Pt/C (JM) catalyst. The high electrocatalytic activity, strong poison-resistivity and good stability of Pt/WC/PC-35-1000 catalyst are attributed to the porous structures and high specific surface area of WC/PC support could facilitate the rapid mass transportation. Moreover, synergistic effect between WC and Pt NPs is favorable to the higher catalytic performance.

  12. Muonium states in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.; Baumeler, H.; Keller, H.; Kiefl, R.F.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Schneider, J.W.; Estle, T.L.; Spencer, D.P.; Savic, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Implanted muons in samples of silicon carbide have been observed to form paramagnetic muonium centers (μ + e - ). Muonium precession signals in low applied magnetic fields have been observed at 22 K in a granular sample of cubic β-SiC, however it was not possible to determine the hyperfine frequency. In a signal crystal sample of hexagonal 6H-SiC, three apparently isotropic muonium states were observed at 20 K and two at 300 K, all with hyperfine frequencies intermediate between those of the isotropic muonium centers in diamond and silicon. No evidence was seen of an anisotropic muonium state analogous to the Mu * state in diamond and silicon. (orig.)

  13. Copper-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Rape, Aaron; Singh, Jogender; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Thomas, Vinoy; Otte, Kyle G.; Li, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  14. Copper Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Singh, Jogender; Rape, Aaron; Vohra, Yogesh; Thomas, Vinoy; Li, Deyu; Otte, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  15. Machinability of glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) composite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper deals with the study of machinability of GFRP composite tubes of different fiber orientation angle vary from 300 to 900. Machining studies were carried out on an all geared lathe using three different cutting tools: namely Carbide (K-20), Cubic Boron Nitride (CBN) and Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD). Experiments ...

  16. Influence of electroformation regime on the specific properties of cobalt oxide‒platinum composite films deposited on conductive diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spătaru, Tanţa; Osiceanu, Petre; Preda, Loredana; Munteanu, Cornel [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu”, 202 Spl. Independenţei 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Spătaru, Nicolae, E-mail: nspataru@icf.ro [Institute of Physical Chemistry “Ilie Murgulescu”, 202 Spl. Independenţei 060021, Bucharest (Romania); Fujishima, Akira [Tokyo University of Science, 1-3 Kagurazaka, Shinjuku-ku Tokyo 162-8601 (Japan)

    2014-04-01

    Two straightforward electrochemical methods were used in the present work for depositing cobalt oxide-platinum composite films on boron-doped diamond substrates in order to put into evidence the effect of the electroformation regime on the morphological and electrochemical features of these hybrid systems. The shift from potentiostatic to potentiodynamic deposition enabled not only a significant improvement of the Pt particles dispersion but also a much higher surface concentration of oxygenated species of platinum. For similar Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Pt loadings, the specific capacitance of the composite films deposited by cyclic voltammetry was with ca. 8% higher than that of the potentiostatically obtained ones. Additional advantage of potentiodynamic deposition is the improved resistance to fouling during methanol anodic oxidation of Pt particles, tentatively ascribed to the higher surface concentration of oxygenated species of platinum. - Highlights: • Cobalt oxide-platinum composite films were electrodeposited on conductive diamond. • Composite films formed by cyclic voltammetry exhibit enhanced specific capacitance. • Potentiodynamic deposition enables higher concentration of oxygenated Pt species. • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}–Pt films prepared by cyclic voltammetry are less susceptible to CO poisoning.

  17. Oxidation protection and behavior of in-situ zirconium diboride–silicon carbide coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lu; Li, Hejun; Yin, Xuemin; Chu, Yanhui; Chen, Xi; Fu, Qiangang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ZrB 2 –SiC coating was prepared on C/C composite by in-situ reaction. • A two-layered structure was obtained when the coating was oxidized at 1500 °C. • The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. • The morphology evolution of oxide scale during oxidation was illuminated. - Abstract: To protect carbon/carbon (C/C) composites against oxidation, zirconium diboride–silicon carbide (ZrB 2 –SiC) coating was prepared by in-situ reaction using ZrC, B 4 C and Si as raw materials. The in-situ ZrB 2 –SiC coated C/C presented good oxidation resistance, whose weight loss was only 0.15% after isothermal oxidation at 1500 °C for 216 h. Microstructure evolution of coating at 1500 °C was studied, revealing a two-layered structure: (1) ZrO 2 (ZrSiO 4 ) embedded in SiO 2 -rich glass, and (2) unaffected ZrB 2 –SiC. The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. A model based on the evolution of oxide scale was proposed to explain the failure mechanism of coating

  18. Composite material having high thermal conductivity and process for fabricating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    1998-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  19. Atomic composition of WC/ and Zr/O-terminated diamond Schottky interfaces close to ideality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piñero, J.C., E-mail: josecarlos.pinero@uca.es [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz,11510 (Spain); Araújo, D. [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz,11510 (Spain); Fiori, A. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Traoré, A. [Institut Néel, CNRS-UJF, av. des Martyrs, Grenoble,38042 France (France); Villar, M.P. [Dpto. Ciencias de los Materiales, Universidad de Cádiz, Puerto Real, Cádiz,11510 (Spain); Eon, D.; Muret, P.; Pernot, J. [Institut Néel, CNRS-UJF, av. des Martyrs, Grenoble,38042 France (France); Teraji, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Metal/O-terminated diamond interfaces are analyzed by a variety of TEM techniques. • Thermal treatment is shown to modify structural and chemical interface properties. • Electrical behavior vs annealing is shown to be related with interface modification. • Interfaces are characterized with atomic resolution to probe inhomogeneities. • Oxide formation and modification is demonstrated in both Schottky diodes. - Abstract: Electrical and nano-structural properties of Zr and WC-based Schottky power diodes are compared and used for investigating oxide-related effects at the diamond/metal interface. Differences in Schottky barrier heights and ideality factors of both structures are shown to be related with the modification of the oxygen-terminated diamond/metal interface configuration. Oxide formation, oxide thickness variations and interfacial oxygen redistribution, associated with thermal treatment are demonstrated. Ideality factors close to ideality (n{sub WC} = 1.02 and n{sub Zr} = 1.16) are obtained after thermal treatment and are shown to be related with the relative oxygen content at the surface (OCR{sub WC} = 3.03 and OCR{sub Zr} = 1.5). Indeed, thermal treatment at higher temperatures is shown to promote an escape of oxygen for the case of the WC diode, while it generates a sharper accumulation of oxygen at the metal/diamond interface for the case of Zr diode. Therefore, the metal-oxygen affinity is shown to be a key parameter to improve diamond-based Schottky diodes.

  20. MICROSTRUCTURE, THERMO-PHYSICAL, MECHANICAL AND WEAR PROPERTIES OF IN-SITU FORMED BORON CARBIDE - ZIRCONIUM DIBORIDE COMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. R. Ch. Murthy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure, thermos-physical, mechanical and wear properties of in-situ formed B₄C- ZrB₂ composite were investigated. Coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal diffusivity and electrical resistivity of the composite were measured at different temperatures up to 1000 °C in inert atmosphere. Flexural strength was measured up to 900 °C in air. Friction and wear properties have been studied at different loads under reciprocative sliding, using a counter body (ball of cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co at ambient conditions. X-ray diffraction (XRD and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA confirmed the formation of ZrB₂ as the reaction product in the composite. Electrical resistivity was measured as 3.02 x 10-4Ω.m at 1000°C. Thermal conductivity measured at temperatures between 25°C and 1000 °C was in the range of 8 to 10 W/m-K. Flexural strength of the composite decreased with increase in temperature and reached a value of 92 MPa at 900°C. The average value of coefficient of friction (COF was measured as 0.15 at 20 N load and 10 Hz frequency. Increase of load from 5 N to 20 N resulted in decrease in COF from 0.24 to 0.15 at 10 Hz frequency. Specific wear rate data observed was of the order of 10-6 mm³/N-m. Both abrasive and tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanisms were observed on the worn surface of flat and counter body materials. At higher loads (≥10 N a tribo-chemical reaction wear mechanism was dominant.

  1. Comparative investigation of smooth polycrystalline diamond films on dental burs by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, Htet; Ahmed, Waqar; Rego, Christopher; Jackson, Mark; Polini, Riccardo

    2006-04-01

    Depositions of hot filament chemical vapor-deposited diamond on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) rotary cutting dental burs are presented. Conventional dental tools made of sintered polycrystalline diamond have a number of problems associated with the heterogeneity of the crystallite, decreased cutting efficiency, and short life. A preferential (111) faceted diamond was obtained after 15 h of deposition at a growth rate of 1.1 µm/h. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs and conventional sintered burs are mainly used in turning, milling, and drilling operations for machining metal ceramic hard alloys such as CoCr, composite teeth, and aluminum alloy in the dental laboratory. The influence of structure, the mechanical characteristics of both diamond grains and hard alloys on the wear behavior, as well as the regimen of grinding on diamond wear are considered. Erosion wear properties are also investigated under air-sand erosion testing. After machining with excessive cutting performance, calculations can be made on flank and crater wear areas. Diamond-coated WC-Co dental burs offered significantly better erosion and wear resistance compared with uncoated WC-Co tools and sintered burs.

  2. Chemical-vapor-infiltrated silicon nitride, boron nitride, and silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ventri, R.D.; Galasso, F.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports composites of carbon/chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) Si 3 N 4 , carbon/CVD BN, mullite/CVD SiC, and SiC yarn/CVD SiC prepared to determine if there were inherent toughness in these systems. The matrices were deposited at high enough temperatures to ensure that they were crystalline, which should make them more stable at high temperatures. The fiber-matrix bonding in the C/Si 3 N 4 composite appeared to be too strong; the layers of BN in the matrix of the C/BN were too weakly bonded; and the mullite/SiC composite was not as tough as the SiC/SiC composites. Only the SiC yarn/CVD SiC composite exhibited both strength and toughness

  3. Micromechanical analysis of a hybrid composite—effect of boron carbide particles on the elastic properties of basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Golla, Sai; Prasanthi, P.

    2016-11-01

    A fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite is an important material for structural application. The diversified application of FRP composites has become the center of attention for interdisciplinary research. However, improvements in the mechanical properties of this class of materials are still under research for different applications. The reinforcement of inorganic particles in a composite improves its structural properties due to their high stiffness. The present research work is focused on the prediction of the mechanical properties of the hybrid composites where continuous fibers are reinforced in a micro boron carbide particle mixed polypropylene matrix. The effectiveness of the addition of 30 wt. % of boron carbide (B4C) particle contributions regarding the longitudinal and transverse properties of the basalt fiber reinforced polymer composite at various fiber volume fractions is examined by finite element analysis (FEA). The experimental approach is the best way to determine the properties of the composite but it is expensive and time-consuming. Therefore, the finite element method (FEM) and analytical methods are the viable methods for the determination of the composite properties. The FEM results were obtained by adopting a micromechanics approach with the support of FEM. Assuming a uniform distribution of reinforcement and considering one unit-cell of the whole array, the properties of the composite materials are determined. The predicted elastic properties from FEA are compared with the analytical results. The results suggest that B4C particles are a good reinforcement for the enhancement of the transverse properties of basalt fiber reinforced polypropylene.

  4. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  5. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibrium in system Ti-B-Si-C, synthesis and phases composition of borides and carbides layers on titanic alloyVT-1 at electron beam treatment in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnyagina, N. N.; Khaltanova, V. M.; Lapina, A. E.; Dasheev, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Composite layers on the basis of carbides and borides the titan and silicon on titanic alloy VT-1 are generated at diffused saturation in vacuum. Formation in a composite of MAX phase Ti3SiC2 is shown. Thermodynamic research of phase equilibrium in systems Ti-Si-C and Ti-B-C in the conditions of high vacuum is executed. The thermodynamics, formation mechanisms of superfirm layers borides and carbides of the titan and silicon are investigated.

  6. Effect of diamond blend on the gas-separation properties of composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryuchkova, S. V.; Kostina, Yu. V.; Yablokova, M. Yu.; Gasanova, L. G.; Kepman, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    The morphological structure and gas transport properties of polyimide- and polyamide-imidebased rigid-chain polymers containing a fine carbon filler (a diamond blend) are studied. Gas transport properties are measured, and the effect exerted on these properties by intermolecular interaction between the functional groups of polymer chains and the fine filler is analyzed.

  7. A Revival of Waste: Atmospheric Pressure Nitrogen Plasma Jet Enhanced Jumbo Silicon/Silicon Carbide Composite in Lithium Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Hong; Chuang, Shang-I; Liu, Wei-Ren; Duh, Jenq-Gong

    2015-12-30

    In this study, a jumbo silicon/silicon carbide (Si/SiC) composite (JSC), a novel anode material source, was extracted from solar power industry cutting waste and used as a material for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), instead of manufacturing the nanolized-Si. Unlike previous methods used for preventing volume expansion and solid electrolyte interphase (SEI), the approach proposed here simply entails applying surface modification to JSC-based electrodes by using nitrogen-atmospheric pressure plasma jet (N-APPJ) treatment process. Surface organic bonds were rearranged and N-doped compounds were formed on the electrodes through applying different plasma treatment durations, and the qualitative examinations of before/after plasma treatment were identified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The surface modification resulted in the enhancement of electrochemical performance with stable capacity retention and high Coulombic efficiency. In addition, depth profile and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images were executed to determine the existence of Li-N matrix and how the nitrogen compounds change the surface conditions of the electrodes. The N-APPJ-induced rapid surface modification is a major breakthrough for processing recycled waste that can serve as anode materials for next-generation high-performance LIBs.

  8. Fabrication and characterization of aluminium hybrid composites reinforced with fly ash and silicon carbide through powder metallurgy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal Naim Shaikh, Mohd; Arif, Sajjad; Arif Siddiqui, M.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the fabrication and characterization of aluminium hybrid composites (AMCs) reinforced with commonly available and inexpensive fly ash (FA, 0, 5, 10 and 15 wt.%) particles along silicon carbide (SiC) using powder metallurgy process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed for microstructural characterization and phase identification respectively. Wear behaviour were investigated using pin-on-disc wear tester for the different combinations of wear parameters like load (10, 20 and 30 N), sliding speed (1.5, 2 and 2.5 m s‑1) and sliding distance (300, 600 and 900 m). SEM confirms the uniform distribution of FA and SiC in aluminium matrix. The hardness of Al/SiC/FA is increased by 20%–25% while wear rate decreased by 15%–40%. From wear analysis, sliding distance was the least significant parameter influencing the wear loss followed by applied load and sliding speed. To identify the mechanism of wear, worn out surface were also analysed by SEM.

  9. High thermal conductivity of graphite fiber silicon carbide composites for fusion reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, L.L.; Balden, M.; Causey, R.A.; Atsumi, H.

    2002-01-01

    The benefits of using CVI SiC/graphite fiber composites as low tritium retaining, high thermal conductivity composites for fusion applications are presented. Three-dimensional woven composites have been chemically vapor infiltrated with SiC and their thermophysical properties measured. One material used an intermediate grade graphite fiber in all directions (Amoco P55) while a second material used very high thermal conductive fiber (Amoco K-1100) in the high fiber density direction. The overall void was less than 20%. Strength as measured by four-point bending was comparable to those of SiC/SiC composite. The room temperature thermal conductivity in the high conductivity direction was impressive for both materials, with values >70 W/m K for the P-55 and >420 W/m K for the K-1100 variant. The thermal conductivity was measured as a function of temperature and exceeds the highest thermal conductivity of CVD SiC currently available at fusion relevant temperatures (>600 deg. C). Limited data on the irradiation-induced degradation in thermal conductivity is consistent with carbon fiber composite literature

  10. Interfacial bonding and friction in silicon carbide (filament)-reinforced ceramic- and glass-matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bright, J.D.; Shetty, D.K.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports interfacial shear strength and interfacial sliding friction stress assessed in unidirectional SiC-filament-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) and borosilicate glass composites and 0/90 cross-ply reinforced borosilicate glass composite using a fiber pushout test technique. The interface debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load were measured for varying lengths of the embedded fibers by continuously monitoring the load during debonding and pushout of single fibers in finite-thickness specimens. The dependences of the debonding load and the maximum sliding friction load on the initial embedded lengths of the fibers were in agreement with nonlinear shear-lag models. An iterative regression procedure was used to evaluate the interfacial properties, shear debond strength (τ d ), and sliding friction stress (τ f ), from the embedded fiber length dependences of the debonding load and the maximum frictional sliding load, respectively. The shear-lag model and the analysis of sliding friction permit explicit evaluation of a coefficient of sliding friction (μ) and a residual compressive stress on the interface (σ 0 ). The cross-ply composite showed a significantly higher coefficient of interfacial friction as compared to the unidirectional composites

  11. Microstructure formations in copper-silicon carbide composites during mechanical alloying in a planetary activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudashov, D.V.; Aksenov, A.A.; Portnoy, V.K.; Zolotorevskii, V.S. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys, Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Physical Metallurgy of Non-ferrous Metals; Klemm, V.; Martin, U.; Oettel, H. [Technical Univ., Freiberg (Germany). Inst. of Physical Metallurgy

    2000-12-01

    In the present paper the structure formation process of the powder metallurgical produced copper composite materials was studied. The volume part of the reinforcing SiC particles was varied from 5 to 25 wt.-%. It was discovered that while milling in a planetary activator first of all a ''puff- pastry'' structure appeared. There are important differences between this structure formation process and other known processes of milling. The homogeneous distribution of SiC particles was obtained after 60-100 minutes of treatment in ''Gefest11-3'' planetary activator. Phase composition of the powder and composite samples at the interface SiC/Cu (particles/matrix) was analysed after consolidation of the powder mixture and after the high temperature annealing. It was still determined that not only pure copper powder can be as a starting material for Cu-composites production used, but also the wastes of copper mechanical treatment, for instance, copper shaving. (orig.)

  12. Microstructure characterization of laser-deposited titanium carbide and zirconium-based titanium metal matrix composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ochonogor, OF

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this work, the technique is used to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) by using an elementally blended feedstock combining metal and ceramic powders in the melt pool, which melt and solidify to create the required morphology. Ti6Al4V + TiC MMCs were...

  13. Composition and morphology of metal-containing diamond-like carbon films obtained by reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbella, C.; Pascual, E.; Oncins, G.; Canal, C.; Andujar, J.L.; Bertran, E.

    2005-01-01

    The addition of metal atoms within the matrix of diamond-like carbon films leads to the improvement of their mechanical properties. The present paper discusses the relationship between the composition and morphology of metal-containing (W, Nb, Mo, Ti) diamond-like carbon thin films deposited at room temperature by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metal target in an argon and methane atmosphere. Composition was measured either by electron microprobe technique or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and shows a smooth variation with relative methane flow. High relative methane flows lead to a bulk saturation of carbon atoms, which leads to a lack of homogeneity in the films as confirmed by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cross-section micrographs were observed by transmission electron microscopy and revealed a structure strongly influenced by the metal inserted and its abundance. The surface pattern obtained by scanning electrochemical potential microscopy provided the metallicity distribution. These measurements were completed with atomic force microscopy of the surface. Selected area electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction measurements provided data of the crystalline structure along with nano-crystallite size. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy provided images of these crystallites

  14. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  15. Effects of superfine refractory carbide additives on microstructure and mechanical properties of TiB2–TiC+Al2O3 composite ceramic cutting tool materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Bin; Ji, Wenbin; Huang, Chuanzhen; Wang, Jun; Li, Shasha; Xu, Kaitao

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The superfine carbides determined the mechanical properties of composites. • Superfine HfC or TaC caused some oxide impurities in composites. • Superfine VC or NbC refined and homogenized the microstructure. • Failure of composites containing HfC or TaC was produced by larger grains. • Composite containing VC exhibited more bridging and transcrystalline failure. -- Abstract: A study to increase the mechanical properties of TiB 2 –TiC+Al 2 O 3 composite ceramic cutting tool material by using superfine refractory carbide additives is presented. Four superfine refractory carbides are considered to investigate their effects on the phase composition, element distribution, grain size, fracture surface, crack propagation of the metal ceramic. The physicochemical properties of superfine carbides, such as chemical activities and atom radius, were found to have the significant effects on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the metal ceramic. Hafnium carbide (HfC) and Tantalum carbide (TaC) reduced the mechanical properties of the metal ceramic because of their poor solubility with the Ni binder phase and the formation of oxides. The mechanical properties of the metal ceramic were increased by the addition of superfine niobium carbide (NbC) and vanadium carbide (VC), and their optimum values were a flexural strength of 1100 ± 62 MPa, fracture toughness of 8.5 ± 0.8 MPa.m1/2 and hardness of 21.53 ± 0.36 GPa, respectively, when 3.2 wt% superfine VC was used

  16. Effects of hydrogenation on thermal conductivity of ultrananocrystalline diamond/amorphous carbon composite films prepared via coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeichi, Satoshi; Nishiyama, Takashi; Tabara, Mitsuru; Kawawaki, Shuichi; Kohno, Masamichi; Takahashi, Koji; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2018-06-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) composite (UNCD/a-C:H) and UNCD/non-hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite (UNCD/a-C) films were prepared via coaxial arc plasma deposition, and their thermal conductivity and interfacial conductance in grain boundaries were measured using a time-domain thermoreflectance method. The interfacial conductance was estimated to be 1,010 and 4,892 MW/(m2·K) for UNCD/a-C:H and UNCD/a-C films, respectively. The reasons for the hydrogenated film having lower interfacial conductance than the non-hydrogenated film are 1) the reduced number of carriers that contribute to heat transport and 2) the hydrogen atoms, which are preferentially located at the grain boundaries and enhance phonon scattering.

  17. Influence of the gas phase composition on nanocrystalline diamond films prepared by MWCVD

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Popov, C.; Jelínek, Miroslav; Boycheva, S.; Vorlíček, Vladimír; Kulisch, W.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 23, - (2005), s. 31-34 ISSN 1422-6375 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA1010110 Grant - others:European Community Marie Curie Fellowship(XE) HPMF-CT-2002-01713 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : microwave plasma CVD * nanocrystalline diamond films * characterization Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  18. Fracture and Residual Characterization of Tungsten Carbide Cobalt Coatings on High Strength Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Donald S

    2003-01-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt coatings applied via high velocity oxygen fuel thermal spray deposition are essentially anisotropic composite structures with aggregates of tungsten carbide particles bonded...

  19. Preparation of silicon carbide/carbon fiber composites through high-temperature spark plasma sintering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehsan Ghasali

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the potentials of spark plasma sintering (SPS integrated with high temperature process that can enable sintering of SiC/Cf composites without any sintering aids. The random distribution of carbon fibers was obtained through mixing composite components in ethanol by using a shaker mill for 10 min. The corresponding sintering process was carried out at 1900 and 2200 °C with 50 MPa pressure applied at maximum temperature. The results showed that 89 ± 0.9 and 97 ± 0.8% of the theoretical density can be obtained for sintering temperatures of 1900 and 2200 °C, respectively. The densification curves were plotted to monitor sintering behavior with punch displacement changes. The appropriate bonding between SiC particles and carbon fibers was detected using FE-SEM for sample which was sintered at 2200 °C. The clear maximum in hardness (2992 ± 33 Vickers, bending strength (427 ± 26 MPa and fracture toughness (4.2 ± 0.3 MPa m1/2 were identified for sample sintered at 2200 °C. XRD investigations supposed that SiC and carbon were the only crystalline phases in both sintered samples.

  20. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  1. Conditions for forming composite carbon nanotube-diamond like carbon material that retain the good properties of both materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Wei, E-mail: wei.ren@helsinki.fi; Avchaciov, Konstantin; Nordlund, Kai [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 43, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Iyer, Ajai; Koskinen, Jari [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, School of Chemical Technology, Aalto University, P.O. Box 16200, 00076 Espoo (Finland); Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I. [NanoMaterials Group, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science, P.O. Box 15100, 00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2015-11-21

    Carbon nanotubes are of wide interest due to their excellent properties such as tensile strength and electrical and thermal conductivity, but are not, when placed alone on a substrate, well resistant to mechanical wear. Diamond-like carbon (DLC), on the other hand, is widely used in applications due to its very good wear resistance. Combining the two materials could provide a very durable pure carbon nanomaterial enabling to benefit from the best properties of both carbon allotropes. However, the synthesis of high-quality diamond-like carbon uses energetic plasmas, which can damage the nanotubes. From previous works it is neither clear whether the quality of the tubes remains good after DLC deposition, nor whether the DLC above the tubes retains the high sp{sup 3} bonding fraction. In this work, we use experiments and classical molecular dynamics simulations to study the mechanisms of DLC formation on various carbon nanotube compositions. The results show that high-sp{sup 3}-content DLC can be formed provided the deposition conditions allow for sidewards pressure to form from a substrate close beneath the tubes. Under optimal DLC formation energies of around 40–70 eV, the top two nanotube atom layers are fully destroyed by the plasma deposition, but layers below this can retain their structural integrity.

  2. Unique graphitized mesophase carbon microbead@niobium carbide-derived carbon composites as high performance anode materials of lithium-ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, Xiulan; Cong, Ye; Yu, Yanyan; Li, Xuanke; Zhang, Jiang; Dong, Zhijun; Yuan, Guanming; Cui, Zhengwei; Li, Yanjun

    2017-01-01

    To meet the requirements of the energy storage materials for high energy density and high power density, unique niobium carbide-derived carbon (NbC-CDC) coated graphitized mesophase carbon microbead (GMCMB) composites (GMCMB@NbC-CDC) with core-shell structure were prepared by chlorinating the precursor of graphitization mesophase carbon microbead@niobium carbide. The microstructure of NbC-CDC was characterized as mainly amorphous carbon combined with short and curved sheets of graphene, and the order degree of carbon layers increases with the chlorination temperature. The composites exhibited a tunable specific surface area and micropore volume, with micropore size of 0.6∼0.7 nm. Compared with the pure GMCMB, the GMCMB@NbC-CDC composites manifested higher charge (726.9 mAh g"−"1) and discharge capacities (458.9 mAh g"−"1) at the first cycle, which was probably that Li ions could insert into not only carbon layers of GMCMB but also micropores of NbC-CDC. After 100 cycles, the discharge capacity of GMCMB@NbC-CDC chlorinated at 800 °C still kept 384.6 mAh g"−"1, which was much higher than that of the pure GMCMB (305.2 mAh g"−"1). Furthermore, the GMCMB@NbC-CDC composites presented better rate performance at higher current densities.

  3. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  4. Diamond film growth with modification properties of adhesion between substrate and diamond film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Setasuwon P.

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Diamond film growth was studied using chemical vapor deposition (CVD. A special equipment was build in-house, employing a welding torch, and substrate holder with a water-cooling system. Acetylene and oxygen were used as combustion gases and the substrate was tungsten carbide cobalt. It was found that surface treatments, such as diamond powder scratching or acid etching, increase the adhesion and prevent the film peel-off. Diamond powder scratching and combined diamond powder scratching with acid etching gave the similar diamond film structure with small grain and slightly rough surface. The diamond film obtained with both treatments has high adhesion and can withstand internal stress better than ones obtained by untreated surface or acid etching alone. It was also found that higher substrate temperature produced smoother surface and more uniform diamond grain.

  5. Cu incorporated amorphous diamond like carbon (DLC) composites: An efficient electron field emitter over a wide range of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sk Faruque; Alam, Md Shahbaz; Mukherjee, Nillohit

    2018-03-01

    The effect of temperature on the electron field emission properties of copper incorporated amorphous diamond like carbon (a-Cu:DLC) thin films have been reported. The a-Cu:DLC thin films have been deposited on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass and silicon substrate by the radio frequency sputtering process. The chemical composition of the films was investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the micro structure was established using high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The sp2 and sp3 bonding ratio in the a-Cu:DLC have been analyzed by the Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy studies. The material showed excellent electron field emission properties; which was optimized by varying the copper atomic percentage and temperature of the films. It was found that the threshold field and effective emission barrier were reduced significantly by copper incorporation as well as temperature and a detailed explanation towards emission mechanism has been provided.

  6. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of stir-cast Zn–27Al based composites reinforced with rice husk ash, silicon carbide, and graphite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo Alaneme

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and mechanical properties of Zn–27Al based composites reinforced with rice husk ash (RHA, silicon carbide (SiC, and graphite (Cg particles have been investigated. The Zn–27Al composites consisting of varied weight ratios of the reinforcing materials were produced using the stir casting process. Hardness test, tensile properties evaluation, fracture toughness determination, and microstructural examination, were used to characterize the composites produced. Results show that the microstructures of the composites are similar, consisting of the dendritic structure of the Zn–27Al alloy matrix with fine dispersion of the reinforcing particles. The hardness of the composites decreased with increase in the weight percent of RHA (and corresponding decrease in SiC weight percent in the reinforcement. The tensile strength and yield strength decreased slightly with increase in the weight ratio of RHA in the composites with a maximum of 8.5% and 9.6% reductions respectively observed for as much as 40% RHA (corresponding to 40% reduction in SiC in the hybrid reinforcement. Although some of the composite compositions containing RHA had slightly higher % elongation values compared with those without RHA, it was generally observed that the % elongation was invariant to the composite RHA content. The fracture toughness of the composites increases with increase in the weight percent of RHA with as much as a 20% increase obtained for as much as 40% RHA (corresponding to 40% reduction in SiC in the hybrid reinforcement.

  7. Tungsten-nanodiamond composite powders produced by ball milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, D., E-mail: daniela.nunes@ist.utl.pt [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Livramento, V. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Mardolcar, U.V. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Centro de Ciencias Moleculares e Materiais, Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, 1749-016 Lisboa (Portugal); Correia, J.B. [LNEG, Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal); Carvalho, P.A. [ICEMS, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Bioengenharia, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-07-15

    The major challenge in producing tungsten-nanodiamond composites by ball milling lies in successfully dispersing carbon nanoparticles in the metallic matrix while keeping carbide formation at a minimum. Processing windows for carbide minimization have been established through systematic variation of the nanodiamond fraction, milling energy and milling time. Materials characterization has been carried out by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and microhardness testing. Nanostructured matrices with homogeneously dispersed particles that preserved the diamond structure have been produced. Differential thermal analysis has been used to evaluate the composites thermal stability.

  8. Creep behavior and wear resistance of Al 5083 based hybrid composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and boron carbide (B{sub 4}C)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alizadeh, Ali [Faculty of Materials & Manufacturing Processes, Malek-e-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Alireza, E-mail: alirezaabdollahi1366@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials & Manufacturing Processes, Malek-e-Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biukani, Hootan [Faculty of Engineering, South Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-11-25

    In the current research, aluminum based hybrid composite reinforced with boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was produced by powder metallurgy method. creep behavior, wear resistance, surface roughness, and hardness of the samples were investigated. To prepare the samples, Al 5083 powder was milled with boron carbide particles and carbon nanotubes using planetary ball mill under argon atmosphere with ball-to-powder weight ratio of 10:1 for 5 h. Afterwards, the milled powders were formed by hot press process at 380{sup °}C and then were sintered at 585{sup °}C under argon atmosphere for 2 h. There was shown to be an increase in hardness values of composite with an increase in B{sub 4}C content. The micrograph of worn surfaces indicate a delamination mechanism due to the presence of CNTs and abrasion mechanism in composite containing 10 vol.%B{sub 4}C. Moreover, it was shown that increasing B{sub 4}C content increases the wear resistance by 3 times under a load of 20 N and 10 times under a load of 10 N compared to CNTs-reinforced composite. surface roughness of the composite containing 5 vol.%CNT has shown to be more than other samples. The results of creep test showed that adding carbon nanotubes increases creep rate of Al 5083 alloy; however, adding B{sub 4}C decreases its creep rate. - Highlights: • Al 5083/(CNTs + B{sub 4}C) hybrid composite was produced by powder metallurgy method. • Creep behavior, wear resistance, surface roughness, and Hardness of samples were investigated. • Addition of CNTs to Al 5083 matrix reduces alloy hardness, wear resistance and creep strength. • By addition of B{sub 4}C and composite hybridization, creep strength and wear resistance increased. • Surface roughness of Al-5 vol.%CNT has shown to be more than other samples.

  9. Construction of reduced graphene oxide supported molybdenum carbides composite electrode as high-performance anode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Minghua; Zhang, Jiawei [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and Applications (Ministry of Education), and School of Applied Science, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Chen, Qingguo, E-mail: qgchen@263.net [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and Applications (Ministry of Education), and School of Applied Science, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Qi, Meili [Key Laboratory of Engineering Dielectric and Applications (Ministry of Education), and School of Applied Science, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Xia, Xinhui, E-mail: helloxxh@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials and Applications for Batteries of Zhejiang Province, and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Highlights: • Reduced graphene oxide supported molybdenum carbides are prepared by two-step strategy. • A unique sheet-on-sheet integrated nanostructure is favorable for fast ion/electron transfer. • The integrated electrode shows excellent Li ion storage performance. - Abstract: Metal carbides are emerging as promising anodes for advanced lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Herein we report reduced graphene oxide (RGO) supported molybdenum carbides (Mo{sub 2}C) integrated electrode by the combination of solution and carbothermal methods. In the designed integrated electrode, Mo{sub 2}C nanoparticles are uniformly dispersed among graphene nanosheets, forming a unique sheet-on-sheet integrated nanostructure. As anode of LIBs, the as-prepared Mo{sub 2}C-RGO integrated electrode exhibits noticeable electrochemical performances with a high reversible capacity of 850 mAh g{sup −1} at 100 mA g{sup −1}, and 456 mAh g{sup −1} at 1000 mA g{sup −1}, respectively. Moreover, the Mo{sub 2}C-RGO integrated electrode shows excellent cycling life with a capacity of ∼98.6 % at 1000 mA g{sup −1} after 400 cycles. Our research may pave the way for construction of high-performance metal carbides anodes of LIBs.

  10. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use .... or open dumping which have effect on surface and ... Table 1: Chemical Composition of Calcium Carbide Waste and Cement.

  11. Modular fabrication and characterization of complex silicon carbide composite structures Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART) Research Final Report (Feb 2015 – May 2017)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalifa, Hesham [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2017-08-03

    Advanced ceramic materials exhibit properties that enable safety and fuel cycle efficiency improvements in advanced nuclear reactors. In order to fully exploit these desirable properties, new processing techniques are required to produce the complex geometries inherent to nuclear fuel assemblies and support structures. Through this project, the state of complex SiC-SiC composite fabrication for nuclear components has advanced significantly. New methods to produce complex SiC-SiC composite structures have been demonstrated in the form factors needed for in-core structural components in advanced high temperature nuclear reactors. Advanced characterization techniques have been employed to demonstrate that these complex SiC-SiC composite structures provide the strength, toughness and hermeticity required for service in harsh reactor conditions. The complex structures produced in this project represent a significant step forward in leveraging the excellent high temperature strength, resistance to neutron induced damage, and low neutron cross section of silicon carbide in nuclear applications.

  12. Diamond identifaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    X-ray topography on diamonds allows for unique identification of diamonds. The method described consists of the registration of crystal defects, inclusions etc. of a diamond, resulting in a 'finger print' of the individual jewel which can only be changed by its complete destruction

  13. Crystallization of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a crystallization process of nodular cast iron with carbides having a different chemical composition have been presented. It have been found, that an increase of molybdenum above 0,30% causes the ledeburutic carbides crystallization after (γ+ graphite eutectic phase crystallization. When Mo content is lower, these carbides crystallize as a pre-eutectic phase. In this article causes of this effect have been given.

  14. Silicon/Wolfram Carbide@Graphene composite: enhancing conductivity and structure stability in amorphous-silicon for high lithium storage performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Wei; Hu, Renzong; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Hanying; Liu, Jiangwen; Yang, Lichun; Wang, Haihui; Zhu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Two-step ball milling was used to produce an amorphous-Si/WC@Graphene(SW@G) composite. • Concrete-like core-shell structure with high stability was designed. • Multiscale WC particle strengthen the inside structure. • Graphene coating outside much enhanced the cycling stability and conductivity. • The SW@G anode exhibited long cycle life and superior volumetric capacity. - Abstract: Improving the electron conductivity and lithiated structure stability for Si anodes can result in high stable capacity in cells. A Silicon/Wolfram Carbide@Graphene (SW@G) composite anode is designed and produced by a simple two-step ball milling the mixture of coarse-grained Si with good conductive wolfram carbide (WC) and graphite. The SW@G composite consists of multiple-scale WC particles, which are uniformly distributed in amorphous Si matrices, and wrapped by graphene nanosheets (GNs) on the outside. Owing to the unique concrete-like core-shell structure, the wrapping of GNs on the Si improves the conductivity and structural stability of the composite. The inner WC particles which tightly connect the Si and graphene act as the cornerstone to resist large volumetric expansion of Si during charge/discharge, and in particular serve as the high-speed channels of electrons as well as provide more interface paths for Li + to accelerate their transfer inside the Si. These contribute to the excellent electrochemical properties of SW@G composite anode, including high volumetric capacity (three times higher than that of graphite), superior rate capability, and long-life stable cycleability. The synthetic method developed in this work paves the way for large-scale manufacturing of high performance Li storage anodes using commercially available materials and technologies.

  15. Automatic generation of 2D micromechanical finite element model of silicon–carbide/aluminum metal matrix composites: Effects of the boundary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional finite element (FE) simulations of the deformation and damage evolution of Silicon–Carbide (SiC) particle reinforced aluminum alloy composite including interphase are carried out for different microstructures and particle volume fractions of the composites. A program is developed...... for the automatic generation of 2D micromechanical FE-models with randomly distributed SiC particles. In order to simulate the damage process in aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles, a damage parameter based on the stress triaxial indicator and the maximum principal stress criterion based elastic brittle damage...... model are developed within Abaqus/Standard Subroutine USDFLD, respectively. An Abaqus/Standard Subroutine MPC, which allows defining multi-point constraints, is developed to realize the symmetric boundary condition (SBC) and periodic boundary condition (PBC). A series of computational experiments...

  16. Structure and properties of diamond and diamond-like films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clausing, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is broken into four parts: (1) introduction, (2) natural IIa diamond, (3) importance of structure and composition, and (4) control of structure and properties. Conclusions of this discussion are that properties of chemical vapor deposited diamond films can compare favorably with natural diamond, that properties are anisotropic and are a strong function of structure and crystal perfection, that crystal perfection and morphology are functions of growth conditions and can be controlled, and that the manipulation of texture and thereby surface morphology and internal crystal perfection is an important step in optimizing chemically deposited diamond films for applications.

  17. Perspectives of application of synthetic diamonds in polyurethane compositions for development of new high thermal conductivity system of isolation of powerful turbogenerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kensits'kij, O.G.; Vigovs'kij, O.V.; Khvalyin, D.Yi.

    2017-01-01

    Reviewed and analyzed components of modern high-voltage insulation of electrical machines. The expediency of increasing of heat-conducting properties of the system of isolation of stator winding of powerful turbogenerators is justified. The main ways of improving heat transfer in the insulation system the stator windings of the turbogenerators are presented and analyzed. Perspectives of application of composite material based on polyurethane with additives of synthetic diamonds for development of new high thermal conductivity system of isolation of powerful electrical machines are analyzed. The technology by which was created the prototype of the insulating material with the application of diamond powder in a polyurethane composition is described. Executed laboratory experimental researches of the electrophysical parameters of the sample developed insulating material. That showed the perspective of this direction of perfection of isolation.

  18. Helium diffusion in irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    Boron carbide has been internationally adopted as the neutron absorber material in the control and safety rods of large fast breeder reactors. Its relatively large neutron capture cross section at high neutron energies provides sufficient reactivity worth with a minimum of core space. In addition, the commercial availability of boron carbide makes it attractive from a fabrication standpoint. Instrumented irradiation experiments in EBR-II have provided continuous helium release data on boron carbide at a variety of operating temperatures. Although some microstructural and compositional variations were examined in these experiments most of the boron carbide was prototypic of that used in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The density of the boron carbide pellets was approximately 92% of theoretical. The boron carbide pellets were approximately 1.0 cm in diameter and possessed average grain sizes that varied from 8 to 30 μm. Pellet centerline temperatures were continually measured during the irradiation experiments

  19. AlTiN layer effect on mechanical properties of Ti-doped diamond-like carbon composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang Xiaolu; Yang Huisheng; Gao Kewei; Wang Yanbin; Volinsky, Alex A.

    2011-01-01

    Ti/Ti-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) and Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC composite coatings were deposited by magnetron sputtering on W18Cr4V high speed steel substrates. The effect of the AlTiN support layer on the properties of these composite coatings was investigated through microstructure and mechanical properties characterization, including hardness, elastic modulus, coefficient of friction and wear properties measured by scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, scratch and ball-on-disk friction tests. Ti and AlTiN interlayers have a columnar structure with 50-80 nm grains. The hardness and elastic modulus of Ti/Ti-DLC and Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC coatings is 25.9 ± 0.4, 222.2 ± 6.3 GPa and 19.3 ± 1, 205.6 ± 6.7 GPa, respectively. Adhesion of Ti-DLC, Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC and AlTiN/Ti-DLC coatings expressed as the critical lateral force is 26.5 N, 38.2 N, and 47.8 N, respectively. Substrate coefficient of friction without coatings is 0.44, and it is 0.1 for Ti/Ti-DLC and Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC coatings. Wear resistance of Ti/AlTiN/Ti-DLC composite coatings is much higher than Ti/Ti-DLC coatings based on the wear track width of 169.8 and 73.2 μm, respectively, for the same experimental conditions.

  20. A new route to process diamond wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Filgueira

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available We propose an original route to process diamond wires, denominated In Situ Technology, whose fabrication involves mechanical conformation processes, such as rotary forging, copper tubes restacking, and thermal treatments, such as sintering and recrystallisation of a bronze 4 wt.% diamond composite. Tensile tests were performed, reaching an ultimate tensile strength (UTS of 230 MPa for the diameter of Æ = 1.84 mm. Scanning electron microscopy showed the diamond crystals distribution along the composite rope during its manufacture, as well as the diamond adhesion to the bronze matrix. Cutting tests were carried out with the processed wire, showing a probable performance 4 times higher than the diamond sawing discs, however its probable performance was about 5 to 8 times less than the conventional diamond wires (pearl system due to the low abrasion resistance of the bronze matrix, and low adhesion between the pair bronze-diamond due to the use of not metallised diamond single crystals.

  1. Surface analytical investigation of diamond coatings and nucleation processes by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, R.

    1993-10-01

    Imaging SIMS for the investigation of substrate surfaces: the influence of the substrate surface on diamond nucleation is a major topic in the investigation of the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of diamond. It is well known that the nucleation density can be enhanced by scratching the substrate surface with abrasive powders. Diamond can nucleate at scratches or at residues of the polishing material. In the present work the surface of refractory metals (Mo, Nb, Ta, W) polished with silicon carbide and diamond powder is studied by imaging (2- or 3-D) secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). In first experiments the distribution of SiC and/or diamond residues after polishing was determined. The reaction of diamond with the substrate during heating to deposition temperatures was investigated. Investigation of WC/Co hardmetal substrates: it is well known that Co contained in the binder phase of the hard metal inhibits a strong adhesion between the diamond film and the substrate, which is need for an application as cutting tool. Several attempts to improve the adhesion have been reported up to now. In this work a pre-treatment procedure leading to the formation of Co compounds (borides and silicides) which are stable under diamond deposition conditions were investigated. Furthermore, the application of intermediate sputter layers consisting of chromium and titanium were studied. Investigation of P-doped diamond coatings: in the quaternary phase diagram C-P-B-N exist some phases with diamond structure and superhard phases (e.g BP, c-BN). Also a hypothetical superhard phase of the composition C 3 N 4 is predicted. A scientific objective is the synthesis of such phases by chemical vapour deposition. An increase of the phosphorus concentration effects a distinct change in the morphology of the deposited coatings. A major advantage of SIMS is that the concentration profiles can be measured through the whole film, due to the sputter removal of the sample, and the interface

  2. Effects of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties of silicon carbide composites fabricated by nano-infiltration and transient eutectic-phase process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyanagi, T.; Hinoki, T.; Shimoda, K.; Ozawa, K.; Katoh, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Unidirectional silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites fabricated by a nano-infiltration and transient eutectic-phase (NITE) process were irradiated with neutrons at 830°C to 5.9 dpa, and at 1270°C to 5.8 dpa. The in-plane and trans-thickness tensile and the inter-laminar shear properties were evaluated at ambient temperature. The mechanical characteristics, including the quasi-ductile behavior, the proportional limit stress, and the ultimate tensile strength, were retained subsequent to irradiation. Analysis of the stress–strain hysteresis loop indicated the increased fiber/matrix interface friction and the decreased residual stresses. The inter-laminar shear strength exhibited a significant decrease following irradiation. (author)

  3. Processing map and hot working mechanisms in a P/M TiAl alloy composite with in situ carbide and silicide dispersions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K.P.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: Mechanical alloying of Ti and Al with small additions of Si and C was used to synthesize metastable phases, which were incorporated in Ti-Al matrices using powder metallurgy techniques. These metastable phases (or also called as precursors), at higher temperatures, transformed in situ into very fine hard reinforcements that develop coherent interface with the surrounding matrix. Typically, Ti5Si3 and TiC are the end products after the synthesis of composite. In this study, hot working behavior of such composites has been studied using the concepts of processing maps to identify the safe and best processing conditions that should be adopted while forming this composite. Also, kinetic analysis of hot deformation has been performed to identify the dominant deformation mechanism. The results are compared with that of base TiAl matrix. The powder metallurgy route offers the advantage of working the material at much lower temperatures compared to the traditional cast and forge route. - Abstract: A titanium aluminide alloy composite with in situ carbide and silicide dispersions has been synthesized by mixing 90% of matrix with elemental composition of 46Ti-46Al-4Nb-2Cr-2Mn and 10% precursor with composition 55Ti-27Al-12Si-6C prepared by mechanical alloying. The powder mixture was blended for 2 h followed by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1150 deg. C for 4 h under a pressure of 150 MPa. In addition to TiAl alloy matrix, the microstructure of the HIP'ed billet showed a small volume fraction of Nb-rich intermetallic phase along with carbide and silicide dispersions formed in situ during HIP'ing. Cylindrical specimens from the HIP'ed billets were compressed at temperatures and strain rates in the ranges of 800-1050 deg. C and 0.0001-1 s -1 . The flow curves exhibited flow softening leading to a steady-state flow at strain rates lower than 0.01 s -1 while fracture occurred at higher strain rates. The processing map developed on the basis of flow stress at

  4. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  5. Mechanical pretreatment for improved adhesion of diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toenshoff, H.K.; Mohlfeld, A.; Gey, C.; Winkler, J.

    1999-01-01

    Diamond coatings are mainly used in cutting processes due to their tribological characteristics. They show a high hardness, low friction coefficient, high wear resistance and good chemical inertness. In relation to polycrystalline diamond (PCD)-tipped cutting inserts, especially the advantageous chemical stability of diamond coatings is superior as no binder phases between diamond grains are used. However, the deposition of adherent high-quality diamond coatings has been found difficult. Thus, substrate pretreatment is utilised to improve film adhesion. This investigation is based on water peening of the substrate material before coating. The investigation revealed best results for diamond film adhesion on pretreated substrates compared to conventional diamond coatings on cemented carbide tools applied with the CVD hot-filament process. In final cutting tests with increased film adhesion trough water peened cutting tools an improved wear behavior was detected. (orig.)

  6. An electrical conductivity inspection methodology of polycrystalline diamond cutters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanov, G.; Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K.; Ludwig, R.

    2012-05-01

    The polycrystalline diamond cutter (PDC) is widely used in oil and gas drilling operations. It is manufactured by sintering diamond powder onto a tungsten carbide substrate at 6 GPa and 1500 C. During sintering, molten cobalt from the substrate infiltrates the diamond table. The residual metal content correlates with cutter performance. We present an instrument that employs electrical impedance tomography capable of imaging the 3D metal content distribution in the diamond table. These images can be used to predict cutter performance as well as detect flaws.

  7. Diamond identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, A.R.

    1979-01-01

    Methods of producing sets of records of the internal defects of diamonds as a means of identification of the gems by x-ray topography are described. To obtain the records one can either use (a) monochromatic x-radiation reflected at the Bragg angle from crystallographically equivalent planes of the diamond lattice structure, Bragg reflections from each such plane being recorded from a number of directions of view, or (b) white x-radiation incident upon the diamond in directions having a constant angular relationship to each equivalent axis of symmetry of the diamond lattice structure, Bragg reflections being recorded for each direction of the incident x-radiation. By either method an overall point-to-point three dimensional representation of the diamond is produced. (U.K.)

  8. Reinforcement architectures and thermal fatigue in diamond particle-reinforced aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoebel, M., E-mail: michaels@mail.tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Degischer, H.P. [Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Vaucher, S. [Advanced Materials Processing, EMPA - Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Feuerwerkstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Hofmann, M. [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Lichtenbergstrasse 1, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Cloetens, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2010-11-15

    Aluminum reinforced by 60 vol.% diamond particles has been investigated as a potential heat sink material for high power electronics. Diamond (CD) is used as reinforcement contributing its high thermal conductivity (TC {approx} 1000 W mK{sup -1}) and low coefficient thermal expansion (CTE {approx} 1 ppm K{sup -1}). An Al matrix enables shaping and joining of the composite components. Interface bonding is improved by limited carbide formation induced by heat treatment and even more by SiC coating of diamond particles. An AlSi7 matrix forms an interpenetrating composite three-dimensional (3D) network of diamond particles linked by Si bridges percolated by a ductile {alpha}-Al matrix. Internal stresses are generated during temperature changes due to the CTE mismatch of the constituents. The stress evolution was determined in situ by neutron diffraction during thermal cycling between room temperature and 350 deg. C (soldering temperature). Tensile stresses build up in the Al/CD composites: during cooling <100 MPa in a pure Al matrix, but around 200 MPa in the Al in an AlSi7 matrix. Compressive stresses build up in Al during heating of the composite. The stress evolution causes changes in the void volume fraction and interface debonding by visco-plastic deformation of the Al matrix. Thermal fatigue damage has been revealed by high resolution synchrotron tomography. An interconnected diamond-Si 3D network formed with an AlSi7 matrix promises higher stability with respect to cycling temperature exposure.

  9. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartal, Muhammet, E-mail: kartal@sakarya.edu.tr [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Uysal, Mehmet [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Gul, Harun [Duzce University, Gumusova Vocational School, 81850 Duzce (Turkey); Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Effect of surfactant concentration on the co-deposited WC was investigated. • In the Ni matrix significantly high hardness was achieved by WC co-deposition. • Optimum surfactant resulted in obtaining superior wear resistance in the Ni. • Friction coefficient was decreased by WC co-deposition in the Ni matrix. - Abstract: A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55–65%).

  10. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Muhammet; Uysal, Mehmet; Gul, Harun; Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-11-01

    A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55-65%).

  11. Status and applications of diamond and diamond-like materials: An emerging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Recent discoveries that make possible the growth of crystalline diamond by chemical vapor deposition offer the potential for a wide variety of new applications. This report takes a broad look at the state of the technology following from these discoveries in relation to other allied materials, such as high-pressure diamond and cubic boron nitride. Most of the potential defense, space, and commercial applications are related to diamond's hardness, but some utilize other aspects such as optical or electronic properties. The growth processes are reviewed, and techniques for characterizing the resulting materials' properties are discussed. Crystalline diamond is emphasized, but other diamond-like materials (silicon carbide, amorphous carbon containing hydrogen) are also examined. Scientific, technical, and economic problem areas that could impede the rapid exploitation of these materials are identified. Recommendations are presented covering broad areas of research and development.

  12. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen.The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  13. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrowski S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  14. Biological characteristics of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells on composite tantalum carbide/amorphous carbon films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available Tantalum (Ta is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C, was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics.

  15. Optimization of Gas Composition Used in Plasma Chemical Vaporization Machining for Figuring of Reaction-Sintered Silicon Carbide with Low Surface Roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongyan; Yang, Xu; Ohkubo, Yuji; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2018-02-05

    In recent years, reaction-sintered silicon carbide (RS-SiC) has been of interest in many engineering fields because of its excellent properties, such as its light weight, high rigidity, high heat conductance and low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, RS-SiC is difficult to machine owing to its high hardness and chemical inertness and because it contains multiple components. To overcome the problem of the poor machinability of RS-SiC in conventional machining, the application of atmospheric-pressure plasma chemical vaporization machining (AP-PCVM) to RS-SiC was proposed. As a highly efficient and damage-free figuring technique, AP-PCVM has been widely applied for the figuring of single-component materials, such as Si, SiC, quartz crystal wafers, and so forth. However, it has not been applied to RS-SiC since it is composed of multiple components. In this study, we investigated the AP-PCVM etching characteristics for RS-SiC by optimizing the gas composition. It was found that the different etching rates of the different components led to a large surface roughness. A smooth surface was obtained by applying the optimum gas composition, for which the etching rate of the Si component was equal to that of the SiC component.

  16. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1994-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, and spectrochemical analysis of nuclear-grade aluminum oxide and aluminum oxide-boron carbide composite pellets to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Boron by Titrimetry 7 to 13 Separation of Boron for Mass Spectrometry 14 to 19 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrometry 20 to 23 Separation of Halides by Pyrohydrolysis 24 to 27 Fluoride by Ion-Selective Electrode 28 to 30 Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 31 to 33 Trace Elements by Emission Spectroscopy 34 to 46 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. (F...

  17. Diamond nanophotonics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Beha

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the coupling of single color centers in diamond to plasmonic and dielectric photonic structures to realize novel nanophotonic devices. Nanometer spatial control in the creation of single color centers in diamond is achieved by implantation of nitrogen atoms through high-aspect-ratio channels in a mica mask. Enhanced broadband single-photon emission is demonstrated by coupling nitrogen–vacancy centers to plasmonic resonators, such as metallic nanoantennas. Improved photon-collection efficiency and directed emission is demonstrated by solid immersion lenses and micropillar cavities. Thereafter, the coupling of diamond nanocrystals to the guided modes of micropillar resonators is discussed along with experimental results. Finally, we present a gas-phase-doping approach to incorporate color centers based on nickel and tungsten, in situ into diamond using microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The fabrication of silicon–vacancy centers in nanodiamonds by microwave-plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is discussed in addition.

  18. Elastic moduli of boron carbide/copper composites from -400C to 8000C by ultrasonic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieske, J.H.

    1980-10-01

    An ultrasonic through-transmission technique for high attenuating materials was developed to determine the ultrasonic longitudinal and shear velocities in B 4 C/Cu composites to 800 0 C. Ultrasonic velocity data was used to calculate Young's modulus, shear modulus, and Poisson's ratio for the composites from -40 0 C to 800 0 C. 5 figures, 1 table

  19. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel-tungsten composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M.; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G.; Singh, Raghuvir; Keshri, Anup Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel-tungsten (Ni-W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni-W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, Ecorr) compared to Ni-W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO4 and SiO2.

  20. Diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond TiO.sub.2./sub. sol-gel composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Daenen, M.; Zhang, L.; Erni, R.; Williams, O.A.; Hardy, A.; Van Bael, M.K.; Wagner, P.; Haenen, K.; Nesládek, Miloš; van Tendeloo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2009), s. 670-673 ISSN 0935-9648 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : diamond nucleation * nanodiamond * TiO 2 sol-gel omposites Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 8.379, year: 2009

  1. Plasma metallization of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroleva, E.B.; Klinskaya, N.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of treatment conditions in plasma on properties of produced metallized powders of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbides with the main particle size of 40-80 μm is considered. It is shown that plasma treatment permits to produce metallized powders of carbide materials with the 40-80 μm particle size. The degree of metallization, spheroidization, chemical and phase composition of metallized carbide powders are controlled by dispersivity of the treated material, concentration of a metal component in the treated mixtures, rate of plasma flow and preliminary spheroidization procedure

  2. Diamond carbon sources: a comparison of carbon isotope models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirkley, M.B.; Otter, M.L.; Gurney, J.J.; Hill, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    The carbon isotope compositions of approximately 500 inclusion-bearing diamonds have been determined in the past decade. 98 percent of these diamonds readily fall into two broad categories on the basis of their inclusion mineralogies and compositions. These categories are peridotitic diamonds and eclogitic diamonds. Most peridotitic diamonds have δ 13 C values between -10 and -1 permil, whereas eclogitic diamonds have δ 13 C values between -28 and +2 permil. Peridotitic diamonds may represent primordial carbon, however, it is proposed that initially inhomogeneous δ 13 C values were subsequently homogenized, e.g. during melting and convection that is postulated to have occurred during the first billion years of the earth's existence. If this is the case, then the wider range of δ 13 C values exhibited by eclogitic diamonds requires a different explanation. Both the fractionation model and the subduction model can account for the range of observed δ 13 C values in eclogitic diamonds. 16 refs., 2 figs

  3. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel–tungsten composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M.; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G.; Singh, Raghuvir; Keshri, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulse electrodeposited Ni–W–SiC coating has been synthesized successfully. • Dome to turtle like structure has been observed on addition of SiC in Ni–W coating. • Formation of W(Ni) solid solution was observed on adding 5 g/l SiC in Ni–W coating. • Corrosion resistance improved for Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. • Texture formation and continuous barrier layer enhanced the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel–tungsten (Ni–W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni–W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, E_c_o_r_r) compared to Ni–W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO_4 and SiO_2.

  4. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel–tungsten composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India); Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy & New Materials (ARCI) Hyderabad, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh 500005 (India); Singh, Raghuvir [CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand 831007 (India); Keshri, Anup Kumar, E-mail: anup@iitp.ac.in [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulse electrodeposited Ni–W–SiC coating has been synthesized successfully. • Dome to turtle like structure has been observed on addition of SiC in Ni–W coating. • Formation of W(Ni) solid solution was observed on adding 5 g/l SiC in Ni–W coating. • Corrosion resistance improved for Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. • Texture formation and continuous barrier layer enhanced the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel–tungsten (Ni–W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni–W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, E{sub corr}) compared to Ni–W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}.

  5. Centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc alloy and composite A356/silicon carbide: Study and modeling of phases' and particles' segregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balout, Bahaa

    Centrifugation is a casting technology that allows the production of cylindrical and graduated parts with different mechanical properties through the section. The need for materials with good quality and specific mechanical properties has been driven this technology in order to produce different types of materials such as zinc alloys and graduated metal matrix composites reinforced by hard and wear resistant particles. The goal of this research project is to study and model the eutectic macrosegregation, the solidification speed, and the speeds of solidification fronts during centrifugal casting of ZA8 zinc-aluminum alloy in order to improve the part quality and increase its strength and field reliability. Moreover, the segregation of the particles during centrifugal casting of an aluminum matrix composite reinforced by silicon carbide particles (A356/SiC) is also studied to improve and control the graduation of the parts. The cooling rate, the speed, acceleration/deceleration, displacement, and segregation of the particles across the section will be modeled by discretization of Stokes' law in time in order to take into consideration the change in the centrifugal radius and melt viscosity during cooling process. This study will allow the control of the graduation degree of particles across the section in order to improve the properties and wear resistance of the composite. This composite can be used in systems where friction is critical and load is high (reinforcements of parts for the cylinders of pneumatic systems). The results show that the maximum macrosegregation zone of the eutectic across the casting section corresponds to the last point of solidification. The eutectic macrosegregation produced during centrifugal casting of thin walled part is a normal segregation which varies depending on the solidification speed and the ratio between the speeds of solidification fronts. On the other hand, it was found that the position and volume fraction of the particles

  6. Novel polymer composite having diamond particles and boron nitride platelets for thermal management of electric vehicle motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Anri; Shoji, Atsushi; Yonemori, Kei; Seo, Nobuhide

    2016-02-01

    Thermal conductivities of silicone matrix polymers including fillers of diamond particles and/or hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) platelets were systematically investigated in an attempt to find a thermal interface material (TIM) having high isotropic thermal conductivity and high electrical insulating ability to enable efficient heat dissipation from the motor coil ends of electric vehicles. The TIM with mixed fillers of diamond particles and h-BN platelets had a maximum thermal conductivity of 6.1 W m-1 K-1 that was almost isotropic. This is the highest value among the thermal conductivities of TIMs with silicone matrix polymer reported to date. The mechanism behind the thermal conductivity of the TIMs was also examined from the viewpoint of the change in the number of thermally conductive networks and/or a decrease in the thermal resistivity of junctions of neighboring diamond particles through the incorporation of h-BN platelets. The TIMs developed in this study will make it possible to manage the heat of electric motors and will help to popularize electric vehicles.

  7. Preparation, surface chemistry, and electrical conductivity of novel silicon carbide/polypyrrole composites containing an anionic surfactant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mičušík, M.; Omastová, M.; Boukerma, K.; Albouy, A.; Chehimi, M. M.; Trchová, Miroslava; Fedorko, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 8 (2007), s. 1198-1206 ISSN 0032-3888. [Bratislava International Conference on Macromolecules: Advanced Polymeric Materials /20./. Bratislava, 11.06.2006-15.06.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400500504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : composites Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.272, year: 2007

  8. CVD diamond substrates for electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, H.

    1996-03-01

    In this study the applicability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond as a material for heat spreaders was investigated. Economical evaluations on the production of heat spreaders were also performed. For the diamond synthesis the hot-filament and microwave method were used respectively. The deposition parameters were varied in a way that free standing diamond layers with a thickness of 80 to 750 microns and different qualities were obtained. The influence of the deposition parameters on the relevant film properties was investigated and discussed. With both the hot-filament and microwave method it was possible to deposit diamond layers having a thermal conductivity exceeding 1200 W/mK and therefore to reach the quality level for commercial uses. The electrical resistivity was greater than 10 12 Ωcm. The investigation of the optical properties was done by Raman-, IR- and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Because of future applications of diamond-aluminium nitride composites as highly efficient heat spreaders diamond deposition an AIN was investigated. An improved substrate pretreatment prior to diamond deposition showed promising results for better performance of such composite heat spreaders. Both free standing layers and diamond-AIN composites could be cut by a CO2 Laser in Order to get an exact size geometry. A reduction of the diamond surface roughness was achieved by etching with manganese powder or cerium. (author)

  9. Performance and characterisation of CVD diamond coated, sintered diamond and WC-Co cutting tools for dental and micromachining applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sein, Htet; Ahmed, Waqar; Jackson, Mark; Woodwards, Robert; Polini, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    Diamond coatings are attractive for cutting processes due to their high hardness, low friction coefficient, excellent wear resistance and chemical inertness. The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) tools was the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life. WC-Co tools containing 6% Co and 94% WC substrate with an average grain size 1-3 μm were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and WC substrates, it is necessary to etch away the surface Co and prepare the surface for subsequent diamond growth. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films. Diamond film quality and purity have been characterised using scanning electron microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The performance of diamond coated WC-Co bur, uncoated WC-Co bur, and diamond embedded (sintered) bur have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human teeth, borosilicate glass and porcelain teeth. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the tools. The materials subjected to cutting processes have been examined to assess the quality of the finish. Diamond coated WC-Co microdrills and uncoated microdrills were also tested on aluminium alloys. Results show that there was a 300% improvement when the drills were coated with diamond compared to the uncoated tools

  10. Polishing and toothbrushing alters the surface roughness and gloss of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamonkhantikul, Krid; Arksornnukit, Mansuang; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Kanehira, Masafumi; Finger, Werner J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the surface roughness and gloss of composite resins after using two polishing systems and toothbrushing. Six composite resins (Durafill VS, Filtek Z250, Filtek Z350 XT, Kalore, Venus Diamond, and Venus Pearl) were evaluated after polishing with two polishing systems (Sof-Lex, Venus Supra) and after toothbrushing up to 40,000 cycles. Surface roughness (Ra) and gloss were determined for each composite resin group (n=6) after silicon carbide paper grinding, polishing, and toothbrushing. Two-way ANOVA indicated significant differences in both Ra and gloss between measuring stages for the composite resins tested, except Venus Pearl, which showed significant differences only in gloss. After polishing, the Filtek Z350 XT, Kalore, and Venus Diamond showed significant increases in Ra, while all composite resin groups except the Filtek Z350 XT and Durafill VS with Sof-Lex showed increases in gloss. After toothbrushing, all composite resin demonstrated increases in Ra and decreases in gloss.

  11. Illumination-induced charge transfer in polypyrrole-diamond nanosystem

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jan; Kromka, Alexander; Ledinský, Martin; Rezek, Bohuslav

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 5-8 (2009), s. 800-803 ISSN 0925-9635. [European Conference on Diamond, Diamond-Like Materials, Carbon Nanotubes, Nitrides and Silicon Carbide /19./. Sitges, 07.09.2008-11.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06040; GA AV ČR KAN400100701; GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H003; GA MŠk LC510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : diamond * polymers * heterojunction * electronic transport Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.822, year: 2009

  12. Software optimization for electrical conductivity imaging in polycrystalline diamond cutters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanov, G.; Ludwig, R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 100 Institute Rd, Worcester, MA 01609 (United States); Wiggins, J.; Bertagnolli, K. [US Synthetic, 1260 South 1600 West, Orem, UT 84058 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    We previously reported on an electrical conductivity imaging instrument developed for measurements on polycrystalline diamond cutters. These cylindrical cutters for oil and gas drilling feature a thick polycrystalline diamond layer on a tungsten carbide substrate. The instrument uses electrical impedance tomography to profile the conductivity in the diamond table. Conductivity images must be acquired quickly, on the order of 5 sec per cutter, to be useful in the manufacturing process. This paper reports on successful efforts to optimize the conductivity reconstruction routine, porting major portions of it to NVIDIA GPUs, including a custom CUDA kernel for Jacobian computation.

  13. Fabrication of TiC-TiO{sub 2} composite powders by thermal plasma oxidation of titanium carbide powder; Tanka chitan funmatsu no plasma sanka hanno ni yori seiseishita TiC-TiO{sub 2} fukugo funmatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishigaki, T.; Li, Y.; Haneda, H. [National institute for Research Inorganic materials, Tsukuba (Japan); Kataoka, E. [Showa Cabot Supermetals K.K., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-09-15

    TiC-TiO{sub 2} composite powders were prepared by in-flight oxidation of titanium carbide powder in RF induction thermal plasmas. Original titanium carbide powder of 20 - 38 {mu}m in particle size was axially injected into the center of argon-oxygen plasma. The powders were partially spheroidized and evaporated through the plasma treatment. X-ray diffraction of plasma-treated powders showed the formation of titanium dioxides, both rutile and anatase phases. The phase content of the plasma-prepared powders strongly depended on the plasma conditions, such as the plasma generating pressure and the oxygen flow rate in plasma generating gas. Especially, the increase of oxygen flow rate in plasma gas gave rise to the increase of heat transfer from plasma to powder particles, exothermic heat of oxidation reaction and cooling rate of plasma, giving the increase of spheroidization ratio, formation ratio of titanium dioxides, and content of anatase phases. (author)

  14. Thermomechanical Fatigue Behavior of a Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Calcium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Testing of Coated Monocrystalline Superalloys," in Low Cycle Fatigue. ASTM STP 942, Solomon, H.D., Hafford, G.R., Kaisand, L.R., and Keis, B.N. , eds...HOTOL) project is considering the use of CMCs on lower aeroshell panels , air intake leading edges, and the nose cone where temperatures may climb to...Works (Corning, NY). The composite was supplied in 16-ply, unidirectionally reinforced (10116) panels , measuring 152.4 cm x 152.4 cm (6 in x 6 in

  15. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello

    2010-01-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  16. CVD diamond deposition onto dental burs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, N.; Sein, H.

    2001-01-01

    A hot-filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD) system has been modified to enable non-planar substrates, such as metallic wires and dental burs, to be uniformly coated with thin polycrystalline diamond films. Initially, diamond deposition was carried out on titanium and tantalum wires in order to test and optimize the system. High growth rates of the order of approx. 8 /hr were obtained when depositing diamond on titanium wires using the vertical filament arrangement. However, lower growth rates of the order of 4-5meu m/hr were obtained with diamond deposition on tantalum wires. To extend the work towards a practical biomedical application tungsten carbide dental burs were coated with diamond films. The as-grown films were found to be polycrystalline and uniform over the cutting tip. Finally, the costs relating to diamond CVD onto dental burs have been presented in this paper. The costs relating to coating different number of burs at a time and the effect of film thickness on costs have been included in this investigation. (author)

  17. Effect of a high temperature cycle on the mechanical properties of silicon carbide/titanium metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, R. A.; Johnson, W. S.; Pollock, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    An investigation is conducted of the effects of the SPF/DB cycle on continuous SiC fiber-reinforced Ti-15V-3Cr-3Al-3Sn composite's matrix, fiber, and matrix-fiber interface. The fibers in question, designated SCS-6, have a carbon core and thin, carbon-rich surface. The fatigue endurance limit at 50,000 cycles for the SPF/DB specimens was 50 percent lower than for the as-fabricated material. The substantial changes in tensile strength, fatigue life, and fracture-surface appearance due to the SPF-DB cycle are explained by a difference in the failure mechanisms due to SPF/DB-induced changes in the fiber/matrix interface strength.

  18. Synergistic effect of carbon nanotube as sintering aid and toughening agent in spark plasma sintered molybdenum disilicide-hafnium carbide composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Biswajyoti; Asiq Rahman, O.S.; Sribalaji, M [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta Kanpa Road, Bihta, Patna, Bihar 801103 (India); Bakshi, Srinivasa Rao [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Keshri, Anup Kumar, E-mail: anup@iitp.ac.in [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta Kanpa Road, Bihta, Patna, Bihar 801103 (India)

    2016-12-15

    Hafnium carbide (HfC) along with sintering aids was consolidated at a relatively lower temperature i.e. 1600 °C (i.e. T=~0.41 T{sub m}) under a uniaxial load of 50 MPa by spark plasma sintering. Two different sintering aids such as molybdenum disilicide (MoSi{sub 2}) and carbon nanotube (CNT) were added to enhance the densification and lower the extent of grain growth in the sintered pellets. Density of the sintered pellet increased from 96.0±0.8% in HfC +5 wt% MoSi{sub 2} (HM) to 99.0±0.5% with the addition of 2 wt% CNT in HfC+5 wt% MoSi{sub 2} (HMC) at sintering temperature of 1600 °C. Further, the extent of grain growth drastically reduced from 204% in HM to 50% in HMC. Analysis of linear shrinkage during densification revealed that CNT addition increased densification rate and decreased the time required to reach the density of 99.0±0.5% at 1600 °C. Increased densification and lower degree of grain growth could be due to the synergistic effect offered by the CNT, which are as follows: (i) Lubrication effect of CNT, (ii) Lower activation energy for grain boundary diffusion (iii) Reduction in liquid phase sintering temperature and (iv) Grain boundary pinning. Fracture toughness of the sintered HM and HMC composite was obtained using indentation technique. By the addition of 2 wt% CNT in HM, drastic increase of 91% in fracture toughness was seen. This significant improvement in fracture toughness was due to the enhanced densification and relatively lower grain size of HMC. Also crack bridging, crack deflection, crack arrest, CNT and graphene sheet pull-out and swording played major role in toughening of HMC pellet.

  19. Cutting force and wear evaluation in peripheral milling by CVD diamond dental tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polini, R.; Allegri, A.; Guarino, S.; Quadrini, F.; Sein, H.; Ahmed, W.

    2004-01-01

    Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) tools are currently employed in dental application for prosthesis fabrication. The deposition of a diamond coating onto WC-Co tools could allow both to increase the tool life and tool performance at higher speeds. However, at present it is very difficult to quantify the effective advantage of the application of a diamond coating onto dental tools compared to traditional uncoated tools. Therefore, in this work, we have deposited diamond coatings onto WC-Co dental tools having different geometries by Hot Filament Chemical Vapour Deposition (HFCVD). Prior to deposition, the WC-Co tools were pre-treated in order to roughen the surface and to modify the chemical surface composition. The use of the HFCVD process enabled the deposition of a uniform coating despite the complex geometries of the dental mills. For the first time, in accordance to the knowledge of the authors, we have studied and compared the cutting behaviour of both virgin and diamond-coated dental tools by measuring both wear and cutting force time evolution under milling a very hard Co-Cr-Mo dental alloy. To ensure constant cutting rate (20,000-r.p.m. cutting rate, 0.01-m/min feed rate and 0.5-mm depth of cut), a proper experimental apparatus was used. Three different mill geometries were considered in both coated and uncoated conditions. The results showed that, under the high-speed conditions employed, uncoated tools underwent to catastrophic failure within a few seconds of machining. Diamond-coated tools exhibited much longer tool lives. Lower forces were measured when the coated tool was employed due to the much lower material-mill friction. The best behaviour was observed for coated mills with the presence of a chip-breaker

  20. Joining of porous silicon carbide bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Carl H.; Couhig, John T.; Pelletier, Paul J.

    1990-05-01

    A method of joining two porous bodies of silicon carbide is disclosed. It entails utilizing an aqueous slip of a similar silicon carbide as was used to form the porous bodies, including the sintering aids, and a binder to initially join the porous bodies together. Then the composite structure is subjected to cold isostatic pressing to form a joint having good handling strength. Then the composite structure is subjected to pressureless sintering to form the final strong bond. Optionally, after the sintering the structure is subjected to hot isostatic pressing to further improve the joint and densify the structure. The result is a composite structure in which the joint is almost indistinguishable from the silicon carbide pieces which it joins.

  1. Architecting boron nanostructure on the diamond particle surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, H.; Dai, D.; Yu, J.H.; Nishimura, K.; Sasaoka, S.; Jiang, N.

    2014-01-01

    The present study provides an efficient approach for nano-functionalization of diamond powders. Boron nanostructure can be grown on diamond particle entire surface by a simple heat-treatment process. After treatment, various boron nanoforms were grown on the diamond particle surface at different processing temperature. High-density boron nanowires (BNWs) grow on the diamond particle entire surface at 1333 K, while nanopillars cover diamond powders when the heat treatment process is performed at 1393 K. The influence of the pretreatment temperature on the microstructure and thermal conductivity of Cu/diamond composites were investigated. Cu/diamond composites with high thermal conductivity of 670 W (m K) −1 was obtained, which was achieved by the formation of large number of nanowires and nanopillars on the diamond particle surface.

  2. An Observation of Diamond-Shaped Particle Structure in a Soya Phosphatidylcohline and Bacteriorhodopsin Composite Langmuir Blodgett Film Fabricated by Multilayer Molecular Thin Film Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujiuchi, Y.; Makino, Y.

    A composite film of soya phosphatidylcohline (soya PC) and bacteriorhodopsin (BR) was fabricated by the multilayer molecular thin film method using fatty acid and lipid on a quartz substrate. Direct Force Microscopy (DFM), UV absorption spectra and IR absorption spectra of the film were characterized on the detail of surface structure of the film. The DFM data revealed that many rhombus (diamond-shaped) particles were observed in the film. The spectroscopic data exhibited the yield of M-intermediate of BR in the film. On our modelling of molecular configuration indicate that the coexistence of the strong inter-molecular interaction and the strong inter-molecular interaction between BR trimmers attributed to form the particles.

  3. Encapsulation of electroless copper patterns into diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenov, S.M.; Shafeev, G.A.; Lavrischev, S.V. [General Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The results are reported on encapsulating copper lines into diamond films grown by a DC plasma CVD. The process includes the steps of (i) laser activation of diamond for electroless metal plating, (ii) electroless copper deposition selectively onto the activated surface regions, and (iii) diamond regrowth on the Cu-patterned diamond films. The composition and electrical properties of the encapsulated copper lines were examined, revealing high purity and low electrical resistivity of the encapsulated electroless copper.

  4. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  5. Novel diamond-coated tools for dental drilling applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M J; Sein, H; Ahmed, W; Woodwards, R

    2007-01-01

    The application of diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) tools has been the subject of much attention in recent years in order to improve cutting performance and tool life in orthodontic applications. WC-Co tools containing 6% Co metal and 94% WC substrate with an average grain size of 1 - 3 microm were used in this study. In order to improve the adhesion between diamond and WC substrates it is necessary to etch cobalt from the surface and prepare it for subsequent diamond growth. Alternatively, a titanium nitride (TiN) interlayer can be used prior to diamond deposition. Hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) with a modified vertical filament arrangement has been employed for the deposition of diamond films to TiN and etched WC substrates. Diamond film quality and purity has been characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and micro Raman spectroscopy. The performances of diamond-coated WC-Co tools, uncoated WC-Co tools, and diamond embedded (sintered) tools have been compared by drilling a series of holes into various materials such as human tooth, borosilicate glass, and acrylic tooth materials. Flank wear has been used to assess the wear rates of the tools when machining biomedical materials such as those described above. It is shown that using an interlayer such as TiN prior to diamond deposition provides the best surface preparation for producing dental tools.

  6. The chemical vapor deposition of zirconium carbide onto ceramic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass A, John Jr.; Palmisiano, Nick Jr.; Welsh R, Edward

    1999-01-01

    Zirconium carbide is an attractive ceramic material due to its unique properties such as high melting point, good thermal conductivity, and chemical resistance. The controlled preparation of zirconium carbide films of superstoichiometric, stoichiometric, and substoichiometric compositions has been achieved utilizing zirconium tetrachloride and methane precursor gases in an atmospheric pressure high temperature chemical vapor deposition system

  7. Point defects and transport properties in carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1984-01-01

    Carbides of transition metals and of actinides are interesting and technologically important. The transition-metal carbides (or carbonitrides) are extensively being used as hard materials and some of them are of great interest because of the high transition temperature for superconductivity, e.g. 17 K for Nb(C,N). Actinide carbides and carbonitrides, (U,Pu)C and (U,Pu)(C,N) are being considered as promising advanced fuels for liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors. Basic interest exists in all these materials because of their high melting points (e.g. 4250 K for TaC) and the unusually broad range of homogeneity of nonstoichiometric compositions (e.g. from UCsub(0.9) to UCsub(1.9) at 2500 K). Interaction of point defects to clusters and short-range ordering have recently been studied with elastic neutron diffraction and diffuse scattering techniques, and calculations of energies of formation and interaction of point defects became available for selected carbides. Diffusion measurements also exist for a number of carbides, in particular for the actinide carbides. The existing knowledge is discussed and summarized with emphasis on informative examples of particular technological relevance. (Auth.)

  8. Diamond Fuzzy Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Pathinathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we define diamond fuzzy number with the help of triangular fuzzy number. We include basic arithmetic operations like addition, subtraction of diamond fuzzy numbers with examples. We define diamond fuzzy matrix with some matrix properties. We have defined Nested diamond fuzzy number and Linked diamond fuzzy number. We have further classified Right Linked Diamond Fuzzy number and Left Linked Diamond Fuzzy number. Finally we have verified the arithmetic operations for the above mentioned types of Diamond Fuzzy Numbers.

  9. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  10. Carbides crystalline structure of AISI M2 high-speed steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serna, M.M.; Galego, E.; Rossi, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the crystallographic structure of the extracted carbides of AISI M2 steel spray formed The structure determination of these carbides. The structure determination of these carbides is a very hard work. Since these structures were formed by atom migration it is not possible to reproduce them by a controlled process with a determined chemical composition. The solution of this problem is to obtain the carbide by chemical extraction from the steel. (Author)

  11. Plastic deformation of particles of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kravchik, A.E.; Neshpor, V.S.; Savel' ev, G.A.; Ordan' yan, S.S.

    1976-12-01

    A study is made of the influence of stoichiometry on the characteristics of microplastic deformation in powders of zirconium and titanium carbide subjected to vibration grinding. The carbide powders were produced by direct synthesis from the pure materials: metallic titanium and zirconium and acetylene black. As to the nature of their elastic deformation, zirconium and titanium carbides can be considered elastic-isotropic materials. During vibration grinding, the primary fracture planes are the (110) planes. Carbides of nonstoichiometric composition are more brittle.

  12. Prospects for the synthesis of large single-crystal diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khmelnitskiy, R A

    2015-01-01

    The unique properties of diamond have stimulated the study of and search for its applications in many fields, including optics, optoelectronics, electronics, biology, and electrochemistry. Whereas chemical vapor deposition allows the growth of polycrystalline diamond plates more than 200 mm in diameter, most current diamond application technologies require large-size (25 mm and more) single-crystal diamond substrates or films suitable for the photolithography process. This is quite a challenge, because the largest diamond crystals currently available are 10 mm or less in size. This review examines three promising approaches to fabricating large-size diamond single crystals: growing large-size single crystals, the deposition of heteroepitaxial diamond films on single-crystal substrates, and the preparation of composite diamond substrates. (reviews of topical problems)

  13. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xuezhang; Wei Qiuping; Yu Zhiming; Yang Taiming; Zhai Hao

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adherent polycrystalline diamond films were grown on copper substrate by carbon transport. ► The nucleation density was increased to 10 11 cm −2 . ► Diamond films were a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. ► Diamond nucleation was based by carbon dissolving from UDDs to Pt interlayer and formation of sp 3 -bonded diamond clusters at the Pt surface. - Abstract: Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 10 11 cm −2 , and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  14. Adherent diamond film deposited on Cu substrate by carbon transport from nanodiamond buried under Pt interlayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Xuezhang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Wei Qiuping, E-mail: qiupwei@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yu Zhiming, E-mail: zhiming@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Yang Taiming; Zhai Hao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adherent polycrystalline diamond films were grown on copper substrate by carbon transport. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nucleation density was increased to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond films were a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Diamond nucleation was based by carbon dissolving from UDDs to Pt interlayer and formation of sp{sup 3}-bonded diamond clusters at the Pt surface. - Abstract: Diamond film deposited on Cu suffered from poor adhesion mainly due to the large mismatch of thermal expansion coefficients and the lack of affinity between carbon and Cu. Enhancing diamond nucleation by carbon transport from buried nanodiamond through a Pt ultrathin interlayer, adherent diamond film was then deposited on Cu substrate without distinctly metallic interlayer. This novel nucleation mechanism increased diamond nucleation density to 10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}, and developed diamond film with a composite structure of nano-crystalline diamond (NCD) layer and micro-crystalline diamond layer. Diamond film was characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Raman spectroscope, respectively. The composition of diamond film/Cu substrate interface was examined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). The adhesion of diamond film was evaluated by indentation test. Those results show that a Pt ultrathin interlayer provides stronger chemically bonded interfaces and improve film adhesion.

  15. Boron-carbide-aluminum and boron-carbide-reactive metal cermets. [B/sub 4/C-Al

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halverson, D.C.; Pyzik, A.J.; Aksay, I.A.

    1985-05-06

    Hard, tough, lighweight boron-carbide-reactive metal composites, particularly boron-carbide-aluminum composites, are produced. These composites have compositions with a plurality of phases. A method is provided, including the steps of wetting and reacting the starting materials, by which the microstructures in the resulting composites can be controllably selected. Starting compositions, reaction temperatures, reaction times, and reaction atmospheres are parameters for controlling the process and resulting compositions. The ceramic phases are homogeneously distributed in the metal phases and adhesive forces at ceramic-metal interfaces are maximized. An initial consolidated step is used to achieve fully dense composites. Microstructures of boron-carbide-aluminum cermets have been produced with modules of rupture exceeding 110 ksi and fracture toughness exceeding 12 ksi..sqrt..in. These composites and methods can be used to form a variety of structural elements.

  16. Precision Surface Grinding of Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Konneh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC is well known for its excellent material properties, high durability, high wear resistance, light weight and extreme hardness. Among the engineering applications of this material, it is an excellent candidate for optic mirrors used in an Airbone Laser (ABL device. However, the low fracture toughness and extreme brittleness characteristics of SiC are predominant factors for its poor machinability. This paper presents surface grinding of SiC using diamond cup wheels to assess the performance of diamond grits with respect to the roughness produced on the machined surfaces and also the morphology of the ground work-piece. Resin bonded diamond cup wheels of grit sizes 46 µm, 76 µm and 107 µm; depth of cut of 10 µm, 20 µm and 30 µm; and feed rate of 2 mm/min, 12 mm/min and 22 mm/min were used during this machining investigation. It has been observed that the 76 grit performs better in terms of low surface roughness value and morphology.

  17. NEW HIGH STRENGTH AND FASTER DRILLING TSP DIAMOND CUTTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Radtke

    2006-01-31

    The manufacture of thermally stable diamond (TSP) cutters for drill bits used in petroleum drilling requires the brazing of two dissimilar materials--TSP diamond and tungsten carbide. The ENDURUS{trademark} thermally stable diamond cutter developed by Technology International, Inc. exhibits (1) high attachment (shear) strength, exceeding 345 MPa (50,000 psi), (2) TSP diamond impact strength increased by 36%, (3) prevents TSP fracture when drilling hard rock, and (4) maintains a sharp edge when drilling hard and abrasive rock. A novel microwave brazing (MWB) method for joining dissimilar materials has been developed. A conventional braze filler metal is combined with microwave heating which minimizes thermal residual stress between materials with dissimilar coefficients of thermal expansion. The process results in preferential heating of the lower thermal expansion diamond material, thus providing the ability to match the thermal expansion of the dissimilar material pair. Methods for brazing with both conventional and exothermic braze filler metals have been developed. Finite element modeling (FEM) assisted in the fabrication of TSP cutters controllable thermal residual stress and high shear attachment strength. Further, a unique cutter design for absorbing shock, the densification of otherwise porous TSP diamond for increased mechanical strength, and diamond ion implantation for increased diamond fracture resistance resulted in successful drill bit tests.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF CARBIDE AND NITRIDE CERAMICS OF INCREASED RESISTIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Roman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The developments of carbide and nitrite ceramics of high solidity are presented. It is shown that development of nanotechnology led to creation of thenanostructural ceramics, the composition of which is controlled on cluster level.

  19. Analytical chemistry methods for boron carbide absorber material. [Standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DELVIN WL

    1977-07-01

    This standard provides analytical chemistry methods for the analysis of boron carbide powder and pellets for the following: total C and B, B isotopic composition, soluble C and B, fluoride, chloride, metallic impurities, gas content, water, nitrogen, and oxygen. (DLC)

  20. Spheroidization of transition metal carbides in low temperature plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinskaya, N.A.; Koroleva, E.B.; Petrunichev, V.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Solov'ev, P.V.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    Plasma process of preparation of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbide spherical powders with the main particle size 40-80 μm is considered. Spheroidization degree, granulometric and phase composition of the product are investigated

  1. Nanostructured Diamond Device for Biomedical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijalkowski, M; Karczemska, A; Lysko, J M; Zybala, R; KozaneckI, M; Filipczak, P; Ralchenko, V; Walock, M; Stanishevsky, A; Mitura, S

    2015-02-01

    Diamond is increasingly used in biomedical applications because of its unique properties such as the highest thermal conductivity, good optical properties, high electrical breakdown voltage as well as excellent biocompatibility and chemical resistance. Diamond has also been introduced as an excellent substrate to make the functional microchip structures for electrophoresis, which is the most popular separation technique for the determination of analytes. In this investigation, a diamond electrophoretic chip was manufactured by a replica method using a silicon mold. A polycrystalline 300 micron-thick diamond layer was grown by the microwave plasma-assisted CVD (MPCVD) technique onto a patterned silicon substrate followed by the removal of the substrate. The geometry of microstructure, chemical composition, thermal and optical properties of the resulting free-standing diamond electrophoretic microchip structure were examined by CLSM, SFE, UV-Vis, Raman, XRD and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and by a modified laser flash method for thermal property measurements.

  2. Seebeck effect of some thin film carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beensh-Marchwicka, G.; Prociow, E.

    2002-01-01

    Several materials have been investigated for high-temperature thin film thermocouple applications. These include silicon carbide with boron (Si-C-B), ternary composition based on Si-C-Mn, fourfold composition based on Si-C-Zr-B and tantalum carbide (TaC). All materials were deposited on quartz or glass substrates using the pulse sputter deposition technique. Electrical conduction and thermoelectric power were measured for various compositions at 300-550 K. It has been found, that the efficiency of thermoelectric power of films containing Si-C base composition was varied from 0.0015-0.034 μW/cmK 2 . However for TaC the value about 0.093 μW/cmK 2 was obtained. (author)

  3. Preliminary Evaluation of PS300: A New Self-Lubricating High Temperature Composite Coating for Use to 800 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800 C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF2/CaF2 eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating, which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650 C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  4. Abrasive wear behavior of heat-treated ABC-silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiao Feng; Lee, Gun Y.; Chen, Da; Ritchie, Robert O.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2002-06-17

    Hot-pressed silicon carbide, containing aluminum, boron, and carbon additives (ABC-SiC), was subjected to three-body and two-body wear testing using diamond abrasives over a range of sizes. In general, the wear resistance of ABC-SiC, with suitable heat treatment, was superior to that of commercial SiC.

  5. Synthetic diamond in electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pleskov, Yurii V

    1999-01-01

    The results of studies on the electrochemistry of diamond carried out during the last decade are reviewed. Methods for the preparation, the crystalline structure and the main electrophysical properties of diamond thin films are considered. Depending on the doping conditions, the diamond behaves as a superwide-gap semiconductor or as a semimetal. It is shown that the 'metal-like' diamond is corrosion-resistant and can be used advantageously as an electrode in the electrosynthesis (in particular, for the electroreduction of compounds that are difficult to reduce) and electroanalysis. Kinetic characteristics of some redox reactions and the impedance parameters for diamond electrodes are presented. The results of comparative studies of the electrodes made of diamond single crystals, polycrystalline diamond and amorphous diamond-like carbon, which reveal the effect of the crystalline structure (e.g., the influence of intercrystallite boundaries) on the electrochemical properties of diamond, are presented. The bibliography includes 99 references.

  6. The valve effect of the carbide interlayer of an electric resistance plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakomskii, V.

    1998-01-01

    The welded electric resistance plug (ERP) usually contains a carbide interlayer at the plug-carbon material interface. The interlayer forms during welding the contact metallic alloy with the carbon material when the oxide films of the alloy are reduced on the interface surface by carbon to the formation of carbides and the surface layer of the plug material dissolves carbon to saturation. Subsequently, during solidification of the plug material it forms carbides with the alloy components. The structural composition of the carbide interlayer is determined by the chemical composition of the contact alloy. In alloys developed by the author and his colleagues the carbide forming elements are represented in most cases by silicon and titanium and, less frequently, by chromium and manganese. Therefore, the carbide interlayers in the ERP consisted mainly of silicon and titanium carbides

  7. Proceedings of the NATO Advances Research Workshop on Diamond Based Composites, Saint Petersburg, Russia, June 21-22, 1997, Volume 38

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-06-01

    Figure 9), green strength sufficient for handling of powder compacts, ability to wet diamond and tailorability to a range of application requirements...M.D. Drory, D.B. Bogy, M.S. Donley and J.E Field (eds.), Mechanical Behavor of Diamond and Other Forms of Carbon, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol...M.S. Donley and J.E Field (eds.), Mechanical Behavor of Diamond and Other Forms of Carbon, Mat. Res. Soc. Symp. Proc. Vol. 383, pp. 21-31. 13. Knight

  8. Kankan diamonds (Guinea) III: δ13C and nitrogen characteristics of deep diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachel, T.; Harris, J. W.; Aulbach, S.; Deines, P.

    Diamonds from the Kankan area in Guinea formed over a large depth profile beginning within the cratonic mantle lithosphere and extending through the asthenosphere and transition zone into the lower mantle. The carbon isotopic composition, the concentration of nitrogen impurities and the nitrogen aggregation level of diamonds representing this entire depth range have been determined. Peridotitic and eclogitic diamonds of lithospheric origin from Kankan have carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C: peridotitic -5.4 to -2.2‰ eclogitic -19.7 to -0.7‰) and nitrogen characteristics (N: peridotitic 17-648 atomic ppm; eclogitic 0-1,313 atomic ppm; aggregation from IaA to IaB) which are generally typical for diamonds of these two suites worldwide. Geothermobarometry of peridotitic and eclogitic inclusion parageneses (worldwide sources) indicates that both suites formed under very similar conditions within the cratonic lithosphere, which is not consistent with a derivation of diamonds with light carbon isotopic composition from subducted organic matter within subducting oceanic slabs. Diamonds containing majorite garnet inclusions fall to the isotopically heavy side (δ13C: -3.1‰ to +0.9‰) of the worldwide diamond population. Nitrogen contents are low (0-126 atomic ppm) and one of the two nitrogen-bearing diamonds shows such a low level of nitrogen aggregation (30% B-centre) that it cannot have been exposed to ambient temperatures of the transition zone (>=1,400 °C) for more than 0.2 Ma. This suggests rapid upward transport and formation of some Kankan diamonds pene-contemporaneous to Cretaceous kimberlite activity. Similar to these diamonds from the asthenosphere and the transition zone, lower mantle diamonds show a small shift towards isotopic heavy compositions (-6.6 to -0.5‰, mode at -3.5‰). As already observed for other mines, the nitrogen contents of lower mantle diamonds were below detection (using FTIRS). The mutual shift of sublithospheric diamonds towards

  9. The broad utility of Trizac diamond tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, John I.; Romero, Vincent D.; Sventek, Bruce; Zu, Lijun

    2017-10-01

    Sample finishing data from a broad range of materials — glasses, sapphire, silicon carbide, silicon, zirconium oxide, lithium tantalate, and flooring materials — are shown effectively processed with Trizact™ Diamond Tile (TDT). This data should provide the reader with an understanding of what to expect when using TDT on hard to grind or brittle materials. Keys to maintaining effective TDT pad wear rates, and therefore cost effect and stable processes, are described as managing 1) the proper lubricant flow rate for glasses and silicon-type materials and 2) the conditioning particle concentration for harder-to-grind materials

  10. Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Charles Schenck

    2011-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of

  11. Pharmacokinetic properties of new antitumor radiopharmaceutical on the basis of diamond nanoporous composites labeled with rhenium-188

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petriev, V M; Tishchenko, V K; Kuril’chik, A A; Skvortsov, V G

    2017-01-01

    Today the development of address therapeutic radionuclide delivery systems directly to tumor tissue is of current interest. It can be achieved by the design of drug containers of specific sizes and shapes from carbon-based composite materials. It will be allowed to enhance the efficacy of anticancer therapy and avoid serious side effects. In this work we studied the pharmacokinetic properties of nanodiamond nanoporous composite labeled with rhenium-188 in rats with hepatocholangioma PC-1 after intratumoral injection. It was established that substantial part of injected radioactivity remained in tumor tissue. Within three hours after 188 Re-nanoporous composites injection activity in tumor constituted 79.1–91.3% of injected dose (ID). Then activity level declined to 45.9% ID at 120 hours. No more than 1.34% ID entered the bloodstream. In soft organs and tissues, except thyroid gland, the content of compound didn’t exceed 0.3% ID/g. The highest activity in thyroid gland was 6.95% ID/g. In conclusion, received results suggest 188 Re-nanoporous composites can be promising radionuclide delivery systems for cancer treatment. (paper)

  12. Sintering by infiltration of loose mixture of powders, a method for metal matrix composite elaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constantinescu, V.; Orban, R.; Colan, H.

    1993-01-01

    Starting from the observation that Sintering by Infiltration of Loose Mixture of Powders confers large possibilities for both complex shaped and of large dimensions Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite components elaboration, its mechanism comparative with those of the classical melt infiltration was investigated. Appropriate measures in order to prevent an excessive hydrostatic flow of the melt and, consequently, reinforcement particle dispersion, as well as to promote wetting in both infiltration and liquid phase sintering stages of the process were established as necessary. Some experimental results in the method application to the fusion tungsten carbide and diamond reinforced metal matrix composite elaboration are, also, presented. (orig.)

  13. Corrosion behaviour of groundnut shell ash and silicon carbide hybrid reinforced Al-Mg-Si alloy matrix composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Kanayo ALANEME

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion behaviour of Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites reinforced with groundnut shell ash (GSA and silicon carbide (SiC was investigated. The aim is to assess the corrosion properties of Al-Mg-Si alloy based hybrid reinforced composites developed using different mix ratios of GSA (a cheaply processed agro waste derivative which served as partial replacement for SiC and SiC as reinforcing materials. GSA and SiC mixed in weight ratios 0:1, 1:3, 1:1, 3:1, and 1:0 were utilized to prepare 6 and 10 wt% of the reinforcing phase with Al‐Mg‐Si alloy as matrix using two‐step stir casting method. Mass loss and corrosion rate measurement was used to study the corrosion behaviour of the produced composites in 3.5% NaCl and 0.3M H2SO4 solutions. The results show that the Al-Mg-Si alloy based composites containing 6 and 10 wt% GSA and SiC in varied weight ratios were resistant to corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution. The composites were however more susceptible to corrosion in 0.3M H2SO4 solution (in comparison with the 3.5% NaCl solution. It was noted that the Al-Mg-Si/6 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades containing GSA and SiC in weight ratio 1:3 and 3:1 respectively exhibited superior corrosion resistance in the 0.3M H2SO4 solution compared to other composites produced for this series. In the case of the Al-Mg-Si/10 wt% GSA-SiC hybrid composite grades, the corrosion resistance was relatively superior for the composites containing a greater weight ratio of GSA (75% and 100% in 0.3M H2SO4 solution.

  14. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  15. Hybrid metallic nanocomposites for extra wear-resistant diamond machining tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loginov, P.A.; Sidorenko, D.A.; Levashov, E.A.

    2018-01-01

    The applicability of metallic nanocomposites as binder for diamond machining tools is demonstrated. The various nanoreinforcements (carbon nanotubes, boron nitride hBN, nanoparticles of tungsten carbide/WC) and their combinations are embedded into metallic matrices and their mechanical properties...... are determined in experiments. The wear resistance of diamond tools with metallic binders modified by various nanoreinforcements was estimated. 3D hierarchical computational finite element model of the tool binder with hybrid nanoscale reinforcements is developed, and applied for the structure...

  16. Liquid phase sintering of carbides using a nickel-molybdenum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barranco, J.M.; Warenchak, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid phase vacuum sintering was used to densify four carbide groups. These were titanium carbide, tungsten carbide, vanadium carbide, and zirconium carbide. The liquid phase consisted of nickel with additions of molybdenum of from 6.25 to 50.0 weight percent at doubling increments. The liquid phase or binder comprised 10, 20, and 40 percent by weight of the pressed powders. The specimens were tested using 3 point bending. Tungsten carbide showed the greatest improvement in bend rupture strength, flexural modulus, fracture energy and hardness using 20 percent binder with lesser amounts of molybdenum (6.25 or 12.5 wt %) added to nickel compared to pure nickel. A refinement in the carbide microstructure and/or a reduction in porosity was seen for both the titanium and tungsten carbides when the alloy binder was used compared to using the nickel alone. Curves depicting the above properties are shown for increasing amounts of molybdenum in nickel for each carbide examined. Loss of binder phase due to evaporation was experienced during heating in vacuum at sintering temperatures. In an effort to reduce porosity, identical specimens were HIP processed at 15 ksi and temperatures averaging 110 C below the sintering g temperature. The tungsten carbide and titanium carbide series containing 80 and 90 weight percent carbide phase respectively showed improvement properties after HIP while properties decreased for most other compositions

  17. Single Photon Sources in Silicon Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brett Johnson

    2014-01-01

    Single photon sources in semiconductors are highly sought after as they constitute the building blocks of a diverse range of emerging technologies such as integrated quantum information processing, quantum metrology and quantum photonics. In this presentation, we show the first observation of single photon emission from deep level defects in silicon carbide (SiC). The single photon emission is photo-stable at room temperature and surprisingly bright. This represents an exciting alternative to diamond color centers since SiC possesses well-established growth and device engineering protocols. The defect is assigned to the carbon vacancy-antisite pair which gives rise to the AB photoluminescence lines. We discuss its photo-physical properties and their fabrication via electron irradiation. Preliminary measurements on 3C SiC nano-structures will also be discussed. (author)

  18. Preliminary evaluation of PS300: A new self-lubricating high temperature composite coating for use to 800{degrees}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DellaCorte, C.; Edmonds, B.J.

    1996-12-31

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800{degrees}C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF{sub 2}/CaF{sub 2} eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating; which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650{degrees}C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  19. Plasma spraying process of disperse carbides for spraying and facing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Kostyukovich, T.G.; Ostapovich, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    A possibility to metallize carbides in plasma of impulsing capacitor discharge is considered. Powders granulation occurs during plasma spraying process, ceramic core being completely capped. X-ray phase and chemical analyses of coatings did not show considerable changes of carbon content in carbides before and after plasma processing. This distinguishes the process of carbides metallization in impulsing plasma from the similar processing in arc and high-frequency plasma generator. Use of powder composites produced in the impulsing capacitor discharge, for plasma spraying and laser facing permits 2-3 times increasing wear resistance of the surface layer as against the coatings produced from mechanical powders mixtures

  20. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Nanda, B. R. K.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m −2 and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface

  1. Adhesion at WC/diamond interfaces - A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padmanabhan, Haricharan [Department of Engineering Design, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India); Rao, M. S. Ramachandra [Department of Physics and Nano-Functional Materials Technology Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India); Nanda, B. R. K., E-mail: nandab@iitm.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai – 600036 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We investigate the adhesion at the interface of face-centered tungsten-carbide (001) and diamond (001) from density-functional calculations. Four high-symmetry model interfaces, representing different lattice orientations for either side of the interface, are constructed to incorporate different degrees of strain arising due to lattice mismatch. The adhesion, estimated from the ideal work of separation, is found to be in the range of 4 - 7 J m{sup −2} and is comparable to that of metal-carbide interfaces. Maximum adhesion occurs when WC and diamond slabs have the same orientation, even though such a growth induces large epitaxial strain at the interface. From electronic structure calculations, we attribute the adhesion to covalent interaction between carbon p-orbitals as well as partial ionic interaction between the tungsten d- and carbon p-orbitals across the interface.

  2. Diamond bio electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Robert; Doering, Patrick; Linares, Bryant

    2009-01-01

    The use of diamond for advanced applications has been the dream of mankind for centuries. Until recently this dream has been realized only in the use of diamond for gemstones and abrasive applications where tons of diamonds are used on an annual basis. Diamond is the material system of choice for many applications, but its use has historically been limited due to the small size, high cost, and inconsistent (and typically poor) quality of available diamond materials until recently. The recent development of high quality, single crystal diamond crystal growth via the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process has allowed physcists and increasingly scientists in the life science area to think beyond these limitations and envision how diamond may be used in advanced applications ranging from quantum computing, to power generation and molecular imaging, and eventually even diamond nano-bots. Because of diamond's unique properties as a bio-compatible material, better understanding of diamond's quantum effects and a convergence of mass production, semiconductor-like fabrication process, diamond now promises a unique and powerful key to the realization of the bio-electronic devices being envisioned for the new era of medical science. The combination of robust in-the-body diamond based sensors, coupled with smart bio-functionalized diamond devices may lead to diamond being the platform of choice for bio-electronics. This generation of diamond based bio-electronic devices would contribute substantially to ushering in a paradigm shift for medical science, leading to vastly improved patient diagnosis, decrease of drug development costs and risks, and improved effectiveness of drug delivery and gene therapy programs through better timed and more customized solutions.

  3. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  4. Calculation of vapour pressures over mixed carbide fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph, M.; Mathews, C.K.

    1988-01-01

    Vapour pressure over the uranium-plutonium mixed carbide (Usub(l-p) Pusub(p C) was calculated in the temperature range of 1300-9000 for various compositions (p=0.1 to 0.7). Effects of variation of the sesquicarbide content were also studied. The principle of corresponding states was applied to UC and mixed carbides to obtain the equation of state. (author)

  5. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  6. Diamond semiconducting devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polowczyk, M.; Klugmann, E.

    1999-01-01

    Many efforts to apply the semiconducting diamond for construction of electronic elements: resistors, thermistors, photoresistors, piezoresistors, hallotrons, pn diodes, Schottky diodes, IMPATT diodes, npn transistor, MESFETs and MISFETs are reviewed. Considering the possibilities of acceptor and donor doping, electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of diamond as well as high electric-field breakdown points, that diamond devices could be used at about 30-times higher frequency and more then 8200 times power than silicon devices. Except that, due to high heat resistant of diamond, it is concluded that diamond devices can be used in environment at high temperature, range of 600 o C. (author)

  7. Diamonds for beam instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griesmayer, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Diamond is perhaps the most versatile, efficient and radiation tolerant material available for use in beam detectors with a correspondingly wide range of applications in beam instrumentation. Numerous practical applications have demonstrated and exploited the sensitivity of diamond to charged particles, photons and neutrons. In this paper, a brief description of a generic diamond detector is given and the interaction of the CVD diamond detector material with protons, electrons, photons and neutrons is presented. Latest results of the interaction of sCVD diamond with 14 MeV mono-energetic neutrons are shown.

  8. Diamond Synthesis Employing Nanoparticle Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppireddi, Kishore (Inventor); Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Weiner, Brad R. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Iron nanoparticles were employed to induce the synthesis of diamond on molybdenum, silicon, and quartz substrates. Diamond films were grown using conventional conditions for diamond synthesis by hot filament chemical vapor deposition, except that dispersed iron oxide nanoparticles replaced the seeding. This approach to diamond induction can be combined with dip pen nanolithography for the selective deposition of diamond and diamond patterning while avoiding surface damage associated to diamond-seeding methods.

  9. Friction Properties of Polished Cvd Diamond Films Sliding against Different Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zichao; Sun, Fanghong; Shen, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Owing to their excellent mechanical and tribological properties, like the well-known extreme hardness, low coefficient of friction and high chemical inertness, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond films have found applications as a hard coating for drawing dies. The surface roughness of the diamond films is one of the most important attributes to the drawing dies. In this paper, the effects of different surface roughnesses on the friction properties of diamond films have been experimentally studied. Diamond films were fabricated using hot filament CVD. The WC-Co (Co 6wt.%) drawing dies were used as substrates. A gas mixture of acetone and hydrogen gas was used as the feedstock gas. The CVD diamond films were polished using mechanical polishing. Polished diamond films with three different surface roughnesses, as well as the unpolished diamond film, were fabricated in order to study the tribological performance between the CVD diamond films and different metals with oil lubrication. The unpolished and polished CVD diamond films are characterized with scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), surface profilometer, Raman spectrum and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The friction examinations were carried out by using a ball-on-plate type reciprocating friction tester. Low carbide steel, stainless steel, copper and aluminum materials were used as counterpart balls. Based on this study, the results presented the friction coefficients between the polished CVD films and different metals. The friction tests demonstrate that the smooth surface finish of CVD diamond films is beneficial for reducing their friction coefficients. The diamond films exhibit low friction coefficients when slid against the stainless steel balls and low carbide steel ball, lower than that slid against copper ball and aluminum ball, attributed to the higher ductility of copper and aluminum causing larger amount of wear debris adhering to the sliding interface and higher adhesive

  10. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Robert P [Kingwood, TX

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  11. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of PVD-Coated Cemented Carbide as Evaluated by a New Multipass Scratch-Testing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fallqvist

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new test method based on multipass scratch testing has been developed for evaluating the mechanical and tribological properties of thin, hard coatings. The proposed test method uses a pin-on-disc tribometer and during testing a Rockwell C diamond stylus is used as the “pin” and loaded against the rotating coated sample. The influence of normal load on the number of cycles to coating damage is investigated and the resulting coating damage mechanisms are evaluated by posttest scanning electron microscopy. The present study presents the test method by evaluating the performance of Ti0.86Si0.14N, Ti0.34Al0.66N, and (Al0.7Cr0.32O3 coatings deposited by cathodic arc evaporation on cemented carbide inserts. The results show that the test method is quick, simple, and reproducible and can preferably be used to obtain relevant data concerning the fatigue, wear, chipping, and spalling characteristics of different coating-substrate composites. The test method can be used as a virtually nondestructive test and, for example, be used to evaluate the fatigue and wear resistance as well as the cohesive and adhesive interfacial strength of coated cemented carbide inserts prior to cutting tests.

  12. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  13. Preparation and Fatigue Properties of Functionally Graded Cemented Carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yong; Liu Fengxiao; Liaw, Peter K.; He Yuehui

    2008-01-01

    Cemented carbides with a functionally graded structure have significantly improved mechanical properties and lifetimes in cutting, drilling and molding. In this work, WC-6 wt.% Co cemented carbides with three-layer graded structure (surface layer rich in WC, mid layer rich in Co and the inner part of the average composition) were prepared by carburizing pre-sintered η-phase-containing cemented carbides. The three-point bending fatigue tests based on the total-life approach were conducted on both WC-6wt%Co functionally graded cemented carbides (FGCC) and conventional WC-6wt%Co cemented carbides. The functionally graded cemented carbide shows a slightly higher fatigue limit (∼100 MPa) than the conventional ones under the present testing conditions. However, the fatigue crack nucleation behavior of FGCC is different from that of the conventional ones. The crack nucleates preferentially along the Co-gradient and perpendicular to the tension surface in FGCC, while parallel to the tension surface in conventional cemented carbides

  14. Single-Crystal Tungsten Carbide in High-Temperature In-Situ Additive Manufacturing Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolopus, James A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boatner, Lynn A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-05-18

    Nanoindenters are commonly used for measuring the mechanical properties of a wide variety of materials with both industrial and scientific applications. Typically, these instruments employ an indenter made of a material of suitable hardness bonded to an appropriate shaft or holder to create an indentation on the material being tested. While a variety of materials may be employed for the indenter, diamond and boron carbide are by far the most common materials used due to their hardness and other desirable properties. However, as the increasing complexity of new materials demands a broader range of testing capabilities, conventional indenter materials exhibit significant performance limitations. Among these are the inability of diamond indenters to perform in-situ measurements at temperatures above 600oC in air due to oxidation of the diamond material and subsequent degradation of the indenters mechanical properties. Similarly, boron carbide also fails at high temperature due to fracture. [1] Transition metal carbides possess a combination of hardness and mechanical properties at high temperatures that offer an attractive alternative to conventional indenter materials. Here we describe the technical aspects for the growth of single-crystal tungsten carbide (WC) for use as a high-temperature indenter material, and we examine a possible approach to brazing these crystals to a suitable mount for grinding and attachment to the indenter instrument. The use of a by-product of the recovery process is also suggested as possibly having commercial value.

  15. Lattice dynamics of α boron and of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vast, N.

    1999-01-01

    The atomic structure and the lattice dynamics of α boron and of B 4 C boron carbide have been studied by Density Functional Theory (D.F.T.) and Density Functional Perturbation Theory (D.F.P.T.). The bulk moduli of the unit-cell and of the icosahedron have been investigated, and the equation of state at zero temperature has been determined. In α boron, Raman diffusion and infrared absorption have been studied under pressure, and the theoretical and experimental Grueneisen coefficients have been compared. In boron carbide, inspection of the theoretical and experimental vibrational spectra has led to the determination of the atomic structure of B 4 C. Finally, the effects of isotopic disorder have been modeled by an exact method beyond the mean-field approximation, and the effects onto the Raman lines has been investigated. The method has been applied to isotopic alloys of diamond and germanium. (author)

  16. Spectral analysis of the structure of ultradispersed diamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglov, V. V.; Shimanski, V. I.; Rusalsky, D. P.; Samtsov, M. P.

    2008-07-01

    The structure of ultradispersed diamonds (UDD) is studied by spectral methods. The presence of diamond crystal phase in the UDD is found based on x-ray analysis and Raman spectra. The Raman spectra also show sp2-and sp3-hybridized carbon. Analysis of IR absorption spectra suggests that the composition of functional groups present in the particles changes during the treatment.

  17. Iron Carbides and Nitrides: Ancient Materials with Novel Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhantong; Zhang, Peng; Lei, Xiang; Wang, Xiaobai; Zhao, Nan; Yang, Hua

    2018-02-07

    Iron carbides and nitrides have aroused great interest in researchers, due to their excellent magnetic properties, good machinability and the particular catalytic activity. Based on these advantages, iron carbides and nitrides can be applied in various areas such as magnetic materials, biomedical, photo- and electrocatalysis. In contrast to their simple elemental composition, the synthesis of iron carbides and nitrides still has great challenges, particularly at the nanoscale, but it is usually beneficial to improve performance in corresponding applications. In this review, we introduce the investigations about iron carbides and nitrides, concerning their structure, synthesis strategy and various applications from magnetism to the catalysis. Furthermore, the future prospects are also discussed briefly. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Ferropericlase inclusions in ultradeep diamonds from Sao Luiz (Brazil): high Li abundances and diverse Li-isotope and trace element compositions suggest an origin from a subduction mélange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Hans-Michael; Brey, Gerhard P.; Harris, Jeffrey W.; Durali-Müller, Soodabeh; Ludwig, Thomas; Höfer, Heidi E.

    2018-05-01

    The most remarkable feature of the inclusion suite in ultradeep alluvial and kimberlitic diamonds from Sao Luiz (Juina area in Brazil) is the enormous range in Mg# [100xMg/(Mg + Fe)] of the ferropericlases (fper). The Mg-richer ferropericlases are from the boundary to the lower mantle or from the lower mantle itself when they coexist with ringwoodite or Mg- perovskite (bridgmanite). This, however, is not an explanation for the more Fe-rich members and a lowermost mantle or a "D" layer origin has been proposed for them. Such a suggested ultra-deep origin separates the Fe-rich fper-bearing diamonds from the rest of the Sao Luiz ultradeep diamond inclusion suite, which also contains Ca-rich phases. These are now thought to have an origin in the uppermost lower mantle and in the transition zone and to belong either to a peridotitic or mafic (subducted oceanic crust) protolith lithology. We analysed a new set of more Fe-rich ferropericlase inclusions from 10 Sao Luiz ultradeep alluvial diamonds for their Li isotope composition by solution MC-ICP-MS (multi collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), their major and minor elements by EPMA (electron probe micro-analyser) and their Li-contents by SIMS (secondary ion mass spectrometry), with the aim to understand the origin of the ferropericlase protoliths. Our new data confirm the wide range of ferropericlase Mg# that were reported before and augment the known lack of correlation between major and minor elements. Four pooled ferropericlase inclusions from four diamonds provided sufficient material to determine for the first time their Li isotope composition, which ranges from δ7Li + 9.6 ‰ to -3.9 ‰. This wide Li isotopic range encompasses that of serpentinized ocean floor peridotites including rodingites and ophicarbonates, fresh and altered MORB (mid ocean ridge basalt), seafloor sediments and of eclogites. This large range in Li isotopic composition, up to 5 times higher than `primitive upper mantle' Li

  19. Detection of diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.O.; Blondeel, E.J.G.; Taylor, G.T.

    1991-01-01

    Diamond particles are distinguished from non-diamond, associated particles on the basis of their higher refractive index. The particles are brought to a specific location, typically in a stream of water flowing full in a vertical duct, and a beam of collimated electromagnetic radiation is directed at them. An array of radiation detectors is provided to detect refracted and/or reflected radiation. The array is so configured that the responses of the detectors, considered collectively, will be indicative of the presence of a diamond when a diamond is in fact present. However, when a particle having a substantially lower refractive index is present, the responses of the detectors will not be so indicative. The diamond and non-diamond particles can subsequently be sorted from one another

  20. Joining elements of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of joining together at least two silicon carbide elements (e.g.in forming a heat exchanger) is described, comprising subjecting to sufficiently non-oxidizing atmosphere and sufficiently high temperature, material placed in space between the elements. The material consists of silicon carbide particles, carbon and/or a precursor of carbon, and silicon, such that it forms a joint joining together at least two silicon carbide elements. At least one of the elements may contain silicon. (author)

  1. SiC interlayer by laser-cladding on WC-Co substrates for CVD diamond deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contin, Andre; Fraga, Mariana Amorim; Vieira, Jose; Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Corat, Evaldo Jose, E-mail: andrecontin@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Campos, Raonei Alves [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para (UNIFESSPA), Belem, PA (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Getulio [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Despite their huge industrial potential and commercial interest, the direct diamond coating on cemented carbide (WC-Co) is limited, mainly because of the catalytic effect of Cobalt (Co) and the high difference in thermal expansion coefficient [1]. This results in poor adherence between diamond and WC-Co. In addition, the low diamond film adhesion to the cemented carbide useless for machining applications. Removal of Co binder from the substrate surface by superficial etching is one of the techniques used to improve the adhesion between diamond and WC-Co. For the present study, diamond films were deposited on WC-Co substrates with an intermediate barrier to block the Co diffusion to the surface substrate. The laser cladding process produced the SiC barrier, in which a powder layer is melted by a laser irradiation to create the coating on the substrate. The use of laser cladding is the novel method for an intermediate barrier for cemented carbides. The advantages of laser cladding include a faster processing speed, precision, versatility. We reported the application of pretreatment method called ESND (Electrostatic self-assembly seeding of nanocrystalline diamond). The nucleation density was around 10{sup 11}part/cm{sup 2}. Diamond films were grown by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition. Characterization of samples included Field Emission Gun-Scanning Electron Microscopy (FEG-SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman Scattering Spectroscopy. Results showed that laser irradiation formed stable Co compounds in the interfacial barrier. It is because nucleation and good quality of diamond film since the cobalt are no longer free to migrate to the surface during the CVD diamond deposition. Reference: [1] Y. X. Cui, B. Shen, F. H. Sun. Diamond deposition on WC–Co substrate with amorphous SiC interlayer, Surface Engineering, 30, (2014) 237-243. (author)

  2. Diamond-cleaning investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.

    Four parcels of diamonds which either had or had not been cleaned using the usual techniques, chiefly involving etch in molten potassium nitrate were supplied by De Beers Diamond Research Laboratories. Each parcel contained about 40 stones, amounting to about 10 carats. Half the diamonds in each parcel were cleaned by a standard procedure involving half an hours ultrasonic agitation in a 20% solution of the commercial detergent 'Contrad' which is effectively a surfactant and chelating agent. Visual comparisons by a number of observers who were not told the stones' histories, established that these diamonds generally had a more sparkling appearance after the cleaning procedure had been applied

  3. Optical engineering of diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Rabeau, James R

    2013-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on the engineering of diamond optical devices. It will give readers an up-to-date account of the properties of optical quality synthetic diamond (single crystal, nanodiamond and polycrystalline) and reviews the large and growing field of engineering of diamond-based optical devices, with applications in quantum computation, nano-imaging, high performance lasers, and biomedicine. It aims to provide scientists, engineers and physicists with a valuable resource and reference book for the design and performance of diamond-based optical devices.

  4. Neutron irradiation damage in transition metal carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Hisayuki; Nesaki, Kouji; Kiritani, Michio

    1991-01-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation on the physical properties of light transition metal carbides, TiC x , VC x and NbC x , were examined, emphasizing the characterization of irradiation induced defects in the nonstoichiometric composition. TiC x irradiated with 14 MeV (fusion) neutrons showed higher damage rates with increasing C/Ti (x) ratio. A brief discussion is made on 'cascade damage' in TiC x irradiated with fusion neutrons. Two other carbides (VC x and NbC x ) were irradiated with fission reactor neutrons. The irradiation effects on VC x were not so simple, because of the complex irradiation behavior of 'ordered' phases. For instance, complete disordering was revealed in an ordered phase, 'V 8 C 7 ', after an irradiation dose of 10 25 n/m 2 . (orig.)

  5. Investigations on diamond nanostructuring of different morphologies by the reactive-ion etching process and their potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunuku, Srinivasu; Sankaran, Kamatchi Jothiramalingam; Tsai, Cheng-Yen; Chang, Wen-Hao; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan

    2013-08-14

    We report the systematic studies on the fabrication of aligned, uniform, and highly dense diamond nanostructures from diamond films of various granular structures. Self-assembled Au nanodots are used as a mask in the self-biased reactive-ion etching (RIE) process, using an O2/CF4 process plasma. The morphology of diamond nanostructures is a close function of the initial phase composition of diamond. Cone-shaped and tip-shaped diamond nanostructures result for microcrystalline diamond (MCD) and nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films, whereas pillarlike and grasslike diamond nanostructures are obtained for Ar-plasma-based and N2-plasma-based ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films, respectively. While the nitrogen-incorporated UNCD (N-UNCD) nanograss shows the most-superior electron-field-emission properties, the NCD nanotips exhibit the best photoluminescence properties, viz, different applications need different morphology of diamond nanostructures to optimize the respective characteristics. The optimum diamond nanostructure can be achieved by proper choice of granular structure of the initial diamond film. The etching mechanism is explained by in situ observation of optical emission spectrum of RIE plasma. The preferential etching of sp(2)-bonded carbon contained in the diamond films is the prime factor, which forms the unique diamond nanostructures from each type of diamond films. However, the excited oxygen atoms (O*) are the main etching species of diamond film.

  6. Microstructural studies of carbides in MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotok, A.; Rodak, K.

    2012-05-01

    Carbides play an important role in the strengthening of microstructures of nickel-based superalloys. Grain boundary carbides prevent or retard grain-boundary sliding and make the grain boundary stronger. Carbides can also tie up certain elements that would otherwise promote phase instability during service. Various types of carbides are possible in the microstructure of nickel-based superalloys, depending on the superalloy composition and processing. In this paper, scanning electron and scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of carbides occurring in the microstructure of polycrystalline MAR-M247 nickel-based superalloy were carried out. In the present work, MC and M23C6 carbides in the MAR-M247 microstructure were examined.

  7. Diamond network: template-free fabrication and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Hao; Yang, Nianjun; Fu, Haiyuan; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Chun; Huang, Nan; Jiang, Xin

    2015-03-11

    A porous diamond network with three-dimensionally interconnected pores is of technical importance but difficult to be produced. In this contribution, we demonstrate a simple, controllable, and "template-free" approach to fabricate diamond networks. It combines the deposition of diamond/β-SiC nanocomposite film with a wet-chemical selective etching of the β-SiC phase. The porosity of these networks was tuned from 15 to 68%, determined by the ratio of the β-SiC phase in the composite films. The electrochemical working potential and the reactivity of redox probes on the diamond networks are similar to those of a flat nanocrystalline diamond film, while their surface areas are hundreds of times larger than that of a flat diamond film (e.g., 490-fold enhancement for a 3 μm thick diamond network). The marriage of the unprecedented physical/chemical features of diamond with inherent advantages of the porous structure makes the diamond network a potential candidate for various applications such as water treatment, energy conversion (batteries or fuel cells), and storage (capacitors), as well as electrochemical and biochemical sensing.

  8. Formation Energies and Electronic Properties of Vanadium Carbides Found in High Strength Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Krista; Medvedeva, Julia

    2013-03-01

    Carbide formation and stabilization in steels is of great interest owing to its effect on the microstructure and properties of the Fe-based alloys. The appearance of carbides with different metal/C ratios strongly depends on the carbon concentration, alloy composition as well as the heat treatment. Strong carbide-forming elements such as Ti, V, and Nb have been used in microalloyed steels; with VC showing an increased solubility in the iron matrix as compared with TiC and NbC. This allows for dissolution of the VC into the steel during heating and fine precipitation during cooling. In addition to VC, the primary vanadium carbide with cubic structure, a wide range of non-stoichiometric compositions VCy with y varying from 0.72 to 0.88, has been observed. This range includes two ordered compounds, V8C7 and V6C5. In this study, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is employed to examine the stability of the binary carbides by calculating their formation energies. We compare the local structures (atomic coordination, bond distances and angles) and the density of states in optimized geometries of the carbides. Further, the effect of alloying additions, such as niobium and titanium, on the carbide stabilization is investigated. We determine the energetically preferable substitutional atom location in each carbide and study the impurity distribution as well as its role in the carbide formation energy and electronic structure.

  9. Diamond Nucleation Using Polyethene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morell, Gerardo (Inventor); Makarov, Vladimir (Inventor); Varshney, Deepak (Inventor); Weiner, Brad (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention presents a simple, non-destructive and non-abrasive method of diamond nucleation using polyethene. It particularly describes the nucleation of diamond on an electrically viable substrate surface using polyethene via chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique in a gaseous environment.

  10. Diamond films: Historical perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messier, R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This section is a compilation of notes and published international articles about the development of methods of depositing diamond films. Vapor deposition articles are included from American, Russian, and Japanese publications. The international competition to develop new deposition methodologies is stressed. The current status of chemical vapor deposition of diamond is assessed.

  11. Diamond Pixel Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Doroshenko, J.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foster, J.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Gobbi, B.; Grim, G.P.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Lander, R.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Lynne, L.M.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Plano, R.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rott, C.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2001-01-01

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles

  12. Diamond Pixel Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Doroshenko, J.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foster, J.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Gobbi, B.; Grim, G.P.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Lander, R.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Lynne, L.M.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Perera, L. E-mail: perera@physics.rutgers.edu; Pirollo, S.; Plano, R.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rott, C.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M

    2001-06-01

    Diamond based pixel detectors are a promising radiation-hard technology for use at the LHC. We present first results on a CMS diamond pixel sensor. With a threshold setting of 2000 electrons, an average pixel efficiency of 78% was obtained for normally incident minimum ionizing particles.

  13. Investing in Diamonds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renneboog, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the risk-return characteristics of investment grade gems (white diamonds, colored diamonds and other types of gems including sapphires, rubies, and emeralds). The transactions are coming from gem auctions and span the period 1999-2012. Over our time frame, the annual nominal USD

  14. Method and article of manufacture corresponding to a composite comprised of ultra nonacrystalline diamond, metal, and other nanocarbons useful for thermoelectric and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruen, Dieter M.

    2010-05-18

    One provides (101) disperse ultra-nanocrystalline diamond powder material that comprises a plurality of substantially ordered crystallites that are each sized no larger than about 10 nanometers. One then reacts (102) these crystallites with a metallic component. The resultant nanowire is then able to exhibit a desired increase with respect to its ability to conduct electricity while also substantially preserving the thermal conductivity behavior of the disperse ultra-nanocrystalline diamond powder material. The reaction process can comprise combining (201) the crystallites with one or more metal salts in an aqueous solution and then heating (203) that aqueous solution to remove the water. This heating can occur in a reducing atmosphere (comprising, for example, hydrogen and/or methane) to also reduce the salt to metal.

  15. The effect of irradiation on the stability and properties of monolithic silicon carbide and SiCf/SiC composites up to 25 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Henager, C.H. Jr.; Youngblood, G.E.; Trimble, D.J.; Simonson, S.A.; Newsome, G.A.; Lewis, E.

    1994-04-01

    Stability and properties of monolithic and SiC f /SiC composites were measured before and after irradiation in a fast neutron spectrum up to 25 dpa between 500 and 1500C. Dimensional changes were relatively consistent with previous investigations. Strength and modulus of SiC f /SiC composites decreased after irradiation as a result of fiber/matrix decoupling. For some composites, uniform elongation was not significantly degraded by irradiation. Thermal conductivity also decreased after irradiation at low temperatures because of the introduction of lattice defects as phonon scattering sites. Retention of properties under the severe conditions of 25 dpa and 800C suggests that a composite tailored for neutron damage resistance can be developed

  16. Degradation in the fatigue strength of dentin by diamond bur preparations: Importance of cutting direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majd, B; Majd, H; Porter, J A; Romberg, E; Arola, D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to evaluate the degradation in fatigue strength of dentin by diamond bur preparations and to identify the importance of cutting direction. Three groups of coronal dentin specimens were prepared from unrestored third molars, including a flaw free "control," and two groups that received a diamond bur cutting treatment performed parallel or perpendicular to the specimen length. The specimens were subjected to static or cyclic flexural loading to failure and the results were compared with data for carbide bur cutting. Under static loading diamond bur cutting resulted in significantly lower flexure strength (p ≤ 0.05) than the control for both cutting directions (from 154 to ∼124 MPa). However, there was no significant difference in the strength between the control and carbide bur treated specimens. Similarly, the fatigue strength of the diamond bur treated specimens was significantly lower (p ≤ 0.0001) than that of the control for both cutting directions. Cutting in the perpendicular direction resulted in nearly 60% reduction to the endurance limit (from 44 to 19 MPa). Based on the results, diamond bur cutting of cavity preparations causes a reduction in the fatigue strength of dentin, regardless of the cutting direction. To maintain the durability of dentin, cavity preparations introduced using diamond burs must be performed with appropriate cutting direction and followed by a finishing pass. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  18. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagle, Dennis; Zhang, Dajie

    2009-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm -3 (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  19. Noble gas studies in vapor-growth diamonds: Comparison with shock-produced diamonds and the origin of diamonds in ureilites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Junichi; Fukunaga, Kazuya; Ito, Keisuke (Kobe Univ. (Japan))

    1991-07-01

    The authors synthesized vapor-trowth diamonds by two kinds of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) using microwave (MWCVD) and hot filament (HFCVD) ionization of gases, and examined elemental abundances and isotopic compositions of the noble gases trapped in the diamonds. It is remarkable that strong differences existed in the noble gas concentrations in the two kinds of CVD diamonds: large amounts of noble gases were trapped in the MWCVD diamonds, but not in the HFCVD diamonds. The heavy noble gases (Ar to Xe) in the MWCVD diamonds were highly fractionated compared with those in the ambient atmosphere, and are in good agreement with the calculated fractionation patterns for plasma at an electron temperature of 7,000-9,000 K. These results strongly suggest that the trapping mechanism of noble gases in CVD diamonds is ion implantation during diamond growth. The degrees of fractionation of heavy noble gases were also in good agreement with those in ureilites. The vapor-growth hypothesis is discussed in comparison with the impact-shock hypothesis as a better model for the origin of diamonds in ureilites. The diamond (and graphite, amorphous carbon, too) may have been deposited on early condensates such as Re, Ir, W, etc. This model explains the chemical features of vein material in ureilites; the refractory siderophile elements are enriched in carbon and noble gases and low in normal siderophiles. The vapor-growth model is also compatible with the oxygen isotopic data of ureilites which suggests that nebular processes are primarily responsible for the composition of ureilites.

  20. Metal Carbides for Biomass Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine E. Chan-Thaw

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal carbides have been utilized as an alternative catalyst to expensive noble metals for the conversion of biomass. Tungsten and molybdenum carbides have been shown to be effective catalysts for hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation and isomerization reactions. The satisfactory activities of these metal carbides and their low costs, compared with noble metals, make them appealing alternatives and worthy of further investigation. In this review, we succinctly describe common synthesis techniques, including temperature-programmed reaction and carbothermal hydrogen reduction, utilized to prepare metal carbides used for biomass transformation. Attention will be focused, successively, on the application of transition metal carbide catalysts in the transformation of first-generation (oils and second-generation (lignocellulose biomass to biofuels and fine chemicals.

  1. Machinability of Al-SiC metal matrix composites using WC, PCD and MCD inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beristain, J.; Gonzalo, O.; Sanda, A.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this work is the study of the machinability of aluminium-silicon carbide Metal Matrix Composites (MMC) in turning operations. The cutting tools used were hard metal (WC) with and without coating, different grades and geometries of Poly-Crystalline Diamond (PCD) and Mono-Crystalline Diamond (MCD). The work piece material was AMC225xe, composed of aluminium-copper alloy AA 2124 and 25% wt of SiC, being the size of the SiC particles around 3 {mu}m. Experiments were conducted at various cutting speeds and cutting parameters in facing finishing operations, measuring the surface roughness, cutting forces and tool wear. The worn surface of the cutting tool was examined by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). It was observed that the Built Up Edge (BUE) and stuck material is higher in the MCD tools than in the PCD tools. The BUE acts as a protective layer against abrasive wear of the tool. (Author)

  2. Thermal conductivity and retention characteristics of composites made of boron carbide and carbon fibers with extremely high thermal conductivity for first wall armour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimbou, R.; Kodama, K.; Saidoh, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Nakagawa, M.; Morita, K.; Tsuchiya, B.

    1997-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of the composite hot-pressed at 2100°C including B 4C and carbon fibers with a thermal conductivity of 1100 W/ m· K was nearly the same as that of the composite including carbon fibers with a thermal conductivity of 600 W/ m· K. This resulted from the higher amount of B diffused into the carbon fibers through the larger interface. The B 4C content in the composite can be reduced from 35 to 20 vol% which resulted from the more uniform distribution of B 4C by stacking the flat cloth woven of carbon fibers (carbon fiber plain fabrics) than in the composite with 35 vol% B 4C including curled carbon fiber plain fabrics. The decrease in the B 4C content does not result in the degradation of D (deuterium)-retention characteristics or D-recycling property, but will bring about the decreased amount of the surface layer to be melted under the bombardment of high energy hydrogen ions such as disruptions because of higher thermal conduction of the composite.

  3. Room temperature pulsed laser deposition of Si{sub x} C thin films in different compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyecz, I.; Budai, J. [University of Szeged, Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, P.O. Box 406, Szeged (Hungary); Oszko, A. [University of Szeged, Department of Solid State and Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 168, Szeged (Hungary); Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, Budapest (Hungary); Toth, Z. [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 406, Szeged (Hungary)

    2010-09-15

    Amorphous silicon-carbon alloy films in different compositions were prepared by pulsed laser deposition from two-component targets containing pure silicon and carbon parts. The silicon-carbon ratio in the films was varied by adjusting the number of laser shots on the constituent silicon and carbon targets. The composition, optical properties, thickness, and bonding structure of the films were determined by backscattering spectrometry, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Backscattering spectrometry data were used to determine the deposition rate of silicon and carbon. This enabled the calculation of the number of the shots onto each target to reach a predefined composition. As the film composition changed from carbon to silicon, it was shown that the microscopic and macroscopic properties of the films also changed from a diamond-like carbon phase to an amorphous silicon phase via graphite- and silicon-carbide-like composite. (orig.)

  4. Tracing the depositional history of Kalimantan diamonds by zircon provenance and diamond morphology studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueter, Nico; Soesilo, Joko; Fedortchouk, Yana; Nestola, Fabrizio; Belluco, Lorenzo; Troch, Juliana; Wälle, Markus; Guillong, Marcel; Von Quadt, Albrecht; Driesner, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Diamonds in alluvial deposits in Southeast Asia are not accompanied by indicator minerals suggesting primary kimberlite or lamproite sources. The Meratus Mountains in Southeast Borneo (Province Kalimantan Selatan, Indonesia) provide the largest known deposit of these so-called "headless" diamond deposits. Proposals for the origin of Kalimantan diamonds include the adjacent Meratus ophiolite complex, ultra-high pressure (UHP) metamorphic terranes, obducted subcontinental lithospheric mantle and undiscovered kimberlite-type sources. Here we report results from detailed sediment provenance analysis of diamond-bearing Quaternary river channel material and from representative outcrops of the oldest known formations within the Alino Group, including the diamond-bearing Campanian-Maastrichtian Manunggul Formation. Optical examination of surfaces of diamonds collected from artisanal miners in the Meratus area (247 stones) and in West Borneo (Sanggau Area, Province Kalimantan Barat; 85 stones) points toward a classical kimberlite-type source for the majority of these diamonds. Some of the diamonds host mineral inclusions suitable for deep single-crystal X-ray diffraction investigation. We determined the depth of formation of two olivines, one coesite and one peridotitic garnet inclusion. Pressure of formation estimates for the peridotitic garnet at independently derived temperatures of 930-1250 °C are between 4.8 and 6.0 GPa. Sediment provenance analysis includes petrography coupled to analyses of detrital garnet and glaucophane. The compositions of these key minerals do not indicate kimberlite-derived material. By analyzing almost 1400 zircons for trace element concentrations with laser ablation ICP-MS (LA-ICP-MS) we tested the mineral's potential as an alternative kimberlite indicator. The screening ultimately resulted in a small subset of ten zircons with a kimberlitic affinity. Subsequent U-Pb dating resulting in Cretaceous ages plus a detailed chemical reflection make

  5. Effect of TiO2/Al2O3 film coated diamond abrasive particles by sol-gel technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weida; Wan, Long; Liu, Xiaopan; Li, Qiang; Wang, Zhiqi

    2011-04-01

    The diamond abrasive particles were coated with the TiO2/Al2O3 film by the sol-gel technique. Compared with the uncoated diamonds, the TiO2/Al2O3 film was excellent material for the protection of the diamonds. The results showed that the incipient oxidation temperature of the TiO2/Al2O3 film coated diamonds in air atmosphere was 775 °C, which was higher 175 °C than that of the uncoated diamonds. And the coated diamonds also had better the diamond's single particle compressive strength and the impact toughness than that of uncoated diamonds after sintering at 750 °C. For the vitrified bond grinding wheels, replacing the uncoated diamonds with the TiO2/Al2O3 film coated diamonds, the volume expansion of the grinding wheels decreased from 6.2% to 3.4%, the porosity decreased from 35.7% to 25.7%, the hardness increased from 61.2HRC to 66.5HRC and the grinding ratio of the vitrified bond grinding wheels to carbide alloy (YG8) increased from 11.5 to 19.1.

  6. Brazing diamond/Cu composite to alumina using reactive Ag-Cu-Ti alloy%金刚石/铜复合材料与氧化铝陶瓷的Ag-Cu-Ti活性钎焊

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴茂; 曹车正; Rafi-ud-din; 何新波; 曲选辉

    2013-01-01

    The novel properties of diamond/Cu composites such as low thermal expansion coefficient and high thermal conductivity have rendered the composites a valuable packaging material. The reactive brazing of diamond/Cu composites and alumina was performed using the 97%(72Ag−28Cu)−3%Ti alloy. The reactive brazing alloy displays good wettability with alumina and diamond film, and the equilibrium contact angle on both the substrates is found to be less than 5º. The influence of main bonding conditions such as peak heating temperature and holding time was investigated in detail. It is found that Ti element concentrates at the surface of diamond particle resulting in the formation of TiC compound. The morphology of TiC compound exhibits a close relationship with the shear strength of brazing joint. It is surmised that an optimal thickness of TiC layer on the diamond particle surface can ameliorate the shear strength of brazing joint. However, on the contrary, the particle-like shaped TiC compound or a thicker TiC compound layer can impair the shear strength. The maximum shear strength is found to be 117 MPa.%金刚石/铜复合材料具有低膨胀系数和高热导率等优异性能,使其成为一种理想的电子封装材料。采用97%(72Ag−28Cu)−3%Ti 活性钎料对金刚石/铜复合材料和氧化铝陶瓷进行钎焊。发现活性钎料在氧化铝陶瓷和金刚石薄膜表面均具有良好的润湿性,在两者表面的平衡润湿角均小于5°。讨论了主要钎焊条件(如钎焊温度和保温时间等)对接头性能的影响。发现钎焊过程中Ti元素聚集在金刚石颗粒的表面形成TiC化合物,且TiC化合物的形貌与钎焊接头的剪切强度具有紧密联系。推测合适的TiC化合物层厚度可改善钎焊接头的剪切强度,而颗粒状的TiC化合物及过厚的TiC化合物层却会损害钎焊接头的性能。获得的最大剪切强度为117 MPa。

  7. Progress in Studies on Carbon and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposite Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, P.; Chen, J.; Xian-feng, X.

    2010-01-01

    Silicon carbide nanofiber and carbon nanotubes are introduced. The structure and application of nanotubers (nanofibers) in carbon/carbon composites are emphatically presented. Due to the unique structure of nanotubers (nanofibers), they can modify the microstructure of pyrocarbon and induce the deposition of pyrocarbon with high text in carbon/carbon composites. So the carbon/carbon composites modified by CNT/CNF have more excellent properties.

  8. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  9. Obtainment, machining and wear of metal matrix composites processed by powder metallurgy; Obtencao, usinagem e desgaste de materiais compositos de matriz metalica processados via metalurgia do po

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesus, Edilson Rosa Barbosa de. E-mail: erbjesus@usp.br

    1998-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was the obtainment of metal matrix composites (MMC) by the route of powder metallurgy, and the valuation of these materials with relation to their machining and wear characteristics. Firstly, were obtained pure commercial aluminium matrix composites materials, with 5, 10 and 15% volumetric fraction of silicon carbide particles. Was also obtained a material without reinforcement particles in order to verify by comparison, the influence of addition of reinforcement particles. The obtained materials were characterized physics (hydrostatic density), mechanics (hardness and tensile tests) and microstructurally (optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy). The results showed a homogeneous distribution of reinforcement particles in the composite, and improvement in the mechanical properties, mainly tensile strength (UTS) in comparison to the unreinforced material. After, tests were made to verify the materials behavior during machining and to check the performance of several tool materials (cemented carbide, ceramics and polycrystalline diamond). In these tests, values of the cutting force were measured by instrumented tool-holders. Phenomena such as tool wear, built-up edge formation and mechanism of chip formation were also observed and evaluated. The results from the cemented carbide tool tests, were utilised for the machinability index determination of each material. These results were applied to the Taylor equation and the equation constants for each material and test conditions were determined. The results showed that the inclusion of silicon carbide particles made extremely difficult the machining of the composites, and only with diamond tool, satisfactory results were obtained. At last, wear tests were performed to verify the influence of the reinforcement particles in the characteristics of wear resistance of the materials. The results obtained were utilized in the wear coefficient determination for each material. The

  10. Titanium Matrix Composite Pressure Vessel, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For over 15 years, FMW Composite Systems has developed Metal Matrix Composite manufacturing methodologies for fabricating silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced titanium...

  11. Diamond as a scaffold for bone growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Kate; Palamara, Joseph; Judge, Roy; Greentree, Andrew D

    2013-04-01

    Diamond is an attractive material for biomedical implants. In this work, we investigate its capacity as a bone scaffold. It is well established that the bioactivity of a material can be evaluated by examining its capacity to form apatite-like calcium phosphate phases on its surface when exposed to simulated body fluid. Accordingly, polycrystalline diamond (PCD) and ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition were exposed to simulated body fluid and assessed for apatite growth when compared to the bulk silicon. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that both UNCD and PCD are capable of acting as a bone scaffold. The composition of deposited apatite suggests that UNCD and PCD are suitable for in vivo implantation with UNCD possible favoured in applications where rapid osseointegration is essential.

  12. Graphitization of diamond with a metallic coating on ferritic matrix; Grafitizacao do diamante com revestimento metalico em matriz ferritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Stenio Cavalier; Oliveira, Hellen Cristine Prata de; Filgueira, Marcello, E-mail: stenio@uenf.b [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (PPGECM/CCT/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologia. Programa de Pos Graduacao em Engenharia e Ciencia dos Materiais

    2010-07-01

    Iron is a strong catalyst of graphitization of diamonds. This graphitization occurs mainly during the processing of composites - conventional sintering or hot pressing, and during cutting operations. Aiming to avoid or minimize this deleterious effect, there is increasing use of diamond coated with metallic materials in the production of diamond tools processed via powder metallurgy. This work studies the influence of Fe on diamond graphitization diamond-coated Ti after mixing of Fe-diamonds, hot pressing parameters were performed with 3 minutes/35MPa/900 deg C - this is the condition of pressing hot used in industry for production of diamond tools. Microstructural features were observed by SEM, diffusion of Fe in diamond was studied by EDS. Graphitization was analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. It was found that Fe not activate graphitization on the diamond under the conditions of hot pressing. (author)

  13. On the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tool for the effective machining of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, Balaji; Rao, Balkrishna C; Ramachandra Rao, M S

    2017-01-01

    This work is focused on the development of a dual-layered diamond-coated tungsten carbide tool for machining titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. A hot-filament chemical vapor deposition technique was used to synthesize diamond films on tungsten carbide tools. A boron-doped diamond interlayer was added to a microcrystalline diamond layer in an attempt to improve the interface adhesion strength. The dual-layered diamond-coated tool was employed in machining at cutting speeds in the range of 70 to 150 m min −1 with a lower feed and a lower depth of cut of 0.5 mm rev −1 and 0.5 mm, respectively, to operate in the transition from adhesion- to diffusion-tool-wear and thereby arrive at suitable conditions for enhancing tool life. The proposed tool was then compared, on the basis of performance under real-time cutting conditions, with commercially available microcrystalline diamond, nanocrystalline diamond, titanium nitride and uncoated tungsten carbide tools. The life and surface finish of the proposed dual-layered tool and uncoated tungsten carbide were also investigated in interrupted cutting such as milling. The results of this study show a significant improvement in tool life and finish of Ti-6Al-4V parts machined with the dual-layered diamond-coated tool when compared with its uncoated counterpart. These results pave the way for the use of a low-cost tool, with respect to, polycrystalline diamond for enhancing both tool life and machining productivity in critical sectors fabricating parts out of titanium Ti-6Al-4V alloy. The application of this coating technology can also be extended to the machining of non-ferrous alloys owing to its better adhesion strength. (paper)

  14. Friction and wear properties of diamonds and diamond coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    The recent development of chemical vapor deposition techniques for diamond growth enables bearings to be designed which exploit diamond's low friction and extreme resistance to wear. However, currently produced diamond coatings differ from natural diamond surfaces in that they are polycrystalline and faceted, and often contain appreciable amounts of non-diamond material (i.e. graphitic or amorphous carbon). Roughness, in particular, influences the friction and wear properties; rough coatings severely abrade softer materials, and can even wear natural diamond sliders. Nevertheless, the best available coatings exhibit friction coefficients as low as those of natural diamond and are highly resistant to wear. This paper reviews the tribological properties of natural diamond, and compares them with those of chemical vapor deposited diamond coatings. Emphasis is placed on the roles played by roughness and material transfer in controlling frictional behavior. (orig.)

  15. Effect of plasma composition on nanocrystalline diamond layers deposited by a microwave linear antenna plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taylor, Andrew; Ashcheulov, Petr; Čada, Martin; Fekete, Ladislav; Hubík, Pavel; Klimša, Ladislav; Olejníček, Jiří; Remeš, Zdeněk; Jirka, Ivan; Janíček, P.; Bedel-Pereira, E.; Kopeček, Jaromír; Mistrík, J.; Mortet, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 212, č. 11 (2015), s. 2418-2423 ISSN 1862-6300 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-31783S; GA MŠk LO1409 Grant - others:FUNBIO(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/21568 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61388955 Keywords : diamond * electrical conductivity * nanocrystalline materials * optical emission spectroscopy * plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition * SiC Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.648, year: 2015

  16. MC Carbide Characterization in High Refractory Content Powder-Processed Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Stoichko; Chen, Wei; Huo, Jiajie; Feng, Qiang; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Sun, Eugene; Tin, Sammy

    2018-04-01

    Carbide precipitates in Ni-based superalloys are considered to be desirable phases that can contribute to improving high-temperature properties as well as aid in microstructural refinement of the material; however, they can also serve as crack initiation sites during fatigue. To date, most of the knowledge pertaining to carbide formation has originated from assessments of cast and wrought Ni-based superalloys. As powder-processed Ni-based superalloys are becoming increasingly widespread, understanding the different mechanisms by which they form becomes increasingly important. Detailed characterization of MC carbides present in two experimental high Nb-content powder-processed Ni-based superalloys revealed that Hf additions affect the resultant carbide morphologies. This morphology difference was attributed to a higher magnitude of elastic strain energy along the interface associated with Hf being soluble in the MC carbide lattice. The composition of the MC carbides was studied through atom probe tomography and consisted of a complex carbonitride core, which was rich in Nb and with slight Hf segregation, surrounded by an Nb carbide shell. The characterization results of the segregation behavior of Hf in the MC carbides and the subsequent influence on their morphology were compared to density functional theory calculations and found to be in good agreement, suggesting that computational modeling can successfully be used to tailor carbide features.

  17. Rhenium Alloys as Ductile Substrates for Diamond Thin-Film Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M; Martin, Heidi B

    2014-02-01

    Molybdenum-rhenium (Mo/Re) and tungsten-rhenium (W/Re) alloys were investigated as substrates for thin-film, polycrystalline boron-doped diamond electrodes. Traditional, carbide-forming metal substrates adhere strongly to diamond but lose their ductility during exposure to the high-temperature (1000°C) diamond, chemical vapor deposition environment. Boron-doped semi-metallic diamond was selectively deposited for up to 20 hours on one end of Mo/Re (47.5/52.5 wt.%) and W/Re (75/25 wt.%) alloy wires. Conformal diamond films on the alloys displayed grain sizes and Raman signatures similar to films grown on tungsten; in all cases, the morphology and Raman spectra were consistent with well-faceted, microcrystalline diamond with minimal sp 2 carbon content. Cyclic voltammograms of dopamine in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) showed the wide window and low baseline current of high-quality diamond electrodes. In addition, the films showed consistently well-defined, dopamine electrochemical redox activity. The Mo/Re substrate regions that were uncoated but still exposed to the diamond-growth environment remained substantially more flexible than tungsten in a bend-to-fracture rotation test, bending to the test maximum of 90° and not fracturing. The W/Re substrates fractured after a 27° bend, and the tungsten fractured after a 21° bend. Brittle, transgranular cleavage fracture surfaces were observed for tungsten and W/Re. A tension-induced fracture of the Mo/Re after the prior bend test showed a dimple fracture with a visible ductile core. Overall, the Mo/Re and W/Re alloys were suitable substrates for diamond growth. The Mo/Re alloy remained significantly more ductile than traditional tungsten substrates after diamond growth, and thus may be an attractive metal substrate for more ductile, thin-film diamond electrodes.

  18. Diamond films on stainless steel substrates with an interlayer applied by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contin, Andre; Alves, Kenya Aparecida; Damm, Djoille Denner; Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir Jesus; Corat, Evaldo Jose, E-mail: andrecontin@yahoo.com.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (LAS/INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais; Campos, Raonei Alves [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para (UNIFESSPA), Maraba, PA (Brazil); Vasconcelos, Getulio de [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (DedALO/IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Laboratorio de Desenvolvimento de Aplicacoes de Lasers e Optica

    2017-03-15

    The objective of this work is the Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition (HFCVD) of diamond films on stainless steel substrates using a new technique for intermediate barrier forming, made by laser cladding process. In this technique, a powder layer is irradiated by a laser beam to melt the powder layer and the substrate surface layer to create the interlayer. The control of the laser beam parameters allows creating homogeneous coating layers, in rather large area in few seconds. In this work, the silicon carbide powder (SiC) was used to create an intermediate layer. Before the diamond growth, the samples were subjected to the seeding process with diamond powder. The diamond deposition was performed using Hot-Filament CVD reactor and the characterizations were Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman Scattering Spectroscopy and Scratch Test. (author)

  19. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  20. Electron microscopy of boron carbide before and after electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.; Zuppiroli, L.; Beauvy, M.; Athanassiadis, T.

    1984-06-01

    The microstructure of boron carbide has been studied by electron microscopy and related to the composition of the material. After electron irradiations in an usual transmission electron microscope and in a high voltage electron microscope at different temperatures and fluxes no change of these microstructures have been observed but a sputtering of the surface of the samples, which has been studied quantitatively [fr

  1. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  2. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    weight armour plates etc (Alizadeh et al 2004). It can also be used as a reinforcing material for ceramic matrix composites. It is an excellent neutron absorption material in nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption co- efficient (Sinha et al 2002). Boron carbide can be prepared by reaction of elemental boron and ...

  3. Data science implications in diamond formation and craton evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, F.; Huang, F.; Fox, P. A.

    2017-12-01

    Diamonds are so-called "messengers" from the deep Earth. Fluid and mineral inclusions in diamonds could reflect the compositions of fluids/melts and wall-rocks in which diamond formed. Recently many diamond samples are examined to study the water content in the mantle transition zone1, the mechanism of diamond formation2 and the mantle evolution history3. However, most of the studies can only explain local activities. Therefore, an overall project of data grouping, comparison and correlation is needed, but limited progress has been made due to a lack of benchmark datasets on diamond formation and effective computing algorithms. In this study, we start by proposing the very first complete and easily-accessible dataset on mineral and fluid inclusions in diamonds. We rescue, collect and organize the data available from papers, journals and other publications resources ([2-4] and more), and then apply several state-of-the-art machine learning methods to tackle this earth science problem by clustering diamond formation process into distinct groups primarily based on the compositions, the formation temperature and pressure, the age and so on. Our ongoing work includes further data exploration and training existing models. Our preliminary results show that diamonds formed from older cratons usually have higher formation temperature. Also peridotitic diamonds take a much larger population than the ecologitic ones. More details are being discovered when we finish constructing the database and training our model. We expect the result to demonstrate the advantages of using machine learning and data science in earth science research problems. Our methodology for knowledge discovery are very general and can be broadly applied to other earth science research problems under the same framework.[1] Pearson et al, Nature (2014); [2] Tomlinson et al, EPSL (2006); [3] Weiss et al, Nature (2016); [4] Stachel and Harris, Ore Geology Reviews (2008); Weiss et al, EPSL (2013)

  4. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.; El Tall, Omar; Raja, Inam U.

    2014-01-01

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  5. Functionalized diamond nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre M.

    2014-10-21

    A diamond nanoparticle can be functionalized with a substituted dienophile under ambient conditions, and in the absence of catalysts or additional reagents. The functionalization is thought to proceed through an addition reaction.

  6. Diamond Jubilee Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1994-10-01

    Oct 1, 1994 ... Science, Bangalore, the Diamond Jubilee Annual. Meeting will be held in ... "The fascination of statistics" .... on post Hartree-Fock methods, highly correlated systems ..... Gold Medal of the National Institute of Social. Sciences ...

  7. Quantum Computing in Diamond

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Prawer, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this proposal is to demonstrate the key elements needed to construct a logical qubit in diamond by exploiting the remarkable quantum properties of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) optical centre...

  8. Corrosion and Wear Behaviors of Cr-Doped Diamond-Like Carbon Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, S.; Mohan, L.; Bera, Parthasarathi; Kumar, V. Praveen; Barshilia, Harish C.; Anandan, C.

    2017-08-01

    A combination of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and magnetron sputtering techniques has been employed to deposit chromium-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings on stainless steel, silicon and glass substrates. The concentrations of Cr in the coatings are varied by changing the parameters of the bipolar pulsed power supply and the argon/acetylene gas composition. The coatings have been studied for composition, morphology, surface nature, nanohardness, corrosion resistance and wear resistance properties. The changes in I D / I G ratio with Cr concentrations have been obtained from Raman spectroscopy studies. Ratio decreases with an increase in Cr concentration, and it has been found to increase at higher Cr concentration, indicating the disorder in the coating. Carbide is formed in Cr-doped DLC coatings as observed from XPS studies. There is a decrease in sp 3/ sp 2 ratios with an increase in Cr concentration, and it increases again at higher Cr concentration. Nanohardness studies show no clear dependence of hardness on Cr concentration. DLC coatings with lower Cr contents have demonstrated better corrosion resistance with better passive behavior in 3.5% NaCl solution, and corrosion potential is observed to move toward nobler (more positive) values. A low coefficient of friction (0.15) at different loads is observed from reciprocating wear studies. Lower wear volume is found at all loads on the Cr-doped DLC coatings. Wear mechanism changes from abrasive wear on the substrate to adhesive wear on the coating.

  9. Silicon Carbide Lightweight Optics With Hybrid Skins for Large Cryo Telescopes, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) has developed new silicon carbide (SiC) foam-based optics with hybrid skins that are composite, athermal and lightweight (FOCAL) that...

  10. Silicon Carbide Lightweight Optics With Hybrid Skins for Large Cryo Telescopes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Optical Physics Company (OPC) proposes to manufacture new silicon carbide (SiC) foam-based optics that are composite, athermal and lightweight (FOCAL) that provide...

  11. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  12. High temperature oxidation of carbide-carbon materials of NbC-C, NbC-TiC-C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afonin, Yu.D.; Shalaginov, V.N.; Beketov, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of titanium carbide additions on the oxidation of carbide - carbon composition NbC-TiC-C in oxygen under the pressure of 10 mm Hg and in the air at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 800-1300 deg is studied. It is shown that the region of negative temperature coefficient during oxidation in the system NbC+C is determined by the processes of sintering and polymorphous transformation. The specific character of the oxide film, formed during oxidation of Nbsub(x)Tisub(y)C+C composites is connected with non-equilibrium nature of carbide grain in its composition. Carbon gasification takes place with the formation of carbon dioxide. Composite materials, containing titanium carbide in complex carbide up to 50-83 mol. %, are the most corrosion resisting ones [ru

  13. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2013-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide supported on active carbon, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide, and promoted by K2CO3, has been prepared and tested for methanol and higher alcohol synthesis from syngas. At optimal conditions, the activity and selectivity to alcohols (methanol and higher alcohols) over...... carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide...... alcohols is obtained at a K/Mo molar ratio of 0.21 over the active carbon supported Mo2C (20wt%)....

  14. Preparation of hafnium carbide by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Hard, adhesive coatings of single-phase hafnium carbide were obtained by chemical vapor reaction in an atmosphere containing hafnium tetrachloride, methane and a large excess of hydrogen. By varying the gas phase composition and temperature the zones of formation of the different solid phases were studied and the growth of elementary hafnium and carbon deposits evaluated separately. The results show that the mechanism of hafnium carbide deposition does not hardly involve phenomene of homogeneous-phase methane decomposition or tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen unless the atmosphere is very rich or very poor in methane with respect to tetrachloride. However, hydrogen acting inversely on these two reactions, affects the stoichiometry of the substance deposited. The methane decomposition reaction is fairly slow, the reaction leading to hafnium carbide deposition is faster and that of tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen is quite fast [fr

  15. CVD diamond coatings on titanium : Characterisation by XRD techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappuccio, G [CNR, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Istituto di Strutturistica Chimica; [INFN-LNF, Frascati, Rome (Italy). Laboratorio Dafne Luce

    1996-09-01

    Here, the authors report an analysis carried out on diamond coatings on titanium substrates to show the potentially of x-ray diffraction techniques in the structural characterisation both of diamond thin films and of the other phases (TiC and TiH{sub 2}) present in the interfacial layer. It should be noted that the composition and microstructure of the interface layers strongly affect the characteristics of the diamond films, particularly adhesion, which is one of the most important elements determining the final quality of the coating.

  16. Diamond anvil cells using boron-doped diamond electrodes covered with undoped diamond insulating layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Ryo; Yamashita, Aichi; Hara, Hiroshi; Irifune, Tetsuo; Adachi, Shintaro; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2018-05-01

    Diamond anvil cells using boron-doped metallic diamond electrodes covered with undoped diamond insulating layers have been developed for electrical transport measurements under high pressure. These designed diamonds were grown on a bottom diamond anvil via a nanofabrication process combining microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and electron beam lithography. The resistance measurements of a high-quality FeSe superconducting single crystal under high pressure were successfully demonstrated by just putting the sample and gasket on the bottom diamond anvil directly. The superconducting transition temperature of the FeSe single crystal was increased to up to 43 K by applying uniaxial-like pressure.

  17. Preliminary Investigation of the Effect of Surface Treatment on the Strength of a Titanium Carbide - 30 Percent Nickel Base Cermet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Leonard; Grala, Edward M

    1957-01-01

    Specimens of a nickel-bonded titanium carbide cermet were given the following surface treatments: (1) grinding, (2) lapping, (3) blast cleaning, (4) acid roughening, (5) oxidizing, and (6) oxidizing and refinishing. Room-temperature modulus-of-rupture and impact strength varied with the different surface treatments. Considerable strength losses resulted from the following treatments: (1) oxidation at 1600 F for 100 hours, (2) acid roughening, and (3) severe grinding with 60-grit silicon carbide abrasive. The strength loss after oxidation was partially recovered by grit blasting or diamond grinding.

  18. Influence of structures on fracture and fracture toughness of cemented tungsten carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, W.; Zhang, X.

    1987-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of structures on fracture and fracture toughness of cemented tungsten carbides with different compositions and grain sizes. The measurement of the fracture toughness of cemented tungsten carbide was carried out using single edge notched beam. The microstructural parameters and the proportion for each fracture mode on the fracture surface were obtained. The brittle fracture of the alloy is mainly due to the interfacial decohesion fracture following the interface of the carbide crystals. It has been observed that there are localized fractures region ahead of the crack tip. The morphology of the crack propagation path as well as the slip structure in the cobalt phase of the deformed region have been investigated. In addition, a study of the correlation between the plane strain fracture toughness and microstructural parameters, such as mean free path of the cobalt phase, tungsten carbide grain size and the contiguity of tungsten carbide crystals was also made

  19. Light volatiles in diamond: Physical interpretation and genetic significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellschop, J.P.F.; Madiba, C.C.P.; Annegarn, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Natural diamond is characterised in terms of features in the infra-red and ultra-violet spectra. Additionally electron spin resonance, X-ray diffraction and topography, cathodoluminescence, mechanical and electrical measurements have been used to give more detail to such specification. It had been concluded that the major impurity in diamond was nitrogen and hence most physical phenomena have been interpreted as a manifestation of the mode(s) of occurence of nitrogen. From neutron activation analysis studies some 58 elements have been identified in diamond, many of course at trace levels. It has been shown that these data reveal a distinctive trace and minor element chemistry for diamond. Recently ion beam analyses have quantified the role of nitrogen in diamond characterisation. Most recently ion beam analysis has revealed that hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen are all major impurities in diamond. Quantitative studies have been made using ( 19 Fe,α), (α,n) and ( 3 He,p) reactions. High temperature annealing in ultra-high vacuum conditions results in a substantial increase in the hydrogen measured as well as in the shape of the depth profile. Hydrogen is released from defect centres and diffuses rapidly through the diamond. Some of these hydrogen atoms are trapped at defect sites which are concentrated near surface as a result of the ion beam bombardement. A lesser response to the annealing treatment is found for oxygen and the smallest change for nitrogen. These ion beam data lend independent support to our earlier interpretation of the neutron activation data that all diamonds contain defects distributed fairly uniformly and consisting of sub-microscopic inclusions, the elemental composition of which suggests that each is a magma droplet from the upper mantle in which the diamond crystallized. The water-richness of the magma is an essential feature of the diamond genesis conditions. (orig.)

  20. Diamond pixel modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asner, D.; Barbero, M.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Brom, J-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Cristinziani, M.; Costa, S.; D'Alessandro, R.; Boer, W. de; Dobos, D.; Dolenc, I.; Dulinski, W.; Duris, J.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Frais-Koelbl, H.

    2011-01-01

    With the commissioning of the LHC in 2010 and upgrades expected in 2015, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as a sensor material for use very close to the interaction region where the most extreme radiation conditions exist. Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences expected at the super-LHC. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8x10 16 protons/cm 2 illustrating that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve. We also present beam test results of irradiated complete diamond pixel modules.

  1. Diamond pixel modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, D. [Carleton University, Ottawa (Canada); Barbero, M. [Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Bellini, V. [INFN/University of Catania (Italy); Belyaev, V. [MEPHI Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Brom, J-M. [IPHC, Strasbourg (France); Bruzzi, M. [INFN/University of Florence (Italy); Chren, D. [Czech Technical University, Prague (Czech Republic); Cindro, V. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Claus, G. [IPHC, Strasbourg (France); Cristinziani, M. [Universitaet Bonn (Germany); Costa, S. [INFN/University of Catania (Italy); D' Alessandro, R. [Department of Energetics/INFN Florence (Italy); Boer, W. de [Universitaet Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dobos, D. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Dolenc, I. [Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Dulinski, W. [IPHC, Strasbourg (France); Duris, J. [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Eremin, V. [Ioffe Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Eusebi, R. [FNAL, Batavia (United States); Frais-Koelbl, H. [Fachhochschule fuer Wirtschaft und Technik, Wiener Neustadt (Austria)

    2011-04-21

    With the commissioning of the LHC in 2010 and upgrades expected in 2015, ATLAS and CMS are planning to upgrade their innermost tracking layers with radiation hard technologies. Chemical Vapor Deposition diamond has been used extensively in beam conditions monitors as the innermost detectors in the highest radiation areas of BaBar, Belle, CDF and all LHC experiments. This material is now being considered as a sensor material for use very close to the interaction region where the most extreme radiation conditions exist. Recently the RD42 collaboration constructed, irradiated and tested polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamond sensors to the highest fluences expected at the super-LHC. We present beam test results of chemical vapor deposition diamond up to fluences of 1.8x10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2} illustrating that both polycrystalline and single-crystal chemical vapor deposition diamonds follow a single damage curve. We also present beam test results of irradiated complete diamond pixel modules.

  2. Ion implantation into diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Susumu

    1994-01-01

    The graphitization and the change to amorphous state of diamond surface layer by ion implantation and its characteristics are reported. In the diamond surface, into which more than 10 16 ions/cm 2 was implanted, the diamond crystals are broken, and the structure changes to other carbon structure such as amorphous state or graphite. Accompanying this change of structure, the electric conductivity of the implanted layer shows two discontinuous values due to high resistance and low resistance. This control of structure can be done by the temperature of the base during the ion implantation into diamond. Also it is referred to that by the base temperature during implantation, the mutual change of the structure between amorphous state and graphite can be controlled. The change of the electric resistance and the optical characteristics by the ion implantation into diamond surface, the structural analysis by Raman spectroscopy, and the control of the structure of the implanted layer by the base temperature during implantation are reported. (K.I.)

  3. Milling Machinability of TiC Particle and TiB Whisker Hybrid Reinforced Titanium Matrix Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Haixiang; Xu Jiuhua; Su Honghua; Ge Yingfei; Liang Xinghui

    2017-01-01

    The milling machinabilities of titanium matrix composites were comprehensively evaluated to provide a theoretical basis for cutting parameter determination.Polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tools with different grain sizes and geometries,and carbide tools with and without coatings were used in the experiments.Milling forces,milling temperatures,tool lifetimes,tool wear,and machined surface integrities were investigated.The PCD tool required a primary cutting force 15 % smaller than that of the carbide tool,while the uncoated carbide tool required a primary cutting force 10% higher than that of the TiAlN-coated tool.A cutting force of 300 N per millimeter of the cutting edge (300 N/mm) was measured.This caused excessive tool chipping.The cutting temperature of the PCD tool was 20%-30% lower than that of the carbide tool,while that of the TiAlN-coated tool was 12% lower than that of the uncoated carbide tool.The cutting temperatures produced when using water-based cooling and minimal quantity lubrication (MQL) were reduced by 100 ℃ and 200 ℃,compared with those recorded with dry cutting,respectively.In general,the PCD tool lifetimes were 2-3 times longer than the carbide tool lifetimes.The roughness Ra of the machined surface was less than 0.6μm,and the depth of the machined surface hardened layer was in the range of 0.15-0.25 mm for all of the PCD tools before a flank wear land of 0.2 mm was reached.The PCD tool with a 0.8 mm tool nose radius,0° rake angle,10° flank angle,and grain size of (30+2)μm exhibited the best cutting performance.For this specific tool,a lifetime of 16 min can be expected.

  4. Nanocrystalline diamond coatings for machining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, M.; Breidt, D.; Cremer, R. [CemeCon AG, Wuerselen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    This history of CVD diamond synthesis goes back to the fifties of the last century. However, the scientific and economical potential was only gradually recognized. In the eighties, intensive worldwide research on CVD diamond synthesis and applications was launched. Industrial products, especially diamond-coated cutting tools, were introduced to the market in the middle of the nineties. This article shows the latest developments in this area, which comprises nanocrystalline diamond coating structures. (orig.)

  5. Microstructural evaluation of the NbC-20Ni cemented carbides during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, D.; Cannizza, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Fine carbides in a metallic matrix (binder) form the microstructure of the cemented carbides. Grain size and binder content are the main variables to adjust hardness and toughness. These products are produced by Powder Metallurgy, and traditional route involves mixing carbides with binder by high energy milling, pressing and sintering. During sintering, a liquid phase promotes densification, and a final relative density higher than 99% is expected. Sintering is carried out at high temperatures, and dissolution of the carbides changes the chemical composition of the binder. To control grain growth of the main carbide, which reduces hardness, small quantities of secondary carbides are used. These additives limit dissolution and precipitation of the main carbides reducing the final grain size. This paper focused the structural and chemical evolution during sintering using NbC-20Ni cermets. Mixtures of very fine NbC carbides and carbonyl Ni powders were produce by intense milling. These mixtures were pressed using uniaxial pressures from 50 to 200MPa. Shrinkage was evaluated using dilatometric measurements under an atmosphere of dynamic argon. Samples were also sintered under vacuum in high temperature industrial furnace. The sintered samples were characterized in terms of density hardness, toughness and microstructure. DRX was the main tool used to evaluate the structural evolution of the binder. In situ chemical analysis helped to understand the dissolution mechanisms. (author)

  6. Present status of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel development for LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo; Suzuki, Yasufumi

    1984-01-01

    The feature of carbide fuel is that it has the doubling time as short as about 13 years, that is, close to one half as compared with oxide fuel. The development of the carbide fuel in the past 10 years has been started in amazement. Especially in the program of new fuel development in USA started in 1974, He and Na bond fuel attained the burnup of 16 a/o without causing the breaking of cladding tubes. In 1984, the irradiation of the assembly composed of 91 fuel pins in the FFTF is expected. On the other hand in Japan, the fuel research laboratory was constructed in 1974 in the Oarai Laboratory, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, to carry out the studies on carbide fuel. In the autumn of 1982, two carbide fuel pins with different chemical composition have been successfully made. Accordingly, the recent status of the development is explained. The uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel is suitable to liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors because of large heat conductivity and the high density of nuclear fission substances. The thermal and nuclear characteristics of carbide fuel, the features of the reactor core using carbide fuel, the chemical and mechanical interaction of fuel and cladding tubes, the selection of bond materials, the manufacturing techniques for the fuel, the development of the analysis code for fuel behavior, and the research and development of carbide fuel in Japan are described. (Kako, I.)

  7. Influence of Heat Treatment on Content of the Carbide Phases in the Microstructure of High-Speed Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski J.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of investigations of the effect of heat treatment temperature on the content of the carbide phase of HS3-1-2 and HS6-5-2 low-alloy high-speed steel. Analysis of the phase composition of carbides is carried out using the diffraction method. It is determined that with increasing austenitising temperature, the intensification of dissolution of M6C carbide increases. As a result, an increase in the grain size of the austenite and the amount of retained austenite causes a significant reduction in the hardness of hardened steel HS3-1-2 to be observed. The results of diffraction investigations showed that M7C3 carbides containing mainly Cr and Fe carbides and M6C carbides containing mainly Mo and W carbides are dissolved during austenitisation. During austenitisation of HS3-1-2 steel, the silicon is transferred from the matrix to carbides, thus replacing carbide-forming elements. An increase in a degree of tempering leads to intensification of carbide separation and this process reduce the grindability of tested steels.

  8. Thermionic emission of cermets made of refractory carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsonow, G.W.; Bogomol, I.W.; Ochremtschuk, L.N.; Podtschernjajewa, I.A.; Fomenko, W.S.

    1975-01-01

    In order to improve the resistance to thermal variations of refractory carbides having good behavior for thermionic emission, they have been combined with transition metals d. Thermionic emission was studied with cermets in compact samples. Following systems were examined: TiC-Nb, TiC-Mo, TiC-W, ZrC-Nb, ZrC-Mo, ZrC-W, WC-Mo with compositions of: 75% M 1 C-25% M 2 , 50%M 1 C-50%M 2 , 25%M 1 C-75%M 2 . When following the variation of electron emission energy phi versus the composition, it appears that in the range of mixed crystals (M 1 M 2 )C, phi decreases and the resistance to thermal variations of these phases is higher than that of individual carbides. The study of obtained cermets shows that their resistance to thermal variations is largely superior to the one of starting carbides; TiC and ZrC carbides, combined with molybdenum and tungsten support the highest number of thermic cycles

  9. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  10. Nuclear techniques of analysis in diamond synthesis and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Gonon, P.; Walker, R.; Dooley, S.; Bettiol, A.; Pearce, J. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear techniques of analysis have played an important role in the study of synthetic and laser annealed diamond. These measurements have mainly used ion beam analysis with a focused MeV ion beam in a nuclear microprobe system. A variety of techniques have been employed. One of the most important is nuclear elastic scattering, sometimes called non-Rutherford scattering, which has been used to accurately characterise diamond films for thickness and composition. This is possible by the use of a database of measured scattering cross sections. Recently, this work has been extended and nuclear elastic scattering cross sections for both natural boron isotopes have been measured. For radiation damaged diamond, a focused laser annealing scheme has been developed which produces near complete regrowth of MeV phosphorus implanted diamonds. In the laser annealed regions, proton induced x-ray emission has been used to show that 50 % of the P atoms occupy lattice sites. This opens the way to produce n-type diamond for microelectronic device applications. All these analytical applications utilize a focused MeV microbeam which is ideally suited for diamond analysis. This presentation reviews these applications, as well as the technology of nuclear techniques of analysis for diamond with a focused beam. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Nuclear techniques of analysis in diamond synthesis and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamieson, D N; Prawer, S; Gonon, P; Walker, R; Dooley, S; Bettiol, A; Pearce, J [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-12-31

    Nuclear techniques of analysis have played an important role in the study of synthetic and laser annealed diamond. These measurements have mainly used ion beam analysis with a focused MeV ion beam in a nuclear microprobe system. A variety of techniques have been employed. One of the most important is nuclear elastic scattering, sometimes called non-Rutherford scattering, which has been used to accurately characterise diamond films for thickness and composition. This is possible by the use of a database of measured scattering cross sections. Recently, this work has been extended and nuclear elastic scattering cross sections for both natural boron isotopes have been measured. For radiation damaged diamond, a focused laser annealing scheme has been developed which produces near complete regrowth of MeV phosphorus implanted diamonds. In the laser annealed regions, proton induced x-ray emission has been used to show that 50 % of the P atoms occupy lattice sites. This opens the way to produce n-type diamond for microelectronic device applications. All these analytical applications utilize a focused MeV microbeam which is ideally suited for diamond analysis. This presentation reviews these applications, as well as the technology of nuclear techniques of analysis for diamond with a focused beam. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Nuclear techniques of analysis in diamond synthesis and annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Gonon, P.; Walker, R.; Dooley, S.; Bettiol, A.; Pearce, J.

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear techniques of analysis have played an important role in the study of synthetic and laser annealed diamond. These measurements have mainly used ion beam analysis with a focused MeV ion beam in a nuclear microprobe system. A variety of techniques have been employed. One of the most important is nuclear elastic scattering, sometimes called non-Rutherford scattering, which has been used to accurately characterise diamond films for thickness and composition. This is possible by the use of a database of measured scattering cross sections. Recently, this work has been extended and nuclear elastic scattering cross sections for both natural boron isotopes have been measured. For radiation damaged diamond, a focused laser annealing scheme has been developed which produces near complete regrowth of MeV phosphorus implanted diamonds. In the laser annealed regions, proton induced x-ray emission has been used to show that 50 % of the P atoms occupy lattice sites. This opens the way to produce n-type diamond for microelectronic device applications. All these analytical applications utilize a focused MeV microbeam which is ideally suited for diamond analysis. This presentation reviews these applications, as well as the technology of nuclear techniques of analysis for diamond with a focused beam. 9 refs., 6 figs

  13. Superconductivity in heavily boron-doped silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Kriener, Takahiro Muranaka, Junya Kato, Zhi-An Ren, Jun Akimitsu and Yoshiteru Maeno

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The discoveries of superconductivity in heavily boron-doped diamond in 2004 and silicon in 2006 have renewed the interest in the superconducting state of semiconductors. Charge-carrier doping of wide-gap semiconductors leads to a metallic phase from which upon further doping superconductivity can emerge. Recently, we discovered superconductivity in a closely related system: heavily boron-doped silicon carbide. The sample used for that study consisted of cubic and hexagonal SiC phase fractions and hence this led to the question which of them participated in the superconductivity. Here we studied a hexagonal SiC sample, free from cubic SiC phase by means of x-ray diffraction, resistivity, and ac susceptibility.

  14. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  15. New developments in laser sintering of diamond cutting disks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovalenko, V.; Golovko, L.; Meijer, J.; Anyakin, M.

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of techniques and problems in the fabrication of cutting tools based on super hard composites results in a solution by the application of lasers. The results of systematic study of diamond composites sintering with laser radiation are discussed. A mathematical modeling of the heat

  16. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  17. Production of silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, K.

    1981-01-01

    A body consisting essentially of a coherent mixture of silicon carbide and carbon for subsequent siliconising is produced by casting a slip comprising silicon carbide and carbon powders in a porous mould. Part of the surface of the body, particularly internal features, is formed by providing within the mould a core of a material which retains its shape while casting is in progress but is compressed by shrinkage of the cast body as it dries and is thereafter removable from the cast body. Materials which are suitable for the core are expanded polystyrene and gelatinous products of selected low elastic modulus. (author)

  18. High yield silicon carbide prepolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Prepolymers which exhibit good handling properties, and are useful for preparing ceramics, silicon carbide ceramic materials and articles containing silicon carbide, are polysilanes consisting of 0 to 60 mole% (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and 40 to 100 mole% CH 3 Si units, all Si valences being satisfied by CH 3 groups, other Si atoms, or by H atoms, the latter amounting to 0.3 to 2.1 weight% of the polysilane. They are prepared by reducing the corresponding chloro- or bromo-polysilanes with at least the stoichiometric amount of a reducing agent, e.g. LiAlH 4 . (author)

  19. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdsaar, H.

    1978-01-01

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  20. Method for fabricating boron carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardary, Z.; Reynolds, C.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a method for fabricating an essentially uniformly dense boron carbide article of a length-to-diameter or width ratio greater than 2 to 1 comprising the steps of providing a plurality of article segments to be joined together to form the article with each of said article segments having a length-to-diameter or width ratio less than 1.5 to 1. Each segment is fabricated by hot pressing a composition consisting of boron carbide powder at a pressure and temperature effective to provide the article segment with a density greater than about 85% of theoretical density, providing each article segment with parallel planar end surfaces, placing a plurality of said article segments in a hot-pressing die in a line with the planar surfaces of adjacent article segments being disposed in intimate contact, and hot pressing the aligned article segments at a temperature and pressure effective to provide said article with a density over the length thereof in the range of about 94 to 98 percent theoretical density and greater than the density provided in the discrete hot pressing of each of the article segments and to provide a bond between adjacent article segments with said bond being at least equivalent in hardness, strength and density to a remainder of said article

  1. Carbon potential measurement on some actinide carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthonysamy, S.; Ananthasivan, K.; Kaliappan, I.; Chandramouli, V.; Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Mathews, C.K.; Jacob, K.T.

    1994-01-01

    Uranium-Plutonium mixed carbides with a Pu/(U+Pu) ratio of 0.55 are to be used as the fuel in the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam, India. Carburization of the stainless steel clad by this fuel is determined by its carbon potential. Because the carbon potential of this fuel composition is not available in the literature, it was measured by the methane-hydrogen gas equilibration technique. The sample was equilibrated with purified hydrogen and the equilibrium methane-to-hydrogen ratio in the gas phase was measured with a flame ionization detector. The carbon potential of the ThC-ThC 2 as well as Mo-Mo 2 C system, which is an important binary in the actinide-fission product-carbon systems, were also measured by this technique in the temperature range 973 to 1,173 K. The data for the Mo-Mo 2 C system are in agreement with values reported in the literature. The results for the ThC-ThC 2 system are different from estimated values with large uncertainty limits given in the literature. The data on (U, Pu) mixed carbides indicates the possibility of stainless steel clad attack under isothermal equilibrium conditions

  2. Diamonds are forever: drill bit advances may offer cheaper and stronger alternatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahoney, J.

    2001-02-01

    The rise to prominence of polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) and diamond-impregnated drill bits, slowly providing stiff competition to the roller-cone type bits that for many years was the standard in the drilling industry, is discussed. A roller-cone drill bit, although much improved by heat treatment of the metal and the addition of tungsten carbide, is still mostly steel. It works by crushing the rock by overcoming its compressive strength, whereas PDC drill bits shear the rock away in a manner similar to scraping ice from a car windshield. PDC bits typically have three to six cutting surfaces, each one edged with a row of polycrystalline diamond cutters, bonded to a tungsten carbide base by a process called microwave sintering. Compared to roller cones, PDCs drill at least twice as fast, especially in the soft rock and clay where they have been used principally. In addition to saving rig time, PDC bits can handle longer runs; in the right application it is possible to drill the total depth of a well with only one bit. The microwave-sintered tungsten carbide also has higher corrosion resistance than the same material bonded under high pressure; PDCs are also less subject to mechanical failure than roller cones which use moveable bearings, seals and rotating cones. 1 photo.

  3. Interlayers Applied to CVD Diamond Deposition on Steel Substrate: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoille Denner Damm

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Academics and industry have sought after combining the exceptional properties of diamonds with the toughness of steel. Since the early 1990s several partial solutions have been found but chemical vapor deposition (CVD diamond deposition on steel substrate continues to be a persistent problem. The main drawbacks are the high carbon diffusion from gas phase into substrate, the transition metals on the material surface that catalyze sp2 bond formation, instead of sp3 bonds, and the high thermal expansion coefficient (TEC mismatch between diamond and steels. An intermediate layer has been found necessary to increase diamond adhesion. Literature has proposed many efficient intermediate layers as a diffusion barrier for both, carbon and iron, but most intermediate layers shown have not solved TEC mismatch. In this review, we briefly discuss the solutions that exclusively work as diffusion barrier and discuss in a broader way the ones that also solve, or may potentially solve, the TEC mismatch problem. We examine some multilayers, the iron borides, the chromium carbides, and vanadium carbides. We go through the most relevant results of the last two and a half decades, including recent advances in our group. Vanadium carbide looks promising since it has shown excellent diffusion barrier properties, its TEC is intermediary between diamond and steel and, it has been thickened to manage thermal stress relief. We also review a new deposition technique to set up intermediate layers: laser cladding. It is promising because of its versatility in mixing different materials and fusing and/or sintering them on a steel surface. We conclude by remarking on new perspectives.

  4. Use of Acoustic Emission and Pattern Recognition for Crack Detection of a Large Carbide Anvil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Wang, Yanan; Yan, Zhaoli

    2018-01-29

    Large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus is commonly used to produce synthetic diamond. Due to the high pressure, high temperature and alternative stresses in practical production, cracks often occur in the carbide anvil, thereby resulting in significant economic losses or even casualties. Conventional methods are unsuitable for crack detection of the carbide anvil. This paper is concerned with acoustic emission-based crack detection of carbide anvils, regarded as a pattern recognition problem; this is achieved using a microphone, with methods including sound pulse detection, feature extraction, feature optimization and classifier design. Through analyzing the characteristics of background noise, the cracked sound pulses are separated accurately from the originally continuous signal. Subsequently, three different kinds of features including a zero-crossing rate, sound pressure levels, and linear prediction cepstrum coefficients are presented for characterizing the cracked sound pulses. The original high-dimensional features are adaptively optimized using principal component analysis. A hybrid framework of a support vector machine with k nearest neighbors is designed to recognize the cracked sound pulses. Finally, experiments are conducted in a practical diamond workshop to validate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  5. Enhancing the brightness of electrically driven single-photon sources using color centers in silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khramtsov, Igor A.; Vyshnevyy, Andrey A.; Fedyanin, Dmitry Yu.

    2018-03-01

    Practical applications of quantum information technologies exploiting the quantum nature of light require efficient and bright true single-photon sources which operate under ambient conditions. Currently, point defects in the crystal lattice of diamond known as color centers have taken the lead in the race for the most promising quantum system for practical non-classical light sources. This work is focused on a different quantum optoelectronic material, namely a color center in silicon carbide, and reveals the physics behind the process of single-photon emission from color centers in SiC under electrical pumping. We show that color centers in silicon carbide can be far superior to any other quantum light emitter under electrical control at room temperature. Using a comprehensive theoretical approach and rigorous numerical simulations, we demonstrate that at room temperature, the photon emission rate from a p-i-n silicon carbide single-photon emitting diode can exceed 5 Gcounts/s, which is higher than what can be achieved with electrically driven color centers in diamond or epitaxial quantum dots. These findings lay the foundation for the development of practical photonic quantum devices which can be produced in a well-developed CMOS compatible process flow.

  6. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei, E-mail: jwchen@scu.edu.cn; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin, E-mail: rl.wang@scu.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A hybrid catalyst was prepared via a quite green and simple method to achieve an one-pot synthesis of the N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides. It exhibited comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability and ability to methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C to ORR. - Highlights: • A novel type of hybrid Fe/Co/WC@NC catalysts have been successfully synthesized. • The hybrid catalyst also exhibited better durability and methanol tolerance. • Multiple effective active sites of Fe{sub 3}C, Co{sub 3}C, WC, and NC help to improve catalytic performance. - Abstract: This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe{sub 3}C and Co{sub 3}C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe{sub 3}C, and Co{sub 3}C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  7. Biofunctionalization of diamond microelectrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitinger, Andreas Adam; Lud, Simon Quartus; Stutzmann, Martin; Garrido, Jose Antonio [Walter Schottky Institut, TU Muenchen (Germany); Hutter, Naima Aurelia; Richter, Gerhard; Jordan, Rainer [WACKER-Chair of Macromolecular Chemistry, TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    In this work we present two main routes for the biofunctionalization of nanocrystalline diamond films, aiming at the application of diamond microelectrodes as amperometric biosensors. We report on direct covalent grafting of biomolecules on nanocrystalline diamond films via diazonium monophenyls and biphenyls as well as other linker molecules, forming self-assembled monolayers on the diamond surface. Monolayers with different functional head groups have been characterized. Patterning of the available functional groups using electron beam-induced chemical lithography allows the selective preparation of well-localized docking sites for the immobilization of biomolecules. Furthermore, polymer brushes are expected to enable novel paths for designing more advanced biosensing schemes, incorporating multifunctional groups and a higher loading capacity for biomolecules. Here, we focus on the preparation of polymer grafts by self-initiated photografting and photopolymerization. Further chemical modification of the grafted polymer brushes results in the introduction of additional functional molecules, paving the way for the incorporation of more complex molecular structures such as proteins. In a comparative study we investigate the advantages and disadvantages of both approaches.

  8. CVD diamond - fundamental phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbrough, W.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This compilation of figures and diagrams addresses the basic physical processes involved in the chemical vapor deposition of diamond. Different methods of deposition are illustrated. For each method, observations are made of the prominent advantages and disadvantages of the technique. Chemical mechanisms of nucleation are introduced.

  9. Genesis of diamond inclusions: An integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study on eclogitic and peridotitic inclusions and their diamond host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Quint; Matveev, Sergei; Drury, Martyn; Gress, Michael; Chinn, Ingrid; Davies, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    Diamond inclusions are potentially fundamental to understanding the formation conditions of diamond and the volatile cycles in the deep mantle. In order to fully understand the implications of the compositional information recorded by inclusions it is vital to know whether the inclusions are proto-, syn-, or epigenetic and the extent to which they have equilibrated with diamond forming fluids. In previous studies, the widespread assumption was made that the majority of diamond inclusions are syngenetic, based upon observation of cubo-octahedral morphology imposed on the inclusions. Recent work has reported the crystallographic relationship between inclusions and the host diamond to be highly complex and the lack of crystallographic relationships between inclusions and diamonds has led some to question the significance of imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. This study presents an integrated EBSD and CL study of 9 diamonds containing 20 pyropes, 2 diopsides, 1 forsterite and 1 rutile from the Jwaneng and Letlhakane kimberlite clusters, Botswana. A new method was developed to analyze the crystallographic orientation of the host diamond and the inclusions with EBSD. Diamonds plates were sequentially polished to expose inclusions at different levels in the diamond. CL imaging at different depths was performed in order to produce a 3D view of diamond growth zones around the inclusions. Standard diamond polishing techniques proved too aggressive for silicate inclusions as they were damaged to such a degree that EBSD measurements on the inclusions were impossible. The inclusions were milled with a Ga+ focused ion beam (FIB) at a 12° angle to clean the surface for EBSD measurements. Of the 24 inclusions, 9 have an imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. Of these inclusions, 6 have faces orientated parallel to diamond growth zones and/or appear to have nucleated on a diamond growth surface, implying syngenesis. In contrast, other diamonds record resorption events such that

  10. Real time monitoring of filament-assisted chemically vapor deposited diamond by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Cong; An, I.; Vedam, K.; Collins, R.W.; Nguyen, H.V.; Messier, R.

    1991-01-01

    Spectroscopic ellipsometry over the range 1.5-4.5 eV was applied as a real time probe of the processes occurring in the initial nucleation of thin film diamond by heated-filament assisted chemical vapor deposition. Using both untreated and diamond-polished c-Si substrates, as well as both carburized and uncarburized tungsten filaments, it was possible to separate and characterize competing phenomena, including the increase in surface temperature induced by filament ignition, the formation of carbide layers, contamination of the substrate by tungsten from the filament, annealing of diamond polishing damage, and, finally, diamond nucleation. An accurate measurement of the true temperature of the substrate surface averaged over the top 500 A can be obtained from the energy position of critical points in the c-Si band structure. For diamond deposition, we operated with an initial excess flow of CH 4 to stimulate nucleation. We applied real time feedback and manual control to reduce the CH 4 flow in the first monolayers of deposition. The thickness of diamond and an estimate of its nucleation density can be obtained from real time spectra, and the latter was in good agreement with that obtained from scanning electron microscopy. (orig.)

  11. Surface properties and field emission characteristics of chemical vapor deposition diamond grown on Fe/Si substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirakuri, Kenji; Yokoyama, Takahiro; Enomoto, Hirofumi; Mutsukura, Nobuki; Friedbacher, Gernot

    2001-01-01

    Electron field emission characteristics of diamond grains fabricated on iron dot-patterned silicon (Fe/Si) substrates at different methane concentrations have been investigated. The characteristics of the samples could be improved by control of the methane concentration during diamond fabrication. Etching treatment of the as-grown diamond has enhanced the emission properties both with respect to current and threshold voltage. In order to study the influence of etching effects on the field emission characteristics, the respective surfaces were studied by Raman spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA). ESCA revealed intensive graphite and FeO x peaks on the sample surface grown at high methane concentration. For the etched samples, the peaks of diamond and silicon carbide were observed, and the peaks of nondiamond carbon disappeared. The experimental results show that the etching process removes graphitic and nondiamond carbon components. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  12. High 240Pu FTR/EMC experiments and analysis: Carbide fuel and UO2 blanket subassembly worths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ombrellaro, P.A.

    1977-06-01

    Carbide-plutonium fuel and UO 2 blanket subassembly worth measurements performed at ANL in the EMC/LWR were analyzed. Composition exchange worth calculations were performed for: (a) the replacement of high- 240 Pu fuel composition for low- 240 Pu fuel composition and carbide-plutonium fuel composition, successively, in the center subassembly of the core; (b) the replacement of low- 240 Pu fuel composition for carbide--plutonium fuel composition in one outer driver subassembly; and (c) the replacement of the radial reflector composition with UO 2 blanket composition in one subassembly of the radial reflector. The composition exchange worth calculations were performed in two-dimensional x,y geometry, using diffusion theory and perturbation theory. Each method produces about the same calculated-to-experimental bias factors

  13. Decomposition of silicon carbide at high pressures and temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daviau, Kierstin; Lee, Kanani K. M.

    2017-11-01

    We measure the onset of decomposition of silicon carbide, SiC, to silicon and carbon (e.g., diamond) at high pressures and high temperatures in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. We identify decomposition through x-ray diffraction and multiwavelength imaging radiometry coupled with electron microscopy analyses on quenched samples. We find that B3 SiC (also known as 3C or zinc blende SiC) decomposes at high pressures and high temperatures, following a phase boundary with a negative slope. The high-pressure decomposition temperatures measured are considerably lower than those at ambient, with our measurements indicating that SiC begins to decompose at ~ 2000 K at 60 GPa as compared to ~ 2800 K at ambient pressure. Once B3 SiC transitions to the high-pressure B1 (rocksalt) structure, we no longer observe decomposition, despite heating to temperatures in excess of ~ 3200 K. The temperature of decomposition and the nature of the decomposition phase boundary appear to be strongly influenced by the pressure-induced phase transitions to higher-density structures in SiC, silicon, and carbon. The decomposition of SiC at high pressure and temperature has implications for the stability of naturally forming moissanite on Earth and in carbon-rich exoplanets.

  14. Phase transformation order-disorder in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.A.; Karmo, Yu.S.; Kustova, L.V.

    1986-01-01

    Titanium carbide delta-phase is studied using the methods of electric conductivity and differential thermal analysis (DTA). It is shown on the Ti-C system phase diagram that two regions of TiCsub(0.46-0.60) and TiCsub(0.65-1.00) compositions, different in their properties, correspond to delta-phase. Both ordered and disordered phases exist within the TiCsub(0.046-0.60) concentration range, and in equilibrium heating or cooling one phase converts to another at 590 deg C (the first order phase transformation). Samples of the TiCsub(0.65-1.00) composition are characterized by low electric conductivity stability, that is explained by strong titanium carbide electric conductivity sensitivity to defects and impurities

  15. Hydrotreatment activities of supported molybdenum nitrides and carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolce, G.M.; Savage, P.E.; Thompson, L.T. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    The growing need for alternative sources of transportation fuels encourages the development of new hydrotreatment catalysts. These catalysts must be active and more hydrogen efficient than the current commercial hydrotreatment catalysts. Molybdenum nitrides and carbides are attractive candidate materials possessing properties that are comparable or superior to those of commercial sulfide catalysts. This research investigated the catalytic properties of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-supported molybdenum nitrides and carbides. These catalysts were synthesized via temperature-programmed reaction of supported molybdenum oxides with ammonia or methane/hydrogen mixtures. Phase constituents and compositions were determined by X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and neutral activation analysis. Oxygen chemisorption was used to probe the surface properties of the catalysts. Specific activities of the molybdenum nitrides and carbides were competitive with those of a commercial sulfide catalyst for hydrodenitrogenation (HDN), hydrodesulfurization (HDS), and hydrodeoxygenation (HDO). For HDN and HDS, the catalytic activity on a molybdenum basis was a strong inverse function of the molybdenum loading. Product distributions of the HDN, HDO and HDS of a variety of heteroatom compounds indicated that several of the nitrides and carbides were more hydrogen efficient than the sulfide catalyst. 35 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  16. Testing methodology of diamond composite inserts to be used in the drilling of petroleum wells; Metodologia de testes de insertos compositos diamantados a serem usados na perfuracao de pocos de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobrovnitchii, G.S.; Filgueira, M.; Skury, A.L.D.; Tardim, R.C. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: rtardim@terra.com.br

    2006-07-01

    The useful life of the inserts used in the cutters of the drills for perforation of oil wells determines the quality of the perforation as well as the productivity. Therefore, the research of the wear of insert is carried through with the objective to foretell the most important properties of the inserts. Due to the fact of the UENF to be developing the processes of composites sintering to the synthetic diamond base, it is interesting to define the testing methodology of the gotten inserts. The proposed methodology is based on the evaluation of the wear suffered by de sample. For this end a micro processed 'Abrasimeter', model AB800-E, manufactured for the Contenco Company was used. The instrument capacity is 1,36 kVA; axial load applied in the cutter up to 50 kgf; rotation of table speed 20 rpm; course of the tool in radial direction speed before 2 m/min; dimensions of the granite block D = 808 mm, d = 484 mm, h = 50 mm. The gotten results show that the proposed methodology can be used for the evaluation of the inserts of the cutters applied in perforation drills. (author)

  17. Carbon based nanostructures: diamond clusters structured with nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Shenderova

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of designing composites from carbon nanotubes and nanodiamond clusters is discussed based on atomistic simulations. Depending on nanotube size and morphology, some types of open nanotubes can be chemically connected with different facets of diamond clusters. The geometrical relation between different types of nanotubes and different diamond facets for construction of mechanically stable composites with all bonds saturated is summarized. Potential applications of the suggested nanostructures are briefly discussed based on the calculations of their electronic properties using environment dependent self-consistent tight-binding approach.

  18. Boron Carbide: Stabilization of Highly-Loaded Aqueous Suspensions, Pressureless Sintering, and Room Temperature Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Cano, Andres

    Boron carbide (B4C) is the third hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride. It's unique combination of properties makes B4C a highly valuable material. With hardness values around 35 MPa, a high melting point, 2450°C, density of 2.52 g/cm3, and high chemical inertness, boron carbide is used in severe wear components, like cutting tools and sandblasting nozzles, nuclear reactors' control rots, and finally and most common application, armor. Production of complex-shaped ceramic component is complex and represents many challenges. Present research presents a new and novel approach to produce complex-shaped B4C components. Proposed approach allows forming to be done at room temperatures and under very low forming pressures. Additives and binder concentrations are kept as low as possible, around 5Vol%, while ceramics loadings are maximized above 50Vol%. Given that proposed approach uses water as the main solvent, pieces drying is simple and environmentally safe. Optimized formulation allows rheological properties to be tailored and adjust to multiple processing approaches, including, injection molding, casting, and additive manufacturing. Boron carbide samples then were pressureless sintered. Due to the high covalent character of boron carbide, multiples sintering aids and techniques have been proposed in order to achieve high levels of densification. However, is not possible to define a clear sintering methodology based on literature. Thus, present research developed a comprehensive study on the effect of multiple sintering aids on the densification of boron carbide when pressureless sintered. Relative densities above 90% were achieved with values above 30MPa in hardness. Current research allows extending the uses and application of boron carbide, and other ceramic systems, by providing a new approach to produce complex-shaped components with competitive properties.

  19. Mixed Uranium/Refractory Metal Carbide Fuels for High Performance Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, Travis; Anghaie, Samim

    2002-01-01

    Single phase, solid-solution mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides have been proposed as an advanced nuclear fuel for advanced, high-performance reactors. Earlier studies of mixed carbides focused on uranium and either thorium or plutonium as a fuel for fast breeder reactors enabling shorter doubling owing to the greater fissile atom density. However, the mixed uranium/refractory carbides such as (U, Zr, Nb)C have a lower uranium densities but hold significant promise because of their ultra-high melting points (typically greater than 3700 K), improved material compatibility, and high thermal conductivity approaching that of the metal. Various compositions of (U, Zr, Nb)C were processed with 5% and 10% metal mole fraction of uranium. Stoichiometric samples were processed from the constituent carbide powders, while hypo-stoichiometric samples with carbon-to-metal (C/M) ratios of 0.92 were processed from uranium hydride, graphite, and constituent refractory carbide powders. Processing techniques of cold uniaxial pressing, dynamic magnetic compaction, sintering, and hot pressing were investigated to optimize the processing parameters necessary to produce high density (low porosity), single phase, solid-solution mixed carbide nuclear fuels for testing. This investigation was undertaken to evaluate and characterize the performance of these mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for high performance, ultra-safe nuclear reactor applications. (authors)

  20. Reaction of Oxygen with Chromium and Chromium Carbide at Low O2 Pressures and High Temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Dong O.; Kang, Sung G.; Paik, Young N.

    1984-01-01

    The oxidation rate of chromium carbide has been measured continuously using thermogravimetric analysis at different oxygen pressures ranging from 1.33x10 -2 to 2.67x10 -1 Pa O 2 at 1000-1300 .deg. C. The oxidation of pure chromium has also been studied between 1000-1300 .deg. C under 6.67x10 -2 Pa O 2 and compared with that of chromium carbide. The oxidation of chromium carbide showed a linear behavior which was different from that of chromium. The oxidation rate of chromium carbide increased with increasing temperature and oxygen pressure was lower than of pure chromium. Above 1200 .deg. C, the volatile oxide was formed and evaporated causing a weight loss. The compositions and morphology of the oxide were studied with X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope, respectively. The morphology of oxide changed with varying temperature and pressure. The oxide scale was consisted of mainly two different layers of Cr 2 O 3 and CrO, and the properties of oxide scale were correlated with oxidation behavior. The oxide film formed in the above test condition has been detached from the carbide surface. The crack and pore were thought to be from CO gas evolving at the interface of chromium carbide and its oxide and the major factor of the linear behavior of chromium carbide

  1. Diamonds from Orapa Mine show a clear subduction signature in SIMS stable isotope data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinn, Ingrid L.; Perritt, Samantha H.; Stiefenhofer, Johann; Stern, Richard A.

    2018-05-01

    Spatially resolved analyses reveal considerable isotopic heterogeneity within and among diamonds ranging in size from 0.15 to 4.75 mm from the Orapa Mine, Botswana. The isotopic data are interpreted in conjunction with nitrogen aggregation state data and growth zone relationships from cathodoluminescence images. The integrated information confirms that a distinct diamond growth event (with low IaAB nitrogen aggregation states, moderately high nitrogen contents and δ13C and δ15N values compatible with average mantle values) is younger than the dominant population(s) of Type IaAB diamonds and cores of composite diamonds with more negative and positive δ13C and δ15N values, respectively. A significant proportion of the older diamond generation has high nitrogen contents, well outside the limit sector relationship, and these diamonds are likely to reflect derivation from subducted organic matter. Diamonds with low δ13C values combined with high nitrogen contents and positive δ15N values have not been previously widely recognised, even in studies of diamonds from Orapa. This may have been caused by prior analytical bias towards inclusion-bearing diamonds that are not necessarily representative of the entire range of diamond populations, and because of average measurements from heterogeneous diamonds measured by bulk combustion methods. Two distinct low nitrogen/Type II microdiamond populations were recognised that do not appear to continue into the macrodiamond sizes in the samples studied. Other populations, e.g. those containing residual singly-substituted nitrogen defects, range in size from small microdiamonds to large macrodiamonds. The total diamond content of the Orapa kimberlite thus reflects a complex assortment of multiple diamond populations.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Diamond-Blackfan anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Diamond-Blackfan anemia Diamond-Blackfan anemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Diamond-Blackfan anemia is a disorder of the bone marrow . The ...

  3. Surface/subsurface observation and removal mechanisms of ground reaction bonded silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wang; Zhang, Yu-Min; Han, Jie-cai; Zhang, Yun-long; Zhang, Jian-han; Zhou, Yu-feng; Han, Yuan-yuan

    2006-01-01

    Reaction Bonded Silicon Carbide (RBSiC) has long been recognized as a promising material for optical applications because of its unique combination of favorable properties and low-cost fabrication. Grinding of silicon carbide is difficult because of its high hardness and brittleness. Grinding often induces surface and subsurface damage, residual stress and other types of damage, which have great influence on the ceramic components for optical application. In this paper, surface integrity, subsurface damage and material removal mechanisms of RBSiC ground using diamond grinding wheel on creep-feed surface grinding machine are investigated. The surface and subsurface are studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. The effects of grinding conditions on surface and subsurface damage are discussed. This research links the surface roughness, surface and subsurface cracks to grinding parameters and provides valuable insights into the material removal mechanism and the dependence of grind induced damage on grinding conditions.

  4. Diamond turning of glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackley, W.S.; Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    A new research initiative will be undertaken to investigate the critical cutting depth concepts for single point diamond turning of brittle, amorphous materials. Inorganic glasses and a brittle, thermoset polymer (organic glass) are the principal candidate materials. Interrupted cutting tests similar to those done in earlier research are Ge and Si crystals will be made to obtain critical depth values as a function of machining parameters. The results will provide systematic data with which to assess machining performance on glasses and amorphous materials

  5. Fast diamond photoconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochet, T.

    1993-01-01

    Preliminary results on the response of type Ib and IIa diamond photodetectors to fast laser pulse exposures at 265 and 530 nm are presented. The influence of the applied bias, the laser wavelengths and the light intensity on the detector sensitivity is studied. Also, recent measurements with 1.25 MeV gamma ray pulses are reported. (authors). 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  6. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim, E-mail: ruslindarahim@gmail.com [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, Jln Kgr-Alor Setar, Seriab, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Ishiyama, Y. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan); Penmatsa, V. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H. [Department of Nano Science and Nano Engineering, School of Advance Science and Engineering, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, 169-8555 Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m.

  7. Repulsive effects of hydrophobic diamond thin films on biomolecule detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruslinda, A. Rahim; Ishiyama, Y.; Penmatsa, V.; Ibori, S.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We report the effect of fluorine plasma treatment on diamond thin film to resist the nonspecific adsorption of biomolecules. • The diamond thin film were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m. • The repulsive effect shows excellent binding efficiency for both DNA and HIV-1 Tat protein. - Abstract: The repulsive effect of hydrophobic diamond thin film on biomolecule detection, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 trans-activator of transcription peptide protein detection, was investigated using a mixture of a fluorine-, amine-, and hydrogen-terminated diamond surfaces. These chemical modifications lead to the formation of a surface that effectively resists the nonspecific adsorption of proteins and other biomolecules. The effect of fluorine plasma treatment on elemental composition was also investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XPS results revealed a fluorocarbon layer on the diamond thin films. The contact angle measurement results indicated that the fluorine-treated diamond thin films were highly hydrophobic with a surface energy value of ∼25 mN/m

  8. Diamond brazing - interfacial reactions and wetting; Loeten von Diamant - Grenzflaechenreaktionen und Benetzung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tillmann, W.; Osmanda, A.M.; Yurchenko, S. [Lehrstuhl fuer Werkstofftechnologie, Universitaet Dortmund, Leonhard-Euler-Str. 2, 44227 Dortmund (Germany); Theisen, W. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Lehrstuhl Werkstofftechnik (Germany)

    2005-08-01

    Diamond tools are increasingly gaining importance as cutting materials for various construction materials. The quality of synthetic diamonds, monocrystalline as well as polycrystalline or CVD-diamonds has been significantly improved over the last years. Integrating these cutting materials requires adequate joining technologies that produce sound joints without exposing the temperature sensitive diamond to too elevated temperatures. The paper highlights current developments in the joining of synthetic diamonds to steel and cemented carbide. Owing to their covalent atomic bonding diamonds cannot easily be wetted and joined by employing conventional brazing alloys. Hence, active agents are needed to foster an interfacial reaction. Different active filler concepts are presented and discussed regarding their joint formation. The brazing temperatures influence not only possible diamond degradation but also the interfacial decomposition of the diamond due to the formation of corresponding reaction layers.Active brazing, monocrystalline. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Diamantwerkstoffe erlangen zunehmend Bedeutung als Schneidmaterialien in Diamantwerkzeugen fuer die Bearbeitung verschiedener Konstruktionswerkstoffe. Die Qualitaet von synthetischen Diamanten, sowohl monokristallinen als auch polykristallinen oder CVD-Diamantschichten konnte in den letzten Jahren deutlich verbessert werden. Die Integration dieser Schneidstoffe erfordert eine angepasste Fuegetechnologie, die fehlerfreie Verbunde bereitstellt, ohne die gegenueber hohen Temperaturen empfindlichen Diamanten zu hohen Temperaturen auszusetzen. Der Beitrag zeigt aktuelle Entwicklungen in der Fuegetechnik von synthetischen Diamanten mit Stahl und Hartmetall auf. Infolge ihrer kovalenten atomaren Bindungen koennen Diamanten nicht ohne weiteres mit herkoemmlichen Lotwerkstoffen benetzt und gefuegt werden. Daher sind reaktive Elemente notwendig, die eine Grenzflaechenreaktion forcieren

  9. Structure and single-phase regime of boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1988-01-01

    The boron carbides are composed of twelve-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom intericosahedral chains. The boron carbides are known to exist as a single phase with carbon concentrations from about 8 to about 20 at. %. This range of carbon concentrations is made possible by the substitution of boron and carbon atoms for one another within both the icosahedra and intericosahedral chains. The most widely accepted structural model for B 4 C (the boron carbide with nominally 20% carbon) has B/sub 11/C icosahedra with C-B-C intericosahedral chains. Here, the free energy of the boron carbides is studied as a function of carbon concentration by considering the effects of replacing carbon atoms within B 4 C with boron atoms. It is concluded that entropic and energetic considerations both favor the replacement of carbon atoms with boron atoms within the intericosahedral chains, C-B-C→C-B-B. Once the carbon concentration is so low that the vast majority of the chains are C-B-B chains, near B/sub 13/C 2 , subsequent substitutions of carbon atoms with boron atoms occur within the icosahedra, B/sub 11/C→B/sub 12/. Maxima of the free energy occur at the most ordered compositions: B 4 C,B/sub 13/C 2 ,B/sub 14/C. This structural model, determined by studying the free energy, agrees with that previously suggested by analysis of electronic and thermal transport data. These considerations also provide an explanation for the wide single-phase regime found for boron carbides

  10. Surface geometry of three packable and one hybrid composite after polishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Martin; Bruegger, Hilka; Klimek, Joachim

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the surface quality of four composite materials after polishing with six different polishing techniques. Eighty specimens were made using three packable composites (Definite/Degussa, SureFil/ Dentsply and Solitaire/Heraeus-Kulzer) and one hybrid composite (Herculite XRV/Kerr). Five specimens of each material were polished using flexible Sof-Lex discs. The remaining 75 specimens of each composite were prepared using three finishing protocols: a single 30 microm diamond (n = 25), two finishing diamonds (30/20 microm; n = 25) and a 30 microm diamond followed by a tungsten carbide finishing bur (n = 25). Final polishing of each of the three finishing groups was accomplished with SuperBuff, Diafix-oral, OneGloss, Astropol and HaWe Composite Polishers (n = 5, each). Surface roughness was evaluated quantitatively by laser-stylus profilometry. Average roughness (R(a)) was calculated; statistical analysis of the data was performed with two-way ANOVA and Scheffé post-hoc tests. The polished surfaces were examined qualitatively by SEM. The results showed significant effects on surface roughness from the different composites (p = 0.011) and polishing systems (p < 0.001). After polishing, the Solitaire surfaces (R(a) = 0.72 microm) were smoother than Definite (R(a) = 0.87 microm) and SureFil (R(a) = 0.89 microm) and significantly smoother than Herculite (R(a) = 0.92 microm; p = 0.011). Three of the polishing methods (SuperBuff, Diafix-oral and Astropol) achieved lower R(a)-values than Sof-Lex discs. The polishing quality of the one-step systems SuperBuff and Diafix-oral was strongly affected by the initial finishing protocol.

  11. Ion channelling in diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derry, T.E.

    1978-06-01

    Diamond is one of the most extreme cases from a channelling point of view, having the smallest thermal vibration amplitude and the lowest atomic number of commonly-encountered crystals. These are the two parameters most important for determining channelling behaviour. It is of consiberable interest therefore to see how well the theories explaining and predicting the channeling properties of other substance, succeed with diamond. Natural diamond, although the best available form for these experiments, is rather variable in its physical properties. Part of the project was devoted to considering and solving the problem of obtaining reproducible results representative of the ideal crystal. Channelling studies were performed on several good crystals, using the Rutherford backscattering method. Critical angles for proton channelling were measured for incident energies from 0.6 to 4.5 MeV, in the three most open axes and three most open planes of the diamond structure, and for α-particle channelling at 0.7 and 1.0 MeV (He + ) in the same axes and planes. For 1.0 MeV protons, the crystal temperature was varied from 20 degrees Celsius to 700 degrees Celsius. The results are presented as curves of backscattered yield versus angle in the region of each axis or plane, and summarised in the form of tables and graphs. Generally the critical angles, axial minimum yields, and temperature dependence are well predicted by the accepted theories. The most valuable overall conclusion is that the mean thermal vibration amplitude of the atoms in a crytical determines the critical approach distance to the channel walls at which an ion can remain channelled, even when this distance is much smaller than the Thomas-Fermi screening distance of the atomic potential, as is the case in diamond. A brief study was made of the radiation damage caused by α-particle bombardment, via its effect on the channelling phenomenon. It was possible to hold damage down to negligible levels during the

  12. Superconductivity in borides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    It was thought that intermetallic superconductors do not exhibit superconductivity at temperatures over 30 K because of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) limit; therefore, researchers have been interested in high-T c cuprates. Our group discovered high-T c superconductivity in MgB 2 at 39 K in 2001. This discovery has initiated a substantial interest in the potential of high-T c superconductivity in intermetallic compounds that include 'light' elements (borides, carbides, etc.). (author)

  13. Investigations on the conditions for obtaining high density boron carbide by sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kislyj, P.S.; Grabtschuk, B.L.

    1975-01-01

    The results of investigations on kinetics of condensation and mechanisms of mass transfer in the process of sintering of technical, chemically pure and synthesized boron carbide are generalized. Laws on boron carbide densification depending upon temperature, time of isothermic endurance, thermal speed, size of powder particles and variable composition in homogeneity are determined. From the results obtained on condensation kinetics and special experiments on studying the changes in properties after heating under different conditions, the role of dislocation and diffusion processes in mass transfer during boron carbide sintering is exposed. The properties of sintered boron carbide are 15-20% lower than the properties of high-pressed one, that is conditioned by intercrystallite distortion of the first one and transcrystallite of the second one

  14. Present status of uranium-plutonium mixed carbide fuel development for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Muneo; Suzuki, Yasufumi.

    One Oarai characteristic of a carbide fuel is that its doubling time is about 13 years which is only about half as long as that of an oxide fuel. The development of carbide fuels in the past ten years has been truly remarkable. Especially, through the new fuel development program initiated in 1974 in the United States, success has been achieved with respect to He- and Na-bond fuels in obtaining a 16 a/o burning rate without damage to cladding tubes. In 1984 at FFTF, a radiation of a fuel assembly consisting 91 fuel pins is contemplated. On the other hand, in Japan, in 1974, a Fuel Research Wing specializing in the study of carbide fuels was constructed in the Oarai Laboratory of the Atomic Energy Research Institute and in the fall of 1982, was successful in fabricating two carbide fuel pins having different chemical compositions

  15. Synthesis and characterisation of star polymer/silicon carbide nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majewski, Peter; Choudhury, Namita Roy; Spori, Doris; Wohlfahrt, Ellen; Wohlschloegel, Markus

    2006-01-01

    A new type of composite material's preparation and property are reported in this paper. The composite was formed by solution blending a styrene ethylene butylenes (SEBS) star polymer with silicon carbide at various compositions. The composites were characterised using spectroscopic, microscopic and thermal techniques. Photo-acoustic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (PA-FT-IR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results show that the SiC resides uniformly in the organic network. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the hybrid shows that the thermal stability of the composite is higher than that of the star polymer. The maximum decomposition temperature increases by 73 deg. C. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) of the hybrid shows that the storage modulus of the star polymer increases after the composite formation, indicating the existence of thermodynamically stable SiC nanoparticles mostly in the micro-phase separated multiarm structure of the polymer

  16. Diamond film deposition on WC–Co and steel substrates with a CrN interlayer for tribological applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The most renowned property of diamond is its exceptional hardness. By depositing diamond films on tungsten carbide (WC–Co) and steel substrates, the hardness of diamond can be combined with the toughness of these materials, resulting in an excellent wear resistance material for tribological applications. However, poor adhesion of diamond coating on these substrates leads to a lesser lifetime for the diamond coated tools than expected. The prime reasons for the lack of proper adhesion are the preferential formation of graphitic layer at the interface due to the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and the interfacial residual stresses due to the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients of diamond (1.5  ×  10 −6 K −1 ) and WC–Co (5.2  ×  10 −6 K −1 ) or steel (12  ×  10 −6 K −1 ). In this review, we discuss the possibility of using a Cr–N interlayer as a diffusion barrier to prevent the catalytic activities of cobalt/iron and also to relax the interfacial residual stresses to some extent to enhance the adhesion of diamond coatings on these substrates. An overview of the most pertinent results of the last two decades, including the recent progress is introduced. We describe in detail how the Cr–N interlayer with the desired properties is fabricated. We give a concise overview of diamond deposition process, including the methods to vary the grain size from microcrystalline to nanocrystalline, which are suitable for some tribological applications. We describe in detail on surface and interface analysis, residual stress measurements, assessment adhesion strength and tribological performance of diamond coated WC–Co and steel substrates using various characterization techniques. We conclude by highlighting the current progress and future perspectives of diamond coatings on these substrates for tribological applications. (topical review)

  17. Diamond Pixel Detectors and 3D Diamond Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturi, N.

    2016-01-01

    Results from detectors of poly-crystalline chemical vapour deposited (pCVD) diamond are presented. These include the first analysis of data of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). The DBM module consists of pCVD diamond sensors instrumented with pixellated FE-I4 front-end electronics. Six diamond telescopes, each with three modules, are placed symmetrically around the ATLAS interaction point. The DBM tracking capabilities allow it to discriminate between particles coming from the interaction point and background particles passing through the ATLAS detector. Also, analysis of test beam data of pCVD DBM modules are presented. A new low threshold tuning algorithm based on noise occupancy was developed which increases the DBM module signal to noise ratio significantly. Finally first results from prototypes of a novel detector using pCVD diamond and resistive electrodes in the bulk, forming a 3D diamond device, are discussed. 3D devices based on pCVD diamond were successfully tested with test beams at CERN. The measured charge is compared to that of a strip detector mounted on the same pCVD diamond showing that the 3D device collects significantly more charge than the planar device.

  18. Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of molybdenum and vanadium-containing carbide hardened iron-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrol, E.; Bellot, C.; Lamesle, P.; Delagnes, D.; Povoden-Karadeniz, E.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Improvement of a carbide selective extraction method. ► Determination of experimental data on the Fe–C–Cr–Mo–V system for carbides above 900 °C: crystallographic structures and compositions of precipitates, matrix composition. ► High molybdenum solubility in FCC carbides. ► Improvement of thermodynamic databases from experimental results. ► Validation of the optimized database with different compositions steels. -- Abstract: A technique for the microstructural study of steels, based on the use of matrix dissolution to collect the very low number density precipitates formed in martensitic steels, has been considerably improved. This technique was applied to two different grades of alloy, characterized by high nickel and cobalt contents and varying chromium, molybdenum and vanadium contents. The technique was implemented at temperatures ranging between 900 °C and 1000 °C, in order to accurately determine experimental data including the crystallographic structure and chemical composition of the carbides, the carbide solvus temperatures, and variations in the chemical composition of the matrix. These experimental investigations reveal that the solubility of molybdenum in FCC carbides can be very high. These results have been compared with the behavior predicted by computational thermodynamics, and used to evaluate and improve the thermodynamic Matcalc steel database. This upgraded database has been validated on three other steels with different chemical compositions, characterized by the same Fe–Cr–Mo–V–C system

  19. Experimental investigation and thermodynamic modeling of molybdenum and vanadium-containing carbide hardened iron-based alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabrol, E., E-mail: ecabrol@mines-albi.fr [Institut Clément Ader, Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi Cedex 09 (France); Aubert and Duval, BP1 F-63770 Les Ancizes (France); Bellot, C. [Institut Clément Ader, Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi Cedex 09 (France); Aubert and Duval, BP1 F-63770 Les Ancizes (France); Lamesle, P.; Delagnes, D. [Institut Clément Ader, Mines Albi, Campus Jarlard, F-81013 Albi Cedex 09 (France); Povoden-Karadeniz, E. [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Early Stages of Precipitation, Vienna University of Technology, Favoritenstrasse 9-11, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► Improvement of a carbide selective extraction method. ► Determination of experimental data on the Fe–C–Cr–Mo–V system for carbides above 900 °C: crystallographic structures and compositions of precipitates, matrix composition. ► High molybdenum solubility in FCC carbides. ► Improvement of thermodynamic databases from experimental results. ► Validation of the optimized database with different compositions steels. -- Abstract: A technique for the microstructural study of steels, based on the use of matrix dissolution to collect the very low number density precipitates formed in martensitic steels, has been considerably improved. This technique was applied to two different grades of alloy, characterized by high nickel and cobalt contents and varying chromium, molybdenum and vanadium contents. The technique was implemented at temperatures ranging between 900 °C and 1000 °C, in order to accurately determine experimental data including the crystallographic structure and chemical composition of the carbides, the carbide solvus temperatures, and variations in the chemical composition of the matrix. These experimental investigations reveal that the solubility of molybdenum in FCC carbides can be very high. These results have been compared with the behavior predicted by computational thermodynamics, and used to evaluate and improve the thermodynamic Matcalc steel database. This upgraded database has been validated on three other steels with different chemical compositions, characterized by the same Fe–Cr–Mo–V–C system.

  20. Atomistic aspects of ductile responses of cubic silicon carbide during nanometric cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Saurav; Luo, Xichun; Reuben, Robert L; Rashid, Waleed Bin

    2011-11-11

    Cubic silicon carbide (SiC) is an extremely hard and brittle material having unique blend of material properties which makes it suitable candidate for microelectromechanical systems and nanoelectromechanical systems applications. Although, SiC can be machined in ductile regime at nanoscale through single-point diamond turning process, the root cause of the ductile response of SiC has not been understood yet which impedes significant exploitation of this ceramic material. In this paper, molecular dynamics simulation has been carried out to investigate the atomistic aspects of ductile response of SiC during nanometric cutting process. Simulation results show that cubic SiC undergoes sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition resulting in the formation of SiC-graphene-like substance with a growth rate dependent on the cutting conditions. The disorder transition of SiC causes the ductile response during its nanometric cutting operations. It was further found out that the continuous abrasive action between the diamond tool and SiC causes simultaneous sp3-sp2 order-disorder transition of diamond tool which results in graphitization of diamond and consequent tool wear.

  1. 钛沉积工艺制备TiN/cBN和TiC/金钢石涂层颗粒%Fabrication of TiN/cBN and TiC/diamond coated particles by titanium deposition process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Walid M. DAOUSH; Hee S. PARK; Soon H. HONG

    2014-01-01

    Cubic boron nitride particles coated by titanium nitride (TiN/cBN) as well as diamond particles coated by titanium carbide (TiC/diamond) were prepared by Ti molten salt deposition followed by heat-treatment process. cBN or diamond particles were mixed separately with Ti powders and molten salts (KCl, NaCl and K2TiF6). The mixture was heated at 900 °C under argon atmosphere. The produced particles were heat-treated under hydrogen at 1000 °C. The morphologies and chemical compositions of the produced particles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and focused ion beam (FIB). The results show that the cBN and the diamond particles are coated by nano-sized Ti layers. By heat-treatment of the Ti/cBN and TiC/diamond coated particles under hydrogen atmosphere, the deposited Ti layers were interacted by the in-situ transformation reaction with the surfaces of cBN and diamond particles and converted to titanium compounds (TiN and TiC), respectively.%用钛熔盐沉积及热处理工艺分别制备碳化钛涂覆的立方碳化硼颗粒(TiN/cBN)及碳化钛涂覆的金刚石颗粒(TiC/金刚石)。将cBN或金刚石颗粒分别与钛粉和KCl、NaCl和K2TiF6熔盐混合。将所得混合物在Ar气氛中加热至900°C,然后在H2气氛中于1000°C进行热处理。采用扫描电镜、X射线衍射和聚焦离子束技术对所制得颗粒进行表征。结果表明:cBN和金刚石颗粒表面已覆盖了纳米钛层。对Ti/cBN和TiC/金刚石涂层颗粒进行热处理后,颗粒表面沉积的Ti层与cBN和金刚石颗粒发生了原位化学反应,分别转化为钛化合物TiN和TiC。

  2. Cast-in hardfacing composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Jia-Lin; Wang, Hua-Ming.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten carbide and chromium ferroalloy particles in binderless state were placed on a vacuum sealed mold surface, and a wear resistant surface was formed by pouring high temperature liquid steel into the mold cavity. Higher surface hardness HRC 65-69 and increased toughness were obtained by this composite material. It is shown that a strengthened martensitic matrix alloyed by tungsten and chromium supports tungsten carbide particles as well as reformed carbides (M6C, M7C3). 3 refs

  3. CARBON-CONTAINING COMPOSITES BASED ON METALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VAGANOV V. E.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement Among the developed technologies metal-composites production,a special place takes powder metallurgy, having fundamental differences from conventionally used foundry technologies. The main advantages of this technology are: the possibility of sensitive control, the structure and phase composition of the starting components, and ultimately the possibility of obtaining of bulk material in nanostructured state with a minimum of processing steps. The potential reinforcers metals include micro and nano-sized oxides, carbides, nitrides, whiskers. The special position is occupied with carbon nanostructures (CNS: С60 fullerenes, single-layer and multi-layer nanotubes, onions (spherical "bulbs", nano-diamonds and graphite,their properties are being intensively studied in recent years. These objects have a high thermal and electrical conductivity values, superelasticity, and have a strength approximate to the theoretical value, which can provide an obtaining composite nanomaterial with a unique set of physical and mechanical properties. In creation of a metal matrix composite nanomaterials (CM, reinforced by various CNS, a special attention should be given to mechanical activation processes (MA already at the stage of preparation of the starting components affecting the structure, phase composition and properties of aluminum-matrix composites. Purpose. To investigate the influence of mechanical activation on the structure and phase composition of aluminum-matrix composites. Conclusion. The results of the study of the structure and phase composition of the initial and mechanically activated powders and bulk-modified metal-composites are shown, depending on the type and concentration of modifying varieties CNS, regimes of MA and parameters of compaction. The study is conducted of tribological properties of Al-CNS OF nanostructured materials.

  4. Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradetti, S.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Zanonato, P.; Tusseau-Nenez, S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements of uranium carbides were performed. • The tested materials are candidates as targets for radioactive ion beam production. • The results are correlated with the materials composition and microstructure. - Abstract: Thermal conductivity and emissivity measurements on different types of uranium carbide are presented, in the context of the ActiLab Work Package in ENSAR, a project within the 7th Framework Program of the European Commission. Two specific techniques were used to carry out the measurements, both taking place in a laboratory dedicated to the research and development of materials for the SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) target. In the case of thermal conductivity, estimation of the dependence of this property on temperature was obtained using the inverse parameter estimation method, taking as a reference temperature and emissivity measurements. Emissivity at different temperatures was obtained for several types of uranium carbide using a dual frequency infrared pyrometer. Differences between the analyzed materials are discussed according to their compositional and microstructural properties. The obtainment of this type of information can help to carefully design materials to be capable of working under extreme conditions in next-generation ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) facilities for the generation of radioactive ion beams.

  5. Surface temperature measurements of diamond

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masina, BN

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Diamond has the highest thermal conductivity among known materials, and as such finds uses as an industrial tool in areas where dissipation of excess heat is a requirement. In this investigation we set up a laser system to heat a diamond sample...

  6. Electrical and thermal transport properties of uranium and plutonium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, H.D.; Kerrisk, J.F.

    1976-09-01

    Contributions of many authors are outlined with respect to the experimental measurement methods used and characteristics of the sample materials. Discussions treat the qualitative effects of sample material composition; oxygen, nitrogen, and nickel concentrations; porosity; microstructural variations; and the variability in transport property values obtained by the various investigators. Temperature-dependent values are suggested for the electrical resistivities and thermal conductivities of selected carbide compositions based on a comparative evaluation of the available data and the effects of variation in the characteristics of sample materials

  7. Corrosion resistant composite materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanin, E.A.

    1986-01-01

    Foundations for corrosion-resistant composite materials design are considered with account of components compatibility. Fibrous and lamellar composites with metal matrix, dispersion-hardened steels and alloys, refractory metal carbides-, borides-, nitrides-, silicides-based composites are described. Cermet compositions and fields of their application, such as protective coatings for operation in agressive media at high temperatures, are presented

  8. Electrochemical applications of CVD diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastor-Moreno, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    Diamond technology has claimed an important role in industry since non-expensive methods of synthesis such as chemical vapour deposition allow to elaborate cheap polycrystalline diamond. This fact has increased the interest in the scientific community due to the outstanding properties of diamond. Since Pleskov published in 1987 the first paper in electrochemistry, many researchers around the world have studied different aspects of diamond electrochemistry such as reactivity, electrical structure, etc. As part of this worldwide interest these studies reveal new information about diamond electrodes. These studies report investigation of diamond electrodes characterized using structural techniques like scanning electrode microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. A new electrochemical theory based on surface states is presented that explains the metal and the semiconductor behaviour in terms of the doping level of the diamond electrode. In an effort to characterise the properties of diamond electrodes the band edges for hydrogen and oxygen terminated surface are located in organic solvent, hence avoiding possible interference that are present in aqueous solution. The determination of the band edges is performed by Mott-Schottky studies. These allow the calculation of the flat band potential and therefore the band edges. Additional cyclic voltammetric studies are presented for both types of surface termination. Mott-Schottky data and cyclic voltammograms are compared and explained in terms of the band edge localisation. Non-degenerately p-type semiconductor behaviour is presented for hydrogen terminated boron doped diamond. Graphitic surface states on oxidised surface boron doped diamond are responsible for the electrochemistry of redox couples that posses similar energy. Using the simple redox couple 1,4-benzoquinone effect of surface termination on the chemical behaviour of diamond is presented. Hydrogen sublayers in diamond electrodes seem to play an important role for the

  9. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  10. Polymer-based nucleation for chemical vapour deposition of diamond

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Domonkos, Mária; Ižák, Tibor; Kromka, Alexander; Varga, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 29 (2016), 1-7, č. článku 43688. ISSN 0021-8995 R&D Projects: GA ČR GC15-22102J Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : copolymers * composites * diamond * nucleation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.860, year: 2016

  11. Diamond-based electrodes for organic photovoltaic devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovalenko, Alexander; Ashcheulov, Petr; Guerrero, A.; Heinrichová, P.; Fekete, Ladislav; Vala, M.; Weiter, M.; Kratochvílová, Irena; Garcia-Belmonte, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 134, Mar (2015), s. 73-79 ISSN 0927-0248 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04020156 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : organic photovoltaic s * boron doped diamond * chemical vapor deposition Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials Impact factor: 4.732, year: 2015

  12. Diamond lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oitmaa, J.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate ground-state and high-temperature properties of the nearest-neighbour Heisenberg antiferromagnet on the three-dimensional diamond lattice, using series expansion methods. The ground-state energy and magnetization, as well as the magnon spectrum, are calculated and found to be in good agreement with first-order spin-wave theory, with a quantum renormalization factor of about 1.13. High-temperature series are derived for the free energy, and physical and staggered susceptibilities for spin S  =  1/2, 1 and 3/2, and analysed to obtain the corresponding Curie and Néel temperatures.

  13. Presolar Diamond in Meteorites

    OpenAIRE

    Amari, Sachiko

    2009-01-01

    Presolar diamond, the carrier of the isotopically anomalous Xe component Xe-HL, was the first mineral type of presolar dust that was isolated from meteorites. The excesses in the light, p-process only isotopes 124Xe and 126Xe, and in the heavy, r-process only isotopes 134Xe and 136Xe relative to the solar ratios indicate that Xe-HL was produced in supernovae: they are the only stellar source where these two processes are believed to take place. Although these processes occur in supernovae, th...

  14. Eclogitic inclusions in diamonds: Evidence of complex mantle processes over time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Snyder, Gregory A.; Crozaz, Ghislaine; Sobolev, Vladimir N.; Yefimova, Emiliya S.; Sobolev, Nikolai V.

    1996-08-01

    The first ion-probe trace element analyses of clinopyroxene-garnet pairs both included within diamonds and from the eclogite host xenoliths are reported; these diamondiferous eclogites are from the Udachnaya and Mir kimberlite pipes, Yakutia, Russia. The major and trace element analyses of these diamond-inclusion and host-rock pairs are compared in order to determine the relative ages of the diamonds, confirm or deny genetic relationships between the diamonds and the eclogites, evaluate models of eclogite petrogenesis, and model igneous processes in the mantle before, during, and after diamond formation. The most striking aspect of the chemical compositions of the diamond inclusions is the diversity of relationships with their eclogite hosts. No single distinct pattern of variation from diamond inclusion minerals to host minerals is found for all four samples. Garnet and clinopyroxene inclusions in the diamonds from two samples (U-65/3 and U-66/3) have lower Mg#s, lower Mg, and higher Fe contents, and lower LREE than those in the host eclogite. We interpret such variations as due to metasomatism of the host eclogite after diamond formation. One sample, U-41/3 shows enrichment in diamond-inclusion MREE enrichment relative to the eclogite host and may indicate a metasomatic event prior to, or during, diamond formation. Bulanova [2] found striking differences between inclusions taken from within different portions of the very same diamond. Clinopyroxene inclusions taken from the central (early) portions of Yakutian diamonds were lower in Mg# and Mg contents (by up to 25%) than those later inclusions at the rims of diamonds. These trends are parallel to those between diamond inclusions and host eclogites determined for four of the five samples from the present study and may merely represent changing magmatic and/or P-T conditions in the mantle. Garnet trace element compositions are similar in relative proportions, but variable in abundances, between diamond inclusions

  15. Transmission diamond imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley, John, E-mail: smedley@bnl.gov; Pinelli, Don; Gaoweia, Mengjia [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Muller, Erik; Ding, Wenxiang; Zhou, Tianyi [Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Bohon, Jen [Case Center for Synchrotron Biosciences, Center for Proteomics and Bioinformatics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2016-07-27

    Many modern synchrotron techniques are trending toward use of high flux beams and/or beams which require enhanced stability and precise understanding of beam position and intensity from the front end of the beamline all the way to the sample. For high flux beams, major challenges include heat load management in optics (including the vacuum windows) and a mechanism of real-time volumetric measurement of beam properties such as flux, position, and morphology. For beam stability in these environments, feedback from such measurements directly to control systems for optical elements or to sample positioning stages would be invaluable. To address these challenges, we are developing diamond-based instrumented vacuum windows with integrated volumetric x-ray intensity, beam profile and beam-position monitoring capabilities. A 50 µm thick single crystal diamond has been lithographically patterned to produce 60 µm pixels, creating a >1kilopixel free-standing transmission imaging detector. This device, coupled with a custom, FPGA-based readout, has been used to image both white and monochromatic x-ray beams and capture the last x-ray photons at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). This technology will form the basis for the instrumented end-station window of the x-ray footprinting beamline (XFP) at NSLS-II.

  16. Diamonds in the Sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, M.

    2004-12-01

    My first science fiction novel, Star Dragon, just recently available in paperback from Tor, features a voyage to the cataclysmic variable star system SS Cygni. My second novel, Spider Star, to appear early in 2006, takes place in and around a dark matter ``planet'' orbiting a neutron star. Both novels are ``hard'' science fiction, relying on accurate physics to inform the tales. It's possible to bring to life abstract concepts like special relativity, and alien environments like accretion disks, by using science fiction. Novels are difficult to use in a science class, but short stories offer intriguing possibilities. I'm planning to edit an anthology of hard science fiction stories that contain accurate science and emphasize fundamental ideas in modern astronomy. The working title is Diamonds in the Sky. The collection will be a mix of original stories and reprints, highlighting challenging concepts covered in a typical introductory astronomy course. Larry Niven's classic story, ``Neutron Star," is an excellent demonstration of extreme tidal forces in an astronomical context. Diamonds in the Sky will include forewards and afterwards to the stories, including discussion questions and mathematical formulas/examples as appropriate. I envision this project will be published electronically or through a print-on-demand publisher, providing long-term availabilty and keeping low cost. I encourage interested parties to suggest previously published stories, or to suggest which topics must be included.

  17. Thermal applications of low-pressure diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubner, R.; Lux, B.

    1997-01-01

    During the last decade several applications of low-pressure diamond were developed. Main products are diamond heat-spreaders using its high thermal conductivity, diamond windows with their high transparency over a wide range of wavelengths and wear resistant tool coatings because of diamonds superhardness. A short description of the most efficient diamond deposition methods (microwave, DC-glow discharge, plasma-jet and arc discharge) is given. The production and applications of diamond layers with high thermal conductivity will be described. Problems of reproducibility of diamond deposition, the influence of impurities, the heat conductivity in electronic packages, reliability and economical mass production will be discussed. (author)

  18. Investigation of the physics of diamond MEMS : diamond allotrope lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zalizniak, I.; Olivero, P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Prawer, S.; Reichart, P.; Rubanov, S.; Petriconi, S.

    2005-01-01

    We propose a novel lithography process in which ion induced phase transfomations of diamond form sacrificial layers allowing the fabrication of small structures including micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS). We have applied this novel lithography to the fabrication of diamond microcavities, cantilevers and optical waveguides. In this paper we present preliminary experiments directed at the fabrication of suspended diamond disks that have the potential for operation as optical resonators. Such structures would be very durable and resistant to chemical attack with potential applications as novel sensors for extreme environments or high temperature radiation detectors. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs

  19. Microstructure and property of diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr co-doping deposited using a hybrid beams system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Wei; Liu, Jingmao; Geng, Dongsen; Guo, Peng; Zheng, Jun; Wang, Qimin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr doping were deposited. • Alternate multilayered structure consisted of Al-poor layer and Al-rich layer was formed. • The periodic Al-rich layers can greatly improve the residual stress and elastic resilience of the films. - Abstract: DLC films with weak carbide former Al and carbide former Cr co-doping (Al:Cr-DLC) were deposited by a hybrid beams system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source (LIS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering using a gas mixture of C 2 H 2 and Ar as the precursor. The doped Al and Cr contents were controlled via adjusting the C 2 H 2 fraction in the gas mixture. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of the Al:Cr-DLC films were researched carefully using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stress-tester, nanoindentation and ball-on-plate tribometer as function of the C 2 H 2 fraction. The results show that the Al and Cr contents in the films increased continuously as the C 2 H 2 fraction decreased. The doped Cr atoms preferred to bond with the carbon while the Al atoms mainly existed in metallic state. Structure modulation with alternate multilayer consisted of Al-poor DLC layer and Al-rich DLC layer was found in the films. Those periodic Al-rich DLC layers can effectively release the residual stress of the films. On the other hand, the formation of the carbide component due to Cr incorporation can help to increase the film hardness. Accordingly, the residual stress of the DLC films can be reduced without sacrificing the film hardness though co-doping Al and Cr atoms. Furthermore, it was found that the periodic Al-rich layer can greatly improve the elastic resilience of the DLC films and thus decreases the film friction coefficient and wear rate significantly. However, the existence of the carbide component would cause abrasive wear and thus

  20. Microstructure and property of diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr co-doping deposited using a hybrid beams system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Wei, E-mail: popdw@126.com [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Liu, Jingmao; Geng, Dongsen [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guo, Peng [Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Zheng, Jun [Science and Technology on Surface Engineering Laboratory, Lanzhou Institute of Physics, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Qimin, E-mail: qmwang@gdut.edu.cn [School of Electromechanical Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Diamond-like carbon films with Al and Cr doping were deposited. • Alternate multilayered structure consisted of Al-poor layer and Al-rich layer was formed. • The periodic Al-rich layers can greatly improve the residual stress and elastic resilience of the films. - Abstract: DLC films with weak carbide former Al and carbide former Cr co-doping (Al:Cr-DLC) were deposited by a hybrid beams system comprising an anode-layer linear ion beam source (LIS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering using a gas mixture of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and Ar as the precursor. The doped Al and Cr contents were controlled via adjusting the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} fraction in the gas mixture. The composition, microstructure, compressive stress, mechanical properties and tribological behaviors of the Al:Cr-DLC films were researched carefully using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, stress-tester, nanoindentation and ball-on-plate tribometer as function of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} fraction. The results show that the Al and Cr contents in the films increased continuously as the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} fraction decreased. The doped Cr atoms preferred to bond with the carbon while the Al atoms mainly existed in metallic state. Structure modulation with alternate multilayer consisted of Al-poor DLC layer and Al-rich DLC layer was found in the films. Those periodic Al-rich DLC layers can effectively release the residual stress of the films. On the other hand, the formation of the carbide component due to Cr incorporation can help to increase the film hardness. Accordingly, the residual stress of the DLC films can be reduced without sacrificing the film hardness though co-doping Al and Cr atoms. Furthermore, it was found that the periodic Al-rich layer can greatly improve the elastic resilience of the DLC films and thus decreases the film friction coefficient and wear rate significantly. However, the existence of the carbide component would

  1. Diamonds from Myanmar and Thailand: Characteristics and possible origins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, W.L.; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, North Ryde, NSW; Win, T.T.; Andrew, A.S.; Davies, R.; Wathanakul, P.; Metcalfe, I.

    2000-01-01

    Alluvial diamonds with no obvious sources ('headless placers') are found in several areas of SE Asia and Oceania, including Myanmar, southern Thailand (Phuket), Sumatra, Kalimantan and eastern Australia. These deposits occur in relatively young geological terrains, in contrast to the Archaean or Proterozoic terrains that host most primary diamond deposits and their associated alluvial workings. Significant quantities of diamonds have been recovered from two areas in Myanmar, Momeik in the northern part of the country, and Theindaw in the southern part, and from the Phuket-Takuapa area of SW Thailand. Smaller quantities have been found in several other localities, notably in the Taungoo-Htantabin area of Myanmar. The Momeik diamonds are recovered during mining of gemstone gravels; the Theindaw and Phuket diamonds are by-products of tin dredging. To understand the origin of these enigmatic diamonds and to provide an improved exploration model, we are carrying out detailed studies of the morphology, mineral inclusions, internal growth structures and growth history, nitrogen concentration and aggregation state, and carbon isotopic composition of diamonds from Myanmar, Thailand and eastern Australia. We have examined >40 stones from Phuket, >110 from Theindaw and >25 from Momeik; these range in size from <0.1 ct to 3.5 ct, averaging ca 0.2 ct. While there are differences among the samples from different areas, the small sample size means these may not be representative and the similarities among the samples are striking. They are therefore described together here. More detailed data are given by Win et al., (1998) and Wathanakul et al., (1998)

  2. Deposition and micro electrical discharge machining of CVD-diamond layers incorporated with silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, R.; Berger, T.; Prieske, M.; Börner, R.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Zeidler, H.; Schubert, A.

    2017-10-01

    In metal forming, lubricants have to be used to prevent corrosion or to reduce friction and tool wear. From an economical and ecological point of view, the aim is to avoid the usage of lubricants. For dry deep drawing of aluminum sheets it is intended to apply locally micro-structured wear-resistant carbon based coatings onto steel tools. One type of these coatings are diamond layers prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Due to the high strength of diamond, milling processes are unsuitable for micro-structuring of these layers. In contrast to this, micro electrical discharge machining (micro EDM) is a suitable process for micro-structuring CVD-diamond layers. Due to its non-contact nature and its process principle of ablating material by melting and evaporating, it is independent of the hardness, brittleness or toughness of the workpiece material. In this study the deposition and micro electrical discharge machining of silicon incorporated CVD-diamond (Si-CVD-diamond) layers were presented. For this, 10 µm thick layers were deposited on molybdenum plates by a laser-induced plasma CVD process (LaPlas-CVD). For the characterization of the coatings RAMAN- and EDX-analyses were conducted. Experiments in EDM were carried out with a tungsten carbide tool electrode with a diameter of 90 µm to investigate the micro-structuring of Si-CVD-diamond. The impact of voltage, discharge energy and tool polarity on process speed and resulting erosion geometry were analyzed. The results show that micro EDM is a suitable technology for micro-structuring of silicon incorporated CVD-diamond layers.

  3. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  4. Elastic modulus and fracture of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Walther, G.

    1978-12-01

    The elastic modulus of hot-pressed boron carbide with 1 to 15% porosity was measured at room temperature. K/sub IC/ values were determined for the same porosity range at 500 0 C by the double torsion technique. The critical stress intensity factor of boron carbide with 8% porosity was evaluated from 25 to 1200 0 C

  5. Diamond: a material for acoustic devices

    OpenAIRE

    MORTET, Vincent; WILLIAMS, Oliver; HAENEN, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Diamond has been foreseen to replace silicon for high power, high frequency electronic applications or for devices that operates in harsh environments. However, diamond electronic devices are still in the laboratory stage due to the lack of large substrates and the complexity of diamond doping. On another hand, surface acoustic wave filters based on diamond are commercially available. Diamond is especially suited for acoustic applications because of its exceptional mechanical properties. The ...

  6. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... example of a cationic terminal carbide complex, [RuC(Cl)(CH3CN)(PCy3)2]+, is described and characterized by NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and computational studies. The experimentally observed irregular variation of the carbide 13C chemical shift is shown to be accurately reproduced by DFT, which also...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...

  7. Synthesis and characterization of a nanocrystalline diamond aerogel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pauzauskie, Peter J.; Crowhurst, Jonathan C.; Worsley, Marcus A.; Laurence, Ted A.; Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Wang, Yinmin; Willey, Trevor M.; Visbeck, Kenneth S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Evans, William J.; Zaug, Joseph M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.

    2011-07-06

    Aerogel materials have myriad scientific and technological applications due to their large intrinsic surface areas and ultralow densities. However, creating a nanodiamond aerogel matrix has remained an outstanding and intriguing challenge. Here we report the high-pressure, high-temperature synthesis of a diamond aerogel from an amorphous carbon aerogel precursor using a laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Neon is used as a chemically inert, near-hydrostatic pressure medium that prevents collapse of the aerogel under pressure by conformally filling the aerogel's void volume. Electron and X-ray spectromicroscopy confirm the aerogel morphology and composition of the nanodiamond matrix. Time-resolved photoluminescence measurements of recovered material reveal the formation of both nitrogen- and silicon- vacancy point-defects, suggesting a broad range of applications for this nanocrystalline diamond aerogel.

  8. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraimovitch, D., E-mail: dimitryf@mail.tau.ac.il [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Lefeuvre, G. [Micron Semiconductor Ltd. Royal Buildings, Marlborough Road, Lancing Business Park, BN15 8SJ (United Kingdom); Ruzin, A. [Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2017-02-11

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz–1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  9. CVD diamond metallization and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraimovitch, D.; Adelberd, A.; Marunko, S.; Lefeuvre, G.; Ruzin, A.

    2017-01-01

    In this study we compared three diamond substrate grades: polycrystalline, optical grade single crystal, and electronic grade single crystal for detector application. Beside the bulk type, the choice of contact material, pre-treatment, and sputtering process details have shown to alter significantly the diamond detector performance. Characterization of diamond substrate permittivity and losses indicate grade and crystallinity related, characteristic differences for frequencies in 1 kHz–1 MHz range. Substantial grade related variations were also observed in surface electrostatic characterization performed by contact potential difference (CPD) mode of an atomic force microscope. Study of conductivity variations with temperature reveal that bulk trap energy levels are also dependent on the crystal grade.

  10. Corrosion-electrochemical characteristics of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings formed by electrolytic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Chukalovskaya, T.V.; Medova, I.L.; Duradzhi, V.N.; Plavnik, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The composition, structure, microhardness and corrosion-electrochemical properties of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings on titanium in 5n H 2 SO 4 , 50 deg, produced by the method of chemical-heat treatment in electrolytic plasma, containing saturation components of nitrogen and carbon, were investigated. It is shown that the coatings produced have increased hardness, possess high corrosion resistance in sulfuric acid solution at increased temperature, as to their electrochemcial behaviour they are similar to titanium carbide and nitride respectively. It is shown that high corrosion resistance is ensured by electrochemical mechanism of the oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coating protection

  11. Diamond and Diamond-Like Materials as Hydrogen Isotope Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foreman, L.R.; Barbero, R.S.; Carroll, D.W.; Archuleta, T.; Baker, J.; Devlin, D.; Duke, J.; Loemier, D.; Trukla, M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The purpose of this project was to develop diamond and diamond-like thin-films as hydrogen isotope permeation barriers. Hydrogen embrittlement limits the life of boost systems which otherwise might be increased to 25 years with a successful non-reactive barrier. Applications in tritium processing such as bottle filling processes, tritium recovery processes, and target filling processes could benefit from an effective barrier. Diamond-like films used for low permeability shells for ICF and HEDP targets were also investigated. Unacceptable high permeabilities for hydrogen were obtained for plasma-CVD diamond-like-carbon films

  12. Diamond family of colloidal supercrystals as phononic metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryana, Kiumars; Zanjani, Mehdi B.

    2018-05-01

    Colloidal crystals provide a versatile platform for designing phononic metamaterials with exciting applications for sound and heat management. New advances in the synthesis and self-assembly of anisotropic building blocks such as colloidal clusters have expanded the library of available micro- and nano-scale ordered multicomponent structures. Diamond-like supercrystals formed by such clusters and spherical particles are notable examples that include a rich family of crystal symmetries such as diamond, double diamond, zinc-blende, and MgCu2. This work investigates the design of phononic supercrystals by predicting and analyzing phonon transport properties. In addition to size variation and structural diversity, these supercrystals encapsulate different sub-lattice types within one structure. Computational models are used to calculate the effect of various parameters on the phononic spectrum of diamond-like supercrystals. The results show that structures with relatively small or large filling factors (f > 0.65 or f f > 0.45). The double diamond and zinc-blende structures render the largest bandgap size compared to the other supercrystals studied in this paper. Additionally, this article discusses the effect of incorporating various configurations of sub-lattices by selecting different material compositions for the building blocks. The results suggest that, for the same structure, there exist multiple phononic variants with drastically different band structures. This study provides a valuable insight for evaluating novel colloidal supercrystals for phononic applications and guides the future experimental work for the synthesis of colloidal structures with desired phononic behavior.

  13. Assessing the efficiency of carbide drill bits and factors influencing their application to debris-rich subglacial ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Jiang, Jianliang; Cao, Pinlu; Wang, Jinsong; Fan, Xiaopeng; Shang, Yuequan; Talalay, Pavel

    2017-09-01

    When drilling into subglacial bedrock, drill operators commonly encounter basal ice containing high concentrations of rock debris and melt water. As such conditions can easily damage conventional ice drills, researchers have experimented with carbide, diamond, and polycrystalline diamond compact drill bits, with varying degrees of success. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between drilling speed and power consumption for a carbide drill bit penetrating debris-rich ice. We also assessed drill load, rotation speed, and various performance parameters for the cutting element, as well as the physical and mechanical properties of rock and ice, to construct mathematical models. We show that our modeled results are in close agreement with the experimental data, and that both penetration speed and power consumption are positively correlated with drill speed and load. When used in ice with 30% rock content, the maximum penetration speed of the carbide bit is 3.4 mm/s with a power consumption of ≤0.5 kW, making the bit suitable for use with existing electromechanical drills. Our study also provides a guide for further research into cutting heat and equipment design.

  14. Implementation Challenges for Sintered Silicon Carbide Fiber Bonded Ceramic Materials for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2011-01-01

    During the last decades, a number of fiber reinforced ceramic composites have been developed and tested for various aerospace and ground based applications. However, a number of challenges still remain slowing the wide scale implementation of these materials. In addition to continuous fiber reinforced composites, other innovative materials have been developed including the fibrous monoliths and sintered fiber bonded ceramics. The sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics have been fabricated by the hot pressing and sintering of silicon carbide fibers. However, in this system reliable property database as well as various issues related to thermomechanical performance, integration, and fabrication of large and complex shape components has yet to be addressed. In this presentation, thermomechanical properties of sintered silicon carbide fiber bonded ceramics (as fabricated and joined) will be presented. In addition, critical need for manufacturing and integration technologies in successful implementation of these materials will be discussed.

  15. Irradiation of a 19 pin subassembly with mixed carbide fuel in KNK II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geithoff, D.; Mühling, G.; Richter, K.

    1992-06-01

    The presentation deals with the fabrication, irradiation and nondestructive postirradiation examinations of LMR fuel pins with mixed (U, Pu)-carbide fuels. The mixed carbide fuel was fabricated by the European Institute of Transuranium Elements using various fabrication procedures. Fuel composition varied therefore in a wide range of tolerances with respect to oxygen and phase content and microstructure. The 19 carbide pins were irradiated in the fast neutron flux of the KNK II reactor to a burn-up of about 7 at% without any failure in the centre of a KNK "carrier element" at a maximum linear rating of 800 W/cm. After dismantling in the Hot Cells of KfK nondestructive examinations were carried out comprising dimensional controls, radiography, γ-scanning and eddy-current testing. The results indicate differences in fuel behaviour with respect to composition of the fuel.

  16. Toughness behaviour of tungsten-carbide-cobalt alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigl, L.S.

    1985-05-01

    In the present work the mechanisms of crack propagation in technically important WC-Co alloys are investigated and a model describing the influence of microstructural parameters and of the mechanical properties of the constituents is developed. An energy concept is used for modelling fracture toughness. The energies dissipated in the four crack-paths (trans- and intergranular carbide fracture, fracture across the binder-ligaments, fracture in the binder close to the carbide/binder interface) are summed up using the experimentally determined area-fractions of the crack-paths, the specific energy of brittle fracture in the carbide and of ductile fracture is calculated by integrating the energy to deform a volume element over the plastically deformed region. In contrast to all earlier models, this concept describes fracture toughness of WC-Co alloys only with physically meaningful parameters. The excellent agreement with experimental toughness values and with qualitative observations of crack propagation show that the new model includes all effects which influence toughness. As demonstrated with WC-based hardmetals with a cobalt-nickel binder, the results open new possibilities for optimizing the toughness of composites in which a small amount of a tough phase is embedded in a brittle matrix. (Author, shortened by G.Q.)

  17. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  18. Creating and Controlling Single Spins in Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christle, David

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a well-established commercial semiconductor used in high-power electronics, optoelectronics, and nanomechanical devices, and has recently shown promise for semiconductor-based implementations of quantum information technologies. In particular, a set of divacancy-related point defects have improved coherence properties relative to the prominent nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond, are addressable at near-telecom wavelengths, and reside in a material for which there already exist advanced growth, doping, and microfabrication capabilities. These properties suggest divacancies in SiC have compelling advantages for photonics and micromechanical applications, yet their relatively recent discovery means crucial aspects of their fundamental physics for these applications are not well understood. I will review our progress on manipulating spin defects in SiC, and discuss efforts towards isolating and controlling them at the single defect limit. In particular, our most recent experimental results demonstrate isolation and control of long-lived (T2 = 0 . 9 ms) divacancies in a form of SiC that can be grown epitaxially on silicon. By studying the time-resolved photoluminescence of a single divacancy, we reveal its fundamental orbital structure and characterize in detail the dynamics of its special optical cycle. Finally, we probe individual divacancies using resonant laser techniques and reveal an efficient spin-photon interface with figures of merit comparable to those reported for NV centers in diamond. These results suggest a pathway towards photon-mediated entanglement of SiC defect spins over long distances. This work was supported by NSF, AFOSR, the Argonne CNM, the Knut & Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the Linköping Linnaeus Initiative, the Swedish Government Strategic Research Area, and the Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture of Japan.

  19. Upper mantle fluids evolution, diamond formation, and mantle metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, F.; Sverjensky, D. A.

    2017-12-01

    During mantle metasomatism, fluid-rock interactions in the mantle modify wall-rock compositions. Previous studies usually either investigated mineral compositions in xenoliths and xenocrysts brought up by magmas, or examined fluid compositions preserved in fluid inclusions in diamonds. However, a key study of Panda diamonds analysed both mineral and fluid inclusions in the diamonds [1] which we used to develop a quantitative characterization of mantle metasomatic processes. In the present study, we used an extended Deep Earth Water model [2] to simulate fluid-rock interactions at upper mantle conditions, and examine the fluids and mineral assemblages together simultaneously. Three types of end-member fluids in the Panda diamond fluid inclusions include saline, rich in Na+K+Cl; silicic, rich in Si+Al; and carbonatitic, rich in Ca+Mg+Fe [1, 3]. We used the carbonatitic end-member to represent fluid from a subducting slab reacting with an excess of peridotite + some saline fluid in the host environment. During simultaneous fluid mixing and reaction with the host rock, the logfO2 increased by about 1.6 units, and the pH increased by 0.7 units. The final minerals were olivine, garnet and diamond. The Mg# of olivine decreased from 0.92 to 0.85. Garnet precipitated at an early stage, and its Mg# also decreased with reaction progress, in agreement with the solid inclusions in the Panda diamonds. Phlogopite precipitated as an intermediate mineral and then disappeared. The aqueous Ca, Mg, Fe, Si and Al concentrations all increased, while Na, K, and Cl concentrations decreased during the reaction, consistent with trends in the fluid inclusion compositions. Our study demonstrates that fluids coming from subducting slabs could trigger mantle metasomatism, influence the compositions of sub-lithospherc cratonic mantle, precipitate diamonds, and change the oxygen fugacity and pH of the upper mantle fluids. [1] Tomlinson et al. EPSL (2006); [2] Sverjensky, DA et al., GCA (2014

  20. Wear resistance of nano- and micro-crystalline diamond coatings onto WC-Co with Cr/CrN interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy); Barletta, Massimiliano, E-mail: barletta@ing.uniroma2.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy); Cristofanilli, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Cr/CrN bi-layers have been used recently to promote the growth of high quality Hot Filament Chemical Vapour Deposition (HFCVD) diamond coatings onto Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-6 wt.%Co) substrates. In the present investigation, the influence of the crystalline size of the diamond coatings on their wear endurance is looked into. Nano- (NDC) and micro-crystalline Diamond Coatings (MDC) were deposited by HFCVD onto untreated and Fluidized Bed (FB) treated Cr/CrN interlayers. NDCs, characterized by a cauliflower-like morphology, showed improved wear resistance. However, the superimposition of NDCs onto Cr/CrN interlayers micro-corrugated by FB treatment was found to be the most promising choice, leading to the formation of highly adherent and wear resistant coatings.