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Sample records for carbide cobalt nanoparticles

  1. Atomic structure of high-coercivity cobalt-carbide nanoparticles ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, D. A.; Sterbinsky, G.; Stephens, P. W.; Carroll, K. J.; Yoon, H.; Meng, S.; Huba, Z.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2013-03-01

    Permanent magnets are increasingly important in numerous applications, including the quickly expanding area of green technologies (e . g . high efficiency electric car motors and wind turbine power systems). We present studies of novel permanent magnet materials based on cobalt carbide nanoparticles (NPs), where the energy product (BHmax) exceeds 20 kJ / m3. The NPs are synthesized via a polyol process, which offers a flexible approach to modify the Co-carbide phase (Co2C and Co3C), and NP morphology, size and size dispersion. The Co2C and Co3C phases have unique magnetic properties, and the combination exhibits the high BHmax . We present a detailed assessment of the structure of mixtures of Co2C and Co3 NPs, measured by high-resolution, synchrotron based powder x-ray diffraction (p-XRD). Both the Co2C and Co3 phases exhibit an orthorhombic structure (Pnnm and Pnma space groups, respectively). The high-resolution p-XRD facilitates identification of mixed phase samples, enabling detailed comparisons of the atomic structure with the magnetic properties, measured by both lab-based magnetometry and x-ray spectroscopy (soft x-ray XAS & XMCD).

  2. Cobalt exposure in a carbide tip grinding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbins, A I; Horstman, S W; Daniell, W E; Atallah, R

    1992-03-01

    Reports relating hard metal disease or nonspecific respiratory symptoms to tungsten or cobalt exposure have been published in the past 20 yr. This report discusses a work site investigation of a small company, employing approximately 50 workers, producing carbide tip saw blades for the woodworking industry. Cobalt exposure was characterized by ambient air monitoring (area and personnel), particle size determination, and biological monitoring. Area sampling for cadmium, cobalt, and tungsten indicated low ambient air levels in all manufacturing areas except the grinding department, which had cobalt air levels approaching the threshold limit value of 0.05 mg/m3. Area airborne cobalt exposure levels measured over six shifts in the grinding department ranged from 0.017 to 0.12 mg/m3 for the total collection method and 0.002 to 0.028 mg/m3 for the method collecting respirable particles. Cobalt content in the total and respirable fractions was similar. Urine monitoring indicated production workers have elevated cobalt levels, and the grinders' levels were higher than other production workers. The grinding coolant was found to have elevated cobalt concentrations. A survey of coolants from nine carbide grinding shops indicated the elevated cobalt concentrations may be common.

  3. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2016-10-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V (vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  4. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2017-02-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V ( vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  5. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  6. Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstead, Andrea L; Arena, Christopher B; Li, Bingyun

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) has been recognized as a workplace inhalation hazard in the manufacturing, mining and drilling industries by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Exposure to WC-Co is known to cause "hard metal lung disease" but the relationship between exposure, toxicity and development of disease remain poorly understood. To better understand this relationship, the present study examined the role of WC-Co particle size and internalization on toxicity using lung epithelial cells. We demonstrated that nano- and micro-WC-Co particles exerted toxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that nano-WC-Co particles caused significantly greater toxicity at lower concentrations and shorter exposure times compared to micro-WC-Co particles. WC-Co particles in the nano-size range (not micron-sized) were internalized by lung epithelial cells, which suggested that internalization may play a key role in the enhanced toxicity of nano-WC-Co particles over micro-WC-Co particles. Further exploration of the internalization process indicated that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in WC-Co internalization such as actin and microtubule based cytoskeletal rearrangements. These findings support our hypothesis that WC-Co particle internalization contributes to cellular toxicity and suggest that therapeutic treatments inhibiting particle internalization may serve as prophylactic approaches for those at risk of WC-Co particle exposure.

  7. Exploring the potential role of tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) nanoparticle internalization in observed toxicity toward lung epithelial cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstead, Andrea L. [Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences Graduate Program, School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Arena, Christopher B. [Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); E.J. Van Liere Research Program, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Li, Bingyun, E-mail: bili@hsc.wvu.edu [Biomaterials, Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Orthopaedics, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences Graduate Program, School of Pharmacy, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); E.J. Van Liere Research Program, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Mary Babb Randolph Cancer Center, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt (WC-Co) has been recognized as a workplace inhalation hazard in the manufacturing, mining and drilling industries by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health. Exposure to WC-Co is known to cause “hard metal lung disease” but the relationship between exposure, toxicity and development of disease remain poorly understood. To better understand this relationship, the present study examined the role of WC-Co particle size and internalization on toxicity using lung epithelial cells. We demonstrated that nano- and micro-WC-Co particles exerted toxicity in a dose- and time-dependent manner and that nano-WC-Co particles caused significantly greater toxicity at lower concentrations and shorter exposure times compared to micro-WC-Co particles. WC-Co particles in the nano-size range (not micron-sized) were internalized by lung epithelial cells, which suggested that internalization may play a key role in the enhanced toxicity of nano-WC-Co particles over micro-WC-Co particles. Further exploration of the internalization process indicated that there may be multiple mechanisms involved in WC-Co internalization such as actin and microtubule based cytoskeletal rearrangements. These findings support our hypothesis that WC-Co particle internalization contributes to cellular toxicity and suggest that therapeutic treatments inhibiting particle internalization may serve as prophylactic approaches for those at risk of WC-Co particle exposure. - Highlights: • Hard metal (WC-Co) particle toxicity was established in lung epithelial cells. • Nano-WC-Co particles caused greater toxicity than micro-WC-Co particles. • Nano- and micro-WC-Co particles were capable of inducing cellular apoptosis. • Nano-WC-Co particles were internalized by lung epithelial cells. • WC-Co particle internalization was mediated by actin dynamics.

  8. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin

    2016-12-01

    This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe3C and Co3C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe3C, and Co3C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  9. Heat-Resistance of the Powder Cobalt Alloys Reinforced by Niobium or Titanium Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherepova, T.S.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of heat-resistance of powder cobalt alloys at 1100 °C were investigated. These alloys were developed for the protection of workers banding shelves GTE blades from wear. The alloys were prepared by hot pressing powders of cobalt, chromium, aluminum, iron and niobium or titanium carbides. The values of heat resistance alloys containing carbides between 30 and 70% (vol. depend on the type made of carbide alloys: alloys with titanium carbide superior in heat-resistant alloy of niobium carbide. The most significant factor affecting on the heat-resistant alloys, is porosity: with its increase the parameters decline regardless of the type and content of carbide. The optimum composition of powder heat resisting alloys of titanium carbide with a melting point above 1300 °C were determined for use in the aircraft engine.

  10. Sonochemical Synthesis of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Partha P. Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite being a hard magnetic material with high coercivity and moderate magnetization has found wide-spread applications. In this paper, we have reported the sonochemical synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles using metal acetate precursors. The ferrite synthesis occurs in three steps (hydrolysis of acetates, oxidation of hydroxides, and in situ microcalcination of metal oxides that are facilitated by physical and chemical effects of cavitation bubbles. The physical and magnetic properties of the ferrite nano-particles thus synthesized have been found to be comparable with those reported in the literature using other synthesis techniques.

  11. Chemical Modification Methods of Nanoparticles of Silicon Carbide Surface

    OpenAIRE

    Anton S. Yegorov; Vitaly S. Ivanov; Alexey V. Antipov; Alyona I. Wozniak; Kseniia V. Tcarkova.

    2015-01-01

    silicon carbide exhibits exceptional properties: high durability, high thermal conductivity, good heat resistance, low thermal expansion factor and chemical inactivity. Reinforcement with silicon carbide nanoparticles increases polymer’s tensile strength and thermal stability.Chemical methods of modification of the silicon carbide surface by means of variety of reagents from ordinary molecules to macromolecular polymers are reviewed in the review.The structure of silicon carbide surface layer...

  12. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V. [Instituto de Tecnologías y Ciencias de la Ingeniería, “Ing. H. Fernández Long,” Av. Paseo Colón 850 (1063), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Errandonea, D., E-mail: daniel.errandonea@uv.es [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Institut Universitari de Ciència dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, c/ Doctor Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Agouram, S. [Departamento de Física Aplicada y Electromagnetismo, Universitat de València, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  13. Chemical Modification Methods of Nanoparticles of Silicon Carbide Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton S. Yegorov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available silicon carbide exhibits exceptional properties: high durability, high thermal conductivity, good heat resistance, low thermal expansion factor and chemical inactivity. Reinforcement with silicon carbide nanoparticles increases polymer’s tensile strength and thermal stability.Chemical methods of modification of the silicon carbide surface by means of variety of reagents from ordinary molecules to macromolecular polymers are reviewed in the review.The structure of silicon carbide surface layer and the nature of modificator bonding with the surface of SiC particles are reviewed. General examples of surface modification methodologies and composite materials with the addition of modified SiC are given.

  14. Mechanochemical Preparation of Cobalt Nanoparticles through a Novel Intramolecular Reaction in Cobalt(II) Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    A novel solid state reaction involving a series of cobalt(II) hydrazine-azides has been used to prepare metallic cobalt nanoparticles. The reactions of [Co(N2H4)(N3)2], [Co(N2H4)2(N3)2], and [Co(N2H4)(N3)Cl]·H2O via NaOH, KOH as reactants were carried out in the solid state. These complexes undergo an intramolecular two-electron oxidation-reduction reaction at room temperature, producing metallic cobalt nanoparticles (Co1–Co6). The aforementioned complexes contain cobalt(II) that is an oxidiz...

  15. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Decorated with Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles

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    D. G. Larrude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs synthesized by spray pyrolysis were decorated with cobalt oxide nanoparticles using a simple synthesis route. This wet chemistry method yielded nanoparticles randomly anchored to the surface of the nanotubes by decomposition of cobalt nitrate hexahydrate diluted in acetone. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that dispersed particles were formed on the MWCNTs walls. The average size increased with the increasing concentration of cobalt nitrate in acetone in the precursor mixture. TEM images indicated that nanoparticles were strongly attached to the tube walls. The Raman spectroscopy results suggested that the MWCNT structure was slightly damaged after the nanoparticle growth.

  16. Cobalt-silica magnetic nanoparticles with functional surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadala, Michael L. [Department of Chemistry and the Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Mail Code 0212, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344 (United States); Zalich, Michael A. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Fulks, David B. [Department of Chemistry and the Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Mail Code 0212, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344 (United States); St Pierre, Tim G. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Dailey, James P. [Department of Ophthalmology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH (United States); Riffle, Judy S. [Department of Chemistry and the Macromolecules and Interfaces Institute, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Mail Code 0212, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0344 (United States)]. E-mail: judyriffle@aol.com

    2005-05-15

    Cobalt nanoparticles encased in polysiloxane block copolymers have been heated at 600-700 deg C to form protective shells around the particles, which contain crosslinked Si-O structures, and to anneal the cobalt. Methods to functionalize and modify the surfaces of the pyrolyzed/annealed silica-cobalt complexes with amines, isocyanates, poly(ethylene oxide), poly(L-lactide) and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are presented.

  17. Weak ferromagnetism and exchange biasing in cobalt oxide nanoparticle systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomou, A; Gournis, D; Panagiotopoulos, [No Value; Huang, Y; Hadjipanayis, GC; Kooi, BJ; Panagiotopoulos, I.

    2006-01-01

    Cobalt oxide nanoparticle systems have been prepared by wet chemical processing involving the encapsulation of the nanoparticles by an organic ligand shell (oleic acid and oleylamine). CoO nanoparticles were easily prepared by this method, while the synthesis of the CoPt/CoO nanocomposites was achie

  18. Surface oxidation of cobalt nanoparticles studied by Mossbauer spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Franz; Mørup, Steen; Charles, S.W.

    1999-01-01

    The surface oxide formed on cobalt nanoparticles has been studied by Mossbauer emission spectroscopy. Exposure of the cobalt particles to oxygen at room temperature was found to result in the formation of a relatively well-ordered surface oxide with Mossbauer parameters similar to those of CoO....

  19. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain ( 100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe66Co34) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  20. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein – namely the ferritin – in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  1. Physiological Remediation of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles by Ferritin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatron, Jeanne; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Javed, Yasir; Vuong, Quoc Lam; Gossuin, Yves; Neveu, Sophie; Luciani, Nathalie; Hémadi, Miryana; Carn, Florent; Alloyeau, Damien; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-09

    Metallic nanoparticles have been increasingly suggested as prospective therapeutic nanoplatforms, yet their long-term fate and cellular processing in the body is poorly understood. Here we examined the role of an endogenous iron storage protein - namely the ferritin - in the remediation of biodegradable cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. Structural and elemental analysis of ferritins close to exogenous nanoparticles within spleens and livers of mice injected in vivo with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles, suggests the intracellular transfer of degradation-derived cobalt and iron, entrapped within endogenous protein cages. In addition, the capacity of ferritin cages to accommodate and store the degradation products of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was investigated in vitro in the acidic environment mimicking the physiological conditions that are present within the lysosomes. The magnetic, colloidal and structural follow-up of nanoparticles and proteins in the lysosome-like medium confirmed the efficient remediation of nanoparticle-released cobalt and iron ions by ferritins in solution. Metal transfer into ferritins could represent a quintessential process in which biomolecules and homeostasis regulate the local degradation of nanoparticles and recycle their by-products.

  2. Phase transformation during surface ablation of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide with pulsed UV laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, T. [Academia Sinica, Shanghai, SH (China). Shanghai Inst. of Optics and Fine Mechanics; Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an (China); Lou, Q.; Dong, J.; Wei, Y. [Academia Sinica, Shanghai, SH (China). Shanghai Inst. of Optics and Fine Mechanics; Liu, J. [Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an (China)

    2001-09-01

    Surface ablation of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hard metal has been carried out in this work using a 308 nm, 20 ns XeCl excimer laser. Surface microphotography and XRD, as well as an electron probe have been used to investigate the transformation of phase and microstructure as a function of the pulse-number of laser shots at a laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm{sup 2}. The experimental results show that the microstructure of cemented tungsten carbide is transformed from the original polygonal grains of size 3 {mu}m to interlaced large, long grains with an increase in the number of laser shots up to 300, and finally to gross grains of size 10 {mu}m with clear grain boundaries after 700 shots of laser irradiation. The crystalline structure of the irradiated area is partly transformed from the original WC to {beta}WC{sub 1-x}, then to {alpha}W{sub 2}C and CW{sub 3}, and finally to W crystal. It is suggested that the undulating 'hill-valley' morphology may be the result of selective removal of cobalt binder from the surface layer of the hard metal. The formation of non-stoichiometric tungsten carbide may result from the escape of elemental carbon due to accumulated heating of the surface by pulsed laser irradiation. (orig.)

  3. Phase transformation during surface ablation of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide with pulsed UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T.; Lou, Q.; Dong, J.; Wei, Y.; Liu, J.

    Surface ablation of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hard metal has been carried out in this work using a 308 nm, 20 ns XeCl excimer laser. Surface microphotography and XRD, as well as an electron probe have been used to investigate the transformation of phase and microstructure as a function of the pulse-number of laser shots at a laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm2. The experimental results show that the microstructure of cemented tungsten carbide is transformed from the original polygonal grains of size 3 μm to interlaced large, long grains with an increase in the number of laser shots up to 300, and finally to gross grains of size 10 μm with clear grain boundaries after 700 shots of laser irradiation. The crystalline structure of the irradiated area is partly transformed from the original WC to βWC1-x, then to αW2C and CW3, and finally to W crystal. It is suggested that the undulating `hill-valley' morphology may be the result of selective removal of cobalt binder from the surface layer of the hard metal. The formation of non-stoichiometric tungsten carbide may result from the escape of elemental carbon due to accumulated heating of the surface by pulsed laser irradiation.

  4. Ultrathin fiber poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, modified by silicon carbide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Krutikova, A. A.; Goldshtrakh, M. A.; Staroverova, O. V.; Iordanskii, A. L.; Ischenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The article presents the results of studies the composite fibrous material based on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and nano-size silicon carbide obtained by the electrospinning method. Size distribution of the silicon carbide nanoparticles in the fiber was estimated by X-ray diffraction technique. It is shown that immobilization of the SiC nanoparticles to the PHB fibers contributes to obtaining essentially smaller diameter of fibers, high physical-mechanical characteristics and increasing resistance to degradation in comparison with the fibers of PHB.

  5. Mechanochemical Preparation of Cobalt Nanoparticles through a Novel Intramolecular Reaction in Cobalt(II Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Abolghasem Kahani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel solid state reaction involving a series of cobalt(II hydrazine-azides has been used to prepare metallic cobalt nanoparticles. The reactions of [Co(N2H4(N32], [Co(N2H42(N32], and [Co(N2H4(N3Cl]·H2O via NaOH, KOH as reactants were carried out in the solid state. These complexes undergo an intramolecular two-electron oxidation-reduction reaction at room temperature, producing metallic cobalt nanoparticles (Co1–Co6. The aforementioned complexes contain cobalt(II that is an oxidizing agent and also hydrazine ligand as a reducing agent. Other products produced include sodium azide and ammonia gas. The cobalt metal nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. The synthesized cobalt nanoparticles have similar morphologies; however, their particle size distributions are different.

  6. Escape of carbon element in surface ablation of cobalt cemented tungsten carbide with pulsed UV laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiejun; Lou, Qihong; Dong, Jingxing; Wei, Yunrong; Liu, Jingru

    2001-03-01

    Surface ablation of cobalt cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal has been carried out in this work using a 308 nm, 30 ns XeCl excimer laser. The surface phase transformation on different pulse number of laser shots has been investigated by means of XRD and microphotography as well as AES at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2. The experimental results showed that the phase structure of irradiated area has partly transformed from original WC to β-WC 1- x, then to α-W 2C and CW 3, and finally to W crystal. It is suggested that the formation of non-stoichiometric tungsten carbide should result from the escaping of carbon element due to accumulated heating of surface by pulsed laser irradiation.

  7. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.;

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded...... with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  8. Room temperature quantum emission from cubic silicon carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelletto, Stefania; Johnson, Brett C; Zachreson, Cameron; Beke, David; Balogh, István; Ohshima, Takeshi; Aharonovich, Igor; Gali, Adam

    2014-08-26

    The photoluminescence (PL) arising from silicon carbide nanoparticles has so far been associated with the quantum confinement effect or to radiative transitions between electronically active surface states. In this work we show that cubic phase silicon carbide nanoparticles with diameters in the range 45-500 nm can host other point defects responsible for photoinduced intrabandgap PL. We demonstrate that these nanoparticles exhibit single photon emission at room temperature with record saturation count rates of 7 × 10(6) counts/s. The realization of nonclassical emission from SiC nanoparticles extends their potential use from fluorescence biomarker beads to optically active quantum elements for next generation quantum sensing and nanophotonics. The single photon emission is related to single isolated SiC defects that give rise to states within the bandgap.

  9. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou; Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier; Dossot, Manuel; McRae, Edward; Lenoble, Damien

    2016-08-01

    The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  10. Microemulsion-mediated synthesis of cobalt (pure fcc and hexagonal phases) and cobalt-nickel alloy nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Jahangeer; Sharma, Shudhanshu; Ramanujachary, Kandalam V; Lofland, Samuel E; Ganguli, Ashok K

    2009-08-15

    By choosing appropriate microemulsion systems, hexagonal cobalt (Co) and cobalt-nickel (1:1) alloy nanoparticles have been obtained with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as a cationic surfactant at 500 degrees C. This method thus stabilizes the hcp cobalt even at sizes (fcc cobalt is predicted to be stable. On annealing the hcp cobalt nanoparticles in H(2) at 700 degrees C we could transform them to fcc cobalt nanoparticles. Microscopy studies show the formation of spherical nanoparticles of hexagonal and cubic forms of cobalt and Co-Ni (1:1) alloy nanoparticles with the average size of 4, 8 and 20 nm, respectively. Electrochemical studies show that the catalytic property towards oxygen evolution is dependent on the applied voltage. At low voltage (less than 0.65 V) the Co (hexagonal) nanoparticles are superior to the alloy (Co-Ni) nanoparticles while above this voltage the alloy nanoparticles are more efficient catalysts. The nanoparticles of cobalt (hcp and fcc) and alloy (Co-Ni) nanoparticles show ferromagnetism. The saturation magnetization of Co-Ni nanoparticles is reduced compared to the bulk possibly due to surface oxidation.

  11. Transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanpo, Noppakun; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie; Wang, James

    2013-03-01

    Transition metals of copper, zinc, chromium and nickel were substituted into cobalt ferrite nanoparticles via a sol-gel route using citric acid as a chelating agent. The microstructure and elemental composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Phase analysis of transition metal-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was performed via X-ray diffraction. Surface wettability was measured using the water contact angle technique. The surface roughness of all nanoparticles was measured using profilometry. Moreover, thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to determine the temperature at which the decomposition and oxidation of the chelating agents took place. Results indicated that the substitution of transition metals influences strongly the microstructure, crystal structure and antibacterial property of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  12. Cobalt-based Magnetic Nanoparticles: Design, Synthesis and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanpour, Mehdi

    magnet is also reported. To synthesize MnAlC-FeCo, mechanical alloying and dry mixing of MnAlC and FeCo nanoparticles are accomplished followed by annealing in a furnace. Morphological and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffractometry (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and physical property measuring system (PPMS) magnetometry, respectively. Overall, the achieved results in this work enable synthesis of high moment FeCo and high coercivity CoxC with desired structure and magnetic properties obtained through polyol method. In particular, this Dissertation provides the technique to fabricate cobalt carbide nanoparticles without using rare earth elements as a catalyst or as heterogeneous seed nuclei at any stage: pre-processing, synthesis and post-processing. Although the experimental results of this work suggest successful fabrication of desired materials, there are many unanswered questions and unresolved challenges regarding reaction mechanism and optimizing the magnetic properties of these materials. Therefore, some recommendations are provided at the end of this Dissertation for further studies and future work. It should be noted that, implementing first principal calculations on these particles will provide better explanations and enable prediction of structure and magnetic properties of the nanoparticles and facilitate designing more complex heterostructures.

  13. Atomic layer deposition of cobalt carbide films and their magnetic properties using propanol as a reducing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarr, Mouhamadou, E-mail: sarrtapha44@yahoo.fr [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Bahlawane, Naoufal; Arl, Didier [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg); Dossot, Manuel [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Microbiology for the Environment, UMR 7564 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, 405 rue de Vandoeuvre, 54601 Villers-lès-Nancy (France); McRae, Edward [Institut Jean Lamour, UMR 7198CNRS-Université de Lorraine, FST, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Lenoble, Damien, E-mail: damien.lenoble@list.lu [Luxembourg Instituteof Science and Technology, 41, rue du Brill, L-4422 Belvaux (Luxembourg)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Conformal carbon-Co-carbide thin films. • Chemically growth carbone-Co-carbide composite. • Tuneable magnetic properties. - Abstract: The investigation of highly conformal thin films using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is driven by a variety of applications in modern technologies. In particular, the emergence of 3D memory device architectures requires conformal materials with tuneable magnetic properties. Here, nanocomposites of carbon, cobalt and cobalt carbide are deposited by ALD using cobalt acetylacetonate with propanol as a reducing agent. Films were grown by varying the ALD deposition parameters including deposition temperature and propanol exposure time. The morphology, the chemical composition and the crystalline structure of the cobalt carbide film were investigated. Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM) measurements revealed magnetic hysteresis loops with a coercivity reaching 500 Oe and a maximal saturation magnetization of 0.9 T with a grain size less than 15 nm. Magnetic properties are shown to be tuneable by adjusting the deposition parameters that significantly affect the microstructure and the composition of the deposited films.

  14. Structural and magnetic study of dysprosium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Hemaunt, E-mail: hvatsal@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Srivastava, R.C. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Pal Singh, Jitendra [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Negi, P. [Department of Physics, Govind Ballabh Pant University of Agr. & Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand 263145 (India); Agrawal, H.M. [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of); Das, D. [UGC-DAE CSR Kolkata Centre, Kolkata 700098 (India); Hwa Chae, Keun [Advanced Analysis Centre, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 02792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-01

    The present work investigates the magnetic behavior of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. X-ray diffraction studies reveal presence of cubic spinel phases in these nanoparticles. Raman spectra of these nanoparticles show change in intensity of Raman bands, which reflects cation redistribution in cubic spinel lattice. Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with increase of Dy{sup 3+}concentration in these nanoparticles. Room temperature Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in these nanoparticles and corroborates the results obtained from Raman Spectroscopic measurements. Decrease in magnetization of Dy{sup 3+} substituted cobalt ferrite is attributed to the reduction in the magnetic interaction and cation redistribution. - Highlights: • Slight decrease in crystallite size after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease after Dy{sup 3+} doping. • Mössbauer measurements show the cation redistribution in the samples.

  15. Finite element analysis of thermal residual stresses at cemented carbide rock drill buttons with cobalt-gradient structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zi-qian; HE Yue-hui; CAI Hai-tao; XIAO Yi-feng; HUANG Bai-yun

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to apply the concept of functionally graded materials (FGMs) to cemented carbides and to develop high-performance rock drill buttons.Cobalt-gradient structure was introduced to the surface zone of the buttons by carburizing process.Finite element method and XRD measurement were used to decide the distribution of thermal residual stress.Constitutive parameters were determined by constraint factor.Numerical results show that residual stresses of gradient buttons mainly concentrate in cobalt-gradient zone.There is compressive stress in the surface zone and tensile stress in the cobalt-rich zone.The maximum value of surface compressive stress is 180 MPa for WC-6Co cemented carbides.And the numerical results agree with the results of XRD measurement.

  16. Study of DNA interaction with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pershina, A G; Sazonov, A E; Novikov, D V; Knyazev, A S; Izaak, T I; Itin, V I; Naiden, E P; Magaeva, A A; Terechova, O G

    2011-03-01

    Interaction of cobalt ferrite nanopowder and nucleic acid was investigated. Superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (6-12 nm) were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. Structure of the nanopowder was characterized using X-ray diffraction. It was shown that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were associated with ssDNA and dsDNA in Tris-buffer resulting in bionanocomposite formation with mass weight relation nanoparticles: DNA 1:(0.083 +/- 0.003) and 1:(0.075 +/- 0.003) respectively. The mechanism of interaction between a DNA and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was considered basing on the whole set of obtained data: FTIR-spectroscopy, analyzing desorption of DNA from the surface of the particles while changing the chemical content of the medium, and on the modeling interaction of specific biomolecule fragments with surface of a inorganic material. It was supposed that the linkage was based on coordination interaction of the phosphate groups and oxygen atoms heterocyclic bases of DNA with metal ions on the particle surface. These data can be used to design specific magnetic DNA-nanoparticles hybrid structures.

  17. Precipitation method and characterization of cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabaharan, D. Durai Manoharadoss; Sadaiyandi, K.; Mahendran, M.; Sagadevan, Suresh

    2017-04-01

    Cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized using precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern was used to determine the structure of Co3O4 nanoparticles. The presence of Co3O4 nanoparticles was confirmed by the FTIR spectrum. The fact about the surface morphology of Co3O4 nanoparticles was revealed by scanning electron microscopic analysis. Transmission electron microscopy was used to measure the particle size of the Co3O4 nanoparticles. The absorption spectrum made it possible to analyze the optical properties of Co3O4 nanoparticles. This work contributes to the study of dielectric properties such as the dielectric loss and the dielectric constant of Co3O4 nanoparticles, at varied frequencies and temperatures. The magnetic properties of the Co3O4 nanoparticles were also investigated.

  18. Novel Polymer Nanocomposite With Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona I. Wozniak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Polyimides are ranked among the most heat-resistant polymers and are widely used in high temperature plastics, adhesives, dielectrics, photoresistors, nonlinear optical materials, membrane materials for gasseparation, and Langmuir–Blodgett (LB films, among others. While there is a variety of high temperature stable polyimides, there is a growing demand for utilizing these materials at higher temperatures in oxidizing and aggressive environments. Therefore, we sought to use oxidation-resistant materials to enhance properties of the polyimide composition maintaining polyimide weights and processing advantages. In this paper we introduced results of utilizing inorganic nanostructured silicon carbide particles to produce an inorganic particle filled polyimide materials.

  19. Research on Ultrafine Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt (WC-Co) Cemented Carbide Rods of Miniature Drills for Highly Integrated Printed Circuit Board (PCB)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoliang SHI; Gangqin SHAO; Xinglong DUAN; Runzhang YUAN

    2005-01-01

    Nanocrystalline tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) composite powders produced through spray thermal decomposition-continuous reduction and carburization technology were used to prepare φ3.25 mm ×38 mm ultrafine tungsten carbidecobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbide rods through vacuum sintering plus sinterhip technology. The microstructure,Vickers hardness, density and Rockwell A hardness (HRA), transverse rupture strength (TRS), saturated magnetization and coercivity force were tested. The results show that the average grain size of the sintering body prepared through vacuum sintering plus sinterhip technology was 430 nm; transverse rupture strength (TRS) was 3850 MPa;Vickers hardness was 1890 and Rockwell A hardness of sintering body was 93. High strength and high hardness ultrafine WC-Co cemented carbide rods used to manufacture printed circuit board (PCB) drills were obtained.

  20. Cobalt carbide nanoprisms for direct production of lower olefins from syngas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Liangshu; Yu, Fei; An, Yunlei; Zhao, Yonghui; Sun, Yuhan; Li, Zhengjia; Lin, Tiejun; Lin, Yanjun; Qi, Xingzhen; Dai, Yuanyuan; Gu, Lin; Hu, Jinsong; Jin, Shifeng; Shen, Qun; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-06

    Lower olefins-generally referring to ethylene, propylene and butylene-are basic carbon-based building blocks that are widely used in the chemical industry, and are traditionally produced through thermal or catalytic cracking of a range of hydrocarbon feedstocks, such as naphtha, gas oil, condensates and light alkanes. With the rapid depletion of the limited petroleum reserves that serve as the source of these hydrocarbons, there is an urgent need for processes that can produce lower olefins from alternative feedstocks. The 'Fischer-Tropsch to olefins' (FTO) process has long offered a way of producing lower olefins directly from syngas-a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide that is readily derived from coal, biomass and natural gas. But the hydrocarbons obtained with the FTO process typically follow the so-called Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution, which is characterized by a maximum C2-C4 hydrocarbon fraction of about 56.7 per cent and an undesired methane fraction of about 29.2 per cent (refs 1, 10, 11, 12). Here we show that, under mild reaction conditions, cobalt carbide quadrangular nanoprisms catalyse the FTO conversion of syngas with high selectivity for the production of lower olefins (constituting around 60.8 per cent of the carbon products), while generating little methane (about 5.0 per cent), with the ratio of desired unsaturated hydrocarbons to less valuable saturated hydrocarbons amongst the C2-C4 products being as high as 30. Detailed catalyst characterization during the initial reaction stage and theoretical calculations indicate that preferentially exposed {101} and {020} facets play a pivotal role during syngas conversion, in that they favour olefin production and inhibit methane formation, and thereby render cobalt carbide nanoprisms a promising new catalyst system for directly converting syngas into lower olefins.

  1. Cobalt carbide nanoprisms for direct production of lower olefins from syngas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Liangshu; Yu, Fei; An, Yunlei; Zhao, Yonghui; Sun, Yuhan; Li, Zhengjia; Lin, Tiejun; Lin, Yanjun; Qi, Xingzhen; Dai, Yuanyuan; Gu, Lin; Hu, Jinsong; Jin, Shifeng; Shen, Qun; Wang, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Lower olefins—generally referring to ethylene, propylene and butylene—are basic carbon-based building blocks that are widely used in the chemical industry, and are traditionally produced through thermal or catalytic cracking of a range of hydrocarbon feedstocks, such as naphtha, gas oil, condensates and light alkanes. With the rapid depletion of the limited petroleum reserves that serve as the source of these hydrocarbons, there is an urgent need for processes that can produce lower olefins from alternative feedstocks. The ‘Fischer-Tropsch to olefins’ (FTO) process has long offered a way of producing lower olefins directly from syngas—a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide that is readily derived from coal, biomass and natural gas. But the hydrocarbons obtained with the FTO process typically follow the so-called Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution, which is characterized by a maximum C2-C4 hydrocarbon fraction of about 56.7 per cent and an undesired methane fraction of about 29.2 per cent (refs 1, 10, 11, 12). Here we show that, under mild reaction conditions, cobalt carbide quadrangular nanoprisms catalyse the FTO conversion of syngas with high selectivity for the production of lower olefins (constituting around 60.8 per cent of the carbon products), while generating little methane (about 5.0 per cent), with the ratio of desired unsaturated hydrocarbons to less valuable saturated hydrocarbons amongst the C2-C4 products being as high as 30. Detailed catalyst characterization during the initial reaction stage and theoretical calculations indicate that preferentially exposed {101} and {020} facets play a pivotal role during syngas conversion, in that they favour olefin production and inhibit methane formation, and thereby render cobalt carbide nanoprisms a promising new catalyst system for directly converting syngas into lower olefins.

  2. HVOF and HVAF Coatings of Agglomerated Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Powders for Water Droplet Erosion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasi, F.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Dolatabadi, A.; Medraj, M.; Moreau, C.

    2016-12-01

    Water droplet erosion (WDE) is a phenomenon caused by impingement of water droplets of several hundred microns to a few millimeters diameter at velocities of hundreds of meters per second on the edges and surfaces of the parts used in such services. The solution to this problem is sought especially for the moving compressor blades in gas turbines and those operating at the low-pressure end of steam turbines. Thermal-sprayed tungsten carbide-based coatings have been the focus of many studies and are industrially accepted for a multitude of wear and erosion resistance applications. In the present work, the microstructure, phase analysis and mechanical properties (micro-hardness and fracture toughness) of WC-Co coatings are studied in relation with their influence on the WDE resistance of such coatings. The coatings are deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes. The agglomerated tungsten carbide-cobalt powders were in either sintered or non-sintered conditions. The WDE tests were performed using 0.4 mm water droplets at 300 m/s impact velocity. The study shows promising results for this cermet as WDE-resistant coating when the coating can reach its optimum quality using the right thermal spray process and parameters.

  3. Investigation of atypical molten pool dynamics in tungsten carbide-cobalt during laser deposition using in-situ thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yuhong; Hofmeister, William H.; Smugeresky, John E.; Delplanque, Jean-Pierre; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2012-01-01

    An atypical "swirling" phenomenon observed during the laser deposition of tungsten carbide-cobalt cermets by laser engineered net shaping (LENS®) was studied using in-situ high-speed thermal imaging. To provide fundamental insight into this phenomenon, the thermal behavior of pure cobalt during LENS was also investigated for comparison. Several factors were considered as the possible source of the observed differences. Of those, phase difference, material emissivity, momentum transfer, and free surface disruption from the powder jets, and, to a lesser extent, Marangoni convection were identified as the relevant mechanisms.

  4. Investigation of atypical molten pool dynamics in tungsten carbide-cobalt during laser deposition using in-situ thermal imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Yuhong; Schoenung, Julie M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Hofmeister, William H. [Center for Laser Applications, University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahoma, Tennessee 37388 (United States); Smugeresky, John E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Delplanque, Jean-Pierre [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2012-01-16

    An atypical ''swirling'' phenomenon observed during the laser deposition of tungsten carbide-cobalt cermets by laser engineered net shaping (LENS) was studied using in-situ high-speed thermal imaging. To provide fundamental insight into this phenomenon, the thermal behavior of pure cobalt during LENS was also investigated for comparison. Several factors were considered as the possible source of the observed differences. Of those, phase difference, material emissivity, momentum transfer, and free surface disruption from the powder jets, and, to a lesser extent, Marangoni convection were identified as the relevant mechanisms.

  5. Characterization of exposures among cemented tungsten carbide workers. Part I: Size-fractionated exposures to airborne cobalt and tungsten particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Virji, M Abbas; Day, Gregory A

    2009-07-01

    As many as 30,000 workers in the United States of America are exposed to cemented tungsten carbides (CTC), alloys composed primarily of tungsten carbide and cobalt, which are used in cutting tools. Inhalation of cobalt-containing particles may be sufficient for the development of occupational asthma, whereas tungsten carbide particles in association with cobalt particles are associated with the development of hard metal disease (HMD) and lung cancer. Historical epidemiology and exposure studies of CTC workers often rely only on measures of total airborne cobalt mass concentration. In this study, we characterized cobalt- and tungsten-containing aerosols generated during the production of CTC with emphasis on (1) aerosol "total" mass (n=252 closed-face 37 mm cassette samples) and particle size-selective mass concentrations (n=108 eight-stage cascade impactor samples); (2) particle size distributions; and (3) comparison of exposures obtained using personal cassette and impactor samplers. Total cobalt and tungsten exposures were highest in work areas that handled powders (e.g., powder mixing) and lowest in areas that handled finished product (e.g., grinding). Inhalable, thoracic, and respirable cobalt and tungsten exposures were observed in all work areas, indicating potential for co-exposures to particles capable of getting deposited in the upper airways and alveolar region of the lung. Understanding the risk of CTC-induced adverse health effects may require two exposure regimes: one for asthma and the other for HMD and lung cancer. All sizes of cobalt-containing particles that deposit in the lung and airways have potential to cause asthma, thus a thoracic exposure metric is likely biologically appropriate. Cobalt-tungsten mixtures that deposit in the alveolar region of the lung may potentially cause HMD and lung cancer, thus a respirable exposure metric for both metals is likely biologically appropriate. By characterizing size-selective and co-exposures as well as

  6. Synthesis of nanoparticles of vanadium carbide in the ferrite of nodular cast iron

    CERN Document Server

    Fras, E; Guzik, E; Lopez, H

    2005-01-01

    The synthesis method of nanoparticles of vanadium carbide in nodular cast iron is presented. After introduction of this method, the nanoparticles with 10-70 nm of diameter was obtained in the ferrite. The diffraction investigations confirmed that these particles are vanadium carbides of type V/sub 3/C/sub 4/.

  7. Oriented attachment explains cobalt ferrite nanoparticle growth in bioinspired syntheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalena Wolff

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Oriented attachment has created a great debate about the description of crystal growth throughout the last decade. This aggregation-based model has successfully described biomineralization processes as well as forms of inorganic crystal growth, which could not be explained by classical crystal growth theory. Understanding the nanoparticle growth is essential since physical properties, such as the magnetic behavior, are highly dependent on the microstructure, morphology and composition of the inorganic crystals. In this work, the underlying nanoparticle growth of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in a bioinspired synthesis was studied. Bioinspired syntheses have sparked great interest in recent years due to their ability to influence and alter inorganic crystal growth and therefore tailor properties of nanoparticles. In this synthesis, a short synthetic version of the protein MMS6, involved in nanoparticle formation within magnetotactic bacteria, was used to alter the growth of cobalt ferrite. We demonstrate that the bioinspired nanoparticle growth can be described by the oriented attachment model. The intermediate stages proposed in the theoretical model, including primary-building-block-like substructures as well as mesocrystal-like structures, were observed in HRTEM measurements. These structures display regions of substantial orientation and possess the same shape and size as the resulting discs. An increase in orientation with time was observed in electron diffraction measurements. The change of particle diameter with time agrees with the recently proposed kinetic model for oriented attachment.

  8. The structural evolution and diffusion during the chemical transformation from cobalt to cobalt phosphide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2011-01-01

    We report the structural evolution and the diffusion processes which occur during the phase transformation of nanoparticles (NPs), ε-Co to Co 2P to CoP, from a reaction with tri-n-octylphosphine (TOP). Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigations were used to elucidate the changes in the local structure of cobalt atoms which occur as the chemical transformation progresses. The lack of long-range order, spread in interatomic distances, and overall increase in mean-square disorder compared with bulk structure reveal the decrease in the NP\\'s structural order compared with bulk structure, which contributes to their deviation from bulk-like behavior. Results from EXAFS show both the Co2P and CoP phases contain excess Co. Results from EXAFS, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and density functional theory calculations reveal that the inward diffusion of phosphorus is more favorable at the beginning of the transformation from ε-Co to Co2P by forming an amorphous Co-P shell, while retaining a crystalline cobalt core. When the major phase of the sample turns to Co 2P, the diffusion processes reverse and cobalt atom out-diffusion is favored, leaving a hollow void, characteristic of the nanoscale Kirkendall effect. For the transformation from Co2P to CoP theory predicts an outward diffusion of cobalt while the anion lattice remains intact. In real samples, however, the Co-rich nanoparticles continue Kirkendall hollowing. Knowledge about the transformation method and structural properties provides a means to tailor the synthesis and composition of the NPs to facilitate their use in applications. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  9. Modified surface morphology in surface ablation of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide with pulsed UV laser radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiejun; Lou, Qihong; Dong, Jingxing; Wei, Yunrong; Liu, Jingru

    2001-03-01

    Surface ablation of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal has been carried out in this work using a 308 nm, 20 ns XeCl excimer laser. The influence of ablation rate, surface roughness, surface micromorphology as well as surface phase structure on laser conditions including laser irradiance and pulse number have been investigated. The experimental results showed that the ablation rate and surface roughness were controlled by varying the number of pulses and laser irradiance. The microstructure and crystalline structure of irradiated surface layer varied greatly with different laser conditions. After 300 shots of laser irradiation at irradiance of 125 MW/cm 2, the surface micromorphology characterizing a uniform framework pattern of "hill-valleys". With the increment of laser shots at laser irradiance of 125 MW/cm 2, the microstructure of cemented tungsten carbide transformed from original polygon grains with the size of 3 μm to interlaced large and long grains after 300 shots of laser irradiation, and finally to gross grains with the size of 10 μm with clear grain boundaries after 700 shots. The crystalline structure of irradiated area has partly transformed from original WC to β-WC 1- x, then to α-W 2C and CW 3, and finally to W crystal. At proper laser irradiance and pulse number, cobalt binder has been selectively removed from the surface layer of hardmetal. It has been demonstrated that surface ablation with pulsed UV laser should be a feasible way to selectively remove cobalt binder from surface layer of cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal.

  10. An expeditious synthesis of early transition metal carbide nanoparticles on graphitic carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressnig, Debora; Moldovan, Simona; Ersen, Ovidiu; Beaunier, Patricia; Portehault, David; Sanchez, Clément; Carenco, Sophie

    2016-08-01

    An expeditious synthesis of metal carbide nanoparticles onto various carbon supports is demonstrated. The procedure is versatile and readily yields TiC, VC, Mo2C and W2C nanoparticles on different types of carbons. The reaction is initiated at room temperature and proceeds within seconds. This novel synthetic route paves the way for a large variety of metal carbide-carbon nanocomposites that may be implemented in emerging nanotechnology fields.

  11. A thermo dynamical model for the shape and size effect on melting of boron carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniammal, Paneerselvam; Arivuoli, Dakshanamoorthy

    2012-02-01

    The size and shape dependence of the melting temperature of Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles has been investigated with a numerical thermo dynamical approach. The problem considered in this paper is the inward melting of nanoparticles with spherical and cylindrical geometry. The cylindrical Boron Carbide (B4C) nanoparticles, whose melting point has been reported to decrease with decreasing particle radius, become larger than spherical shaped nanoparticle. Comparative investigation of the size dependence of the melting temperature with respect to the two shapes is also been done. The melting temperature obtained in the present study is approximately a dealing function of radius, in a good agreement with prediction of thermo dynamical model.

  12. Sonochemical synthesis of cobalt aluminate nanoparticles under various preparation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Weizhong; Qiu, Qi; Wang, Fang; Wei, Shaohui; Liu, Bo; Luo, Zhongkuan

    2010-06-01

    Cobalt aluminate (CoAl(2)O(4)) nanoparticles were synthesized using a precursor method with the aid of ultrasound irradiation under various preparation parameters. The effects of the preparation parameters, such as the sonochemical reaction time and temperature, precipitation agents, calcination temperature and time on the formation of CoAl(2)O(4) were investigated. The precursor on heating yields nanosized CoAl(2)O(4) particles and both these nanoparticles and the precursor were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The use of ultrasound irradiation during the homogeneous precipitation of the precursor reduces the duration of the precipitation reaction. The mechanism of the formation of cobalt aluminate was investigated by means of Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and EDX (energy dispersive X-ray). The thermal decomposition process and kinetics of the precursor of nanosized CoAl(2)O(4) were investigated by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TG). The apparent activation energy (E) and the pre-exponential constant (A) were 304.26 kJ/mol and 6.441 x 10(14)s(-1), respectively. Specific surface area was investigated by means of Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area measurements.

  13. Dose-dependent cytotoxicity of clinically relevant cobalt nanoparticles and ions on macrophages in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Young-Min; Xia Zhidao; Glyn-Jones, Sion; Beard, David; Gill, Harinderjit S; Murray, David W, E-mail: young-min.kwon@ndos.ox.ac.u [Nuffield Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LD (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    Despite the satisfactory short-term implant survivorship of metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty, periprosthetic soft-tissue masses such as pseudotumours are being increasingly reported. Cytotoxic effects of cobalt or chromium have been suggested to play a role in its aetiology. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of clinically relevant metal nanoparticles and ions on the viability of macrophages in vitro. A RAW 264.7 murine macrophage cell line was cultured in the presence of either: (1) cobalt, chromium and titanium nanoparticles sized 30-35 nm; or (2) cobalt sulphate and chromium chloride. Two methods were used to quantify cell viability: Alamar Blue assay and Live/Dead assay. The cytotoxicity was observed only with cobalt. Cobalt nanoparticles and ions demonstrated dose-dependent cytotoxic effects on macrophages in vitro: the cytotoxic concentrations of nanoparticles and ions were 1 x 10{sup 12} particles ml{sup -1} and 1000 {mu}M, respectively. The high concentration of cobalt nanoparticles required for cytotoxicity of macrophages in vitro suggests that increased production of cobalt nanoparticles in vivo, due to excessive MoM implant wear, may lead to local adverse biological effects. Therefore, cytotoxicity of high concentrations of metal nanoparticles phagocytosed by macrophages located in the periprosthetic tissues may be an important factor in pathogenesis of pseudotumours.

  14. Enhanced peroxidase activity and tumour tissue visualization by cobalt-doped magnetoferritin nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tongwei; Cao, Changqian; Tang, Xu; Cai, Yao; Yang, Caiyun; Pan, Yongxin

    2017-01-01

    Magnetoferritin (M-HFn) is a biomimetic magnetic nanoparticle with a human heavy-chain ferritin (HFn) shell, trapping a magnetite (Fe3O4) core that has inherited peroxidase-like activity. In this study, cobalt-doped M-HFn nanoparticles (M-HFn-Co x Fe3-x O4) with different amounts of cobalt were successfully synthesized. Experimental results indicate that the controlled doping of a certain amount of cobalt into the magnetite cores of M-HFn nanoparticles enhances its peroxidase-like catalytic activity and efficacy for visualizing tumour tissues. For example, compared with sample Co0 (without cobalt doping), the peroxidase-like activity of the cobalt-doped nanoparticle sample Co60 (with a cobalt doping molar percentage of ˜34.2%) increases 1.7 times, and has the maximal reaction velocity (V max) values. Moreover, after a one-step incubation with Co60 nanoparticles, and using the peroxidase substrate 3,3‧-diaminobenzidine tetrahydrochloride (DAB) for colour development, the tumour tissues of breast, colorectal, stomach and pancreas tumours showed a deeper brown colour with clear boundaries between the healthy and tumourous cells. Therefore, this suggests that the cobalt-doped magnetoferritin nanoparticles enhance peroxidase activity and tumour tissue visualization.

  15. Improved adhesion of diamond coating on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal by using pulsed-UV-laser substrate surface pretreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiejun, Li; Qihong, Lou; Jingxing, Dong; Yunrong, Wei; Jun, Zhou; Jingru, Liu; Zhiming, Zhang; Fanghong, Sun

    2002-06-01

    Pulsed-UV-laser surface ablation has been applied in substrate pretreatment in order to obtain good adhesion of diamond coating grown on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal. The dependence of diamond coating's adhesion on different shots of pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment has been studied experimentally. The results were compared with diamond coating deposited by using traditional acid-etching substrate pretreatment. It was shown that adhesion of diamond coating grown on tungsten carbide hardmetal has been greatly improved by using pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment. The corresponding laser pretreatment condition for the optimal adhesion of diamond coatings was finally obtained. It has been demonstrated that pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment should be a feasible and effective method for improving adhesion of diamond coating on cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal. It is the characteristic surface morphology produced by pulsed-UV-laser surface ablation that subsequently results in this improved adhesion of diamond coating grown on tungsten carbide hardmetal. The number of laser shots being used in substrate pretreatment has a great influence to the adhesion of diamond coating deposited on tungsten carbide hardmetal. One should always apply proper number of laser shots in pulsed-UV-laser substrate pretreatment when seeking for the optimal adhesion of diamond coating on tungsten carbide hardmetal. In this work, the corresponding number of laser shots for the optimal adhesion of diamond coating has found to be 300 laser shots.

  16. Cobalt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Joseph F

    2016-01-01

    Cobalt has been a recognized allergen capable of causing contact dermatitis for decades. Why, therefore, has it been named 2016 "Allergen of the Year"? Simply put, new information has come to light in the last few years regarding potential sources of exposure to this metallic substance. In addition to reviewing some background on our previous understanding of cobalt exposures, this article will highlight the recently recognized need to consider leather as a major site of cobalt and the visual cues suggesting the presence of cobalt in jewelry. In addition, a chemical spot test for cobalt now allows us to better identify its presence in suspect materials.

  17. Size-dependent antimicrobial properties of the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žalnėravičius, Rokas; Paškevičius, Algimantas; Kurtinaitiene, Marija; Jagminas, Arūnas

    2016-10-01

    The growing resistance of bacteria to conventional antibiotics elicited considerable interest to non-typical drugs. In this study, antimicrobial investigations were performed on low-size dispersion cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Nps) fabricated by co-precipitation approach in several average sizes, in particular, 15.0, 5.0, and 1.65 nm. A variety of experimental tests demonstrated that the size of these Nps is determinant for antimicrobial efficiency against S. cerevisiae and several Candida species, in particular, C. parapsilosis, C. krusei, and C. albicans. The small and ultra-small fractions of CoFe2O4 Nps possess especially strong antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. The possible reasons are discussed. Nps were characterized by means of transmission and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy, chemical analysis and magnetic measurements.

  18. Cobalt magnetic nanoparticles embedded in carbon matrix: biofunctional validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krolow, Matheus Z., E-mail: matheuskrolow@ifsul.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Monte, Leonardo G.; Remiao, Mariana H.; Hartleben, Claudia P.; Moreira, Angela N.; Dellagostin, Odir A. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Piva, Evandro [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Faculdade de Odontologia (Brazil); Conceicao, Fabricio R. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Nucleo de Biotecnologia, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil); Carreno, Neftali L. V. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Engenharia de Materiais, Centro de Desenvolvimento Tecnologico (Brazil)

    2012-09-15

    Carbon nanostructures and nanocomposites display versatile allotropic morphologies, physico-chemical properties and have a wide range of applications in mechanics, electronics, biotechnology, structural material, chemical processing, and energy management. In this study we report the synthesis, characterization, and biotechnological application of cobalt magnetic nanoparticles, with diameter approximately 15-40 nm, embedded in carbon structure (Co/C-MN). A single-step chemical process was used in the synthesis of the Co/C-MN. The Co/C-MN has presented superparamagnetic behavior at room temperature an essential property for immunoseparation assays carried out here. To stimulate interactions between proteins and Co/C-MN, this nanocomposite was functionalized with acrylic acid (AA). We have showed the bonding of different proteins onto Co/C-AA surface using immunofluorescence assay. A Co/C-AA coated with monoclonal antibody anti-pathogenic Leptospira spp. was able to capture leptospires, suggesting that it could be useful in immunoseparation assays.

  19. Homogeneous Precipitation Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Liu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs of cobalt ferrite have been synthesized via a homogeneous precipitation route using hexamethylenetetramine (HMT as the precipitant. The particle size, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the synthesized particles were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The NPs are of cubic inverse spinel structure and nearly spherical shape. With the increase of oxidation time from 30 to 180 minutes in the reaction solution at 90∘C, the average particle size increases from ~30 nm to ~45 nm. The as-synthesized NPs ~30 nm in size show higher Ms (61.5 emu/g and moderate Hc (945 Oe and Mr/Ms (0.45 value compared with the materials synthesized by coprecipitation method using NaOH as precipitate at high pH value.

  20. Agglomeration of tungsten carbide nanoparticles in exposure medium does not prevent uptake and toxicity toward a rainbow trout gill cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühnel, Dana; Busch, Wibke; Meissner, Tobias; Springer, Armin; Potthoff, Annegret; Richter, Volkmar; Gelinsky, Michael; Scholz, Stefan; Schirmer, Kristin

    2009-06-28

    Due to their increased production and use, engineered nanoparticles are expected to be released into the aquatic environment where particles may agglomerate. The aim of this study was to explore the role of agglomeration of nanoparticles in the uptake and expression of toxicity in the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) gill cell line, RTgill-W1. This cell line was chosen as model because it is known to be amenable to culture in complete as well as greatly simplified exposure media. Nano-sized tungsten carbide (WC) with or without cobalt doping (WC-Co), two materials relevant in the heavy metal industry, were applied as model particles. These particles were suspended in culture media with decreasing complexity from L15 with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS) to L15 to L15/ex, containing only salts, galactose and pyruvate of the complete medium L15. Whereas the serum supplement in L15 retained primary nanoparticle suspensions, agglomerates were formed quickly in L15 and L15/ex. Nevertheless, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) elemental analysis revealed an uptake of both WC and WC-Co nanoparticles into RTgill-W1 cells irrespective of the state of agglomeration of nanoparticles. The localisation seemed to be restricted to the cytoplasm, as no particles were observed in the nucleus of cells. Moreover, reduction in cell viability between 10 and 50% compared to controls were observed upon particle exposure in all media although the pattern of impact varied depending on the medium and exposure time. Short-term exposure of cells led to significant cytotoxicity at the highest nominal particle concentrations, irrespective of the particle type or exposure medium. In contrast, long-term exposures led to preferential toxicity in the simplest medium, L15/ex, and an enhanced toxicity by the cobalt-containing WC nanoparticles in all exposure media. The composition of the exposure media also influenced the toxicity of the cobalt ions, which may

  1. Comparative evaluation of particle properties, formation of reactive oxygen species and genotoxic potential of tungsten carbide based nanoparticles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Dana, E-mail: dana.kuehnel@ufz.de [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Scheffler, Katja [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Cell Techniques and Applied Stem Cell Biology, University of Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Wellner, Peggy [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Meissner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret [Fraunhofer-Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems (IKTS), Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Busch, Wibke [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Springer, Armin [Centre for Translational Bone, Cartilage and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Schirmer, Kristin [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); EPF Lausanne, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); ETH Zuerich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of toxic potential of tungsten carbide-based nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of ROS and micronuclei induction of three hard metal nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependency of observed toxic effects on the materials physical-chemical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences in several particle properties seem to modulate the biological response. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt (Co) are constituents of hard metals and are used for the production of extremely hard tools. Previous studies have identified greater cytotoxic potential of WC-based nanoparticles if particles contained Co. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and micronuclei would help explain the impact on cultured mammalian cells by three different tungsten-based nanoparticles (WC{sub S}, WC{sub L}, WC{sub L}-Co (S: small; L: large)). The selection of particles allowed us to study the influence of particle properties, e.g. surface area, and the presence of Co on the toxicological results. WC{sub S} and WC{sub L}/WC{sub L}-Co differed in their crystalline structure and surface area, whereas WC{sub S}/WC{sub L} and WC{sub L}-Co differed in their cobalt content. WC{sub L} and WC{sub L}-Co showed neither a genotoxic potential nor ROS induction. Contrary to that, WC{sub S} nanoparticles induced the formation of both ROS and micronuclei. CoCl{sub 2} was tested in relevant concentrations and induced no ROS formation, but increased the rate of micronuclei at concentrations exceeding those present in WC{sub L}-Co. In conclusion, ROS and micronuclei formation could not be associated with the presence of Co in the WC-based particles. The contrasting responses elicited by WC{sub S} vs. WC{sub L} appear to be due to large differences in crystalline structure.

  2. In situ thermal imaging and three-dimensional finite element modeling of tungsten carbide-cobalt during laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong Yuhong [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hofmeister, William H. [Center for Laser Applications, University of Tennessee Space Institute, Tullahoma, TN 37388 (United States); Cheng Zhao [Earth Mechanics Inc., Oakland, CA 94621 (United States); Smugeresky, John E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Lavernia, Enrique J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Schoenung, Julie M., E-mail: jmschoenung@ucdavis.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2009-10-15

    Laser deposition is being used for the fabrication of net shapes from a broad range of materials, including tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cermets (composites composed of a metallic phase and a hard refractory phase). During deposition, an unusual thermal condition is created for cermets, resulting in rather complex microstructures. To provide a fundamental insight into the evolution of such microstructures, we studied the thermal behavior of WC-Co cermets during laser deposition involving complementary results from in situ high-speed thermal imaging and three-dimensional finite element modeling. The former allowed for the characterization of temperature gradients and cooling rates in the vicinity of the molten pool, whereas the latter allowed for simulation of the entire sample. By combining the two methods, a more robust analysis of the thermal behavior was achieved. The model and the imaging results correlate well with each other and with the alternating sublayers observed in the microstructure.

  3. Fabrication and analysis of ordered magnetic cobalt nanoparticles; Herstellung und Untersuchung geordneter magnetischer Kobaltnanoteilchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuern, Klaus P.

    2009-12-17

    In the dissertation on hand monodisperse, wellordered magnetic cobalt and cobalt hydride nanoparticles have been produced and investigated magnetically. The preparation was achieved by diblock-copolymer-micelles filled with cobalt salt, from which nanoparticles of elementary cobalt respectively cobalt hydride were generated in different steps of the procedure. It was evident that the cobalthydride generated by the hydrogen plasma was surprisingly stable. It could even be taken into consideration as a hydrogen storage device for fuel cell. The magnetic properties of the particles has been investigated by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). In addition it was evident, that it was principally impossible to investigate a film layered on a substrate with a SQUID-magnetometer, if this film produces only a small signal as well absolutely as relatively to the magnetically measured total moment of the sample. (orig.)

  4. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy for on-line control of selective removal of cobalt binder from tungsten carbide hardmetal by pulsed UV laser surface ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiejun; Lou, Qihong; Wei, Yunrong; Huang, Feng; Dong, Jingxing; Liu, Jingru

    2001-09-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was successfully used in on-line control of selective removal of cobalt from tungsten carbide hardmetal by pulsed UV laser surface ablation. The dependence of LIBS on number of laser shots was investigated at different laser fluences. The optimal laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2 suited for selective removal of cobalt from surface layer of hardmetal was confirmed. The result sample was also subject to different post-examinations to evaluate the feasibility of the application of LIBS in this laser ablation process. It was demonstrated that, monitoring of the emission intensity of cobalt lines could be used as a control parameter for selective removal of cobalt from surface layer of hardmetal by pulsed UV laser. The on-line implementation of the spectroscopic technique LIBS to the surface-ablation process provided important information about the optimal-ablation parameters.

  5. QM/MD simulation of SWNT nucleation on transition-metal carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Alister J; Yamane, Honami; Ohta, Yasuhito; Irle, Stephan; Morokuma, Keiji

    2010-11-10

    The mechanism and kinetics of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) nucleation from Fe- and Ni-carbide nanoparticle precursors have been investigated using quantum chemical molecular dynamics (QM/MD) methods. The dependence of the nucleation mechanism and its kinetics on environmental factors, including temperature and metal-carbide carbon concentration, has also been elucidated. It was observed that SWNT nucleation occurred via three distinct stages, viz. the precipitation of the carbon from the metal-carbide, the formation of a "surface/subsurface" carbide intermediate species, and finally the formation of a nascent sp(2)-hybidrized carbon structure supported by the metal catalyst. The SWNT cap nucleation mechanism itself was unaffected by carbon concentration and/or temperature. However, the kinetics of SWNT nucleation exhibited distinct dependences on these same factors. In particular, SWNT nucleation from Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticles proceeded more favorably compared to nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) nanoparticles. Although SWNT nucleation from Fe(x)C(y) and Ni(x)C(y) nanoparticle precursors occurred via an identical route, the ultimate outcomes of these processes also differed substantially. Explicitly, the Ni(x)-supported sp(2)-hybridized carbon structures tended to encapsulate the catalyst particle itself, whereas the Fe(x)-supported structures tended to form isolated SWNT cap structures on the catalyst surface. These differences in SWNT nucleation kinetics were attributed directly to the relative strengths of the metal-carbon interaction, which also dictates the precipitation of carbon from the nanoparticle bulk and the longevity of the resultant surface/subsurface carbide species. The stability of the surface/subsurface carbide was also influenced by the phase of the nanoparticle itself. The observations agree well with experimentally available data for SWNT growth on iron and nickel catalyst particles.

  6. Magnetically Induced Continuous CO2 Hydrogenation Using Composite Iron Carbide Nanoparticles of Exceptionally High Heating Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordet, Alexis; Lacroix, Lise-Marie; Fazzini, Pier-Francesco; Carrey, Julian; Soulantica, Katerina; Chaudret, Bruno

    2016-12-19

    The use of magnetic nanoparticles to convert electromagnetic energy into heat is known to be a key strategy for numerous biomedical applications but is also an approach of growing interest in the field of catalysis. The heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles is limited by the poor magnetic properties of most of them. Here we show that the new generation of iron carbide nanoparticles of controlled size and with over 80 % crystalline Fe2.2 C leads to exceptional heating properties, which are much better than the heating properties of currently available nanoparticles. Associated to catalytic metals (Ni, Ru), iron carbide nanoparticles submitted to magnetic excitation very efficiently catalyze CO2 hydrogenation in a dedicated continuous-flow reactor. Hence, we demonstrate that the concept of magnetically induced heterogeneous catalysis can be successfully applied to methanation of CO2 and represents an approach of strategic interest in the context of intermittent energy storage and CO2 recovery.

  7. Effect of surfactants on the size and shape of cobalt nanoparticles synthesized by thermal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Huiping; Huang, Yuqiang; Lee, Hyosook; Suh, Yong Jae; Kim, Chongoh

    2006-04-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles with various morphologies were synthesized by thermal decomposition of cobalt acetate in the presence of various surfactants at 260 °C. A combination of surfactants consisting of sufficient amount of oleic acid together with polyvinylpyrrolidone and oleylamine resulted in well-dispersed cubic cobalt nanoparticles of ~25 nm in average size. When 1,2-dodecanediol was added as a reducing agent to the surfactant mixture, triangular-prism-shaped nanoparticles of ~50 nm in average size were synthesized. Furthermore, an injection of trioctylphosphine into the reactor as an additional surfactant decreased the particle size to ~10 nm. The XRD pattern of the prism-like particles corresponded to hexagonal close-packed crystalline phase of cobalt.

  8. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei;

    2014-01-01

    of uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR......). As a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  9. Synthesis of vanadium carbide nanoparticles by thermal decomposition of the precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Mani; Singh, K.; Pandey, O. P.

    2013-06-01

    Vanadium carbide is a typical class of material used for different industrial applications due to its high melting point, high hardness and toughness. For its improved properties, the particle size has to be reduced to nanosize. In this work, a different synthesis approach adopted to synthesize nano vanadium carbide at high pressure and low temperature is reported. Here vanadium carbide is synthesized via thermal decomposition of the precursor in a specially designed stainless steel autoclave. The process parameters which affect the size and shape of the nanoparticles have been discussed. The size, shape and stability of synthesized particles are analysed by XRD, SEM and TEM. The study shows that carbides can be easily synthesized at low temperatures.

  10. Preparation of cobalt nanoparticles from polymorphic bacterial templates: A novel platform for biocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Eunjin; Shim, Hyun-Woo; Ryu, Bum Han; An, Deu Rae; Yoo, Wan Ki; Kim, Kyeong Kyu; Kim, Dong-Wan; Kim, T Doohun

    2015-11-01

    Nanoparticles have gathered significant research attention as materials for enzyme immobilization due to their advantageous properties such as low diffusion rates, ease of manipulation, and large surface areas. Here, polymorphic cobalt nanoparticles of varied sizes and shapes were prepared using Micrococcus lylae, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Paracoccus sp., and Haloarcula vallismortis as bacterial templates. Furthermore, nine lipases/carboxylesterases were successfully immobilized on these cobalt nanoparticles. Especially, immobilized forms of Est-Y29, LmH, and Sm23 were characterized in more detail for potential industrial applications. Immobilization of enzymes onto cobalt oxide nanoparticles prepared from polymorphic bacterial templates may have potential for efficient hydrolysis on an industrial-scale, with several advantages such as high retention of enzymatic activity, increased stability, and strong reusability.

  11. Effect of hydrocarbons on the morphology of synthesized niobium carbide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, David E; Gupta, Ujjwal; Castleman, A W

    2010-11-02

    Niobium carbide nanoparticles were synthesized by flowing methane, ethylene, or acetylene gas through a plasma generated from an arc discharge between two niobium electrodes. Varying methane, ethylene, and acetylene concentrations were employed in the studies to investigate their effects on niobium carbide nanoparticle morphology. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and selected area diffraction pattern (SADP) were used to investigate the synthesized NbC nanoparticles, whereupon it was found that these nanoparticles adopt cubic morphology with methane gas, a mixture of cubes and cuboctahedron morphology with ethylene gas, and solely a cuboctahedron morphology with acetylene gas. The change in particle morphology might be attributed to either the ethylene and acetylene free radicals or the increase in carbon concentration effecting the relative growth rates of the {111} and {100} facets on a NbC seed crystal.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of carbon-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Hamed; Shokuhfar, Ali; Vahdati, Nima

    2016-09-01

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CFNPs) were prepared via a reverse micelle method. The CFNPs were subsequently coated with carbon shells by means of thermal chemical vapor deposition (TCVD). In this process, acetylene gas (C2H2) was used as a carbon source and the coating was carried out for 1, 2, or 3 h at 750°C. The Ar/C2H2 ratio was 10:1. Heating during the TCVD process resulted in a NP core size that approached 30 nm; the thickness of the shell was less than 10 nm. The composition, structure, and morphology of the fabricated composites were characterized using X-ray diffraction, simultaneous thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and selected-area diffraction. A vibrating sample magnetometer was used to survey the samples' magnetic properties. The deposited carbon shell substantially affected the growth and magnetic properties of the CFNPs. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was used to study the carbon coating and revealed that the deposited carbon comprised graphite, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and diamond- like carbon. With an increase in coating time, the intensity ratio between the amorphous and ordered peaks in the Raman spectra decreased, which indicated an increase in crystallite size.

  13. Liquid-phase synthesis of cobalt oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkó, Katalin; Szabó, Géza; Zrínyi, Miklós

    2011-05-01

    Various liquid-phase syntheses of CoO and Co3O4 nanoparticles have been studied. The experiments focus on two synthesis routes: the coprecipitation and the sol-gel methods combined with thermal decomposition. The effect of synthesis route, the type of precursors (cobalt nitrate/chloride) and precipitation agent (carbonate, hydroxide, oxalic acid, and ammonia), the chemical compositions, pH, application of surfactants (PDMS, Triton X-100, NaDS, NaDBS, TTAB, ethyl acetate, citric acid), and the heat treatments on the properties of particles were investigated. The particle size and distribution have been determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS). The phases and the morphology of products have been analysed by XRD and SEM. The coprecipitation technique is less able to shape the particles than sol-gel technique. PDMS can be applied efficiently as surfactant in preparation methods. The finest particles (around 85 nm) with narrow polydispersity (70-100 nm) and spherical shape could be achieved by using sol-gel technique in medium of 1-propanol and ethyl acetate.

  14. Immobilization of cellulase on functionalized cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohara, Raghvendra Ashok; Thorat, Nanasaheb Devappa; Pawar, Shivaji Hariba [Center for Interdisciplinary Research, D. Y. Patil University, Kolhapur (India)

    2016-01-15

    Amine functionalized cobalt ferrite (AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were used for immobilization of cellulase enzyme via 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDS) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) coupling reaction. The structural, morphological and magnetic properties of AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} were determined. TEM micrograph revealed a mean diameter of -8 nm and showed that the AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} remain distinct with no significant change in size after binding with cellulase. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of cellulase to AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The properties of immobilized cellulase were investigated by optimizing binding efficiency, pH, temperature and reusability. The results showed that the immobilized cellulase has higher thermal stability than free cellulase, which might be due to covalent interaction between cellulase and AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} surface. The immobilized cellulase also showed good reusability after recovery. Therefore, AF-CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} MNPs can be considered as promising candidate for enzyme immobilization.

  15. Embryotoxicity of cobalt ferrite and gold nanoparticles: a first in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Guglielmo, Claudia; López, David Ramos; De Lapuente, Joaquín; Mallafre, Joan Maria Llobet; Suàrez, Miquel Borràs

    2010-09-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are emerging as promising biomedical tools thanks to their peculiar characteristics. Our purpose was to investigate the embryotoxicity of cobalt ferrite and gold NPs through the Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST). The EST is an in vitro standard assay, which permits to classify substances as strongly, weakly or non-embryotoxic. Due to the particular physical-chemical nature of nanoparticles, we introduced a modification to the standard protocol exposing the Embryonic Stem Cells (ES-D3) to nanoparticles only during the first 5 days of the assay. Moreover, we proposed a method to discriminate and compare the embryotoxicity of the substances within the weakly embryotoxic range. Our ID(50) results permit to classify cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with gold and silanes as non-embryotoxic. The remaining nanoparticles have been classified as weakly embryotoxic in this decreasing order: gold salt (HAuCl(4).3H(2)O)>cobalt ferrite salt (CoFe(2)O(4))>cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with silanes (Si-CoFe)>gold nanoparticles coated with hyaluronic acid (HA-Au).

  16. N-doped graphitic layer encased cobalt nanoparticles as efficient oxygen reduction catalysts in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ce; Bo, Xiangjie; Zhang, Yufan; Li, Mian; Nsabimana, Anaclet; Guo, Liping

    2015-03-01

    Nitrogen doped graphitic layer encased cobalt (N-C@Co) nanoparticles, as novel non-precious-metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), were fabricated by a facile method using cyanamide and cobalt nitrate as precursors. The N-C@Co catalysts exhibited comparable catalytic performance, better stability and improved methanol tolerance towards the ORR than those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst.Nitrogen doped graphitic layer encased cobalt (N-C@Co) nanoparticles, as novel non-precious-metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), were fabricated by a facile method using cyanamide and cobalt nitrate as precursors. The N-C@Co catalysts exhibited comparable catalytic performance, better stability and improved methanol tolerance towards the ORR than those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr07571d

  17. Friction of tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings obtained by means of plasma spraying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cartier, M. (Hydromecanique et Frottement, Centre de Recherches, 42 - Andreziux-Boutheon (France)); McDonnell, L.; Cashell, E.M. (CRTC, Cork (Ireland))

    1991-11-29

    A study of the frictional properties of WC-Co-type coatings obtained by plasma spraying was carried out, the influence of the majority of the parameters involved in atmospheric spraying being analysed. This study of the correlations between the tribological behaviour and the compositionl of the coatings shows that friction is mainly determined by the method and degree of decomposition of the carbides. These in turn are linked to the effects of heat and/or oxidation, factors which can change considerably, not only as a function of the method used (plasma power, nature and flow rate of the plasma gases etc.) but also as a function of the coating process and the composition of the original powders. It has been possible to correlate the improvement in the frictional properties (resistance to seizure, reduction in the coefficient of friction) with the presence of free carbon in the coatings, associated with the carbide decomposition process. (orig.).

  18. An Efficient and Recyclable Nanoparticle-Supported Cobalt Catalyst for Quinoxaline Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajabi, Fatemeh; Alves, Diego; Luque, Rafael

    2015-11-19

    The syntheses of quinoxalines derived from 1,2-diamine and 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds under mild reaction conditions was carried out using a nanoparticle-supported cobalt catalyst. The supported nanocatalyst exhibited excellent activity and stability and it could be reused for at least ten times without any loss of activity. No cobalt contamination could be detected in the products by AAS measurements, pointing to the excellent activity and stability of the Co nanomaterial.

  19. An Efficient and Recyclable Nanoparticle-Supported Cobalt Catalyst for Quinoxaline Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Rajabi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The syntheses of quinoxalines derived from 1,2-diamine and 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds under mild reaction conditions was carried out using a nanoparticle-supported cobalt catalyst. The supported nanocatalyst exhibited excellent activity and stability and it could be reused for at least ten times without any loss of activity. No cobalt contamination could be detected in the products by AAS measurements, pointing to the excellent activity and stability of the Co nanomaterial.

  20. Synthesis and Magnetic Properties of Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe2O4) Nanoparticles Prepared by Wet Chemical Route

    OpenAIRE

    Maaz, K; Mumtaz, Arif; Hasanain, S. K.; CEYLAN, Abdullah

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite have been synthesized by wet chemical method using stable ferric and cobalt salts with oleic acid as the surfactant. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) confirmed the formation of single phase cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in the range 15-48nm depending on the annealing temperature and time. The size of the particles increases with annealing temperature and time while the coercivity goes through a maximum, peaking at aroun...

  1. Synthesis of Mo and W carbide and nitride nanoparticles via a simple "urea glass" route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Cristina; Erpen, Christian; Yao, Weitang; Antonietti, Markus

    2008-12-01

    A simple, inexpensive, and versatile route for the synthesis of metal nitrides and carbides (such as Mo2N, Mo2C, W2N and WC) nanoparticles was set up. For the first time, metal carbides were obtained using urea as carbon-source. MoCl5 and WCl4 are in a first step contacted with alcohols and an appropriate amount of urea to form a polymer-like, glassy phase, which acts as the starting product for further conversions. Just by heating this phase it was possible to prepare either molybdenum and tungsten nitrides or carbides simply by changing the metal precursor/urea molar ratio. In this procedure, urea plays a double role as a nitrogen/carbon source and stabilizing agent (necessary for the nanoparticle dispersion). Molybdenum and tungsten nitride and carbides synthesized are almost pure and highly crystalline. Sizes estimated by WAXS range around 20 and 4 nm in diameter for Mo and W nitrides or carbides, respectively. The specific surface area was found between 10 and 80 m2/g, depending on the metal and the initial ratio of metal precursor to urea.

  2. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles can enter inside the cells by crossing plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, Elena; Zanella, Daniele; Gornati, Rosalba; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2016-02-29

    The ability of nanoparticles (NPs) to be promptly uptaken by the cells makes them both dangerous and useful to human health. It was recently postulated that some NPs might cross the plasma membrane also by a non-endocytotic pathway gaining access to the cytoplasm. To this aim, after having filled mature Xenopus oocytes with Calcein, whose fluorescence is strongly quenched by divalent metal ions, we have exposed them to different cobalt NPs quantifying quenching as evidence of the increase of the concentration of Co(2+) released by the NPs that entered into the cytoplasm. We demonstrated that cobalt oxide NPs, but not cobalt nor cobalt oxide NPs that were surrounded by a protein corona, can indeed cross plasma membranes.

  3. Highly magnetic iron carbide nanoparticles as effective T(2) contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guoming; Hu, Juan; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Zijian; Chi, Xiaoqin; Gao, Jinhao

    2014-01-21

    This paper reports that iron carbide nanoparticles with high air-stability and strong saturation magnetization can serve as effective T2 contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. Fe5C2 nanoparticles (~20 nm in diameter) exhibit strong contrast enhancement with an r2 value of 283.2 mM(-1) S(-1), which is about twice as high as that of spherical Fe3O4 nanoparticles (~140.9 mM(-1) S(-1)). In vivo experiments demonstrate that Fe5C2 nanoparticles are able to produce much more significant MRI contrast enhancement than conventional Fe3O4 nanoparticles in living subjects, which holds great promise in biomedical applications.

  4. F2∑+-X2∑+ Band System of Cobalt Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-ru Guo; Zhao-xia Zhang; Ting-ting Wang; Cong-xiang Chen; Yang Chen

    2008-01-01

    The laser-induced fluorescence excitation spectrum of CoC was recorded in the spectral region from 13500 cm-1 to 22000 cm-1, in which the CoC molecules were produced by the reaction of sputtered cobalt atoms with methanol under supersonic jet cooled conditions. Much of the visible spectrum was assigned to transitions between the X2∑+ ground state and F2∑+ state. The 11 bands assigned as (v1=3-13, 0) transi-tions of the F2∑+-X2∑+ band system were observed and rotationally analyzed. Equilibrium constants for the F2∑+ state were Te=13628 cm-1,w,e=669 cm-1,weXe=4.3 cm-1, Be=0.546 cm-1, and Re=1.758 A. Some new bands were observed.

  5. New approach for understanding experimental NMR relaxivity properties of magnetic nanoparticles: focus on cobalt ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollet, Anne-Laure; Neveu, Sophie; Porion, Patrice; Dupuis, Vincent; Cherrak, Nadine; Levitz, Pierre

    2016-12-07

    Relaxivities r1 and r2 of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have been investigated in the aim of improving the models of NMR relaxation induced by magnetic nanoparticles. On one hand a large set of relaxivity data has been collected for cobalt ferrite MNP dispersions. On the other hand the relaxivity has been calculated for dispersions of cobalt ferrite MNPs with size ranging from 5 to 13 nm, without using any fitting procedure. The model is based on the magnetic dipolar interaction between the magnetic moments of the MNPs and the (1)H nuclei. It takes into account both the longitudinal and transversal contributions of the magnetic moments of MNPs leading to three contributions in the relaxation equations. The comparison of the experimental and theoretical data shows a good agreement of the NMR profiles as well as the temperature dependence.

  6. Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles: Behavior towards Intact and Impaired Human Skin and Keratinocytes Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Marcella Mauro; Matteo Crosera; Marco Pelin; Chiara Florio; Francesca Bellomo; Gianpiero Adami; Piero Apostoli; Giuseppe Palma; Massimo Bovenzi; Marco Campanini; Francesca Larese Filon

    2015-01-01

    Skin absorption and toxicity on keratinocytes of cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4NPs) have been investigated. Co3O4NPs are commonly used in industrial products and biomedicine. There is evidence that these nanoparticles can cause membrane damage and genotoxicity in vitro, but no data are available on their skin absorption and cytotoxicity on keratinocytes. Two independent 24 h in vitro experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells, using intact (experiment 1) and needle-abraded huma...

  7. Hollow Spheres of Iron Carbide Nanoparticles Encased in Graphitic Layers as Oxygen Reduction Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Yang; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Nonprecious metal catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction are the ultimate materials and the foremost subject for low‐temperature fuel cells. A novel type of catalysts prepared by high‐pressure pyrolysis is reported. The catalyst is featured by hollow spherical morphologies consisting...... of uniform iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles encased by graphitic layers, with little surface nitrogen or metallic functionalities. In acidic media the outer graphitic layers stabilize the carbide nanoparticles without depriving them of their catalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR......). As a result the catalyst is highly active and stable in both acid and alkaline electrolytes. The synthetic approach, the carbide‐based catalyst, the structure of the catalysts, and the proposed mechanism open new avenues for the development of ORR catalysts....

  8. Size effects in the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt nanoparticles: from shape to surface

    OpenAIRE

    Simón Oyarzún; Alexandre Tamion; Florent Tournus; Véronique Dupuis; Matthias Hillenkamp

    2015-01-01

    Strong size-dependent variations of the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt clusters are evidenced quantitatively by combining magnetic experiments and advanced data treatment. The obtained values are discussed in the frame of two theoretical models that demonstrate the decisive role of the shape in larger nanoparticles and the predominant role of the surface anisotropy in clusters below 3 nm diameter.

  9. Size effects in the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt nanoparticles: from shape to surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzún, Simón; Tamion, Alexandre; Tournus, Florent; Dupuis, Véronique; Hillenkamp, Matthias

    2015-10-06

    Strong size-dependent variations of the magnetic anisotropy of embedded cobalt clusters are evidenced quantitatively by combining magnetic experiments and advanced data treatment. The obtained values are discussed in the frame of two theoretical models that demonstrate the decisive role of the shape in larger nanoparticles and the predominant role of the surface anisotropy in clusters below 3 nm diameter.

  10. Influence of the temperature in the electrochemical synthesis of cobalt ferrites nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazario, E. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Morales, M.P. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, C/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Galindo, R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Herrasti, P., E-mail: pilar.herrasti@uam.es [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Menendez, N. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, UAM, C/Francisco Tomas y Valiente 7, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by new electrochemical method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Temperature affects to percentage of inclusion of Co and diameter of the synthesized nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At 80 Degree-Sign C and current densities of 50/25 mA cm{sup -2} applied to Fe and Co, respectively, a stoichiometric CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with 40 nm of diameter were obtained. - Abstract: A new electrochemical method to synthesize cobalt ferrite nanoparticles has been developed. Magnetic measurement, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, inductive coupled plasma spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy were carried out to characterize the cobalt ferrites synthesized at different temperatures between 25 Degree-Sign C and 80 Degree-Sign C. These techniques confirm the efficiency of the electrochemical method. At room temperature a mixture of different compounds was obtained with a particle diameter around 20 nm, while at 80 Degree-Sign C the synthesis of cobalt ferrite leads to a stoichiometric spinel, with a crystallite size of 40 nm measured by Scherrer equation. The temperature was defined as an important parameter to obtain stoichiometric ferrites and different diameters.

  11. Chemical modification of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with possible application as asphaltene flocculant agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, G.E.; Clarindo, J.E.S.; Santo, K.S.E., E-mail: geiza.oliveira@ufes.br [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (CCE/DQUI/UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Quimica; Souza Junior, F.G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (IMA/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Macromoleculas

    2013-11-01

    Asphaltenes can cause enormous losses in the oil industry, because they are soluble only in aromatic solvents. Therefore, they must be removed from the petroleum before it is refined, using flocculant agents. Aiming to find new materials that can work as flocculant agents to asphaltenes, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were chemically modified through acid-base reactions using dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA) to increase their lipophilicity. Nanoparticle synthesis was performed using the co-precipitation method followed by annealing of these nanoparticles, aiming to change the structural phase. Modified and unmodified nanoparticles were tested by FTIR-ATR, XRD and TGA/DTA. In addition, precipitation onset of the asphaltenes was performed using modified and unmodified nanoparticles. These tests showed that modified nanoparticles have a potential application as flocculant agents used to remove asphaltenes before oil refining, since the presence of nanoparticles promotes the asphaltene precipitation onset with the addition of a small amount of non-solvent (author)

  12. Chemical modification of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with possible application as asphaltene flocculant agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Oliveira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Asphaltenes can cause enormous losses in the oil industry, because they are soluble only in aromatic solvents. Therefore, they must be removed from the petroleum before it is refined, using flocculant agents. Aiming to find new materials that can work as flocculant agents to asphaltenes, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were chemically modified through acid-base reactions using dodecylbenzene sulfonic acid (DBSA to increase their lipophilicity. Nanoparticle synthesis was performed using the co-precipitation method followed by annealing of these nanoparticles, aiming to change the structural phase. Modified and unmodified nanoparticles were tested by FTIR-ATR, XRD and TGA/DTA. In addition, precipitation onset of the asphaltenes was performed using modified and unmodified nanoparticles. These tests showed that modified nanoparticles have a potential application as flocculant agents used to remove asphaltenes before oil refining, since the presence of nanoparticles promotes the asphaltene precipitation onset with the addition of a small amount of non-solvent.

  13. Effect of carbon concentration on changing the morphology of titanium carbide nanoparticles from cubic to cuboctahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, David E; Gupta, Ujjwal; Castleman, A W

    2010-01-26

    Titanium carbide nanoparticles were synthesized by flowing methane through a plasma generated from an arc discharge between two titanium electrodes. Different methane concentrations were employed in studies made to investigate the effects of carbon concentration on particle morphology. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the synthesized TiC nanopowders, whereupon it was found that nanocrystalline TiC nanoparticles prefer a cubic morphology at low concentrations of methane and a cuboctahedron morphology at high concentration of methane. The change in particle morphology is attributed to carbon affecting the relative growth rates of the {111} and {100} facets on a TiC seed crystal.

  14. Comparison of catalytic activity of bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by combustion and co-precipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, Venkat Savunthari; Sumathi, Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    In this study, cobalt ferrite and bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite (CoFe2-xBixO4x=0, 0.1) nanoparticles were synthesized by two different methods viz combustion and co-precipitation. The nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results of powder XRD pattern showed an increase in lattice parameter and decrease in particle size of cobalt ferrite by the substitution of bismuth. Catalytic activity of cobalt ferrite and bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by two different methods were compared for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol using NaBH4 as a reducing agent.

  15. Synthesis of core-shell structured magnetic nanoparticles with a carbide shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shushan; Chi, Yue; Zhao, Zhankui

    2017-03-01

    Core-shell structured materials combining the functionalities of the core and shell have great application potential in many fields. In this work, by combining solvothermal, polymerization and the high temperature carbonization, we have successfully developed a facile method to generate core-shell structured nanoparticles which possess an internal magnetic nanoparticle with a carbide shell. The thickness of resorcinol formaldehyde resin as intermediate transition shell could be easily adjusted by changing the concentration of the RF precursor. The resulting nanoparticles possess well-defined structure, uniform size and high magnetization. The unique nanostructure of the magnetic core-shell structured nanoparticles could lead to many promising applications in areas ranging from drug delivery to the purifyication of sewage.

  16. In-situ fabrication of cobalt oxide / sulphide mixed phase nanoparticles in Polyphenylenesulphide matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narendra Rumale

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel approach for the in-situ fabrication of combined cobalt oxide / sulphide nanoparticles in sulphur containing polymer polyphenylenesulphide (PPS by polymer inorganic solid-solid reaction technique is reported here. At present, there is considerable interest in polymer-metal chalcogenides / oxides based nano-composites on account of their optical, magnetic, electronic and catalytic properties. We have demonstrated the suitability of solid-solid reaction methodology by reacting commonly available cobalt precursors with engineering thermoplastic PPS. The cobalt precursor was reacted with PPS in 1:1, 1:5, 1:10, and 1:15 molar ratios, respectively, by heating the mixture at the melting temperature of the polymer (285 ºC for six hours. The resultant products were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD, Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM, Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS techniques and High resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM. The shift in melting temperature of PPS was observed. Increase in absorption peak is observed in the range of 320 to 370 nm with the increase in PPS concentration. Resultant nanoparticles of cobalt sulphide and cobalt oxide embedded in the PPS matrix showed spherical and distorted rod like morphology.

  17. Tungsten carbide nanoparticles as efficient cocatalysts for photocatalytic overall water splitting

    KAUST Repository

    Garcia Esparza, Angel T.

    2012-12-17

    Tungsten carbide exhibits platinum-like behavior, which makes it an interesting potential substitute for noble metals in catalytic applications. Tungsten carbide nanocrystals (≈5 nm) are directly synthesized through the reaction of tungsten precursors with mesoporous graphitic C3N 4 (mpg-C3N4) as the reactive template in a flow of inert gas at high temperatures. Systematic experiments that vary the precursor compositions and temperatures used in the synthesis selectively generate different compositions and structures for the final nanocarbide (W 2C or WC) products. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the WC phase with a high surface area exhibits both high activity and stability in hydrogen evolution over a wide pH range. The WC sample also shows excellent hydrogen oxidation activity, whereas its activity in oxygen reduction is poor. These tungsten carbides are successful cocatalysts for overall water splitting and give H2 and O2 in a stoichiometric ratio from H 2O decomposition when supported on a Na-doped SrTiO3 photocatalyst. Herein, we present tungsten carbide (on a small scale) as a promising and durable catalyst substitute for platinum and other scarce noble-metal catalysts in catalytic reaction systems used for renewable energy generation. Platinum replacement: The phase-controlled synthesis of tungsten carbide nanoparticles from the nanoconfinement of a mesoporous graphite C 3N4 (mpg-C3N4) reactive template is shown. The nanomaterials catalyze hydrogen evolution/oxidation reactions, but are inactive in the oxygen reduction reaction. Tungsten carbide is an effective cocatalyst for photocatalytic overall water splitting (see picture). Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Influence of Cobalt Doping on the Physical Properties of Zn0.9Cd0.1S Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Hari Om

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Zn0.9Cd0.1S nanoparticles doped with 0.005–0.24 M cobalt have been prepared by co-precipitation technique in ice bath at 280 K. For the cobalt concentration >0.18 M, XRD pattern shows unidentified phases along with Zn0.9Cd0.1S sphalerite phase. For low cobalt concentration (≤0.05 M particle size, d XRDis ~3.5 nm, while for high cobalt concentration (>0.05 M particle size decreases abruptly (~2 nm as detected by XRD. However, TEM analysis shows the similar particle size (~3.5 nm irrespective of the cobalt concentration. Local strain in the alloyed nanoparticles with cobalt concentration of 0.18 M increases ~46% in comparison to that of 0.05 M. Direct to indirect energy band-gap transition is obtained when cobalt concentration goes beyond 0.05 M. A red shift in energy band gap is also observed for both the cases. Nanoparticles with low cobalt concentrations were found to have paramagnetic nature with no antiferromagnetic coupling. A negative Curie–Weiss temperature of −75 K with antiferromagnetic coupling was obtained for the high cobalt concentration.

  19. Competing crystallite size and zinc concentration in silica coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Nadeemn; M.Shahid; M.Mumtaz

    2014-01-01

    Silica coated (30 wt%) cobalt zinc ferrite (Co1 ? xZnxFe2O4, x ¼ 0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 1) nanoparticles were synthesized by using sol-gel method. Silica acts as a spacer among the nanoparticles to avoid the agglomeration. X-ray diffraction (XRD) reveals the cubic spinel ferrite structure of nanoparticles with crystallite size in the range 37-45 nm. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy confirmed the formation of spinel ferrite and SiO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the nanoparticles are nearly spherical and non-agglomerated due to presence of non-magnetic SiO2 surface coating. All these measurements signify that the structural and magnetic properties of Co1 ? xZnxFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles strongly depend on Zn concentration and nanoparticle average crystallite size in different Zn concentration regimes.

  20. Polymer Films with Ion-Synthesized Cobalt and Iron Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popok, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents an overview and analysis of data obtained on a few sets of polymer samples implanted by iron and cobalt. The low-energy (40 keV) implantations were carried out into polyimide and polyethyleneterephthalate with fluences between 2.5x10e16-1.5x10e17 cm-2. The samples were...

  1. Laboratory Infrared Spectroscopy of Oxide and Carbide Nanoparticles Condensed from the Gas Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutschke, Harald; Clément, Dominik; Posch, Thomas

    Oxide and carbide dust belong to the first condensates in either oxygen- or carbon-rich stellar outflows. Evidence for their presence in such circumstellar environments comes from infrared spectroscopy (e.g. the 13 micron and 11+ micron bands of M and C stars) and from the study of meteoritic presolar grains (corundum, SiC). We have measured in the laboratory the infrared absorption spectra of oxide and carbide particles produced in condensation experiments. For the production we applied the laser pyrolysis technique in a gas flow reactor as well as laser ablation of metals in reactive atmospheres. The products have been analysed by electron microscopy and other techniques for determination of their chemical composition and structure. They consist of nanoparticles of 5-10 nm size. Silicon carbide particles produced by laser pyrolysis are crystalline (in the cubic SiC structure) whereas oxide nanoparticles produced by laser ablation have a strongly disordered lattice. For the spectroscopic measurement, the particles are extracted from the condensation zone by a molecular beam technique and are deposited on a KBr substrate. At the same time, an Ar ice layer can be grown on the substrate which then incorporates the particles to isolate them from each other. The in-situ measurement also prevents the particles from degradation by environmental influences, e.g. carbonate formation. We discuss the spectra of isolated vs. agglomerated particles and their applicability for comparison with infrared observations of AGB star outflows.

  2. Magnetic hyperthermia heating of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles prepared by low temperature ferrous sulfate based method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejabhiram Yadavalli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A facile low temperature co-precipitation method for the synthesis of crystalline cobalt ferrite nanostructures using ferrous sulfate salt as the precursor has been discussed. The prepared samples were compared with nanoparticles prepared by conventional co-precipitation and hydrothermal methods using ferric nitrate as the precursor. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed the formation of cubic spinel cobalt ferrites when dried at 110 °C as opposed to conventional methods which required higher temperatures/pressure for the formation of the same. Field emission scanning electron microscope studies of these powders revealed the formation of nearly spherical nanostructures in the size range of 20-30 nm which were comparable to those prepared by conventional methods. Magnetic measurements confirmed the ferromagnetic nature of the cobalt ferrites with low magnetic remanance. Further magnetic hyperthermia studies of nanostructures prepared by low temperature method showed a rise in temperature to 50 °C in 600 s.

  3. The cellular magnetic response and biocompatibility of biogenic zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moise, Sandhya; Céspedes, Eva; Soukup, Dalibor; Byrne, James M.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Telling, Neil D.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic moment and anisotropy of magnetite nanoparticles can be optimised by doping with transition metal cations, enabling their properties to be tuned for different biomedical applications. In this study, we assessed the suitability of bacterially synthesized zinc- and cobalt-doped magnetite nanoparticles for biomedical applications. To do this we measured cellular viability and activity in primary human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and human osteosarcoma-derived cells. Using AC susceptibility we studied doping induced changes in the magnetic response of the nanoparticles both as stable aqueous suspensions and when associated with cells. Our findings show that the magnetic response of the particles was altered after cellular interaction with a reduction in their mobility. In particular, the strongest AC susceptibility signal measured in vitro was from cells containing high-moment zinc-doped particles, whilst no signal was observed in cells containing the high-anisotropy cobalt-doped particles. For both particle types we found that the moderate dopant levels required for optimum magnetic properties did not alter their cytotoxicity or affect osteogenic differentiation of the stem cells. Thus, despite the known cytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc ions, these results suggest that iron oxide nanoparticles can be doped to sufficiently tailor their magnetic properties without compromising cellular biocompatibility.

  4. Aerosol emission monitoring in the production of silicon carbide nanoparticles by induction plasma synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Drew; Leparoux, Marc; Jaeggi, Christian; Buha, Jelena; Pui, David Y. H.; Wang, Jing

    2013-12-01

    In this study, the synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles in a prototype inductively coupled thermal plasma reactor and other supporting processes, such as the handling of precursor material, the collection of nanoparticles, and the cleaning of equipment, were monitored for particle emissions and potential worker exposure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of engineering controls and best practice guidelines developed for the production and handling of nanoparticles, identify processes which result in a nanoparticle release, characterize these releases, and suggest possible administrative or engineering controls which may eliminate or control the exposure source. No particle release was detected during the synthesis and collection of SiC nanoparticles and the cleaning of the reactor. This was attributed to most of these processes occurring in closed systems operated at slight underpressure. Other tasks occurring in more open spaces, such as the disconnection of a filter assembly from the reactor system and the use of compressed air for the cleaning of filters where synthesized SiC nanoparticles were collected, resulted in releases of submicrometer particles with a mode size of 170-180 nm. Observation of filter samples under scanning electron microscope confirmed that the particles were agglomerates of SiC nanoparticles.

  5. From nanotechnology to nanogenotoxicology: genotoxic effect of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zülal Atlı Şekeroğlu

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a multi-disciplinary technology that processes the materials that can be measured with nanometer-level and combines many research field or discipline. Nanomaterials (NMs are widely used in the fields of science, technology, communication, electronics, industry, pharmacy, medicine, environment, consumer products and military. Until recently little has been known about whether or not nanomaterials have the toxic or hazardous effects on human health and the environment. However, several studies have indicated that exposure to some nanomaterials, e.g. nanoparticles, can cause some adverse effects in humans and animals. Over the last years the number of publications focusing on nanotoxicology has gained momentum, but, there is still a gap about the genotoxicity of nanomaterials.Metal nanoparticles and their alloys with excellent mechanical properties are the materials which can be easily adapted to the mechanical conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Cobalt-chromium alloys are widely used in orthopedic applications as joint prosthesis and bone regeneration material, fillings and dental implants in jaw surgery, and in cardiovascular surgery, especially stent applications. Studies about cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of metal nanoparticles on human indicate that some metal nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects and they may be hazardous for humans. However, a few studies have been reported concerning the genotoxic effects of cobalt-chromium nanoparticles. The data from these studies indicate that cobalt-chromium nanoparticles have cytotoxic and genotoxic effects. It has been stated that the wear debris from implants cause DNA and chromosome damage in patients with cobalt-chromium replacements. It was also found that the risk of urinary cancers such as bladder, ureter, kidney and prostate in patients after hip replacement than among the wider population.Because there are very little biocompatibility and toxicity tests on

  6. Water dispersible superparamagnetic Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunkhe, Ashwini B.; Khot, Vishwajeet M.; Ruso, Juan M.; Patil, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of Cobalt iron oxide (CoFe2O4) are synthesized chemically, and dispersed in an aqueous suspension for hyperthermia therapy application. Different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, particle concentration which regulates the competence of CoFe2O4 nanoparticle as a heating agents in hyperthermia are investigated. Specific absorption rate (SAR) decreases with increase in the particle concentration and increases with increase in applied magnetic field intensity. Highest value of SAR is found to be 91.84 W g-1 for 5 mg. mL-1 concentration. Oleic acid conjugated polyethylene glycol (OA-PEG) coated CoFe2O4 nanoparticles have shown superior cyto-compatibility over uncoated nanoparticles to L929 mice fibroblast cell lines for concentrations below 2 mg. mL-1. Present work provides the underpinning for the use of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles as a potential heating mediator for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.

  7. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Sørensen, P. G.; Björkdahl, O.;

    2006-01-01

    Boron carbide nanoparticles are proposed as a system for T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy. Nanoparticles were produced by ball milling in various atmospheres of commercially available boron carbide. The physical and chemical properties of the particles were investigated using...

  8. Hazardous phytotoxic nature of cobalt and zinc oxide nanoparticles assessed using Allium cepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodake, Gajanan; Seo, Yeong Deuk; Lee, Dae Sung

    2011-02-15

    The increasing use of nanotechnology requires the clarification of the behavior and the effects of nanoparticles (NPs) as they are released into the environment. This study was to investigate the phytotoxicity of cobalt and zinc oxide NPs using the roots of Allium cepa (onion bulbs) as an indicator organism. The effects of cobalt and zinc oxide NPs on the root elongation, root morphology, and cell morphology of a plant, as well as their adsorption potential, were determined through the hydroponic culturing of A. cepa. A. cepa roots were treated with dispersions of the cobalt and zinc oxide NPs having three different concentrations (5, 10, and 20 μg ml(-1)). With increasing concentrations of the NPs, the elongation of the roots was severely inhibited by both the cobalt and the zinc oxide NPs as compared to that in the control plant (untreated A. cepa roots). Massive adsorption of cobalt oxide NPs into the root system was responsible for the phytotoxicity. Zinc oxide NPs caused damage because of their severe accumulation in both the cellular and the chromosomal modules, thus signifying their highly hazardous phytotoxic nature.

  9. Carbide Nanoparticles Encapsulated in the Caves of Carbon Nanotubes by an In Situ Reduction-Carbonization Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunli Guo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbides (TiC, WC, and NbC nanoparticles fully encapsulated in the caves of carbon nanotubes (CNTs were synthesized via an in situ reduction-carbonization route at 600∘C in an autoclave. The structural features and morphologies of as-obtained products were investigated using by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. HRTEM studies showed that the average diameter of CNTs encapsulated with carbide nanoparticles are in the range of 15–40 nm. The reaction temperature, the reaction time, and the metal catalyst are found to play crucial roles to the product morphology. The growth mechanism of carbide nanoparticles encapsulated in CNTs was discussed in detail.

  10. Magnetite-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for kerosene-based magnetic fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala-Valenzuela, O. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico) and Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna Hermosillo No. 140 CP 25000 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)]. E-mail: oscar.ayala@cimav.edu.mx; Matutes-Aquino, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Materiales Avanzados, Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra No. 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, Chih. (Mexico); Betancourt-Galindo, R. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna Hermosillo No. 140 CP 25000 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico); Garcia-Cerda, L.A. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna Hermosillo No. 140 CP 25000 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico); Rodriguez Fernandez, O. [Centro de Investigacion en Quimica Aplicada, Blvd. Enrique Reyna Hermosillo No. 140 CP 25000 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico); Fannin, P.C. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Giannitsis, A.T. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2005-07-15

    Due to the magnetic anisotropy introduced by the Co{sup 2+} ion in octahedral sites of cubic spinel ferrites, it is possible to tailor the magnetic properties by changing the cobalt content. Magnetic fluids with magnetite-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles given by the formula Co{sub (} {sub x} {sub )}Fe{sub (3-} {sub x} {sub )}O{sub 4} with x=0, 0.2 and 0.4 were prepared. Kerosene and oleic acid were used as liquid carrier and surfactant, respectively. Spherical magnetic nanoparticles were obtained by coprecipitation from metal salts and ammonium hydroxide; afterwards the magnetic fluids were obtained by a peptization process. Powder properties were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherma (BET), vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) and fluids by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA), VSM and the short-circuited transmission line technique.

  11. Hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles from a non-thermal plasma process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Devin; Lopez, Thomas; Yasar-Inceoglu, Ozgul; Mangolini, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate the synthesis of hollow silicon carbide nanoparticles via a two-step process involving the non-thermal plasma synthesis of silicon nanoparticles, followed by their in-flight carbonization, also initiated by a non-thermal plasma. Simple geometric considerations associated with the expansion of the silicon lattice upon carbonization, in combination of the spherical geometry of the system, explain the formation of hollow nanostructures. This is in contrast with previous reports that justify the formation of hollow particles by means of out-diffusion of the core element, i.e., by the Kirkendall nanoscale effect. A theoretical analysis of the diffusion kinetics indicates that interaction with the ionized gas induces significant nanoparticle heating, allowing for the fast transport of carbon into the silicon particle and for the subsequent nucleation of the beta-silicon carbide phase. This work confirms the potential of non-thermal plasma processes for the synthesis of nanostructures composed of high-melting point materials, and suggests that such processes can be tuned to achieve morphological control.

  12. Structural and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by solution combustion method for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Kaliyamoorthy; Rajan Babu, Dhanakotti; Kavya Bai, Mane Prabhu; Supriya, Ravi; Vidya, Radhakrishnan; Madeswaran, Saminathan; Anandan, Pandurangan; Arivanandhan, Mukannan; Hayakawa, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt-doped iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by solution combustion technique. The structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were also investigated. The average crystallite size of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) magnetic nanoparticle was calculated using Scherrer equation, and it was found to be 16±5 nm. The particle size was measured by transmission electron microscope. This value was found to match with the crystallite size calculated by Scherrer equation corresponding to the prominent intensity peak (311) of X-ray diffraction. The high-resolution transmission electron microscope image shows clear lattice fringes and high crystallinity of cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles. The synthesized magnetic nanoparticles exhibited the saturation magnetization value of 47 emu/g and coercivity of 947 Oe. The anti-microbial activity of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles showed better results as an anti-bacterial agent. The affinity constant was determined for the nanoparticles, and the cytotoxicity studies were conducted for the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles at different concentrations and the results are discussed.

  13. ON THE SYNTHESIS OF MOLYBDENUM CARBIDE WITH COBALT ADDITION VIA GAS-SOLID REACTIONS IN A CH4/H2 ATMOSPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. P. B. Araujo

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to ever more severe environmental regulations regarding SOx, NOx and other pollutants' emissions, there has been an interest in developing new and improved catalysts for hydroprocessing reactions. Mo2C has been reported to display good selectivity and activity for those reactions, especially for HDS. Addition of another metal to the carbide structure may improve catalytic properties. Mo2C with low cobalt addition (2.5 and 5% was obtained via gas-solid reaction in a fixed bed reactor with CH4 (5%/H2 atmosphere. XRD and TG/DTA analysis of the precursors were carried out in order to understand its mass loss profile, doping metal presence and phase distributions. CoMoO4 as well as MoO3 were identified after calcining doped precursors at 600 °C/180min. SEM, XRD, XRF, TOC, BET and laser granulometric analysis of the reaction products were also performed. Compositions verified by XRF and theoretical values were compatible. At 700 °C both carbide (Mo2C and oxide (MoO2 phases are present, as identified in XRD analysis and observed by SEM. At 750 °C only single phase Mo2C was verified by XRD, indicating Co dispersion on the carbide matrix. Morphology at this temperature is compatible with pure Mo2C, though XRF indicates Co presence on the material.

  14. Stacking disorder in silicon carbide supported cobalt crystallites: an X-ray diffraction, electron diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Plessis, H E; de Villiers, J P R; Tuling, A; Olivier, E J

    2016-11-21

    Supported cobalt Fischer-Tropsch catalysts are characteristically nanoparticulate and the reduced SiC supported catalyst was found to contain both HCP and FCC polymorphs. This is reflected in the powder XRD patterns and generally there is a poor fit between the experimental and calculated diffractograms. This was ascribed to small crystallite sizes and the occurrence of disorder, manifested as peak broadening and peak shifts. Selected area electron diffraction data of suitably oriented cobalt catalyst grains on silicon carbide supports show non-periodic disorder in the zone axis orientations that contain the common (001) (HCP) and (111) (FCC) reciprocal lattice planes. Both FCC and HCP polymorphs are present in the same grains and these show disorder mainly in the HCP component. The disorder is further examined using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy at atomic resolution and the stacking sequences elucidated. Random sequences of mainly FCC are interrupted by HCP sequences and twin surfaces with reverse stacking sequences are also present. This study highlights the presence of significant disorder in cobalt catalyst grains confirmed by HAADF microscopy.

  15. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-14

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  16. Reinforcement of tungsten carbide grains by nanoprecipitates in cemented carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingwei; Song, Xiaoyan; Wang, Haibin; Hou, Chao; Liu, Xuemei; Wang, Xilong

    2016-10-01

    In contrast to the conventional method that obtains a high fracture strength of tungsten carbide-cobalt (WC-Co) cemented carbides by reducing WC grain size to near-nano or nanoscale, a new approach has been developed to achieve ultrahigh fracture strength by strengthening the WC grains through precipitate reinforcement. The cemented carbides were prepared by liquid-state sintering the in situ synthesized WC-Co composite powders with a little excess carbon and pre-milled Cr3C2 particles having different size scales. It was found that the nanoscale dispersed particles precipitate in the WC grains, which mainly have a coherent or semi-coherent interface with the matrix. The pinning effect of the nanoparticles on the motion of dislocations within the WC grains was observed. The mechanisms for the precipitation of nanoparticles in the WC grains were discussed, based on which a new method to enhance the resistance against the transgranular fracture of cemented carbides was proposed.

  17. Synthesis of Water Dispersible and Catalytically Active Gold-Decorated Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestri, Alessandro; Mondini, Sara; Marelli, Marcello; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Ponti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Anna Maria; Polito, Laura

    2016-07-19

    Hetero-nanoparticles represent an important family of composite nanomaterials that in the past years are attracting ever-growing interest. Here, we report a new strategy for the synthesis of water dispersible cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoxFe3-xO4 NPs) decorated with ultrasmall (2-3 nm) gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The synthetic procedure is based on the use of 2,3-meso-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), which plays a double role. First, it transfers cobalt ferrite NPs from the organic phase to aqueous media. Second, the DMSA reductive power promotes the in situ nucleation of gold NPs in proximity of the magnetic NP surface. Following this procedure, we achieved a water dispersible nanosystem (CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs) which combines the cobalt ferrite magnetic properties with the catalytic features of ultrasmall Au NPs. We showed that CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs act as an efficient nanocatalyst to reduce 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and that they can be magnetically recovered and recycled. It is noteworthy that such nanosystem is more catalytically active than Au NPs with equal size. Finally, a complete structural and chemical characterization of the hetero-NPs is provided.

  18. Structural, optical and magnetic properties of cobalt-doped CdSe nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jaspal Singh; N K Verma

    2014-05-01

    Pure and Co-doped CdSe nanoparticles have been synthesized by hydrothermal technique. The synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV–Visible), photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), at room temperature. From XRD analysis, pure and cobalt-doped CdSe nanoparticles have been found to be polycrystalline in nature and possess zinc blende phase having cubic structure. In addition to this, some peaks related to secondary phase or impurities such as cobalt diselenide (CoSe2) have also been observed. The calculated average crystallite size of the nanoparticles lies in the range, 3–21 nm, which is consistent with the results obtained from TEM analysis. The decrease in average crystallite size and blue shift in the band gap has been observed with Co-doping into the host CdSe nanoparticles. The magnetic analysis shows the ferromagnetic behaviour up to 10% of Co-doping concentration. The increase of Co content beyond 10% doping concentration leads to antiferromagnetic interactions between the Co ions, which suppress the ferromagnetism.

  19. Spin and orbital moments of Co-carbide nanoparticles for permanent magnet applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, D. A.; Sterbinsky, G. E.; Carroll, K. J.; Yoon, H.; Meng, S.; Huba, Z. J.; Carpenter, E. E.

    2014-03-01

    Many efforts are currently devoted to the development of rare earth free permanent magnets (REFPMs). In newly developed permanent magnet materials, examination of the atomic scale magnetic properties is critical to gaining knowledge of the mechanisms of magnetism and hence furthering the development of these materials. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) is a core-level technique ideally suited for such studies as it provides element-specific information on magnetic properties. We present an XMCD study of the REFPM nanoparticulate Co-carbide using a new high-field end-station at beamline U4B of the National Synchrotron Light Source. This end-station facilitates measurement of XMCD spectra from magnetically hard materials. The Co-Carbide nanoparticles (NPs) under study are synthesized via wet chemical methods, which can lead to differences between the atomic and magnetic structures of the surface and bulk of NPs. To separate the determination of the surface and bulk magnetic properties we have combined our XMCD measurements with in-situ surface treatment. Preliminary measurements of Co L-edge XMCD spectra and element specific hysteresis point to the role of the Co orbital and spin moments in the establishment of the high coercive field and (BH)max in Co-carbide NPs.

  20. Cobalt nano-particles for application in magnetic data storage

    CERN Document Server

    Holmes, B M

    2002-01-01

    Particulate magnetic media has been produced through a novel technique, whereby the rapid thermal decomposition of reactively sputtered pre-cursor thin films of cobalt nitride results in a two dimensional array of hcp cobalt particles. The samples produced have been examined and characterised, magnetically, optically, and magneto-optically with respect to the thickness of the precursor films of CoN. Samples with a volume thickness of less than 20A have been found to fall within the superparamagnetic size range, whilst samples thicker than this are found to consist of single domain ferromagnetic particles. The media displays magnetic properties that are greatly enhanced compared to those of bulk Co. The diameters of the particles have been found to be approximately equal to the optimum size range required for high-density magnetic storage. An analysis of the magnetic properties of a core set of samples has enabled a value to be obtained for both the thickness of the oxide shell as well as the effective anisotr...

  1. Self-assembly of noble metal monolayers on transition metal carbide nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sean T; Milina, Maria; Alba-Rubio, Ana C; Hendon, Christopher H; Dumesic, James A; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-05-20

    We demonstrated the self-assembly of transition metal carbide nanoparticles coated with atomically thin noble metal monolayers by carburizing mixtures of noble metal salts and transition metal oxides encapsulated in removable silica templates. This approach allows for control of the final core-shell architecture, including particle size, monolayer coverage, and heterometallic composition. Carbon-supported Ti(0.1)W(0.9)C nanoparticles coated with Pt or bimetallic PtRu monolayers exhibited enhanced resistance to sintering and CO poisoning, achieving an order of magnitude increase in specific activity over commercial catalysts for methanol electrooxidation after 10,000 cycles. These core-shell materials provide a new direction to reduce the loading, enhance the activity, and increase the stability of noble metal catalysts.

  2. Characterization of boron carbide nanoparticles prepared by a solid state thermal reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, B.; Gersten, B. L.; Szewczyk, S. T.; Adams, J. W.

    2007-01-01

    The production of boron carbide (B4C) nanoparticles was investigated in a conventional high temperature furnace reactor. The reaction was carried out by heating a mixture of amorphous carbon and amorphous boron at 1550 °C to efficiently obtain a quantity of B4C. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the average size of B4C particles was 200 nm, ranging from 50 nm to 350 nm. X-ray diffraction transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction studies indicated that the prepared nanoparticles were crystalline B4C with a high density twin structure. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and selected area diffraction were also used to further characterize the structure of the prepared B4C particles, while energy dispersive spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy were used to determine the stoichiometry of the product. A solid state diffusion reaction mechanism is proposed.

  3. Frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility of magnetite and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles embedded in PAA hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Berkum, Susanne; Dee, Joris T; Philipse, Albert P; Erné, Ben H

    2013-05-14

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid)-based hydrogels (PAA). To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network.

  4. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H. Erné

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking of the gel. Here, acrylic acid monomers are adsorbed onto ferrite nanoparticles, which subsequently participate in polymerization during synthesis of poly(acrylic acid-based hydrogels (PAA. To demonstrate the fixation of the nanoparticles to the polymer, our original approach is to measure low-field AC magnetic susceptibility spectra in the 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz range. In the hydrogel, the magnetization dynamics of small iron oxide nanoparticles are comparable to those of the particles dispersed in a liquid, due to fast Néel relaxation inside the particles; this renders the ferrogel useful for chemical sensing at frequencies of several kHz. However, ferrogels holding thermally blocked iron oxide or cobalt ferrite nanoparticles show significant decrease of the magnetic susceptibility resulting from a frozen magnetic structure. This confirms that the nanoparticles are unable to rotate thermally inside the hydrogel, in agreement with their irreversible fixation to the polymer network.

  5. Molybdenum carbide nanoparticles as catalysts for oil sands upgrading: Dynamics and free-energy profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xingchen; Salahub, Dennis R.

    2015-12-01

    There is no doubt that a huge gap exists in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster model of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs. Nanoparticles, which are crucial in heterogeneous catalysis in industry, lie in the middle of the gap. We present here our work on the computational modelling of molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) as the catalysts for the upgrading of oil sands in the in-situ environment, using benzene hydrogenation as a model reaction. With a cluster model, efforts were first made to understand the mechanism of the reaction with a density functional theory (DFT) study on the adsorption of benzene and its hydrogenation product - cyclohexane, as well as the cyclic hydrogenation reaction intermediates on the Mo2C(0001) surface. From the thermodynamic data, along with literature information, it was found that the benzene hydrogenation reaction on molybdenum carbide happens most likely through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the gradual lifting up of the benzene molecule. The electron localization function (ELF) was then used to help understand the nature of the interactions between the MCNPs, identifying strong multi-center interactions between the adsorbates and the MCNPs. To enable the treatment of larger nanoparticles, a fast semi-empirical density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method was parameterized. With this method, the potential energy profiles of benzene hydrogenation reactions on different sizes of MCNPs are calculated. The study was then extended to consider a MCNP embedded in solvent (benzene), using a quantum mechanical (DFTB) / molecular mechanical approach. Calculations on the free energies profiles with the umbrella sampling method show that the entropy of the MCNPs and the solvent are essential in understanding the catalytic activity of the transition metal related nanoparticles for solid/liquid heterogeneous catalysis.

  6. Molybdenum carbide nanoparticles as catalysts for oil sands upgrading: Dynamics and free-energy profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xingchen; Salahub, Dennis R. [Department of Chemistry, Institute for Quantum Science and Technology, and Centre for Molecular Simulation, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    There is no doubt that a huge gap exists in understanding heterogeneous catalysis between a cluster model of a few atoms and a bulk model of periodic slabs. Nanoparticles, which are crucial in heterogeneous catalysis in industry, lie in the middle of the gap. We present here our work on the computational modelling of molybdenum carbide nanoparticles (MCNPs) as the catalysts for the upgrading of oil sands in the in-situ environment, using benzene hydrogenation as a model reaction. With a cluster model, efforts were first made to understand the mechanism of the reaction with a density functional theory (DFT) study on the adsorption of benzene and its hydrogenation product – cyclohexane, as well as the cyclic hydrogenation reaction intermediates on the Mo{sub 2}C(0001) surface. From the thermodynamic data, along with literature information, it was found that the benzene hydrogenation reaction on molybdenum carbide happens most likely through a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with the gradual lifting up of the benzene molecule. The electron localization function (ELF) was then used to help understand the nature of the interactions between the MCNPs, identifying strong multi-center interactions between the adsorbates and the MCNPs. To enable the treatment of larger nanoparticles, a fast semi-empirical density functional tight-binding (DFTB) method was parameterized. With this method, the potential energy profiles of benzene hydrogenation reactions on different sizes of MCNPs are calculated. The study was then extended to consider a MCNP embedded in solvent (benzene), using a quantum mechanical (DFTB) / molecular mechanical approach. Calculations on the free energies profiles with the umbrella sampling method show that the entropy of the MCNPs and the solvent are essential in understanding the catalytic activity of the transition metal related nanoparticles for solid/liquid heterogeneous catalysis.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt Substituted Zinc Ferrite Nanoparticles by Microwave Combustion Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, M; Kennedy, L John; Vijaya, J Judith

    2015-09-01

    Pure and cobalt doped zinc ferrites were prepared by microwave combustion method using L-arginine as a fuel. The prepared samples were characterized by various instrumental techniques such as X-ray powder diffractometry, high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy and UV-Visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. Vibrating sample magnetometry at room temperature was recorded to study the magnetic behavior of the samples. X-ray analysis confirmed the formation of zinc ferrites normal spinel-type structure with an average crystallite sizes in the range, 25.69 nm to 35.68 nm. The lattice parameters decreased as cobalt fraction was increased. The HR-SEM images showed nanoparticles are agglomerated. The estimated band gap energy value was found to decrease with an increase in cobalt content (1.87 to 1.62 eV). Broad visible emissions are observed in the photoluminescence spectra. A gradual increase in the coercivity and saturation magnetization (M(s)) were noted at relatively higher cobalt doping fractions.

  8. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles. The first step toward T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Björkdahl, O; Sørensen, P G; Hansen, T; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

  9. [Research Progress in Genotoxic Effects of Degradation Products, Cobalt, Chromium Ions and Nanoparticles from Metal-on-metal Prostheses on Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hao; Han, Qinglin; Liu, Fan

    2015-04-01

    Cobalt or chromium alloys are the most common clinical materials of prosthesis and there have been some investigators at home and abroad have done related researches about the genotoxic effects of cobalt and chromium ions and nanoparticles. People have certain understanding about the mechanism of production of ions as well as their influence on cells. However, chromium or cobalt nanoparticles genotoxicity related research is still in its preliminary stage. In each stage, the mechanisms, from creating of the particles, through entering cells, until finally causing genotoxic, are still contained many problems to be solved. This article reviews the research progress in mechanisms of production and genotoxic effects of cobalt, chromium ions and nanoparticles.

  10. Rapid degradation of azo dye methyl orange using hollow cobalt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Yingying; Mathew, Iswarya; Cui, Qingzhou; Clay, Molly; Gao, Fan; Zhang, Xiaoqi Jackie; Gu, Zhiyong

    2016-02-01

    A rapid and efficient method for methyl orange degradation using hollow cobalt (Co) nanoparticles is reported. Hollow Co nanoparticles were fabricated by a galvanic replacement reaction using aluminum (Al) nanoparticles as the template material. The methyl orange degradation characteristics were investigated by measuring the time dependent UV-Vis absorption of the dye solution, which showed a very fast degradation rate under acidic conditions. At an initial methyl orange concentration of 100 mg/L (pH = 2.5) and Co nanoparticle dosage of 0.5 g/L, the azo dye degradation efficiency reached up to 99% within 4 min, and the degradation constant rate was up to 2.444 min(-1), which is the highest value among other studies. A comparison of the decolorization rates at similar conditions with several other azo dyes, including Congo red, Amaranth, and Orange G, showed that the dye with a simpler structure and lower molecular mass decolorized considerably faster than the ones having a more complicated structure (higher molecular mass). The methyl orange degradation was also conducted using hollow nickel (Ni) nanoparticles and commercially available solid spherical Co and Ni nanoparticles. The results showed that Co-based nanoparticles outperformed Ni-based nanoparticles, with the hollow Co nanoparticles exhibiting the fastest degradation rate. Using the hollow Co nanoparticles is a very promising approach for the remediation of methyl orange dye containing wastewater due to the fast degradation rate and high degradation efficiency. In addition, these hollow Co nanoparticles are easily recycled because of their magnetic property.

  11. Tracking of the organic species during the synthesis of cobalt-based nanoparticles in non-aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniuk, M.; Niederberger, M.; Koziej, D.

    2014-08-01

    In this work we investigate the organic products of the synthesis of Co-based nanoparticles in benzyl alcohol. Our GC and in situ IR studies provide the experimental proofs for the formation of benzaldehyde, toluene and isopropanol in the reaction solution. These organic products can be correlated with formation of cobalt-based nanoparticles with oxidation state from 0 to 3+. These results shine the light on the complexity of organic and inorganic reactions in solution during crystallization of nanoparticles.

  12. Surface modification of the hard metal tungsten carbide-cobalt by boron ion implantation; Oberflaechenmodifikation des Hartmetalls Wolframkarbid-Kobalt durch Bor-Ionenimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrotchek, I.

    2007-09-07

    In the present thesis ion beam implantation of boron is studied as method for the increasement of the hardness and for the improvement of the operational characteristics of cutting tools on the tungsten carbide-cobalt base. For the boron implantation with 40 keV energy and {approx}5.10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2} fluence following topics were shown: The incoerporation of boron leads to a deformation and remaining strain of the WC lattice, which possesses different stregth in the different directions of the elementary cell. The maximum of the deformation is reached at an implantation temperature of 450 C. The segregation of the new phases CoWB and Co{sub 3}W was detected at 900 C implantation temperature. At lower temperatures now new phases were found. The tribological characteristics of WC-Co are improved. Hereby the maxiaml effect was measured for implantation temperatures from 450 C to 700 C: Improvement of the microhardness by the factor 2..2.5, improvement of the wear resistance by the factor 4. The tribological effects extend to larger depths than the penetration depth of the boron implantation profile. The detected property improvements of the hard metal H3 show the possibility of a practical application of boron ion implantation in industry. The effects essential for a wer decreasement are a hardening of the carbide phase by deformation of the lattice, a hardening of the cobalt binding material and the phase boundaries because of the formation of a solid solution of the implanted boron atoms in Co and by this a blocking of the dislocation movement and the rupture spreading under load.

  13. FTIR and Electrical Study of Dysprosium Doped Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemaunt Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the role of Dy3+ doping on the XRD, TEM, FTIR, and dielectric and electrical properties of CoFe2O4 at room temperature. Cubic spinel phase of CoFe2−xDyxO4 (x = 0.00, 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15 was synthesized by using different sintering temperatures (300, 500, 700, and 900°C. The two absorption bands ν1 and ν2 are observed in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR spectra corresponding to the tetrahedral and octahedral sites, which show signature of spinel structure of the sample. For the sample sintered at 300°C, the dielectric constant is almost unchanged with the frequency at the particular concentrations of x = 0.00 and 0.05. Similar result is obtained for the sample sintered at 500°C (x = 0.10, 0.15, 700°C (x = 0.05, 0.10, and 0.15, and 900°C (x = 0.05, 0.10. An increase in the dielectric constant was observed for the undoped cobalt ferrite sintered at 500, 700, and 900°C. The values of electrical resistivity of the materials vary from ~105 to 109 Ω-cm.

  14. Investigation of Structural, Morphological, Magnetic Properties and Biomedical applications of Cu2+ Substituted Uncoated Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Margabandhu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In the present work, Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite (Co1-xCuxFe2O4, x = 0, 0.3, 0.5, 0.7 and 1 magnetic nanopowders were synthesized via chemical co-precipitation method. The prepared powders were investigated by various characterization methods such as X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD, scanning electron microscope analysis (SEM, vibrating sample magnetometer analysis (VSM and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis (FTIR. The XRD analysis reveals that the synthesized nanopowders possess single phase centred cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size of the particles ranging from 27-49 nm was calculated by using Debye-scherrer formula. Magnetic properties of the synthesized magnetic nanoparticles are studied by using VSM. The VSM results shows the magnetic properties such as coercivity, magnetic retentivity decreases with increase in copper substitution whereas the saturation magnetization shows increment and decrement in accordance with Cu2+ substitution in cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. SEM analysis reveals the morphology of synthesized magnetic nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles were recorded in the frequency range 4000-400cm-1. The spectrum shows the presence of water adsorption and metal oxygen bonds. The adhesion nature of Cu2+ substituted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles with bacteria in reviewed results indicates that the synthesized nanoparticles could be used in biotechnology and biomedical applications.

  15. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  16. Competing crystallite size and zinc concentration in silica coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nadeem

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Silica coated (30 wt% cobalt zinc ferrite (Co1−xZnxFe2O4, x=0, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5 and 1 nanoparticles were synthesized by using sol–gel method. Silica acts as a spacer among the nanoparticles to avoid the agglomeration. X-ray diffraction (XRD reveals the cubic spinel ferrite structure of nanoparticles with crystallite size in the range 37–45 nm. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy confirmed the formation of spinel ferrite and SiO2. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM images show that the nanoparticles are nearly spherical and non-agglomerated due to presence of non-magnetic SiO2 surface coating. All these measurements signify that the structural and magnetic properties of Co1−xZnxFe2O4 ferrite nanoparticles strongly depend on Zn concentration and nanoparticle average crystallite size in different Zn concentration regimes.

  17. Metabolic Effects of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles on Cervical Carcinoma Cells and Nontumorigenic Keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana Beatriz Bortolozo; de Moraes, Fabio Rogério; Candido, Natalia Maria; Sampaio, Isabella; Paula, Alex Silva; de Vasconcellos, Adriano; Silva, Thais Cerqueira; Miller, Alex Henrique; Rahal, Paula; Nery, Jose Geraldo; Calmon, Marilia Freitas

    2016-12-02

    The cytotoxic response, cellular uptake, and metabolomic profile of HeLa and HaCaT cell lines treated with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoFe2O4 NPs) were investigated in this study. Cell viability assays showed low cytotoxicity caused by the uptake of the nanoparticles at 2 mg/mL. However, metabolomics revealed that these nanoparticles impacted cell metabolism even when tested at a concentration that presented low cytotoxicity according to the cell viability assay. The two cell lines shared stress-related metabolic changes such as increase in alanine and creatine levels. A reduced level of fumarate was also observed in HeLa cells after treatment with the nanoparticles, and this alteration can inhibit tumorigenesis. Fumarate is considered to be an oncometabolite that can inhibit prolyl hydroxylase, and this inhibition stabilizes HIF1α, one of the master regulators of tumorigenesis that promotes tumor growth and development. In summary, this study showed that nanoparticle-treated HeLa cells demonstrated decreased concentrations of metabolites associated with cell proliferation and tumor growth. The results clearly indicated that treatment with these nanoparticles might cause a perturbation in cellular metabolism.

  18. Correlation of electronic and magnetic properties of thin polymer layers with cobalt nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharchenko, A.; Lukashevich, M.; Popok, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of cobalt are synthesized in shallow layers of polyimide using 40 keV implantation of Co+ ions with a few different fluences at various ion current densities. Nucleation of individual NPs at low fluencies and their percolation at high fluencies are crucial processes governing...... of the magnetoresistance on the applied magnetic field allows to suggest spin-dependent domain wall scattering affecting the electron transport. The samples implanted with low fluencies demonstrate superparamagnetic behavior down to very low blocking temperatures. While for high fluence (1.25x1017 cm-2) the transition...

  19. Human Skin Penetration of Cobalt Nanoparticles Through Intact and Damaged Skin

    OpenAIRE

    LARESE FILON Francesca; Crosera, Matteo; TIMEUS Elena; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Ponti, Jessica; Maina, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles (CoNPs) are produced for many applications but there is a lack of data on human absorption. The aim of our study was to evaluate the CoNPs skin absorption. Experiments were performed using Franz cells with human skin. Physiological solution was used as receiving phase and 1.0 mg cm-2 of CoNPs was applied as donor phase for 24 h. Mean Co content of 8.3 ± 1.5 ng cm-2 and 1.87 ± 0.86 ug cm-2 were found in the receiving solutions of cells where the CoNPs suspension was app...

  20. Preparation of tungsten carbide nanoparticles by ion implantation and electrochemical etching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamaki, T., E-mail: yamaki.tetsuya@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Yamamoto, S.; Hakoda, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Kawaguchi, K. [Department of Chemistry and Materials Technology, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Matsugasaki, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi, Saitama 350-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, A.; Terai, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    Glassy carbon (GC) substrates were implanted with 100 keV tungsten ions at retained fluences of 4 × 10{sup 16} and 6 × 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} and surface-etched electrochemically in order to prepare tungsten-carbide (WC) nanoparticles on their topmost layers. The calculated current efficiency for the electrochemical etching was nearly the same for the two samples implanted at different fluences, suggesting the controllability of the etched depth using the consumed electric charge. The etching front reached the buried tungsten-implanted layer and increased the tungsten concentration at the surface. No oxidation of WC was observed, even under anodic potential application during electrochemical etching. The voltammogram response of the topmost nanoparticle layer was too small to be observed, probably due to the limited activity of the WC itself and the remaining low concentration. It was demonstrated that this technique could, in principle, be applied to various types of nanoparticle catalysts implanted in GC substrates.

  1. Influence of particle size and reactive oxygen species on cobalt chrome nanoparticle-mediated genotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Devey, Michael; Hawkins, Sue; Hails, Lauren; Davis, Sean A; Mann, Stephen; Chang, Isaac T; Ingham, Eileen; Malhas, Ashraf; Vaux, David J; Lane, Jon D; Case, Charles P

    2013-05-01

    Patients with cobalt chrome (CoCr) metal-on-metal (MOM) implants may be exposed to a wide size range of metallic nanoparticles as a result of wear. In this study we have characterised the biological responses of human fibroblasts to two types of synthetically derived CoCr particles [(a) from a tribometer (30 nm) and (b) thermal plasma technology (20, 35, and 80 nm)] in vitro, testing their dependence on nanoparticle size or the generation of oxygen free radicals, or both. Metal ions were released from the surface of nanoparticles, particularly from larger (80 nm) particles generated by thermal plasma technology. Exposure of fibroblasts to these nanoparticles triggered rapid (2 h) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that could be eliminated by inhibition of NADPH oxidase, suggesting that it was mediated by phagocytosis of the particles. The exposure also caused a more prolonged, MitoQ sensitive production of ROS (24 h), suggesting involvement of mitochondria. Consequently, we recorded elevated levels of aneuploidy, chromosome clumping, fragmentation of mitochondria and damage to the cytoskeleton particularly to the microtubule network. Exposure to the nanoparticles resulted in misshapen nuclei, disruption of mature lamin B1 and increased nucleoplasmic bridges, which could be prevented by MitoQ. In addition, increased numbers of micronuclei were observed and these were only partly prevented by MitoQ, and the incidence of micronuclei and ion release from the nanoparticles were positively correlated with nanoparticle size, although the cytogenetic changes, modifications in nuclear shape and the amount of ROS were not. These results suggest that cells exhibit diverse mitochondrial ROS-dependent and independent responses to CoCr particles, and that nanoparticle size and the amount of metal ion released are influential.

  2. Silicon carbide coated with TiO2 with enhanced cobalt active phase dispersion for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuefeng; Florea, Ileana; Ersen, Ovidiu; Pham-Huu, Cuong; Meny, Christian

    2015-01-04

    The introduction of a thin layer of TiO2 on β-SiC allows a significant improvement of the cobalt dispersion. This catalyst exhibits an excellent and stable catalytic activity for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) with high C5+ selectivity, which contributes to the development of a new active catalyst family in the gas-to-liquid process.

  3. Cobalt oxide magnetic nanoparticles-chitosan nanocomposite based electrochemical urea biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Israr-Qadir, M.; Wazir, Z.; Tufail, M.; Ibupoto, Z. H.; Jamil-Rana, S.; Atif, M.; Khan, S. A.; Willander, M.

    2015-04-01

    In this study, a potentiometric urea biosensor has been fabricated on glass filter paper through the immobilization of urease enzyme onto chitosan/cobalt oxide (CS/Co3O4) nanocomposite. A copper wire with diameter of 500 µm is attached with nanoparticles to extract the voltage output signal. The shape and dimensions of Co3O4 magnetic nanoparticles are investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the average diameter is approximately 80-100 nm. Structural quality of Co3O4 nanoparticles is confirmed from X-ray powder diffraction measurements, while the Raman spectroscopy has been used to understand the chemical bonding between different atoms. The magnetic measurement has confirmed that Co3O4 nanoparticles show ferromagnetic behavior, which could be attributed to the uncompensated surface spins and/or finite size effects. The ferromagnetic order of Co3O4 nanoparticles is raised with increasing the decomposition temperature. A physical adsorption method is adopted to immobilize the surface of CS/Co3O4 nanocomposite. Potentiometric sensitivity curve has been measured over the concentration range between 1 × 10-4 and 8 × 10-2 M of urea electrolyte solution revealing that the fabricated biosensor holds good sensing ability with a linear slope curve of 45 mV/decade. In addition, the presented biosensor shows good reusability, selectivity, reproducibility and resistance against interferers along with the stable output response of 12 s.

  4. Preparation of silica coated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles for the purification of histidine-tagged proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygar, Gülfem; Kaya, Murat; Özkan, Necati; Kocabıyık, Semra; Volkan, Mürvet

    2015-12-01

    Surface modified cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles containing Ni-NTA affinity group were synthesized and used for the separation of histidine tag proteins from the complex matrices through the use of imidazole side chains of histidine molecules. Firstly, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were prepared in an aqueous solution using the controlled co-precipitation method. In order to obtain small CoFe2O4 agglomerates, oleic acid and sodium chloride were used as dispersants. The CoFe2O4 particles were coated with silica and subsequently the surface of these silica coated particles (SiO2-CoFe2O4) was modified by amine (NH2) groups in order to add further functional groups on the silica shell. Then, carboxyl (-COOH) functional groups were added to the SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles through the NH2 groups. After that Nα,Nα-Bis(carboxymethyl)-L-lysine hydrate (NTA) was attached to carboxyl ends of the structure. Finally, the surface modified nanoparticles were labeled with nickel (Ni) (II) ions. Furthermore, the modified SiO2-CoFe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles were utilized as a new system that allows purification of the N-terminal His-tagged recombinant small heat shock protein, Tpv-sHSP 14.3.

  5. Chemical Synthesis and Functionalization of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles with Oleic Acid and Citric Acid Encapsulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watawe Shrikant C.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The functionalized nanoparticles have now a prime importance because of their wide ranging biomedical applications. The particles having size range 30nm-150nm are useful for cell wall interaction specifically the pinocytosis which takes place in all types of cells. The Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles have been synthesized using chemical co- precipitation route and the pH and temperature of the synthesis is controlled to obtain the optimum sized particles. The coating of Sodium Oleate and Citric acid was carried out in aqueous medium at room temperature. The characterization of coated and uncoated particles has been carried out using XRD and IR which confirm the ferrite structure formation. The TGA-DTA analysis shows the coating of magnetic particles. The SEM micrographs reveal the particle size, before and after coating to be in the range of 45 to 90 nm. The saturation magnetization is found to be 16.8 emu/gm.

  6. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on hierarchically structured cobalt nanoparticle/carbon nanofiber/carbon felt composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarubova, Sarka; Rane, Shreyas; Yang, Jia; Yu, Yingda; Zhu, Ye; Chen, De; Holmen, Anders

    2011-07-18

    The hierarchically structured carbon nanofibers (CNFs)/carbon felt composites, in which CNFs were directly grown on the surface of microfibers in carbon felt, forming a CNF layer on a micrometer range that completely covers the microfiber surfaces, were tested as a novel support material for cobalt nanoparticles in the highly exothermic Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. A compact, fixed-bed reactor, made of disks of such composite materials, offered the advantages of improved heat and mass transfer, relatively low pressure drop, and safe handling of immobilized CNFs. An efficient 3-D thermal conductive network in the composite provided a relatively uniform temperature profile, whereas the open structure of the CNF layer afforded an almost 100 % effectiveness of Co nanoparticles in the F-T synthesis in the fixed bed. The greatly improved mass and heat transport makes the compact reactor attractive for applications in the conversion of biomass, coal, and natural gas to liquids.

  7. Highly coercive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles-CuTl-1223 superconductor composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbar, Abdul; Qasim, Irfan; Khan, Shahid A.; Nadeem, K.; Waqee-ur-Rehman, M.; Mumtaz, M., E-mail: mmumtaz75@yahoo.com; Zeb, F.

    2015-03-01

    We explored the effects of highly coercive cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles addition on structural, morphological, and superconducting properties of Cu{sub 0.5}Tl{sub 0.5}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10-δ} (CuTl-1223) matrix. Series of (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub x}/CuTl-1223 (x=0 ∼2.0 wt%) composites samples were synthesized and were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy, and dc-resistivity versus temperature measurements. The magnetic behavior of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles was determined by MH-loops with the help of superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). MH-loops analysis showed that these nanoparticles exhibit high saturation magnetization (86 emu/g) and high coercivity (3350 Oe) at 50 K. The tetragonal structure of host CuTl-1223 superconducting matrix was not altered after the addition of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, which gave us a clue that these nanoparticles had occupied the inter-granular sites (grain-boundaries) and had filled the pores. The increase of mass density with increasing content of these nanoparticles in composites can also be an evidence of filling up the voids in the matrix. The resistivity versus temperature measurements showed an increase in zero resistivity critical {T_c(0)}, which could be most probably due to improvement of weak-links by the addition of these nanoparticles. But the addition of these nanoparticles beyond an optimum level caused the agglomeration and produced additional stresses in material and suppressed the superconductivity. - Highlights: • T{sub c}(0) increased with increasing CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles up to x=1.5. • CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles addition has not affected the structure of CuTl-1223. • Addition of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has improved inter-grains weak links. • Non-monotonic variation of ρ{sub (300} {sub K)} (Ω-cm) is due to

  8. Magnetic and electrical properties of In doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nongjai, Razia; Khan, Shakeel; Asokan, K.; Ahmed, Hilal; Khan, Imran

    2012-10-01

    Nanoparticles of CoFe2O4 and CoIn0.15Fe1.85O4 ferrites were prepared by citrate gel route and characterized to understand their structural, electrical, and magnetic properties. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to confirm the formation of single phase cubic spinel structure. The average grain sizes from the Scherrer formula were below 50 nm. Microstructural features were obtained by scanning electron microscope and compositional analysis by energy dispersive spectroscopy. The hysteresis curve shows enhancement in coercivity while reduction in saturation magnetization with the substitution of In3+ ions. Enhancement of coercivity is attributed to the transition from multidomain to single domain nature. Electrical properties, such as dc resistivity as a function of temperature and ac conductivity as a function of frequency and temperature were studied for both the samples. The activation energy derived from the Arrhenius equation was found to increase in the doped sample. The dielectric constant (ɛ') and dielectric loss (tan δ) are also studied as a function of frequency and temperature. The variation of dielectric properties ɛ', tan δ, and ac conductivity (σac) with frequency reveals that the dispersion is due to Maxwell-Wagner type of interfacial polarization in general and the hopping of charge between Fe2+ and Fe3+ as well as between Co2+ and Co3+ ions at B-sites. Magnetization and electrical property study showed its dominant dependence on the grain size.

  9. Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon for highly effective adsorption of rhodamine B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Lin, E-mail: tanglin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Cai, Ye; Yang, Guide; Liu, Yuanyuan [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zeng, Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhou, Yaoyu; Li, Sisi; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Sheng; Fang, Yan; He, Yibin [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Co/OMC) was applied as a novel adsorption material to remove rhodamine B. • Co/OMC was synthesized by directly introducing cobalt into OMC through a simple infusing method. • High removal capacity of rhodamine B: maximum adsorption capacity reaches 468 mg/g at 200 mg/L initial rhodamine B concentration. • Very quick adsorption property: 96% of rhodamine B can be removed within 25 min. - Abstract: Cobalt nanoparticles-embedded magnetic ordered mesoporous carbon (Co/OMC), prepared through a simple method involving infusing and calcination, was used as a highly effective adsorbent for rhodamine B (Rh B) removal. Several techniques, including SEM, HRTEM, nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, XRD, Raman spectra, EDX, zeta potential and VSM measurement, were applied to characterize the adsorbent. Batch tests were conducted to investigate the adsorption performance. The adsorption capacity of the resultant adsorbent was relatively high compared with raw ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) and reached an equilibrium value of 468 mg/g at 200 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Removal efficiency even reached 96% within 25 min at 100 mg/L initial Rh B concentration. Besides, the adsorption amount increased with the increase of solution pH, adsorbent dose and initial Rh B concentration. Kinetics study showed that the adsorption agreed well with pseudo-second-order model (R{sup 2} = 0.999) and had a significant correlation with intra-particle diffusion model in the both two adsorption periods. Furthermore, thermodynamics research indicated that the adsorption process was endothermic and spontaneous in nature. The adsorption isotherms fitted well with Langmuir model, demonstrating the formation of mono-molecular layer on the surface of Co/OMC during adsorption process. The results confirmed that Co/OMC has the potential superiority in removal of Rh B from aqueous solution.

  10. Effect of sintering temperature on magnetization and Mössbauer parameters of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Grish; Srivastava, R. C.; Reddy, V. R.; Agrawal, H. M.

    2017-04-01

    Nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite of different particle size were prepared using sol-gel method. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques were employed for characterization of nanoparticles for structural and magnetic properties. The particle size and saturation magnetization increase with the increase of sintering temperature. The saturation magnetization increases from 53 to 85 emu/g as the sintering temperature increases from 300 to 900 °C. The remanence increases while the coercivity decreases slightly with the increase of sintering temperature. Mössbauer spectra show the ferrimagnetic nature of all the samples and the cation distribution strictly depends on the sintering temperature. The stoichiometry of the cobalt ferrite formed was estimated to be (Co2+xFe3+1-x)[Co2+1-xFe3+1+x]O4, based on our Mössbauer analysis. The inverse spinel structure gradually transforms towards the normal spinel structure as the sintering temperature increases.

  11. Toxicity of cobalt oxide nanoparticles to normal cells; an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Sourav; Dash, Sandeep Kumar; Tripathy, Satyajit; Das, Balaram; Mandal, Debasis; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2015-01-25

    The aim of this study was to find out the intracellular signaling transduction pathways involved in cobalt oxide nanoparticles (CoO NPs) mediated oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo system. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles released excess Co++ ions which could activated the NADPH oxidase and helps in generating the reactive oxygen species (ROS). Our results showed that CoO NPs elicited a significant (p<0.05) amount of ROS in lymphocytes. In vitro pretreatment with N-acetylene cystine had a protective role on lymphocytes death induced by CoO NPs. In vitro and in vivo results showed the elevated level of TNF-α after CoO NPs treatment. This TNF-α phosphorylated the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase followed by activation of caspase 8 and caspase 3 which could induce cell death. This study showed that CoO NPs induced oxidative stress and activated the signaling pathway of TNF-α-caspase-8-p38-caspase-3 to primary immune cells. This study suggested that bare CoO NPs are a toxic for primary human immune cells that deals directly with human health. Surface modification or surface functionalization may open the gateway for further use of CoO NPs in different industrial use or in biomedical sciences.

  12. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, M W; Sørensen, P G; Björkdahl, O; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2006-03-01

    Boron carbide nanoparticles are proposed as a system for T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy. Nanoparticles were produced by ball milling in various atmospheres of commercially available boron carbide. The physical and chemical properties of the particles were investigated using transmission electron microscopy, photon correlation spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis and chemical assays and reveal profound changes in surface chemistry and structural characteristics. In vitro thermal neutron irradiation of B16 melanoma cells incubated with sub-100 nm nanoparticles (381.5 microg/g (10)B) induces complete cell death. The nanoparticles alone induce no toxicity.

  13. Composition tunable cobalt–nickel and cobalt–iron alloy nanoparticles below 10 nm synthesized using acetonated cobalt carbonyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, Matti M.; Campos-Cuerva, Carlos; Pet, Jeroen; Meeldijk, Johannes D.; van Rijssel, Jos; Meijerink, Andries; Erne, Ben H.; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    2012-01-01

    A general organometallic route has been developed to synthesize CoxNi1-x and CoxFe1-x alloy nanoparticles with a fully tunable composition and a size of 4–10 nm with high yield. In contrast to previously reported synthesis methods using dicobalt octacarbonyl (Co2(CO)8), here the cobalt–cobalt bond i

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis of mixed zinc-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: structural and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppola, P.; da Silva, F. G.; Gomide, G.; Paula, F. L. O.; Campos, A. F. C.; Perzynski, R.; Kern, C.; Depeyrot, J.; Aquino, R.

    2016-05-01

    We synthesize Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite (Zn x Co1- x Fe2O4, with 0 ≤ x ≤ 1) magnetic nanoparticles by a hydrothermal co-precipitation method in alkaline medium. The chemical composition is evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy techniques. The structure and morphology of the nanopaticles are investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. XRD Rietveld refinements reveal the cation distribution among the tetrahedral (A) and octahedral (B) sites. It shows that up to x 0.5 zinc ions occupy preferably A-sites, above which Zn ions begin also a gradual occupancy of B-sites. TEM images show nanoparticles with different shapes varying from spheres, cubes, to octahedrons. Hysteresis loop properties are studied at 300 and 5 K. These properties are strongly influenced by the Zn and Co proportion in the nanoparticle composition. At 300 K, only samples with high Co content present hysteresis. At 5 K, the reduced remanent magnetization ratio ( M R/ M S) and the coercivity ( H C) suggest that nanoparticles with x < 0.5 have cubic anisotropy. A kink on the hysteresis loop, close to the remanence, is observed at low temperature. This feature is presumably associated to interplay between hard and soft anisotropy regimes in the powder samples.

  15. Size-dependent effects of tungsten carbide-cobalt particles on oxygen radical production and activation of cell signaling pathways in murine epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, M; Kisin, E R; Zhao, J; Bowman, L; Lu, Y; Jiang, B; Leonard, S; Vallyathan, V; Castranova, V; Murray, A R; Fadeel, B; Shvedova, A A

    2009-12-15

    Hard metal or cemented carbide consists of a mixture of tungsten carbide (WC) (85%) and metallic cobalt (Co) (5-15%). WC-Co is considered to be potentially carcinogenic to humans. However, no comparison of the adverse effects of nano-sized WC-Co particles is available to date. In the present study, we compared the ability of nano- and fine-sized WC-Co particles to form free radicals and propensity to activate the transcription factors, AP-1 and NF-kappaB, along with stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways in a mouse epidermal cell line (JB6 P(+)). Our results demonstrated that nano-WC-Co generated a higher level of hydroxyl radicals, induced greater oxidative stress, as evidenced by a decrease of GSH levels, and caused faster JB6 P(+) cell growth/proliferation than observed after exposure of cells to fine WC-Co. In addition, nano-WC-Co activated AP-1 and NF-kappaB more efficiently in JB6(+/+) cells as compared to fine WC-Co. Experiments using AP-1-luciferase reporter transgenic mice confirmed the activation of AP-1 by nano-WC-Co. Nano- and fine-sized WC-Co particles also stimulated MAPKs, including ERKs, p38, and JNKs with significantly higher potency of nano-WC-Co. Finally, co-incubation of the JB6(+/+) cells with N-acetyl-cysteine decreased AP-1 activation and phosphorylation of ERKs, p38 kinase, and JNKs, thus suggesting that oxidative stress is involved in WC-Co-induced toxicity and AP-1 activation.

  16. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in coastal waters on cubic Nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao eHan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The novel cubical nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode for selective and sensitive detection of trace chromium (Cr in coastal water was established based on a simple approach. Nano-titanium carbide is used as the typical cubical nanomaterial with wonderful catalytic activity towards the reduction of Cr(VI. Gold nanoparticles with excellent physical and chemical properties can facilitate electron transfer and enhance the catalytic activity of the modified electrode. Taking advantage of the synergistic effects of nano-titanium carbide and gold nanoparticles, the excellent cathodic signal responses for the stripping determination of Cr(VI can be obtained. The detection limit of this method is calculated as 2.08 μg L-1 with the linear calibration curve ranged from 5.2 to 1040 μg L-1. This analytical method can be used to detect Cr(VI effectively without using any complexing agent. The fabricated electrode was successfully applied for the detection of chromium in coastal waters collected from the estuary giving Cr concentrations between 12.48 and 22.88 μg L-1 with the recovery between 96% and 105%.

  17. Yafet-Kittel-type magnetic order in Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkaya, R.; Baykal, A.; Demir, A.

    2013-01-01

    Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite (Zn x Co1- x Fe2O4 with 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 1.0) nanoparticles coated with triethylene glycol (TREG) were prepared by the hydrothermal technique. The effect of Zn substitution on temperature-dependent magnetic properties of the TREG-coated Zn x Co1- x Fe2O4 nanoparticles has been investigated in the temperature range of 10-400 K and in magnetic fields up to 9 T. The structural, morphological, and magnetic properties of TREG-coated Zn x Co1- x Fe2O4 NPs were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The average crystallite size estimated from X-ray line profile fitting was found to be in the range of 7.0-10 nm. The lattice constant determined using the Nelson-Riley extrapolation method continuously increases with the increase in Zn2+ content, obeying Vegard's law. TEM analysis revealed that the synthesized particles were nearly monodisperse, roughly spherical shaped nanoparticles in the size range of 9.0-15 nm. FT-IR spectra confirm that TREG is successfully coated on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The substitution of non-magnetic Zn2+ ions for magnetic Co2+ ions substantially changes the magnetic properties of the TREG-coated Zn x Co1- x Fe2O4 NPs. The saturation magnetization and the experimental magnetic moment are observed to initially increase (up to x = 0.2), which is explained by Néel's collinear two-sublattice model, and then continuously decrease with further increase in Zn content x. This decrease obeys the three-sublattice model suggested by Yafet-Kittel (Y-K). While the Y-K angle is zero for the CoFe2O4 NPs coated with TREG, it increases gradually with increasing Zn concentrations and extrapolates to 82.36° for ZnFe2O4 NPs coated with TREG. The increase in spin canting angles (Y-K angles) suggests the existence of triangular (or canted) spin arrangements in all the samples (except for the samples with x

  18. Yafet-Kittel-type magnetic order in Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with uniaxial anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkaya, R., E-mail: rtopkaya@gyte.edu.tr [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Turkey); Baykal, A. [Fatih University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey); Demir, A. [Istanbul Medeniyet University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey)

    2013-01-15

    Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite (Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with 0.0 {<=} x {<=} 1.0) nanoparticles coated with triethylene glycol (TREG) were prepared by the hydrothermal technique. The effect of Zn substitution on temperature-dependent magnetic properties of the TREG-coated Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles has been investigated in the temperature range of 10-400 K and in magnetic fields up to 9 T. The structural, morphological, and magnetic properties of TREG-coated Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs were examined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM). The average crystallite size estimated from X-ray line profile fitting was found to be in the range of 7.0-10 nm. The lattice constant determined using the Nelson-Riley extrapolation method continuously increases with the increase in Zn{sup 2+} content, obeying Vegard's law. TEM analysis revealed that the synthesized particles were nearly monodisperse, roughly spherical shaped nanoparticles in the size range of 9.0-15 nm. FT-IR spectra confirm that TREG is successfully coated on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The substitution of non-magnetic Zn{sup 2+} ions for magnetic Co{sup 2+} ions substantially changes the magnetic properties of the TREG-coated Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs. The saturation magnetization and the experimental magnetic moment are observed to initially increase (up to x = 0.2), which is explained by Neel's collinear two-sublattice model, and then continuously decrease with further increase in Zn content x. This decrease obeys the three-sublattice model suggested by Yafet-Kittel (Y-K). While the Y-K angle is zero for the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs coated with TREG, it increases gradually with increasing Zn concentrations and extrapolates to 82.36 Degree-Sign for ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs coated with TREG. The increase in spin

  19. Surface spin disorder and spin-glass-like behaviour in manganese-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topkaya, R.; Akman, Ö.; Kazan, S.; Aktaş, B.; Durmus, Z.; Baykal, A.

    2012-10-01

    Manganese-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with triethylene glycol (TREG) have been prepared by the glycothermal reaction. The effect of Mn substitution and coating on temperature-dependent magnetic properties of the TREG-coated Mn x Co1- x Fe2O4 nanoparticles (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.8) with size of 5-7 nm has been investigated in the temperature range of 10-300 K in a magnetic field up to 9 T. After the irreversible processes of the magnetic hysteresis curves were completed, the high-field regions of these curves were fitted by using a `law of approach to saturation' to extract the magnetic properties, such as the effective anisotropy constant ( K eff) and the anisotropy field ( H A) etc. High coercive field of 12.6 kOe is observed in pure cobalt ferrite coated with TREG at 10 K. The low temperature unsaturated magnetization behaviour indicates the core-shell structure of the Mn x Co1- x Fe2O4 NPs. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) measurements revealed superparamagnetic phase of TREG-coated Mn x Co1- x Fe2O4 nanoparticles at room temperature. The blocking and irreversibility temperatures obtained from ZFC-FC curves decrease at highest Mn concentration ( x = 0.8). The existence of spin-glass-like surface layer with freezing temperature of 215 K was established with the applied field dependence of the blocking temperatures following the de Almeida-Thouless line for the Mn0.6Co0.4Fe2O4 NPs. The shifted hysteresis loops with exchange bias field of 60 Oe and high-field irreversibility up to 60 kOe in FC M- H curve at 10 K show that spin-glass-like surface spins surrounds around ordered core material of the Mn0.6Co0.4Fe2O4 NPs. FMR measurement show that all the TREG-coated Mn x Co1- x Fe2O4 nanoparticles absorb microwave in broad field range of about ten thousands Oe. The spectra for all the samples have broad linewidth because of angular distributions of easy axis and internal fields of nanoparticles.

  20. Surface spin disorder and spin-glass-like behaviour in manganese-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Topkaya, R., E-mail: rtopkaya@gyte.edu.tr [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Turkey); Akman, Oe. [Sakarya University, Department of Physics (Turkey); Kazan, S.; Aktas, B. [Gebze Institute of Technology, Department of Physics (Turkey); Durmus, Z.; Baykal, A. [Fatih University, Department of Chemistry (Turkey)

    2012-10-15

    Manganese-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles coated with triethylene glycol (TREG) have been prepared by the glycothermal reaction. The effect of Mn substitution and coating on temperature-dependent magnetic properties of the TREG-coated Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (0.0 {<=} x {<=} 0.8) with size of {approx}5-7 nm has been investigated in the temperature range of 10-300 K in a magnetic field up to 9 T. After the irreversible processes of the magnetic hysteresis curves were completed, the high-field regions of these curves were fitted by using a 'law of approach to saturation' to extract the magnetic properties, such as the effective anisotropy constant (K{sub eff}) and the anisotropy field (H{sub A}) etc. High coercive field of 12.6 kOe is observed in pure cobalt ferrite coated with TREG at 10 K. The low temperature unsaturated magnetization behaviour indicates the core-shell structure of the Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs. Zero-field-cooled (ZFC) and field-cooled (FC) measurements revealed superparamagnetic phase of TREG-coated Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles at room temperature. The blocking and irreversibility temperatures obtained from ZFC-FC curves decrease at highest Mn concentration (x = 0.8). The existence of spin-glass-like surface layer with freezing temperature of 215 K was established with the applied field dependence of the blocking temperatures following the de Almeida-Thouless line for the Mn{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs. The shifted hysteresis loops with exchange bias field of 60 Oe and high-field irreversibility up to 60 kOe in FC M-H curve at 10 K show that spin-glass-like surface spins surrounds around ordered core material of the Mn{sub 0.6}Co{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs. FMR measurement show that all the TREG-coated Mn{sub x}Co{sub 1-x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles absorb microwave in broad field range of about ten thousands Oe. The spectra for all the

  1. Development of europium doped core-shell silica cobalt ferrite functionalized nanoparticles for magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevadiya, Bhavesh D; Bade, Aditya N; Woldstad, Christopher; Edagwa, Benson J; McMillan, JoEllyn M; Sajja, Balasrinivasa R; Boska, Michael D; Gendelman, Howard E

    2017-02-01

    The size, shape and chemical composition of europium (Eu(3+)) cobalt ferrite (CFEu) nanoparticles were optimized for use as a "multimodal imaging nanoprobe" for combined fluorescence and magnetic resonance bioimaging. Doping Eu(3+) ions into a CF structure imparts unique bioimaging and magnetic properties to the nanostructure that can be used for real-time screening of targeted nanoformulations for tissue biodistribution assessment. The CFEu nanoparticles (size ∼7.2nm) were prepared by solvothermal techniques and encapsulated into poloxamer 407-coated mesoporous silica (Si-P407) to form superparamagnetic monodisperse Si-CFEu nanoparticles with a size of ∼140nm. Folic acid (FA) nanoparticle decoration (FA-Si-CFEu, size ∼140nm) facilitated monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) targeting. FA-Si-CFEu MDM uptake and retention was higher than seen with Si-CFEu nanoparticles. The transverse relaxivity of both Si-CFEu and FA-Si-CFEu particles were r2=433.42mM(-1)s(-1) and r2=419.52mM(-1)s(-1) (in saline) and r2=736.57mM(-1)s(-1) and r2=814.41mM(-1)s(-1) (in MDM), respectively. The results were greater than a log order-of-magnitude than what was observed at replicate iron concentrations for ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (r2=31.15mM(-1)s(-1) in saline) and paralleled data sets obtained for T2 magnetic resonance imaging. We now provide a developmental opportunity to employ these novel particles for theranostic drug distribution and efficacy evaluations.

  2. Cobalt iron-oxide nanoparticle modified poly(methyl methacrylate) nanodielectrics. Dielectric and electrical insulation properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Enis; Rondinone, Adam J.; Woodward, Jonathan; Sauers, Isidor; James, D. Randy; Ellis, Alvin R.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we report the dielectric properties of composite systems (nanodielectrics) made of small amounts of mono dispersed magnetic nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix. It is observed from the transmission electron microscope images that the matrix polymeric material is confined in approximately 100 nm size cages between particle clusters. The particle clusters are composed of separated spherical particles which comprise unconnected networks in the matrix. The dielectric relaxation and breakdown characteristics of the matrix polymeric material are altered with the addition of nanometer size cobalt iron-oxide particles. The dielectric breakdown measurements performed at 77 K showed that these nanodielectrics are potentially useful as an electrical insulation material for cryogenic high voltage applications. Finally, structural and dielectric properties of nanocomposite dielectrics are discussed to present plausible reasons for the observed low effective dielectric permittivity values in the present and similar nanodielectric systems. It is concluded that polymeric nanoparticle composites would have low dielectric permittivity regardless of the permittivity of nanoparticles are when the particles are coordinated with a low dielectric permittivity surfactant.

  3. Human skin penetration of cobalt nanoparticles through intact and damaged skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larese Filon, Francesca; Crosera, Matteo; Timeus, Elisa; Adami, Gianpiero; Bovenzi, Massimo; Ponti, Jessica; Maina, Giovanni

    2013-02-01

    Cobalt nanoparticles (CoNPs) are produced for several industrial and biomedical applications but there is a lack of data on human cutaneous absorption. Cobalt is also a skin sensitizer that can cause allergic contact dermatitis. Co applied as NPs, due to their small size and high surface, can penetrate into the skin in higher amount that bulk material. The aim of this study was to evaluate the absorption of Co applied as NPs in both intact and damaged skin. Experiments were performed using Franz cells and 1.0 mg cm(-2) of CoNPs was applied as donor phase for 24h. Mean Co content of 8.5 ± 1.2 ng cm(-2) and 1.87 ± 0.86 μg cm(-2) were found in the receiving solutions of Franz cells when the CoNPs suspension was applied on intact skin and on damaged skin, respectively. Twenty-four hours Co flux permeation was 76 ± 49 ng cm(-2)h(-1) in damaged skin with a lag time of 2.8 ± 2.1h. This study suggests that Co applied as NPs is able to penetrate the human skin in an in vitro diffusion cell system.

  4. Nanotoxicological study of polyol-made cobalt-zinc ferrite nanoparticles in rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanini, Amel; Massoudi, Mohamed El; Gavard, Julie; Kacem, Kamel; Ammar, Souad; Souilem, Ouajdi

    2016-07-01

    The increasing use of engineered nanomaterials in commercial manufacturing and consumer products presents an important toxicological concern. Superparamagnetic zinc-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (SFN) emerge as a promising tool for early cancer diagnostics and targeted therapy. However, toxicity and biological activities of SFN should be evaluated in vitro and in vivo in animal before any clinical application. In this study we aim to synthesize and characterize such objects using polyol process in order to assess its nanotoxicological profile in vitro as well as in vivo. The produced particles consist of a cobalt-zinc ferrite phase corresponding to the Zn0.8Co0.2Fe2O4 composition. They are isotropic in shape single crystals of 8nm in size. The thermal variation of their dc-magnetization confirms their superparamagnetic behavior. In vitro, acute exposure (4h) to them (100μgmL(-1)) induced an important decrease of healthy Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) viability. In vivo investigation in New-Zealand rabbits revealed that they lead to tissue toxicities; in lungs, liver and kidneys. Our investigations report, for the first time as far as we know, that SFN exhibit harmful properties in human cells and mammals.

  5. Improvement of drug delivery by hyperthermia treatment using magnetic cubic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Chaitali; Baishya, Kaushik; Ghosh, Arup; Goswami, Madhuri Mandal; Ghosh, Ajay; Mandal, Kalyan

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we report a novel synthesis method, characterization and application of a new class of ferromagnetic cubic cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) for hyperthermia therapy and temperature triggered drug release. The MNPs are characterized by XRD, TEM, FESEM, AC magnetic hysteresis and VSM. These MNPs were coated with folic acid and loaded with an anticancer drug. The drug release studies were done at two different temperatures (37 °C and 44 °C) with progress of time. It was found that higher release of drug took place at elevated temperature (44 °C). We have developed a temperature sensitive drug delivery system which releases the heat sensitive drug selectively as the particles are heated up under AC magnetic field and controlled release is possible by changing the external AC magnetic field.

  6. Cobalt diselenide nanoparticles embedded within porous carbon polyhedra as advanced electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renbing; Xue, Yanhong; Liu, Bo; Zhou, Kun; Wei, Jun; Chan, Siew Hwa

    2016-10-01

    Highly efficient and cost-effective electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is crucial for a variety of renewable energy applications. Herein, strongly coupled hybrid composites composed of cobalt diselenide (CoSe2) nanoparticles embedded within graphitic carbon polyhedra (GCP) as high-performance ORR catalyst have been rationally designed and synthesized. The catalyst is fabricated by a convenient method, which involves the simultaneous pyrolysis and selenization of preformed Co-based zeolitic imidazolate framework (ZIF-67). Benefiting from the unique structural features, the resulting CoSe2/GCP hybrid catalyst shows high stability and excellent electrocatalytic activity towards ORR (the onset and half-wave potentials are 0.935 and 0.806 V vs. RHE, respectively), which is superior to the state-of-the-art commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.912 and 0.781 V vs. RHE, respectively).

  7. Morphological impact on the reaction kinetics of size-selected cobalt oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartling, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.bartling@uni-rostock.de; Meiwes-Broer, Karl-Heinz; Barke, Ingo [Department of Physics, University of Rostock, Universitätsplatz 3, D-18051 Rostock (Germany); Pohl, Marga-Martina [Leibniz-Institut für Katalyse e.V. an der Universität Rostock (LIKAT), Albert-Einstein-Str. 29a, D-18059 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-09-21

    Apart from large surface areas, low activation energies are essential for efficient reactions, particularly in heterogeneous catalysis. Here, we show that not only the size of nanoparticles but also their detailed morphology can crucially affect reaction kinetics, as demonstrated for mass-selected, soft-landed, and oxidized cobalt clusters in a 6 nm to 18 nm size range. The method of reflection high-energy electron diffraction is extended to the quantitative determination of particle activation energies which is applied for repeated oxidation and reduction cycles at the same particles. We find unexpectedly small activation barriers for the reduction reaction of the largest particles studied, despite generally increasing barriers for growing sizes. We attribute these observations to the interplay of reaction-specific material transport with a size-dependent inner particle morphology.

  8. Influence of cobalt doping on the hyperthermic efficiency of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantechi, Elvira; Innocenti, Claudia; Albino, Martin; Lottini, Elisabetta [INSTM and Department of Chemistry “U. Schiff”, Università di Firenze, via della Lastruccia 3, Sesto Fiorentino, I-50019 Firenze (Italy); Sangregorio, Claudio, E-mail: csangregorio@iccom.cnr.it [C.N.R. – I.C.C.O.M., via Madonna del Piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) are extensively investigated for biomedical applications, particularly as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging and as heat mediators in Magnetic Fluid Hyperthermia. For the latter, one of the goal of the research is to obtain materials with improved hyperthermic properties. A valuable strategy is the increase of the magnetic anisotropy of commonly employed magnetite through the total or partial substitution of Fe{sup 2+} ions with Co{sup 2+} ions. Here we present a study on a family of 8 nm Co-doped magnetite NPs (Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3−x}O{sub 4}), with composition ranging from pure magnetite (x=0) to stoichiometric cobalt ferrite (x=1), aimed to investigate the evolution of the hyperthermic properties with the increase of Co content. We found that the addition of a small amount of Co is enough to sharply increase the Specific Absorption Rate (SAR). The SAR further increases with x but it reaches a maximum for an intermediate value (x=0.6). Such anomalous behavior is ascribed to the intrinsic magnetic properties of the material, and, in particular, to the magnetic anisotropy, which displays the same peculiar trend. The Co-doping thus may represent an effective strategy to improve the poor hyperthermic efficiency of very small magnetite NPs (<10 nm). - Highlights: • A series of 8 nm non-stoichiometric cobalt ferrite nanoparticles was synthesized. • The Co:Fe molar ratio was varied systematically from 0 to 0.5. • The SAR was observed to have a maximum at intermediate Co content. • The hyperthermic results are explained on the basis of the magnetic anisotropy. • Co-doping is an effective strategy to improve the SAR of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs less than 10 nm.

  9. Ultrafine Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticles Composited with Carbon as a Highly Active Hydrogen-Evolution Electrocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruguang; Zhou, Yao; Chen, Yongfang; Li, Pengxi; Liu, Qian; Wang, Jiacheng

    2015-12-01

    The replacement of platinum with non-precious-metal electrocatalysts with high efficiency and superior stability for the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) remains a great challenge. Herein, we report the one-step synthesis of uniform, ultrafine molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) nanoparticles (NPs) within a carbon matrix from inexpensive starting materials (dicyanamide and ammonium molybdate). The optimized catalyst consisting of Mo2C NPs with sizes lower than 3 nm encapsulated by ultrathin graphene shells (ca. 1-3 layers) showed superior HER activity in acidic media, with a very low onset potential of -6 mV, a small Tafel slope of 41 mV dec(-1), and a large exchange current density of 0.179 mA cm(-2), as well as good stability during operation for 12 h. These excellent properties are similar to those of state-of-the-art 20% Pt/C and make the catalyst one of the most active acid-stable electrocatalysts ever reported for HER.

  10. 抑制硬质合金中金属Co浸出的复合润滑剂研究%Study on composite lubricant for inhibiting cobalt leaching from cemented carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    连建肖; 张秀玲; 杨桥; 贾晓鸣

    2011-01-01

    Some lubricants were made by esterification reaction of several acid lubricant additives that commonly used in industry and triethanolamine (TEA). Some solutions were prepared by mixing the reaction products and water in a certain ratio to carry on immersion tests of pure cobalt and cemented carbide tool at room temperature. The pure cobalt sheet was used as electrode to form galvanic cell with saturated calomel electrode to determine the electromotive force. According to the value of the electromotive force and combining with the amount of cobalt leaching in different solution,which was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, the lubricant that showed good inhibiting effect on cobalt leaching was chosen. The results show that triethanolnmine oleate and boric acid-oleic acid triethanolamine can significantly inhibit cobalt leaching from cemented carbide.%选用几种工业上常用的酸类润滑添加剂与三乙醇胺进行醴化反应生成不同润滑剂,将反应产物配成一定浓度的溶液对纯钴片和硬质合金刀具在常温下做浸泡实验,用纯钴片做电极与饱和甘汞电极组成原电池测定电动势,根据电动势的大小结合电镜扫描分析判断不同润滑剂溶液使金属Co浸出的情况,优选出抑制金属Co浸出效果好的润滑剂.实验结果表明:油酸三乙醇胺和油酸硼酸三乙醇胺对Co的浸出有抑制作用.

  11. Enhancing Electrode Performance by Exsolved Nanoparticles: A Superior Cobalt-Free Perovskite Electrocatalyst for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangming; Zhou, Wei; Liu, Meilin; Shao, Zongping

    2016-12-28

    The successful development of low-cost, durable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at intermediate temperatures is critical for broad commercialization of solid oxide fuel cells. Here, we report our findings in design, fabrication, and characterization of a cobalt-free SrFe0.85Ti0.1Ni0.05O3-δ cathode decorated with NiO nanoparticles. Exsolved from and well bonded to the parent electrode under well-controlled conditions, the NiO nanoparticles uniformly distributed on the surface of the parent electrode greatly enhance cathode performance, demonstrating ORR activity better than that of the benchmark cobalt-based Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ. Further, a process for regeneration of the NiO nanoparticles was also developed to mitigate potential performance degradation due to coarsening of NiO particles under practical operating conditions. As a general approach, this exsolution-dissolution of electrocatalytically active nanoparticles on an electrode surface may be applicable to the development of other high-performance cobalt-free cathodes for fuel cells and other electrochemical systems.

  12. Magnetic hyperthermia studies on water-soluble polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna Surendra, M. [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India); Annapoorani, S. [Anna University of Technology, Department of Nanotechnology (India); Ansar, Ereath Beeran; Harikrishna Varma, P. R. [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Bioceramics Laboratory (India); Ramachandra Rao, M. S., E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Department of Physics, Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Materials Research Centre (India)

    2014-12-15

    We report on synthesis and hyperthermia studies in the water-soluble ferrofluid made of polyacrylic acid-coated cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with different particle sizes. Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized using co-precipitation method and particle size was varied as 6, 10, and 14 nm by varying the precursor to surfactant concentration. PAA surfactant bonding and surfactant thickness were studied by FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis. At room temperature, nanoparticles show superparamagnetism and saturation magnetization was found to vary from 33 to 44 emu/g with increase in the particle size from 6 to 14 nm, and this increase was attributed to the presence of a magnetic inert layer of 4 Å thick. Effect of particle size, concentration, and alternating magnetic field strength at 275 kHz on specific absorption rate were studied by preparing ferrofluids in deionized water at different concentrations. Ferrofluids at a concentration of 1.25 g/L, with 10 min of AMF exposure of strength ∼15.7 kA/m show stable temperatures ∼48, 58, and 68 °C with increase in the particle sizes 6, 10, and 14 nm. A maximum specific absorption rate of 251 W/g for ferrofluid with a particle size of 10 nm at 1.25 g/L, 15.7 kA/m, and 275 kHz was observed. Viability of L929 fibroblasts is measured by MTT assay cytotoxicity studies using the polyacrylic acid-coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles.

  13. Nitrite Oxidation with Copper-Cobalt Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes Doped Conducting Polymer PEDOT Composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junjie; Xu, Guiyun; Wang, Wei; Xu, Shenghao; Luo, Xiliang

    2015-09-01

    Copper-cobalt bimetal nanoparticles (Cu-Co) have been electrochemically prepared on glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs), which were electrodeposited with conducting polymer nanocomposites of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) doped with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Owing to their good conductivity, high mechanical strength, and large surface area, the PEDOT/CNTs composites offered excellent substrates for the electrochemical deposition of Cu-Co nanoparticles. As a result of their nanostructure and the synergic effect between Cu and Co, the Cu-Co/PEDOT/CNTs composites exhibited significantly enhanced catalytic activity towards the electrochemical oxidation of nitrite. Under optimized conditions, the nanocomposite-modified electrodes had a fast response time within 2 s and a linear range from 0.5 to 430 μm for the detection of nitrite, with a detection limit of 60 nm. Moreover, the Cu-Co/PEDOT/CNTs composites were highly stable, and the prepared nitrite sensors could retain more than 96 % of their initial response after 30 days.

  14. A hybrid-assembly approach towards nitrogen-doped graphene aerogel supported cobalt nanoparticles as high performance oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruili; Jin, Yeqing; Xu, Peimin; Xing, Xia; Yang, Yuxing; Wu, Dongqing

    2016-02-15

    As a novel electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), nitrogen-doped graphene aerogel supported cobalt nanoparticles (Co-NGA) is archived by a hybrid-assembly of graphene oxide (GO), o-phthalonitrile and cobalt acetate and the following thermal treatment. The hybrid-assembly process successfully combines the ionic assembly of GO sheets and Co ions with the coordination between o-phthalonitrile and Co ions, which can be converted to nitrogen doped carbon and Co nanoparticles in the pyrolysis process under nitrogen flow. Remarkable features of Co-NGA including the macroporous graphene scaffolds, high surface area, and N/Co-doping effect can lead to a high catalytic efficiency for ORR. As the results, the composites pyrolyzed at 600°C (Co-NGA600) shows excellent electrocatalytic activities and kinetics for ORR in basic media, which are comparable with those of Pt/C catalyst, together with superior durability.

  15. In Vitro Toxicological Assessment of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles in Several Mammalian Cell Types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyak, Mahmoud; Altincekic Gurkaynak, Tuba; Özhan, Gül

    2017-02-01

    Nanoparticles have been widely used in various fields due to the superior physicochemical properties and functions. As a result, human exposure to nanoparticles increases dramatically. Previous researches have shown that nanoparticles could travel through the respiratory, digestive system, or skin into the blood and then to the secondary organs such as the brain, heart, and liver. Besides, the nanoparticle toxicity is controversial and dependent on the sensitivity of the cell type, route of exposure, and condition, as well as their characteristics. Similarly, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoFe2O4-NPs) have been used in different industrial fields, and have also various application possibilities in medical and biomedical fields. CoFe2O4-NPs induce toxic responses in various organisms such as human, mice, and algae. However, there is a serious deficit of information concerning their effects on human health and the environment. We aimed to investigate the toxic effects of CoFe2O4-NPs on liver (HepG2), colon (Caco-2), lung (A549), and neuron (SH-SY5Y) cells, which reflect different exposure routes in vitro, by using various toxicological endpoints. The cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, oxidative damage, and apoptosis induction of CoFe2O4-NPs (39 ± 17 nm) were evaluated. After 24 h, the nanoparticles decreased cell viability at ≤100 μg/mL, while increasing viability at >100 μg/mL. CoFe2O4-NPs induced DNA and oxidative damage with increased malondialdehyde (MDA) and 8-hydroxy deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels and decreased glutathione (GSH) levels with no change in protein carbonyl (PC) levels. CoFe2O4-NPs had apoptotic effect in HepG2 and Caco-2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner and necrotic effects on SH-SY5Y and A549 cells. Consequently, the adverse effects of CoFe2O4-NPs should raise concern about their safety in consumer products.

  16. Measurements of nanoparticle size distribution produced by laser ablation of tungsten and boron-carbide in N 2 ambient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereznai, Miklós; Heszler, Péter; Tóth, Zsolt; Wilhelmsson, Ola; Boman, Mats

    2006-04-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by ablating tungsten and boron-carbide (B 4C) target materials in atmospheric pressure nitrogen ambient using ArF excimer laser pulses. The size distributions of the NPs formed during the ablation were monitored—within a 7-133 nm size window—by a condensation particle counter connected to a differential mobility analyzer. The laser repetition rate was varied between 1-50 Hz, and the fluence was systematically changed in the range of 0.5-15 J/cm 2, for both materials, allowing a comparative study in an extended laser parameter regime. The multishot ablation threshold ( Φth) of B 4C was determined to be ˜1.9 J/cm 2 for the laser used (ArF excimer, λ = 193 nm). Similarly to earlier studies, it was shown that the size distributions consist of mainly small nanoparticles (<˜20 nm) attributed to a non-thermal ablation mechanism below Φth. An additional broad peak appears (between 20 and 40 nm) above Φth as a consequence of the thermally induced macroscopic ablation. Chemical composition of deposited polydisperse nanoparticles was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showing nitrogen incorporation into the boron-carbide.

  17. Paramagnetism of cobalt-doped ZnO nanoparticles obtained by microwave solvothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Wojnarowicz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Zinc oxide nanopowders doped with 1–15 mol % cobalt were produced by the microwave solvothermal synthesis (MSS technique. The obtained nanoparticles were annealed at 800 °C in nitrogen (99.999% and in synthetic air. The material nanostructure was investigated by means of the following techniques: X-ray diffraction (XRD, helium pycnometry density, specific surface area (SSA, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS and with magnetometry using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID. Irrespective of the Co content, nanoparticles in their initial state present a similar morphology. They are composed of loosely agglomerated spherical particles with wurtzite-type crystal structure with crystallites of a mean size of 30 nm. Annealing to temperatures of up to 800 °C induced the growth of crystallites up to a maximum of 2 μm in diameter. For samples annealed in high purity nitrogen, the precipitation of metallic α-Co was detected for a Co content of 5 mol % or more. For samples annealed in synthetic air, no change of phase structure was detected, except for precipitation of Co3O4 for a Co content of 15 mol %. The results of the magentometry investigation indicated that all as-synthesized samples displayed paramagnetic properties with a contribution of anti-ferromagnetic coupling of Co–Co pairs. After annealing in synthetic air, the samples remained paramagnetic and samples annealed under nitrogen flow showed a magnetic response under the influences of a magnetic field, likely related to the precipitation of metallic Co in nanoparticles.

  18. Structural and magnetic properties correlated with cation distribution of Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiba, Z.K. [Faculty of Science, Taif University, P.O. Box: 888, Al-Haweiah, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt); Mostafa, Nasser Y., E-mail: nmost69@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Taif University, P.O. Box: 888, Al-Haweiah, Taif (Saudi Arabia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt); Abd-Elkader, Omar H. [Department of Zoology, Science College, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Electron Microscope and Thin Films Department, National Research Center (NRC), El-Behooth Street, Dokki, Cairo 12622 (Egypt)

    2014-11-15

    Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles; CoFe{sub 2−2x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.0≤x≤0.3) were prepared by a one-step solution combustion synthesis technique. The reactants were metal nitrates and glycine as a fuel. The samples were characterized using an X-ray diffraction (XRD), a transmission electron microscope (TEM) and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). XRD analysis revealed a pure single phase of cubic spinel ferrites for all samples with x up to 0.3. The lattice parameter decreases with Mo{sup 6+} substitution linearly up to x=0.15, then nonlinearly for x≥0.2. Rietveld analysis and saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) revealed that Mo{sup 6+} replaced Fe{sup 3+} in the tetrahedral A-sites up to x=0.15, then it replaced Fe{sup 3+} in both A-sites and B-sites for x≥0.2. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) increases with increasing Mo{sup 6+} substitution up to x=0.15 then decreases. The crystallite size decreased while the microstrain increased with increasing Mo{sup 6+} substitution. Inserting Mo{sup 6+} produces large residents of defects and cation vacancies. - Highlights: • Nano-sized Mo-substituted cobalt ferrite CoFe{sub 2−2x}Mo{sub x}O{sub 4} (0.0≤x≤0.3) were prepared by solution combustion. • The change in M{sub s} with increasing Mo-substitution was investigated. • The cations distributions of ferrites were obtained from Rietveld analysis. • Inserting Mo{sup 6+} produces large residents of defects and cation vacancies.

  19. [Murine peritoneal neutrophil activation upon tungsten nanoparticles exposure in vivo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinova, E A; Baranov, V I

    2014-01-01

    Two examples of tungsten carbide nanoparticles (d = 15 nm, 50 nm) and tungsten carbide nanoparticles with 8% cobalt (d = 50 nm) have been found to induce the neutrophil activation 3 h and 36 h after intraperitoneal administration in the doses 0.005; 0.025; 0.05; 0.25; 0.5; 1; 2.5 and 5 microgram per 1 gram body weight to FVB mice. Neutrophil activation was calculated based on the CD11b and S100 antigen expression. Effect of nanoparticles is bimodal for all tested examples.

  20. Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles: Behavior towards Intact and Impaired Human Skin and Keratinocytes Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Mauro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Skin absorption and toxicity on keratinocytes of cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4NPs have been investigated. Co3O4NPs are commonly used in industrial products and biomedicine. There is evidence that these nanoparticles can cause membrane damage and genotoxicity in vitro, but no data are available on their skin absorption and cytotoxicity on keratinocytes. Two independent 24 h in vitro experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells, using intact (experiment 1 and needle-abraded human skin (experiment 2. Co3O4NPs at a concentration of 1000 mg/L in physiological solution were used as donor phase. Cobalt content was evaluated by Inductively Coupled–Mass Spectroscopy. Co permeation through the skin was demonstrated after 24 h only when damaged skin protocol was used (57 ± 38 ng·cm−2, while no significant differences were shown between blank cells (0.92 ± 0.03 ng cm−2 and those with intact skin (1.08 ± 0.20 ng·cm−2. To further investigate Co3O4NPs toxicity, human-derived HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to Co3O4NPs and cytotoxicity evaluated by MTT, Alamarblue® and propidium iodide (PI uptake assays. The results indicate that a long exposure time (i.e., seven days was necessary to induce a concentration-dependent cell viability reduction (EC50 values: 1.3 × 10−4 M, 95% CL = 0.8–1.9 × 10−4 M, MTT essay; 3.7 × 10−5 M, 95% CI = 2.2–6.1 × 10−5 M, AlamarBlue® assay that seems to be associated to necrotic events (EC50 value: 1.3 × 10−4 M, 95% CL = 0.9–1.9 × 10−4 M, PI assay. This study demonstrated that Co3O4NPs can penetrate only damaged skin and is cytotoxic for HaCat cells after long term exposure.

  1. Cobalt Oxide Nanoparticles: Behavior towards Intact and Impaired Human Skin and Keratinocytes Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Marcella; Crosera, Matteo; Pelin, Marco; Florio, Chiara; Bellomo, Francesca; Adami, Gianpiero; Apostoli, Piero; De Palma, Giuseppe; Bovenzi, Massimo; Campanini, Marco; Filon, Francesca Larese

    2015-07-17

    Skin absorption and toxicity on keratinocytes of cobalt oxide nanoparticles (Co3O4NPs) have been investigated. Co3O4NPs are commonly used in industrial products and biomedicine. There is evidence that these nanoparticles can cause membrane damage and genotoxicity in vitro, but no data are available on their skin absorption and cytotoxicity on keratinocytes. Two independent 24 h in vitro experiments were performed using Franz diffusion cells, using intact (experiment 1) and needle-abraded human skin (experiment 2). Co3O4NPs at a concentration of 1000 mg/L in physiological solution were used as donor phase. Cobalt content was evaluated by Inductively Coupled-Mass Spectroscopy. Co permeation through the skin was demonstrated after 24 h only when damaged skin protocol was used (57 ± 38 ng·cm⁻²), while no significant differences were shown between blank cells (0.92 ± 0.03 ng cm⁻²) and those with intact skin (1.08 ± 0.20 ng·cm⁻²). To further investigate Co3O4NPs toxicity, human-derived HaCaT keratinocytes were exposed to Co3O4NPs and cytotoxicity evaluated by MTT, Alamarblue and propidium iodide (PI) uptake assays. The results indicate that a long exposure time (i.e., seven days) was necessary to induce a concentration-dependent cell viability reduction (EC50 values: 1.3 × 10-4 M, 95% CL = 0.8-1.9 × 10⁻⁴ M, MTT essay; 3.7 × 10⁻⁵ M, 95% CI = 2.2-6.1 × 10⁻⁵ M, AlamarBlue assay) that seems to be associated to necrotic events (EC50 value: 1.3 × 10⁻⁴ M, 95% CL = 0.9-1.9 × 10⁻⁴ M, PI assay). This study demonstrated that Co3O4NPs can penetrate only damaged skin and is cytotoxic for HaCat cells after long term exposure.

  2. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  3. Evaluation of humidity sensing properties of TMBHPET thin film embedded with spinel cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Qayyum; Azmer, Mohamad Izzat; Al-Sehemi, Abdullah G.; Al-Assiri, Mohammad S.; Kalam, Abul; Sulaiman, Khaulah

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report the enhanced sensing parameters of previously reported TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Significant improved sensing performance has been demonstrated by coupling of TMBHPET moisture sensing thin film with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (synthesized by eco-benign ultrasonic method). The mean size of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles has been estimated to be 6.5 nm. It is assumed that the thin film of organic-ceramic hybrid matrix (TMBHPET:CoFe2O4) is a potential candidate for humidity sensing utility by virtue of its high specific surface area and porous surface morphology (as evident from TEM, FESEM, and AFM images). The hybrid suspension has been drop-cast onto the glass substrate with preliminary deposited coplanar aluminum electrodes separated by 40 µm distance. The influence of humidity on the capacitance of the hybrid humidity sensor (Al/TMBHPET:CoFe2O4/Al) has been investigated at three different frequencies of the AC applied voltage ( V rms 1 V): 100 Hz, 1 kHz, and 10 kHz. It has been observed that at 100 Hz, under a humidity of 99 % RH, the capacitance of the sensor increased by 2.61 times, with respect to 30 % RH condition. The proposed sensor exhibits significantly improved sensitivity 560 fF/ % RH at 100 Hz, which is nearly 7.5 times as high as that of pristine TMBHPET-based humidity sensor. Further, the capacitive sensor exhibits improved dynamic range (30-99 % RH), small hysteresis ( 2.3 %), and relatively quicker response and recovery times ( 12 s, 14 s, respectively). It is assumed that the humidity response of the sensor is associated with the diffusion kinetics of water vapors and doping of the semiconductor nanocomposite by water molecules.

  4. Cobalt Dithiocarbamate Coordination Polymeric Nanoparticles: Morphology Dependent Magnetic and Antimicrobial Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujjain, Sanjeev K; Ahuja, Preety; Bhatia, Rohit; Sharma, Meenakshi; Sharma, Raj Kishore; Sinqh, Gurmeet

    2015-12-01

    Various synthetic methods were employed on a single precursor to synthesize magnetic cobalt dithiocarbamate (Co(dtc-SB)) coordination polymer nanoparticles (MCP NPs) having different morphologies. When subjected to hydrothermal method, the precursor led to the formation of nanosheets (NSs) of MCP (100 x 80 nm), whereas the same precursor when set to slow diffusion precipitation, formed nanowires (NWs) with 30 nm diameter. Further, on micro-emulsion ultrasonication, uniform MCP nanocubes (NCs) -5 nm were obtained. MCP NPs are weakly ferromagnetic in nature with a narrow hysteresis loop opening. In addition, the magnetic properties of MCP NPs are shown to be highly dependent on size. Further, the antimicrobial activity of MCP NPs against various microbes was also shown to be highly size dependent. The biocompatible MCP NCs were found to have the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 6.25 μg/ml against S. aureus and K. pneumoneae, which demonstrate that NPs are equally effective against both gram positive and gram negative bacteria.

  5. Monitoring Endothelial and Tissue Responses to Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles and Hybrid Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finetti, Federica; Terzuoli, Erika; Donnini, Sandra; Uva, Marianna; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been proposed for many biomedical applications as in vivo imaging and drug delivery in cancer treatment, but their toxicity is an ongoing concern. When NPs are intravenously administered, the endothelium represents the first barrier to tissue diffusion/penetration. However, there is little information about the biological effects of NPs on endothelial cells. In this work we showed that cobalt-ferrite (CoFe2O4) NPs affect endothelial cell integrity by increasing permeability, oxidative stress, inflammatory profile and by inducing cytoskeletal modifications. To overcome these problems, NPs have be loaded into biocompatible gels to form nanocomposite hybrid material (polysaccharide hydrogels containing magnetic NPs) that can be further conjugated with anticancer drugs to allow their release close to the target. The organic part of hybrid biomaterials is a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) polymer, while the inorganic part consists of CoFe2O4 NPs coated with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The biological activity of these hybrid hydrogels was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our findings showed that hybrid hydrogels, instead of NPs alone, were not toxic on endothelial, stromal and epithelial cells, safe and biodegradable in vivo. In conclusion, biohydrogels with paramagnetic NPs as cross-linkers can be further exploited for antitumor drug loading and delivery systems.

  6. Influence of Ce-Substitution on Structural, Magnetic and Electrical Properties of Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashhash, A.; Kaiser, M.

    2016-01-01

    Nano-crystalline samples of cerium substituted cobalt ferrites with chemical formula CoCe x Fe2- x O4 (0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) were prepared using the citrate auto-combustion method. The prepared ferrites were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectra (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The XRD patterns and FTIR spectra confirm that the prepared samples reveal the formation of a single-phase spinel structure. TEM micrographs showed that the particles are made up of spherical and elongated nano-metric shapes. A limitation of the size of nanoparticles is observed as the Ce3+ concentration increases. VSM measurements showed that the coercivity H c and magnetization values M s are strongly dependent on Ce3+ content and particle size. The values of H c lie in the range of (411-1600 G), which suggest that these samples are convenient for different applications. The alternating current electrical conductivity ( σ), dielectric permittivities ( ɛ', ɛ″), and dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) were studied at different ranges of frequency and temperature. The relation of conductivity with temperature revealed a semiconductor to semi-metallic behavior as cerium concentration increases. The variation in (tan δ) with frequency at different temperature shows abnormal behavior with more than one relaxation peak. The conduction mechanism used in the present study has been discussed in the light of cation-anion-cation interactions over the octahedral B-site.

  7. Monitoring Endothelial and Tissue Responses to Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles and Hybrid Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzuoli, Erika; Donnini, Sandra; Uva, Marianna; Ziche, Marina; Morbidelli, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been proposed for many biomedical applications as in vivo imaging and drug delivery in cancer treatment, but their toxicity is an ongoing concern. When NPs are intravenously administered, the endothelium represents the first barrier to tissue diffusion/penetration. However, there is little information about the biological effects of NPs on endothelial cells. In this work we showed that cobalt-ferrite (CoFe2O4) NPs affect endothelial cell integrity by increasing permeability, oxidative stress, inflammatory profile and by inducing cytoskeletal modifications. To overcome these problems, NPs have be loaded into biocompatible gels to form nanocomposite hybrid material (polysaccharide hydrogels containing magnetic NPs) that can be further conjugated with anticancer drugs to allow their release close to the target. The organic part of hybrid biomaterials is a carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) polymer, while the inorganic part consists of CoFe2O4 NPs coated with (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane. The biological activity of these hybrid hydrogels was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Our findings showed that hybrid hydrogels, instead of NPs alone, were not toxic on endothelial, stromal and epithelial cells, safe and biodegradable in vivo. In conclusion, biohydrogels with paramagnetic NPs as cross-linkers can be further exploited for antitumor drug loading and delivery systems. PMID:28036325

  8. Generation of Transparent Oxygen Evolution Electrode Consisting of Regularly Ordered Nanoparticles from Self-Assembly Cobalt Phthalocyanine as a Template

    KAUST Repository

    Ziani, Ahmed

    2016-11-04

    The decoration of (photo)electrodes for efficient photoresponse requires the use of electrocatalysts with good dispersion and high transparency for efficient light absorption by the photoelectrode. As a result of the ease of thermal evaporation and particulate self-assembly growth, the phthalocyanine molecular species can be uniformly deposited layer-by-layer on the surface of substrates. This structure can be used as a template to achieve a tunable amount of catalysts, high dispersion of the nanoparticles, and transparency of the catalysts. In this study, we present a systematic study of the structural and optical properties, surface morphologies, and electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction (OER) performance of cobalt oxide prepared from a phthalocyanine metal precursor. Cobalt phthalocyanine (CoPc) films with different thicknesses were deposited by thermal evaporation on different substrates. The films were annealed at 400 °C in air to form a material with the cobalt oxide phase. The final Co oxide catalysts exhibit high transparency after thermal treatment. Their OER measurements demonstrate well expected mass activity for OER. Thermally evaporated and treated transition metal oxide nanoparticles are attractive for the functionalization of (photo)anodes for water oxidation.

  9. Iron carbide nanoparticles growth in room temperature ionic liquids [C{sub n}-MIM][BF{sub 4}] (n = 12, 16)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lartigue, Lenaiec; Long, Jerome; Dumail, Xavier [Universite Montpellier II, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR5253, Chimie Moleculaire et Organisation du Solide (France); Nikitenko, Sergey I.; Cau, Camille [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, UMR 5257, Centre de Marcoule (France); Guari, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.guari@um2.fr [Universite Montpellier II, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR5253, Chimie Moleculaire et Organisation du Solide (France); Stievano, Lorenzo; Sougrati, Moulay T. [Universite Montpellier II, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR 5253, Agregats, Interfaces et Materiaux pour l' Energie (France); Guerin, Christian [Universite Montpellier II, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR5253, Chimie Moleculaire et Organisation du Solide (France); Sangregorio, Claudio [CNR-ISTM (Italy); Larionova, Joulia [Universite Montpellier II, Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR5253, Chimie Moleculaire et Organisation du Solide (France)

    2013-04-15

    The thermal decomposition of Fe{sub x}(CO){sub y} precursors for the synthesis of nanoparticles of iron carbides and their superstructures with sizes ranging from 2.8 to 15.1 nm is developed using imidazolium-based ionic liquids as solvents, stabilizers, and carbon source. A study of the influence of some synthesis parameters such as the heating temperature, nature, and concentration of the iron carbonyl precursor and chain length of the N-alkyl substituent on the imidazolium ring on the size and organization of the iron carbide nanoparticles is presented. These iron carbides nano-objects were characterized by infra-red spectroscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic analyses.

  10. Adsorption of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles within layer-by-layer films: a kinetic study carried out using quartz crystal microbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcantara, Gustavo B; Paterno, Leonardo G; Afonso, André S; Faria, Ronaldo C; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A; Morais, Paulo C; Soler, Maria A G

    2011-12-28

    The paper reports on the successful use of the quartz crystal microbalance technique to assess accurate kinetics and equilibrium parameters regarding the investigation of in situ adsorption of nanosized cobalt ferrite particles (CoFe(2)O(4)--10.5 nm-diameter) onto two different surfaces. Firstly, a single layer of nanoparticles was deposited onto the surface provided by the gold-coated quartz resonator functionalized with sodium 3-mercapto propanesulfonate (3-MPS). Secondly, the layer-by-layer (LbL) technique was used to build multilayers in which the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle-based layer alternates with the sodium sulfonated polystyrene (PSS) layer. The adsorption experiments were conducted by modulating the number of adsorbed CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers (n) and/or by changing the CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration while suspended as a stable colloidal dispersion. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles onto the 3-MPS-functionalized surface follows perfectly a first order kinetic process in a wide range (two orders of magnitude) of nanoparticle concentrations. These data were used to assess the equilibrium constant and the adsorption free energy. Alternatively, the Langmuir adsorption constant was obtained while analyzing the isotherm data at the equilibrium. Adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles while growing multilayers of CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS was conducted using colloidal suspensions with CoFe(2)O(4) concentration in the range of 10(-8) to 10(-6) (moles of cobalt ferrite per litre) and for different numbers of cycles n = 1, 3, 5, and 10. We found the adsorption of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticles within the CoFe(2)O(4)/PSS bilayers perfectly following a first order kinetic process, with the characteristic rate constant growing with the increase of CoFe(2)O(4) nanoparticle concentration and decreasing with the rise of the number of LbL cycles (n). Additionally, atomic force microscopy was employed for assessing the LbL film roughness and thickness. We found the film

  11. Synthesis and characterization of palladium and palladium-cobalt nanoparticles on Vulcan XC-72R for the oxygen reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo-Ramírez, Lisandra; Montano-Serrano, Rubenier; Luna-Pineda, Tatiana; Román, Félix R; Raptis, Raphael G; Cabrera, Carlos R

    2013-11-27

    A single-source approach was used to synthesize bimetallic nanoparticles on a high-surface-area carbon-support surface. The synthesis of palladium and palladium-cobalt nanoparticles on carbon black (Vulcan XC-72R) by chemical and thermal reduction using organometallic complexes as precursors is described. The electrocatalysts studied were Pd/C, Pd2Co/C, and PdCo2/C. The nanoparticles composition and morphology were characterized using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrophotometer (ICP-MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques. Electrocatalytic activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol tolerance in oxygen-saturated acid solution were determined. The bimetallic catalyst on carbon support synthetized by thermal reduction of the Pd2Co precursor has ORR electrocatalytic activity and a higher methanol tolerance than a Pt/C catalyst.

  12. Cobalt oxide nanoparticle-modified carbon nanotubes as an electrocatalysts for electrocatalytic evolution of oxygen gas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jahan Bakhsh Raoof; Fereshteh Chekin; Vahid Ehsani

    2015-02-01

    A simple procedure was developed to prepare cobalt oxide nanoparticles (nano-CoO) on multiwall carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (MWNT/GCE). Scanning electron microscopy revealed the electrodeposition of nano-CoO with an average particle size of 25 nm onto MWNT/GCE. Also, the presence of nano-CoO was revealed by energy dispersive X-ray spectra. The electrocatalytic activity of nano-CoO and MWNT composite-modified GCE (CoO–MWNT/GCE) has been examined towards the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) by linear sweep voltammetry. The OER is significantly enhanced at CoO–MWNT/GCE, as demonstrated by a negative shift in the polarization curves at the CoO–MWNT/GCE compared with that obtained at the CoO–GCE and GCE. Optimization of the operating experimental conditions (i.e., solution pH and loading level of nano-CoO) has been achieved to maximize the electrocatalytic activity of CoO–MWNT/GCE. The maximum electrocatalytic activity towards the OER was obtained in alkaline media (pH = 13). The electrocatalytic activity of CoO–MWNT/GCE increased with the number of potential cycles employed for the CoO deposition till a certain loading (20 cycles) beyond which an adverse effect is observed. The fabricated CoO–MWNT/GCE exhibited a good stability and durability. The value of energy saving per gram of oxygen gas at a current density of 10 mA cm-2 is 19.3 kWh kg-1.

  13. NanoSQUID magnetometry of individual cobalt nanoparticles grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pérez, M. J.; Müller, B.; Schwebius, D.; Korinski, D.; Kleiner, R.; Sesé, J.; Koelle, D.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate the operation of low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) based on the high critical field and high critical temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) as ultra-sensitive magnetometers for single magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The nanoSQUIDs exploit the Josephson behavior of YBCO grain boundaries and have been patterned by focused ion beam milling. This allows us to precisely define the lateral dimensions of the SQUIDs so as to achieve large magnetic coupling between the nanoloop and individual MNPs. By means of focused electron beam induced deposition, cobalt MNPs with a typical size of several tens of nm have been grown directly on the surface of the sensors with nanometric spatial resolution. Remarkably, the nanoSQUIDs are operative over extremely broad ranges of applied magnetic field (-1 T \\lt {μ }0H\\lt 1 T) and temperature (0.3 K \\lt T\\lt 80 K). All these features together have allowed us to perform magnetization measurements under different ambient conditions and to detect the magnetization reversal of individual Co MNPs with magnetic moments (1-30) × {10}6 {μ }{{B}}. Depending on the dimensions and shape of the particles we have distinguished between two different magnetic states yielding different reversal mechanisms. The magnetization reversal is thermally activated over an energy barrier, which has been quantified for the (quasi) single-domain particles. Our measurements serve to show not only the high sensitivity achievable with YBCO nanoSQUIDs, but also demonstrate that these sensors are exceptional magnetometers for the investigation of the properties of individual nanomagnets.

  14. Influence of aging time of oleate precursor on the magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Polo-Corrales, Liliana [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Chavez, Ermides; Cabarcas-Bolivar, Jari [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Uwakweh, Oswald N.C. [Department of General Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States); Rinaldi, Carlos, E-mail: crinaldi@uprm.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Puerto Rico, Mayagueez, Puerto Rico, PR 00681-9000 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles are of interest because of their room temperature coercivity and high magnetic anisotropy constant, which make them attractive in applications such as sensors based on the Brownian relaxation mechanism and probes to determine the mechanical properties of complex fluids at the nanoscale. These nanoparticles can be synthesized with a narrow size distribution by the thermal decomposition of an iron-cobalt oleate precursor in a high boiling point solvent. We studied the influence of aging time of the iron-cobalt oleate precursor on the structure, chemical composition, size, and magnetic relaxation of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. The structure and thermal behavior of the iron-cobalt oleate was studied during the aging process. Infrared spectra indicated a shift in the coordination state of the oleate and iron/cobalt ions from bidentate to bridging coordination. Aging seemed to influence the thermal decomposition of the iron-cobalt oleate as determined from thermogravimmetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry, where shifts in the temperatures corresponding to decomposition events and a narrowing of the endotherms associated with these events were observed. Aging promoted formation of the spinel crystal structure, as determined from X-ray diffraction, and influenced the nanoparticle magnetic properties, resulting in an increase in blocking temperature and magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Mossbauer spectra also indicated changes in the magnetic properties resulting from aging of the precursor oleate. Although all samples exhibited some degree of Brownian relaxation, as determined from complex susceptibility measurements in a liquid medium, aging of the iron-cobalt oleate precursor resulted in crossing of the in-phase {chi} Prime and out-of-phase {chi} Double-Prime components of the complex susceptibility at the frequency of the Brownian magnetic relaxation peak, as expected for

  15. Dispersion of silicon carbide nanoparticles in a AA2024 aluminum alloy by a high-energy ball mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreño-Gallardo, C.; Estrada-Guel, I. [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología-Chihuahua, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, México (Mexico); López-Meléndez, C. [Universidad La Salle Chihuahua, Prol. Lomas de Majalca No. 11201, CP 31020, Chihuahua, México (Mexico); Martínez-Sánchez, R., E-mail: roberto.martinez@cimav.edu.mx [Centro de Investigación en Materiales Avanzados (CIMAV), Laboratorio Nacional de Nanotecnología-Chihuahua, Miguel de Cervantes No. 120, CP 31109, Chihuahua, México (Mexico)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of 2024-SiC{sub NP} nanocomposite by mechanical milling process. • SiC nanoparticles improved mechanical properties of aluminum alloy 2024 matrix. • A homogeneous distribution of SiC nanoparticles were observed in the matrix • Compressive and hardness properties of the composite are improved significantly. -- Abstract: Al{sub 2024} alloy was reinforced with silicon carbide nanoparticles (SiC{sub NP}), whose concentration was varied in the range from 0 to 5 wt.%; some composites were synthesized with the mechanical milling (MM) process. Structure and microstructure of the consolidated samples were studied by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, while mechanical properties were investigated by compressive tests and hardness measurements. The microstructural evidence shows that SiC{sub NP} were homogeneously dispersed into the Al{sub 2024} alloy using high-energy MM after 2 h of processing. On the other hand, an increase of the mechanical properties (yield stress, maximum strength and hardness) was observed in the synthesized composites as a direct function of the SiC{sub NP} content. In this research several strengthening mechanisms were observed, but the main was the obstruction of dislocations movement by the addition of SiC{sub NP}.

  16. Effect of Particle Size and Lattice Strain on the Debye-Waller Factors of Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purushotham, E

    2016-03-01

    Nano Silicon Carbide (SiC) particles have been produced by ball milling process. The sample was taken 0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 hours of milling. The resulting nanoparticle powders were characterized by X-ray diffraction measurements. The high-energy ball milling of SiC after 50 hours resulted in particle size of about 24 nm. The Debye temperature, mean-square amplitudes of vibration, Debye-Waller factor, particle size, and lattice strain and vacancy formation of energies of SiC nanoparticles prepared by ball mill have been obtained from X-ray integrated intensities. The integrated intensities have been measured with a Philips CWU 3710 X-ray powder diffractometer fitted with a scintillation counter using filtered CuKα radiation at room temperature and have been corrected for thermal diffuse scattering. The X-ray Debye temperatures obtained in the present investigation has been used to estimate the vacancy formation energies for SiC nanoparticles.

  17. Mechanical and thermal properties of tungsten carbide – graphite nanoparticles nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kornaus Kamil

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies concerning pure tungsten carbide polycrystalline materials revealed that nanolayers of graphite located between WC grains improve its thermal properties. What is more, pressure-induced orientation of graphene nano platelets (GNP in hot pressed silicon nitride-graphene composites results in anisotropy of thermal conductivity. Aim of this study was to investigate if addition of GNP to WC will improve its thermal properties. For this purpose, tungsten carbide with 0.5–6 wt.% of GNP(12-additive underwent hot pressing. The microstructure observations performed by SEM microscopy. The anisotropy was determined via ultrasonic measurements. The following mechanical properties were evaluated: Vickers hardness, bending strength, fracture toughness KIc. The influence of GNP(12 addition on oxidation resistance and thermal conductivity was examined. It was possible to manufacture hot-pressed WC-graphene composites with oriented GNP(12 particles, however, the addition of graphene decreased both thermal and mechanical properties of the material.

  18. Frequency-Dependent Magnetic Susceptibility of Magnetite and Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Embedded in PAA Hydrogel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Berkum, S.; Dee, J.T.; Philipse, A.P.; Erné, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemically responsive hydrogels with embedded magnetic nanoparticles are of interest for biosensors that magnetically detect chemical changes. A crucial point is the irreversible linkage of nanoparticles to the hydrogel network, preventing loss of nanoparticles upon repeated swelling and shrinking o

  19. Synthesis and magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles prepared by wet chemical route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maaz, K. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Mumtaz, Arif [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)]. E-mail: arif@qau.edu.pk; Hasanain, S.K. [Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan); Ceylan, Abdullah [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark (United States)

    2007-01-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite have been synthesized by wet chemical method using stable ferric and cobalt salts with oleic acid as the surfactant. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) confirmed the formation of single-phase cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in the range 15-48 nm depending on the annealing temperature and time. The size of the particles increases with annealing temperature and time while the coercivity goes through a maximum, peaking at around 28 nm. A very large coercivity (10.5 kOe) is observed on cooling down to 77 K while typical blocking effects are observed below about 260 K. The high field moment is observed to be small for smaller particles and approaches the bulk value for large particles.

  20. Size dependent stability of cobalt nanoparticles on silica under high conversion Fischer-Tropsch environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Moritz; Kotzé, Hendrik; Fischer, Nico; Claeys, Michael

    2017-02-15

    Highly monodisperse cobalt crystallites, supported on Stöber silica spheres, as model catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were exposed to simulated high conversion environments in the presence and absence of CO utilising an in house developed in situ magnetometer. The catalyst comprising the smallest crystallites in the metallic state (average diameter of 3.2 nm) experienced pronounced oxidation whilst the ratio of H2O to H2 was increased stepwise to simulate CO conversions from 26% up to complete conversion. Direct exposure of this freshly reduced catalyst to a high conversion Fischer-Tropsch environment resulted in almost spontaneous oxidation of 40% of the metallic cobalt. In contrast, a model catalyst with cobalt crystallites of 5.3 nm only oxidised to a small extent even when exposed to a simulated conversion of over 99%. The largest cobalt crystallites were rather stable and only experienced measurable oxidation when subjected to H2O in the absence of H2. This size dependency of the stability is in qualitative accordance with reported thermodynamic calculations. However, the cobalt crystallites showed an unexpected low susceptibility to oxidation, i.e. only relatively high ratios of H2O to H2 partial pressure caused oxidation. Similar experiments in the presence of CO revealed the significance of the actual Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on the metallic surface as the dissociation of CO, an elementary step in the Fischer-Tropsch mechanism, was shown to be a prerequisite for oxidation. Direct oxidation of cobalt to CoO by H2O seems to be kinetically hindered. Thus, H2O may only be capable of indirect oxidation, i.e. high concentrations prevent the removal of adsorbed oxygen species on the cobalt surface leading to oxidation. However, a spontaneous direct oxidation of cobalt at the interface between the support and the crystallites by H2O forming presumably cobalt silicate type species was observed in the presence and absence of CO. The formation of these

  1. Nonlinear optical properties of cobalt and iron doped CdSe nanoparticles using Z-scan technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaur, Poonam, E-mail: poonam.gaur612@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Sonipat 131001, Haryana (India); Malik, B.P. [Department of Physics, Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Sonipat 131001, Haryana (India); Gaur, Arun [Department of Physics, Hindu College, Sonipat 131001, Haryana (India)

    2015-01-15

    The present work aims at the synthesis of pure, Cobalt (Co) and Iron (Fe) doped CdSe nanoparticles by the wet chemical method. The optical properties of synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–vis spectroscopy to find the optical direct band gap and estimation of particle size by using Debye–Scherrer formula and HRTEM. The nonlinear optical properties such as nonlinear absorption co-efficient, nonlinear refraction co-efficient and third order nonlinear susceptibility χ{sup (3)} are investigated. The calculations have been performed with the help of Z-scan experimental set-up using Nd: YAG laser emitting 532 nm, 5 ns laser pulses with intensity maintained at 2.296 TW/cm{sup 2}. The nanoparticles clearly exhibit a negative value of nonlinear refraction, which is attributed to the two photon absorption and free carrier absorption. Further the optical limiting behavior is determined (figure of merit (FOM)). The presence of RSA in these nanoparticles makes them a potential material for the development of optical limiter.

  2. Cobalt Nanoparticle-Embedded Porous Carbon Nanofibers with Inherent N- and F-Doping as Binder-Free Bifunctional Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Richa; Kalra, Vibha

    2017-01-18

    Efficient, low-cost, non-precious metal-based, and stable bifunctional electrocatalysts are key to various energy storage and conversion devices such as regenerative fuel cells and metal-air batteries. In this work, we report cobalt nanoparticle-embedded porous carbon nanofibers with inherent N- and F-doping as binder-free bifunctional electrocatalysts with excellent activity for both the oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reaction (ORR/OER) in an alkaline medium. Single-step electrospinning of a solution of the polymer mixture (carbon precursor) and the cobalt precursor followed by controlled pyrolysis with an intermediate reduction step in H2 (to reduce cobalt oxides to cobalt) was utilized to synthesize an integrated freestanding catalyst. The fabricated catalyst with effective structural and electronic interaction between the cobalt metal nanoparticles and the N- and F-doped carbon defect sites showed enhanced catalytic properties compared to the benchmark catalysts for ORR and OER (Pt, Ir, and Ru). The ORR potential at the current density of -3 mA cm(-2) was 0.81 VRHE and the OER potential at a current density of 10 mA cm(-2) was 1.595 VRHE , resulting in a ΔE of only 0.785 V.

  3. Eco-friendly microbial route to synthesize cobalt nanoparticles using Bacillus thuringiensis against malaria and dengue vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marimuthu, Sampath; Rahuman, Abdul Abdul; Kirthi, Arivarasan Vishnu; Santhoshkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Jayaseelan, Chidambaram; Rajakumar, Govindasamy

    2013-12-01

    The developments of resistance and persistence to chemical insecticides and concerns about the non-target effects have prompted the development of eco-friendly mosquito control agents. The aim of this study was to investigate the larvicidal activities of synthesized cobalt nanoparticles (Co NPs) using bio control agent, Bacillus thuringiensis against malaria vector, Anopheles subpictus and dengue vector, Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae). The synthesized Co NPs were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), Field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD analysis showed three distinct diffraction peaks at 27.03°, 31.00°, and 45.58° indexed to the planes 102, 122, and 024, respectively on the face-centered cubic cobalt acetate with an average size of 85.3 nm. FTIR spectra implicated role of the peak at 3,436 cm(-1) for O-H hydroxyl group, 2924 cm(-1) for methylene C-H stretch in the formation of Co NPs. FESEM analysis showed the topological and morphological appearance of NPs which were found to be spherical and oval in shape. TEM analysis showed polydispersed and clustered NPs with an average size of 84.81 nm. The maximum larvicidal mortality was observed in the cobalt acetate solution, B. thuringiensis formulation, and synthesized Co NPs against fourth instar larvae of A. subpictus and A. aegypti with LC50 values of 29.16, 8.12, 3.59 mg/L; 34.61, 6.94, and 2.87 mg/L; r (2) values of 0.986, 0.933, 0.942; 0.962, 0.957, and 0.922, respectively.

  4. L-Ascorbic Acid Protected Against Extrinsic and Intrinsic Apoptosis Induced by Cobalt Nanoparticles Through ROS Attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yake; Hong, Hongxiang; Lu, Xu; Wang, Wei; Liu, Fan; Yang, Huilin

    2017-02-01

    Currently, tissue damage induced by cobalt nanoparticles (CoNPs) and cobalt ions (Co(2+)) are the most serious syndrome in the patients with metal-on-metal hip prostheses. Therefore, an urgent need exists for the identification of the mechanisms and the development of therapeutic strategies to limit it. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism of this damage and to demonstrate if L-ascorbic acid (L-AA) could protect against the cell toxicities induced by CoNPs and Co(2+) in vitro. With CoNPs and Co(2+) treatment, cell viability was significantly decreased; the ROS (reactive oxygen species) level in mitochondria was dramatically increased in CoNPs treated cells, but cobalt ions could barely induce the ROS. Consistently, the level of cell apoptosis was increased with the upregulation of pro-apoptotic factors (caspases 8, 9, and 3, and Bax) and the downregulation of anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2. Besides that, the levels of cytochrome c and AIF were increased and released from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. After the cells were pretreated with L-AA, the cell viability decreased by CoNPs was reversed and the ROS induced by CoNPs was suppressed. The level of cell apoptosis induced by CoNPs was decreased as well. But it could not reverse the effects induced by Co(2+). These studies demonstrated that CoNPs induce extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways via generation of ROS, and L-AA could prevent the cytotoxicity by reducing the level of ROS. While Co(2+) may induce cytotoxicity through other signals, it could not be protected by L-AA treatment.

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Cobalt Containing Nanoparticles on Alumina A Potential Catalyst for Gas to Liquid Fuels Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowen, Jonathan; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2016-01-01

    Fisher-Tröpsch synthesis (FTS) is a century-old gas-to-liquid (GTL) technology that commonly employs cobalt (Co, on an oxide support) or iron (supported or not) species catalysts. It has been well established that the activity of the Co catalyst depends directly upon the number of surface Co atoms. The addition of promoter (mainly noble) metals has been widely utilized to increase the fraction of Co that is available for surface catalysis. Direct synthesis of Co nanoparticles is a possible alternative approach; our preliminary synthesis and characterization efforts are described. Materials were characterized by various transmission microscopies and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) and dicobalt octacarbonyl were heated under argon to a temperature of 180 deg with constant stirring for 1 hr. Quenching the reaction in toluene produced Co-containing nanoparticles with a diameter of 5 to 10 nm. Alternatively, an alumina support (SBA-200 Al2O3) was added; the reaction was further stirred and the temperature was decreased to 140 deg to reduce the rate of further growth/ripening of the nucleated Co nanoparticles. A typical size of Co-containing NPs was also found to be in the range of 5 to 10 nm. This can be contrasted with a range of 50 to 200 nm for conventionally-produced Co-Al2O3 Fischer-Tröpsch catalysts. This method shows great potential for production of highly dispersed catalysts that are either supported or unsupported.

  6. Synthesis and characterization of undoped and cobalt-doped TiO2 nanoparticles via sol-gel technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugundan, S.; Rajamannan, B.; Viruthagiri, G.; Shanmugam, N.; Gobi, R.; Praveen, P.

    2015-04-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles doped with different concentrations of cobalt (4, 8, 12 and 16 %) were synthesized by sol-gel method at room temperature with appropriate reactants. In general, TiO2 can exist in anatase, rutile, and brookite phases. In this present study, we used titanium tetra iso propoxide and 2-propanol as a common starting materials and the obtained products were calcined at 500 °C and 800 °C to get anatase and rutile phases, respectively. The crystalline sizes of the doped and undoped TiO2 nanoparticles were observed with X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The functional groups of the samples were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). From UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS), the band gap energy and excitation wavelength of doped and undoped TiO2 nanoparticles were identified. The defect oriented emissions were seen from photoluminescence (PL) study. The spherical uniform size distribution of particles and elements present in the samples was determined using two different techniques viz., scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDX) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) with selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was also found and the obtained result was compared with potassium di hydrogen phosphate (KDP).

  7. Ultrafine cobalt nanoparticles supported on reduced graphene oxide: Efficient catalyst for fast reduction of hexavalent chromium at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tingting; Xue, Jinjuan; Zhang, Xiaolei; He, Guangyu; Chen, Haiqun

    2017-04-01

    A novel composite ultrafine cobalt nanoparticles-reduced graphene oxide (Co-RGO) was firstly synthesized through a modified one-step solvothermal method with Co(OH)2 as the precursor. The prepared low-cost Co-RGO composite exhibited excellent catalytic activity for the reduction of highly toxic Cr(VI) to nontoxic Cr(III) at room temperature when formic acid (HCOOH) was employed as the reductant, and its catalytic performance was even comparable with that of noble metal-based catalysts in the same reduction reaction. Moreover, Co-RGO composite could be readily recovered under an external magnetic field and efficiently participated in recycled reaction for Cr(VI) reduction.

  8. Surface plasmon resonance sensor for detecting of arsenic in aqueous solution using polypyrrole-chitosan-cobalt ferrite nanoparticles composite layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadrolhosseini, Amir Reza; Naseri, Mahmoud; Kamari, Halimah Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The detection and measurement of low concentrations of arsenic (V) are the subjects of intense research interest in chemistry and environmental activity. In this research, a polypyrrole-chitosan/cobalt ferrite nanoparticles composite layer was prepared using an electrodeposition method on a gold-coated glass slide. The composite layer was characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersed spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and a high surface stylus profilometer. The composite layer was used to detect the arsenic in water, and the sensor limitation was about 0.001 ppm. The composite layer was tested using atomic-force microscopy before and after the detection of arsenic. As a result, the roughness was disoriented, as the arsenic was bound on the surface of the composite layer.

  9. In situ TEM observation of the Boudouard reaction: multi-layered graphene formation from CO on cobalt nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremmer, G Marien; Zacharaki, Eirini; Sjåstad, Anja O; Navarro, Violeta; Frenken, Joost W M; Kooyman, Patricia J

    2017-02-09

    Using a MEMS nanoreactor in combination with a specially designed in situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) holder and gas supply system, we imaged the formation of multiple layers of graphene encapsulating a cobalt nanoparticle, at 1 bar CO : N2 (1 : 1) and 500 °C. The cobalt nanoparticle was imaged live in a TEM during the Boudouard reaction. The in situ/operando TEM studies give insight into the behaviour of the catalyst at the nanometer-scale, under industrially relevant conditions. When switching from Fischer-Tropsch syngas conditions (CO : H2 : N2 1 : 2 : 3 at 1 bar) to CO-rich conditions (CO : N2 1 : 1 at 1 bar), we observed the formation of multi-layered graphene on Co nanoparticles at 500 °C. Due to the high temperature, the surface of the Co nanoparticles facilitated the Boudouard reaction, causing CO dissociation and the formation of layers of graphene. After the formation of the first patches of graphene at the surface of the nanoparticle, more and more layers grew over the course of about 40 minutes. In its final state, around 10 layers of carbon capped the nanoparticle. During this process, the carbon shell caused mechanical stress in the nanoparticle, inducing permanent deformation.

  10. Synthesis of tantalum carbide and nitride nanoparticles using a reactive mesoporous template for electrochemical hydrogen evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2013-01-01

    Tantalum carbide and nitride nanocrystals were prepared through the reaction of a tantalum precursor with mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C 3N4. The effects of the reaction temperature, the ratio of the Ta precursor to the reactive template (mpg-C3N4), and the selection of the carrier gas (Ar, N2 and NH3) on the resultant crystal phases and structures were investigated. The produced samples were characterized using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, a temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicate that the different tantalum phases with cubic structure, TaN, Ta2CN, and TaC, can be formed under a flow of nitrogen when formed at different temperatures. The Ta3N5 phase with a Ta5+ oxidation state was solely obtained at 1023 K under a flow of ammonia, which gasified the C 3N4 template and was confirmed by detecting the decomposed gaseous products via MS. Significantly, the formation of TaC, Ta2CN, and TaN can be controlled by altering the weight ratio of the C 3N4 template relative to the Ta precursor at 1573 K under a flow of nitrogen. The high C3N4/Ta precursor ratio generally resulted in high carbide content rather than a nitride one, consistent with the role of mpg-C3N4 as a carbon source. Electrochemical measurements revealed that the synthesized nanomaterials were consistently able to produce hydrogen under acidic conditions (pH 1). The obtained Tafel slope indicates that the rate-determining step is the Volmer discharge step, which is consistent with adsorbed hydrogen being weakly bound to the surface during electrocatalysis. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticles on Carbon Nanotubes and Carbon Xerogel: Low-Cost Cathodes for Hydrogen Production by Alkaline Water Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šljukić, Biljana; Santos, Diogo M F; Vujković, Milica; Amaral, Luís; Rocha, Raquel P; Sequeira, César A C; Figueiredo, José L

    2016-05-23

    Low-cost molybdenum carbide (Mo2 C) nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and on carbon xerogel (CXG) were prepared and their activity for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) was evaluated in 8 m KOH aqueous electrolyte at 25-85 °C. Measurements of the HER by linear scan voltammetry allowed us to determine Tafel slopes of 71 and 74 mV dec(-1) at 25 °C for Mo2 C/CNT and Mo2 C/CXG, respectively. Stability tests were also performed, which showed the steady performance of the two electrocatalysts. Moreover, the HER kinetics at Mo2 C/CNT was enhanced significantly after the long-term stability tests. The specific activity of both materials was high, and a higher stability was obtained for the activated Mo2 C/CNT (40 A g(-1) at -0.40 V vs. the reversible hydrogen electrode).

  12. Plasma synthesis of titanium nitride, carbide and carbonitride nanoparticles by means of reactive anodic arc evaporation from solid titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesler, D., E-mail: dennis.kiesler@uni-due.de; Bastuck, T.; Theissmann, R.; Kruis, F. E. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Institute of Technology for Nanostructures (NST) and Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE) (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Plasma methods using the direct evaporation of a transition metal are well suited for the cost-efficient production of ceramic nanoparticles. In this paper, we report on the development of a simple setup for the production of titanium-ceramics by reactive anodic arc evaporation and the characterization of the aerosol as well as the nanopowder. It is the first report on TiC{sub X}N{sub 1 − X} synthesis in a simple anodic arc plasma. By means of extensive variations of the gas composition, it is shown that the composition of the particles can be tuned from titanium nitride over a titanium carbonitride phase (TiC{sub X}N{sub 1 − X}) to titanium carbide as proven by XRD data. The composition of the plasma gas especially a very low concentration of hydrocarbons around 0.2 % of the total plasma gas is crucial to tune the composition and to avoid the formation of free carbon. Examination of the particles by HR-TEM shows that the material consists mostly of cubic single crystalline particles with mean sizes between 8 and 27 nm.

  13. Titanium carbide nanoparticles reinforcing nickel matrix for improving nanohardness and fretting wear properties in wet conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dănăilă, Eliza; Benea, Lidia; Caron, Nadège; Raquet, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    In this study Ni/nano-TiC functional composite coatings were produced by electro-codeposition of TiC nanoparticles (50 nm mean diameter) with nickel on 304L stainless steel support. Coatings were obtained from a Watts classical solution in which TiC nanoparticles were added. The surface morphology, chemical composition, structure, roughness and thickness, were evaluated in relation to the effect of TiC nanoparticles incorporation into Ni matrix. It was found that incorporation of TiC nanoparticles into the nickel matrix produces morphological changes in the deposit and increases the roughness. The fretting wear behavior in wet conditions of the obtained coatings was evaluated on a ball-on-plate configuration. To evaluate the wet fretting wear (tribocorrosion) behavior the open circuit potential was measured before, during and after the fretting tests at room temperature in the solution that simulates the primary water circuit of Pressurized Water Reactors. The results show that Ni/nano-TiC composite coatings exhibited a low friction coefficient, high nanohardness and fretting wear resistance in wet conditions compared with pure Ni coatings.

  14. Cobalt-assisted in situ synthesis of crystalline bismuth nanoparticle arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seok; Noh, Jin-Seo; Suh, Kwang S.

    2014-12-01

    Almost monodisperse, crystalline Bi nanoparticle arrays were synthesized using a newly developed method, magnetically assisted growth of Bi nanoparticles (MAGBINs). The MAGBIN utilizes co-sputtering from Bi and Co targets at an elevated temperature. Crystalline Bi nanoparticles with hexagonal morphology were formed in situ on a Si substrate with a thin surface oxide during this process. The size and density of Bi nanoparticles could be controlled by adjusting the relative powers applied to Bi and Co targets, and they showed opposite trends against the relative powers. Several physical processes such as Co agglomeration, element-selective growth, and Ostwald ripening were proposed to be involved in this Bi nanoparticle growth. The MAGBIN is a facile method to synthesize crystalline Bi nanoparticle arrays, which does not need any chemical agents, complex process, or lithography.

  15. Size-controlled bismuth nanoparticles physically grown by the support of cobalt atomic flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Seok; Noh, Jin-Seo

    2016-04-01

    Bi nanoparticle arrays with the almost monodispersity were synthesized using a magnetically assisted physical method. The average size and the overall morphology of Bi nanoparticles could be controlled by the adjustment of several parameters such as relative powers applied to Bi and Co targets, substrate temperature, and growth time. It was disclosed that Bi nanoparticles grow larger at a higher relative power to Bi, higher substrate temperature, and longer growth time, accompanying the deterioration of well-developed faceted structures. This physical method may provide a facile and fast route to achieving quality Bi nanoparticle arrays with a certain extent of size and morphology controllability.

  16. Optical and magnetic properties of Yb ion-doped cobalt-based ZnO nanoparticles for DMS applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Thangeeswari; M Priya; J Velmurugan; N Padmanathan

    2015-09-01

    Well-crystalline structured ZnO nanoparticles with cobalt (Co) and ytterbium (Yb) multiple ions doping were successfully synthesized by the chemical precipitation technique. The structures, optical and magnetic properties of the samples were analysed with X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV–visible spectroscopy and magnetic measurements, respectively. In the XRD pattern of the pure ZnO and Yb co-doped samples, the formation of highly crystalline phase of pure ZnO was observed even at high Yb concentration. UV–vis spectra show a strong UV absorbance for all the samples with different absorbance maxima. Magnetic characterizations have shown that the sample with 1% Yb co-doped ZnO: Co nanoparticles exhibited a clear ferromagnetic (FM) behaviour at room temperature. The X-ray photoelectron spectral peaks for Yb 4f ions reveal Yb occupation of both Yb3+ as well as Yb2+ states. Hence, it can be confirmed that a clear FM behaviour at room temperature was exhibited by an imbalanced valence state of Yb that strongly interacted with the Co2+. When compared to the Co-doped ZnO, Yb co-doped ZnO exhibits a clear ferromagnetism at room temperature with high coercivity due to the contribution of both 3d and 4f exchange interaction with the host matrix.

  17. Femtosecond pulsed laser ablation of molybdenum carbide: Nanoparticles and thin film characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bonis, A.; Santagata, A.; Sansone, M.; Rau, J. V.; Mori, T.; Teghil, R.

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we have used pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique to ablate a Mo2C target in vacuum by using an ultra-short pulse laser, with a 250 fs pulse duration, carrying out the study of both plasma and film characteristics. The aim of the work is to connect the film structure and morphology to the characteristics of the nanoparticles found in the plasma produced by the target ablation. To analyze the plasma we have used ICCD fast imaging and optical emission spectroscopy while the films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force spectroscopy. The obtained results have been interpreted considering an ablation model which justifies the emission of molten nanoparticles directly from the target.

  18. Titanium carbide@polypyrrole core-shell nanoparticles prepared by controlled heterogeneous nucleation for rechargeable batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yu-Ting; Wu, Nae-Lih

    2013-11-28

    A unique nanostructure consisting of a TiC nanoparticle core and a conformal polypyrrole shell doped with p-toluene sulfonate has been synthesized by a controlled heterogeneous nucleation process. As an electrode material in a Li-ion containing organic electrolyte, the nanocomposite exhibits remarkable high-rate (up to 400 C-rate) charge-discharge capability and cycling stability even at 50 °C.

  19. Studying the effect of Zn-substitution on the magnetic and hyperthermic properties of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, V.; Musinu, A.; Ardu, A.; Ennas, G.; Peddis, D.; Niznansky, D.; Sangregorio, C.; Innocenti, C.; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.; Cannas, C.

    2016-05-01

    The possibility to finely control nanostructured cubic ferrites (MIIFe2O4) paves the way to design materials with the desired magnetic properties for specific applications. However, the strict and complex interrelation among the chemical composition, size, polydispersity, shape and surface coating renders their correlation with the magnetic properties not trivial to predict. In this context, this work aims to discuss the magnetic properties and the heating abilities of Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with different zinc contents (ZnxCo1-xFe2O4 with 0 100 emu g-1). The increase in the zinc content up to x = 0.46 in the structure has resulted in an increase of the saturation magnetisation (Ms) at 5 K. High Ms values have also been revealed at room temperature (~90 emu g-1) for both CoFe2O4 and Zn0.30Co0.70Fe2O4 samples and their heating ability has been tested. Despite a similar saturation magnetisation, the specific absorption rate value for the cobalt ferrite is three times higher than the Zn-substituted one. DC magnetometry results were not sufficient to justify these data, the experimental conditions of SAR and static measurements being quite different. The synergic combination of DC with AC magnetometry and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy represents a powerful tool to get new insights into the design of suitable heat mediators for magnetic fluid hyperthermia.The possibility to finely control nanostructured cubic ferrites (MIIFe2O4) paves the way to design materials with the desired magnetic properties for specific applications. However, the strict and complex interrelation among the chemical composition, size, polydispersity, shape and surface coating renders their correlation with the magnetic properties not trivial to predict. In this context, this work aims to discuss the magnetic properties and the heating abilities of Zn-substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with different zinc contents (ZnxCo1-xFe2O4 with 0 100 emu g-1). The increase in the

  20. Measurements of nanoparticle size distribution produced by laser ablation of tungsten and boron-carbide in N{sub 2} ambient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, Miklos [Department of Optics and Quantum Electronics, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, 6720 Szeged (Hungary) and Department of Materials Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)]. E-mail: bereznai@physx.u-szeged.hu; Heszler, Peter [Department of Engineering Sciences, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Toth, Zsolt [Research Group on Laser Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, University of Szeged, Dom ter 9, 6720 Szeged (Hungary); Wilhelmsson, Ola [Department of Materials Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden); Boman, Mats [Department of Materials Chemistry, Angstroem Laboratory, Uppsala University, PO Box 538, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-04-30

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were produced by ablating tungsten and boron-carbide (B{sub 4}C) target materials in atmospheric pressure nitrogen ambient using ArF excimer laser pulses. The size distributions of the NPs formed during the ablation were monitored-within a 7-133 nm size window-by a condensation particle counter connected to a differential mobility analyzer. The laser repetition rate was varied between 1-50 Hz, and the fluence was systematically changed in the range of 0.5-15 J/cm{sup 2}, for both materials, allowing a comparative study in an extended laser parameter regime. The multishot ablation threshold ({phi} {sub th}) of B{sub 4}C was determined to be {approx}1.9 J/cm{sup 2} for the laser used (ArF excimer, {lambda} = 193 nm). Similarly to earlier studies, it was shown that the size distributions consist of mainly small nanoparticles (<{approx}20 nm) attributed to a non-thermal ablation mechanism below {phi} {sub th}. An additional broad peak appears (between 20 and 40 nm) above {phi} {sub th} as a consequence of the thermally induced macroscopic ablation. Chemical composition of deposited polydisperse nanoparticles was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showing nitrogen incorporation into the boron-carbide.

  1. Chemical nature of catalysts of oxide nanoparticles in environment prevailing during growth of carbon nanostructures by CCVD

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M JANA; A SIL; S RAY

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanostructures (CNS) are often grown using oxide nanoparticles as catalyst in chemical vapour deposition and these oxides are not expected to survive as such during growth. In the present study, the catalysts of cobalt- and nickel oxide-based nanoparticles of sizes varying over a range have been reduced at 575$^{\\circ}$C under environment resulting from the introduction of C$_2$H$_2$ $+$ NH$_3$ during growth of CNS as well as under introductionof C$_2$H$_2$ and NH$_3$ separately. The structure of the reduced nanoparticles is often different from the equilibrium structure of the bulk. Nanoparticles of cobalt oxide with and without doping by copper oxide are reduced to cobalt alloy or cobalt nanoparticles having fcc structure, but the rate of reduction is relatively less in NH$_3$ environment. However, reduced nickel oxide nanoparticles with and without doping shows a mix of fcc and hcp phases. The presence of hydrogen and nitrogen in the environment appears to discourage the formation of hcp nickel as inferred from the results in NH$_3$ environment. Cobalt carbide forms when the 10 wt.% or less doped cobalt oxide is reduced in C$_2$H$_2$ $+$ NH$_3$ environment. At higher level of doping of 20 wt.%, separate metallic phase of copper appears andcarbide formation gets suppressed.

  2. Oxide or carbide nanoparticles synthesized by laser ablation of a bulk Hf target in liquids and their structural, optical, and dielectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaltianos, N. G.; Friedt, J.-M.; Chassagnon, R.; Moutarlier, V.; Blondeau-Patissier, V.; Combe, G.; Assoul, M.; Monteil, G.

    2016-05-01

    Laser ablation of a bulk Hf target in deionized (DI) water, ethanol, or toluene was carried out for the production of nanoparticles' colloidal solutions. Due to the interaction of the ablation plasma plume species with the species which are produced by the liquid decomposition at the plume-liquid interface, hafnia (HfO2) nanoparticles are synthesized in DI water, hafnium carbide (HfC) nanoparticles in toluene, and a mixture of these in ethanol. The hafnia nanoparticles are in the monoclinic low temperature phase and in the tetragonal and fcc high temperature phases. Their size distribution follows log-normal function with a median diameter in the range of 4.3-5.3 nm. Nanoparticles synthesized in DI water have band gaps of 5.6 and 5.4 eV, in ethanol 5.72 and 5.65 eV (using low and high pulse energy), and in toluene 3 eV. The values for the relative permittivity in the range of 7.74-8.90 were measured for hafnia nanoparticles' thin films deposited on substrates by drop-casting (self-assembled layers) in parallel plate capacitor structures.

  3. Impact of Hydrogenolysis on the Selectivity of the Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis: Diesel Fuel Production over Mesoporous Zeolite-Y-Supported Cobalt Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Xiaobo; Cheng, Kang; Kang, Jincan; Gu, Bang; Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Ye

    2015-04-07

    Selectivity control is a challenging goal in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis. Hydrogenolysis is known to occur during FT synthesis, but its impact on product selectivity has been overlooked. Demonstrated herein is that effective control of hydrogenolysis by using mesoporous zeolite Y-supported cobalt nanoparticles can enhance the diesel fuel selectivity while keeping methane selectivity low. The sizes of the cobalt particles and mesopores are key factors which determine the selectivity both in FT synthesis and in hydrogenolysis of n-hexadecane, a model compound of heavier hydrocarbons. The diesel fuel selectivity in FT synthesis can reach 60 % with a CH4 selectivity of 5 % over a Na-type mesoporous Y-supported cobalt catalyst with medium mean sizes of 8.4 nm (Co particles) and 15 nm (mesopores). These findings offer a new strategy to tune the product selectivity and possible interpretations of the effect of cobalt particle size and the effect of support pore size in FT synthesis.

  4. Design of Cobalt Nanoparticles with Tailored Structural and Morphological Properties via O/W and W/O Microemulsions and Their Deposition onto Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Di Carlo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt nanostructures with different size and morphology, i.e., spherical nanoparticles, nanorods, and particles arranged into elongated structures, were prepared using micelles and microemulsions as confined reaction media. The syntheses were carried out using three types of systems: aqueous surfactant solutions, oil-in water (O/W, and water-in-oil (W/O microemulsions. The influence of the surfactant and the precipitating agent used for synthesis was also investigated. For this purpose, cobalt nanostructures were prepared using different non-ionic surfactants, namely Synperonic® 10/6, Pluronic® P123 and a mixture of SPAN 20–TWEEN 80. Three different precipitating agents were used: sodium borohydride, sodium hydroxide, and oxalic acid. Our findings revealed that by changing the type of reaction media as well as the precipitating agent it is possible to modify the shape and size of the cobalt nanostructures. Moreover, the use of O/W microemulsion generates better results in terms of colloidal stability and uniformity of particle size with respect to W/O microemulsion. The different cobalt nanostructures were supported on commercial and mesoporous silica; transmission electron microscopy (TEM images showed that after deposition the Co nanocrystals remain well dispersed on the silica supports. This behavior suggests their great potential in catalytic applications.

  5. Comparison of the Structural Configuration of Cobalt Nanoparticles on Titania and Titania Nanotube Supports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Muzenda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two cobalt based catalyst samples were prepared on titania and titania nanotubes supports using the deposition precipitation method. Their structural configurations were characterized and compared using BET, and TRP analyses. The BET analysis showed that the surface area of TiO2 is much higher than that of TNT which was due to their structural differences. Analyses of the results obtained revealed that the surface area of the 10 % Co/TNT catalyst sample is higher than that of the 10 % Co/TiO2. The TPR analysis showed that it is much easier to reduce 10 % Co/TiO2, than 10 % Co/TNT. This is attributed to be due to the fact that the cobalt particles were adsorbed on the surface of the TiO2, and formed covalent bonds with TNT. Therefore reduction temperature was higher with TNT than TiO2. The investigation of structural changes of these catalysts when they were coated with carbon, using chemical vapour deposition method was also conducted. The catalyst prepared on TNT support showed better properties in terms of average pore diameter, pore volume and surface area than the catalyst sample prepared on TiO2 support when the two samples were exposed to carbon environment for the same period of time. In this study, two cobalt based catalyst samples were prepared on titania and titania nanotubes supports using the deposition precipitation method. Their structural configurations were characterized and compared using BET, and TRP analyses. The BET analysis showed that the surface area of TiO2 is much higher than that of TNT which was due to their structural differences. Analyses of the results obtained revealed that the surface area of the 10 % Co/TNT catalyst sample is higher than that of the 10 % Co/TiO2. The TPR analysis showed that it is much easier to reduce 10 % Co/TiO2, than 10 % Co/TNT. This is attributed to be due to the fact that the cobalt particles were adsorbed on the surface of the TiO2, and formed covalent bonds

  6. Part I. Cobalt thiolate complexes modeling the active site of cobalt nitrile hydratase. Part II. Formation of inorganic nanoparticles on protein scaffolding in Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Irene Yuk Man

    Part I. A series of novel cobalt dithiolate complexes with mixed imine/amine ligand systems is presented here as electronic and structural models for the active site in the bacterial enzyme class, nitrile hydratase (NHase). Pentadentate cobalt(II) complexes with S2N 3 ligand environments are first studied as precursors to the more relevant cobalt(III) complexes. Adjustment of the backbone length by removal of a methylene group increases the reactivity of the system; whereas reduction of the two backbone imine bonds to allow free rotation about those bonds may decrease reactivity. Reactivity change due to the replacement of the backbone amine proton with a more sterically challenging methyl group is not yet clear. Upon oxidation, the monocationic pentadentate cobalt(III) complex, 1b, shows promising reactivity similar to that of NHase. The metal's open coordination site allows reversible binding of the endogenous, monoanionic ligands, N 3- and NCS-. Oxygenation of the thiolate sulfur atoms by exposure to O2 and H2O 2 produces sulfenate and sulfinate ligands in complex 8, which resembles the crystal structure of "deactivated" Fe NHase. However, its lack of reactivity argues against the oxygenated enzyme structure as the active form. Six-coordinate cobalt(III) complexes with S2N4 amine/amine ligand systems are also presented as analogues of previously reported iron(III) compounds, which mimic the spectroscopic properties of Fe NHase. The cobalt complexes do not seem to similarly model Co NHase. However, the S = 0 cobalt(III) center can be spectroscopically silent and difficult to detect, making comparison with synthetic models using common techniques hard. Part II. Dodecameric Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase mutant, E165C, stacks along its six-fold axis to produce tubular nanostructures in the presence of some divalent metal ions, as does the wild type enzyme. The centrally located, engineered Cys-165 residues appear to bind to various species and may serve as

  7. Catalytic Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane by Cobalt Nickel Nanoparticles Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Well dispersed magnetically recyclable bimetallic CoNi nanoparticles (NPs supported on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO were synthesized by one-step in situ coreduction of aqueous solution of cobalt(II chloride, nickel (II chloride, and graphite oxide (GO with ammonia borane (AB as the reducing agent under ambient condition. The CoNi/RGO NPs exhibits excellent catalytic activity with a total turnover frequency (TOF value of 19.54 mol H2 mol catalyst−1 min−1 and a low activation energy value of 39.89 kJ mol−1 at room temperature. Additionally, the RGO supported CoNi NPs exhibit much higher catalytic activity than the monometallic and RGO-free CoNi counterparts. Moreover, the as-prepared catalysts exert satisfying durable stability and magnetically recyclability for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB, which make the practical reusing application of the catalysts more convenient. The usage of the low-cost, easy-getting catalyst to realize the production of hydrogen under mild condition gives more confidence for the application of ammonia borane as a hydrogen storage material. Hence, this general method indicates that AB can be used as both a potential hydrogen storage material and an efficient reducing agent, and can be easily extended to facile preparation of other RGO-based metallic systems.

  8. Oxidative and pro-inflammatory effects of cobalt and titanium oxide nanoparticles on aortic and venous endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinovi, Rossella; Goldoni, Matteo; Pinelli, Silvana; Campanini, Marco; Aliatis, Irene; Bersani, Danilo; Lottici, Pier Paolo; Iavicoli, Sergio; Petyx, Marta; Mozzoni, Paola; Mutti, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-fine particles have recently been included among the risk factors for the development of endothelium inflammation and atherosclerosis, and cobalt (CoNPs) and titanium oxide nanoparticles (TiNPs) have attracted attention because of their wide range of applications. We investigated their toxicity profiles in two primary endothelial cell lines derived from human aorta (HAECs) and human umbilical vein (HUVECs) by comparing cell viability, oxidative stress, the expression of adhesion molecules and the release of chemokines during NP exposure. Both NPs were very rapidly internalised, and significantly increased adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, VCAM-1, E-selectin) mRNA and protein levels and the release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and interleukin 8 (IL-8). However, unlike the TiNPs, the CoNPs also induced time- and concentration-dependent metabolic impairment and oxidative stress without any evident signs of cell death or the induction of apoptosis. There were differences between the HAECs and HUVECs in terms of the extent of oxidative stress-related enzyme and vascular adhesion molecule expression, ROS production, and pro-inflammatory cytokine release despite the similar rate of NP internalisation, thus indicating endothelium heterogeneity in response to exogenous stimuli. Our data indicate that NPs can induce endothelial inflammatory responses via various pathways not involving only oxidative stress.

  9. Amperometric detection of acetaminophen by an electrochemical sensor based on cobalt oxide nanoparticles in a flow injection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razmi, Habib, E-mail: h.razmi@azaruniv.ed [Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan University of Tarbiat Moallem, P.O. Box 53714-161, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Habibi, Esmaeil [Electrochemistry Research Laboratory, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan University of Tarbiat Moallem, P.O. Box 53714-161, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports the use of a carbon ceramic electrode as a highly-porous substrate for the electrochemical formation of cobalt oxide nanoparticles. The electrocatalyst was characterized by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and cyclic voltammetry techniques, and it was used in a homemade flow injection analysis (FIA) system for acetaminophen determination using 0.1 M KOH as the carrier solution. The rate constant (k{sub s}) and charge transfer coefficient ({alpha}) were calculated for the electron exchange reaction of the modified film. The kinetic parameters and the mechanism of acetaminophen electrooxidation at the electrode surface were studied by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The effects of working potential and flow rate on the performance of the FIA system were studied. Under optimized conditions, the electrode response due to the electrocatalytic oxidation of acetaminophen at 450 mV (vs. SCE) is proportional to the concentration of acetaminophen over a 5-35 {mu}M range with an associated detection limit (S/N = 3) of 0.37 {mu}M and a sensitivity of 0.0296 {mu}A/{mu}M. The relative standard deviation (RSD) was 1.6% for eight replicate measurements. The modified electrode was used to determine the acetaminophen content in tablet samples.

  10. Formation of silicon carbide and diamond nanoparticles in the surface layer of a silicon target during short-pulse carbon ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remnev, G. E.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Naiden, E. P.; Saltymakov, M. S.; Stepanov, A. V.; Shtan'ko, V. F.

    2009-04-01

    Synthesis of silicon carbide and diamond nanoparticles is studied during short-pulse implantation of carbon ions and protons into a silicon target. The experiments are carried out using a TEMP source of pulsed powerful ion beams based on a magnetically insulated diode with radial magnetic field B r . The beam parameters are as follows: the ion energy is 300 keV, the pulse duration is 80 ns, the beam consists of carbon ions and protons, and the ion current density is 30 A/cm2. Single-crystal silicon wafers serve as a target. SiC nanoparticles and nanodiamonds form in the surface layer of silicon subjected to more than 100 pulses. The average coherent domain sizes in the SiC particles and nanodiamonds are 12-16 and 8-9 nm, respectively.

  11. Synthesis and controllable oxidation of monodisperse cobalt-doped wüstite nanoparticles and their core-shell stability and exchange-bias stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Kamali, Saeed; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2015-09-14

    Cobalt-doped wüstite (CWT), Co0.33Fe0.67O, nanoparticles were prepared via the thermal decomposition of CoFe2-oleate complexes in organic solvents. A controllable oxidation process was then performed to obtain Co0.33Fe0.67O/CoFe2O4 core-shell structures with different core-to-shell volume ratios and exchange bias properties. The oxidized core-shell samples with a ∼4 nm CoFe2O4 shell showed good resistance to oxygen transmission. Thus, it is inferred that the cobalt ferrite shell provides a better oxidation barrier performance than magnetite in the un-doped case. The hysteresis loops of the oxidized 19 nm samples exhibited a high exchange bias field (H(E)), an enhanced coercivity field (H(C)), and a pronounced vertical shift, thus indicating the presence of a strong exchange bias coupling effect. More importantly, the onset temperature of H(E) was found to be higher than 200 K, which suggests that cobalt doping increases the Néel temperature (T(N)) of the CWT core. In general, the results show that the homogeneous dispersion of Co in iron precursors improves the stability of the final CWT nanoparticles. Moreover, the CoFe2O4 shells formed following oxidation increase the oxidation resistance of the CWT cores and enhance their anisotropy energy.

  12. Cobalt- and iron-based nanoparticles hosted in SBA-15 mesoporous silica and activated carbon from biomass: Effect of modification procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoncheva, Tanya; Genova, Izabela; Paneva, Daniela; Dimitrov, Momtchil; Tsyntsarski, Boyko; Velinov, Nicolay; Ivanova, Radostina; Issa, Gloria; Kovacheva, Daniela; Budinova, Temenujka; Mitov, Ivan; Petrov, Narzislav

    2015-10-01

    Ordered mesoporous silica of SBA-15 type and activated carbon, prepared from waste biomass (peach stones), are used as host matrix of nanosized iron and cobalt particles. The effect of preparation procedure on the state of loaded nanoparticles is in the focus of investigation. The obtained materials are characterized by Boehm method, low temperature physisorption of nitrogen, XRD, UV-Vis, FTIR, Mossbauer spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen. The catalytic behaviour of the samples is tested in methanol decomposition. The dispersion, oxidative state and catalytic behaviour of loaded cobalt and iron nanoparticles are successfully tuned both by the nature of porous support and the metal precursor used during the samples preparation. Facile effect of active phase deposition from aqueous solution of nitrate precursors is assumed for activated carbon support. For the silica based materials the catalytic activity could be significantly improved when cobalt acetylacetonate is used during the modification. The complex effect of pore topology and surface functionality of different supports on the active phase formation is discussed.

  13. A look inside epitaxial cobalt-on-fluorite nanoparticles with three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping using GIXD, RHEED and GISAXS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suturin, S M; Fedorov, V V; Korovin, A M; Valkovskiy, G A; Konnikov, S G; Tabuchi, M; Sokolov, N S

    2013-08-01

    In this work epitaxial growth of cobalt on CaF2(111), (110) and (001) surfaces has been extensively studied. It has been shown by atomic force microscopy that at selected growth conditions stand-alone faceted Co nanoparticles are formed on a fluorite surface. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) studies have revealed that the particles crystallize in the face-centered cubic lattice structure otherwise non-achievable in bulk cobalt under normal conditions. The particles were found to inherit lattice orientation from the underlying CaF2 layer. Three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping carried out using X-ray and electron diffraction has revealed that there exist long bright 〈111〉 streaks passing through the cobalt Bragg reflections. These streaks are attributed to stacking faults formed in the crystal lattice of larger islands upon coalescence of independently nucleated smaller islands. Distinguished from the stacking fault streaks, crystal truncation rods perpendicular to the {111} and {001} particle facets have been observed. Finally, grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) has been applied to decouple the shape-related scattering from that induced by the crystal lattice defects. Particle faceting has been verified by modeling the GISAXS patterns. The work demonstrates the importance of three-dimensional reciprocal space mapping in the study of epitaxial nanoparticles.

  14. Cobalt iron-oxide nanoparticle modified poly(methyl methacrylate) nanodielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuncer, Enis [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Woodward, Jonathan [ORNL; Sauers, Isidor [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report the dielectric properties of composite systems (nanodielectrics) made of small amounts of mono dispersed magnetic nanoparticles embedded in a polymer matrix. It is observed from the transmission electron microscope images that the matrix polymeric material is confined in approximately $100\\ \

  15. Reversal of Flux Closure States in Cobalt Nanoparticle Rings With Coaxial Magnetic Pulses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasama, T; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Scheinfein, MR

    2008-01-01

    Bistable flux closure (FC) states in Co nanoparticle rings can be switched reversibly by applying a coaxial magnetic field (H-z). The FC switching phenomena can be reproduced by micromagnetics simulations, which also reveal novel magnetic states at intermediate applied field strengths....

  16. Enhanced electrical properties in Nd doped cobalt ferrite nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, S.; Munir, A.; Zahra, F.; Rehman, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Spinel ferrites are important class of compounds which has variety of electrical, magnetic and catalytic applications. A small amount of rare earth element causes modification in structural, electrical and magnetic properties of ferrite materials for practical applications. Neodymium doped cobalt ferrites with composition CoNdxFe2-xO4 where x is 0.1 has been synthesized by sol-gel method. Sol-gel method was preferred because it has good control over stoichiometry, crystallite size and particle size distribution. Characterization was done by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) technique for structural analysis and crystal structure was found to be spinel. Particles like morphology was observed in micrographs obtained by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Thermal analysis of sample has been done which includes Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR) of samples was also performed. DC resistivity as a function of temperature has been studied and its shows direct dependence on temperature and inverse dependence on the concentration of Nd dopant. The studied material is a potential candidate for resistive random access memory application.

  17. Preparation of Magnesium, Cobalt and Nickel Ferrite Nanoparticles from Metal Oxides using Deep Eutectic Solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söldner, Anika; Zach, Julia; Iwanow, Melanie; Gärtner, Tobias; Schlosser, Marc; Pfitzner, Arno; König, Burkhard

    2016-09-05

    Natural deep eutectic solvents (DESs) dissolve simple metal oxides and are used as a reaction medium to synthesize spinel-type ferrite nanoparticles MFe2 O4 (M=Mg, Zn, Co, Ni). The best results for phase-pure spinel ferrites are obtained with the DES consisting of choline chloride (ChCl) and maleic acid. By employing DESs, the reactions proceed at much lower temperatures than usual for the respective solid-phase reactions of the metal oxides and at the same temperatures as synthesis with comparable calcination processes using metal salts. The method therefore reduces the overall required energy for the nanoparticle synthesis. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that the thermolysis process of the eutectic melts in air occurs in one major step. The phase-pure spinel-type ferrite particles are thoroughly characterized by X-ray diffraction, diffuse-reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The properties of the obtained nanoparticles are shown to be comparable to those obtained by other methods, illustrating the potential of natural DESs for processing metal oxides.

  18. LSM-YSZ cathode with infiltrated cobalt oxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, R.; Murata, K.; Hirano, A.; Takeda, Y.; Yamamoto, O. [Department of Chemistry, Mie University, Tsu (Japan); Yamahara, K. [Mitsubihsi Chemical Corporation, Shiba, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Imanishi, N.

    2009-06-15

    To improve the La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) -8 mol-%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) cathode performance of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles were infiltrated into the cathode. Co-infiltration of these oxide particles drastically enhanced the cell performance between 800 and 600 C. The infiltrated CeO{sub 2} suppressed the aggregation of nanoparticle Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}, resulting in the high catalytic activity of the nanoparticle Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} for oxygen reduction at intermediate temperatures. The anode-supported SOFC with Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and CeO{sub 2} co-infiltrated LSM-YSZ cathode at 700 C showed the high specific power density of 0.58 W cm{sup -2} at 0.7 V. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  19. Synthesis of IV-VI Transition Metal Carbide and Nitride Nanoparticles Using a Reactive Mesoporous Template for Electrochemical Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-01-01

    Interstitial carbides and nitrides of early transition metals in Groups IV-VI exhibit platinum-like behavior which makes them a promising candidate to replace noble metals in a wide variety of reactions. Most synthetic methods used to prepare these materials lead to bulk or micron size powder which limits their use in reactions in particular in catalytic applications. Attempts toward the production of transition metal carbide and nitride nanoparticles in a sustainable, simple and cheap manner have been rapidly increasing. In this thesis, a new approach was presented to prepare nano-scale transition metal carbides and nitrides of group IV-VI with a size as small as 3 nm through the reaction of transition metal precursor with mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4) that not only provides confined spaces for nanoparticles formation but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature-programmed reaction with mass spectroscopy (MS), CHN elemental analyses, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of the reaction temperature, the ratio of the transition metal precursor to the reactive template (mpg-C3N4), and the selection of the carrier gas (Ar, N2, and NH3) on the resultant crystal phases and structures were investigated. The results indicated that different tantalum phases with cubic structure, TaN, Ta2CN, and TaC, can be formed under a flow of nitrogen by changing the reaction temperatures. Two forms of tantalum nitride, namely TaN and Ta3N5, were selectively formed under N2 and NH3 flow, respectively. Significantly, the formation of TaC, Ta2CN, and TaN can be controlled by altering the weight ratio of the C3N4 template relative to the Ta precursor at 1573 K under a flow of nitrogen where high C3N4/Ta precursor ratio generally resulted in high carbide

  20. PYROLYTIC CARBIDE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    and injector design changes were made to improve the quality of the carbide produced. Niobium carbide and tantalum carbide coated nozzles are described...Additional data for pyrolytic niobium carbide and hafnium carbide is also presented. (Author)

  1. Calixarene-stabilised cobalt nanoparticle rings: Self-assembly and collective magnetic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, A; Tripp, SL; Liu, J

    2009-01-01

    ) and entropic loss, analogous to the thermodynamic balance of forces governing supramolecular self-assembly. Examination of the Co nanoparticle rings by electron holography (an electron microscopy technique for imaging in-plane magnetic induction) reveals the existence of chiral flux closure (FC) domains...... at room temperature, comprising a 'racemic' mixture of clockwise and anticlockwise states. Furthermore, these FC polarisations can be reversed by applying out-of-plane magnetic pulses (Hz) in alternating directions. This switching behaviour has no known analogy at the macroscopic level, and may represent...

  2. Synthesis and characterization of cobalt and nickel ferrites containing nanoparticles dispersed in silicon; Sintese e carcacterizacao de ferritas de cobalto e niquel contendo nanoparticulas dispersas em oxido de silicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, T.P.; Sales, B.M.C.; Pinheiro, A.N.; Sousa, A.F. de; Valentini, A., E-mail: tiagoufc2003@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Analitica e Fisico-Quimica. Lab. de Adsorcao e Catalise; Herrera, W.T.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas em Fisica (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Experimental

    2010-07-01

    Cobalt and nickel ferrites containing nanoparticles dispersed in silicon oxides were prepared via polymeric precursor method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XDR), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS) and N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption isotherms (BET). The analysis results of FTIR, XRD and MS revealed the presence of nickel and cobalt ferrite besides the existence of {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Additionally, Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements at 300 K show that nanoparticles are in the superparamagnetic regime being blocked at 4.2 K. Furthermore, all the solids showed by nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms profiles characteristic of mesoporous materials. (author)

  3. Electrochemical biosensors utilizing the electron transfer of hemoglobin immobilized on cobalt-substituted ferrite nanoparticles-chitosan film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Weiying; Zhou Xia; Zheng Na [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Graduate University, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquan Road 19A, Beijing 100049 (China); Li Xiangjun, E-mail: lixiangj@gucas.ac.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Graduate University, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquan Road 19A, Beijing 100049 (China); Yuan Zhuobin [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Graduate University, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yuquan Road 19A, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2011-07-30

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4}) and chitosan (CS) film were used to immobilize/adsorb hemoglobin (Hb) to create a protein electrode to study the direct electron transfer between the redox centers of the proteins and the electrode. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4} particles were nanoscale in size and formed an ordered layered structure. The native structure of the immobilized Hb was preserved as indicated by Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy. The Hb-Co{sub x}Fe{sub 3-x}O{sub 4}-CS modified electrode showed a pair of well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammetric peaks at -0.373 V (vs. SCE) and exhibited appreciable electrocatalytic activity for the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The catalysis currents increased linearly with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration in a wide range of 5.0 x 10{sup -8} to 1.0 x 10{sup -3} mol L{sup -1} with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1} (S/N = 3) and had long-term stability. Finally, the proposed method was applied to investigate the coexistence of hydrogen peroxide with the interfering substances. Experimental results showed that the ascorbic acid, glucose, L-cysteine, uric acid, and dopamine at corresponding concentrations did not influence the detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  4. Ultradispersed Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Assembled in Graphene Aerogel for Continuous Photo-Fenton Reaction and Enhanced Lithium Storage Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bocheng; Deng, Yuanxin; Du, Mengmeng; Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-07-04

    The Photo-Fenton reaction is an advanced technology to eliminate organic pollutants in environmental chemistry. Moreover, the conversion rate of Fe(3+)/Fe(2+) and utilization rate of H2O2 are significant factors in Photo-Fenton reaction. In this work, we reported three dimensional (3D) hierarchical cobalt ferrite/graphene aerogels (CoFe2O4/GAs) composites by the in situ growing CoFe2O4 crystal seeds on the graphene oxide (GO) followed by the hydrothermal process. The resulting CoFe2O4/GAs composites demonstrated 3D hierarchical pore structure with mesopores (14~18 nm), macropores (50~125 nm), and a remarkable surface area (177.8 m(2 )g(-1)). These properties endowed this hybrid with the high and recyclable Photo-Fenton activity for methyl orange pollutant degradation. More importantly, the CoFe2O4/GAs composites can keep high Photo-Fenton activity in a wide pH. Besides, the CoFe2O4/GAs composites also exhibited excellent cyclic performance and good rate capability. The 3D framework can not only effectively prevent the volume expansion and aggregation of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles during the charge/discharge processes for Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), but also shorten lithium ions and electron diffusion length in 3D pathways. These results indicated a broaden application prospect of 3D-graphene based hybrids in wastewater treatment and energy storage.

  5. Long-term exposures to low doses of cobalt nanoparticles induce cell transformation enhanced by oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annangi, Balasubramanyam; Bach, Jordi; Vales, Gerard; Rubio, Laura; Marcos, Ricard; Hernández, Alba

    2015-03-01

    A weak aspect of the in vitro studies devoted to get information on the toxic, genotoxic and carcinogenic properties of nanomaterials is that they are usually conducted under acute-exposure and high-dose conditions. This makes difficult to extrapolate the results to human beings. To overcome this point, we have evaluated the cell transforming ability of cobalt nanoparticles (CoNPs) after long-term exposures (12 weeks) to sub-toxic doses (0.05 and 0.1 µg/mL). To get further information on whether CoNPs-induced oxidative DNA damage is relevant for CoNPs carcinogenesis, the cell lines selected for the study were the wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF Ogg1(+/+)) and its isogenic Ogg1 knockout partner (MEF Ogg1(-)(/)(-)), unable to properly eliminate the 8-OH-dG lesions from DNA. Our initial short-term exposure experiments demonstrate that low doses of CoNPs are able to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that MEF Ogg1(-)(/)(-) cells are more sensitive to CoNPs-induced acute toxicity and oxidative DNA damage. On the other hand, long-term exposures of MEF cells to sub-toxic doses of CoNPs were able to induce cell transformation, as indicated by the observed morphological cell changes, significant increases in the secretion of metalloproteinases (MMPs) and anchorage-independent cell growth ability, all cancer-like phenotypic hallmarks. Interestingly, such changes were significantly dependent on the cell line used, the Ogg1(-)(/)(-) cells being particularly sensitive. Altogether, the data presented here confirms the potential carcinogenic risk of CoNPs and points out the relevance of ROS and Ogg1 genetic background on CoNPs-associated effects.

  6. Ultradispersed Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles Assembled in Graphene Aerogel for Continuous Photo-Fenton Reaction and Enhanced Lithium Storage Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Bocheng; Deng, Yuanxin; Du, Mengmeng; Xing, Mingyang; Zhang, Jinlong

    2016-07-01

    The Photo-Fenton reaction is an advanced technology to eliminate organic pollutants in environmental chemistry. Moreover, the conversion rate of Fe3+/Fe2+ and utilization rate of H2O2 are significant factors in Photo-Fenton reaction. In this work, we reported three dimensional (3D) hierarchical cobalt ferrite/graphene aerogels (CoFe2O4/GAs) composites by the in situ growing CoFe2O4 crystal seeds on the graphene oxide (GO) followed by the hydrothermal process. The resulting CoFe2O4/GAs composites demonstrated 3D hierarchical pore structure with mesopores (14~18 nm), macropores (50~125 nm), and a remarkable surface area (177.8 m2 g‑1). These properties endowed this hybrid with the high and recyclable Photo-Fenton activity for methyl orange pollutant degradation. More importantly, the CoFe2O4/GAs composites can keep high Photo-Fenton activity in a wide pH. Besides, the CoFe2O4/GAs composites also exhibited excellent cyclic performance and good rate capability. The 3D framework can not only effectively prevent the volume expansion and aggregation of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles during the charge/discharge processes for Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs), but also shorten lithium ions and electron diffusion length in 3D pathways. These results indicated a broaden application prospect of 3D-graphene based hybrids in wastewater treatment and energy storage.

  7. Synthesis and characterizations of Ni{sup 2+} substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashim, Mohd., E-mail: md.hashim09@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Alimuddin [Department of Applied Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Kumar, Shalendra [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Shirsath, Sagar E. [Spin Device Technology Center, Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Kotnala, R.K.; Shah, Jyoti [National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K.S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kumar, Ravi [Centre for Material Science Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Hamirpur 177005, HP (India)

    2013-05-15

    Nanocrystalline Co–Ni ferrites bearing chemical formula Co{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2−x}Ni{sub 0.5+1.0x}O{sub 4} for x ranging from 0.0 to 0.4 with the step increment of 0.1 were successfully synthesized by sol gel auto-combustion method. The energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) results give relevant information for the homogenous mixing of the Co, Fe, and Ni atoms as expected from the synthesis. The phase identification of the materials by XRD reveals single phase with cubic symmetry. The presence of functional group was identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies. The dielectric parameters such as dielectric constant ((ε′), dielectric loss (ε″) and dielectric loss tangent (tan δ) have been studied at room temperature in the frequency range 42 Hz−5MHz and is explained in the light of interfacial polarization, arising from the heterogeneous nature of ferrite structure. The decrease in DC resistivity with increasing Ni concentration is attributed to the Verwey mechanism between Fe{sup 2+} ↔ Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+} ↔ Co{sup 3+} and Ni{sup 2+} ↔ Ni{sup 3+}. Ni-doped nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite samples exhibit a very large value for dielectric constant of the order of 10{sup 13}. Complex impedance analysis has been used to separate grain and grain boundary in the studied samples. It is observed that saturation magnetization (Ms) decreases with increase in nickel contents which is attributed to the substitution of magnetic Fe{sup 3+} ions of 5 μ{sub B} by less magnetic Ni{sup 2+} ions of 2 μ{sub B}. The analysis of the Mössbauer spectra shows the hyperfine field, relative % area and isomer shift decreases whereas quadruple splitting and line width increases at A- and B-sites on increasing the substitution of Ni{sup 2+} ions. - Highlights: ► Crystallite size decreases with increasing Ni{sup 2+} substitution. ► IR spectra reveal the bands corresponding to spinel structure. ► Resistivity increases initially followed by decreasing

  8. Development of Nile red-functionalized magnetic silica nanoparticles for cobalt ion sensing and entrapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Tao; Lv, Yanlin; Liu, Heng; Lv, Yi; Tian, Zhiyuan, E-mail: zytian@ucas.ac.cn [University of Chinese Academy of Sciences (UCAS), School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2013-09-15

    A new type of hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) with combined magnetic and fluorescent properties in single particle was developed by incorporating magnetic silica NPs with highly fluorescent Nile red dyes. These NPs clearly exhibit Co{sup 2+} ion entrapping ability in aqueous milieu and Co{sup 2+}-induced fluorescence enhancement features with high selectivity owing to the Co{sup 2+}-triggered inhibition on the photoinduced electron transfer progress in the efficient fluorophore (Nile red derivative). Moreover, these dual-functional NPs display superparamagnetic features and the motion of these fluorescent NPs can be induced by the application of an external magnetic field, enabling a facile separation/removal of toxic Co{sup 2+} ion from the aqueous milieu and real-time monitoring via fluorescence measurements.

  9. Ligand-induced evolution of intrinsic fluorescence and catalytic activity from cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Monalisa; Kundu, Anirban; Rakshit, Rupali; Mandal, Kalyan

    2015-06-08

    To develop CoFe(2)O(4) as magneto-fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for biomedical applications, it would be advantageous to identify any intrinsic fluorescence of this important magnetic material by simply adjusting the surface chemistry of the NPs themselves. Herein, we demonstrate that intrinsic multicolor fluorescence, covering the whole visible region, can be induced by facile functionalization of CoFe(2)O(4) NPs with Na-tartrate. Moreover, the functionalized CoFe(2)O(4) NPs also show unprecedented catalytic efficiency in the degradation of both biologically and environmentally harmful dyes, pioneering the potential application of these NPs in therapeutics and wastewater treatment. Detailed investigation through various spectroscopic tools unveils the story behind the emergence of this unique optical property of CoFe(2)O(4) NPs upon functionalization with tartrate ligands. We believe our developed multifunctional CoFe(2)O(4) NPs hold great promise for advanced biomedical and technological applications.

  10. 核壳型钴碳纳米颗粒的微波法制备%Preparation of Core -shell Carbon/Cobalt Nanoparticles by Microwave Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    燕翔; 高进

    2012-01-01

    以硝酸钴为钴源,葡萄糖为碳源,乙二醇做溶剂,水合肼做还原剂,使用微波加热的方法两步合成核壳结构的纳米颗粒。用X-射线衍射仪(XRD)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)、透射电子显微镜(TEM)对产物进行表征。结果表明:产物为核壳结构的球形碳包钴纳米颗粒,尺寸分布在300-500 nm,晶化程度较高。%Corc -shell nanometer materials were synthesized via microwave heating two -step synthesis method with nitric acid cobalt for cobalt source, glucose for carbon sources, glycol for solvent and hydrazine hydrate for rcductant. The morphologies and structures of the products were characterized by X- ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and trans- mission electron microscopy (TEM). The results show that the product is the core - shell structure of spherical cobalt in carbon nanoparticles, size distribution in the 300 -500 nm, the obtained samples have a high crystallization degree.

  11. Synthesis of magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with controlled morphology, monodispersity and composition: the influence of solvent, surfactant, reductant and synthetic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Le T.; Dung, Ngo T.; Tung, Le D.; Thanh, Cao T.; Quy, Ong K.; Chuc, Nguyen V.; Maenosono, Shinya; Thanh, Nguyen T. K.

    2015-11-01

    In our present work, magnetic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesised by thermal decomposition of Fe(iii) and Co(ii) acetylacetonate compounds in organic solvents in the presence of oleic acid (OA)/ oleylamine (OLA) as surfactants and 1,2-hexadecanediol (HDD) or octadecanol (OCD-ol) as an accelerating agent. As a result, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles of different shapes were tightly controlled in size (range of 4-30 nm) and monodispersity (standard deviation only at ca. 5%). Experimental parameters, such as reaction time, temperature, surfactant concentration, solvent, precursor ratio, and accelerating agent, in particular, the role of HDD, OCD-ol, and OA/OLA have been intensively investigated in detail to discover the best conditions for the synthesis of the above magnetic nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles have been successfully applied for producing oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and they have potential to be used in biomedical applications.In our present work, magnetic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesised by thermal decomposition of Fe(iii) and Co(ii) acetylacetonate compounds in organic solvents in the presence of oleic acid (OA)/ oleylamine (OLA) as surfactants and 1,2-hexadecanediol (HDD) or octadecanol (OCD-ol) as an accelerating agent. As a result, CoFe2O4 nanoparticles of different shapes were tightly controlled in size (range of 4-30 nm) and monodispersity (standard deviation only at ca. 5%). Experimental parameters, such as reaction time, temperature, surfactant concentration, solvent, precursor ratio, and accelerating agent, in particular, the role of HDD, OCD-ol, and OA/OLA have been intensively investigated in detail to discover the best conditions for the synthesis of the above magnetic nanoparticles. The obtained nanoparticles have been successfully applied for producing oriented carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and they have potential to be used in biomedical applications. Electronic

  12. Synthesis and controllable oxidation of monodisperse cobalt-doped wüstite nanoparticles and their core-shell stability and exchange-bias stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Kamali, Saeed; Wang, Sue-Lein

    2015-08-01

    Cobalt-doped wüstite (CWT), Co0.33Fe0.67O, nanoparticles were prepared via the thermal decomposition of CoFe2-oleate complexes in organic solvents. A controllable oxidation process was then performed to obtain Co0.33Fe0.67O/CoFe2O4 core-shell structures with different core-to-shell volume ratios and exchange bias properties. The oxidized core-shell samples with a ~4 nm CoFe2O4 shell showed good resistance to oxygen transmission. Thus, it is inferred that the cobalt ferrite shell provides a better oxidation barrier performance than magnetite in the un-doped case. The hysteresis loops of the oxidized 19 nm samples exhibited a high exchange bias field (HE), an enhanced coercivity field (HC), and a pronounced vertical shift, thus indicating the presence of a strong exchange bias coupling effect. More importantly, the onset temperature of HE was found to be higher than 200 K, which suggests that cobalt doping increases the Néel temperature (TN) of the CWT core. In general, the results show that the homogeneous dispersion of Co in iron precursors improves the stability of the final CWT nanoparticles. Moreover, the CoFe2O4 shells formed following oxidation increase the oxidation resistance of the CWT cores and enhance their anisotropy energy.Cobalt-doped wüstite (CWT), Co0.33Fe0.67O, nanoparticles were prepared via the thermal decomposition of CoFe2-oleate complexes in organic solvents. A controllable oxidation process was then performed to obtain Co0.33Fe0.67O/CoFe2O4 core-shell structures with different core-to-shell volume ratios and exchange bias properties. The oxidized core-shell samples with a ~4 nm CoFe2O4 shell showed good resistance to oxygen transmission. Thus, it is inferred that the cobalt ferrite shell provides a better oxidation barrier performance than magnetite in the un-doped case. The hysteresis loops of the oxidized 19 nm samples exhibited a high exchange bias field (HE), an enhanced coercivity field (HC), and a pronounced vertical shift, thus

  13. An electrochemical sensor prepared by sonochemical one-pot synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported cobalt nanoparticles for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol and dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutluay, Aysegul; Aslanoglu, Mehmet, E-mail: maslanoglu@harran.edu.tr

    2014-08-11

    Highlights: • A GCE was modified with carbon nanotubes and cobalt nanoparticles. • The composite material was obtained using an ultrasonic chemical deposition method. • The CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE was applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. • The presence of AA and UA did not affect the responses of PAR and DA. • Lower detection limits were obtained using the CoNPs/MWCNT/GCE. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by cobalt nanoparticles were obtained using a single step chemical deposition method in an ultrasonic bath. The composite material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The electroactivity of the cobalt-functionalized MWCNTs was assessed in respect to the electrooxidation of paracetamol (PAR) and dopamine (DA). It was found that the carbon nanotube supported cobalt nanoparticles have significantly higher catalytic properties. The proposed electrode has been applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. The modified electrode could resolve the overlapped voltammetric waves of PAR and DA into two well-defined voltammetric peaks with peak to peak separation of about 203 mV. On the other hand, the presence of potential drug interfering compounds AA and UA did not affect the voltammetric responses of PAR and DA. The current of oxidation peaks showed a linear dependent on the concentrations of PAR and DA in the range of 5.2 × 10{sup −9}–4.5 × 10{sup −7} M (R{sup 2} = 0.9987) and 5.0 × 10{sup −8}–3.0 × 10{sup −6} M (R{sup 2} = 0.9999), respectively. The detection limits of 1.0 × 10{sup −9} M and 1.5 × 10{sup −8} M were obtained for PAR and DA, respectively. The proposed electrode showed good stability (peak current change: 4.9% with and RSD of 2.6% for PAR; 5.5% with and RSD of 3.0% for DA over 3 weeks), reproducibility (RSD 2.3% for PAR and RSD 1.5% for DA), repeatability (RSD 2.25% for PAR and RSD 2.50% for DA) and

  14. Field dependent transition to the non-linear regime in magnetic hyperthermia experiments: Comparison between maghemite, copper, zinc, nickel and cobalt ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Verde

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Further advances in magnetic hyperthermia might be limited by biological constraints, such as using sufficiently low frequencies and low field amplitudes to inhibit harmful eddy currents inside the patient's body. These incite the need to optimize the heating efficiency of the nanoparticles, referred to as the specific absorption rate (SAR. Among the several properties currently under research, one of particular importance is the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime that takes place as the field amplitude is increased, an aspect where the magnetic anisotropy is expected to play a fundamental role. In this paper we investigate the heating properties of cobalt ferrite and maghemite nanoparticles under the influence of a 500 kHz sinusoidal magnetic field with varying amplitude, up to 134 Oe. The particles were characterized by TEM, XRD, FMR and VSM, from which most relevant morphological, structural and magnetic properties were inferred. Both materials have similar size distributions and saturation magnetization, but strikingly different magnetic anisotropies. From magnetic hyperthermia experiments we found that, while at low fields maghemite is the best nanomaterial for hyperthermia applications, above a critical field, close to the transition from the linear to the non-linear regime, cobalt ferrite becomes more efficient. The results were also analyzed with respect to the energy conversion efficiency and compared with dynamic hysteresis simulations. Additional analysis with nickel, zinc and copper-ferrite nanoparticles of similar sizes confirmed the importance of the magnetic anisotropy and the damping factor. Further, the analysis of the characterization parameters suggested core-shell nanostructures, probably due to a surface passivation process during the nanoparticle synthesis. Finally, we discussed the effect of particle-particle interactions and its consequences, in particular regarding discrepancies between estimated

  15. Cobalt oxide nanoparticles as a novel high-efficiency fiber coating for solid phase microextraction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene from aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher, E-mail: MB.Gholivand@yahoo.com [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Shamizadeh, Mohammad [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moradian, Rostam; Astinchap, Bandar [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Technology Research Laboratory, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were introduced as a novel SPME fiber coating. • The fiber was evaluated for the extraction of BTEX in combination with GC–MS. • The fiber showed extraction efficiencies better than a PDMS fiber toward BTEX. • The fiber was successfully applied to the determination of BTEX in real samples. - Abstract: In this work cobalt oxide nanoparticles were introduced for preparation of a novel solid phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coating. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique was used in order for synthesis and immobilization of the Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanomaterials on a Pt wire for fabrication of SPME fiber. The prepared cobalt oxide coating was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The fiber was evaluated for the extraction of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene (BTEX) in combination with GC–MS. A simplex optimization method was used to optimize the factors affecting the extraction efficiency. Under optimized conditions, the proposed fiber showed extraction efficiencies comparable to those of a commercial polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber toward the BTEX compounds. The repeatability of the fiber and its reproducibility, expressed as relative standard deviation (RSD), were lower than about 11%. No significant change was observed in the extraction efficiency of the new SPME fiber after over 50 extractions. The fiber was successfully applied to the determination of BTEX compounds in real samples. The proposed nanostructure cobalt oxide fiber is a promising alternative to the commercial fibers as it is robust, inexpensive and easily prepared.

  16. Ultrasonic ranking of toughness of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vary, A.; Hull, D. R.

    1983-01-01

    The feasibility of using ultrasonic attenuation measurements to rank tungsten carbide alloys according to their fracture toughness was demonstrated. Six samples of cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) were examined. These varied in cobalt content from approximately 2 to 16 weight percent. The toughness generally increased with increasing cobalt content. Toughness was first determined by the Palmqvist and short rod fracture toughness tests. Subsequently, ultrasonic attenuation measurements were correlated with both these mechanical test methods. It is shown that there is a strong increase in ultrasonic attenuation corresponding to increased toughness of the WC-Co alloys. A correlation between attenuation and toughness exists for a wide range of ultrasonic frequencies. However, the best correlation for the WC-Co alloys occurs when the attenuation coefficient measured in the vicinity of 100 megahertz is compared with toughness as determined by the Palmqvist technique.

  17. Template-free formation of carbon nanotube-supported cobalt sulfide@carbon hollow nanoparticles for stable and fast sodium ion storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fei; Jun Tan, Clara Yi; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Carbon-coated cobalt sulfide (CoS) hollow nanoparticles on carbon nanotube (CNT) networks are synthesized by combining three simple approaches: direct growth of Co3O4 nanocrystals on the CNT backbones, chemical conversion of the Co3O4 nanocrystals to CoS hollow nanoparticles, and the spatial introduction of conformal surface modification by carbon. It is noteworthy that the CoS hollow nanoparticles with inner cavity of <50 nm and an average wall thickness of 6-8 nm are derived from a template-free method. Such a template-free-derived multifunctional nanostructure design achieves the amalgamation of the favorite traits of one-dimensional conducting networks, hollow nanoparticles, and surface modification, thus resulting in much enhanced charge transfer, ion transport, and upholding the integrity of the electrode and electrode/electrolyte interface. When applied the synthesized CoS-based material as anodes in sodium-ion batteries (SIBs), excellent performance is observed. For instance, a reversible specific capacity of 562 mAh g-1 at 100 mA g-1 and a capacity retention rate of 90% after 200 cycles at a higher current density of 500 mA g-1 are obtained. Moreover, a superior rate capability is observed with reversible specific capacities of 341 and 276 mAh g-1 at 2000 and at 5000 mA g-1, respectively.

  18. In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical features on pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourchez, Jeremie, E-mail: pourchez@emse.fr; Forest, Valerie [LINA EA 4624, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines, CIS-EMSE (France); Boumahdi, Najih; Boudard, Delphine [SFR IFRESIS (France); Tomatis, Maura; Fubini, Bice [Universita di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica and ' G. Scansetti' Interdepartmental Center for Studies on Asbestos and other Toxic Particulates (Italy); Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Leconte, Yann [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-CNRS URA2453, IRAMIS, CEA SACLAY, Laboratoire Francis Perrin (France); Guilhot, Bernard; Cottier, Michele; Grosseau, Philippe [SFR IFRESIS (France)

    2012-10-15

    Silicon carbide is an extremely hard, wear resistant, and thermally stable material with particular photoluminescence and interesting biocompatibility properties. For this reason, it is largely employed for industrial applications such as ceramics. More recently, nano-sized SiC particles were expected to enlarge their use in several fields such as composite supports, power electronics, biomaterials, etc. However, their large-scaled development is restricted by the potential toxicity of nanoparticles related to their manipulation and inhalation. This study aimed at synthesizing (by laser pyrolysis or sol-gel methods), characterizing physico-chemical properties of six samples of SiC nanopowders, then determining their in vitro biological impact(s). Using a macrophage cell line, toxicity was assessed in terms of cell membrane damage (LDH release), inflammatory effect (TNF-{alpha} production), and oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species generation). None of the six samples showed cytotoxicity while remarkable pro-oxidative reactions and inflammatory response were recorded, whose intensity appears related to the physico-chemical features of nano-sized SiC particles. In vitro data clearly showed an impact of the extent of nanoparticle surface area and the nature of crystalline phases ({alpha}-SiC vs. {beta}-SiC) on the TNF-{alpha} production, a role of surface iron on free radical release, and of the oxidation state of the surface on cellular H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production.

  19. In vitro cellular responses to silicon carbide nanoparticles: impact of physico-chemical features on pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourchez, Jérémie; Forest, Valérie; Boumahdi, Najih; Boudard, Delphine; Tomatis, Maura; Fubini, Bice; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Leconte, Yann; Guilhot, Bernard; Cottier, Michèle; Grosseau, Philippe

    2012-10-01

    Silicon carbide is an extremely hard, wear resistant, and thermally stable material with particular photoluminescence and interesting biocompatibility properties. For this reason, it is largely employed for industrial applications such as ceramics. More recently, nano-sized SiC particles were expected to enlarge their use in several fields such as composite supports, power electronics, biomaterials, etc. However, their large-scaled development is restricted by the potential toxicity of nanoparticles related to their manipulation and inhalation. This study aimed at synthesizing (by laser pyrolysis or sol-gel methods), characterizing physico-chemical properties of six samples of SiC nanopowders, then determining their in vitro biological impact(s). Using a macrophage cell line, toxicity was assessed in terms of cell membrane damage (LDH release), inflammatory effect (TNF-α production), and oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species generation). None of the six samples showed cytotoxicity while remarkable pro-oxidative reactions and inflammatory response were recorded, whose intensity appears related to the physico-chemical features of nano-sized SiC particles. In vitro data clearly showed an impact of the extent of nanoparticle surface area and the nature of crystalline phases (α-SiC vs. β-SiC) on the TNF-α production, a role of surface iron on free radical release, and of the oxidation state of the surface on cellular H2O2 production.

  20. Effect of Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles on the Grain Boundary Segregation and Thermoelectric Properties of Bismuth Doped Mg2Si0.7Ge0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahi, Nader; Prabhudev, Sagar; Bugnet, Matthieu; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Salvador, James R.; Kleinke, Holger

    2016-12-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the thermoelectric properties of Mg2Si0.676Ge0.3Bi0.024 was investigated. Increasing the concentration of SiC nanoparticles systematically reduces the electrical conductivity from 431 Ω-1 cm-1 for the pristine sample to 370 Ω-1 cm-1 for the sample with 1.5 wt.% SiC at 773 K, while enhancing the Seebeck coefficient from -202 μV K-1 to -215 μV K-1 at 773 K. In spite of the high thermal conductivity of SiC, its additions could successfully decrease the lattice thermal conductivity from 3.2 W m-1 K-1 to 2.7 W m-1 K-1 at 323 K, presumably by adding more interfaces. The Z contrast transmission electron microscopy imaging ( Z = atomic number) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed bismuth segregation at the grain boundary. In summary, the figure of merit reached its maximum value of 0.75 at 773 K for the sample containing 0.5 wt.% SiC.

  1. Effect of Silicon Carbide Nanoparticles on the Grain Boundary Segregation and Thermoelectric Properties of Bismuth Doped Mg2Si0.7Ge0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahi, Nader; Prabhudev, Sagar; Bugnet, Matthieu; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Salvador, James R.; Kleinke, Holger

    2016-09-01

    The effect of silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles on the thermoelectric properties of Mg2Si0.676Ge0.3Bi0.024 was investigated. Increasing the concentration of SiC nanoparticles systematically reduces the electrical conductivity from 431 Ω-1 cm-1 for the pristine sample to 370 Ω-1 cm-1 for the sample with 1.5 wt.% SiC at 773 K, while enhancing the Seebeck coefficient from -202 μV K-1 to -215 μV K-1 at 773 K. In spite of the high thermal conductivity of SiC, its additions could successfully decrease the lattice thermal conductivity from 3.2 W m-1 K-1 to 2.7 W m-1 K-1 at 323 K, presumably by adding more interfaces. The Z contrast transmission electron microscopy imaging (Z = atomic number) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy revealed bismuth segregation at the grain boundary. In summary, the figure of merit reached its maximum value of 0.75 at 773 K for the sample containing 0.5 wt.% SiC.

  2. Non-catalytic facile synthesis of superhard phase of boron carbide (B13C2) nanoflakes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sky Shumao; Su, Liap Tat; Guo, Jun; Vasylkiv, Oleg; Borodianska, Hanna; Xi, Zhu; Krishnan, Gireesh M; Su, Haibin; Tokl, Alfred I Y

    2012-01-01

    Boron Carbide is one the hardest and lightest material that is also relatively easier to synthesis as compared to other superhard ceramics like cubic boron nitride and diamond. However, the brittle nature of monolithic advanced ceramics material hinders its use in various engineering applications. Thus, strategies that can toughen the material are of fundamental and technological importance. One approach is to use nanostructure materials as building blocks, and organize them into a complex hierarchical structure, which could potentially enhance its mechanical properties to exceed that of the monolithic form. In this paper, we demonstrated a simple approach to synthesize one- and two-dimension nanostructure boron carbide by simply changing the mixing ratio of the initial compound to influence the saturation condition of the process at a relatively low temperature of 1500 degrees C with no catalyst involved in the growing process. Characterization of the resulting nano-structures shows B13C2, which is a superhard phase of boron carbide as its hardness is almost twice as hard as the commonly known B4C. Using ab-initio density functional theory study on the elastic properties of both B12C3 and B13C2, the high hardness of B13C2 is consistent to our calculation results, where bulk modulus of B13C2 is higher than that of B4C. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of the nanoflakes also reveals high density of twinning defects which could potentially inhibit the crack propagation, leading to toughening of the materials.

  3. Suspended nanoparticles in surfactant media as a microextraction technique for simultaneous separation and preconcentration of cobalt, nickel and copper ions for electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadfarnia, Shayessteh; Shakerian, Farid; Shabani, Ali Mohammad Haji

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this study was to describe a new method of microextraction based on the suspension of alumina nanoparticles in the surfactant media for simultaneous separation and preconcentration of the ultra-traces of cobalt, nickel and copper ions. In this technique, the alumina nanoparticles were suspended in the non-ionic surfactant solution of Triton X-114. The analytes in the sample solution were adsorbed onto the nanoparticles. After the phase separation based on the cloud point of the mixture at 40 °C, the nanoparticles settled down in the surfactant rich phase. Then 120 μL of nitric acid (3.0 mol L(-1)) was added to the surfactant rich phase which caused desorption of the analytes. Finally, the liquid phase was separated by centrifugation from the nanoparticles and was used for the quantification of the analytes by the electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). The parameters affecting the extraction and detection processes were optimized. Under the optimized experimental conditions (i.e. pH∼8, Triton X-114, 0.05% (v/v); temperature 40 °C), a sample volume of 25 mL resulted in the enhancement factors of 198, 205 and 206 and detection limits (defined as 3Sb/m) of 2.5, 2.8 and 2.6 ng L(-1) for Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) respectively. The sorbent showed high capacity for these metal ions (30-40 mg g(-1) sorbent). The method was successfully applied to the determination of the analytes in natural water samples.

  4. Formation and microstructure of carbon encapsulated superparamagnetic Co nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiang-Cheng; Reyes-Gasga, J.; Dong, X. L.

    Carbon encapsulated magnetic cobalt nanoparticles have been synthesized by the modified arc-discharge method. Both high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HREM) and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) profiles reveal the presence of 8-15nm diameter crystallites coated with 1-3 carbon layers. In particular, HREM images indicate that the intimate and contiguous carbon fringe around those Co nanoparticles is good evidence for complete encapsulation by carbon shell layers. The encapsulated phases are identified as hcp α-Co, fcc β-Co and cobalt carbide (Co 3 C) nanocrystals using X-ray diffraction (XRD), nano-area electron diffraction (SAED) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). However, some fcc β-Co particles with a significant fraction of stacking faults are observed by HREM and confirmed by means of numerical fast Fourier transform (FFT) of HREM lattice images. The carbon encapsulation formation and growth mechanism are also reviewed.

  5. Structural, electrical, magnetic and dielectric properties of rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikumbh, A. K.; Pawar, R. A.; Nighot, D. V.; Gugale, G. S.; Sangale, M. D.; Khanvilkar, M. B.; Nagawade, A. V.

    2014-04-01

    Pure nanoparticles of the rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites CoRExFe2-xO4 (where RE=Nd, Sm and Gd and x=0.1 and 0.2) were prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), d.c. electrical conductivity, Magnetic hysteresis and Thermal analysis are utilized in order to study the effect of variation in the rare-earth substitution and its impact on particle size, magnetic properties like MS, HC and Curie temperature. The phase identification of the materials by X-ray diffraction reveals the single-phase nature of the materials. The lattice parameter increased with rare-earth content for x≤0.2. The Transmission electron micrographs of Nd-, Sm- and Gd-substituted CoFe2O4 exhibit the particle size 36.1 to 67.8 nm ranges. The data of temperature variation of the direct current electrical conductivity showed definite breaks, which corresponds to ferrimagnetic to paramagnetic transitions. The thermoelectric power for all compound are positive over the whole range of temperature. The dielectric constant decreases with frequency and rare-earth content for the prepared samples. The magnetic properties of rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites showed a definite hysteresis loop at room temperature. The reduction of coercive force, saturation magnetization, ratio MR/MS and magnetic moments may be due to dilution of the magnetic interaction.

  6. Incorporation of cobalt and nickel metal nano-particles in nano-grain zirconia film matrix by solution route

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Jana; P K Biswas

    2000-08-01

    Precursor solutions of cobalt/nickel incorporated nano-grain zirconia films were prepared from aquo-organic solutions of zirconium oxychloride octahydrate and corresponding transition metal nitrate. The films were deposited onto silica glass substrate by the dipping technique. Annealing was made at different temperatures from 450°C to 1200°C ± 5°C in air atmosphere. The range of thickness of the films baked at 450°C was 1800–1870 Å. For cobalt system Co3O4 was formed initially at 450°C which gradually transformed to alpha cobalt and next to cubic cobalt along with a non-stoichiometric compound (Zr0.71Co0.23O0.06) with increasing annealing temperature. On the other hand, for nickel system nickel metal of nano-size was observed in the nano-grain zirconia film matrix at 450°C. By increasing annealing temperature to 1200°C, a compound, ZrNi4O, was formed which was found to be stable for ∼ 30 days.

  7. On Titanium Carbide Nanoparticles as the Origin of the 21 Micron Emission Feature in Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Li, A

    2003-01-01

    Titanium carbide (TiC) nanocrystals were recently proposed as the carrier of the mysterious 21$\\mum$ emission feature observed in post-asymptotic giant branch stars, based on their close spectral match and the presolar nature of meteoritic TiC nanograins (which reveals their stellar ejecta origin). But we show in this {\\it Letter} that the Kramers-Kronig dispersion relations, which relate the wavelength-integrated extinction cross section to the total dust mass, would impose a lower bound on the TiC mass. This Kramers-Kronig lower limit exceeds the maximum available TiC mass by a factor of at least $\\simali$50, independent of the absolute value of the ultraviolet/visible absorptivity of nano TiC. The TiC model is therefore readily ruled out by the Kramers-Kronig physical principle.

  8. An electrochemical sensor prepared by sonochemical one-pot synthesis of multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported cobalt nanoparticles for the simultaneous determination of paracetamol and dopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutluay, Aysegul; Aslanoglu, Mehmet

    2014-08-11

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by cobalt nanoparticles were obtained using a single step chemical deposition method in an ultrasonic bath. The composite material was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The electroactivity of the cobalt-functionalized MWCNTs was assessed in respect to the electrooxidation of paracetamol (PAR) and dopamine (DA). It was found that the carbon nanotube supported cobalt nanoparticles have significantly higher catalytic properties. The proposed electrode has been applied for the simultaneous determination of PAR and DA. The modified electrode could resolve the overlapped voltammetric waves of PAR and DA into two well-defined voltammetric peaks with peak to peak separation of about 203 mV. On the other hand, the presence of potential drug interfering compounds AA and UA did not affect the voltammetric responses of PAR and DA. The current of oxidation peaks showed a linear dependent on the concentrations of PAR and DA in the range of 5.2×10(-9)-4.5×10(-7) M (R(2)=0.9987) and 5.0×10(-8)-3.0×10(-6) M (R(2)=0.9999), respectively. The detection limits of 1.0×10(-9) M and 1.5×10(-8) M were obtained for PAR and DA, respectively. The proposed electrode showed good stability (peak current change: 4.9% with and RSD of 2.6% for PAR; 5.5% with and RSD of 3.0% for DA over 3 weeks), reproducibility (RSD 2.3% for PAR and RSD 1.5% for DA), repeatability (RSD 2.25% for PAR and RSD 2.50% for DA) and high recovery (99.7% with an RSD of 1.3% for PAR; 100.8% with an RSD of 1.8% for DA). The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of PAR and DA in pharmaceuticals.

  9. Sensitive Detection of Aromatic Hydrophobic Compounds in Water and Perfluorooctane Sulfonate in Human Serum by Surface-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry (SALDI-MS) with Amine Functionalized Graphene-Coated Cobalt Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Keisuke; Kawasaki, Hideya; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Arakawa, Ryuichi; Grass, Robert N; Stark, Wendelin J

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe the application of surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (SALDI-MS) with the use of amine functionalized graphene-coated cobalt nanoparticles (CoC-NH2 nanoparticles) to analyse aromatic hydrophobic compounds that are known environmental contaminants, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Our results demonstrated that SALDI-MS can detect PCP, anthracene, and pyrene in water. In particular, the CoC-NH2 nanoparticles proved to be an efficient means of capturing PCP in water because of the high adsorption capacity of the nanoparticles for PCP, which resulted in a detectability of 100 ppt. Furthermore, the CoC-NH2 nanoparticles also functioned as an adsorbent for solid-phase extraction of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) from human serum, displaying good performance with a detectability of 10 ppb by SALDI-MS.

  10. Synthesis, characterization and adsorptive properties of carbon with iron nanoparticles and iron carbide for the removal of As(V) from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Muñiz, O E; García-Rosales, G; Ordoñez-Regil, E; Olguin, M T; Cabral-Prieto, A

    2013-01-15

    This manuscript presents the synthesis of carbon modified with iron nanoparticles (CFe) and iron carbide (CarFe) from the pyrolyzed crown leaves of pineapple (Ananas comosus) treated with iron salts. The materials that were obtained were used for the removal of As(V) from aqueous media. The carbonaceous materials were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Mossbauer Spectroscopy. The specific area (BET), number site density and point of zero charge (pH(pzc)) were also determined. The kinetic parameters were obtained by fitting the experimental data to the pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order models. Different isotherm models were applied to describe the As(V) adsorption behavior. The kinetics of As(V) sorption by CFe and CarFe was well defined for the pseudo-second-order model (R(2) = 0.9994 and 0.999, respectively). The maximum As(V) uptake was 1.8 mg g(-1) for CFe and 1.4 mg g(-1) for CarFe. The results obtained indicated that both materials are equally useful for As(V) sorption. The As(V) experimental isotherm data were described by the Freundlich model for CFe and CarFe.

  11. Cobalt poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... against the metal cup when you walk. These metal particles (ions) can get released into the hip socket and ... Cobalt may also be found in: Alloys Batteries Chemistry/crystal ... Magnets Some metal-on-metal hip implants Tires Cobalt was once ...

  12. Platinum-Free Counter Electrode Comprised of Metal-Organic-Framework (MOF)-Derived Cobalt Sulfide Nanoparticles for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shao-Hui; Li, Chun-Ting; Chien, Heng-Ta; Salunkhe, Rahul R.; Suzuki, Norihiro; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Ho, Kuo-Chuan; Wu, Kevin C.-W.

    2014-11-01

    We fabricated a highly efficient (with a solar-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 8.1%) Pt-free dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). The counter electrode was made of cobalt sulfide (CoS) nanoparticles synthesized via surfactant-assisted preparation of a metal organic framework, ZIF-67, with controllable particle sizes (50 to 320 nm) and subsequent oxidation and sulfide conversion. In contrast to conventional Pt counter electrodes, the synthesized CoS nanoparticles exhibited higher external surface areas and roughness factors, as evidenced by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) element mapping, and electrochemical analysis. Incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency (IPCE) results showed an increase in the open circuit voltage (VOC) and a decrease in the short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) for CoS-based DSSCs compared to Pt-based DSSCs, resulting in a similar power conversion efficiency. The CoS-based DSSC fabricated in the study show great potential for economically friendly production of Pt-free DSSCs.

  13. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotny, K. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)], E-mail: codl@sci.muni.cz; Stankova, A. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Haekkaenen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. BOX 35, FIN-40014 (Finland); Otruba, V.; Kanicky, V. [Laboratory of Atomic Spectrochemistry, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Masaryk University, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-15

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r{sup 2} > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r{sup 2} = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  14. Analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented compact tungsten carbides using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novotný, K.; Staňková, A.; Häkkänen, H.; Korppi-Tommola, J.; Otruba, V.; Kanický, V.

    2007-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been applied to the direct analysis of powdered tungsten carbide hard-metal precursors and cemented tungsten carbides. The aim of this work was to examine the possibility of quantitative determination of the niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt. The investigated samples were in the form of pellets, pressed with and without binder (powdered silver) and in the form of cemented tungsten carbides. The pellets were prepared by pressing the powdered material in a hydraulic press. Cemented tungsten carbides were embedded in resin for easier manipulation. Several lasers and detection systems were utilized. The Nd:YAG laser working at a basic wavelength of 1064 nm and fourth-harmonic frequency of 266 nm with a gated photomultiplier or ICCD detector HORIBA JY was used for the determination of niobium which was chosen as a model element. Different types of surrounding gases (air, He, Ar) were investigated for analysis. The ICCD detector DICAM PRO with Mechelle 7500 spectrometer with ArF laser (193 nm) and KrF laser (248 nm) were employed for the determination of niobium, titanium, tantalum and cobalt in samples under air atmosphere. Good calibration curves were obtained for Nb, Ti, and Ta (coefficients of determination r2 > 0.96). Acceptable calibration curves were acquired for the determination of cobalt (coefficient of determination r2 = 0.7994) but only for the cemented samples. In the case of powdered carbide precursors, the calibration for cobalt was found to be problematic.

  15. Nickel-doped cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: efficient catalysts for the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds and photo-oxidative degradation of toxic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Charanjit; Goyal, Ankita; Singhal, Sonal

    2014-07-21

    This study deals with the exploration of NixCo₁-xFe₂O₄ (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) ferrite nanoparticles as catalysts for reduction of 4-nitrophenol and photo-oxidative degradation of Rhodamine B. The ferrite samples with uniform size distribution were synthesized using the reverse micelle technique. The structural investigation was performed using powder X-ray diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and scanning tunneling microscopy. The spherical particles with ordered cubic spinel structure were found to have the crystallite size of 4-6 nm. Diffused UV-visible reflectance spectroscopy was employed to investigate the optical properties of the synthesized ferrite nanoparticles. The surface area calculated using BET method was found to be highest for Co₀.₄Ni₀.₆Fe₂O₄ (154.02 m(2) g(-1)). Co₀.₄Ni₀.₆Fe₂O₄ showed the best catalytic activity for reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of NaBH4 as reducing agent, whereas CoFe₂O₄ was found to be catalytically inactive. The reduction reaction followed pseudo-first order kinetics. The effect of varying the concentration of catalyst and NaBH₄ on the reaction rates was also scrutinized. The photo-oxidative degradation of Rhodamine B, enhanced oxidation efficacy was observed with the introduction of Ni(2+) in to the cobalt ferrite lattice due to octahedral site preference of Ni(2+). Almost 99% degradation was achieved in 20 min using NiFe₂O₄ nanoparticles as catalyst.

  16. Structural, electrical, magnetic and dielectric properties of rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites nanoparticles synthesized by the co-precipitation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikumbh, A.K., E-mail: aknik@chem.unipune.ac.in; Pawar, R.A.; Nighot, D.V.; Gugale, G.S.; Sangale, M.D.; Khanvilkar, M.B.; Nagawade, A.V.

    2014-04-15

    Pure nanoparticles of the rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites CoRE{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (where RE=Nd, Sm and Gd and x=0.1 and 0.2) were prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method. X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), d.c. electrical conductivity, Magnetic hysteresis and Thermal analysis are utilized in order to study the effect of variation in the rare-earth substitution and its impact on particle size, magnetic properties like M{sub S}, H{sub C} and Curie temperature. The phase identification of the materials by X-ray diffraction reveals the single-phase nature of the materials. The lattice parameter increased with rare-earth content for x≤0.2. The Transmission electron micrographs of Nd-, Sm- and Gd-substituted CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} exhibit the particle size 36.1 to 67.8 nm ranges. The data of temperature variation of the direct current electrical conductivity showed definite breaks, which corresponds to ferrimagnetic to paramagnetic transitions. The thermoelectric power for all compound are positive over the whole range of temperature. The dielectric constant decreases with frequency and rare-earth content for the prepared samples. The magnetic properties of rare-earth substituted cobalt ferrites showed a definite hysteresis loop at room temperature. The reduction of coercive force, saturation magnetization, ratio M{sub R}/M{sub S} and magnetic moments may be due to dilution of the magnetic interaction.

  17. 复合电刷镀镍-钨-钴-纳米碳化硅及其性能%Electro-brush plating of nickel-tungsten-cobalt-nano silicon carbide composite coating and its properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈大川; 谢光荣; 曾鹏; 李程飞; 许小东

    2016-01-01

    A Ni-W-Co-n-SiC (nano silicon carbide) composite coating was prepared on the surface of 45 steel by electro-brush plating. The bath composition and process conditions are as follows: NiSO4·7H2O 393 g/L, Na2WO4·2H2O 23 g/L, H3BO331 g/L, citric acid 42 g/L, Na2SO46.5 g/L, CoSO4·7H2O 3 g/L, NaF 5 g/L,n-SiC 0-30 g/L, temperature 25-45 °C, pH 1.4-2.4, voltage 5-7 V, moving rate of plating pen 0.8 m/s and time 25 min. The suitable voltage for composite electro-brush plating was determined as 6 V based on the evaluation of appearance using a Ni-W-Co alloy coating as the standard. The effect ofn-SiC content in bath on the structure, microhardness and friction-wear performance of the nanocomposite coating was studied. The results showed that a crack-free Ni-W-Co-n-SiC composite coating with uniformly distributed particles can be obtained from the bath containing 15-25 g/L SiC nanoparticles. With increasingn-SiC content in bath, the crystallization degree, solid solubility of Ni, as well as microhardness and wear resistance of composite coating are increased, while the friction coefficient of the composite coating surface is changed little.%采用电刷镀工艺在45钢表面制备了Ni-W-Co-n-SiC(纳米碳化硅)复合镀层,镀液组成和工艺条件为:NiSO4·7H2O 393 g/L,Na2WO4·2H2O 23 g/L,H3BO331 g/L,柠檬酸42 g/L,Na2SO46.5 g/L,CoSO4·7H2O 3 g/L,NaF 5 g/L,n-SiC 0~30 g/L,温度25~45°C,pH 1.4~2.4,电压5~7 V,镀笔速率0.8 m/s,时间25 min.以Ni-W-Co合金镀层的外观为指标,筛选得到较适合的复合电刷镀电压为6 V.研究了镀液n-SiC含量对镀层的组织结构、显微硬度和摩擦磨损性能的影响.结果表明,镀液中n-SiC含量为15~25 g/L时,可以获得颗粒均匀分布、无微裂纹的Ni-W-Co-n-SiC复合镀层.随镀液中n-SiC含量增大,复合镀层的晶化程度、Ni固溶度和显微硬度均提高,耐磨性改善,但摩擦因数的变化不大.

  18. Bioavailability of cobalt and iron from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in the terrestrial isopod Porcellio scaber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romih, Tea; Drašler, Barbara; Jemec, Anita; Drobne, Damjana; Novak, Sara; Golobič, Miha; Makovec, Darko; Susič, Robert; Kogej, Ksenija

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether citric acid adsorbed onto cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs) influences the bioavailability of their constituents Co and Fe. Dissolution of Co and Fe was assessed by two measures: (i) in aqueous suspension using chemical analysis, prior to application onto the food of test organisms; and (ii) in vivo, measuring the bioavailability in the model terrestrial invertebrate (Porcellio scaber, Isopoda, Crustacea). The isopods were exposed to citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs for 2 weeks, and tissue accumulation of Co and Fe was assessed. This was compared to pristine CoFe2O4 NPs, and CoCl2 and Fe(III) salts as positive controls. The combined data shows that citric acid enhances free metal ion concentration from CoFe2O4 NPs in aqueous suspension, although in vivo, very similar amounts of assimilated Co were found in isopods exposed to both types of NPs. Therefore, evaluation of the dissolution in suspension by chemical means is not a good predictor of metal assimilation of this model organism; body assimilation of Co and Fe is rather governed by the physiological capacity of P. scaber for the uptake of these metals. Moreover, we propose that citric acid, due to its chelating properties, may hinder the uptake of Co that dissolves from citric-acid-adsorbed CoFe2O4 NPs, if citric acid is present in sufficient quantity.

  19. 2-Amino-2-deoxy-glucose conjugated cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticle (2DG-MNP) as a targeting agent for breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşık, Elif; Aslan, Tuğba Nur; Volkan, Mürvet; Güray, N Tülin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 2-amino-2-deoxy-glucose (2DG) was conjugated to COOH modified cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles (COOH-MNPs), which were designed to target tumor cells as a potential targetable drug/gene delivery agent for cancer treatment. According to our results, it is apparent that, 2DG labeled MNPs were internalized more efficiently than COOH-MNPs under the same conditions in all cell types (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 cancer and MCF-10A normal breast cells) (p<0.001). Moreover, the highest amount of uptake was observed in MDA-MB-231, followed by MCF-7 and normal MCF-10A cells for both MNPs. The apoptotic effects of 2DG-MNPs were further evaluated, and it was found that apoptosis was not induced at low concentrations of 2DG-MNPs in all cell types, whereas dramatic cell death was observed at higher concentrations. In addition, the gene expression levels of four drug-metabolizing enzymes, two Phase I (CYP1A1, CYP1B1) and two Phase II (GSTM3, GSTZ1) were also increased with the high concentrations of 2DG-MNPs.

  20. Dextrin-coated zinc substituted cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles as an MRI contrast agent: In vitro and in vivo imaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattarahmady, N; Zare, T; Mehdizadeh, A R; Azarpira, N; Heidari, M; Lotfi, M; Heli, H

    2015-05-01

    Application of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (NPs) as a negative contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been of widespread interest. These particles can enhance contrast of images by altering the relaxation times of the water protons. In this study, dextrin-coated zinc substituted cobalt-ferrite (Zn0.5Co0.5Fe2O4) NPs were synthesized by a co-precipitation method, and the morphology, size, structure and magnetic properties of the NPs were investigated. These NPs had superparamagnetic behavior with an average size of 3.9 (±0.9, n=200)nm measured by transmission electron microscopy. Measurements on the relaxivities (r2 and r2(*)) of the NPs were performed in vitro by agarose phantom. In addition, after subcutaneous injection of the NPs into C540 cell line in C-57 inbred mice, the relaxivities were measured in vivo by a 1.5T MRI system. These NPs could effectively increase the image contrast in both T2-and T2(*)-weighted samples.

  1. Chiral-Selective Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes on Lattice-Mismatched Epitaxial Cobalt Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Maoshuai; Jiang, Hua; Liu, Bilu

    2013-01-01

    Controlling chirality in growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is important for exploiting their practical applications. For long it has been conceptually conceived that the structural control of SWNTs is potentially achievable by fabricating nanoparticle catalysts with proper structur...

  2. Silicon carbide-free graphene growth on silicon for lithium-ion battery with high volumetric energy density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, In Hyuk; Hwan Park, Jong; Kwon, Soonchul; Park, Seongyong; Rümmeli, Mark H; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Song, Hyun Jae; Ku, Junhwan; Choi, Jang Wook; Choi, Jae-Man; Doo, Seok-Gwang; Chang, Hyuk

    2015-06-25

    Silicon is receiving discernable attention as an active material for next generation lithium-ion battery anodes because of its unparalleled gravimetric capacity. However, the large volume change of silicon over charge-discharge cycles weakens its competitiveness in the volumetric energy density and cycle life. Here we report direct graphene growth over silicon nanoparticles without silicon carbide formation. The graphene layers anchored onto the silicon surface accommodate the volume expansion of silicon via a sliding process between adjacent graphene layers. When paired with a commercial lithium cobalt oxide cathode, the silicon carbide-free graphene coating allows the full cell to reach volumetric energy densities of 972 and 700 Wh l(-1) at first and 200th cycle, respectively, 1.8 and 1.5 times higher than those of current commercial lithium-ion batteries. This observation suggests that two-dimensional layered structure of graphene and its silicon carbide-free integration with silicon can serve as a prototype in advancing silicon anodes to commercially viable technology.

  3. Effect of cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles on the growth and development of Lycopersicon lycopersicum (tomato plants).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, Martha L; Avilés, Leany Lugo; Pérez, Nitza Guzmán; Irizarry, Bianca Álamo; Perales, Oscar; Cedeno-Mattei, Yarilyn; Román, Félix

    2016-04-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthetized and studied to be incorporated in many industrial and medical applications in recent decades. Due to their different physical and chemical properties compared with bulk materials, researchers are focused to understand their interactions with the surroundings. Living organisms such as plants are exposed to these materials and they are able to tolerate different concentrations and types of NPs. Cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) NPs are being studied for their application in medical sciences because of their high coercivity, anisotropy, and large magnetostriction. These properties are desirable in magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery, and cell labeling. This study is aimed to explore the tolerance of Solanum lycopersicum L. (tomato) plants to CoFe2O4 NPs. Tomato plants were grown in hydroponic media amended with CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in a range from 0 to 1000mgL(-1). Exposure to CoFe2O4 NPs did not affect germination and growth of plants. Uptake of Fe and Co inside plant tissues increased as CoFe2O4 nanoparticle concentration was increased in the media. Mg uptake in plant leaves reached its maximum level of 4.9mgg(-1) DW (dry weight) at 125mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs exposure and decreased at high CoFe2O4 NPs concentrations. Similar pattern was observed for Ca uptake in leaves where the maximum concentration found was 10mgg(-1) DW at 125mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs exposure. Mn uptake in plant leaves was higher at 62.5mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs compared with 125 and 250mgL(-1) treatments. Catalase activity in tomato roots and leaves decreased in plants exposed to CoFe2O4 NPs. Tomato plants were able to tolerate CoFe2O4 NPs concentrations up to 1000mgL(-1) without visible toxicity symptoms. Macronutrient uptake in plants was affected when plants were exposed to 250, 500 and 1000mgL(-1) of CoFe2O4 NPs.

  4. Effect of microwave power on the thermal genesis of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles from cobalt oxalate micro-rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Zied, Bahaa M., E-mail: babuzaid@kau.edu.sa [Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research (CEAMR), King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Bawaked, Salem M.; Kosa, Samia A. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Schwieger, Wilhelm [Institut Für Chemische Reaktionstechnik, Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Egerlandstraße 3, Erlangen 91058 (Germany)

    2015-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Preparation of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O using a microwave (280 and 700 W) assisted synthesis. • Effect of MWP on the morphology and crystallite size of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. • Irrespective of the MWP utilized single phase of the prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs has been confirmed by XRD. • The developed procedure allows for the control of the morphology and size of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. - Abstract: This study focuses on investigating the influence of microwave power (MWP) change on the morphology and size of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs), which was obtained from the thermal decomposition of cobalt oxalate precursor. The oxalate precursor was prepared via the microwave-assisted route in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) employing an MWP of 280 and 700 W. Physicochemical properties of the prepared solids were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and thermogravimetry-differential thermal analyses (TGA-DTA). The results obtained indicated that the applied MWP has a crucial effect in controlling the morphology and the size of CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}·2H{sub 2}O as well as Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs. Acicular- and rod-like morphologies of both phases were obtained employing an MWP of 280 and 700 W during the preparation, respectively. Further, both the prepared Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoneedles and nanorods are composed of net-like structure of interconnected nanocapsules. Moreover, although all the routes led to the same phase, additional difference existed in terms of surface Co{sup 2+} and hydroxyl-carbonate concentrations. Lower MWP favors high Co{sup 2+} and low cobalt hydroxyl-carbonate surface concentrations.

  5. An electrochemical biosensor based on cobalt nanoparticles synthesized in iron storage protein molecules to determine ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafipour, Ronak; Kashanian, Soheila; Hashemi, Sadegh; Shahabadi, Nahid; Omidfar, Kobra

    2016-09-01

    The electrochemical detection of ascorbic acid (AA) was investigated using a cobalt(III)-ferritin immobilized on a self-assembled monolayer modified gold electrode in phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.5). The modified electrode showed excellent electrochemical activity for oxidation of AA. The response to AA on the modified electrode was examined using cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry techniques. The resulting biosensor showed a linear response to AA in a concentration range from 6.25×10(-6) to 2.31×10(-5) M with sensitivity of 86,437 μAM(-)(1) and detection limit of 4.65 × 10(-6) M based on a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. Electrochemical parameters including the charge transfer coefficient (α) and the apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (ks ) for AA were found to be 0.52 and 1.054 Sec(-1) , respectively. It has been shown that, using this modified electrode, AA can be determined with high sensitivity, low detection limit, and high selectivity.

  6. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles decorated on exfoliated graphene oxide, application for amperometric determination of NADH and H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A; Alinajafi, Hossein A; Jafari-Asl, M; Rezaei, B; Ghazaei, F

    2016-03-01

    Here, cobalt ferrite nanohybrid decorated on exfoliated graphene oxide (CoFe2O4/EGO) was synthesized. The nanohybrid was characterized by different methods such as X-ray diffraction spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical methods. The CoFe2O4/EGO nanohybrid was used to modify glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The voltammetric investigations showed that CoFe2O4/EGO nanohybrid has synergetic effect towards the electro-reduction of H2O2 and electro-oxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH). Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used for their quantitative analysis. The calibration curves were observed in the range of 0.50 to 100.0 μmol L(-1) NADH and 0.9 to 900.0 μmol L(-1) H2O2 with detections limit of 0.38 and 0.54 μmol L(-1), respectively. The repeatability, reproducibility and selectivity of the electrochemical sensor for analysis of the analytes were studied. The new electrochemical sensor was successfully applied for the determination of NADH and H2O2 in real samples with satisfactory results.

  7. Cobalt salophen complex supported on magnetic nanoparticles as an efficient reusable catalyst for oxidation of benzylic alcohols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Afshari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel and general method has been developed for oxidation of benzylic alcohols using magnetic nanoparticles immobilized salophen Co(II as an efficient and recyclable catalyst. The structural and magnetic properties of catalyst are identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM instruments. FT-IR, and XRD. Nanocatalyst can be easily recovered by a magnetic field and reused for subsequent reactions for at least 5 times with less deterioration in catalytic activity.

  8. Titanium Carbide-Graphite Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-08

    titanium carbide , titanium carbide with free graphite, titanium carbide /vanadium carbide alloy with free graphite, and titanium carbide with...from melts. The test pins were drawn across hot pressed titanium carbide wear plates with 5 newtons of normal force. The lowest friction coefficient at...22 C was 0.12 obtained with pure titanium carbide . The lowest friction coefficient at 900 C was 0.19 obtained with titanium carbide with boron and

  9. Selective transformation of syngas into gasoline-range hydrocarbons over mesoporous H-ZSM-5-supported cobalt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Kang; Zhang, Lei; Kang, Jincan; Peng, Xiaobo; Zhang, Qinghong; Wang, Ye

    2015-01-26

    Bifunctional Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysts that couple uniform-sized Co nanoparticles for CO hydrogenation and mesoporous zeolites for hydrocracking/isomerization reactions were found to be promising for the direct production of gasoline-range (C5-11 ) hydrocarbons from syngas. The Brønsted acidity results in hydrocracking/isomerization of the heavier hydrocarbons formed on Co nanoparticles, while the mesoporosity contributes to suppressing the formation of lighter (C1-4 ) hydrocarbons. The selectivity for C5-11 hydrocarbons could reach about 70 % with a ratio of isoparaffins to n-paraffins of approximately 2.3 over this catalyst, and the former is markedly higher than the maximum value (ca. 45 %) expected from the Anderson-Schulz-Flory distribution. By using n-hexadecane as a model compound, it was clarified that both the acidity and mesoporosity play key roles in controlling the hydrocracking reactions and thus contribute to the improved product selectivity in FT synthesis.

  10. Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity and regulate the apoptotic genes through ROS in human liver cells (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Khan, M A Majeed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws

    2016-12-01

    Cobalt iron oxide (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (CIO NPs) have been one of the most widely explored magnetic NPs because of their excellent chemical stability, mechanical hardness and heat generating potential. However, there is limited information concerning the interaction of CIO NPs with biological systems. In this study, we investigated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated cytotoxicity and apoptotic response of CIO NPs in human liver cells (HepG2). Diameter of crystalline CIO NPs was found to be 23nm with a band gap of 1.97eV. CIO NPs induced cell viability reduction and membrane damage, and degree of induction was dose- and time-dependent. CIO NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress revealed by induction of ROS, depletion of glutathione and lower activity of superoxide dismutase enzyme. Real-time PCR data has shown that mRNA level of tumor suppressor gene p53 and apoptotic genes (bax, CASP3 and CASP9) were higher, while the expression level of anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was lower in cells following exposure to CIO NPs. Activity of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes was also higher in CIO NPs exposed cells. Furthermore, co-exposure of N-acetyl-cysteine (ROS scavenger) efficiently abrogated the modulation of apoptotic genes along with the prevention of cytotoxicity caused by CIO NPs. Overall, we observed that CIO NPs induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in HepG2 cells through ROS via p53 pathway. This study suggests that toxicity mechanisms of CIO NPs should be further investigated in animal models.

  11. Radiochemical separation of Cobalt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, P.C. van

    1961-01-01

    A method is described for the radiochemical separation of cobalt based on the extraordinary stability of cobalt diethyldithiocarbamate. Interferences are few; only very small amounts of zinc and iron accompany cobalt, which is important in neutron-activation analysis.

  12. Magnetic properties of iron-oxide and (iron, cobalt)-oxide nanoparticles synthesized in polystyrene resin matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naik, R. E-mail: naik@physics.wayne.edu; Kroll, E.; Rodak, D.; Tsoi, G.M.; McCullen, E.; Wenger, L.E.; Suryanarayanan, R.; Naik, V.M.; Vaishnava, P.P.; Tao, Qu; Boolchand, P

    2004-05-01

    A sulfonated polystyrene resin matrix was ion exchanged with aqueous solutions of (1) FeCl{sub 2}, (2) FeCl{sub 3}, (3) 2FeCl{sub 2}:FeCl{sub 3}, (4) 9FeCl{sub 2}:CoCl{sub 2}, and (5) 4FeCl{sub 2}:CoCl{sub 2} to prepare magnetic nanoparticles of varying size. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), {sup 57}Fe Mossbauer spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and identify two major phases: {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and perhaps a minor Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phase. SQUID magnetometry measurements indicate superparamagnetic particles with blocking temperatures (T{sub B}) ranging from 20 K to room temperature.

  13. Effect of cobalt alloying on the electrochemical performance of manganese oxide nanoparticles nucleated on multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Sajad; Kashfi-Sadabad, Raana; Palmieri, Alessandro; Mustain, William E.; Thompson Pettes, Michael

    2017-04-01

    MnO is an electrically insulating material which limits its usefulness in lithium ion batteries. We demonstrate that the electrochemical performance of MnO can be greatly improved by using oxygen-functional groups created on the outer walls of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as nucleation sites for metal oxide nanoparticles. Based on the mass of the active material used in the preparation of electrodes, the composite conversion-reaction anode material Mn1‑x Co x O/MWCNT with x = 0.2 exhibited the highest reversible specific capacity, 790 and 553 mAhg‑1 at current densities of 40 and 1600 mAg‑1, respectively. This is 3.1 times higher than that of MnO/MWCNT at a charge rate of 1600 mAg‑1. Phase segregation in the {{{Mn}}}1-x{{{Co}}}x{{O}} nanoparticles was not observed for x ≤ 0.15. Capacity retention in x = 0, 0.2, and 1 electrodes showed that the corresponding specific capacities were stabilized at 478, 709 and 602 mAhg‑1 respectively, after 55 cycles at a current density of 400 mAg‑1. As both MnO and CoO exhibit similar theoretical capacities and MnO/MWCNT and CoO/MWCNT anodes both exhibit lower performance than Mn0.8Co0.2O/MWCNT, the improved performance of the {{{Mn}}}1-x{{{Co}}}x{{O}}/{{MWCNT}} alloy likely arises from beneficial synergistic interactions in the bimetallic system.

  14. Macroscale cobalt-MOFs derived metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers as efficient oxygen electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hai-Sheng; Zhang, Haimin; Liu, Rongrong; Zhang, Xian; Zhao, Huijun; Wang, Guozhong

    2017-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) materials have aroused great research interest in different areas owing to their unique properties, such as high surface area, various composition, well-organized framework and controllable porous structure. Controllable fabrication of MOFs materials at macro-scale may be more promising for their large-scale practical applications. Here we report the synthesis of macro-scale Co-MOFs crystals using 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylic acid (H3BTC) linker in the presence of Co2+, triethylamine (TEA) and nonanoic acid by a facile solvothermal reaction. Further, the as-fabricated Co-MOFs as precursor was pyrolytically treated at different temperatures in N2 atmosphere to obtain metallic Co nanoparticles embedded in N-doped porous carbon layers (denoted as Co@NPC). The results demonstrate that the Co-MOFs derived sample obtained at 900 °C (Co@NPC-900) shows a porous structure (including micropore and mesopore) with a surface area of 110.8 m2 g-1 and an N doping level of 1.62 at.% resulted from TEA in the pyrolysis process. As electrocatalyst, the Co@NPC-900 exhibits bifunctional electrocatalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in alkaline media which are key reactions in some renewable energy technologies such as fuel cells and rechargeable metal-air batteries. The results indicate that the Co@NPC-900 can afford an onset potential of 1.50 V (vs. RHE) and a potential value of 1.61 V (vs. RHE) at a current density of 10 mA cm-2 for ORR and OER with high applicable stability, respectively. The efficient catalytic activity of Co@NPC-900 as bifunctional oxygen electrocatalyst can be ascribed to N doping and embedded metallic Co nanoparticles in carbon structure providing catalytic active sites and porous structure favourable for electrocatalysis-related mass transport.

  15. Magnetic anisotropy of cobalt nanoparticle 2D arrays grown on corrugated MnF{sub 2}(1 1 0) and CaF{sub 2}(1 1 0) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, D.A., E-mail: dbaranov@mail.ioffe.ru [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Krichevtsov, B.B.; Gastev, S.V.; Banschikov, A.G.; Fedorov, V.V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Koshmak, K.V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Materiali e dell’Ambiente, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via Vignolese 905, 41100 Modena (Italy); Suturin, S.M.; Sokolov, N.S. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya str., St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    Cobalt nanoparticle 2D arrays with different effective thicknesses of cobalt layer (2 nm < d{sub eff} < 10 nm) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on CaF{sub 2}(1 1 0)/Si(0 0 1) and MnF{sub 2}(1 1 0)/CaF{sub 2}(1 1 0)/Si(0 0 1) substrates with corrugated morphology of the surface. Surface morphology analysis showed that for effective thickness of cobalt layer d{sub eff} = 5 nm the lateral dimensions of cobalt islands are about 5–10 nm and the distances between the islands differs in a half along and across the grooves. In both types of the heterostructures the shape of hysteresis loops measured by LMOKE depend on orientation of in-plane magnetic field relative to the direction of the grooves. The azimuthal dependence of coercive field H{sub c} in Co/CaF{sub 2}(1 1 0)/Si(0 0 1) structures corresponds to Stoner–Wohlfarth model's predictions, which takes into account the anisotropy of individual particles. In contrast to that, in Co/MnF{sub 2}(1 1 0)/CaF{sub 2}(1 1 0)/Si(0 0 1) structures these dependences are analogous to those predicted by the model based on account of magnetic–dipole interaction between particles which are placed in chains (chain-of-spheres-model). Possible explanations of the difference in magnetic anisotropy are suggested.

  16. In situ diagnosis of pulsed UV laser surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal by using laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiejun; Lou, Qihong; Wei, Yunrong; Huang, Feng; Dong, Jingxing; Liu, Jingru

    2001-12-01

    Surface ablation of cobalt cemented tungsten carbide hardmetal with pulsed UV laser has been in situ diagnosed by using the technique of laser-induced optical emission spectroscopy. The dependence of emission intensity of cobalt lines on number of laser shots was investigated at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2. As a comparison, the reliance of emission intensity of cobalt lines as a function of laser pulse number by using pure cobalt as ablation sample was also studied at the same laser condition. It was found that for surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal at laser fluence of 2.5 J/cm 2, the intensities of cobalt lines fell off dramatically in the first 300 consecutive laser shots and then slowed down to a low stable level with even more shots. For surface ablation of pure cobalt at the same laser condition, the intensities of cobalt lines remained constant more or less even after 500 laser shots and then reduced very slowly with even more shots. It was concluded that selective evaporation of cobalt at this laser fluence should be responsible for the dramatic fall-off of cobalt lines with laser shots accumulation for surface ablation of tungsten carbide hardmetal. In contrast, for surface ablation of pure cobalt, the slow reduction of cobalt lines with pulse number accumulation should be due to the formation of laser-induced crater effect.

  17. Facile Fabrication of Platinum-Cobalt Alloy Nanoparticles with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity for a Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huihong; Hu, Xiulan; Zhang, Jianbo; Su, Nan; Cheng, JieXu

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the cost associated with platinum-based catalysts along with improving their catalytic properties is a major challenge for commercial direct methanol fuel cells. In this work, a simple and facile strategy was developed for the more efficient preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) -supported Pt/CoPt composite nanoparticles (NPs) via solution plasma sputtering with subsequent thermal annealing. Quite different from general wet synthesis methods, Pt/CoPt composite NPs were directly derived from metal wire electrodes without any additions. The obtained Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs composite catalysts exhibited tremendous improvement in the electro-oxidation of methanol in acidic media with mass activities of 1719 mA mg−1Pt. This value is much higher than that of previous reports of Pt-Co alloy and commercial Pt/C (3.16 times) because of the many active sites and clean surface of the catalysts. The catalysts showed good stability due to the special synergistic effects of the CoPt alloy. Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs can be used as a promising catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells. In addition, this solution plasma sputtering-assisted synthesis method introduces a general and feasible route for the synthesis of binary alloys. PMID:28358143

  18. Cobalt-doped cadmium sulfide nanoparticles as efficient strategy to enhance performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firoozi, Najmeh; Dehghani, Hossein; Afrooz, Malihe

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we investigate the effect of Co2+ ion incorporation into CdS layer on the photovoltaic performance of quantum dot sensitized solar cell (QDSSC). Quantum dots are deposited by the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method on the mesoporous TiO2 film. The doped system modifies the structure of photoanode that leads to an increase in short circuit current density (Jsc) from 13.16 mA cm-2 to 16.6 mA cm-2 in the un-doped system. Electrochemical impedance analysis (EIS) reveals a decrease in charge transfer resistance at the TiO2/QDs/electrolyte interface that arises from the presence of an internal recombination pathway. The highest energy conversion efficiency (η) of 3.16% is obtained under standard air mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) simulated sun light by doping the optimized amount of Co2+ ion in CdS nanoparticles, corresponding to efficiency increment (35%) compared to the un-doped system. The origin of the increase in the efficiency is attributed to the dominance of charge collection to recombination. To further investigation of the electron transport time in the photoanode, the intensity modulated photocurrent spectroscopy (IMPS) is performed under standard conditions. Our obtained results can help to develop a simple and effective method to enhance the efficiency in the QDSSCs.

  19. Electrocatalysis using transition metal carbide and oxide nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Yagya N.

    Carbides are one of the several families of transition metal compounds that are considered economic alternatives to catalysts based on noble metals and their compounds. Phase pure transition metal carbides of group 4-6 metals, in the first three periods, were synthesized using a common eutectic salt flux synthesis method, and their electrocatalytic activities compared under uniform electrochemical conditions. Mo2C showed highest hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities among the nine metal carbides investigated, but all other metal carbides also showed substantial activities. All the metal carbides showed remarkable enhancement in catalytic activities as supports, when compared to traditional graphitic carbon as platinum support. Mo2C, the most active transition metal carbide electrocatalyst, was prepared using four different synthesis routes, and the synthesis route dependent activities compared. Bifunctional Mo 2C that is HER as well as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) active, was achieved when the carbide was templated on a multiwalled carbon nanotube using carbothermic reduction method. Bimetallic carbides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo or W were prepared using a common carbothermic reduction method. Two different stoichiometries of bimetallic carbides were obtained for each system within a 60 °C temperature window. While the bimetallic carbides showed relatively lower electrocatalytic activities towards HER and ORR in comparison to Mo2C and WC, they revealed remarkably higher OER activities than IrO2 and RuO2, the state-of-the-art OER catalysts. Bimetallic oxides of Fe, Co, and Ni with Mo and W were also prepared using a hydrothermal synthesis method and they also revealed OER activities that are much higher than RuO2 and IrO2. Additionally, the OER activities were dependent on the degree and nature of hydration in the bimetallic oxide crystal lattice, with the completely hydrated, as synthesized, cobalt molybdate and nickel

  20. The Protective Effect of Bafilomycin A1 Against Cobalt Nanoparticle-Induced Cytotoxicity and Aseptic Inflammation in Macrophages In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songhua; Liu, Fan; Zeng, Zhaoxun; Yang, Huilin; Jiang, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    Co ions released due to corrosion of Co nanoparticles (CoNPs) in the lysosomes of macrophages may be a factor in the particle-induced cytotoxicity and aseptic inflammation accompanying metal-on-metal (MOM) hip prosthesis failure. Here, we show that CoNPs are easily dissolved under a low pH, simulating the acidic lysosomal environment. We then used bafilomycin A1 to change the pH inside the lysosome to inhibit intracellular corrosion of CoNPs and then investigated its protective effects against CoNP-induced cytotoxicity and aseptic inflammation on murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells. XTT {2,3-bis (2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide} assays revealed that bafilomycin A1 can significantly decrease CoNP-induced cytotoxicity in RAW264.7 cells. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that bafilomycin A1 can significantly decrease the subtoxic concentration of CoNP-induced levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and interleukin-6), but has no effect on anti-inflammatory cytokines (transforming growth factor-β and interleukin-10) in RAW264.7 cells. We studied the protective mechanism of bafilomycin A1 against CoNP-induced effects in RAW264.7 cells by measuring glutathione/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG), superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase levels and employed scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectrometer assays to observe the ultrastructural cellular changes. The changes associated with apoptosis were assessed by examining the pAKT and cleaved caspase-3 levels using Western blotting. These data strongly suggested that bafilomycin A1 can potentially suppress CoNP-induced cytotoxicity and aseptic inflammation by inhibiting intracellular corrosion of CoNPs and that the reduction in Co ions released from CoNPs may play an important role in downregulating oxidative stress in RAW264.7 cells.

  1. Directed magnetic field induced assembly of high magnetic moment cobalt nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Srivastava, Akhilesh Kumar; Madhavi, S.; Ramanujan, R.V.

    2010-01-01

    A directed magnetic field induced assembly technique was employed to align two phase (h.c.p. + f.c.c.) cobalt nanoparticles in a mechanically robust long wire morphology. Co nanoparticles with an average size of 4.3 nm and saturation magnetization comparable to bulk cobalt were synthesized...

  2. SILICON CARBIDE FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This state-of-the-art survey on silicon carbide for semiconductors includes a bibliography of the most important references published as of the end...of 1964. The various methods used for growing silicon carbide single crystals are reviewed, as well as their properties and devices fabricated from...them. The fact that the state of-the-art of silicon carbide semiconductors is not further advanced may be attributed to the difficulties of growing

  3. Silicon Carbide Shapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free-standing silicon carbide shapes are produced by passing a properly diluted stream of a reactant gas, for example methyltrichlorosilane, into a...reaction chamber housing a thin walled, hollow graphite body heated to 1300-1500C. After the graphite body is sufficiently coated with silicon carbide , the...graphite body is fired, converting the graphite to gaseous CO2 and CO and leaving a silicon carbide shaped article remaining.

  4. Formation of CoAl2O4 Nanoparticles via Low-Temperature Solid-State Reaction of Fine Gibbsite and Cobalt Precursor

    OpenAIRE

    Natpakan Srisawad; Wasu Chaitree; Okorn Mekasuwandumrong; Piyasan Praserthdam; Joongjai Panpranot

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4) was synthesized by the solid-state reaction method with cobalt chloride hexahydrate (CoCl2 · 6H2O) as the source of Co and gibbsite (Al(OH)3) as the source of Al, respectively. The effects of particle size of the starting fine gibbsite (0.6 and 13 μm) and calcination temperatures (450, 550, and 650°C) on the properties of CoAl2O4 were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetry analysis and differential thermal analysis (TG/DT...

  5. SILICON CARBIDE DATA SHEETS

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data sheets present a compilation of a wide range of electrical, optical and energy values for alpha and beta- silicon carbide in bulk and film...spectrum. Energy data include energy bands, energy gap and energy levels for variously-doped silicon carbide , as well as effective mass tables, work

  6. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined. Etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the WC and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation. The wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  7. Thermal Transport in Refractory Carbides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thermal energy transport mechanisms in titanium carbide and zirconium carbide have been studied. Several compositions of vanadium carbide alloyed...with titanium carbide were used. The electronic component of the thermal conductivity exceeded the values computed using the classical value for L in

  8. Tungsten carbide promoted Pd and Pd–Co electrocatalysts for formic acid electrooxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yin, Min; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Tungsten carbide (WC) promoted palladium (Pd) and palladium–cobalt (Pd–Co) nanocatalysts are prepared and characterized for formic acid electrooxidation. The WC as the dopant to carbon supports is found to enhance the CO tolerance and promote the activity of the Pd-based catalysts for formic acid...

  9. Formation of CoAl2O4 Nanoparticles via Low-Temperature Solid-State Reaction of Fine Gibbsite and Cobalt Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natpakan Srisawad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanocrystalline cobalt aluminate (CoAl2O4 was synthesized by the solid-state reaction method with cobalt chloride hexahydrate (CoCl2 · 6H2O as the source of Co and gibbsite (Al(OH3 as the source of Al, respectively. The effects of particle size of the starting fine gibbsite (0.6 and 13 μm and calcination temperatures (450, 550, and 650°C on the properties of CoAl2O4 were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD, thermogravimetry analysis and differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Increasing of calcination temperature promoted the insertion amounts of Co2+ in alumina matrix in CoAl2O4 structure, which resulted in the brighter blue particles and increasing of UV spectra band. The lowest temperature for the formation of nanocrystalline CoAl2O4 particles was 550°C for the solid-state reaction of cobalt chloride and 0.6 μm fine gibbsite.

  10. Dynamic SEM wear studies of tungsten carbide cermets. [friction and wear experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Dynamic friction and wear experiments were conducted in a scanning electron microscope. The wear behavior of pure tungsten carbide and composite with 6 and 15 weight percent cobalt binder was examined, and etching of the binder was done to selectively determine the role of the binder in the wear process. Dynamic experiments were conducted as the tungsten carbide (WC) and bonded WC cermet surfaces were transversed by a 50 micron radiused diamond stylus. These studies show that the predominant wear process in WC is fracture initiated by plastic deformation, and the wear of the etched cermets is similar to pure WC. The presence of the cobalt binder reduces both friction and wear. The cementing action of the cobalt reduces granular separation, and promotes a dense polished layer because of its low shear strength film-forming properties. The wear debris generated from unetched surface is approximately the same composition as the bulk.

  11. Multiple Ion Cluster Source for the Generation of Magnetic Nanoparticles: Investigation of the Efficiency as a Function of the Working Parameters for the Case of Cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Llamosa Perez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present dataset of Co nanoparticles production using a Multiple Ion Cluster Source (MICS. We study the evolution of the mean size and deposition rate of Co nanoparticles as a function of the power and argon flux applied to the Co magnetron, the aggregation length of the Co magnetron and the total argon flux. The results show the strong influence of these parameters on the mean size of the nanoparticles and the efficiency of the process as well as on the atomic deposition rate. In particular, it is shown that nanoparticles of mean size ranging from 4 to 14 nm can be produced and that the influence of the working parameters on the production of magnetic nanoparticles is more complex than for the case of noble metal presented previously.

  12. Control of morphology and structure for β-Co nanoparticles from cobalt oxalate and research on its phase-change mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ying [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Chongqing University of Arts and Science, Chongqing 402160 (China); Xiong, Xiang, E-mail: xiangxiong88@qq.com [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Zou, J.P., E-mail: zoujp@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Deng, Ling [Chengdu Chengliang Tool Group Co., Ltd., Chengdu 610056 (China); Tu, M.J. [Chongqing University of Arts and Science, Chongqing 402160 (China)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Nanoscale precursor β-CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O can be prepared by mechanical solid phase reaction. • Growth mechanism, morphology and crystal structure of β-CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O have been studied. • Internal energy reserves of precursor making it directly generate β-Co in the thermal decomposition reaction. • Martensitic transformation of Co has been studied. • The Co powder will inherit the morphology of its precursor. - Abstract: The face-centered cubic crystal structure β-Co has excellent performance. As the main material to produce high toughness hard alloys and metal cermet, its morphology and structure will have an important impact on the performance of the alloy. This study, based on solid-phase reaction, starting from the crystal structure studied, discussed the effection of the mechanical solid-phase chemical reactions on the morphology of the cobalt precursor structure, researched the cobalt phase change mechanism, and presented a method to prepare nano β-Co. With H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}⋅2H{sub 2}O and Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O as raw materials, nano-crystalline cobalt oxalate powders with nearly spherical shape have been prepared by using solid-phase chemical reactions in high-speed ball milling, and then by decomposing at 400–450 °C, the target was prepared. The thermodynamical and IR analysis has been studied. The microstructure of the powders was characterized by XRD, SEM, TEM. It has been identified that a spherical, fcc structure, 100 nm β-Co powders was synthesized successfully, which confirmed the theoretical feasibility of this study.

  13. Dysprosium Modification of Cobalt Ferrite Ionic Magnetic Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Rong-li; LIU Yong-chao; GENG Quan-rong; ZHAO Wen-tao

    2005-01-01

    Dysprosium composite cobalt ferrite ionic magnetic fluids were prepared by precipitation in the presence of Tri-sodium citrate. Influence of dysprosium modification on magnetic property is studied. The result shows that magnetic response toward exterior magnetic field can be improved by adding Dy3+. Studies also show that the increase of reaction temperature may improve the modification effect of dysprosium. By adding dysprosium ions, the average diameter of the magnetic nanoparticles will be decreased evidently. It is clear that the particles appear as balls, Cobalt ferrite with sizes of 12-15 nm, rare earth composite cobalt ferrite with sizes of 6-8 nm.

  14. Production of cobalt and nickel particles by hydrogen reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, J.; Tapper, U.; Auvinen, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2008-05-01

    Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles were produced by hydrogen reduction reaction from cobalt or nickel chloride precursor vapour in nitrogen carrier gas. This aerosol phase method to produce nanoparticles is a scalable one-step process. Two different setups were introduced in particle production: a batch type reactor and a continuously operated reactor. Common feature in these setups was hydrogen mixing in a vertical flow reactor. The process was monitored on-line for particle mass concentration and for gas phase chemical reactions. Tapered element oscillating microbalance measured the particle mass concentration and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor relevant gas phase species. The produced cobalt and nickel particles were characterised using transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction. The produced cobalt and nickel particles were crystalline with cubic fcc structure. Twinning was often observed in cobalt particles while nickel particles were mostly single crystals. The cobalt particles formed typically long agglomerates. No significant neck growth between the primary particles was observed. The primary particle size for cobalt and nickel was below 100 nm.

  15. Calorimetric examination of mixtures for modification of nickel and cobalt superalloys

    OpenAIRE

    F. Binczyk; J. Sleziona; R. Przeliorz

    2009-01-01

    The study presents the results of thermodynamic calculations and calorimetric examination of thermal reactions taking place at hightemperatures between the nanoparticle inoculants and metallic constituents of nickel and cobalt superalloys. The calculations andmeasurements were made for different compositions, containing cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4, cobalt oxide CoO*Co2O3, zircon flourZrSi2O4, powdered and metallic Al, powdered Ti, and IN-713C alloy. The obtained results have indicated the possib...

  16. 钴纳米颗粒催化酚醛树脂制备碳纳米管%Catalytic Preparation of Carbon Nanotubes from Phenolic Resin Using Cobalt Nanoparticle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄珍霞; 梁峰; 王军凯; 张海军; 刘思敏; 李赛赛; 张少伟

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared via catalytic pyrolysis of phenol resin under Ar atmosphere using cobalt nitrate as a catalyst precursor. The effects of temperature and catalyst content on the formation of CNTs were investigated. The results show that cobalt nitrate catalyst precursor firstly decomposed into Co3O4 and then in-situ transformed to Co nanoparticles in a heat-treated process, the formed Co nanoparticles act as a catalyst to catalyze the carbon containing gases released from the phenolic resin pyrolysis forming CNTs. The starting growth temperature and optimal growth temperature of CNTs are 673 and 1 273 K, respectively. The growth of CNTs is based on the tip growth mechanism. The optimal mass ratio of Co catalyst to phenol resin is 0.75%. The synthesized CNTs are 20–100 nm in diameter and up to ten microns in length.%以酚醛树脂为原料、硝酸钴为催化剂前驱体,利用催化酚醛树脂合成碳纳米管。研究了温度、催化剂含量等对催化合成碳纳米管的影响。结果表明:硝酸钴首先分解为Co3O4,而后被原位还原为Co纳米颗粒,Co纳米颗粒再催化酚醛树脂裂解释放出的含碳气体生成碳纳米管;碳纳米管起始生长温度为673 K,最适宜生长温度为1273 K;碳纳米管生长遵循顶端生长模式;催化剂的最佳加入量为酚醛树脂质量的0.75%;所制备碳纳米管直径约为20~100 nm,长度可达10μm。

  17. Cobalt sensitization and dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob P

    2012-01-01

    : This clinical review article presents clinical and scientific data on cobalt sensitization and dermatitis. It is concluded that cobalt despite being a strong sensitizer and a prevalent contact allergen to come up on patch testing should be regarded as a very complex metal to test with. Exposure...... data together with clinical data from metal workers heavily exposed to cobalt suggest that patch-test reactions are sometimes false positive and that patch testers should carefully evaluate their clinical relevance....

  18. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    OpenAIRE

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, Denis Viktorovich

    2015-01-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the...

  19. 14. EXPOSURE AND EFFECT MONITORING OF WORKERS IN THE COBALT/HARD METAL INDUSTRIES: ABSENCE OF SIGNIFICANT GENOTOXIC EFFECTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@An increased lung cancer risk is associated with occupational exposure to mixtures of cobalt metal and metallic carbide particles, but when exposure is to cobalt metal alone. The current TLV-TWA was established without consideration of carcinogenicity data. The present study was designed to assess whether an increased cancer risk can be detected in workers currently exposed on average to the TLV-TWA (20 μg/m3).

  20. Cobalt release from inexpensive jewellery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl; Menné, Torkil

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to study 354 consumer items using the cobalt spot test. Cobalt release was assessed to obtain a risk estimate of cobalt allergy and dermatitis in consumers who would wear the jewellery. Methods: The cobalt spot test was used to assess cobalt release from all items....... Microstructural characterization was made using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Results: Cobalt release was found in 4 (1.1%) of 354 items. All these had a dark appearance. SEM/EDS was performed on the four dark appearing items which showed tin-cobalt plating on these....... Conclusions: This study showed that only a minority of inexpensive jewellery purchased in Denmark released cobalt when analysed with the cobalt spot test. As fashion trends fluctuate and we found cobalt release from dark appearing jewellery, cobalt release from consumer items should be monitored in the future...

  1. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology-A brief update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole, E-mail: LOSimonsen@dadlnet.dk; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-08-15

    phase lasting several weeks, and with a significant long-term retention in tissues for several years. In serum cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) binds to albumin, and the concentration of free, ionized Co{sup 2+} is estimated at 5-12% of the total cobalt concentration. In human red cells the membrane transport pathway for cobalt (Co{sup 2+}) uptake appears to be shared with calcium (Ca{sup 2+}), but with the uptake being essentially irreversible as cobalt is effectively bound in the cytosol and is not itself extruded by the Ca-pump. It is tempting to speculate that this could perhaps also be the case in other animal cells. If this were actually the case, the tissue partitioning and biokinetics of cobalt in cells and tissues would be closely related to the uptake of calcium, with cobalt partitioning primarily into tissues with a high calcium turn-over, and with cobalt accumulation and retention in tissues with a slow turn-over of the cells. The occupational cobalt exposure, e.g. in cobalt processing plants and hard-metal industry is well known and has probably been somewhat reduced in more recent years due to improved work place hygiene. Of note, however, adverse reactions to heart and lung have recently been demonstrated following cobalt exposure near or slightly under the current occupational exposure limit. Over the last decades the use of cobalt-chromium hard-metal alloys in orthopedic joint replacements, in particular in metal-on-metal bearings in hip joint arthroplasty, has created an entirely new source of internal cobalt exposure. Corrosion and wear produce soluble metal ions and metal debris in the form of huge numbers of wear particles in nanometric size, with systemic dissemination through lymph and systemic vascular system. This may cause adverse local reactions in peri-prosthetic soft-tissues, and in addition systemic toxicity. Of note, the metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be clearly more toxic than larger, micrometer-sized particles, and this has made the

  2. Cobalt metabolism and toxicology--a brief update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, Lars Ole; Harbak, Henrik; Bennekou, Poul

    2012-08-15

    , and with a significant long-term retention in tissues for several years. In serum cobalt (Co(2+)) binds to albumin, and the concentration of free, ionized Co(2+) is estimated at 5-12% of the total cobalt concentration. In human red cells the membrane transport pathway for cobalt (Co(2+)) uptake appears to be shared with calcium (Ca(2+)), but with the uptake being essentially irreversible as cobalt is effectively bound in the cytosol and is not itself extruded by the Ca-pump. It is tempting to speculate that this could perhaps also be the case in other animal cells. If this were actually the case, the tissue partitioning and biokinetics of cobalt in cells and tissues would be closely related to the uptake of calcium, with cobalt partitioning primarily into tissues with a high calcium turn-over, and with cobalt accumulation and retention in tissues with a slow turn-over of the cells. The occupational cobalt exposure, e.g. in cobalt processing plants and hard-metal industry is well known and has probably been somewhat reduced in more recent years due to improved work place hygiene. Of note, however, adverse reactions to heart and lung have recently been demonstrated following cobalt exposure near or slightly under the current occupational exposure limit. Over the last decades the use of cobalt-chromium hard-metal alloys in orthopedic joint replacements, in particular in metal-on-metal bearings in hip joint arthroplasty, has created an entirely new source of internal cobalt exposure. Corrosion and wear produce soluble metal ions and metal debris in the form of huge numbers of wear particles in nanometric size, with systemic dissemination through lymph and systemic vascular system. This may cause adverse local reactions in peri-prosthetic soft-tissues, and in addition systemic toxicity. Of note, the metal nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be clearly more toxic than larger, micrometer-sized particles, and this has made the concept of nanotoxicology a crucial, new

  3. Tailoring the magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, A. Estrada de la; Garza-Navarro, M. A., E-mail: marco.garzanr@uanl.edu.mx; Durán-Guerrero, J. G.; Moreno Cortez, I. E.; Lucio-Porto, R.; González-González, V. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica (Mexico)

    2016-01-15

    In this contribution, we report on the tuning of magnetic properties of cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters. The cobalt-ferrite nanoclusters were synthesized from a two-step approach that consists of the synthesis of cobalt-ferrite nanoparticles in organic media, followed by their dispersion into aqueous dissolution to form an oil-in-water emulsion. These emulsions were prepared at three different concentrations of the cationic surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), in order to control the size and clustering density of the nanoparticles in the nanoclusters. The synthesized samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and their related techniques, such as bright-field and Z-contrast imaging, electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry; as well as static magnetic measures. The experimental evidence indicates that the size, morphology, and nanoparticles clustering density in the nanoclusters is highly dependent of the cobalt-ferrite:CTAB molar ratio that is used in their synthesis. In addition, due to the clustering of the nanoparticles into the nanoclusters, their magnetic moments are blocked to relax cooperatively. Hence, the magnetic response of the nanoclusters can be tailored by controlling the size and nanoparticles clustering density.

  4. Titanium Carbide: Nanotechnology, Properties, Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galevsky, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.; Garbuzova, A. K.; Valuev, D. V.

    2015-09-01

    The paper develops scientific and technological bases for fabrication of titanium carbide which is a nanocomponent of composite materials. The authors determine optimum technology specifications and the main titanium carbide properties: fineness of titaniferous raw materials, carbide-forming agent quantity, set temperature of plasma flow, tempering temperature, titanium carbide yield, productivity, specific surface, size and shape of particles. The paper includes equations to describe how the major specifications of the fabrication technique influence the content of titanium carbide and free carbon in the end product.

  5. Silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salvatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to a process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  6. Research on Diamond Enhanced Tungsten Carbide Composite Button

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    At the present, the cutters used in button bits and rock bits are mainly cobalt tungsten carbide in our country. Because of its low abrasive resistance, the bit service life and drilling efficiency was very low when the hard and extremely hard formations were being drilled. Owing to its high abrasive resistance, the diamond composite material is widely used in drilling operations. However, its toughness against impact is too low to be used in percussion drilling, only can it be used in rotary drilling. In ...

  7. Characterization of Silicon Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The various electrical and structural measurement techniques for silicon carbide are described. The electrical measurements include conductivity, resistivity, carrier concentration, mobility, doping energy levels, and lifetime. The structural measurements include polytype determination and crystalline perfection. Both bulk and epitaxial films are included.

  8. Composition Comprising Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehregany, Mehran (Inventor); Zorman, Christian A. (Inventor); Fu, Xiao-An (Inventor); Dunning, Jeremy L. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of depositing a ceramic film, particularly a silicon carbide film, on a substrate is disclosed in which the residual stress, residual stress gradient, and resistivity are controlled. Also disclosed are substrates having a deposited film with these controlled properties and devices, particularly MEMS and NEMS devices, having substrates with films having these properties.

  9. Thermal Properties of Polyimide Composites with Nanostructured Silicon Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyona Igorevna Wozniak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of polyimide composites reinforced with different loadings of silicon carbide (SiC nanoparticles are prepared by in-situ polymerization technique. The polyimide (PI matrix resin is derived from 4,4’-oxydianiline (4,4’-ODA and pyromelliticdianhydride (PMDA. The dispersions of SiC nanoparticles are prepared via ultrasonic irradiation or mechanical homogenization. In this method, the SiC nanoparticles are dispersed in diamine solution followed by polymerization with dianhydride. The composites obtained under sonication were found to have lower thermal properties than composites prepared under homogenization.

  10. Electrodeposition of Cobalt Nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sungbok; Hong, Kimin [Chungnam National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-03-15

    We developed an electroplating process of cobalt nanowires of which line-widths were between 70 and 200 nm. The plating electrolyte was made of CoSO{sub 4} and an organic additive, dimethyldithiocarbamic acid ester sodium salt (DAESA). DAESA in plating electrolytes had an accelerating effect and reduced the surface roughness of plated cobalt thin films. We obtained void-free cobalt nanowires when the plating current density was 6.25 mA/cm{sup 2} and DAESA concentration was 1 mL/L.

  11. Effect of Cobalt Particle Size on Acetone Steam Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Junming; Zhang, He; Yu, Ning; Davidson, Stephen; Wang, Yong

    2015-06-11

    Carbon-supported cobalt nanoparticles with different particle sizes were synthesized and characterized by complementary characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, N-2 sorption, acetone temperature-programmed desorption, transmission electron microscopy, and CO chemisorption. Using acetone steam reforming reaction as a probe reaction, we revealed a volcano-shape curve of the intrinsic activity (turnover frequency of acetone) and the CO2 selectivity as a function of the cobalt particle size with the highest activity and selectivity observed at a particle size of approximately 12.8nm. Our results indicate that the overall performance of acetone steam reforming is related to a combination of particle-size-dependent acetone decomposition, water dissociation, and the oxidation state of the cobalt nanoparticles.

  12. Structural modifications under reactive atmosphere of cobalt catalysts; Modifications structurales sous atmospheres reactionnelles de catalyseurs a base de cobalt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducreux, O.

    1999-11-23

    The purpose of this work was to develop in situ methods under reactive dynamic conditions (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) to describe the active phase structure in order to understand Fischer-Tropsch catalyst behaviour and improve the natural gas conversion process performance. Experiments were designed to correlate structural modifications with catalytic results. The effect of ruthenium used as a promoter has also been studied. The impregnation process increases cobalt-support interaction. The presence of ruthenium promoter reduces this effect. Interactions between Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} oxide and support play an important role in the reducibility of cobalt and in the resulting metal structure. This in turn strongly influences the catalytic behaviour. Our results show a close correlation between structure modification and reactivity in the systems studied. Cobalt metal and CO can react to form a carbide Co{sub 2}C under conditions close to those of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. This carbide formation seems to be related to a deactivation process. The presence of interstitial carbon formed by dissociation of CO is proposed as a key to understanding the mechanism of the Fischer-Tropsch reaction. A specific catalyst activation treatment was developed to increase the catalytic activity. This work permits correlation of materials structure with their chemical properties and demonstrates the contribution of in situ physico-chemical characterisation methods to describe solids under reactive atmosphere. (author)

  13. Effect of Plasma Boronitriding on Diamond Nucle-ation and Growth onto Cemented Carbide Substrates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    满卫东; 汪建华; 马志斌; 王传新

    2002-01-01

    Plasma boronitriding has been successfully employed to overcome the difficulty in diamond growth on ferrous-based substrates. Commercial cobalt-sintered, tungsten-cemented carbides (WC(Co)) were pretreated by a plasma boronitriding method, diamond was then deposited by microwave-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD). The deposited films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Continuous diamond films with a sharp characteristic Raman peak of 1334 cm-1 were grown and adhered well on the boronitrided region of the cemented carbide substrates. On the other hand, a mixture of diamond crystallites, amorphous carbon and graphitic carbon was loosely deposited on the unboronitrided region. A cobalt inert thin layer formed after plasma boronitriding pretreatment enabled the subsequent nucleation and growth of a high-quality CVD diamond.

  14. Preparation and investigation of ultrafine-grained tungsten carbide with high hardness and fracture toughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvil'deev, V. N.; Blagoveshchenskii, Yu. V.; Sakharov, N. V.; Boldin, M. S.; Nokhrin, A. V.; Isaeva, N. V.; Shotin, S. V.; Lopatin, Yu. G.; Smirnova, E. S.

    2015-07-01

    High-density samples of ultrafine-grained tungsten carbide with high hardness (up to 31-34 GPa) and increased fracture toughness (up to 5.2-6.4 MPa m1/2) are obtained using the technology of electropulse plasma sintering. The influence of the initial size of nanoparticles of α-WC prepared by plasmachemical synthesis on the density, structural parameters, and mechanical properties of tungsten carbide is investigated.

  15. Chemical Analysis Methods for Silicon Carbide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shen Keyin

    2006-01-01

    @@ 1 General and Scope This Standard specifies the determination method of silicon dioxide, free silicon, free carbon, total carbon, silicon carbide, ferric sesquioxide in silicon carbide abrasive material.

  16. High-Loading Nickel Cobaltate Nanoparticles Anchored on Three-Dimensional N-Doped Graphene as an Efficient Bifunctional Catalyst for Lithium-Oxygen Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Hao; Xue, Hairong; Wang, Tao; Guo, Hu; Fan, Xiaoli; Song, Li; Xia, Wei; He, Jianping

    2016-07-20

    The lithium-oxygen batteries have been considered as the progressive energy storage equipment for their expected specific energy. To improve the electrochemical catalytic performance in the lithium-oxygen batteries, the NiCo2O4 nanoparticles (NCONPs) are firmly anchored onto the surface of the N-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-rGO) by the hydrothermal method followed by low-temperature calcination. Compared with the pure metallic oxide, the introduction of the rGO can create the high surface area, which give a good performance for ORR (oxygen reduction reaction), and improve the electrical conductivity between the NCONPs. The high-loading NCONPs also ensure the material to have great catalytic activity for OER (oxygen evolution reaction), and the rGO can be protected by the nanoparticles coating against the side reaction with the Li2O2. The as-synthesized NCO@N-rGO composites deliver a specific surface area (about 242.5 m(2) g(-1)), exhibiting three-dimensional (3D) porous structure, which provides a large passageway for the diffusion of the oxygen and benefits the infiltration of electrolyte and the storage of the discharge products. Owing to these special architectures features and intrinsic materials, the NCO@N-rGO cathode delivers a high specific capacity (6716 mAh g(-1)), great rate performance, and excellent cycling stability with cutoff capacity of 1000 mAh g(-1) (112 cycles) in the lithium-oxygen batteries. The improved electrochemical catalytic activity and the special 3D porous structure make the NCO@N-rGO composites be a promising candidate for Li-O2 batteries.

  17. Fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles-enhanced chemiluminescence from hydrogen peroxide-hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide-bicarbonate in presence of cobalt(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinge; Li, Qianqian; Lu, Chao; Zhao, Lixia; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2011-02-01

    Nonionic fluorosurfactant (FSN)-capped gold nanoparticles (GNPs) remain excellently stable at a wider pH range and high ionic strength, which is useful to investigate some CL systems involved in high salt and a strict pH range. In this study, we utilized FSN-capped GNPs of different sizes to distinguish the emitting species from H 2O 2-Co 2+-NaOH and H 2O 2-Co 2+-NaHCO 3 systems. When the pH of FSN-capped gold colloidal solution was adjusted to 10.2 by dropwise addition of 0.05 M NaOH, the CL intensity of H 2O 2-Co 2+-NaHCO 3 system was enhanced 6-fold or 60-fold respectively in the presence of FSN-capped 14 nm or 69 nm GNPs with comparison to H 2O 2-Co 2+-NaOH. The variation of CL spectra and UV-vis spectra, as well as the quenching effect of reactive oxygen species scavengers were studied in detail to understand the CL enhancement mechanisms of FSN-capped GNPs on the two systems. For H 2O 2-Co 2+-NaOH system, the gold(I) complexes intermediate and singlet oxygen dimol species were proposed as the emitting species. The excited states of the carbon dioxide dimers and singlet oxygen dimol species were considered responsible for the light emission of H 2O 2-Co 2+-NaHCO 3 system. To our knowledge, this work is the first time to study the two CL systems simultaneously using nanoparticles.

  18. PIXE characterization of by-products resulting from the zinc recycling of industrial cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemantle, C.S. [School of Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering and DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, P/Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Pilot Tools (Pty) (Ltd), P.O. Box 27420, Benrose 2011 (South Africa); Sacks, N. [School of Chemical & Metallurgical Engineering and DST-NRF Centre of Excellence in Strong Materials, University of the Witwatersrand, P/Bag 3, Wits 2050 (South Africa); Topic, M. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Pineda-Vargas, C.A. [iThemba LABS, National Research Foundation, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Faculty of Health & Wellness Sciences, CPUT, Bellville (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    By-product materials of the widely used zinc recycling process of cemented carbides have been studied. Scanning electron microscopy and micro-PIXE techniques have identified elemental concentrations, distributions and purity of by-product materials from an industrial zinc recycling plant. Cobalt surface enrichment, lamellar microstructures of varying composition, including alternating tungsten carbide (WC) grains and globular cobalt, and regions of excess zinc contamination were found in materials with incomplete zinc penetration. Liquid Co–Zn formation occurred above 72 wt.% Zn at the furnace temperature of 930 °C, and was extracted towards the surface of poorly zinc infiltrated material, primarily by the vacuum used for zinc distillation. Surface enrichment was not observed in material that was zinc infiltrated to the sample center, which was more friable and exhibited more homogeneous porosity and elemental concentrations. The result of incomplete zinc infiltration was an enriched surface zone of up to 60 wt.% Co, compared to an original sample composition of ∼10–15 wt.% Co. The impact on resulting powders could be higher or inhomogeneous cobalt content, as well as unacceptably high zinc concentrations. PIXE has proven it can be a powerful technique for solving industrial problems in the cemented carbide cutting tool industry, by identifying trace elements and their locations (such as Zn to 0.1 wt.% accuracy), as well as the distribution of major elements within WC–Co materials.

  19. Effects of carbon on the stability and chemical performance of transition metal carbides: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping; Rodriguez, José A.

    2004-03-01

    Density functional theory was employed to study the stabilities and chemical activities of transition metal carbides. Here we take the well-known Mo carbides and Ti carbides as an example. Different kinds of structures including the bulk surfaces [Mo2C(001), MoC(001), and TiC(001)] and metcars [Mo8C12 and Ti8C12] are taken into consideration. Systematic studies show that by raising the C coordination number of the metal atoms in the carbides, in general the stability of the carbides increases (metcars are an exception since they include both high-coordinated and low-coordinated metal atoms.); at the same time, the chemical activities of the carbides decrease due to a downshift of the metal d-band center (ligand effect). Considering the better catalysts those that combine high stability and moderate chemical activity, our results suggest that the catalytic potential of Mo carbide systems should decrease in the following sequence: Mo8C12>Mo2C(001) or MoC(001)>pure Mo(110). In spite of having the largest C/Mo ratio, the metcar appears as the most attractive system. Our studies also indicate that the "magic" behavior of metcars is not unique for Mo carbides. Similar behavior is also observed for Ti carbides. This implies that nanoparticles like metcar species could exhibit better performances than the corresponding bulk metal carbides as catalysts.

  20. Friction and metal transfer for single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with various metals in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1978-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal silicon carbide in contact with transition metals (tungsten, iron, rhodium, nickel, titanium, and cobalt), copper, and aluminum. Results indicate the coefficient of friction for a silicon carbide-metal system is related to the d bond character and relative chemical activity of the metal. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. All the metals examined transferred to the surface of silicon carbide in sliding. The chemical activity of metal to silicon and carbon and shear modulus of the metal may play important roles in metal transfer and the form of the wear debris. The less active and greater resistance to shear the metal has, with the exception of rhodium and tungsten, the less transfer to silicon carbide.

  1. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu; Li, Hui; Liu, Xu-Jun; Guan, Lei-Lei; Li, Yan-Li; Sun, Jian; Ying, Zhi-Feng; Wu, Jia-Da; Xu, Ning

    2014-06-01

    Evenly separated crystalline CuIn0.8Ga0.2Se2 (CIGS) nanoparticles are deposited on ITO-glass substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Such CIGS layers are introduced between conjugated polymer layers and ITO-glass substrates for enhancing light absorbance of polymer solar cells. The P3HT:PCBM absorbance between 300 and 650 nm is enhanced obviously due to the introduction of CIGS nanoparticles. The current density-voltage curves of a P3HT:PCBM/CIGS solar cell demonstrate that the short-circuit current density is improved from 0.77 to 1.20 mA/cm2. The photoluminescence spectra show that the excitons in the polymer are obviously quenched, suggesting that the charge transfer between the P3HT:PCBM and CIGS occurred. The results reveal that the CIGS nanoparticles may exhibit the localized surface plasmon resonance effect just as metallic nanostructures.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of magnetic cobalt ferrite nanoparticles covered with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane for use as hybrid material in nano technology; Sintese e caracterizacao de nanoparticulas magneticas de ferrita de cobalto recobertas por 3-aminopropiltrietoxissilano para uso como material hibrido em nanotecnologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilo, Ruth Luqueze

    2006-07-01

    Nowadays with the appear of nano science and nano technology, magnetic nanoparticles have been finding a variety of applications in the fields of biomedicine, diagnosis, molecular biology, biochemistry, catalysis, etc. The magnetic functionalized nanoparticles are constituted of a magnetic nucleus, involved by a polymeric layer with active sites, which ones could anchor metals or selective organic compounds. These nanoparticles are considered organic inorganic hybrid materials and have great interest as materials for commercial applications due to the specific properties. Among the important applications it can be mentioned: magneto hyperthermia treatment, drugs delivery in specific local of the body, molecular recognition, biosensors, enhancement of nuclear magnetic resonance images quality, etc. This work was developed in two parts: 1) the synthesis of the nucleus composed by superparamagnetic nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite and, 2) the recovering of nucleus by a polymeric bifunctional 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The parameters studied in the first part of the research were: pH, hydroxide molar concentration, hydroxide type, reagent order of addition, reagent way of addition, speed of shake, metals initial concentrations, molar fraction of cobalt and thermal treatment. In the second part it was studied: pH, temperature, catalyst type, catalyst concentration, time of reaction, relation ratios of H{sub 2}O/silane, type of medium and the efficiency of the recovering regarding to pH. The products obtained were characterized using the following techniques X-ray powder diffraction (DRX), transmission electronic microscopy (TEM), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), spectroscopy of scatterbrained energy spectroscopy (DES), atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTGA), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and magnetization curves (VSM). (author)

  3. A new approach for bisphenol A detection employing fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticle-amplified chemiluminescence from cobalt(II) and peroxymonocarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Liu, Lin; Dong, Shichao; Lu, Chao

    2014-07-15

    In this work, we utilized the nonionic fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a novel chemiluminescence (CL) probe for the determination of trace bisphenol A. Bisphenol A can induce a sharp decrease in CL intensity from the GNP-Co(2+)-peroxymonocarbonate (HCO4(-)) system. Under the selected experimental conditions, a linear relationship was obtained between the CL intensity and the logarithm of concentration of bisphenol A in the range of 0.05-50 μM (R(2) = 0.9936), and the detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for bisphenol A was 10 nM. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by determining bisphenol A in real polycarbonate samples with satisfactory results. The recoveries for bisphenol A in spiked samples were found to be between 94.4% and 105.0%. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 12 repeated measurements of 0.5 μM bisphenol A was 2.2%. The proposed method described herein was simple, selective and obviated the need of extensive sample pretreatment.

  4. A new approach for bisphenol A detection employing fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticle-amplified chemiluminescence from cobalt(II) and peroxymonocarbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Liu, Lin; Dong, Shichao; Lu, Chao

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we utilized the nonionic fluorosurfactant-capped gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a novel chemiluminescence (CL) probe for the determination of trace bisphenol A. Bisphenol A can induce a sharp decrease in CL intensity from the GNP-Co2+-peroxymonocarbonate (HCO4-) system. Under the selected experimental conditions, a linear relationship was obtained between the CL intensity and the logarithm of concentration of bisphenol A in the range of 0.05-50 μM (R2 = 0.9936), and the detection limit at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3 for bisphenol A was 10 nM. The applicability of the proposed method has been validated by determining bisphenol A in real polycarbonate samples with satisfactory results. The recoveries for bisphenol A in spiked samples were found to be between 94.4% and 105.0%. The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 12 repeated measurements of 0.5 μM bisphenol A was 2.2%. The proposed method described herein was simple, selective and obviated the need of extensive sample pretreatment.

  5. Silicon carbide sewing thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems provide lightweight thermal insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  6. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  7. Oxidation Behavior of Carbon Nanoparticles/Silicon Carbide Composite Ceramics%纳米碳颗粒/碳化硅陶瓷基复合材料的氧化行为

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆有军; 王燕民; 吴澜尔; 黄振坤

    2013-01-01

    以微米硅(Si)和纳米碳黑(Cp)粉体为主要原料,采用经机械化学法合成的碳化硅(SiC)和15%和25%的纳米碳颗粒与碳化硅(Cp-SiC)的复合粉体,并经无压烧结得到了Cp/SiC陶瓷基复合材料,分析了在不同温度条件下Cp/SiC烧结体的氧化行为。结果表明:当温度小于700℃时,Cp/SiC复合陶瓷在空气中的氧化受C-O2反应控制,致使其为均匀氧化;700℃时,氧化后的复合材料显气孔率最大,弯曲强度达极小值;大于700℃,氧化过程受O2的气相扩散控制,呈非均匀氧化;700~900℃之间,O2通过微裂纹的扩散控制着Cp/SiC的氧化过程;900~1100℃之间,O2通过SiC缺陷的扩散控制着Cp/SiC的氧化过程,并在1000℃时的最初的2 h内,复合材料弯曲强度增大,且达到了极大值。同时表明,纳米碳含量是影响复合材料强度及氧化行为的关键因素,添加纳米碳质量分数为15%的Cp/SiC复合陶瓷可以作为一种抗氧化性能优良的玻璃夹具材料。%The oxidation behavior of three pressureless-sintered silicon carbide (SiC), 15%Cp/SiC and 25%Cp/SiC composites,which were prepared with carbon nanoparticles (Cp) and silicon micron-sized particles by a mechanochemical method, at various tempera-tures was investigated. The results show that the oxidation of Cp/SiC ceramics in air is controlled via C+O2 reaction at<700℃, the bending strength of samples decreases to a minimum value at 700℃; the oxidation is controlled by O2 diffusion through mi-cro-cracks unequally in the range of 700-900℃;the oxidation of Cp/SiC is controlled by O2 diffusion through the structural defects of matrix in the range of 900-1 100℃. The bending strength of composites reaches to a maximum value during initial 2 h at 1 000℃due to the formation of SiO2 layer and the healing defects of matrix. It is also indicated that the addition of Cp in the composite has an effect on the bending strength and the

  8. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  9. Studies on structural and magnetic properties of ternary cobalt magnesium zinc (CMZ) Co{sub 0.6-x}Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 0.4} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6) ferrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Manpreet, E-mail: manpreetchem@pau.edu; Jain, Palak; Singh, Mandeep

    2015-07-15

    In this paper we report the variation in structural and magnetic properties of ternary ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) having stoichiometery Co{sub 0.6-x}Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 0.4} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6) and pure spinel ferrites MFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (M = Mg, Co). NPs with average particle diameter of 25–45 nm were synthesized employing self-propagating oxalyl dihydrazide - metal nitrate combustion method. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and FT-IR spectroscopy. FT-IR spectral analysis revealed two bands centered at 560 and 440 cm{sup −1} for tetrahedral and octahedral metal–oxygen bond stretching. Zinc doping caused red shift in the frequency band of tetrahedral M−O stretching. XRD powder diffraction patterns confirmed the formation of spinel ferrite nanoparticles, expansion of the lattice on zinc doping and enhancement of spinel phase purity in the doped ferrites. Cobalt ferrite displayed lowering of the magnetic parameters on zinc doping which further decreased in ternary ferrites Co{sub 0.6-x}Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} on replacing cobalt ions with non-magnetic magnesium ions up to x = 0.4. At x = 0.6 reverse trend was observed and Ms was enhanced. Magnesium zinc ferrite Mg{sub 0.6}Zn{sub 0.4} Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high value of Ms was obtained. Combustion process employed in the present studies serves as a low temperature facile route for the synthesis and structural analysis of ternary doped ferrite nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Ternary doped cobalt magnesium zinc ferrite nanoparticles are synthesized. • FT-IR displayed red shift in tetrahedral stretching band on Zinc doping. • Expansion of lattice and enhancement of spinel phase purity on zinc doping. • The variation in saturation magnetization (Ms) on doping is explained.

  10. nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Cabedo, Patricia; Mondragon, Rosa; Hernandez, Leonor; Martinez-Cuenca, Raul; Cabedo, Luis; Julia, J. Enrique

    2014-10-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) is extremely important in concentrated solar power (CSP) plants since it represents the main difference and advantage of CSP plants with respect to other renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, etc. CSP represents a low-carbon emission renewable source of energy, and TES allows CSP plants to have energy availability and dispatchability using available industrial technologies. Molten salts are used in CSP plants as a TES material because of their high operational temperature and stability of up to 500°C. Their main drawbacks are their relative poor thermal properties and energy storage density. A simple cost-effective way to improve thermal properties of fluids is to dope them with nanoparticles, thus obtaining the so-called salt-based nanofluids. In this work, solar salt used in CSP plants (60% NaNO3 + 40% KNO3) was doped with silica nanoparticles at different solid mass concentrations (from 0.5% to 2%). Specific heat was measured by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). A maximum increase of 25.03% was found at an optimal concentration of 1 wt.% of nanoparticles. The size distribution of nanoparticle clusters present in the salt at each concentration was evaluated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image processing, as well as by means of dynamic light scattering (DLS). The cluster size and the specific surface available depended on the solid content, and a relationship between the specific heat increment and the available particle surface area was obtained. It was proved that the mechanism involved in the specific heat increment is based on a surface phenomenon. Stability of samples was tested for several thermal cycles and thermogravimetric analysis at high temperature was carried out, the samples being stable.

  11. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  12. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, Paul K.; Abney, Kent D.; Kinkead, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  13. Calorimetric examination of mixtures for modification of nickel and cobalt superalloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Binczyk

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The study presents the results of thermodynamic calculations and calorimetric examination of thermal reactions taking place at hightemperatures between the nanoparticle inoculants and metallic constituents of nickel and cobalt superalloys. The calculations andmeasurements were made for different compositions, containing cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4, cobalt oxide CoO*Co2O3, zircon flourZrSi2O4, powdered and metallic Al, powdered Ti, and IN-713C alloy. The obtained results have indicated the possibility of using certainmixtures as potential inoculating additives for the volume modification of nickel and cobalt superalloys. A characteristic feature of these alloys is the formation of a detrimental structure containing very large columnar crystal, present even in castings of a very high solidification rate. It has been proved that the inoculant most effective in the formation of the structure of equiaxial grains is the inoculant based on cobalt aluminate, colloidal silica and powdered aluminium.

  14. Technology of Iron Carbide Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.Bahgat

    2006-01-01

    Iron carbides are very promising metallurgical products and can be used for steelmaking process, where it plays as an alternative raw material with significant economic advantages. Also it has many other applications,e.g. catalysts, magnets, sensors. The present review investigates the different properties and uses of the iron carbides. The commercial production and the different varieties for the iron carbides synthesis (gaseous carburization, mechanochemical synthesis, laser pyrolysis, plasma pyrolysis, chemical vapor deposition and ion implantation) were reviewed. Also the effect of different factors on the carburization process like gas composition, raw material, temperature, reaction time, catalyst presence and sulfur addition was indicated.

  15. Fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xin; Jiang, Jun; Liu, Chao; Yuan, Jun

    2009-09-01

    Chemical composition and crystal structure of fivefold twinned boron carbide nanowires have been determined by electron energy-loss spectroscopy and electron diffraction. The fivefold cyclic twinning relationship is confirmed by systematic axial rotation electron diffraction. Detailed chemical analysis reveals a carbon-rich boron carbide phase. Such boron carbide nanowires are potentially interesting because of their intrinsic hardness and high temperature thermoelectric property. Together with other boron-rich compounds, they may form a set of multiply twinned nanowire systems where the misfit strain could be continuously tuned to influence their mechanical properties.

  16. Cobalt Nanoparticles Promoted Highly Efficient One Pot Four-Component Synthesis of 1,4-Dihydropyridines under Solvent-Free Conditions%Cobalt Nanoparticles Promoted Highly Efficient One Pot Four-Component Synthesis of1,4-Dihydropyridines under Solvent-Free Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Javad SAFARI; Sayed Hossein BANITABA; Shiva DEHGHAN KHALILI

    2011-01-01

    A straightforward and general method has been developed for the synthesis of Cs-unsubstitiuted 1,4-dihydropyridines by a reaction using dimedone,acetophenone,aromatic aldehydes,and ammonium acetate in the presence of a catalytic amount of Co nanoparticles as a heterogeneous and eco-friendly catalyst with high catalytic activity at room temperature under solvent-free conditions.This catalyst is easily separated by magnetic devices and can be reused without any apparent loss of activity for the reaction.In addition,it is very interesting that when using Co nanoparticles as a catalyst,spatially-hindered aldehydes such as 2-methoxy-,2-fluoro-,and 2-chloro-aldehydes are suitable for this reaction.

  17. Opportunities from the nanoworld : Gas phase nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.; Koch, S. A.; Vystavel, T.; De Hosson, J. Th. M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present studies related to coalescence and oxidation of transition metal nanoparticles with sizes ranging between 2 and 10 nm. For cobalt and iron exposure to air leads to thin oxide shell formation (thickness

  18. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  19. Ballistic Evaluation of rolled Homogeneous Steel Armor with Tungsten Carbide and Titanium Carbide Facing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-12-01

    LABORATORIES BALLISTIC EVALUATION OF ROLLED HMtOGE14EOUS STEEL ASWKR f VITH TUNGSTEN CARBIDE AND TITANIUM CARBIDE FACING (U) TECHNICAL REPORT NO. WAL...carbide steel and titanium carbide steel composite armor when attacked by cal. .40 H19B WC cores, cal. .0 AP W2 projectiles, ZOIN fragment simulating...determine the effectiveness of tungsten car- bide (WC) and titanium carbide (TIC) facing on steel armor for the defeat of steel and tungsten carbide

  20. Influences of the microstructure on the wear resistance of cobalt-based ahoy coatings obtained by plasma transferred arc process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Qingyu; GAO Jiasheng

    2005-01-01

    The microstructure, substructure, and wear characteristic of cobalt-based alloy coatings obtained by plasma transferred arc (PTA) process were investigated using optical metallurgical microscope, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and dry sand abrasion tester (DSAT). The aging effect on the structure and wear resistance of the cobalt-based PTA coating was also studied. The results show that the as-welded coating consists of cobalt-based solid solution with face-centered cubic structure and hexagonal (Cr, Fe)7C3. There are a lot of stacking faults existing in the cobalt-based solid solution. After aging at 600℃ for 60 h, the microstructure becomes coarse, and another carbide (Cr, Fe)23C6 precipitates. As a result, the wear mass loss of the aged sample is higher than that of the as-welded sample.

  1. TRANSFORMATIONS IN NANO-DIAMONDS WITH FORMATION OF NANO-POROUS SILICON CARBIDE AT HIGH PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains investigations on regularities of diamond - silicon carbide composite structure formation at impact-wave excitation. It has been determined that while squeezing a porous blank containing Si (SiC nano-diamond by explosive detonation products some processes are taking place such as diamond nano-particles consolidation, reverse diamond transition into graphite, fragments formation from silicon carbide. A method for obtaining high-porous composites with the presence of ultra-disperse diamond particles has been developed. Material with three-dimensional high-porous silicon-carbide structure has been received due to nano-diamond graphitation at impact wave transmission and plastic deformation. The paper reveals nano-diamonds inverse transformation into graphite and its subsequent interaction with the silicon accompanied by formation of silicon-carbide fragments with dimensions of up to 100 nm.

  2. Synthesis of Samarium Cobalt Nanoblades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darren M. Steele

    2010-08-25

    As new portable particle acceleration technologies become feasible the need for small high performance permanent magnets becomes critical. With particle accelerating cavities of a few microns, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) candidate demands magnets of comparable size. To address this need, samarium cobalt (SmCo) nanoblades were attempted to be synthesized using the polyol process. Since it is preferable to have blades of 1-2 {micro}m in length, key parameters affecting size and morphology including method of stirring, reaction temperature, reaction time and addition of hydroxide were examined. Nanoparticles consisting of 70-200 nm spherical clusters with a 3-5 nm polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) coating were synthesized at 285 C and found to be ferromagnetic. Nanoblades of 25nm in length were observed at the surface of the nanoclusters and appeared to suggest agglomeration was occurring even with PVP employed. Morphology and size were characterized using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Powder X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis was conducted to determine composition but no supportive evidence for any particular SmCo phase has yet been observed.

  3. Synthesis and Adsorption Property of SiO2@Co(OH2 Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongde Meng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Silica nanoparticles were directly coated with cobalt hydroxide by homogeneous precipitation of slowly decomposing urea in cobalt nitrate solution. The cobalt hydroxide was amorphous, and its morphology was nanoflower-like. The BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area of the core-shell composite was 221 m2/g. Moreover, the possible formation procedure is proposed: the electropositive cobalt ions were first adsorbed on the electronegative silica nanoparticles surface, which hydrolyzed to form cobalt hydroxide nanoparticles. Then, the cobalt hydroxide nanoparticles were aggregated to form nanoflakes. Finally, the nanoflakes self-assembled, forming cobalt hydroxide nanoflowers. Adsorption measurement showed that the core-shell composite exhibited excellent adsorption capability of Rhodamine B (RB.

  4. Effects of TiO2 and TiC Nanofillers on the Performance of Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Based on the Polymer Gel Electrolyte of a Cobalt Redox System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, Shanmuganathan; Liu, I-Ping; Chen, Li-Tung; Hou, Yi-Chen; Li, Chiao-Wei; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2016-09-21

    Polymer gel electrolytes (PGEs) of cobalt redox system are prepared for dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) applications. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) is used as a gelator of an acetonitrile (ACN) liquid electrolyte containing tris(2,2'-bipyridine)cobalt(II/III) redox couple. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and titanium carbide (TiC) nanoparticles are utilized as nanofillers (NFs) of this PGE, and the effects of the two NFs on the conductivity of the PGEs, charge-transfer resistances at the electrode/PGE interface, and the performance of the gel-state DSSCs are studied and compared. The results show that the presence of TiC NFs significantly increases the conductivity of the PGE and decreases the charge-transfer resistance at the Pt counter-electrode (CE)/PGE interface. Therefore, the gel-state DSSC utilizing TiC NFs can achieve a conversion efficiency (6.29%) comparable to its liquid counterpart (6.30%), and, furthermore, the cell efficiency can retain 94% of its initial value after a 1000 h stability test at 50 °C. On the contrary, introduction of TiO2 NFs in the PGE causes a decrease of cell performances. It shows that the presence of TiO2 NFs increases the charge-transfer resistance at the Pt CE/PGE interface, induces the charge recombination at the photoanode/PGE interface, and, furthermore, causes a dye desorption in a long-term-stability test. These results are different from those reported for the iodide redox system and are ascribed to a specific attractive interaction between TiO2 and cobalt redox ions.

  5. Graphene/cobalt nanocarrier for hyperthermia therapy and MRI diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatamie, Shadie; Ahadian, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghiass, Mohammad Adel; Iraji Zad, Azam; Saber, Reza; Parseh, Benyamin; Oghabian, Mohammad Ali; Shanehsazzadeh, Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are promising materials for theranostic nanomedicine applications, which are defined as the ability to diagnose, provide targeted therapy and monitor the response to the therapy. In this study, the composites were synthesized via chemical method, using graphene oxide as the source material and assembling cobalt nanoparticles of 15nm over the surface of graphene sheets. Various characterization techniques were then employed to reveal the morphology, size and structure of the nanocomposites, such as X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and ultraviolet visible spectroscopy. Using ion-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, cobalt concentration in the nanocomposites was found to be 80%. In addition, cytotoxicity of graphene/cobalt nanocomposites were evaluated using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide or MTT assay. MTT viability assay exhibited biocompatibility to L929 mouse fibroblasts cells, under a high dose of 100μg/mL over 24h. Hyperthermia results showed the superior conversion of electromagnetic energy into heat at 350kHz frequency for 0.01 and 0.005g/L of the nanocomposites solution. The measured heat generation and energy transfer results were anticipated by the finite element analysis, conducted for the 3D structure. Magnetic resonance imaging characteristics also showed that negatively charge graphene/cobalt nanocomposites are suitable for T1-weighted imaging.

  6. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer (grade 5 of 5 in the guinea-pig maximization test) that is used in various industrial and consumer applications. To prevent sensitization to cobalt and elicitation of allergic cobalt dermatitis, information about the elicitation threshold level...... of cobalt is important. OBJECTIVE: To identify the dermatitis elicitation threshold levels in cobalt-allergic individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published patch test dose-response studies were reviewed to determine the elicitation dose (ED) levels in dermatitis patients with a previous positive patch test...... reaction to cobalt. A logistic dose-response model was applied to data collected from the published literature to estimate ED values. The 95% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of mean doses that can elicit a reaction in 10% (ED(10)) of a population was calculated with Fieller's method. RESULTS...

  7. Cobalt sorption in silica-pillared clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampieri, A; Fetter, G; Bosch, P; Bulbulian, S

    2006-01-03

    Silicon pillared samples were prepared following conventional and microwave irradiation methods. The samples were characterized and tested in cobalt sorption. Ethylenediammine was added before cobalt addition to improve the amount of cobalt retained. The amount of cobalt introduced in the original clay in the presence of ethylenediammine was the highest. In calcined pillared clays the cobalt retention with ethylenediammine was lower (ca. 40%). In all cases the presence of ethylenediammine increased twice the amount of cobalt sorption measured for aqueous solutions.

  8. Bioaccessibility testing of cobalt compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stopford, Woodhall; Turner, John; Cappellini, Danielle; Brock, Tom

    2003-08-01

    Testing of metal compounds for solubility in artificial fluids has been used for many years to assist determining human health risk from exposure to specific compounds of concern. In lieu of obtaining bioavailability data from samples of urine, blood, or other tissues, these studies measured solubility of compounds in various artificial fluids as a surrogate for bioavailability. In this context, the measurement of metal "bioaccessibility" can be used as an in vitro substitute for measuring metal bioavailability. Bioaccessibility can be defined as a value representing the availability of metal for absorption when dissolved in in vitro surrogates of body fluids or juices. The aim of this study was to measure and compare the bioaccessibility of selected cobalt compounds in artificial human tissue fluids and human serum. A second aim was to initiate studies to experimentally validate an in vitro methodology that would provide a conservative estimate of cobalt bioavailability in the assessment of dose from human exposure to various species of cobalt compounds. This study evaluated the bioaccessibility of cobalt(II) from 11 selected cobalt compounds and an alloy in 2 physical forms in 5 surrogate human tissue fluids and human serum. Four (4) separate extraction times were used up to 72 hours. The effect of variables such as pH, dissolution time, and mass-ion effect on cobalt bioaccessibility were assessed as well. We found that the species of cobalt compound as well as the physico-chemical properties of the surrogate fluids, especially pH, had a major impact on cobalt solubility. Cobalt salts such as cobalt(II) sulfate heptahydrate were highly soluble, whereas cobalt alloys used in medical implants and cobalt aluminate spinels used as pigments, showed minimal dissolution over the period of the assay.

  9. Cobalt and antimony: genotoxicity and carcinogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline; Lison, Dominique

    2003-12-10

    The purpose of this review is to summarise the data concerning genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of Co and Sb. Both metals have multiple industrial and/or therapeutical applications, depending on the considered species. Cobalt is used for the production of alloys and hard metal (cemented carbide), diamond polishing, drying agents, pigments and catalysts. Occupational exposure to cobalt may result in adverse health effects in different organs or tissues. Antimony trioxide is primarily used as a flame retardant in rubber, plastics, pigments, adhesives, textiles, and paper. Antimony potassium tartrate has been used worldwide as an anti-shistosomal drug. Pentavalent antimony compounds have been used for the treatment of leishmaniasis. Co(II) ions are genotoxic in vitro and in vivo, and carcinogenic in rodents. Co metal is genotoxic in vitro. Hard metal dust, of which occupational exposure is linked to an increased lung cancer risk, is proven to be genotoxic in vitro and in vivo. Possibly, production of active oxygen species and/or DNA repair inhibition are mechanisms involved. Given the recently provided proof for in vitro and in vivo genotoxic potential of hard metal dust, the mechanistic evidence of elevated production of active oxygen species and the epidemiological data on increased cancer risk, it may be advisable to consider the possibility of a new evaluation by IARC. Both trivalent and pentavalent antimony compounds are generally negative in non-mammalian genotoxicity tests, while mammalian test systems usually give positive results for Sb(III) and negative results for Sb(V) compounds. Assessment of the in vivo potential of Sb2O3 to induce chromosome aberrations (CA) gave conflicting results. Animal carcinogenicity data were concluded sufficient for Sb2O3 by IARC. Human carcinogenicity data is difficult to evaluate given the frequent co-exposure to arsenic. Possible mechanisms of action, including potential to produce active oxygen species and to interfere with

  10. Cobalt ion-containing epoxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoakley, D. M.; St.clair, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    Varying concentrations of an organometallic cobalt complex were added to an epoxy system currently used by the aerospace industry as a composite matrix resin. Methods for combining cobalt (III) acetylacetonate with a tetraglycidyl 4,4 prime - diaminodiphenylmethane-based epoxy were investigated. The effects of increasing cobalt ion concentration on the epoxy cure were demonstrated by epoxy gel times and differential scanning calorimetry cure exotherms. Analysis on cured cobalt-containing epoxy castings included determination of glass transition temperatures by thermomechanical analysis, thermooxidative stabilities by thermogravimetric analysis, and densities in a density gradient column. Flexural strength and stiffness were also measured on the neat resin castings.

  11. Studies of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Zhila

    Silicon carbide semiconductor technology is continuing to advance rapidly. The excellent physical and electronic properties of silicon carbide recently take itself to be the main focused power device material for high temperature, high power, and high frequency electronic devices because of its large band gap, high thermal conductivity, and high electron saturation drift velocity. SiC is more stable than Si because of its high melting point and mechanical strength. Also the understanding of the structure and properties of semiconducting thin film alloys is one of the fundamental steps toward their successful application in technologies requiring materials with tunable energy gaps, such as solar cells, flat panel displays, optical memories and anti-reflecting coatings. Silicon carbide and silicon nitrides are promising materials for novel semiconductor applications because of their band gaps. In addition, they are "hard" materials in the sense of having high elastic constants and large cohesive energies and are generally resistant to harsh environment, including radiation. In this research, thin films of silicon carbide and silicon carbide nitride were deposited in a r.f magnetron sputtering system using a SiC target. A detailed analysis of the surface chemistry of the deposited films was performed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy whereas structure and morphology was studied atomic force microscopy (AFM), and nonoindentation.

  12. Preferential killing of cancer cells using silicon carbide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mognetti, Barbara; Barberis, Alessandro; Marino, Silvia; Di Carlo, Francesco; Lysenko, Vladimir; Marty, Olivier; Géloën, Alain

    2010-12-01

    Silicon carbide quantum dots are highly luminescent biocompatible nanoparticles whose properties might be of particular interest for biomedical applications. In this study we investigated Silicon Carbide Quantum Dots (3C-SiC QDs) cellular localisation and influence on viability and proliferation on oral squamous carcinoma (AT-84 and HSC) and immortalized cell lines (S-G). They clearly localize into the nuclei, but the presence of 3C-SiC QDs in culture medium provoke morphological changes in cultured cells. We demonstrate that 3C-SiC QDs display dose- and time-dependent selective cytotoxicity on cancer versus immortalized cells in vitro. Since one of the limitations of classical antineoplastic drugs is their lack of selectivity, these results open a new way in the search for antiproliferative drugs.

  13. Molybdenum carbide stabilized on graphene with high electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lin Feng; Li, Yu Hang; Yang, Shuang; Liu, Peng Fei; Yu, Ming Quan; Yang, Hua Gui

    2014-11-01

    In this work, we developed a general two-step method to prepare molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) nanoparticles stabilized by a carbon layer on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The Mo2C-RGO hybrid showed excellent performance, which is attributed to the intimate interactions between Mo2C and graphene as well as the outer protection of the carbon layer.

  14. Research on rare earth and iron-rich diamond-enhanced tungsten carbide composite button

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiaoliang; SHAO Gangqin; DUAN Longchen; YUAN Runzhang

    2004-01-01

    At the present time in china, the binder used in tungsten carbide composite button is mainly cobalt, which is very expensive. In order to solve the problems, a new type of rare earth and iron-rich diamond-enhanced tungsten carbide with high abrasive resistance and high toughness against impact, which realizes to substitute ferrum for cobalt, has been developed. The key problems in making the button are to improve the mechanical properties of matrix and increase the welding strength between the diamond and the matrix. All these problems have been solved effectively by low temperature activation hot-press sintering, doping rare earth lanthanum in matrix and high sintering pressure. The properties of the button have been determined under laboratory conditions. The test results show that its hardness is more than 90 HRA, its abrasive resistance is 39 times more than that of conventional cemented tungsten carbide, and its toughness against impact is more than 200 J. All these data show the button has very good mechanical properties.

  15. Synthesis of cobalt aluminate nanopigments by a non-aqueous sol-gel route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmaoui, Mohamed; Silva, Nuno J O; Amaral, Vitor S; Ibarra, Alfonso; Millán, Ángel; Palacio, Fernando

    2013-05-21

    Here we report the chemical synthesis of cobalt aluminum oxide (CoAl2O4) nanoparticles by a non-aqueous sol-gel route. The one-pot procedure is carried out at mild temperatures (in the 150 to 300 °C range), and consists of the reaction between cobalt acetate and aluminium isopropoxide in benzyl alcohol. The resulting CoAl2O4 nanoparticles show an unusually low average size, between 2.5 and 6.2 nm, which can be controlled by the synthesis temperature. The colorimetric properties of the nanoparticles are also determined by the synthesis temperature and the characteristic blue color of CoAl2O4 pigments is achieved in samples prepared at T ≥ 200 °C. The nanoparticles are antiferromagnetically ordered below ∼27 K with an uncompensated configuration. The uncompensated moment shows the typical features of strongly interacting superparamagnetic nanoparticles and spin-glass systems.

  16. Blood doping by cobalt. Should we measure cobalt in athletes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guidi Gian

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Blood doping is commonplace in competitive athletes who seek to enhance their aerobic performances through illicit techniques. Presentation of the hypothesis Cobalt, a naturally-occurring element with properties similar to those of iron and nickel, induces a marked and stable polycythemic response through a more efficient transcription of the erythropoietin gene. Testing the hypothesis Although little information is available so far on cobalt metabolism, reference value ranges or supplementation in athletes, there is emerging evidence that cobalt is used as a supplement and increased serum concentrations are occasionally observed in athletes. Therefore, given the athlete's connatural inclination to experiment with innovative, unfair and potentially unhealthy doping techniques, cobalt administration might soon become the most suited complement or surrogate for erythropoiesis-stimulating substances. Nevertheless, cobalt administration is not free from unsafe consequences, which involve toxic effects on heart, liver, kidney, thyroid and cancer promotion. Implications of the hypothesis Cobalt is easily purchasable, inexpensive and not currently comprehended within the World Anti-Doping Agency prohibited list. Moreover, available techniques for measuring whole blood, serum, plasma or urinary cobalt involve analytic approaches which are currently not practical for antidoping laboratories. Thus more research on cobalt metabolism in athletes is compelling, along with implementation of effective strategies to unmask this potentially deleterious doping practice

  17. Controlling of morphology and electrocatalytic properties of cobalt oxide nanostructures prepared by potentiodynamic deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallaj, Rahman [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akhtari, Keivan [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O.Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salimi, Abdollah, E-mail: absalimi@uok.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Nanotechnology, University of Kurdistan, P.O.Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Soltanian, Saied [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, P.O. Box 416, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Electrodeposited cobalt oxide nanostructures were prepared by Repetitive Triangular Potential Scans (RTPS) as a simple, remarkably fast and scalable potentiodynamic method. Electrochemical deposition of cobalt oxide nanostructures onto GC electrode was performed from aqueous Co(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, (pH 6) solution using cyclic voltammetry method. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to characterize the morphology of fabricated nanostructures. The evaluation of electrochemical properties of deposited films was performed using cyclic voltametry (CV) and impedance spectroscopy (IS) techniques. The analysis of the experimental data clearly showed that the variations of potential scanning ranges during deposition process have drastic effects on the geometry, chemical structure and particle size of cobalt oxide nanoparticles. In addition, the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties of prepared nanostructures can be controlled through applying different potential windows in electrodeposition process. The imaging and voltammetric studies suggested to the existence of at least three different shapes of cobalt-oxide nanostructures in various potential windows applied for electrodeposition. With enlarging the applied potential window, the spherical-like cobalt oxide nanoparticles with particles sizes about 30–50 nm changed to the grain-like structures (30 nm × 80 nm) and then to the worm-like cobalt oxide nanostructures with 30 nm diameter and 200–400 nm in length. Furthermore, the roughness of the prepared nanostructures increased with increasing positive potential window. The GC electrodes modified with cobalt oxide nanostructures shows excellent electrocatalytic activity toward H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and As (III) oxidation. The electrocatalytic activity of cobalt oxide nanostructures prepared at more positive potential window toward hydrogen peroxide oxidation was increased, while for As(III) oxidation the electrocatalytic

  18. Laser melting of uranium carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utton, C. A.; De Bruycker, F.; Boboridis, K.; Jardin, R.; Noel, H.; Guéneau, C.; Manara, D.

    2009-03-01

    In the context of the material research aimed at supporting the development of nuclear plants of the fourth Generation, renewed interest has recently arisen in carbide fuels. A profound understanding of the behaviour of nuclear materials in extreme conditions is of prime importance for the analysis of the operation limits of nuclear fuels, and prediction of possible nuclear reactor accidents. In this context, the main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of laser induced melting experiments on stoichiometric uranium carbides; UC, UC1.5 and UC2. Measurements were performed, at temperatures around 3000 K, under a few bars of inert gas in order to minimise vaporisation and oxidation effects, which may occur at these temperatures. Moreover, a recently developed investigation method has been employed, based on in situ analysis of the sample surface reflectivity evolution during melting. Current results, 2781 K for the melting point of UC, 2665 K for the solidus and 2681 K for the liquidus of U2C3, 2754 K for the solidus and 2770 K for the liquidus of UC2, are in fair agreement with early publications where the melting behaviour of uranium carbides was investigated by traditional furnace melting methods. Further information has been obtained in the current research about the non-congruent (solidus-liquidus) melting of certain carbides, which suggest that a solidus-liquidus scheme is followed by higher ratio carbides, possibly even for UC2.

  19. Control and impact of the nanoscale distribution of supported cobalt particles used in fischer-tropsch catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, Peter; De Jongh, Petra E.; De Jong, Krijn P.

    2014-01-01

    The proximity of nanoparticles may affect the performance, in particular the stability, of supported metal catalysts. Short interparticle distances often arise during catalyst preparation by formation of aggregates. The cause of aggregation of cobalt nanoparticles during the synthesis of highly load

  20. Nickel, cobalt, and their alloys

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive guide to the compositions, properties, processing, performance, and applications of nickel, cobalt, and their alloys. It includes all of the essential information contained in the ASM Handbook series, as well as new or updated coverage in many areas in the nickel, cobalt, and related industries.

  1. Interfacial Engineering of Silicon Carbide Nanowire/Cellulose Microcrystal Paper toward High Thermal Conductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yimin; Zeng, Xiaoliang; Pan, Guiran; Sun, Jiajia; Hu, Jiantao; Huang, Yun; Sun, Rong; Xu, Jian-Bin; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2016-11-16

    Polymer composites with high thermal conductivity have attracted much attention, along with the rapid development of electronic devices toward higher speed and better performance. However, high interfacial thermal resistance between fillers and matrix or between fillers and fillers has been one of the primary bottlenecks for the effective thermal conduction in polymer composites. Herein, we report on engineering interfacial structure of silicon carbide nanowire/cellulose microcrystal paper by generating silver nanostructures. We show that silver nanoparticle-deposited silicon carbide nanowires as fillers can effectively enhance the thermal conductivity of the matrix. The in-plane thermal conductivity of the resultant composite paper reaches as high as 34.0 W/m K, which is one order magnitude higher than that of conventional polymer composites. Fitting the measured thermal conductivity with theoretical models qualitatively demonstrates that silver nanoparticles bring the lower interfacial thermal resistances both at silicon carbide nanowire/cellulose microcrystal and silicon carbide nanowire/silicon carbide nanowire interfaces. This interfacial engineering approach provides a powerful tool for sophisticated fabrication of high-performance thermal-management materials.

  2. Thermal conductivity of boron carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.; Gray, P. E.

    1985-01-01

    Knowledge of the thermal conductivity of boron carbide is necessary to evaluate its potential for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion applications. Measurements have been conducted of the thermal diffusivity of hot-pressed boron carbide BxC samples as a function of composition (x in the range from 4 to 9), temperature (300-1700 K), and temperature cycling. These data, in concert with density and specific-heat data, yield the thermal conductivities of these materials. The results are discussed in terms of a structural model that has been previously advanced to explain the electronic transport data. Some novel mechanisms for thermal conduction are briefly discussed.

  3. The effect of cobalt substitution on magnetic hardening of magnetite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozaffari, M., E-mail: mozafari@sci.ui.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Isfahan, Isfahan 81746-73441 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hadadian, Y. [Physics Department, Razi University, Taghebostan, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aftabi, A. [Department of Physics, University of Kurdistan, Sanandaj 66177-15175 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Oveisy Moakhar, M. [Physics Department, Razi University, Taghebostan, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    In this work cobalt-substituted magnetite (Co{sub x}Fe{sub 1−x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, x=0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction was carried out and the results show that all of the samples have single phase spinel structure. Microstructure of the samples was studied using a field emission scanning electron microscope and the results show that particle sizes of the prepared nanoparticles were uniform and in the 50–55 nm range. Room temperature magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were measured by an alternating gradient force magnetometer and the results revealed that substituting cobalt for iron in magnetite structure, changes the magnetite from a soft magnetic material to a hard one. So that coercivity changes from 0 (a superparamagnetic state) to 337 Oe (a hard magnetic material), which is a remarkable change. Curie temperatures of the samples were determined by recording their susceptibility-temperature (χ–T) curves and the results show that by increasing cobalt content, Curie temperature of the samples also increases. Also χ–T curves of the samples were recorded from above Curie temperature to room temperature (first cooling), while the curves in the second heating and second cooling have the same behaviour as the first cooling curve. The results depict that all samples have different behaviour in the first cooling and in the first heating processes. This shows remarkable changes of the cation distribution in the course of first heating. - Highlights: • It is possible to get Co substituted magnetite nanoparticles by coprecipitation method. • Prepared nanoparticles have different cation distribution in comparison with that of bulk counterparts. • Co substitution increases coercivity of the magnetite.

  4. Cobalt source calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizvi, H.M.

    1999-12-03

    The data obtained from these tests determine the dose rate of the two cobalt sources in SRTC. Building 774-A houses one of these sources while the other resides in room C-067 of Building 773-A. The data from this experiment shows the following: (1) The dose rate of the No.2 cobalt source in Building 774-A measured 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 17, 1999). The dose rate of the Shepherd Model 109 Gamma cobalt source in Building 773-A measured 9.27 x 10{sup 5} rad/h (June 25, 1999). These rates come from placing the graduated cylinder containing the dosimeter solution in the center of the irradiation chamber. (2) Two calibration tests in the 774-A source placed the graduated cylinder with the dosimeter solution approximately 1.5 inches off center in the axial direction. This movement of the sample reduced the measured dose rate 0.92% from 1.083 x 10{sup 5} rad/h to 1.073 x 10{sup 5} rad/h. and (3) A similar test in the cobalt source in 773-A placed the graduated cylinder approximately 2.0 inches off center in the axial direction. This change in position reduced the measured dose rate by 10.34% from 1.036 x 10{sup 6} to 9.27 x 10{sup 5}. This testing used chemical dosimetry to measure the dose rate of a radioactive source. In this method, one determines the dose by the chemical change that takes place in the dosimeter. For this calibration experiment, the author used a Fricke (ferrous ammonium sulfate) dosimeter. This solution works well for dose rates to 10{sup 7} rad/h. During irradiation of the Fricke dosimeter solution the Fe{sup 2+} ions ionize to Fe{sup 3+}. When this occurs, the solution acquires a slightly darker tint (not visible to the human eye). To determine the magnitude of the change in Fe ions, one places the solution in an UV-VIS Spectrophotometer. The UV-VIS Spectrophotometer measures the absorbency of the solution. Dividing the absorbency by the total time (in minutes) of exposure yields the dose rate.

  5. Recycling cobalt from spent lithium ion battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-dong XIA; Xiao-qian XIE; Yao-wu SHI; Yong-ping LEI; Fu GUO

    2008-01-01

    Spent lithium ion battery is a useful resource of cobalt. In this paper, cobalt was recovered by a chemical process based upon the analysis of the structure and com-position of the lithium ion battery. X-ray diffraction results show that cobalt oxalate and cobaltous sulfate have been obtained in two different processes. Compared with the cobaltous oxalate process, the cobaltous sulfate process was characterized by less chemical substance input and a cobalt recovery rate of as much as 88%. A combination of these two processes in the recycling industry may win in the aspects of compact process and high recovery rate.

  6. In situ cobalt-cobalt oxide/N-doped carbon hybrids as superior bifunctional electrocatalysts for hydrogen and oxygen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Haiyan; Wang, Jing; Su, Diefeng; Wei, Zhongzhe; Pang, Zhenfeng; Wang, Yong

    2015-02-25

    Remarkable hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) or superior oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyst has been applied in water splitting, however, utilizing a bifunctional catalyst for simultaneously generating H2 and O2 is still a challenging issue, which is crucial for improving the overall efficiency of water electrolysis. Herein, inspired by the superiority of carbon conductivity, the propitious H atom binding energy of metallic cobalt, and better OER activity of cobalt oxide, we synthesized cobalt-cobalt oxide/N-doped carbon hybrids (CoOx@CN) composed of Co(0), CoO, Co3O4 applied to HER and OER by simple one-pot thermal treatment method. CoOx@CN exhibited a small onset potential of 85 mV, low charge-transfer resistance (41 Ω), and considerable stability for HER. Electrocatalytic experiments further indicated the better performance of CoOx@CN for HER can be attributed to the high conductivity of carbon, the synergistic effect of metallic cobalt and cobalt oxide, the stability of carbon-encapsulated Co nanoparticles, and the introduction of electron-rich nitrogen. In addition, when used as catalysts of OER, the CoOx@CN hybrids required 0.26 V overpotential for a current density of 10 mA cm(-2), which is comparable even superior to many other non-noble metal catalysts. More importantly, an alkaline electrolyzer that approached ∼20 mA cm(-2) at a voltage of 1.55 V was fabricated by applying CoOx@CN as cathode and anode electrocatalyst, which opened new possibilities for exploring overall water splitting catalysts.

  7. Synthesis of silicon carbide nanocrystals from waste polytetrafluoroethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbiao; Cheng, Qinglin; Qin, Hengfei; Li, Zhongchun; Lou, Zhengsong; Lu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Junhao; Zhou, Quanfa

    2017-02-28

    Resource utilization of waste plastic could solve the problem of environmental pollution and simultaneously relieve energy shortages, achieving sustainable development. In this study, the conversion of waste polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to cubic silicon carbide (SiC) nanoparticles has been described. The structures and morphologies of the obtained SiC were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Furthermore, the FTIR spectrum of the obtained SiC sample suggests that the waste PTFE was completely converted into SiC in our approach.

  8. Tribological behaviour of mechanically synthesized titanium-boron carbide nanostructured coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliofkhazraei, M; Rouhaghdam, A Sabour

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, titanium-boron carbide (Ti/B4C) nanocomposite coatings with different B4C nanoparticles contents were fabricated by surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) method by using B4C nanoparticles with average nanoparticle size of 40 nm. The characteristics of the nanopowder and coatings were evaluated by microhardness test, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Friction and wear performances of nanocomposite coatings and pure titanium substrate were comparatively investigated, with the effect of the boron carbide content on the friction and wear behaviours to be emphasized. The results show the microhardness, friction and wear behaviours of nanocomposite coatings are closely related with boron carbide nanoparticle content. Nanocomposite coating with low B4C content shows somewhat (slight) increased microhardness and wear resistance than pure titanium substrate, while nanocomposite coating with high B4C content has much better (sharp increase) wear resistance than pure titanium substrate. The effect of B4C nanoparticles on microhardness and wear resistance was discussed.

  9. Thermal residual stress analysis of diamond coating on graded cemented carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zi-qian; HE Yue-hui; CAI Hai-tao; WU Cong-hai; XIAO Yi-feng; HUANG Bai-yun

    2008-01-01

    Finite element model was developed to analyze thermal residual stress distribution of diamond coating on graded and homogeneous substrates. Graded cemented carbides were formed by carburizing pretreatment to reduce the cobalt content in the surface layer and improve adhesion of diamond coating. The numerical calculation results show that the surface compressive stress of diamond coating is 950 MPa for graded substrate and 1 250 MPa for homogenous substrate, the thermal residual stress decreases by around 24% due to diamond coating. Carburizing pretreatment is good for diamond nucleation rate, and can increase the interface strength between diamond coating and substrate.

  10. Determination of emissivity coefficient of heat-resistant super alloys and cemented carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieruj Piotr

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the analysis of emissivity engineering materials according to temperature. Experiment is concerned on difficult to machine materials, which may be turned with laser assisting. Cylindrical samples made of nickel-based alloys Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Waspaloy and tungsten-carbides based on cobalt matrix were analyzed. The samples’ temperature in contact method was compared to the temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers. Based on this relative, the value of the emissivity coefficient was adjusted to the right indication of pyrometers.

  11. Determination of emissivity coefficient of heat-resistant super alloys and cemented carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieruj, Piotr; Przestacki, Damian; Chwalczuk, Tadeusz

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents the analysis of emissivity engineering materials according to temperature. Experiment is concerned on difficult to machine materials, which may be turned with laser assisting. Cylindrical samples made of nickel-based alloys Inconel 625, Inconel 718, Waspaloy and tungsten-carbides based on cobalt matrix were analyzed. The samples' temperature in contact method was compared to the temperature measured by non-contact pyrometers. Based on this relative, the value of the emissivity coefficient was adjusted to the right indication of pyrometers.

  12. Re-entrant-Groove-Assisted VLS Growth of Boron Carbide Five-Fold Twinned Nanowires

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xin; JIANG Jun; LIU Chao; YU Zhi-Yang; Steffan LEA; YUAN Jun

    2009-01-01

    We report a preferential growth of boron carbide nanowires with a Eve-fold twinned internal structure.The nanowires are found to grow catalytically via iron boron nanoparticles,but unusually the catalytic particle is in contact with the low-energy surfaces of boron carbide with V-shaped contact lines.We propose that this catalytical growth may be caused by preferential nucleation at the re-entrant grooves due to the twinning planes,followed by rapid spreading of atomic steps.This is consistent with the observed temperature dependence of the five-fold twinned nanowire growth.

  13. Nanostructures obtained from a mechanically alloyed and heat treated molybdenum carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga Arceo, L. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico) and ESIQIE-UPALM, IPN Apdo Postal 118-395, C.P. 07051 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: luchell@yahoo.com; Orozco, E. [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apdo Postal 20-364, C.P. 01000 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: eorozco@fisica.unam.mx; Mendoza-Leon, H. [ESIQIE-UPALM, IPN Apdo Postal 118-395, C.P. 07051 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: luchell@yahoo.com; Palacios Gonzalez, E. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: epalacio@imp.mx; Leyte Guerrero, F. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fleyte@imp.mx; Garibay Febles, V. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: vgaribay@imp.mx

    2007-05-31

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare molybdenum carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. Molybdenum carbide was heated at 800 {sup o}C for 15 min in order to produce carbon nanotubes. Nanoparticles of about 50-140 nm in diameter and nanotubes with diameters of about 70-260 nm and 0.18-0.3 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 {sup o}C, by means of this process.

  14. The Influence of Cobalt on the Microstructure of the Nickel-Base Superalloy MAR-M247

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathal, M. V.; Maier, R. D.; Ebert, L. J.

    1982-10-01

    The influence of cobalt on the microstructure of MAR-M247, a cast nickel-base superalloy, was investigated. Nickel was substituted for Co to produce 0, 5, and the standard 10 pct Co versions of MAR-M247. The microstructures of the alloys were examined using optical and electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, phase extraction, and differential thermal analysis. Samples were examined in as-cast, heat treated, long-time aged, and stress-rupture tested conditions. As Co was removed from MAR-M247, the γ' volume fraction decreased, the mean γ' particle size increased, the W and Ti concentrations in the γ' increased, the Cr and Al concentrations in the γ phase decreased, and the amount of carbides increased. This increase in carbide precipitation caused a change from discrete grain boundary carbides to a grain boundary film as Co level decreased.

  15. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Creep in Sintered Alpha Silicon Carbide and Niobium Carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-09-18

    CARBIDE AND NIOBIUM CARBIDE Supported by 30 F (DMR-812-0804) and ARO (MIPR’s 43-48, 127-83, 141-84) U August, 1985 NCSU .LET tow A CL School of Engineering...SILICON CARBIDE AND NIOBIUM CARBIDE Supported by NSF (DMR-812-0804) and ARO (MIPR’s 43-48, 127-83, 141-84) August, 1985 L. U. 1’ ’’ b b MASTER COPY - FOR...and Mechanisms of Creep in Sintered May 1, 1982-June 15, 1985 Alpha Silicon Carbide and Niobium Carbide 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(*) 11

  16. On the Deactivation of Cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, K.H.

    2016-01-01

    The Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) process is an attractive way to obtain synthetic liquid fuel from alternative energy sources such as natural gas, coal or biomass. However, the deactivation of the catalyst, consisting of cobalt nanoparticles supported on TiO2, currently hampers the industrial app

  17. Facile synthesis of cobalt ferrite nanotubes using bacterial nanocellulose as template.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchaca-Nal, S; Londoño-Calderón, C L; Cerrutti, P; Foresti, M L; Pampillo, L; Bilovol, V; Candal, R; Martínez-García, R

    2016-02-10

    A facile method for the preparation of cobalt ferrite nanotubes by use of bacterial cellulose nanoribbons as a template is described. The proposed method relays on a simple coprecipitation operation, which is a technique extensively used for the synthesis of nanoparticles (either isolated or as aggregates) but not for the synthesis of nanotubes. The precursors employed in the synthesis are chlorides, and the procedure is carried out at low temperature (90 °C). By the method proposed a homogeneous distribution of cobalt ferrite nanotubes with an average diameter of 217 nm in the bacterial nanocellulose (BC) aerogel (3%) was obtained. The obtained nanotubes are formed by 26-102 nm cobalt ferrite clusters of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles with diameters in the 9-13 nm interval. The nanoparticles that form the nanotubes showed to have a certain crystalline disorder, which could be attributed in a greater extent to the small crystallite size, and, in a lesser extent, to microstrains existing in the crystalline lattice. The BC-templated-CoFe2O4 nanotubes exhibited magnetic behavior at room temperature. The magnetic properties showed to be influenced by a fraction of nanoparticles in superparamagnetic state.

  18. Effect of the Polymeric Stabilizer in the Aqueous Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalyzed by Colloidal Cobalt Nanocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge A. Delgado

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of small and well defined cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical reduction of cobalt salts in water using NaBH4 as a reducing agent and using various polymeric stabilizers. The obtained nanocatalysts of similar mean diameters (ca. 2.6 nm were fully characterized and tested in the aqueous phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (AFTS. Interestingly, the nature and structure of the stabilizers used during the synthesis of the CoNPs affected the reduction degree of cobalt and the B-doping of these NPs and consequently, influenced the performance of these nanocatalysts in AFTS.

  19. Effect of the Polymeric Stabilizer in the Aqueous Phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Catalyzed by Colloidal Cobalt Nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Jorge A.; Claver, Carmen; Castillón, Sergio; Curulla-Ferré, Daniel; Godard, Cyril

    2017-01-01

    A series of small and well defined cobalt nanoparticles were synthesized by the chemical reduction of cobalt salts in water using NaBH4 as a reducing agent and using various polymeric stabilizers. The obtained nanocatalysts of similar mean diameters (ca. 2.6 nm) were fully characterized and tested in the aqueous phase Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (AFTS). Interestingly, the nature and structure of the stabilizers used during the synthesis of the CoNPs affected the reduction degree of cobalt and the B-doping of these NPs and consequently, influenced the performance of these nanocatalysts in AFTS. PMID:28336892

  20. Discovery of the Cobalt Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, T.; Thoennessen, M.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-six cobalt isotopes have so far been observed; the discovery of these isotopes is discussed. For each isotope a brief summary of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  1. Cobalt: for strength and color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Maeve A.; Kropschot, S.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cobalt is a shiny, gray, brittle metal that is best known for creating an intense blue color in glass and paints. It is frequently used in the manufacture of rechargeable batteries and to create alloys that maintain their strength at high temperatures. It is also one of the essential trace elements (or "micronutrients") that humans and many other living creatures require for good health. Cobalt is an important component in many aerospace, defense, and medical applications and is a key element in many clean energy technologies. The name cobalt comes from the German word kobold, meaning goblin. It was given this name by medieval miners who believed that troublesome goblins replaced the valuable metals in their ore with a substance that emitted poisonous fumes when smelted. The Swedish chemist Georg Brandt isolated metallic cobalt-the first new metal to be discovered since ancient times-in about 1735 and identified some of its valuable properties.

  2. Titanium carbide/carbon composite nanofibers prepared by a plasma process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Mel, A A; Gautron, E; Angleraud, B; Granier, A; Tessier, P Y [Universite de Nantes, CNRS, Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6502, 2 rue de la Houssiniere BP 32229-44322 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Choi, C H [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ 07030 (United States)

    2010-10-29

    The incorporation of metal or metal carbide nanoparticles into carbon nanofibers modifies their properties and enlarges their field of application. The purpose of this work is to report a new non-catalytic and easy method to prepare organized metal carbide-carbon composite nanofibers on nanopatterned silicon substrates prepared by laser interference lithography coupled with deep reactive ion etching. Titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers were grown on the top of the silicon lines parallel to the substrate by a hybrid plasma process combining physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The prepared nanofibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the shape, microstructure and the chemical composition of the as-grown nanofibers can be tuned by changing the plasma conditions.

  3. Titanium carbide/carbon composite nanofibers prepared by a plasma process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mel, A A; Gautron, E; Choi, C H; Angleraud, B; Granier, A; Tessier, P Y

    2010-10-29

    The incorporation of metal or metal carbide nanoparticles into carbon nanofibers modifies their properties and enlarges their field of application. The purpose of this work is to report a new non-catalytic and easy method to prepare organized metal carbide-carbon composite nanofibers on nanopatterned silicon substrates prepared by laser interference lithography coupled with deep reactive ion etching. Titanium carbide-carbon composite nanofibers were grown on the top of the silicon lines parallel to the substrate by a hybrid plasma process combining physical vapor deposition and plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The prepared nanofibers were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. We demonstrate that the shape, microstructure and the chemical composition of the as-grown nanofibers can be tuned by changing the plasma conditions.

  4. Thermo-Mechanical Characterization of Silicon Carbide-Silicon Carbide Composites at Elevated Temperatures Using a Unique Combustion Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-10

    F THERMO-MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE - SILICON CARBIDE COMPOSITES AT ELEVATED...MECHANICAL CTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE -SILIC BIDE COMPOSITES AT LEVATED TEMPER S USING A UNIQUE COMBUSTION FACILITY DISSERTATI N Ted T. Kim...THERMO-MECHANICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF SILICON CARBIDE - SILICON CARBIDE COMPOSITES AT ELEVATED TEMPERATURES USING A UNIQUE COMBUSTION FACILITY

  5. Asymmetric supercapacitor based on flexible TiC/CNF felt supported interwoven nickel-cobalt binary hydroxide nanosheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gangyong; Xiong, Tianrou; He, Shuijian; Li, Yonghong; Zhu, Yongmei; Hou, Haoqing

    2016-06-01

    Nanostructured nickel-cobalt binary hydroxide (NiCosbnd BH) is widely investigated as supercapacitor electrode material. However, the aggregation and poor electrical conductivity of NiCosbnd BH limit its practical application as a supercapacitor. In this work, a flexible free-standing hierarchical porous composite composed of NiCosbnd BH nanosheets and titanium carbide-carbon nanofiber (NiCosbnd BH@TiC/CNF) is fabricated through electrospinning and microwave assisted method. The as-prepared composites exhibit desirable electrochemical performances, including high specific capacitance, cycling stability, and rate capability. In particular, the NiCosbnd BH41@TiC/CNF composite electrode exhibits a maximum specific capacitance of 2224 F g-1 at the current density of 0.5 A g-1 and excellent cyclic stability of 91% capacity retention after 3000 cycles at 5.0 A g-1. To expand its practical application, an asymmetric supercapacitor (ASC) is fabricated using the NiCosbnd BH41@TiC/CNF composite as the positive electrode and active carbon as the negative electrode. The ASC exhibits a prominent energy density of 55.93 Wh kg-1 and a high power density of 18,300 W kg-1 at 5.0 A g-1. The superior electrochemical property is attributed to the uniform dispersion of NiCosbnd BH nanosheets on the TiC/CNF felt matrix. The TiC/CNF felt with uniformed TiC nanoparticles makes the fiber surface more suitable for growing NiCosbnd BH nanosheets and simultaneously enhances the conductivity of electrode.

  6. [Calcium carbide of different crystal formation synthesized by calcium carbide residue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhong-yuan; Kang, Ming; Jiang, Cai-rong; Tu, Ming-jing

    2006-04-01

    To recycle calcium carbide residue effectively, calcium carbide of different crystal form, including global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide was synthesized. Both the influence of pretreatment in the purity of calcium carbide, and the influence of temperatures of carbonization reaction, release velocity of carbon dioxide in the apparition of calcium carbide of different crystal form were studied with DTA-TG and SEM. The result shows that calcium carbide residue can take place chemistry reaction with ammonia chlorinate straight. Under the condition that pH was above 7, the purity of calcium carbide was above 97%, and the whiteness was above 98. Once provided the different temperatures of carbonization reaction and the proper release velocity of carbon dioxide, global aragonite, calcite and acicular calcium carbide were obtained.

  7. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudmila V. Dyakova

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cobalt solution for the production of pure cobalt salts has been developed and introduced at Severonikel combine.

  8. Synthesis of core-shell gold coated magnetic nanoparticles and their interaction with thiolated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Ian; Tung, Le D; Maenosono, Shinya; Wälti, Christoph; Thanh, Nguyen T K

    2010-12-01

    Core-shell magnetic nanoparticles have received significant attention recently and are actively investigated owing to their large potential for a variety of applications. Here, the synthesis and characterization of bimetallic nanoparticles containing a magnetic core and a gold shell are discussed. The gold shell facilitates, for example, the conjugation of thiolated biological molecules to the surface of the nanoparticles. The composite nanoparticles were produced by the reduction of a gold salt on the surface of pre-formed cobalt or magnetite nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and super-conducting quantum interference device magnetometry. The spectrographic data revealed the simultaneous presence of cobalt and gold in 5.6±0.8 nm alloy nanoparticles, and demonstrated the presence of distinct magnetite and gold phases in 9.2±1.3 nm core-shell magnetic nanoparticles. The cobalt-gold nanoparticles were of similar size to the cobalt seed, while the magnetite-gold nanoparticles were significantly larger than the magnetic seeds, indicating that different processes are responsible for the addition of the gold shell. The effect on the magnetic properties by adding a layer of gold to the cobalt and magnetite nanoparticles was studied. The functionalization of the magnetic nanoparticles is demonstrated through the conjugation of thiolated DNA to the gold shell.

  9. Conduction mechanism in boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.; Emin, D.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical conductivity, Seebeck-coefficient, and Hall-effect measurements have been made on single-phase boron carbides, B(1-x)C(x), in the compositional range from 0.1 to 0.2 X, and between room temperature and 1273 K. The results indicate that the predominant conduction mechanism is small-polaron hopping between carbon atoms at geometrically inequivalent sites.

  10. High capacity magnetic mesoporous carbon-cobalt composite adsorbents for removal of methylene green from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Mingzhi; Vogt, Bryan D

    2012-12-01

    Mesoporous carbons containing cobalt nanoparticles are synthesized by tri-or quad-constituent self assembly of Pluronic F127, phenol-formaldehyde oligomer (resol), cobalt acetylacetonate (acac), and optionally tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS, optional). Upon pyrolysis in N(2) atmosphere, the resol provides sufficient carbon yield to maintain the ordered structure, while decomposition of the Co(acac) yields cobalt nanoparticles. To provide increased surface area, the dispersed silicate from condensation of TEOS can be etched after carbonization to yield micropores, Without silica templated micropores, the surface area decreases as the cobalt content increases, but there is a concurrent increase in the volume-average pore diameter (BHJ) and a dramatic increase in the adsorption capacity of methylene green with the equilibrium adsorption capacity from 2 to 90 mg/g with increasing Co content. Moreover, the surface area and pore size of mesoporous composites can be dramatically increased by addition of TEOS and subsequent etching. These composites exhibit extremely high adsorption capacity up to 1151 mg/g, which also increases with increases in the Co content. Additionally, the inclusion of cobalt nanoparticles provides magnetic separation from aqueous suspension. The in situ synthesis of the Co nanoparticles yields to a carbon shell that can partially protect the Co from leaching in acidic media; after 96 h in 2 M HCl, the powders remain magnetic.

  11. Investigation of Infiltrated and Sintered Titanium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    1952-04-01

    taneive investigations in this field during the ’time preceding this contract, and concentrated their effort® On titanium carbide as the’ refractospy...component • The Basic work of this investigation consisted of? X, KpälfiCÄVtloh and refinement of cOmätrcial grades of titanium carbide hj...facilitate a comparison between the different methods» an investigation was then carried out with composite bodies* consisting of titanium carbide asd

  12. Advanced microstructure of boron carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werheit, Helmut; Shalamberidze, Sulkhan

    2012-09-26

    The rhombohedral elementary cell of the complex boron carbide structure is composed of B(12) or B(11)C icosahedra and CBC, CBB or B□B (□, vacancy) linear arrangements, whose shares vary depending on the actual chemical compound. The evaluation of the IR phonon spectra of isotopically pure boron carbide yields the quantitative concentrations of these components within the homogeneity range. The structure formula of B(4.3)C at the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range is (B(11)C) (CBC)(0.91) (B□B)(0.09) (□, vacancy); and the actual structure formula of B(13)C(2) is (B(12))(0.5)(B(11)C)(0.5)(CBC)(0.65)(CBB)(0.16) (B□B)(0.19), and deviates fundamentally from (B(12))CBC, predicted by theory to be the energetically most favourable structure of boron carbide. In reality, it is the most distorted structure in the homogeneity range. The spectra of (nat)B(x)C make it evident that boron isotopes are not randomly distributed in the structure. However, doping with 2% silicon brings about a random distribution.

  13. Shock-wave strength properties of boron carbide and silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, D.E.

    1994-02-01

    Time-resolved velocity interferometry measurements have been made on boron carbide and silicon carbide ceramics to assess dynamic equation-of-state and strength properties of these materials. Hugoniot pecursor characteristics, and post-yield shock and release wave properties, indicated markedly different dynamic strength and flow behavior for the two carbides.

  14. Microstructure and Fractural Morphology of Cobalt-based Alloy Laser Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hao; PAN Chun-xu

    2003-01-01

    The solidification features,micro-segregation,and fracture characteristics of cobalt-based alloy on the substrate of 20CrMo steel by laser cladding were studied by using electron microscopy.Experimental results show that the fine columnar grains and cellular dendrite grains are obtained which are perpendicular to the coating/substrate interface;the primary arms are straight while the side branches are degenerated;the microstructure consists of primary face-centered cubic (fcc) Co dendrites and a network of Cr-enriched eutectic M23C6 (M=Cr,W,Fe) carbides;the micro-segregation is severe for the rapid heating and cooling of laser cladding;the typical brittle intergranular fracture occurs in cobalt-based laser cladding layer.

  15. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  16. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  17. AN ELECTROPLATING METHOD OF FORMING PLATINGS OF NICKEL, COBALT, NICKEL ALLOYS OR COBALT ALLOYS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1997-01-01

    An electroplating method of forming platings of nickel, cobalt, nickel alloys or cobalt alloys with reduced stresses in an electrodepositing bath of the type: Watt's bath, chloride bath or a combination thereof, by employing pulse plating with periodic reverse pulse and a sulfonated naphthalene...... additive. This method makes it possible to deposit nickel, cobalt, nickel or cobalt platings without internal stresses....

  18. The wetting behaviour of silver on carbon, pure and carburized nickel, cobalt and molybdenum substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hula, Robert C., E-mail: robert.hula@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, A-1060 Wien (Austria); Edtmaier, Christian; Holzweber, Markus; Hutter, Herbert [Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/164, A-1060 Wien (Austria); Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph [Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstrasse 8-10, A 1040 Wien (Austria)

    2010-05-01

    Properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity or the expansion behaviour of silver matrix composites with carbon based inclusions are strongly affected by the contact angle between carbon and silver. In order to promote wetting of carbon, insertion of metallic interlayers such as nickel, cobalt or molybdenum is a feasible approach. This paper presents contact angle measurements done with the sessile drop method on carbon substrates (glassy carbon, polycrystalline graphite) and on pure nickel, cobalt and molybdenum foils. The ability of these interlayer elements to lower the high contact angles of silver on glassy carbon (117 deg.) and polycrystalline graphite (124 deg.) under vacuum conditions was verified. Unlike nickel (30 deg.) and cobalt (26 deg.), molybdenum (107 deg.) nevertheless was not wettable by liquid silver (at 1273 K) under vacuum conditions. ToF-SIMS was used to identify oxygen on the surface, causing higher contact angles than expected. After oxide reduction a contact angle of 18 deg. on molybdenum was detected. Furthermore, the influence of carbon diffusion on the contact angle was investigated by gas phase carburization of the metal foils. ToF-SIMS and XRD identified dissolved carbon (Ni, Co) and carbide formation (Mo). However, only nickel and cobalt showed a slight decrease of the contact angle due to carbon uptake.

  19. Cobalt separation by Alphaproteobacterium MTB-KTN90: magnetotactic bacteria in bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajer-Mohammad-Ghazvini, Parisa; Kasra-Kermanshahi, Rouha; Nozad-Golikand, Ahmad; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Ghorbanzadeh-Mashkani, Saeid; Dabbagh, Reza

    2016-12-01

    Bioremediation of toxic metals by magnetotactic bacteria and magnetic separation of metal-loaded magnetotactic bacteria are of great interest. This bioprocess technique is rapid, efficient, economical, and environmentally friendly. In this study, cobalt removal potential of a novel isolated magnetotactic bacterium (Alphaproteobacterium MTB-KTN90) as a new biosorbent was investigated. The effects of various environmental parameters in the cobalt removal and the technique of magnetic separation of cobalt-loaded bacterial cells were studied. Cobalt removal by MTB-KTN90 was very sensitive to pH solution; higher biosorption capacity was observed around pH 6.5-7.0. When biomass concentration increased from 0.009 to 0.09 g/l, the biosorption efficiency increased from 13.87 % to 19.22 %. The sorption of cobalt by MTB-KTN90 was rapid during the first 15 min (859.17 mg/g dry weight). With the increasing of cobalt concentrations from 1 to 225 mg/l, the specific cobalt uptake increased. Maximum cobalt removal (1160.51 ± 15.42 mg/g dry weight) took place at optimum conditions; pH 7.0 with initial cobalt concentration of 115 mg/l at 60 min by 0.015 g/l of dry biomass. The results showed maximum values for constants of Langmuir and Freundlich models so far. The biosorption mechanisms were studied with FTIR, PIXE, and FESEM analysis. Cobalt-loaded MTB-KTN90 had ability to separate from solution by a simple magnetic separator. Magnetic response in MTB-KTN90 is due to the presence of unique intracellular magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes). The orientation magnetic separation results indicated that 88.55 % of cobalt was removed from solution. Consequently, Alphaproteobacterium MTB-KTN90 as a new biosorbent opens up good opportunities for the magnetic removal of cobalt from the polluted aquatic environments.

  20. The effect of cobalt substitution on magnetic hardening of magnetite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozaffari, M.; Hadadian, Y.; Aftabi, A.; Oveisy Moakhar, M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work cobalt-substituted magnetite (CoxFe1-xFe2O4, x=0, 0.25, 0.50 and 0.75) nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation method and their structural and magnetic properties were investigated. X-ray diffraction was carried out and the results show that all of the samples have single phase spinel structure. Microstructure of the samples was studied using a field emission scanning electron microscope and the results show that particle sizes of the prepared nanoparticles were uniform and in the 50-55 nm range. Room temperature magnetic properties of the nanoparticles were measured by an alternating gradient force magnetometer and the results revealed that substituting cobalt for iron in magnetite structure, changes the magnetite from a soft magnetic material to a hard one. So that coercivity changes from 0 (a superparamagnetic state) to 337 Oe (a hard magnetic material), which is a remarkable change. Curie temperatures of the samples were determined by recording their susceptibility-temperature (χ-T) curves and the results show that by increasing cobalt content, Curie temperature of the samples also increases. Also χ-T curves of the samples were recorded from above Curie temperature to room temperature (first cooling), while the curves in the second heating and second cooling have the same behaviour as the first cooling curve. The results depict that all samples have different behaviour in the first cooling and in the first heating processes. This shows remarkable changes of the cation distribution in the course of first heating.

  1. COBALT SALTS PRODUCTION BY USING SOLVENT EXTRACTION

    OpenAIRE

    Liudmila V. Dyakova; Aleksander G. Kasikov; Elena S. Kshumaneva; Svetlana V. Drogobuzhskaya

    2010-01-01

    The paper deals with the extracting cobalt salts by using mixtures on the basis of tertiary amine from multicomponent solutions from the process of hydrochloride leaching of cobalt concentrate. The optimal composition for the extraction mixture, the relationship between the cobalt distribution coefficients and modifier’s nature and concentration, and the saltingout agent type have been determined. A hydrochloride extraction technology of cobalt concentrate yielding a purified concentrated cob...

  2. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  3. Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in InTe Layered Semiconductor Crystals Intercalated by Cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.B. Boledzyuk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The magnetic properties of CoxInTe layered crystals electrochemically intercalated with cobalt in constant gradient magnetic field and the morphology of the van der Waals surfaces of layers of these crystals were studied. It was established that impurity clusters consisting of cobalt nanoparticles are formed in the intercalates under investigation on the van der Waals planes in the interlayer space. It was revealed that at room temperature the investigated CoxInTe intercalates exhibit magnetic properties characteristic for magnetically hard ferromagnetic materials.

  4. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first exam...

  5. Boron carbide whiskers produced by vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1965-01-01

    Boron carbide whiskers have an excellent combination of properties for use as a reinforcement material. They are produced by vaporizing boron carbide powder and condensing the vapors on a substrate. Certain catalysts promote the growth rate and size of the whiskers.

  6. Titanium Carbide Bipolar Plate for Electrochemical Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaConti, Anthony B.; Griffith, Arthur E.; Cropley, Cecelia C.; Kosek, John A.

    1998-05-08

    Titanium carbide comprises a corrosion resistant, electrically conductive, non-porous bipolar plate for use in an electrochemical device. The process involves blending titanium carbide powder with a suitable binder material, and molding the mixture, at an elevated temperature and pressure.

  7. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This techn

  8. Controlling the misuse of cobalt in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Emmie N M; Chan, George H M; Wan, Terence S M; Curl, Peter; Riggs, Christopher M; Hurley, Michael J; Sykes, David

    2015-01-01

    Cobalt is a well-established inducer of hypoxia-like responses, which can cause gene modulation at the hypoxia inducible factor pathway to induce erythropoietin transcription. Cobalt salts are orally active, inexpensive, and easily accessible. It is an attractive blood doping agent for enhancing aerobic performance. Indeed, recent intelligence and investigations have confirmed cobalt was being abused in equine sports. In this paper, population surveys of total cobalt in raceday samples were conducted using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Urinary threshold of 75 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 2 ng/mL could be proposed for the control of cobalt misuse in raceday or in-competition samples. Results from administration trials with cobalt-containing supplements showed that common supplements could elevate urinary and plasma cobalt levels above the proposed thresholds within 24 h of administration. It would therefore be necessary to ban the use of cobalt-containing supplements on raceday as well as on the day before racing in order to implement and enforce the proposed thresholds. Since the abuse with huge quantities of cobalt salts can be done during training while the use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements are also allowed, different urinary and plasma cobalt thresholds would be required to control cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples. This could be achieved by setting the thresholds above the maximum urinary and plasma cobalt concentrations observed or anticipated from the normal use of legitimate cobalt-containing supplements. Urinary threshold of 2000 ng/mL and plasma threshold of 10 ng/mL were thus proposed for the control of cobalt abuse in non-raceday or out-of-competition samples.

  9. Process for making silicon carbide reinforced silicon carbide composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Sai-Kwing (Inventor); Calandra, Salavatore J. (Inventor); Ohnsorg, Roger W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A process comprising the steps of: a) providing a fiber preform comprising a non-oxide ceramic fiber with at least one coating, the coating comprising a coating element selected from the group consisting of carbon, nitrogen, aluminum and titanium, and the fiber having a degradation temperature of between 1400.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C., b) impregnating the preform with a slurry comprising silicon carbide particles and between 0.1 wt % and 3 wt % added carbon c) providing a cover mix comprising: i) an alloy comprising a metallic infiltrant and the coating element, and ii) a resin, d) placing the cover mix on at least a portion of the surface of the porous silicon carbide body, e) heating the cover mix to a temperature between 1410.degree. C. and 1450.degree. C. to melt the alloy, and f) infiltrating the fiber preform with the melted alloy for a time period of between 15 minutes and 240 minutes, to produce a ceramic fiber reinforced ceramic composite.

  10. 蕾丝状富Co团聚组织与Co粉中硬团聚现象研究%A Lacelike Cobalt-rich Agglomeration Microstructure and Solid Agglomeration in Cobalt Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张立; 杨爱军; 解明伟; 南晴; 冯于平

    2012-01-01

    硬质合金顶锤是WC-Co合金大制品与极端服役工况的典型代表.服役过程中硬质合金顶锤的异常失效是困扰超硬材料与硬质合金顶锤生产企业的棘手问题.本文采用扫描电镜、能谱分析以及X射线衍射分析等研究手段对硬质合金顶锤碎片与硬质合金生产用Co粉进行了观察与分析,报道了异常失效顶锤碎片微观组织结构中存在含K、Na、Ca、S、Cl、O等杂质元素、周长超过100 μm的脆性蕾丝状富Co团聚组织,以及Co粉中存在因杂质与还原烧结效应导致的、外表光滑、尺度高达10 μm的致密硬团聚微观缺陷.其中,富Co团聚组织中K、Na、Ca、S、Cl等杂质元素的总质量分数高达2.8%~3.45%.通过引证关联分析,认为两种缺陷之间存在一定的相关性,建议硬质合金生产企业在采购Co粉时必须重视对粉末微观质量的分析与检测.%Cemented carbide anvil is a typical representative of the large WC-Co products and harsh service situations. Abnormal failure of cemented carbide anvil has puzzled both the super had material and cemented carbide anvil manufacturers. Scanning electronic microscope, energy dispersive spectrometer and X-ray diffractometer were used for the analysis of typical fragments of cemented carbide anvil and cobalt powders used for the production of cemented carbide. A brittle lacelike cobalt-rich agglomeration microstructure containing impurity elements, e.g. K, Na, Ca, S, Cl and O with a perimeter over 100 祄 in the fragment of cemented carbide anvil was observed. Solid agglomerations with smooth appearance and a size as large as 10 祄 in cobalt powders, caused by the combined effects of impurity elements and sintering during the reduction process were reported. The total mass fraction of impurity elements K, Na, Ca, S, Cl in the cobaltr rich agglomeration microstructure reached as high as 2.8%~3.45%. It is suggested that there exists a relationship between these two

  11. Cobalt(II) and Cobalt(III) Coordination Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Nicholas C.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment which illustrates the formation of tris(phenanthroline)cobalt complexes in the 2+ and 3+ oxidation states, the effect of coordination on reactions of the ligand, and the use of a ligand displacement reaction in recovering the transformed ligand. Uses IR, UV-VIS, conductivity, and NMR. (MVL)

  12. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  13. MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF ULTRAFINE WC/Co CEMENTED CARBIDES WITH CUBIC BORON NITRIDE AND Cr₃C₂ ADDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genrong Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine tungsten carbide and cobalt (WC/Co cemented carbides with cubic boron nitride (CBN and chromium carbide (Cr₃C₂ fabricated by a hot pressing sintering process. This study uses samples with 8 wt% Co content and 7.5 vol% CBN content, and with different Cr₃C₂ content ranging from 0 to 0.30 wt%. Based on the experimental results, Cr₃C₂ content has a significant influence on inhibiting abnormal grain growth and decreasing grain size in cemented carbides. Near-full densification is possible when CBN-WC/Co with 0.25 wt% Cr₃C₂ is sintered at 1350°C and 20 MPa; the resulting material possesses optimal mechanical properties and density, with an acceptable Vickers hardness of 19.20 GPa, fracture toughness of 8.47 MPa.m1/2 and flexural strength of 564 MPa.u̇ Å k⃗

  14. Formation of raspberry like cobalt particles with hydrazine reduction in a polyol route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khe, Cheng Seong; Aziz, Azizan; Lockman, Zainovia; Rajalingam, Sokkalingam; Merican, Zulkifli; Vasant, Pandian

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the effect of hydrazine hydrate on the formation of the raspberry-like morphology of the cobalt nanomaterials in a polyol route. In the synthesis, the molar ratio of N2H4 to Co2+was varied from 2.5 to 10. At the beginning with low molar ratio, spherical microspheres were formed. When the molar ratio was increased to 5 and above, final morphology of the cobalt nanomaterials became raspberry-like. This might be attributed to the absorption of the hydrazine complex of cobalt nanoparticles at certain facets during their growth stage and later self-assembled into the raspberry shaped microparticles. The plausible formation mechanism were proposed.

  15. Effect of preparation conditions on physicochemical, surface and catalytic properties of cobalt ferrite prepared by coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shobaky, G.A., E-mail: elshobaky@yahoo.co [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Turky, A.M.; Mostafa, N.Y.; Mohamed, S.K. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt)

    2010-03-18

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were prepared via thermal treatment of cobalt-iron mixed hydroxides at 400-600 {sup o}C. The mixed hydroxides were coprecipitated from their nitrates solutions using NaOH as precipitating agent. The effects of pH and temperature of coprecipitation and calcination temperature on the physicochemical, surface and catalytic properties of the prepared ferrites were studied. The prepared systems were characterized using TG, DTG, DTA, chemical analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) as well as surface and texture properties based on nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The prepared cobalt ferrites were found to be mesoporous materials that have crystallite size ranges between 8 and 45 nm. The surface and catalytic properties of the produced ferrite phase were strongly dependent on coprecipitation conditions of the mixed hydroxides and on their calcination temperature.

  16. Precipitating Mechanism of Carbide in Cold-Welding Surfacing Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuanbin ZHANG; Dengyi REN

    2004-01-01

    Carbides in a series of cold-welding weld metals were studied by means of SEM, TEM and EPMA, and the forming mechanism of carbide was proposed according to their distribution and morphology. Due to their different carbide-forming tendency, Nb and Ti could combine with C to form particulate carbide in liquid weld metal and depleted the carbon content in matrix, while V induced the carbide precipitated along grain boundary. But too much Nb or Ti alone resulted in coarse carbide and poor strengthened matrix. When suitable amount of Nb, Ti and V coexisted in weld metal, both uniformly distributed particulate carbide and well strengthened matrix could be achieved. It was proposed that the carbide nucleated on the oxide which dispersed in liquid weld metal, and then grew into multi-layer complex carbide particles by epitaxial growth. At different sites, carbide particles may present as different morphologies.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis of xonotlite from carbide slag

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianxin Cao; Fei Liu; Qian Lin; Yu Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Carbide slag was used as the calcareous materials for the first time to prepare xonotlite via dynamic hydrothermal synthesis.The effects of influential factors including different calcination temperatures,pretreatment methods of the carbide slag and process param-eters of hydrothermal synthesis on the microstructure and morphology of xonotlite were explored using XRD and SEM techniques.The results indicate that the carbide slag after proper calcination could be used to prepare pure xonotlite;and different calcination tern-peratures have little effect on the crystallinity of synthesized xonotlitc,but have great impact on the morphology of secondary particles.The different pretreatment methods of the carbide slag pose great impact on the crystallinity and morphology of secondary particles of xonotlite.Xonotlite was also synthesized from pure CaO under the salne experimental conditions as that prepared from calcined carbide slag for comparison.Little amount of impurities in carbide slag has no effect on the mechanism of hydrothermal synthesizing xonotlite from carbide slag.

  18. Femtosecond laser ablation of cemented carbides: properties and tribological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, G.; Romano, V.; Weber, H. P.; Gerbig, Y.; Haefke, H.; Bruneau, S.; Hermann, J.; Sentis, M.

    Laser ablation with fs laser pulses was performed in air on cobalt cemented tungsten carbide by means of a Ti : sapphire laser (800 nm, 100 fs). Small and moderate fluences (2, 5, 10 J/cm2) and up to 5×104 pulses per irradiated spot were used to drill holes with aspect ratios up to 10. Cross-section cuts from laser-irradiated samples were produced and they were analysed with optical microscopy and SEM. EDX analyses were carried out on selected zones. Quasi-cylindrical holes were found for 2 J/cm2, whereas for 5 and 10 J/cm2 irregular shapes (lobes, bottoms wider than hole entrances) were found to occur after a given number of incident pulses. Layers with modified structure were evidenced at pore walls. SEM revealed a denser structure, while EDX analyses showed uniform and almost similar contents of W, C, and Co in these layers. As a direct application, patterning of coated WC-Co was carried out with 2 J/cm2 and 100 pulses per pore. The resulted surfaces were tribologically tested and these tests revealed an improved friction and wear behaviour.

  19. Formation of nanoscale titanium carbides in ferrite: an atomic study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanan; Hodgson, Peter; Kong, Lingxue; Gao, Weimin

    2016-03-01

    The formation and evolution of nanoscale titanium carbide in ferrite during the early isothermal annealing process were investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. The atomic interactions of titanium and carbon atoms during the initial formation process explained the atoms aggregation and carbides formation. It was found that the aggregation and dissociation of titanium carbide occurred simultaneously, and the composition of carbide clusters varied in a wide range. A mechanism for the formation of titanium carbide clusters in ferrite was disclosed.

  20. Pulsed laser ablation and deposition of niobium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sansone, M.; De Bonis, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Santagata, A. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, UOS Tito Scalo, C.da Santa Loja, 85010 Tito, PZ (Italy); Rau, J.V. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Galasso, A. [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy); Teghil, R., E-mail: roberto.teghil@unibas.it [Dipartimento di Scienze, Università della Basilicata, Viale dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • We have deposited in vacuum niobium carbide films by fs and ns PLD. • We have compared PLD performed by ultra-short and short laser pulses. • The films deposited by fs PLD of NbC are formed by nanoparticles. • The structure of the films produced by fs PLD at 500 °C corresponds to NbC. - Abstract: NbC crystalline films have been deposited in vacuum by ultra-short pulsed laser deposition technique. The films have been characterized by transmission and scanning electron microscopies and by X-ray diffraction. To clarify the ablation–deposition mechanism, the plasma produced by the ablation process has been characterized by optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging. A comparison of the results with those obtained by ns pulsed deposition of the same target has been carried out.

  1. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    OpenAIRE

    Matus K.; Pawlyta M.; Matula G.; Gołombek K.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary ...

  2. The wear resistance of cobalt free hard surfaced alloys in nuclear power plant conditions. Test results; Kobolttivapaiden pinnoitteiden kulumiskestaevyys ydinvoimalaitosolosuhteissa. Koetulokset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosonen, A.M. [VTT Manufacturing Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-09-01

    Use of cobalt containing materials is restricted in primary circuits of nuclear power plants since the cobalt is activated in the reactor core. The resulting isotope leads to increase of activity in the primary circuit. This report presents the results of the wear resistance tests of four hard facing alloys. The test method was a pin on plate test. The pins were coated with hard-facing alloys and the plates were manufactured from stainless steel. The tested materials were nickel based Stellite 6, wolfram carbide (WC), METCO 442 and cobalt based Stellite 6. Tests were carried out in simulated BWR-environment. According to the results of these tests it is not possible to get any differences between any hard facing alloys if the hardness of the plate material is much lower than that of the hard facing alloys examined. (orig.) (4 refs.).

  3. Carbothermal synthesis of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M.A.; Wei, G.C.; Kennedy, C.R.; Harris, L.A.

    1985-05-01

    Silicon carbide powders were synthesized from various silica and carbon sources by a carbothermal reduction process at temperatures between 1500 and 1600/sup 0/C. The silica sources were fumed silica, methyltrimethoxysilane, and microcrystalline quartz. The carbon sources were petroleum pitch, phenolic resin, sucrose, and carbon black. Submicron SiC powders were synthesized. Their morphologies included equiaxed loosely-bound agglomerates, equiaxed hard-shell agglomerates, and whiskers. Morphology changed with the furnace atmosphere (argon, nitrogen, or nitrogen-4% hydrogen). The best sintering was observed in SiC derived from the fumed-silica-pitch and fumed-silica-sucrose precursors. The poorest sintering was observed in SiC derived from microcrystalline quartz and carbon black. 11 refs., 16 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  5. Cobalt toxicity in anaerobic granular sludge: influence of chemical speciation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartacek, J.; Fermoso, F.G.; Baldo-Urrutia, A.M.; Hullebusch, van E.D.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of cobalt speciation on the toxicity of cobalt to methylotrophic methanogenesis in anaerobic granular sludge was investigated. The cobalt speciation was studied with three different media that contained varying concentrations of complexing ligands [carbonates, phosphates and ethylenedi

  6. Stabilization of boron carbide via silicon doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, J E; Bhakhri, V; Hao, R; Prior, T J; Scheler, T; Gregoryanz, E; Chhowalla, M; Giulani, F

    2015-01-14

    Boron carbide is one of the lightest and hardest ceramics, but its applications are limited by its poor stability against a partial phase separation into separate boron and carbon. Phase separation is observed under high non-hydrostatic stress (both static and dynamic), resulting in amorphization. The phase separation is thought to occur in just one of the many naturally occurring polytypes in the material, and this raises the possibility of doping the boron carbide to eliminate this polytype. In this work, we have synthesized boron carbide doped with silicon. We have conducted a series of characterizations (transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction) on pure and silicon-doped boron carbide following static compression to 50 GPa non-hydrostatic pressure. We find that the level of amorphization under static non-hydrostatic pressure is drastically reduced by the silicon doping.

  7. Calcium carbide poisoning via food in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Per, Hüseyin; Kurtoğlu, Selim; Yağmur, Fatih; Gümüş, Hakan; Kumandaş, Sefer; Poyrazoğlu, M Hakan

    2007-02-01

    The fast ripening of fruits means they may contain various harmful properties. A commonly used agent in the ripening process is calcium carbide, a material most commonly used for welding purposes. Calcium carbide treatment of food is extremely hazardous because it contains traces of arsenic and phosphorous. Once dissolved in water, the carbide produces acetylene gas. Acetylene gas may affect the neurological system by inducing prolonged hypoxia. The findings are headache, dizziness, mood disturbances, sleepiness, mental confusion, memory loss, cerebral edema and seizures. We report the case of a previously healthy 5 year-old girl with no chronic disease history who was transferred to our Emergency Department with an 8-h history of coma and delirium. A careful history from her father revealed that the patient ate unripe dates treated with calcium carbide.

  8. On the structural, magnetic and electrical properties of sol-gel derived nanosized cobalt ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopalan, E. Veena [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala (India); Joy, P.A. [Physical Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411008 (India); Al-Omari, I.A. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, P O Box 36, Sultan Qaboos University, PC 123 Muscat (Oman); Kumar, D. Sakthi; Yoshida, Yasuhiko [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Department of Applied Chemistry, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Anantharaman, M.R., E-mail: mraiyer@gmail.co [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala (India)

    2009-10-19

    Nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite were synthesized by sol gel method. These particles were structurally characterized by using X-Ray Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectrum and Inductively Coupled Plasma Analysis and the results confirmed the formation of spherically shaped nanoparticles of cobalt ferrite having a size lying in the range of 13-14 nm. The as prepared sample was sintered at 800 deg. C and the structural, magnetic and dielectric properties were measured. The dielectric properties were studied and analyzed as a function of temperature and frequency. The ac and dc conductivity studies were carried out to delve into the conduction mechanism. The existing models based on quantum mechanical tunneling were effectively employed to explain the frequency dependent conductivity.

  9. Selective etching of silicon carbide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Di; Howe, Roger T.; Maboudian, Roya

    2006-12-19

    A method of etching silicon carbide using a nonmetallic mask layer. The method includes providing a silicon carbide substrate; forming a non-metallic mask layer by applying a layer of material on the substrate; patterning the mask layer to expose underlying areas of the substrate; and etching the underlying areas of the substrate with a plasma at a first rate, while etching the mask layer at a rate lower than the first rate.

  10. Cobalt release from implants and consumer items and characteristics of cobalt sensitized patients with dermatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyssen, Jacob Pontoppidan; Menne, Torkil; Liden, Carola

    2012-01-01

    -containing dental alloys and revised hip implant components.Results. Six of eight dental alloys and 10 of 98 revised hip implant components released cobalt in the cobalt spot test, whereas none of 50 mobile phones gave positive reactions. The clinical relevance of positive cobalt test reactions was difficult...

  11. Cobalt-Base Alloy Gun Barrel Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    are presented in Section 5. 2. Materials and methods The composition of the cobalt -base alloy (CBA) is presented in Table 1. The production of this... Cobalt -Base Alloy Gun Barrel Study by William S. de Rosset and Jonathan S. Montgomery ARL-RP-0491 July 2014 A reprint...21005-5069 ARL-RP-0491 July 2014 Cobalt -Base Alloy Gun Barrel Study William S. de Rosset and Jonathan S. Montgomery Weapons and Materials

  12. Hot Corrosion of Cobalt-Base Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-06-01

    scale is similar to that which has already been proposed for cobalt . The oxide ions would react with the Al203 to form aluminate ions in the Na2S04...resistance of cobalt -base and nickel-base alloys. The contract was accomplished under the technical direction of Dr. H. C. Graham of the Aerospace Research...Oxidized Specimens RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 1. INTRODUCfiON 2. SODIUM SULFATE INDUCED HOT CORROSION OF COBALT a. Introduction b. Experimental c

  13. Mineral resource of the month: cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedd, Kim B.

    2009-01-01

    Cobalt is a metal used in numerous commercial, industrial and military applications. On a global basis, the leading use of cobalt is in rechargeable lithium-ion, nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride battery electrodes. Cobalt use has grown rapidly since the early 1990s, with the development of new battery technologies and an increase in demand for portable electronics such as cell phones, laptop computers and cordless power tools.

  14. Combustion synthesis of novel boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harini, R. Saai; Manikandan, E.; Anthonysamy, S.; Chandramouli, V.; Eswaramoorthy, D.

    2013-02-01

    The solid-state boron carbide is one of the hardest materials known, ranking third behind diamond and cubic boron nitride. Boron carbide (BxCx) enriched in the 10B isotope is used as a control rod material in the nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption cross section and other favorable physico-chemical properties. Conventional methods of preparation of boron carbide are energy intensive processes accompanied by huge loss of boron. Attempts were made at IGCAR Kalpakkam to develop energy efficient and cost effective methods to prepare boron carbide. The products of the gel combustion and microwave synthesis experiments were characterized for phase purity by XRD. The carbide formation was ascertained using finger-print spectroscopy of FTIR. Samples of pyrolized/microwave heated powder were characterized for surface morphology using SEM. The present work shows the recent advances in understanding of structural and chemical variations in boron carbide and their influence on morphology, optical and vibrational property results discussed in details.

  15. Synthesize and characterization of a novel anticorrosive cobalt ferrite nanoparticles dispersed in silica matrix (CoFe2O4-SiO2) to improve the corrosion protection performance of epoxy coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozlou, M.; Ramezanzadeh, B.; Baradaran, Z.

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed at studying the effect of an anticorrosive nickel ferrite nanoparticle dispersed in silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) on the corrosion protection properties of steel substrate. NiFe2O4 and NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigments were synthesized and then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). Then, 1 wt.% of nanopigments was dispersed in an epoxy coating and the resultant nanocomposites were applied on the steel substrates. The corrosion inhibition effects of nanopigments were tested by an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and salt spray test. Results revealed that dispersing nickel ferrite nanoparticles in a silica matrix (NiFe2O4-SiO2) resulted in the enhancement of the nanopigment dispersion in the epoxy coating matrix. Inclusion of 1 wt.% of NiFe2O4-SiO2 nanopigment into the epoxy coating enhanced its corrosion protection properties before and after scratching.

  16. Cobalt and marine redox evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Swanner, Elizabeth D.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Lalonde, Stefan; Robbins, Leslie J.; Bekker, Andrey; Rouxel, Olivier; Saito, Mak A.; Kappler, Andreas; Mojzsis, Stephen J.; Konhauser, Kurt O.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt (Co) is a bio-essential trace element and limiting nutrient in some regions of the modern oceans. It has been proposed that Co was more abundant in poorly ventilated Precambrian oceans based on the greater utilization of Co by anaerobic microbes relative to plants and animals. However, there are few empirical or theoretical constraints on the history of seawater Co concentrations. Herein, we present a survey of authigenic Co in marine sediments (iron formations, authigenic pyrite and b...

  17. Oxidation of low cobalt alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Four high temperature alloys: U-700, Mar M-247, Waspaloy and PM/HIP U-700 were modified with various cobalt levels ranging from 0 percent to their nominal commercial levels. The alloys were then tested in cyclic oxidation in static air at temperatures ranging from 1000 to 1150 C at times from 500 to 100 1 hour cycles. Specific weight change with time and X-ray diffraction analyses of the oxidized samples were used to evaluate the alloys. The alloys tend to be either Al2O3/aluminate spinel or Cr2O3/chromite spinel formers depending on the Cr/Al ratio in the alloy. Waspaloy with a ratio of 15:1 is a strong Cr2O3 former while this U-700 with a ratio of 3.33:1 tends to form mostly Cr2O3 while Mar M-247 with a ratio of 1.53:1 is a strong Al2O3 former. The best cyclic oxidation resistance is associated with the Al2O3 formers. The cobalt levels appear to have little effect on the oxidation resistance of the Al2O3/aluminate spinel formers while any tendency to form Cr2O3 is accelerated with increased cobalt levels and leads to increased oxidation attack.

  18. Metamagnetism of η-carbide-type transition-metal carbides and nitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, T.; Terazawa, S.; Umemoto, Y.; Tabata, Y.; Sato, K.; Kondo, A.; Kindo, K.; Nakamura, H.

    2011-09-01

    η-carbide-type transition-metal compounds include the frustrated stella quadran-gula lattice. Due to characteristics of the lattice, we expect subtle transitions between frustrated and non-frustrated states. Here, we report metamagnetic transitions newly found in η-carbide-type compounds Fe3W3C, Fe6W6C and Co6W6C.

  19. Elaboration by ion implantation of cobalt nano-particles in silica layers and modifications of their properties by electron and swift heavy ion irradiations; Elaboration par implantation ionique de nanoparticules de cobalt dans la silice et modifications de leurs proprietes sous irradiation d'electrons et d'ions de haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Orleans, C

    2003-07-15

    This work aims to investigate the capability of ion irradiations to elaborate magnetic nano-particles in silica layers, and to modify their properties. Co{sup +} ions have been implanted at 160 keV at fluences of 2.10{sup 16}, 5.10{sup 16} and 10{sup 17} at/cm{sup 2}, and at temperatures of 77, 295 and 873 K. The dependence of the particle size on the implantation fluence, and more significantly on the implantation temperature has been shown. TEM (transmission electronic microscopy) observations have shown a mean diameter varying from 1 nm for implantations at 2.10{sup 16} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 77 K, to 9.7 nm at 10{sup 17} Co{sup +}/cm{sup 2} at 873 K. For high temperature implantations, two regions of particles appear. Simulations based on a kinetic 3-dimensional lattice Monte Carlo method reproduce quantitatively the features observed for implantations. Thermal treatments induce the ripening of the particles. Electron irradiations at 873 K induce an important increase in mean particle sizes. Swift heavy ion irradiations also induce the ripening of the particles for low fluences, and an elongation of the particles in the incident beam direction for high fluences, resulting in a magnetic anisotropy. Mechanisms invoked in thermal spike model could also explain this anisotropic growth. (author)

  20. Influence of Cobalt Precursor on Efficient Production of Commercial Fuels over FTS Co/SiC Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Raquel de la Osa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available β-SiC-supported cobalt catalysts have been prepared from nitrate, acetate, chloride and citrate salts to study the dependence of Fischer–Tropsch synthesis (FTS on the type of precursor. Com/SiC catalysts were synthetized by vacuum-assisted impregnation while N2 adsorption/desorption, XRD, TEM, TPR, O2 pulses and acid/base titrations were used as characterization techniques. FTS catalytic performance was carried out at 220 °C and 250 °C while keeping constant the pressure (20 bar, space velocity (6000 Ncm3/g·h and syngas composition (H2/CO:2. The nature of cobalt precursor was found to influence basic behavior, extent of reduction and metallic particle size. For β-SiC-supported catalysts, the use of cobalt nitrate resulted in big Co crystallites, an enhanced degree of reduction and higher basicity compared to acetate, chloride and citrate-based catalysts. Consequently, cobalt nitrate provided a better activity and selectivity to C5+ (less than 10% methane was formed, which was centered in kerosene-diesel fraction (α = 0.90. On the contrary, catalyst from cobalt citrate, characterized by the highest viscosity and acidity values, presented a highly dispersed distribution of Co nanoparticles leading to a lower reducibility. Therefore, a lower FTS activity was obtained and chain growth probability was shortened as observed from methane and gasoline-kerosene (α = 0.76 production when using cobalt citrate.

  1. Thermodynamic possibilities and constraints for pure hydrogen production by a nickel and cobalt-based chemical looping process at lower temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svoboda, Karel [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre of EC, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Praha 6 - Suchdol 2 (Czech Republic); Siewiorek, Aleksandra; Baxter, David [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre of EC, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Rogut, Jan [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre of EC, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Central Mining Institute, Plac Gwarkow 1, 40 166 Katowice (Poland); Pohorely, Michael [Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of Czech Republic, Rozvojova 135, 165 02 Praha 6 - Suchdol 2 (Czech Republic)

    2008-02-15

    The reduction of nickel and cobalt oxides by hydrogen, CO, CH{sub 4} and model syngas (mixtures of CO + H{sub 2} or H{sub 2} + CO + CO{sub 2}) and oxidation by water vapour has been studied from the thermodynamic and chemical equilibrium points of view. Attention was concentrated not only on convenient conditions for reduction of the relevant oxides to metals at temperatures in the range 400-1000 K, but also on the possible formation of undesired soot, carbides and carbonates as precursors for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide formation in the steam oxidation step. Reduction of nickel and cobalt oxides (NiO, CoO and Co{sub 3}O{sub 4}) by hydrogen or CO at such temperatures is feasible. The oxidation of Ni and Co by steam and simultaneous production of hydrogen is thermodynamically the more difficult step at temperatures of 400-900 K. For the Ni-NiO and Co-CoO systems, the formation of corresponding Ni/Co-ferrite or Ni/Co aluminum spinel could be used for a higher hydrogen equilibrium yield. Only such Ni-NiO and Co-CoO systems with the support of ferrite and aluminum spinel formation could be suitable systems for chemical looping production of hydrogen by the chemical looping redox process. Oxidation of mixed Ni/Co-Fe metals or alloys by steam without segregation caused by preferential oxidation of Fe is critical for the ferrites. For processes based on Ni/Co aluminum spinel, reduction to metals is the critical part of the cyclic process. Under strongly reducing conditions, at high CO concentrations/pressures, formation of nickel carbide (Ni{sub 3}C) before cobalt carbide Co{sub 2}C is thermodynamically favored. Pressurized conditions during the reduction step with CO/CO{sub 2} containing gases enhance the formation of soot and carbon containing carbide and/or carbonate compounds. (author)

  2. Heat transfer fluids containing nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dileep; Routbort, Jules; Routbort, A.J.; Yu, Wenhua; Timofeeva, Elena; Smith, David S.; France, David M.

    2016-05-17

    A nanofluid of a base heat transfer fluid and a plurality of ceramic nanoparticles suspended throughout the base heat transfer fluid applicable to commercial and industrial heat transfer applications. The nanofluid is stable, non-reactive and exhibits enhanced heat transfer properties relative to the base heat transfer fluid, with only minimal increases in pumping power required relative to the base heat transfer fluid. In a particular embodiment, the plurality of ceramic nanoparticles comprise silicon carbide and the base heat transfer fluid comprises water and water and ethylene glycol mixtures.

  3. Effects of Ion Implantation on Cavitation Erosion of a Cobalt Based Metal/Carbide Alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    L_____ L -_ 0nion source. The samlies were heat sunk onto100 200 300 400o100 DEPH a water-cooled holder during implantat ion to limnit tihe temerature...by water test times of between 20 and 35 h, are shown jets ( pump circulated test water) through the in Fig. 2. SEM micrographs showing the dam...qualitative measure of the relative amounts of the - hcp and fcc phases in the alloy [4]. Calculations based on the mass adsorbtion coefficient for

  4. Cobalt particle size effects in catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Breejen, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Aim of the work described in this thesis was first to investigate cobalt particle size effects in heterogeneous catalysis. The main focus was to provide a deeper understanding of the origin of the cobalt particle size effects in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) catalysis in which synthesis gas (H2/CO) is conver

  5. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddie L. Chang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH36]3+ ion.

  6. Cobalt Complexes as Antiviral and Antibacterial Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Eddie L. Chang; Christa Simmers; D. Andrew Knight

    2010-01-01

    Metal ion complexes are playing an increasing role in the development of antimicrobials. We review here the antimicrobial properties of cobalt coordination complexes in oxidation state 3+. In addition to reviewing the cobalt complexes containing polydentate donor ligands, we also focus on the antimicrobial activity of the homoleptic [Co(NH3)6]3+ ion.

  7. Inhalation cancer risk assessment of cobalt metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mina; Thompson, Chad M; Brorby, Gregory P; Mittal, Liz; Proctor, Deborah M

    2016-08-01

    Cobalt compounds (metal, salts, hard metals, oxides, and alloys) are used widely in various industrial, medical and military applications. Chronic inhalation exposure to cobalt metal and cobalt sulfate has caused lung cancer in rats and mice, as well as systemic tumors in rats. Cobalt compounds are listed as probable or possible human carcinogens by some agencies, and there is a need for quantitative cancer toxicity criteria. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has derived a provisional inhalation unit risk (IUR) of 0.009 per μg/m(3) based on a chronic inhalation study of soluble cobalt sulfate heptahydrate; however, a recent 2-year cancer bioassay affords the opportunity to derive IURs specifically for cobalt metal. The mechanistic data support that the carcinogenic mode of action (MOA) is likely to involve oxidative stress, and thus, non-linear/threshold mechanisms. However, the lack of a detailed MOA and use of high, toxic exposure concentrations in the bioassay (≥1.25 mg/m(3)) preclude derivation of a reference concentration (RfC) protective of cancer. Several analyses resulted in an IUR of 0.003 per μg/m(3) for cobalt metal, which is ∼3-fold less potent than the provisional IUR. Future research should focus on establishing the exposure-response for key precursor events to improve cobalt metal risk assessment.

  8. Heterogeneous Photolytic Synthesis of Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Nanoparticles of iron, cobalt and tungsten oxide were synthesised by photolytic laser assisted chemical vapour deposition (LCVD). An excimer laser (operating at 193 nm) was used as an excitation source. The LCVD process, was monitored in situ by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). The synthesised particles were further analysed using transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM), X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF), ...

  9. Gas metal arc welding in refurbishment of cobalt base superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriary, M. S.; Miladi Gorji, Y.; Kolagar, A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Refurbishments of superalloys which are used in manufacturing gas turbine hot components usually consists of removing cracks and other defects by blending and then repair welding in order to reconstruct damaged area. In this study, the effects of welding parameters on repair of FSX-414 superalloy, as the most applicable cobalt base superalloy in order to manufacture gas turbine nozzles, by use of Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) technic were investigated. Results then were compared by Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW). Metallographic and SEM studies of the microstructure of the weld and HAZ showed that there are no noticeable defects in the microstructure by use of GMAW. Also, chemical analysis and morphologies of carbide in both methods are similar. Hardness profile of the GM AW structure then also compared with GTAW and no noticeable difference was observed between the profiles. Also, proper tensile properties, compared with GTAW, can be achieved by use of optimum parameters that can be obtained by examining the current and welding speed. Tensile properties of optimized condition of the GMAW then were compared with GTAW. It was seen that the room and high temperature tensile properties of the GMAW structure is very similar and results confirmed that changing the technic did not have any significant influence on the properties.

  10. Mirror Surface Grinding of Steel Bonded Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The steel bonded carbide, a composite material, is very difficult to be machined to a fine finish mirror surface. In this paper, an electrolytic in-process dressing (ELID) grinding with metallic bond super-hard abrasive wheel was developed for grinding steel bonded carbide GT35. Factors affecting ELID grinding performance were analyzed by an atomic force microscope (AFM). Based on the analysis of AFM topography of the fine ground mirror surface of the steel bonded carbide, a schematic diagram of the mechanism of micro-removal of the ground surface was described. The AFM topography also shows that the hard brittle carbide particles, on the surface of steel bonded carbide, were machined out by ductile cutting. Since the grinding cracks in the ground surface are due to temperature gradient, temperature distribution in the grinding area was analyzed by finite element method (FEM). Experimental results indicate that a good mirror surface with Ra<0.02pm can be obtained by the developed ELID grinding system.

  11. Establishing efficient cobalt based catalytic sites for oxygen evolution on a Ta3N5 photocatalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Nurlaela, Ela

    2015-08-05

    In a photocatalytic suspension system with a powder semiconductor, the interface between the photocatalyst semiconductor and catalyst should be constructed to minimize resistance for charge transfer of excited carriers. This study demonstrates an in-depth understanding of pretreatment effects on the photocatalytic O2 evolution reaction (OER) activity of visible-light-responsive Ta3N5 decorated with CoOx nanoparticles. The CoOx/Ta3N5 sample was synthesized by impregnation followed by sequential heat treat-ments under NH3 flow and air flow at various temperatures. Various characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and X-ray photoelectron spec-troscopy (XPS), were used to clarify the state and role of cobalt. No improvement in photocatalytic activity for OER over the bare Ta3N5 was observed for the as-impregnated CoOx/Ta3N5, likely because of insufficient contact between CoOx and Ta3N5. When the sample was treated in NH3 at high temperature, a substantial improvement in the photocatalytic activity was observed. After NH3 treatment at 700 °C, the Co0-CoOx core-shell agglomerated cobalt structure was identified by XAS and STEM. No metallic cobalt species was evident after the photocatalytic OER, indicating that the metallic cobalt itself is not essential for the reaction. Accordingly, mild oxidation (200 °C) of the NH3-treated CoOx/Ta3N5 sample enhanced photocatalytic OER activity. Oxidation at higher temperatures drastically eliminated the photocatalytic activity, most likely because of unfavorable Ta3N5 oxidation. These results suggest that the intimate contact between cobalt species and Ta3N5 facilitated at high temperature is beneficial to enhancing hole transport and that the cobalt oxide provides electrocatalytic sites for OER.

  12. Synthesis of Nanoporous Metals, Oxides, Carbides, and Sulfides: Beyond Nanocasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Wesley; Jiao, Feng

    2016-07-19

    metal oxides with bimodal pore size distributions can be obtained. Combining nanocasting with chemical etching, a cobalt oxide with a hierarchical porous structure was synthesized, which possessed a surface area up to 250 m(2) g(-1), representing the highest surface area reported to date for nanoporous cobalt oxides. Lastly, this Account also covers the syntheses of nanoporous metal carbides and sulfides. The combination of in situ carburization and nanocasting enabled the syntheses of two ordered nanoporous metal carbides, Mo2C and W2C. For nanoporous metal sulfides, an "oxide-to-sulfide" synthetic strategy was proposed to address the large volume change issue of converting metal nitrate precursors to metal sulfide products in nanocasting. The successful syntheses of ordered nanoporous FeS2, CoS2, and NiS2 demonstrated the feasibility of the "oxide-to-sulfide" method. Concluding remarks include a summary of recent advances in the syntheses of nanoporous metal-based solids and a brief discussion of future opportunities in the hope of stimulating new interests and ideas.

  13. Effects of Implant Copper Layer on Diamond Film Deposition on Cemented Carbides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The deposition of high-quality diamond films and their adhesion on cemented carbides are strongly influenced by the catalytic effect of cobalt under typical deposition conditions.Decreasing Co content on the surface of the cemented carbide is often used for the diamond filmdeposition. But the leaching of Co from the WC-Co substrate leading to a mechanical weak surface often causes a poor adhesion. In this paper we adopted an implant copper layer preparedby vaporization to improve the mechanical properties of the Co-leached substrate. The diamondfilms were grown by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition from CH4 :H2 gas mixture. Thecross section and the morphology of the diamond film were characterized by scanning electronmicroscopy (SEM). The non-diamond content in the film was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy.The effects of pretreatment on the concentrations of Co and Cu near the interfacial region wereexamined by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) equipped with SEM. The adhesion of the diamondon the substrate was evaluated with a Rockwell-type hardness tester. The results indicate that thediamond films prepared with implant copper layer have a good adhesion to the cemented carbidesubstrate due to the recovery of the mechanical properties of the Co-depleted substrate after thecopper implantation and the formation of less amorphous carbon between the substrate and thediamond film.

  14. Development of high toughness, high strength aluminide-bonded carbide ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becher, P.F.; Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Cemented carbides are widely used in applications where resistance to abrasion and wear are important, particularly in combination with high strength and stiffness. In the present case, ductile aluminides have been used as a binder phase to fabricate dense carbide cermets by either sintering of mixed powders or a melt-infiltration sintering process. The choice of an aluminide binder was based on the exceptional high temperature strength and chemical stability exhibited by these alloys. For example, TiC-based composites with a Ni{sub 3}Al binder phase exhibit improved oxidation resistance, Young`s moduli > 375 GPa, high fracture strengths (> 1 GPa) that are retained to {ge} 900{degrees}C, and fracture toughness values of 10 to 15 MPa{radical}m, identical to that measured in commercial cobalt-bonded WC with the same test method. The thermal diffusivity values at 200{degrees}C for these composites are {approximately} 0.070 to 0.075 cm{sup 2}/s while the thermal expansion coefficients rise with Ni3Al content from {approximately} 8 to {approximately}11 x 10{sup {minus}6}/{degrees}C over the range of 8 to 40 vol. % Ni{sub 3}Al. The oxidation and acidic corrosion resistances are quite promising as well. Finally, these materials also exhibit good electrical conductivity allowing them to be sectioned and shaped by electrical discharge machining (EDM) processes.

  15. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  16. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Rueben L.; Herbst, Richard J.; Johnson, Karl W. R.

    1981-01-01

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800.degree. C. and 2000.degree. C. were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and >94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproducibility of chemicals and phase composition. Methods employing liquid techniques that form carbide microspheres or alloying-techniques which form alloys of thorium-uranium or thorium-plutonium suffer from limitation on the quantities processed of because of criticality concerns and lack of precise control of process conditions, respectively.

  17. Titanium carbide nanocrystals in circumstellar environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Helden, G; Tielens, A G; van Heijnsbergen, D; Duncan, M A; Hony, S; Waters, L B; Meijer, G

    2000-04-14

    Meteorites contain micrometer-sized graphite grains with embedded titanium carbide grains. Although isotopic analysis identifies asymptotic giant branch stars as the birth sites of these grains, there is no direct observational identification of these grains in astronomical sources. We report that infrared wavelength spectra of gas-phase titanium carbide nanocrystals derived in the laboratory show a prominent feature at a wavelength of 20.1 micrometers, which compares well to a similar feature in observed spectra of postasymptotic giant branch stars. It is concluded that titanium carbide forms during a short (approximately 100 years) phase of catastrophic mass loss (>0.001 solar masses per year) in dying, low-mass stars.

  18. Ionisation Potentials of Metal Carbide Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryza, Viktoras; Addicoat, M.; Gascooke, Jason; Buntine, Mark; Metha, Gregory

    2006-03-01

    Photo-Ionisation Efficiency (PIE) experiments have been performed on gas phase niobium and tantalum carbide clusters to determine their ionisation potentials (IPs). For TanCm (n = 3-4, m = 0-4) clusters an oscillatory behaviour is observed such that clusters with an odd number of carbon atoms have higher IPs and clusters with an even number of carbons have lower IPs. Excellent agreement is found with relative IPs calculated using density functional theory for the lowest energy structures, which are consistent with the development of a 2x2x2 face-centred nanocrystal. For the niobium carbide clusters we observe the species Nb4C5 and Nb4C6. Initial calculations suggest that these clusters contain carbon-carbon bonding. Interestingly, the stoichiometry for Nb4C6 is half that of a metcar, M8C12. Preliminary data will also be shown on bimetallic-carbide clusters.

  19. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  20. Mechanical Properties of Crystalline Silicon Carbide Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Ding, Weiqiang; Aidun, Daryush K

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties of crystalline silicon carbide nanowires, synthesized with a catalyst-free chemical vapor deposition method, were characterized with nanoscale tensile testing and mechanical resonance testing methods inside a scanning electron microscope. Tensile testing of individual silicon carbide nanowire was performed to determine the tensile properties of the material including the tensile strength, failure strain and Young's modulus. The silicon carbide nanowires were also excited to mechanical resonance in the scanning electron microscope vacuum chamber using mechanical excitation and electrical excitation methods, and the corresponding resonance frequencies were used to determine the Young's modulus of the material according to the simple beam theory. The Young's modulus values from tensile tests were in good agreement with the ones obtained from the mechanical resonance tests.

  1. Silicon carbide, an emerging high temperature semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matus, Lawrence G.; Powell, J. Anthony

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, the aerospace propulsion and space power communities have expressed a growing need for electronic devices that are capable of sustained high temperature operation. Applications for high temperature electronic devices include development instrumentation within engines, engine control, and condition monitoring systems, and power conditioning and control systems for space platforms and satellites. Other earth-based applications include deep-well drilling instrumentation, nuclear reactor instrumentation and control, and automotive sensors. To meet the needs of these applications, the High Temperature Electronics Program at the Lewis Research Center is developing silicon carbide (SiC) as a high temperature semiconductor material. Research is focussed on developing the crystal growth, characterization, and device fabrication technologies necessary to produce a family of silicon carbide electronic devices and integrated sensors. The progress made in developing silicon carbide is presented, and the challenges that lie ahead are discussed.

  2. Magnetic and Structural Investigations of Nanocrystalline Cobalt-Ferrite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sharifi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt ferrite is an important magnetic material due to their large magneto-crystalline anisotropy, high cohercivity, moderate saturation magnetization and chemical stability.In this study, cobalt ferrites Nanoparticles have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and a new microemulsion route. We examined the cation occupancy in the spinel structure based on the “Rietveld with energies” method. The Xray measurements revealed the production of a broad single ferrite cubic phase with the average particle sizes of about 12 nm and 7nm, for co-precipitation and micro-emulsion methods, respectively. The FTIR measurements between 400 and 4000 cm-1 confirmed the intrinsic cation vibrations of the spinelstructure for the two methods. Furthermore, the Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM was carried out at room temperature to study the structural and magnetic properties. The results revealed that by changing the method from co-precipitation to the reverse micelle the material exhibits a softer magnetic behavior in such a way that both saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease from 58 to 29 emu/g and from 286 to 25 Oe, respectively.

  3. Cobalt-doped nanohydroxyapatite: synthesis, characterization, antimicrobial and hemolytic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tank, Kashmira P., E-mail: kashmira_physics@yahoo.co.in [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India); Chudasama, Kiran S.; Thaker, Vrinda S. [Saurashtra University, Bioscience Department (India); Joshi, Mihir J., E-mail: mshilp24@rediffmail.com [Saurashtra University, Crystal Growth Laboratory, Physics Department (India)

    2013-05-15

    Hydroxyapatite (Ca{sub 10}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}(OH){sub 2}; HAP) is a major mineral component of the calcified tissues, and it has various applications in medicine and dentistry. In the present investigation, cobalt-doped hydroxyapatite (Co-HAP) nanoparticles were synthesized by surfactant-mediated approach and characterized by different techniques. The EDAX was carried out to estimate the amount of doping in Co-HAP. The transmission electron microscopy result suggested the transformation of morphology from needle shaped to spherical type on increasing the doping concentration. The powder XRD study indicated the formation of a new phase of brushite for higher concentration of cobalt. The average particle size and strain were calculated using Williamson-Hall analysis. The average particle size was found to be 30-60 nm. The FTIR study confirmed the presence of various functional groups in the samples. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated against four organisms Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Shigella flexneri as Gram negative as well as Micrococcus luteus and Staphylococcus aureus as Gram positive. The hemolytic test result suggested that all samples were non-hemolytic. The photoluminescence study was carried out to identify its possible applicability as a fluorescent probe.

  4. Chemical Synthesis of alpha-Iron Cobalt and Metastable gamma-Iron Nickel Magnetic Nanoparticles with Tunable Magnetic Properties for Study of RF Heating and Magnetomechanical Responses in Polymeric Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNerny, Katie L.

    The successful development of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is necessary for a variety of biomedical applications including magnetic tagging of cells, bioseparation, cell sorting, cell tracking, targeted drug delivery, thermablative cancer therapies, diagnostics and sensing applications. For effective performance in many of these applications, the MNPs must be stable at various temperatures and chemical environments while also being easily dispersed in a variety of media. Chemical synthesis techniques have been developed to achieve desirable shapes, sizes and compositions of Fe-Co, Fe-Ni, as well as other Fe-based ternary alloy MNPs. These MNPs have been functionalized with surfactants, polymers, and antibodies for suspension in aqueous fluids that can be delivered intravenously to a desired location in the body and subsequently manipulated by alternating (AC) and direct (DC) magnetic fields. An exciting application for the gamma-FeNi MNPs that will be investigated is self-regulated heating of cancer tissue. Cancerous tissue is known to be more thermally sensitive than healthy tissue due to irregularities in tumor vasculature, and therefore MNPs can be used to heat and kill these cells while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. gamma-FeNi MNPs have tunable Curie temperatures (TC's) and can be further adjusted by the addition of an antiferromagnetic element such as Mn or Cr to reach temperatures required for killing cancer cells (between 40 and 50°C). The TC acts as an upper limit to heating as the material switches from being ferromagnetic to paramagnetic. These MNPs have been synthesized and characterized, and a model for self-regulated heating has been demonstrated. The vision for this project is to eventually functionalize the particles with a tumor-specific tag, for instance Herceptin, and to potentially attach a chemotherapeutic agent to the MNPs for combined heating and drug delivery. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been used to show

  5. Nickel acts as an adjuvant during cobalt sensitization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonefeld, Charlotte Menne; Nielsen, Morten Milek; Vennegaard, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    Metal allergy is the most frequent form of contact allergy with nickel and cobalt being the main culprits. Typically, exposure comes from metal-alloys where nickel and cobalt co-exist. Importantly, very little is known about how co-exposure to nickel and cobalt affects the immune system. We...... investigated these effects by using a recently developed mouse model. Mice were epicutaneously sensitized with i) nickel alone, ii) nickel in the presence of cobalt, iii) cobalt alone, or iv) cobalt in the presence of nickel, and then followed by challenge with either nickel or cobalt alone. We found...... that sensitization with nickel alone induced more local inflammation than cobalt alone as measured by increased ear-swelling. Furthermore, the presence of nickel during sensitization to cobalt led to a stronger challenge response to cobalt as seen by increased ear-swelling and increased B and T cell responses...

  6. NOVEL PREPARATION AND MAGNETO CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF NANO-PARTICLE MIXED ALCOHOL CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setala V. Naidu

    2003-01-01

    We have produced Co, Cu, and Fe nano-particles by Laser-induced solution deposition (LISD) as evidenced by TEM investigations. Sizes of the nano-particles created are in the order of 5 nm. The LISD system could generate nano-particles in quantities only in the order of a milligram. This may be mainly due to the limited photo induced reactions taking place on the surface of the solutions. We have designed experiments to use drop flow technique with LISD for nano-particle deposition on microreactors. Preliminary work has been done on Co and Fe thin film deposited microreactors. We are also investigating the catalytic properties of nano-particles of FeO and CoO prepared by ball milling and dispersed into sol-gel prepared alumina granules. We have continued our investigation of catalytic reactions of Cu, Co, Fe, Cu/Co, Cu/Fe and Co/Fe on alumina support. The metal oxides were first reduced with hydrogen and used for the conversion of CO/H{sub 2}. The surface area of the catalysts has been determined by nitrogen disorption. They are in the range of 200-300 m{sup 2}/g. Cu, Co, Fe, Co/Fe, Cu/Co and Cu/Fe showed increasing order of catalytic activity for CO/H{sub 2} conversion. We are also studying catalytic conversion rates for CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} and CO/CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} mixtures using these catalysts. Our investigations of Co and Fe thin film deposited microreactors showed higher CO/H{sub 2} conversion for Fe compared to Co. We have used vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) to study the magnetic characteristics of as prepared, reduced, post-reaction catalysts. Comparative study of the ferromagnetic component of these samples gives the reduction efficiency and the changes in metal centers during catalytic reactions. Magnetic studies of post-reaction Co and Fe micro-reactors show that more carbide formation occurs for iron compared to cobalt.

  7. Novel magnetic SPE method based on carbon nanotubes filled with cobalt ferrite for the analysis of organochlorine pesticides in honey and tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhuo; Liu, Miao; Li, Gongke

    2013-10-01

    A novel magnetic SPE method based on magnetic cobalt ferrite filled carbon nanotubes (MFCNTs) coupled with GC with electron capture detection was developed to determine organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) in tea and honey samples. The MFCNTs were prepared through the capillarity of carbon nanotubes for drawing mixed cobalt and iron nitrates solution into their inner cavity followed by heating to 550°C under Ar to form the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles. SEM images provided visible evidence of the filled cobalt ferrite nanoparticles in the multiwalled nanotubes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated no adhesion of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles and metal salts on the outer surface of the MFCNTs. Eight OCPs were extracted with the MFCNTs. The enrichment factors were in the range of 52-68 for eight OCPs. The LODs for the eight OCPs were in the range of 1.3-3.6 ng/L. The recoveries of the OCPs for honey and tea samples were 83.2-128.7 and 72.6-111.0%, respectively. The RSDs for these samples were below 6.8%. The new method is particularly suited to extract nonpolar and weakly polar analytes from a complex matrix and could potentially be extended to other target analytes.

  8. Ablation of carbide materials with femtosecond pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, Gabriel; Romano, Valerio; Weber, Heinz P.; Sentis, Marc; Marine, Wladimir

    2003-01-01

    The response of cemented tungsten carbide and of titanium carbonitride was investigated with respect to damage and ablation properties, under interaction with ultrashort laser pulses. These carbide materials present high microhardness and are of significant interest for tribological applications. The experiments were carried out in air with a commercial Ti:sapphire laser at energy densities on the target up to 6.5 J/cm 2. The irradiated target surfaces were analyzed with optical, SEM and AFM techniques and the damage and ablation threshold values were determined using the measured spot diameters and the calculated incident energy density distributions.

  9. Ultrarapid microwave synthesis of superconducting refractory carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vallance, Simon R. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Round, David M. [School of Chemistry, University Nottingham (United Kingdom); Ritter, Clemens [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Cussen, Edmund J. [WestCHEM, Department of Pure and Applied Chemistry, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Kingman, Sam [Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Nottingham (United Kingdom); Gregory, Duncan H. [WestCHEM, Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2009-11-26

    Nb{sub 1-x}Ta{sub x}C Carbides can be synthesized by high power MW methods in less than 30 s. In situ and ex situ techniques probing changes in temperature and dielectric properties with time demonstrate that the reactions self-terminate as the loss tangent of the materials decreases. The resulting carbides are carbon deficient and superconducting; T{sub c} correlates linearly to unit cell volume, reaching a maximum at NbC. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  10. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  11. Analysis of tungsten carbide coatings by infrared laser-induced argon spark with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanický, V.; Otruba, V.; Mermet, J.-M.

    2000-10-01

    Infrared laser ablation was studied for application to the analysis of plasma-sprayed tungsten carbide/cobalt coatings. The potential of the laser induced argon-spark (LINA-Spark™), as a sample introduction device in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry was studied. The use of an IR laser along with defocusing led to laser-induced microplasma-based ablation. The mass ablation rate, represented by the ICP emission intensity per laser beam unit area, exhibited a flat increase in the irradiance range 2-250 GW/cm 2. A low slope (0.5) of this dependence in log-log scale gave evidence of plasma shielding. The steep increase in the measured acoustic signal when focused in front of the sample, i.e. in argon, indicated a breakdown of argon. Consequently, considerably lower ICP emissions were observed within the same range of irradiance. The cobalt/tungsten line intensity ratio in the ICP was practically constant from 1.5 up to at least 250 GW/cm 2. Acceptable precision (R.S.D.<5%) was obtained without internal standardization for irradiance between 2 and 8 GW/cm 2. Optimization of the laser pulse energy, repetition rate, beam focusing and sample displacement during interaction led to the linearization of dependences of signal vs. cobalt percentage, at least up to the highest studied value of 23% Co.

  12. Controlled crystalline structure and surface stability of cobalt nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yuping; Beerman, Michael; Pakhomov, Alexandre B; Krishnan, Kannan M

    2005-04-21

    The synthesis of monodispersed 10 nm cobalt nanocrystals with controlled crystal morphology and investigation of the surface stability of these nanocrystals are described. Depending on the surfactants used, single crystalline or multiple grain nanocrystals can be reproducibly produced. The relative surface stability of these nanocrystals is analyzed using the temperature dependences of the dc magnetic susceptibility. The novel method, which allows sensitive monitoring of the surface stability, is based on the observation that, with particle oxidation, an anomalous peak appears at 8 K in zero-field-cooled magnetization measurements. It is found that the surfactant protective layer is more important for long-term stability at room temperature, while the high-temperature oxidation rate is controlled by the crystal morphology of the nanoparticles.

  13. Advances in cobalt complexes as anticancer agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Catherine R; Suntharalingam, Kogularamanan

    2015-08-21

    The evolution of resistance to traditional platinum-based anticancer drugs has compelled researchers to investigate the cytostatic properties of alternative transition metal-based compounds. The anticancer potential of cobalt complexes has been extensively studied over the last three decades, and much time has been devoted to understanding their mechanisms of action. This perspective catalogues the development of antiproliferative cobalt complexes, and provides an in depth analysis of their mode of action. Early studies on simple cobalt coordination complexes, Schiff base complexes, and cobalt-carbonyl clusters will be documented. The physiologically relevant redox properties of cobalt will be highlighted and the role this plays in the preparation of hypoxia selective prodrugs and imaging agents will be discussed. The use of cobalt-containing cobalamin as a cancer specific delivery agent for cytotoxins will also be described. The work summarised in this perspective shows that the biochemical and biophysical properties of cobalt-containing compounds can be fine-tuned to produce new generations of anticancer agents with clinically relevant efficacies.

  14. Physical and electrochemical study of cobalt oxide nano- and microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alburquenque, D. [Dpto. de Química de los Materiales, USACh, Av. L.B.O.‘Higgins 3363, 9170022 Santiago (Chile); Dpto. de Metalurgia, USACh, Av. Ecuador 3469, 9170124, Santiago (Chile); Vargas, E. [Dpto. de Física, USACh and CEDENNA, Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Dpto. de Metalurgia, USACh, Av. Ecuador 3469, 9170124, Santiago (Chile); Denardin, J.C.; Escrig, J. [Dpto. de Física, USACh and CEDENNA, Av. Ecuador 3493, 9170124 Santiago (Chile); Marco, J.F. [Instituto de Química Física “Rocasolano”, CSIC, c/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ortiz, J. [Dpto. de Química de los Materiales, USACh, Av. L.B.O.‘Higgins 3363, 9170022 Santiago (Chile); Gautier, J.L., E-mail: juan.gautier@usach.cl [Dpto. de Química de los Materiales, USACh, Av. L.B.O.‘Higgins 3363, 9170022 Santiago (Chile)

    2014-07-01

    Cobalt oxide nanocrystals of size 17–21 nm were synthesized by a simple reaction between cobalt acetate (II) and dodecylamine. On the other hand, micrometric Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} was prepared using the ceramic method. The structural examination of these materials was performed using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM and HRTEM). XRD studies showed that the oxides were pure, well-crystallized, spinel cubic phases with a-cell parameter of 0.8049 nm and 0.8069 nm for the nano and micro-oxide, respectively. The average particle size was 19 nm (nano-oxide) and 1250 μm (micro-oxide). Morphological studies carried out by SEM and TEM analyses have shown the presence of octahedral particles in both cases. Bulk and surface properties investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), point zero charge (pzc), FTIR and cyclic voltammetry indicated that there were no significant differences in the composition on both materials. The magnetic behavior of the samples was determined using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The compounds showed paramagnetic character and no coercivity and remanence in all cases. Galvanostatic measurements of electrodes formed with nanocrystals showed better performance than those built with micrometric particles. - Highlights: • Spinel Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles and microparticles with same structure but with different cell parameters, particle size and surface area were synthesized. • Oxide nanoparticles showed better electrochemical behavior than micrometric ones due to area effect.

  15. Antitumor Activities of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Pilar Vinardell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles have received much attention recently due to their use in cancer therapy. Studies have shown that different metal oxide nanoparticles induce cytotoxicity in cancer cells, but not in normal cells. In some cases, such anticancer activity has been demonstrated to hold for the nanoparticle alone or in combination with different therapies, such as photocatalytic therapy or some anticancer drugs. Zinc oxide nanoparticles have been shown to have this activity alone or when loaded with an anticancer drug, such as doxorubicin. Other nanoparticles that show cytotoxic effects on cancer cells include cobalt oxide, iron oxide and copper oxide. The antitumor mechanism could work through the generation of reactive oxygen species or apoptosis and necrosis, among other possibilities. Here, we review the most significant antitumor results obtained with different metal oxide nanoparticles.

  16. Production of carbide-free thin ductile iron castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ashraf Sheikh

    2008-01-01

    The fast cooling rate of thin ductile iron castings requires special consideration to produce carbide-free castings. Extraor-dinary care was taken to select the charge to produce castings of 100-mm long round bars with 16-ram diameter. The castings show the presence of carbides in the bars. Seven melts were made with different temperatures and with different compositions to get rid of carbides. After chemical analyses, it was found that the extra purity of the charge with less than 0.008wt% sulfur in the castings was the cause of carbides. To remove the carbides fi'om the castings, sulfur should be added to the charge.

  17. Ultra-rapid processing of refractory carbides; 20 s synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo2C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallance, Simon R; Kingman, Sam; Gregory, Duncan H

    2007-02-21

    The microwave synthesis of molybdenum carbide, Mo(2)C, from carbon and either molybdenum metal or the trioxide has been achieved on unprecedented timescales; Ex- and in-situ characterisation reveals key information as to how the reaction proceeds.

  18. Cobalt-mediated radical polymerization of vinyl monomers: investigation of cobalt-coordination

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Controlled Radical Polymerization techniques have been developed to obtain well-defined architectures and to control polymer parameters. Among these systems is Cobalt-Mediated Radical Polymerization (CMRP), which is based on the reversible deactivation of the growing radical chains with a cobalt complex, the cobalt (II) bis(acetylacetonate). The interest of this system is not only due to its ability to control the polymerization of very reactive monomers such as vinyl acetate (VAc) and N-viny...

  19. Flotation of cobalt bearing minerals from a mixed copper-cobalt oxidized ore

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Tech. (Extraction Metallurgy) The techniques for the flotation of mixed copper and cobalt bearing oxide ores using the sulphidization method in order to recover the oxidized copper and cobalt bearing minerals have been well documented by previous researchers. These processes have been successfully implemented in many of the metallurgical plant operations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). The mixed copper and cobalt oxidised ores from this region present significant chal-lenges t...

  20. Galvanic cells including cobalt-chromium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjerdet, N R

    1980-01-01

    Galvanic cells may be created when dentures made of cobalt-chromium alloys are placed on teeth with metallic restorations. The power of such cells was evaluated in an in vitro galvanic using amalgams, gold alloy, and nickel-chromium alloys. The amalgams and one of the nickel-chromium alloys revealed high corrosion currents when placed in contact with cobalt-chromium alloy, the conventional amalgam showing the highest values. The gold alloy and another nickel-chromium alloy exhibited low corrosion currents and they were noble with respect to cobalt-chromium.