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Sample records for carbide coatings produced

  1. Corrosion Resistance of Nanosized Silicon Carbide-Rich Composite Coatings Produced by Noble Gas Ion Mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racz, A S; Kerner, Z; Nemeth, A; Panjan, P; Peter, L; Sulyok, A; Vertesy, G; Zolnai, Z; Menyhard, M

    2017-12-27

    Ion beam mixing has been used to produce a silicon carbide (SiC)-rich nanolayer for protective coating. Different C/Si/C/Si/C/Si(substrate) multilayer structures (with individual layer thicknesses falling in the range of 10-20 nm) have been irradiated by Ar+ and Xe+ ions at room temperature in the energy and fluence ranges of 40-120 keV and 1-6 × 1016 ion/cm2, respectively. The effects of ion irradiation, including the in-depth distribution of the SiC produced, was determined by Auger electron spectroscopy depth profiling. The thickness of the SiC-rich region was only some nanometers, and it could be tailored by changing the layer structure and the ion irradiation conditions. The corrosion resistance of the layers was investigated by potentiodynamic electrochemical test in 4 M KOH solution. The measured corrosion resistance of the SiC-rich layers was orders of magnitude better than that of pure silicon, and a correlation was found between the corrosion current density and the effective areal density of the SiC.

  2. ELECTRICAL FURNACE FOR PRODUCING CARBIDE COATINGS USING THE THERMOREACTIVE DEPOSITION/DIFFUSION TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FABIO CASTILLEJO

    2011-01-01

    the presence of VC and NbC, and as MEB results clearly show, the formation of regular thickness coatings. The results obtained allow for assessing that the designed and built furnace fulfills the requirements of the TRD technique for obtaining different types of hard coatings.

  3. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...

  4. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

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    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  5. Methods for producing silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2016-03-01

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  6. Tribological Characteristics of Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Arc Sprayed Coatings using Different Carbide Grain Size Fractions

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    W. Tillmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide reinforced coatings play an important role in the field of surface engineering to protect stressed surfaces against wear. For thermally sprayed coatings, it is already shown that the tribological properties get mainly determined by the carbide grain size fraction. Within the scope of this study, the tribological characteristics of iron based WC-W2C reinforced arc sprayed coatings deposited using cored wires consisting of different carbide grain size fractions were examined. Microstructural characteristics of the produced coatings were scrutinized using electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses. Ball-on-disk test as well as Taber Abraser and dry sand rubber wheel test were employed to analyze both the dry sliding and the abrasive wear behavior. It was shown that a reduced carbide grain size fraction as filling leads to an enhanced wear resistance against sliding. In terms of the Taber Abraser test, it is also demonstrated that a fine carbide grain size fraction results in an improved wear resistant against abrasion. As opposed to that, a poorer wear resistance was found within the dry sand rubber wheel tests. The findings show that the operating mechanisms for both abrasion tests affect the stressed surface in a different way, leading either to microcutting or microploughing.

  7. Method of fabricating silicon carbide coatings on graphite surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Burchell, T.D.

    1994-07-26

    The vacuum plasma spray process produces well-bonded, dense, stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries to provide for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance, and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this application, silicon metal is deposited on graphite. This invention discloses the optimum processing parameters for as-sprayed coating qualities. The method also discloses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere at about 1,600 C which transforms the coating to silicon carbide. 3 figs.

  8. Development of tungsten carbide-cobalt coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Mark

    1999-09-01

    The discovery of WC, and the development of cemented carbides (WC-Co and WC-TiC-Co) have spawned advancements in higher speed machining of steel. The development of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) coatings has allowed even greater speeds to be realized. The production of titanium components, well known for their high specific strength, low density, corrosion resistance, and elevated temperature properties, would greatly benefit from a similar development allowing high speed machining processes. Currently, no known tool material exists that can effectively machine titanium at high speeds due to insufficient high temperature strength and/or chemical resistance. To address this problem an investigation into the development of a composite tool material combining toughness, high temperature strength and chemical resistance was pursued. Cemented carbide (WC-Co) is currently the most chemically resistant and commercially used tool material for machining Ti. The concept of applying a WC-Co coating on a high temperature deformation resistant substrate material was investigated. Two approaches, namely (i) laminated and (ii) co-deposited coatings, were chosen to chemically vapor deposit WC-Co. Thermodynamic and kinetic calculations were performed to aid in the development of CVD processes for deposition of WC and Co. The systems investigated were WF6-CH4-H2 and WCl6-CH4-H 2 for WC deposition and CoCl2-H2 for Co deposition. In the case of laminated structures the goal was to deposit nanometer scale alternating layers of WC and Co. However, development of a laminated structure led to the discovery that porosity always occurred in the Co layers at the WC/Co interface. Mass balance calculations, SEM, EDS, XRD, and metallographic analyses aided in determining that the porosity was due to the Kirkendall effect. It was observed that the diffusion of Co was enhanced by higher concentrations of soluble C in the Co layers. Effective diffusion barriers, such as TiC, were found to help

  9. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  10. Preparation of tantalum carbide films by reaction of electrolytic carbon coating with the tantalum substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Massot, Laurent; Chamelot, Pierre; Taxil, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    This article demonstrates that coatings of tantalum carbide can be obtained by electrodeposition of carbon in molten fluorides on a tantalum substrate as an alternative to the CVD process. The structural characteristics of the carbon deposited by the electrolytic route lead to a high reactivity of this element towards a tantalum cathode to produce tantalum carbide. Mutual reactivity was shown to be enhanced if tantalum plate is replaced by an electrodeposited layer of tantalum, where th...

  11. Method of producing novel silicon carbide articles. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewski, J.V.

    1982-06-18

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  12. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  13. Surface coating metrology of carbides of cutting tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfenov, V. D.; Basova, G. D.

    2017-10-01

    The coatings were studied by their main sign of the micrometric thickness by means of coating destruction and electron microscopical study of cleavage surfaces. Shock stress ruptures of heated carbides of cutting tools were performed. The discovery of the coating technology and creation of the coating structure for nonuniform and nonequilibrium conditions of the cutting process were dealt with. Multifracture microdestruction of nitride coatings, caused by complex external influences, was analysed to reveal the mechanism of interaction of elementary failures. Positive results were obtained in the form of improving the strength and wear resistance of the product, crack resistance increasing.

  14. Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Arnoldbik, W.M.; Sloof, W.G.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Growth stress in tungsten carbide-diamond-like carbon coatings, sputter deposited in a reactive argon/acetylene plasma, has been studied as a function of the acetylene partial pressure. Stress and microstructure have been investigated by wafer curvature and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

  15. Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

    2013-12-16

    The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

  16. Producing Silicon Carbide/Silicon Nitride Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    Manufacturing process makes CxSiyNz fibers. Precursor fibers spun from extruding machine charged with polycarbosilazane resin. When pyrolyzed, resin converted to cross-linked mixture of silicon carbide and silicon nitride, still in fiber form. CxSiyNz fibers promising substitutes for carbon fibers in high-strength, low-weight composites where high electrical conductivity unwanted.

  17. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  18. Nanofibre growth from cobalt carbide produced by mechanosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga-Arceo, L [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Orozco, E [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Garibay-Febles, V [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico); Bucio-Galindo, L [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apartado Postal 20-364 CP 01000, DF (Mexico); Mendoza Leon, H [FM-UPALM, IPN, Apartado Postal 75-395 CP 07300, DF (Mexico); Castillo-Ocampo, P [UAM-Iztapalapa, Apartado Postal 55-334 CP 09340, DF (Mexico); Montoya, A [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, Colonia San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico DF, 07730 (Mexico)

    2004-06-09

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare cobalt carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry and transmission electron microscopy methods. In order to produce carbon nanotubes, the cobalt carbide was precipitated after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C for 10 min. Nanofibres of about 10-50 nm in diameter, 0.04-0.1 {mu}m in length and 20-200 nm in diameter and 0.6-1.2 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 and 1000 deg. C, respectively, by means of this process.

  19. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy study of radiofrequency-sputtered titanium, carbide, molybdenum carbide, and titanium boride coatings and their friction properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    Radiofrequency sputtered coatings of titanium carbide, molybdenum carbide and titanium boride were tested as wear resistant coatings on stainless steel in a pin on disk apparatus. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to analyze the sputtered films with regard to both bulk and interface composition in order to obtain maximum film performance. Significant improvements in friction behavior were obtained when properly biased films were deposited on deliberately preoxidized substrates. XPS depth profile data showed thick graded interfaces for bias deposited films even when adherence was poor. The addition of 10 percent hydrogen to the sputtering gas produced coatings with thin poorly adherent interfaces. Results suggest that some of the common practices in the field of sputtering may be detrimental to achieving maximum adherence and optimum composition for these refractory compounds.

  20. ELABORATION OF AN EPOXY COATING REINFORCED WITH ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE NANOSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia G. Díaz-Barriga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the preparation of a transparent epoxy coating reinforced with 200 PPM of zirconium carbide nanostructures. The nanostructures of ZrC were prepared by mechanosynthesis. The additive characteristics analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were presented. Epoxy coating adhesion on a steel plate was analyzed using MEB. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was performed to the reinforced paints between 20-700 °C. The reinforced enamel was compared with an enamel without nanostructures. There is not vaporization of reinforced enamel at a 95 y 100 °C with ZrC particles size of 10 µm y 120 nm respectively. The final enamel degradation is slower when there is a 14% by weight of the residue and 426 °C with 120nm diameter particles.

  1. Coating parameters of zirconium carbide on advanced TRISO fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulude, Michael C.

    The feasibility of using very high temperature reactors (VHTR) as part of the next generation of nuclear reactors greatly depends on the tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles reliability to retain both gaseous and metallic fission products created in irradiated UO2. Most research devoted to TRISO fuel particles has focused on the characteristics and retention ability of silicon carbide as the main barrier against metallic fission products. This work investigates the deposition parameters necessary to create advanced TRISO particles consisting of the standard SiC TRISO coatings with an additional layer of ZrC applied directly to the UO2 fuel kernel. The additional ZrC layer will act as an oxygen getter to prevent failure mechanisms experienced in TRISO particles. Two failure mechanisms that are of the most concern are the over pressurization of the particles and kernel migration within the TRISO particles. In this study successful ZrC coatings were created and the deposition characteristics were analyzed via optical and SEM microscopy techniques. The ZrC layer was confirmed through XRD analysis. This investigation also reduced U3O8 microspheres to UO2 in an argon atmosphere. The oxygen to metal ratio from the reduced U3O8 was back calculated from oxidation analysis performed with a TGA machine. Once consistent repeatability is shown with coating surrogate zirconia kernels, advanced TRISO coatings will be deposited on the UO2 fuel kernels.

  2. Microstructures and Wear Performance of PTAW Deposited Ni-Based Coatings with Spherical Tungsten Carbide

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    Dewei Deng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Ni-based coatings with different content of spherical tungsten carbide were deposited by plasma transfer arc welding (PTAW method on 304 austenitic stainless steel sheets in this study. The microstructure and wear property of spherical tungsten carbide particle reinforced composite coatings were investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA and sliding wear test. It is shown that the fraction of spherical tungsten carbides has an important influence on microstructure of Ni-based overlay. The Ni40 overlay consists of γ-Ni dendrites with interdendritic Ni-based eutectics, borides and carbides improving the wear resistance. In the case of composite coatings with different content of tungsten carbide, many new phases are observed, such as Ni2W4C and NiW. In addition, there are a large number of irregular structures in composite coatings, such as acicular structure and irregular stripe organization. The results of sliding wear test indicate that the mass loss of coatings is influenced by the content of tungsten carbide. The mass loss decreases with the increase of tungsten carbide fraction. At high load, the abrasive resistance of composite coating with 60 wt. % tungsten carbide is improved about 50-fold compared to that of Ni40 overlay.

  3. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  4. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  5. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  6. Characterization of Tungsten Carbide coatings deposited on AISI 1020 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A.; Gonzalez, C.; Ramirez, Z. Y.

    2017-01-01

    In order to determine the variation in the mechanical properties of AISI 1020 standardized steel, heat treated by a quenching and tempering process and with a Tungsten Carbide coating, was performed a microstructural and chemical characterization of the coating material through electron microscopy scanning and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. The steel received a heat treatment of quenching performed by heating to 850°C, followed by cooling in water and tempering at a temperature of 450°C with air cooling. Tests of a) microhardness with a Wilson-Wolpert Tukon 2100B micro durometer and b) resistance to adhesive and abrasive wear following the ASTM G99-05 “Standard test method for wear testing with a pin-on-disk machine” and ASTM G65-04 “standard test method for measuring abrasion using dry sand and rubber Wheel” standards respectively. The results show that the microhardness of the steel do not vary with the load used to perform the test; in addition, the heat treatment of quenching and tempering improves by 5.5% the property while the coating increase it by 124.2%. Regarding the abrasive wear resistance, it is observed that the amount of material lost increases linearly with the distance covered. It was determined that the heat treatment decreased on average by 17.5% the volume of released material during the tests while the coating recued it by 66.7%. The amount volume of material lost during the adhesive wear tests increases linearly with the distance covered while the heat treatment decreased on average by 10.5% the volume of released material during the trial and the coating reduced it by 66.5%.

  7. Effect of bond coat and preheat on the microstructure, hardness, and porosity of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of tool steel materials. Bond coatings are commonly used as intermediate layers deposited on steel substrates (i.e. H13 tool steel) before the top coat is applied in order to enhance a number of critical performance criteria including adhesion of a barrier coating, limiting atomic migration of the base metal, and corrosion resistance. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of nickel bond coat and preheats temperatures (i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C) on microstructure, hardness, and porosity of tungsten carbide coatings sprayed by flame thermal coating. Micro-hardness, porosity and microstructure of tungsten carbide coatings are evaluated by using micro-hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results show that nickel bond coatings reduce the susceptibility of micro crack formation at the bonding area interfaces. The percentage of porosity level on the tungsten carbide coatings with nickel bond coat decreases from 5.36 % to 2.78% with the increase of preheat temperature of the steel substrate of H13 from 200°C to 400°C. The optimum hardness of tungsten carbide coatings is 1717 HVN in average resulted from the preheat temperature of 300°C.

  8. MUTUAL SOLUBILITY ОF CARBIDES WITHIN MULTICOMPONENT DIFFUSIVE COATINGS ОN HARD ALLOYS

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    A. A. Shmatov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimization of powder mixtures has been performed with respect to wear resistance of  diffusive carbide coatings on hard alloy Т15К6 (79% WC, 15% TiC and 6% Co for four three-component systems, viz. Cr–Ti–V, Cr–V–Mo, Cr–Ti–Mo and Cr–V–Nb,. The «composition-properties» diagrams have been plotted using the obtained mathematical models. Optimum three-component diffusive saturation of a hard alloy using carbide-forming elements permits to increase its service life by the factor of 2.2–3.1 as compared with one-component saturation. This significant improvement of wear resistance of three-component diffusive carbide coatings is due to formation of heterogeneous microstructure containing complex alloyed carbides of IV-VI-group metals with 2–30% mutually soluble one- or two- saturating elements. 

  9. Prior Surface Integrity Assessment of Coated and Uncoated Carbide Inserts Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla Almazrouee; Ayman Alaskari; Samy Oraby

    2011-01-01

    Coated carbide inserts are considered vital components in machining processes and advanced functional surface integrity of inserts and their coating are decisive factors for tool life. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) implementation has gained acceptance over a wide spectrum of research and science applications. When used in a proper systematic manner, the AFM features can be a valuable tool for assessment of tool surface integrity. The aim of this paper is to assess the integrity of coated and ...

  10. Wear and corrosion behaviour of tungsten carbide based coatings with different metallic binder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamdi, Z.; Apandi, M. N. M.; Ibrahim, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Tungsten carbide based coating has been well known as wear and corrosion resistance materials. However, less study is done on comparing the coating with different binder. Thus, in this work the wear and corrosion behaviour of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) coatings, namely (i) tungsten carbide cobalt and (ii) tungsten carbide nickel will be evaluated. Both coatings were characterised using X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). The wear behaviour has been examined using the modified grinder machine by weight loss measurement. Two types of abrasive have been used that include 3 g by weight alumina and silica. While for the corrosion behaviour, it is monitored by three electrodes of electrochemical test and immersion test for 30 days in an acidic environment. The electrolyte used was 0.5 M sulphuric acids (H2SO4). It was found that the cobalt binder shows higher wear resistance compares to the nickel binder for both slurry types. The harder alumina compared to silica results in higher wear rate with removal of carbide and binder is about the same rate. For silica abrasive, due to slightly lower hardness compared to the carbide, the wear is dominated by binder removal followed by carbide detachment. For corrosion, the nickel binder shows four times higher wear resistance compared to the cobalt binder as expected due to its natural behaviour. These finding demonstrate that the selection of coating to be used in different application in this case, wear and corrosion shall be chosen carefully to maximize the usage of the coating.

  11. Investigations on Wear Mechanisms of PVD Coatings on Carbides and Sialons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staszuk M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results on the wear resistance of PVD coatings on cutting inserts made from sintered carbide and sialon ceramics. The exploitative properties of coatings in technological cutting trials were defined in the paper, which also examined the adhesion of coatings to the substrate, the thickness of the coating, and the microhardness. As a result, it was found that isomorphic coating with AlN-h phase of covalent interatomic bonds exhibits much better adhesion to the sialon substrate than isomorphic coating with titanium nitride TiN. These coatings assure the high wear resistance of the coated tools, and the high adhesion combined with the high microhardness and fine-grained structure assure an increase in the exploitative life of the coated tools. In the case of coatings on substrate made from sintered carbide, there was a significant influence on the properties of the tools coated with them as concerns the existence of the diffusion zone between the substrate and the coating.

  12. Prior Surface Integrity Assessment of Coated and Uncoated Carbide Inserts Using Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla Almazrouee

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Coated carbide inserts are considered vital components in machining processes and advanced functional surface integrity of inserts and their coating are decisive factors for tool life. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM implementation has gained acceptance over a wide spectrum of research and science applications. When used in a proper systematic manner, the AFM features can be a valuable tool for assessment of tool surface integrity. The aim of this paper is to assess the integrity of coated and uncoated carbide inserts using AFM analytical parameters. Surface morphology of as-received coated and uncoated carbide inserts is examined, analyzed, and characterized through the determination of the appropriate scanning setting, the suitable data type imaging techniques and the most representative data analysis parameters using the MultiMode AFM microscope in contact mode. The results indicate that it is preferable to start with a wider scan size in order to get more accurate interpretation of surface topography. Results are found credible to support the idea that AFM can be used efficiently in detecting flaws and defects of coated and uncoated carbide inserts using specific features such as “Roughness” and “Section” parameters. A recommended strategy is provided for surface examination procedures of cutting inserts using various AFM controlling parameters.

  13. Prior Surface Integrity Assessment of Coated and Uncoated Carbide Inserts Using Atomic Force Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oraby, Samy; Alaskari, Ayman; Almazrouee, Abdulla

    2011-04-06

    Coated carbide inserts are considered vital components in machining processes and advanced functional surface integrity of inserts and their coating are decisive factors for tool life. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) implementation has gained acceptance over a wide spectrum of research and science applications. When used in a proper systematic manner, the AFM features can be a valuable tool for assessment of tool surface integrity. The aim of this paper is to assess the integrity of coated and uncoated carbide inserts using AFM analytical parameters. Surface morphology of as-received coated and uncoated carbide inserts is examined, analyzed, and characterized through the determination of the appropriate scanning setting, the suitable data type imaging techniques and the most representative data analysis parameters using the MultiMode AFM microscope in contact mode. The results indicate that it is preferable to start with a wider scan size in order to get more accurate interpretation of surface topography. Results are found credible to support the idea that AFM can be used efficiently in detecting flaws and defects of coated and uncoated carbide inserts using specific features such as "Roughness" and "Section" parameters. A recommended strategy is provided for surface examination procedures of cutting inserts using various AFM controlling parameters.

  14. Method of accurate thickness measurement of boron carbide coating on copper foil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Regmi, Murari

    2017-11-07

    A method is disclosed of measuring the thickness of a thin coating on a substrate comprising dissolving the coating and substrate in a reagent and using the post-dissolution concentration of the coating in the reagent to calculate an effective thickness of the coating. The preferred method includes measuring non-conducting films on flexible and rough substrates, but other kinds of thin films can be measure by matching a reliable film-substrate dissolution technique. One preferred method includes determining the thickness of Boron Carbide films deposited on copper foil. The preferred method uses a standard technique known as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICPOES) to measure boron concentration in a liquid sample prepared by dissolving boron carbide films and the Copper substrates, preferably using a chemical etch known as ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN). Measured boron concentration values can then be calculated.

  15. Robot based deposition of WC-Co HVOF coatings on HSS cutting tools as a substitution for solid cemented carbide cutting tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, W.; Schaak, C.; Biermann, D.; Aßmuth, R.; Goeke, S.

    2017-03-01

    Cemented carbide (hard metal) cutting tools are the first choice to machine hard materials or to conduct high performance cutting processes. Main advantages of cemented carbide cutting tools are their high wear resistance (hardness) and good high temperature strength. In contrast, cemented carbide cutting tools are characterized by a low toughness and generate higher production costs, especially due to limited resources. Usually, cemented carbide cutting tools are produced by means of powder metallurgical processes. Compared to conventional manufacturing routes, these processes are more expensive and only a limited number of geometries can be realized. Furthermore, post-processing and preparing the cutting edges in order to achieve high performance tools is often required. In the present paper, an alternative method to substitute solid cemented carbide cutting tools is presented. Cutting tools made of conventional high speed steels (HSS) were coated with thick WC-Co (88/12) layers by means of thermal spraying (HVOF). The challenge is to obtain a dense, homogenous, and near-net-shape coating on the flanks and the cutting edge. For this purpose, different coating strategies were realized using an industrial robot. The coating properties were subsequently investigated. After this initial step, the surfaces of the cutting tools were ground and selected cutting edges were prepared by means of wet abrasive jet machining to achieve a smooth and round micro shape. Machining tests were conducted with these coated, ground and prepared cutting tools. The occurring wear phenomena were analyzed and compared to conventional HSS cutting tools. Overall, the results of the experiments proved that the coating withstands mechanical stresses during machining. In the conducted experiments, the coated cutting tools showed less wear than conventional HSS cutting tools. With respect to the initial wear resistance, additional benefits can be obtained by preparing the cutting edge by means

  16. Interface coatings for Carbon and Silicon Carbide Fibers in Silicon Carbide Matrixes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Interface coatings for fiber-reinforced composites are an enabling technology for high temperature ceramic matrix composites. Because of their availability and...

  17. Adhesion of CVD coatings on new cemeted carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Bojestig, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Steel turning inserts cemented carbides have a binder phase consisting of cobalt (Co). However, in recent years a study from the United States National Toxicity Program (NTP) found that cobalt powder is carcinogenic upon inhalation. The European Union's REACH have therefore also classified cobalt powder as carcinogenic upon inhalation. The worldwide search to find a replacement has therefore lately intensified. It is important that the alternative binder phase has no negative effects on the p...

  18. Process to produce silicon carbide fibers using a controlled concentration of boron oxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Lipowitz, Jonathan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A process for producing polycrystalline silicon carbide by heating an amorphous ceramic fiber that contains silicon and carbon in an environment containing boron oxide vapor. The boron oxide vapor is produced in situ by the reaction of a boron containing material such as boron carbide and an oxidizing agent such as carbon dioxide, and the amount of boron oxide vapor can be controlled by varying the amount and rate of addition of the oxidizing agent.

  19. Synthesis and characterization of metal carbides nanoparticles produced by electrical explosion of wires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilyin, Alexander P; Nazarenko, Olga B; Tikhonov, Dmitriy V

    2012-10-01

    Tungsten, titanium, tantalum, aluminum carbides nanoparticles were produced by electrical explosion of wires. The explosions were carried out in gaseous mixtures of argon and acetylene at different ratios, argon and propane, and in liquids such as benzene, toluene, decane. The effects of the synthesis conditions on the size and phase composition of metal carbide nanoparticles were investigated. The thermal activity of the prepared powders was studied by the method of differential thermal analysis at the heating in air. Thermodynamic analysis of carbides formation during the process of electrical explosion has been made. The output of the chemical compounds depends on their thermal stability: the more thermally stable they are, the higher their output.

  20. Silicon Carbide/Boron Nitride Dual In-Line Coating of Silicon Carbide Fiber Tows Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project will demonstrate monolayer and dual layer coating of SiC fiber by leveraging Laser Chemical Vapor Deposition techniques developed by Free...

  1. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 deg C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, C.; Sliney, H. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  2. Composition optimization of self-lubricating chromium-carbide-based composite coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Chris; Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes new compositions of self-lubricating coatings that contain chromium carbide. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The coating constituents were treated as a ternary system consisting of: (1) the bonded carbide base material, (2) silver, and (3) the eutectic. A study to determine the optimum amounts of each constituent was performed. The various compositions were prepared by powder blending. The blended powders were then plasma sprayed onto superalloy substrates and diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. Friction and wear studies were performed at temperatures from 25 to 760 C in helium and hydrogen. A variety of counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines.

  3. HVOF and HVAF Coatings of Agglomerated Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Powders for Water Droplet Erosion Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasi, F.; Mahdipoor, M. S.; Dolatabadi, A.; Medraj, M.; Moreau, C.

    2016-12-01

    Water droplet erosion (WDE) is a phenomenon caused by impingement of water droplets of several hundred microns to a few millimeters diameter at velocities of hundreds of meters per second on the edges and surfaces of the parts used in such services. The solution to this problem is sought especially for the moving compressor blades in gas turbines and those operating at the low-pressure end of steam turbines. Thermal-sprayed tungsten carbide-based coatings have been the focus of many studies and are industrially accepted for a multitude of wear and erosion resistance applications. In the present work, the microstructure, phase analysis and mechanical properties (micro-hardness and fracture toughness) of WC-Co coatings are studied in relation with their influence on the WDE resistance of such coatings. The coatings are deposited by high-velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) and high-velocity air fuel (HVAF) processes. The agglomerated tungsten carbide-cobalt powders were in either sintered or non-sintered conditions. The WDE tests were performed using 0.4 mm water droplets at 300 m/s impact velocity. The study shows promising results for this cermet as WDE-resistant coating when the coating can reach its optimum quality using the right thermal spray process and parameters.

  4. Structure and characteristics of chromium steel coatings alloyed with boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, E. N.; Losev, A. S.; Borodikhin, S. A.; Matalasova, A. E.; Ponomarev, I. A.; Ivlev, K. E.

    2018-01-01

    This study explores the problems arising from the increase of wear resistance on the coatings of details of a wide range of applications, obtained by surfacing the Fe - Cr system with flux-cored wires. It has shown that insignificant wear resistance of such steel under conditions of metal friction against another metal is due to their relatively low hardness and the absence of strengthening phases. It also shows the effect of boron carbide on the structure and the characteristics of chromium steel obtained by the surfacing process. It was established that the use of high-chromium flux-cored wires alloyed with boron carbide aids the production of a deposited metal of a composite type, with a dispersed hardening based on chromium carboboride. The deposited metal with such structure has a high wear resistance and the hardness of 55 … 58 HRC and can be used for surfacing cladding the hardening, corrosion-resistant coatings.

  5. Microstructure and tribology behaviors of in-situ WC/Fe carbide coating fabricated by plasma transferred arc metallurgic reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Youlu; Li, Zhuguo

    2017-11-01

    In order to improve the dry sliding tribology properties of mild steel compound, the in-situ WC carbide coatings with 18, 32, 54 vol% WC were successfully synthesized using plasma transferred arc metallurgic reaction (PTAMR) with alloy powders W, C and Fe-30Ni. The composition, microstructure and microhardness of the carbide coatings were characterized. It was found that the carbide coating consisted of WC, M6C and γ phases, carbides distribute gradually from the coating bottom to top, the in-situ WC crystal grows into triangle prism structure with high hardness and good toughness. Dry sliding tribology behaviors were studied on block-on-wheel dry sliding wear tester with load 300 N, sliding speed 0.836 m/s and distance 500 m. Results show that the friction coefficient diagrams contain three stages, variation of friction coefficient increase with the content of WC, friction temperature increase with the sliding distance, increasing the content of WC can directly increase the antiwear property of WC/Fe carbide coating. The main wear mechanisms of in-situ WC/Fe carbide coating are adhesive, oxidation, micro-cutting and ploughing wear.

  6. Mullite coatings for corrosion protection of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulpuri, R.; Sarin, V.K. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    SiC based ceramics have been identified as the leading candidate materials for elevated temperature applications in harsh oxidation/corrosion environments. It has been established that a protective coating can be effectively used to avoid problems with excessive oxidation and hot corrosion. However, to date, no coating configuration has been developed that can satisfy the stringent requirements imposed by such applications. Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) mullite coatings due to their desirable properties of toughness, corrosion resistance, and a good coefficient of thermal expansion match with SiC are being investigated as a potential candidate. Since mullite has never been successfully grown via CVD, the thermodynamics and kinetics of its formation were initially established and used as a guideline in determining the initial process conditions. Process optimization was carried out using an iterative process of theoretical analysis and experimental work coupled with characterization and testing. The results of theoretical analysis and the CVD formation characteristics of mullite are presented.

  7. Mechanical Behavior and Sliding Wear Studies on Iron Aluminide Coatings Reinforced with Titanium Carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Amiriyan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Wear-resistant iron aluminide-based composites were coated on steel substrates with the High-Velocity Oxy-Fuel (HVOF technique using ball milled Fe3Al and TiC powders as feedstock. The phase composition, microstructure, microhardness, elastic modulus and dry sliding wear performance of unreinforced Fe3Al and Fe3Al–TiC composite coatings (reinforced with 30 and 50 vol. % TiC particles were evaluated in order to reveal the relationship between the mechanical and tribological behaviors. Compared to the unreinforced coatings, the composite coating with 30 vol. % TiC particles exhibited much greater hardness and higher elastic modulus. The increase of the elastic modulus of the composite coatings did not result in deterioration of sliding wear behavior. The addition of 50 vol. % TiC resulted in a further increase in hardness, however, both composite coatings showed the same elastic modulus. The fractured cross sectional surface of the unreinforced coating showed a weakly bonded microstructure promoting delamination in wear tests, whereas the composite fractured surface showed strong mechanical bonding between the matrix and carbide particles, leading to better cohesion. The Fe3Al–TiC coatings showed almost three orders of magnitude higher wear resistance under the dry sliding wear test compared to the unreinforced coatings.

  8. Effect of laser irradiation on iron carbide nanoparticles produced by laser ablation in ethanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amagasa, S.; Nishida, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Yamada, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Laser ablation in liquid is a useful mean of producing nanoparticles, based on both laser ablation (LA) and laser irradiation (LI) effects. In order to investigate the mechanism by which iron carbide nanoparticles are generated in ethanol, iron carbide nanoparticles were produced by LA of an iron block in a flowing ethanol solvent, which enabled separation and collection of the nanoparticles immediately following the process. These same particles were subsequently subjected to LI while suspended in stagnant ethanol. Both the LA and LA/LI nanoparticles were assessed using Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. LA in flowing ethanol was found to produce nanoparticles composed of cementite (Fe3C) and other metastable iron carbides with an average size of 16 nm, dispersed in amorphous carbon. LI of the LA nanoparticles suspended in ethanol increased the particle size to 38 nm and changed the composition to pure Fe3C.

  9. Microstructural and Mechanical Study of Inconel 625 – Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings Obtained by Powder Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huebner J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the investigation of fine (~0.54 μm tungsten carbide particles effect on structural and mechanical properties of laser cladded Inconel 625-WC composite. Three powder mixtures with different Inconel 625 – WC weight ratio (10, 20 and 30 weight % of WC were prepared. Coatings were made using following process parameters: laser beam diameter ø ≈ 500 μm, powder feeder rotation speed – 7 m/min, scanning velocity – 10 m/min, laser power – 220 W changed to 320 W, distance between tracks – 1 mm changed to 0.8 mm. Microstructure and hardness were investigated. Coatings produced by laser cladding were crack and pore free, chemically and structurally homogenous. High cooling rate during cladding process resulted in fine microstructure of material. Hardness improved with addition of WC from 396.3 ±10.5 HV for pure Inconel 625, to 469.9 ±24.9 HV for 30 weight % of WC. Tungsten carbide dissolved in Inconel 625 which allowed formation of intergranular eutectic that contains TCP phases.

  10. Simulation and experimental study of CVD process for low temperature nanocrystalline silicon carbide coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaushal, Amit; Prakash, Jyoti, E-mail: jprakash@barc.gov.in; Dasgupta, Kinshuk; Chakravartty, Jayanta K.

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Parametric simulation was carried out for specially designed CVD reactor. • Effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration were studied in CVD reactor. • Coating study carried out using low temperature and environmental safe CVD process. • Dense and uniform nanocrystalline SiC film was coated on zircaloy substrate. - Abstract: There is a huge requirement for development of a coating technique in nuclear industry, which is environmentally safe, economical and applicable to large scale components. In this view, simulation of gas-phase behavior in specially designed CVD reactor was carried out using computational tool, COMSOL. There were two important zones in CVD reactor first one is precursor vaporization zone and second one is coating zone. Optimized parameters for coating were derived from the simulation of gas phase dynamics in both zone of CVD reactor. The overall effect of fluid velocity, heat flow and concentration profile showed that Re = 54 is the optimum reaction condition for uniform coating in CVD system. In CVD coating experiments a synthesized halogen free, non-toxic and non-corrosive silicon carbide precursor was used. Uniform coating of SiC was obtained on zircaloy substrate at 900 °C using as synthesized organosilicon precursor. The X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analysis show that dense nano crystalline SiC film was deposited on zircaloy substrate.

  11. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yansheng [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  12. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  13. In Vitro Biocompatibility of Si Alloyed Multi-Principal Element Carbide Coatings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Vladescu

    Full Text Available In the current study, we have examined the possibility to improve the biocompatibility of the (TiZrNbTaHfC through replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si. The coatings were deposited on Si and 316L stainless steel substrates by magnetron sputtering in an Ar+CH4 mixed atmosphere and were examined for elemental composition, chemical bonds, surface topography, surface electrical charge and biocompatible characteristics. The net surface charge was evaluated at nano and macroscopic scale by measuring the electrical potential and work function, respectively. The biocompatible tests comprised determination of cell viability and cell attachment to the coated surface. The deposited coatings had C/(metal+Si ratios close to unity, while a mixture of metallic carbide, free-carbon and oxidized species formed on the film surface. The coatings' surfaces were smooth and no influence of surface roughness on electrical charge or biocompatibility was found. The biocompatible characteristics correlated well with the electrical potential/work function, suggesting a significant role of surface charge in improving biocompatibility, particularly cell attachment to coating's surface. Replacement of either Ti or Ta by Si in the (TiZrNbTaHfC coating led to an enhanced surface electrical charge, as well as to superior biocompatible properties, with best results for the (TiZrNbSiHfC coating.

  14. Design and simulation of thermal residual stresses of coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tool substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Zang, Jian; Zheng, Wei [Key Laboratory of High Efficiency and Clean Mechanical Manufacture of MOE, School of Mechanical EngineeringShandong University, Jinan (China)

    2016-08-15

    Large thermal residual stresses in coatings during the coating deposition process may easily lead to coating delamination of coated carbide tools in machining. In order to reduce the possibility of coating delamination during the tool failure process, a theoretical method was proposed and a numerical method was constructed for the coating design of WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tools. The thermal residual stresses of multi-layered coatings were analytically modeled based on equivalent parameters of coating properties, and the stress distribution of coatings are simulated by Finite element method (FEM). The theoretically calculated results and the FEM simulated results were verified and in good agreement with the experimental test results. The effects of coating thickness, tool substrate, coating type and interlayer were investigated by the proposed geometric and FEM model. Based on the evaluations of matchability of tool substrate and tool coatings, the basic principles of tool coating design were proposed. This provides theoretical basis for the selection and design of coatings of cutting tools in high-speed machining.

  15. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Laboratory analysis of dental sections made with commercial tungsten carbide burs coated with HFCVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maass, F [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Antofagasta, Av. Angamos 601, Antofagasta (Chile); Aguilera, Y [Departamento de Ingenieria Industrial, Universidad de Antofagasta, Av. Angamos 601, Antofagasta (Chile); Avaria, J [Departamento de OdontologIa, Universidad de Antofagasta, Av. Angamos 601, Antofagasta (Chile)], E-mail: fdmaass@uantof.cl

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the cutting power of diamond burs obtained by the HFCVD deposition process. Diamond was deposited on the active part of each of a series of 10 commonly used Tungsten Carbide (WC) commercial burs. The quality of the section was compared with sections made by commonly used commercial burs, employing fresh human molars and a standard device [1]. Both burs and sections were analysed by using SEM and EDX techniques. The quality and tension of the deposited diamond coatings were analyzed by Raman Spectroscopy. The optimal thickness of the diamond coating which provided the best durability and finish of the sections was determined by comparative observations of results.

  17. Near-field radiative heat transfer between metamaterials coated with silicon carbide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Soumyadipta, E-mail: soumya.005@gmail.com; Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping, E-mail: liping.wang@asu.edu [School for Engineering of Matter, Transport, and Energy, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States)

    2015-01-19

    In this letter, we study the near-field radiative heat transfer between two metamaterial substrates coated with silicon carbide (SiC) thin films. It is known that metamaterials can enhance the near-field heat transfer over ordinary materials due to excitation of magnetic plasmons associated with s polarization, while strong surface phonon polariton exists for SiC. By careful tuning of the optical properties of metamaterial, it is possible to excite electrical and magnetic resonances for the metamaterial and surface phonon polaritons for SiC at different spectral regions, resulting in the enhanced heat transfer. The effect of the SiC film thickness at different vacuum gaps is investigated. Results obtained from this study will be beneficial for application of thin film coatings for energy harvesting.

  18. Effect of metallic coating on the properties of copper-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, M.; Pietrzak, K.; Teodorczyk, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Jarząbek, D.; Zybała, R.; Bazarnik, P.; Lewandowska, M.; Strojny-Nędza, A.

    2017-11-01

    In the presented paper a coating of SiC particles with a metallic layer was used to prepare copper matrix composite materials. The role of the layer was to protect the silicon carbide from decomposition and dissolution of silicon in the copper matrix during the sintering process. The SiC particles were covered by chromium, tungsten and titanium using Plasma Vapour Deposition method. After powder mixing of components, the final densification process via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) method at temperature 950 °C was provided. The almost fully dense materials were obtained (>97.5%). The microstructure of obtained composites was studied using scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. The microstructural analysis of composites confirmed that regardless of the type of deposited material, there is no evidence for decomposition process of silicon carbide in copper. In order to measure the strength of the interface between ceramic particles and the metal matrix, the micro tensile tests have been performed. Furthermore, thermal diffusivity was measured with the use of the laser pulse technique. In the context of performed studies, the tungsten coating seems to be the most promising solution for heat sink application. Compared to pure composites without metallic layer, Cu-SiC with W coating indicate the higher tensile strength and thermal diffusitivy, irrespective of an amount of SiC reinforcement. The improvement of the composite properties is related to advantageous condition of Cu-SiC interface characterized by well homogenity and low porosity, as well as individual properties of the tungsten coating material.

  19. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  20. Enhancement in Tribological and Mechanical Properties of Cemented Tungsten Carbide Substrates using CVD-diamond Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A. Najar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available An experimental investigation has been carried out to study the influence on the performance characteristics of a cutting tool material notably known as cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co. A comparison has been documented between nanocrystalline diamond (NCD and microcrystalline diamond (MCD coatings deposited on two cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co substrates with the architectures of WC-Co/NCD and WC-Co/MCD, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. In the present work, the friction characteristics were studied using ball-on-disc type linear reciprocating micro-tribometer, under the application of 1–10 N normal loads, when sliding against smooth alumina (Al2O3 ceramic ball for the total duration of 20 min, under dry sliding condition. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. However, the average value of friction coefficient (COF corresponding to MCD and NCD coatings decrease from ~0.37–0.32 and ~0.30–0.27, respectively when the load is increased from 1–10 N. However, for conventional WC-Co substrate the average COF increases from ~0.60–0.75, under the same input operating conditions. The wear tracks formed on the surfaces of NCD, MCD and WC-Co, after sliding were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. Therefore, the results will serve breakthrough information for the designer to design the cutting tool or mechanical component using this novel coating procedure.

  1. Influence of substrate microstructure and surface finish on cracking and delamination response of TiN-coated cemented carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jing; Odén, Magnus; Johansson-Joesaar, Mats P.; Llanes, L.

    2016-01-01

    The cracking and delamination of TiN-coated hardmetals (WC-Co cemented carbides) when subjected to Brale indentation were studied. Experimental variables were substrate microstructure related to low (6 wt% Co) and medium (13 wt% Co) binder content, and surface finishes associated with grinding and polishing stages before film deposition. Brale indentation tests were conducted on both coated and uncoated hardmetals. Emphasis has been placed on assessing substrate microstructure and subsurface ...

  2. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  3. Effect of Particle and Carbide Grain Sizes on a HVOAF WC-Co-Cr Coating for the Future Application on Internal Surfaces: Microstructure and Wear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, J.; Kamnis, S.; Murray, J.; Bai, M.; Hussain, T.

    2018-01-01

    The use of nanoscale WC grain or finer feedstock particles is a possible method of improving the performance of WC-Co-Cr coatings. Finer powders are being pursued for the development of coating internal surfaces, as less thermal energy is required to melt the finer powder compared to coarse powders, permitting spraying at smaller standoff distances. Three WC-10Co-4Cr coatings, with two different powder particle sizes and two different carbide grain sizes, were sprayed using a high velocity oxy-air fuel (HVOAF) thermal spray system developed by Castolin Eutectic-Monitor Coatings Ltd., UK. Powder and coating microstructures were characterized using XRD and SEM. Fracture toughness and dry sliding wear performance at three loads were investigated using a ball-on-disk tribometer with a WC-Co counterbody. It was found that the finer powder produced the coating with the highest microhardness, but its fracture toughness was reduced due to increased decarburization compared to the other powders. The sprayed nanostructured powder had the lowest microhardness and fracture toughness of all materials tested. Unlubricated sliding wear testing at the lowest load showed the nanostructured coating performed best; however, at the highest load this coating showed the highest specific wear rates with the other two powders performing to a similar, better standard.

  4. Investigation on the formation of tungsten carbide in tungsten-containing diamond like carbon coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strondl, C.; Carvalho, N.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De; Kolk, G.J. van der

    2003-01-01

    A series of tungsten-containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC) coatings have been produced by unbalanced magnetron sputtering using a Hauzer HTC-1000 production PVD system. Sputtering from WC targets has been used to form W-C:H coatings. The metal to carbon ratio has been varied to study changes in

  5. Influence of Oxidation Behavior of Feedstock on Microstructure and Ablation Resistance of Plasma-Sprayed Zirconium Carbide Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cui; Ge, Xuelian; Niu, Yaran; Li, Hong; Huang, Liping; Zheng, Xuebin; Sun, Jinliang

    2015-10-01

    Plasma spray is one of the suitable technologies to deposit carbide coatings with high melting point, such as ZrC. However, in the spray processes performed under atmosphere, oxidation of the carbide powder is inevitable. To investigate the influence of the oxidation behavior of feedstock on microstructure and ablation resistance of the deposited coating, ZrC coatings were prepared by atmospheric and vacuum plasma spray (APS and VPS) technologies, respectively. SiC-coated graphite was applied as the substrate. The obtained results showed that the oxidation of ZrC powder in APS process resulted in the formation of ZrO and Zr2O phases. Pores and cracks were more likely to be formed in the as-sprayed APS-ZrC coating. The VPS-ZrC coating without oxides possessed denser microstructure, higher thermal diffusivity, and lower coefficients of thermal expansion as compared with the APS-ZrC coating. A dense ZrO2 layer would be formed on the surface of the VPS-ZrC-coated sample during the ablation process and the substrate can be protected sufficiently after being ablated in high temperature plasma jet. However, the ZrO2 layer, formed by oxidation of the APS-ZrC coating having loose structure, was easy to be washed away by the shearing action of the plasma jet.

  6. Performance of PVD-Coated Carbide Tools When Turning Inconel 718 in Dry Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusri Akhyar Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 has found its niche in many industries, owing to its unique properties such as high oxidation resistance and corrosion resistance even at very high temperatures. Coated carbide tool with hard layer of PVD TiAlN is used to turn Inconel 718. Taguchi method with the orthogonal array L9 is applied in this experiment with the parameter cutting speed of 60–80 m/min, feed rate of 0.2–0.3 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 0.3–0.5 mm. The results show that depth of cut is a significant influence to the tool life. Cutting speed of 60 m/min, feed rate of 0.2 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 0.3 mm are the optimum parameters. The flank wear, crater wear, notch wear, and nose wear are the wear mechanisms on the carbide tool. Through the SEM, abrasion, attrition, and adhesion are the wear mechanisms which can be seen on the cutting tool.

  7. Use of microhardness as a simple means of estimating relative wear resistance of carbide thermal spray coatings: Part 2. wear resistance of cemented carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Michael; Roman, Itzhak

    2002-12-01

    A selection of WC-Co and Cr3C2-25%NiCr coatings produced by plasma spray and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) deposition techniques were subjected to various wear tests designed to simulate abrasion, cavitation, sliding, and particle erosion type wear mechanisms. All of the coatings were at least 200 µm thick and were deposited onto stainless steel substrates. In Part 1 of this contribution, the microstructures of the coatings were characterized and their mechanical properties were assessed using microindentation procedures. In this second part of the article, the behavior of the coatings when subjected to the various wear tests is reported and the utility of microhardness testing as an indication of relative wear resistance is discussed. It is shown that correctly performed, appropriate microhardness measurements are a good indication of abrasion resistance and sliding wear resistance, and also correlate well with cavitation resistance in Cr3C2-NiCr. The measurements were less useful for predicting erosion resistance for both Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co, however, and for abrasion resistance when WC-Co was ground against SiC. Here the contribution of micromechanisms involving fracturing and brittle failure is greater than that indicated by the coating microhardness, which is essentially a measurement of resistance to plastic deformation under equilibrium conditions.

  8. Effect of CVD-diamond coatings on the tribological performance of cemented tungsten carbide substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaleem Ahmad Najar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison has been documented between nanocrystalline diamond (NCD and microcrystalline diamond (MCD coatings deposited on cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co substrates with architectures of WC-Co/NCD & WC-Co/MCD, using hot filament chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD technique. In the present work, the frictional characteristics were studied using ball-on-disc type linear reciprocating micro-tribometer, under the application of 1–10N normal loads, when sliding against smooth alumina (Al2O3 ceramic ball for the total duration of 15min, under dry sliding conditions. Nanoindentation tests were also conducted using Berkovich nanoindenter for the purpose of measurement of hardness and elastic modulus values. The average coefficients of friction of MCD and NCD coatings decrease from 0.37 – 0.32 and 0.3 – 0.27 respectively, when the load is increased from 1–10N. However, for conventional WC-Co substrate the average coefficient of friction increases from 0.60–0.75, under the same input operating conditions. The wear tracks formed on the surfaces of CVD-diamond coatings and WC-Co substrate, after friction measurement were characterised using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM techniques. However, the compositional analysis for the formation of tribo-layer observed on the wear tracks of CVD-diamond coatings was confirmed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS technique. Therefore, maintaining an appropriate level of normal load and using appropriate type of diamond coating, friction may be kept to some lower value to improve mechanical processes.

  9. Spontaneous formation and characterization of silicon carbide nanowires produced via thermolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soszynski, Michal; Dabrowska, Agnieszka; Huczko, Andrzej [Laboratory of Nanomaterials Physics and Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University, 1 Pasteur str., 02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-11-15

    We report on experiments to optimize the process of preparation of silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs) by a combustion synthesis (thermolysis). The morphology of starting reactants and combustion atmosphere were varied and we observed the effect of those variables on product yield and characteristics. The produced SiCNWs were characterized using SEM, TEM, XRD, and wet chemistry analysis. High-pressure reactor used for combustion synthesis, combustion reaction, and TEM of produced SiCNW. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. An experimental study of flank wear in the end milling of AISI 316 stainless steel with coated carbide inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odedeyi, P. B.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Liman, M.

    2017-05-01

    Stainless steel 316 is a difficult-to-machine iron-based alloys that contain minimum of about 12% of chromium commonly used in marine and aerospace industry. This paper presents an experimental study of the tool wear propagation variations in the end milling of stainless steel 316 with coated carbide inserts. The milling tests were conducted at three different cutting speeds while feed rate and depth of cut were at (0.02, 0.06 and 01) mm/rev and (1, 2 and 3) mm, respectively. The cutting tool used was TiAlN-PVD-multi-layered coated carbides. The effects of cutting speed, cutting tool coating top layer and workpiece material were investigated on the tool life. The results showed that cutting speed significantly affected the machined flank wears values. With increasing cutting speed, the flank wear values decreased. The experimental results showed that significant flank wear was the major and predominant failure mode affecting the tool life.

  11. Methods for Producing High-Performance Silicon Carbide Fibers, Architectural Preforms, and High-Temperature Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for producing architectural preforms and high-temperature composite structures containing high-strength ceramic fibers with reduced preforming stresses within each fiber, with an in-situ grown coating on each fiber surface, with reduced boron within the bulk of each fiber, and with improved tensile creep and rupture resistance properties tier each fiber. The methods include the steps of preparing an original sample of a preform formed from a pre-selected high-strength silicon carbide ceramic fiber type, placing the original sample in a processing furnace under a pre-selected preforming stress state and thermally treating the sample in the processing furnace at a pre-selected processing temperature and hold time in a processing gas having a pre-selected composition, pressure, and flow rate. For the high-temperature composite structures, the method includes additional steps of depositing a thin interphase coating on the surface of each fiber and forming a ceramic or carbon-based matrix within the sample.

  12. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of PVD-Coated Cemented Carbide as Evaluated by a New Multipass Scratch-Testing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fallqvist

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new test method based on multipass scratch testing has been developed for evaluating the mechanical and tribological properties of thin, hard coatings. The proposed test method uses a pin-on-disc tribometer and during testing a Rockwell C diamond stylus is used as the “pin” and loaded against the rotating coated sample. The influence of normal load on the number of cycles to coating damage is investigated and the resulting coating damage mechanisms are evaluated by posttest scanning electron microscopy. The present study presents the test method by evaluating the performance of Ti0.86Si0.14N, Ti0.34Al0.66N, and (Al0.7Cr0.32O3 coatings deposited by cathodic arc evaporation on cemented carbide inserts. The results show that the test method is quick, simple, and reproducible and can preferably be used to obtain relevant data concerning the fatigue, wear, chipping, and spalling characteristics of different coating-substrate composites. The test method can be used as a virtually nondestructive test and, for example, be used to evaluate the fatigue and wear resistance as well as the cohesive and adhesive interfacial strength of coated cemented carbide inserts prior to cutting tests.

  13. Chemical vapour deposition diamond coating on tungsten carbide dental cutting tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, H.; Ahmed, W.; Rego, C. A.; Jones, A. N.; Amar, M.; Jackson, M.; Polini, R.

    2003-10-01

    Diamond coatings on Co cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal tools are widely used for cutting non-ferrous metals. It is difficult to deposit diamond onto cutting tools, which generally have a complex geometry, using a single step growth process. This paper focuses on the deposition of polycrystalline diamond films onto dental tools, which possess 3D complex or cylindrical shape, employing a novel single step chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth process. The diamond deposition is carried out in a hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor with a modified filament arrangement. The filament is mounted vertically with the drill held concentrically in between the filament coils, as opposed to the commonly used horizontal arrangement. This is a simple and inexpensive filament arrangement. In addition, the problems associated with adhesion of diamond films on WC-Co substrates are amplified in dental tools due to the very sharp edges and unpredictable cutting forces. The presence of Co, used as a binder in hard metals, generally causes poor adhesion. The amount of metallic Co on the surface can be reduced using a two step pre-treatment employing Murakami etching followed by an acid treatment. Diamond films are examined in terms of their growth rate, morphology, adhesion and cutting efficiency. We found that in the diamond coated dental tool the wear rate was reduced by a factor of three as compared to the uncoated tool.

  14. Experimental evaluation of coated carbide insert on alloy of steel materials during high speed turning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Lawal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the effect of coated carbide turning inserts on the surface roughness of AISI 304L austenitic stainless steel, AISI 316L austenitic stainless steel and AISI 1020 low carbon steel workpiece materials. The three steel grade materials were dry-turned using aluminium oxide (Al2O3 duratomic coated inserts at cutting speeds ranging from 1500 – 2000 rpm (229 – 314 m/min, feed rates of 0.25 – 0.75 mm/rev and depth of cut kept constant at 0.5 mm. Surface roughness values at different cutting conditions were measured and analysed. Chips formed at different cutting parameters were collected, classified according to ISO 3685 standards for chip classification and their surface morphology were analysed using optical microscopy. It was observed that feed rate had the greatest influence on surface roughness for the three workpiece materials. Surface finish deteriorated as feed rate increased. The chips formed were generally of the continuous type with built-up-edges.

  15. THE EVALUATION OF TOOL WEAR IN THE MACHINING AISI 1050 STEEL HARDENED UP TO 53 HRC WITH COATED CARBIDE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rıza MOTORCU

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the machining of AISI 1050 steel which is hardened up to 53 HRC is carried out with two carbide tool materials (three layer coated carbide of TP100 containing Ti (C, N/Al2O3/TiN and (multi layer coated carbide of TP1000 containing Ti (C, N/Al2O3/ Ti (C, N/TiN. Cutting tests are performed with constant depth of cut and feed rate under dry cutting conditions. The flank wear is examined using an optical microscope. Tool life curves and Taylor Tool Life Equation constants (n, C are obtained via the flank wear data at various cutting speeds. The test results show that tools' performance is adversely affected by increasing cutting speed due to increased temperatures and stress generated at the cutting edges during machining. Flank wear and chipping/fracture of the tool edges are identified the major failure modes at the cutting conditions. TP1000 multilayer coated inserts give longer tool life than those of TP100 three layer coated inserts.

  16. Effect of cutting parameters on sustainable machining performance of coated carbide tool in dry turning process of stainless steel 316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaber, Salem A.; Yusoff, Ahmed Razlan

    2017-04-01

    The manufacturing industry aims to produce many products of high quality with relatively less cost and time. Different cutting parameters affect the machining performance of surface roughness, cutting force, and material removal rate. Nevertheless, a few studies reported on the effects of sustainable factors such as power consumed, cycle time during machining, and tool life on the dry turning of AISI 316. The present study aims to evaluate the machining performance of coated carbide in the machining of hard steel AISI 316 under the dry turning process. The influence of cutting parameters of cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut with their five (5) levels is established by a central composite design. Highly significant parameters were determined by analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the main effects of power consumed and time during machining, surface roughness, and tool wear were observed. Results showed that the cutting speed was proportional to power consumption and tool wear. Meanwhile, insignificant to surface roughness, feed rate most significantly affected surface roughness and power consumption followed by depth of cut.

  17. Properties and characterization of multilayers of carbides and diamond-like carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strondl, C.; Kolk, G.J. van der; Hurkmans, T.; Fleischer, W.; Trinh, T.; Marcolino Carvalho, Nuno; Hosson, J.Th.M. de

    Metal containing diamond-like carbon (Me-DLC) coatings are widely applied in industrial applications. Normally, the coatings are produced with small inclusions of carbide forming elements like the 3d, 4d or 5d metals, or Si or B. The small carbide islands have sizes of approximately 2-20 nm. The

  18. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Natalia L; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-05-24

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum-chromium-nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating.

  19. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Natalia L.; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R.; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M.; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I.; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-01-01

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum–chromium–nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating. PMID:28809266

  20. Iron oxide and iron carbide particles produced by the polyol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y., E-mail: yyasu@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp; Shimizu, R. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [The University of Electro-Communications, Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Iron oxide (γ-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and iron carbide (Fe{sub 3}C) particles were produced by the polyol method. Ferrocene, which was employed as an iron source, was decomposed in a mixture of 1,2-hexadecandiol, oleylamine, and 1-octadecene. Particles were characterized using Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. It was found that oleylamine acted as a capping reagent, leading to uniform-sized (12-16 nm) particles consisting of γ-Fe {sub 2}O{sub 3}. On the other hand, 1-octadecene acted as a non-coordinating solvent and a carbon source, which led to particles consisting of Fe{sub 3}C and α-Fe with various sizes.

  1. Insulator coating for high temperature alloys method for producing insulator coating for high temperature alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Hee

    1998-01-01

    A method for fabricating an electrically insulating coating on a surface is disclosed comprising coating the surface with a metal, and reacting the metal coated surface with a nonmetal so as to create a film on the metal-coated surface. Alternatively, the invention provides for a method for producing a noncorrosive, electrically insulating coating on a surface saturated with a nonmetal comprising supplying a molten fluid, dissolving a metal in the molten fluid to create a mixture, and contacting the mixture with the saturated surface. Lastly, the invention provides an electrically insulative coating comprising an underlying structural substrate coated with an oxide or nitride compound

  2. Effect of Carbide Dissolution on Chlorine Induced High Temperature Corrosion of HVOF and HVAF Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCrMoNb Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, D.; Matikainen, V.; Uusitalo, M.; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2018-01-01

    Highly corrosion- and wear-resistant thermally sprayed chromium carbide (Cr3C2)-based cermet coatings are nowadays a potential highly durable solution to allow traditional fluidized bed combustors (FBC) to be operated with ecological waste and biomass fuels. However, the heat input of thermal spray causes carbide dissolution in the metal binder. This results in the formation of carbon saturated metastable phases, which can affect the behavior of the materials during exposure. This study analyses the effect of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix of Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb coatings and its effect on chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. Four coatings were thermally sprayed with HVAF and HVOF techniques in order to obtain microstructures with increasing amount of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix. The coatings were heat-treated in an inert argon atmosphere to induce secondary carbide precipitation. As-sprayed and heat-treated self-standing coatings were covered with KCl, and their corrosion resistance was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ordinary high-temperature corrosion test at 550 °C for 4 and 72 h, respectively. High carbon dissolution in the metal matrix appeared to be detrimental against chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. The microstructural changes induced by the heat treatment hindered the corrosion onset in the coatings.

  3. A study of lubrication, processing conditions, and material combinations that affect the wear of micro-textured-carbide coated cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy surfaces used for artificial joints implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne-Modeste, Geriel A.

    Total joint replacement remains one of the most successful treatments for arthritis. The most common materials used for artificial joints are metals (e.g., cobalt-chrome alloys or titanium alloys), which articulate against ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene. Wear related failures of artificial joints may be reduced with the use of novel micro-textured carbide surfaces. The micro-textured carbide surfaces were deposited on a CoCrMo alloy using microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. Wear tests were conducted to determine wear mechanisms and properties of the micro-textured surfaces. The research presented in this thesis addresses: (1) rheolgoical behavior of bovine calf serum with and without antibacterial agents to determine whether they can be used as appropriate models for synovial fluid, (2) the wear behavior of the micro-textured CoCrMo surface system, and (3) the mechanical and material properties of the micro-textured CoCrMo alloy surface relevant to wear performance. The rheological studies showed that the apparent viscosity of bovine calf serum increased with an increase in concentration before and after the serum was used for wear testing. The wear analysis showed that the processing conditions (2hr deposition vs. 4hr deposition times) affected the wear properties. The 2hr carbide-on-carbide lubricated in 50% BCS produced the lowest wear factor and rate for the five wear couple systems containing the carbide disk or plate material. Greater wear was produced in serum without penicillin/streptomycin (P/S) compared to the serum containing P/S. A greater carbide coating thickness 10 (micrometers) was produced during the 4hr deposition time than for the 2hr deposition (˜3mum). The nano-hardness value was higher than the micro-hardness for both the 4hr and 2hr carbide surfaces. The micro-hardness results of the worn carbide surfaces showed that an increase in BCS concentration from 0% to 100% increased the micro-hardness (HV) for carbide

  4. Ultraviolet-Diode Pump Solid State Laser Removal of Titanium Aluminium Nitride Coating from Tungsten Carbide Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Tian Long; Chantzis, Dimitrios; Royer, Raphael; Metsios, Ioannis; Antar, Mohammad; Marimuthu, Sundar

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the titanium aluminium nitride (TiAlN) coating removal from tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrate using a diode pump solid state (DPSS) ultraviolet (UV) laser with maximum average power of 90 W, wavelength of 355 nm and pulse width of 50 ns. The TiAlN coating of 1.5 μm thickness is removed from the WC-Co substrate with laser fluence of 2.71 J/cm2 at 285.6 number of pulses (NOP) and with NOP of 117.6 at 3.38 J/cm2 fluence. Titanium oxide formation was observed on the ablated surface due to the re-deposition of ablated titanium residue and also attributed to the high temperature observed during the laser ablation process. Crack width of around 0.2 μm was observed over both TiAlN coating and WC-Co substrate. The crack depth ranging from 1 to 10 μm was observed and is related to the thickness of the melted carbide. The crack formation is a result of the thermal induced stresses caused by the laser beam interaction with the material as well as the higher thermal conductivity of cobalt compared to WC. Two cleaning regions are observed and is a consequence of the Gaussian distribution of the laser beam energy. The surface roughness of the ablated WC-Co increased with increasing laser fluence and NOP.

  5. Plasma Spraying and Characterization of Tungsten Carbide-Cobalt Coatings by the Water-Stabilized System WSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Ctibor

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide-cobalt powders (WC-17wt% Co were plasma sprayed by a water-stabilized system WSP. Experiments with variable feeding distances and spray distances were carried out. Thinner coatings were deposited on carbon steel substrates and thicker coatings on stainless steel substrates to compare different cooling conditions. Basic characterization of coatings was done by XRD, SEM, and light microscopy plus image analysis. Microhardness was measured on polished cross-sections. The main focus of investigation was resistance against wear in dry as well as wet conditions. The appropriate tests were performed with set-ups based on ASTM G65 and G75, respectively. The influence of spray parameters onto coating wear performance was observed. The results of mechanical tests were discussed in connection with changes of phase composition and with the quality of the coating's microstructure. The results show that for obtaining the best possible WC-17Co coating with WSP process, from the viewpoint of wear resistance, the desired parameters combination is long feeding distance combined with short spray distance.

  6. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  7. Deposition of multicomponent chromium carbide coatings using a non-conventional source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Jesus Eduardo, E-mail: jesus.gonzalez@biomat.uh.cu [Biomaterials Center, University of Havana (Cuba); Rodriguez Cristo, Alejandro [Mechanical Plants Company, Road of the Sub-Plan, Farm La Cana, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Ramos, Adrian Paz [Department of Chemistry, Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Quintana Puchol, Rafael [Welding Research Center, Central University Marta Abreu of Las Villas, Villa Clara (Cuba)

    2017-01-15

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 deg for 4 hours. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness test method and pin-on-disc wear test. It was found that the coatings formed on W108 steel were mainly constituted by (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} , (Cr,Fe){sub 7} C{sub 3} , Cr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3-x} C{sub x+z}, Cr{sub 3} B{sub 0,44}C{sub 1,4} and (or) Cr{sub 7} BC{sub 4} . The carbide layers showed thicknesses between 14 and 15 μm and maximum values of microhardness between 15.8 and 18.8 GPa. Also, the micro-additions of boron to the mixtures showed statistically significant influence on the thickness, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of the carbide coatings. (author)

  8. Optimization of Ni-Based WC/Co/Cr Composite Coatings Produced by Multilayer Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Angelastro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a surface coating technique, laser cladding (LC has been developed for improving wear, corrosion, and fatigue properties of mechanical components. The main advantage of this process is the capability of introducing hard particles such as SiC, TiC, and WC as reinforcements in the metallic matrix such as Ni-based alloy, Co-based alloy, and Fe-based alloy to form ceramic-metal composite coatings, which have very high hardness and good wear resistance. In this paper, Ni-based alloy (Colmonoy 227-F and Tungsten Carbides/Cobalt/Chromium (WC/Co/Cr composite coatings were fabricated by the multilayer laser cladding technique (MLC. An optimization procedure was implemented to obtain the combination of process parameters that minimizes the porosity and produces good adhesion to a stainless steel substrate. The optimization procedure was worked out with a mathematical model that was supported by an experimental analysis, which studied the shape of the clad track generated by melting coaxially fed powders with a laser. Microstructural and microhardness analysis completed the set of test performed on the coatings.

  9. Experimental investigation on flank wear and tool life, cost analysis and mathematical model in turning hardened steel using coated carbide inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Sahoo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Turning hardened component with PCBN and ceramic inserts have been extensively used recently and replaces traditional grinding operation. The use of inexpensive multilayer coated carbide insert in hard turning is lacking and hence there is a need to investigate the potential and applicability of such tools in turning hardened steels. An attempt has been made in this paper to have a study on turning hardened AISI 4340 steel (47 ± 1 HRC using coated carbide inserts (TiN/TiCN/Al2O3/ZrCN under dry environment. The aim is to assess the tool life of inserts and evolution of flank wear with successive machining time. From experimental investigations, the gradual growth of flank wear for multilayer coated insert indicates steady machining without any premature tool failure by chipping or fracturing. Abrasion is found to be the dominant wear mechanisms in hard turning. Tool life of multilayer coated carbide inserts has been found to be 31 minute and machining cost per part is Rs.3.64 only under parametric conditions chosen i.e. v = 90 m/min, f = 0.05 mm/rev and d = 0.5 mm. The mathematical model shows high determination coefficient, R2 (99% and fits the actual data well. The predicted flank wear has been found to lie very close to the experimental value at 95% confidence level. This shows the potential and effectiveness of multilayer coated carbide insert used in hard turning applications.

  10. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  11. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel–tungsten composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India); Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy & New Materials (ARCI) Hyderabad, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh 500005 (India); Singh, Raghuvir [CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand 831007 (India); Keshri, Anup Kumar, E-mail: anup@iitp.ac.in [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulse electrodeposited Ni–W–SiC coating has been synthesized successfully. • Dome to turtle like structure has been observed on addition of SiC in Ni–W coating. • Formation of W(Ni) solid solution was observed on adding 5 g/l SiC in Ni–W coating. • Corrosion resistance improved for Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. • Texture formation and continuous barrier layer enhanced the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel–tungsten (Ni–W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni–W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, E{sub corr}) compared to Ni–W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}.

  12. Mössbauer study of iron carbide nanoparticles produced by laser ablation in alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amagasa, S., E-mail: B115608@ed.tus.ac.jp; Nishida, N. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [The University of Electro-Communications, Graduate School of Informatics and Engineering (Japan); Yamada, Y. [Tokyo University of Science, Department of Chemistry (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Iron carbide nanoparticles were synthesized by laser ablation of iron in alcohols (methanol and ethanol). A new cell, designed to allow the ablation to be conducted in a flowing solvent, enabled separation and collection of the nanoparticles immediately after production, thus preventing further photochemical reactions of the colloids. The nanoparticles were investigated using Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. In methanol, they consisted of α-iron, γ-iron, iron carbide, and amorphous paramagnetic iron carbides, whereas in ethanol they consisted of iron carbides and amorphous paramagnetic iron carbides. The difference in products depending on the alcohol was attributed to the different carbon supplies for methanol and ethanol. For both solvents, the average particle size was found to be 16 nm, and the nanoparticles were dispersed in amorphous carbon. We also examined the effect of further laser irradiation of the colloids using stagnant solvent, and the particle size was found to increase and a very small amount of carbonization was observed.

  13. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  14. Mechanical Properties and Corrosion Resistance of HVOF Sprayed Coatings Using Nanostructured Carbide Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żórawski W.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured and composite WC-12Co coatings were prepared by means of the supersonic spray process (HVOF. The microstructure and composition of WC-12Co nanostructured powder were analyzed by scanning electron microscope (SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM. Investigations revealed nano grains of WC with the size in the range of 50-500 nm. The nanostructured sprayed coating was analysed by SEM and phase composition was investigated by X-ray diffractometer (XRD. A denser coating structure with higher hardness was observed compared to conventional coating with a small amount of W2C, WC1−x, W and some amorphous phase. Young’s modulus and hardness were determined by depth sensing indentation in HVOF sprayed WC-12Co nanostructured coatings. Results were compared to conventional coatings and the relevance of the nanostructure was analyzed. An indentation size effect was observed on the polished surface and cross-section of both coatings. Data provided by indentation tests at maximum load allow to estimate hardness and elastic modulus. Enhanced nanomechanical properties of conventional coating in comparison to nanostructured one were observed. Nanostructured coatings WC-12Co (N revealed significantly better corrosion resistance.

  15. Deposition of mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide by dual-source metal plasma immersion. Topical report, October 1995--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide have been produced by a Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (Mepiiid) technique based on two cathodic vacuum arc sources and concurrent pulse biasing of the substrate in an oxygen atmosphere. The deposition was carried out at oxygen partial pressures of between 0.66 and 3.33 Pa. The Al:Si ratio in the films varied from 1:1 to 8:1 and was controlled by varying the pulse duration of the separate plasma guns. High bias voltage was used early in the deposition process in order to produce atomic mixing at the film-substrate interface, while lower bias voltage was used later in the deposition; low ion energy allows control of the physical properties of the film as well as faster deposition rates. The as-deposited films were amorphous, and crystalline mullite was formed by subsequent annealing at 1,100 C for 2 hours in air. Strong adhesion between the mullite and the SiC was achieved, in some cases exceeding the 70 MPa instrumental limit of the pull-tester.

  16. The wear of the carbide cutting tools coated with TiN during the milling of Inconel 738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebhi, A.; Douib, N.

    2017-02-01

    The machining of superalloy parts still an area not very clear in mechanical manufacturing. It is found to be used in particular areas such as gas turbine, rocket engine, space ships, nuclear reactors, and pumps. The machining of Inconel 738 superalloy has been studied in this context, with the aim to understand the wear behavior with carbide inserts coated with TiN and in order to optimize the cutting parameters before starting the production. The wear behavior of the inserts during the machining process of a very tough austenitic superalloy is unclear, and requires a series of well determined tests. The life of the insert under high stress such as pressure, cutting speed, high temperature, in a hostile zone and in contact with a very tough and harder material is determined. The generated process of wear is very complex, because it is followed by physico-chemical phenomenon appearing on the contact surfaces between the active part of the tool and workpiece.The lifetime of machine tools often depends on the tribological characteristics of the material couples (cutting tool / material to be machined). It has been shown that the most influential parameter is the coating, then comes the sliding speed. A relationship between the wear VB and the roughness Ra is proposed to collect information on the cutting edge and the quality of the tool by measuring the roughness. For wear measurement, an indirect method is used in coupling a Touptek photonics camera to capture and Ttoupview analysis software.

  17. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  18. Studies on Mechanical Behaviour of Aluminium/Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Reinforced Functionally Graded Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohandas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work is to fabricate functionally graded aluminium (Al-Si6Cu/ nickel coated SiC metal matrix composite using centrifugal casting route. SiC particles (53-80 µm were coated with nickel using electroless coating technique to enhance the wettability with aluminium matrix. Several attempts were made to coat nickel on SiC by varying the process temperature (65 °C, 75 °C, and 85 °C to obtain a uniform coating. Silicon particles coated with nickel were characterised using EDS enabled Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope and it was found that the maximum nickel coating on SiC occurred at a process temperature of 75°C. This nickel coated SiC particles were used as the reinforcement for the manufacture of functionally graded metal matrix composite and a cast specimen of dimensions 150×90×15 mm was obtained. To ensure the graded properties in the fabricated composites, microstructure (at a distance of 1, 7 and 14 mm and hardness (at a distance of 1, 3, 7, 10 and 14 mm from outer periphery taken in the radial direction was analysed using Zeiss Axiovert metallurgical microscope and Vickers micro hardness tester respectively. The microstructure reveals presence of more SiC particles at the outer periphery compared to inner periphery and the hardness test shows that the hardness also decreased from outer periphery (90 HV to inner periphery (78 HV.Tensile strength of specimen from outer zone (1-7mm and inner zone (8-14 mm of casting was also tested and found out a value of 153.3 Mpa and 123.3 Mpa for the outer zone and inner zone respectively. An important observation made was that the outer periphery of casting was particle rich and the inner periphery was particle deficient because of centrifugal force and variation in density between aluminium matrix and reinforcement. Functionally graded Al/SiC metal matrix composite could be extensively used in automotive industry especially in the manufacture of liners and brake drums.

  19. Mechanical properties of Cr-Cu coatings produced by electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyadi, Tri Widodo Besar; Sarjito, Masyrukan, Riswan, Ricky Ary

    2017-06-01

    Hard chromium coatings has long been considered as the most used electrodeposited coating in several industrial applications such as in petrochemistry, oil and gas industries. When hard coatings used in fastener components, the sliding contact during fastening operation produces high tensile stresses on the surface which can generate microcracks. For component used in high oxidation and corrosion environment, deep cracks cannot be tolerated. In this work, a laminated structure of Cr-Cu coating was prepared using electroplating on carbon steel substrates. Two baths of chrome and copper electrolyte solutions were prepared to deposit Cr as the first layer and Cu as the second layer. The effect of current voltages on the thickness, hardness and specific wear rate of the Cu layer was investigated. The results show that an increase of the current voltages increased the thickness and hardness of the Cu layer, but reduced the specific wear rate. This study showed that the use of Cu can be a potential candidate as a laminated structure Cr-Cu for chromium plating.

  20. XPS study of surface chemistry of tungsten carbides nanopowders produced through DC thermal plasma/hydrogen annealing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovskii, Pavel V.; Malinovskaya, Olga S.; Samokhin, Andrey V.; Blagoveshchenskiy, Yury V.; Kazakov, Valery А.; Ashmarin, Artem А.

    2015-06-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been employed to characterize the surface composition and bonding of the tungsten carbides nanopowders produced through a DC thermal plasma/hydrogen annealing process. The XPS results were complemented with those from Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and evolved gas analysis. The products of the DC plasma synthesis are the high-surface-area multicarbide mixtures composed mainly of crystalline WC1-x and W2C. The materials are contaminated with a pyrolitic carbonaceous deposit which forms ∼1 nm thick graphitic overlayers on the nanoparticles' surface. The underlying carbides are not oxidized in ambient air, and show no interfacial compounds underneath the graphitic overlayers. When annealed in hydrogen, the multicarbide mixtures undergo transformation into the single-phase WC nanopowders with an average particle size of 50-60 nm. The surface of the passivated and air-exposed WC nanopowders is stabilized by an ultrathin, no more than 0.5 nm in thickness, chemically heterogeneous overlayer, involving graphitic, carbon-to-oxygen, and WO3 bonding. Oxygen presents at coverages above a monolayer preferentially in the bonding configurations with carbon. The surface segregations of carbon are normally observed, even when the bulk content of carbon is below the stoichiometric level.

  1. On the melt infiltration of copper coated silicon carbide with an aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration of porous compacts of Cu coated and uncoated single crystals of platelet shaped alpha (hexagonal) SiC was used to study infiltration dynamics and particulate wettability with a 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration lengths were measured for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size. A threshold pressure (P(th)) for flow initiation through compacts was identified from an analysis of infiltration data; P(th) decreased while penetration lengths increased with increasing SiC size (more fundamentally, due to changes in interparticle pore size) and with increasing infiltration times. Cu coated SiC led to lower P(th) and 60-80 percent larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical processing conditions.

  2. Characterization of uranium carbide target materials to produce neutron-rich radioactive beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tusseau-Nenez, Sandrine; Roussière, Brigitte; Barré-Boscher, Nicole [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR8608) CNRS/IN2P3 – Université Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Gottberg, Alexander [CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); Corradetti, Stefano; Andrighetto, Alberto [INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Universit‘a 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Cheikh Mhamed, Maher; Essabaa, Saïd [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR8608) CNRS/IN2P3 – Université Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Franberg-Delahaye, Hanna; Grinyer, Joanna [Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, 14076 Caen (France); Joanny, Loïc [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (UMR 6226) CNRS – Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Lau, Christophe [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR8608) CNRS/IN2P3 – Université Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Le Lannic, Joseph [Institut des Sciences Chimiques de Rennes (UMR 6226) CNRS – Université de Rennes 1, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 RENNES Cedex (France); Raynaud, Marc; Saïd, Abdelhakim [Institut de Physique Nucléaire (UMR8608) CNRS/IN2P3 – Université Paris Sud, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Stora, Thierry [CERN, CH-1211 Genève 23 (Switzerland); and others

    2016-03-01

    In the framework of a R&D program aiming to develop uranium carbide (UC{sub x}) targets for radioactive nuclear beams, the Institut de Physique Nucléaire d’Orsay (IPNO) has developed an experimental setup to characterize the release of various fission fragments from UC{sub x} samples at high temperature. The results obtained in a previous study have demonstrated the feasibility of the method and started to correlate the structural properties of the samples and their behavior in terms of nuclear reaction product release. In the present study, seven UC{sub x} samples have been systematically characterized in order to better understand the correlation between their physicochemical characteristics and release properties. Two very different samples, the first one composed of dense UC and the second one of highly porous UC{sub x} made of multi-wall carbon nanotubes, were provided by the ActILab (ENSAR) collaboration. The others were synthesized at IPNO. The systems for irradiation and heating necessary for the release studies have been improved with respect to those used in previous studies. The results show that the open porosity is hardly the limiting factor for the fission product release. The homogeneity of the microstructure and the pore size distribution contributes significantly to the increase of the release. The use of carbon nanotubes in place of traditional micrometric graphite particles appears to be promising, even if the homogeneity of the microstructure can still be enhanced.

  3. Surface Layer States of Worn Uncoated and TiN-Coated WC/Co-Cemented Carbide Cutting Tools after Dry Plain Turning of Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Kümmel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyzing wear mechanisms and developments of surface layers in WC/Co-cemented carbide cutting inserts is of great importance for metal-cutting manufacturing. By knowing relevant processes within the surface layers of cutting tools during machining the choice of machining parameters can be influenced to get less wear and high tool life of the cutting tool. Tool wear obviously influences tool life and surface integrity of the workpiece (residual stresses, surface quality, work hardening, etc., so the choice of optimised process parameters is of great relevance. Vapour-deposited coatings on WC/Co-cemented carbide cutting inserts are known to improve machining performance and tool life, but the mechanisms behind these improvements are not fully understood. The interaction between commercial TiN-coated and uncoated WC/Co-cemented carbide cutting inserts and a normalised SAE 1045 steel workpiece was investigated during a dry plain turning operation with constant material removal under varied machining parameters. Tool wear was assessed by light-optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and EDX analysis. The state of surface layer was investigated by metallographic sectioning. Microstructural changes and material transfer due to tribological processes in the cutting zone were examined by SEM and EDX analyses.

  4. Amorphous boron coatings produced with vacuum arc deposition technology

    CERN Document Server

    Klepper, C C; Yadlowsky, E J; Carlson, E P; Keitz, M D; Williams, J M; Zuhr, R A; Poker, D B

    2002-01-01

    In principle, boron (B) as a material has many excellent surface properties, including corrosion resistance, very high hardness, refractory properties, and a strong tendency to bond with most substrates. The potential technological benefits of the material have not been realized, because it is difficult to deposit it as coatings. B is difficult to evaporate, does not sputter well, and cannot be thermally sprayed. In this article, first successful deposition results from a robust system, based on the vacuum (cathodic) arc technology, are reported. Adherent coatings have been produced on 1100 Al, CP-Ti, Ti-6Al-4V, 316 SS, hard chrome plate, and 52 100 steel. Composition and thickness analyses have been performed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. Hardness (H) and modules (E) have been evaluated by nanoindentation. The coatings are very pure and have properties characteristic of B suboxides. A microhardness of up to 27 GPa has been measured on a 400-nm-thick film deposited on 52 100 steel, with a corresp...

  5. Tribological and Wear Performance of Carbide Tools with TiB2 PVD Coating under Varying Machining Conditions of TiAl6V4 Aerospace Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Mario Paiva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tribological phenomena and tool wear mechanisms during machining of hard-to-cut TiAl6V4 aerospace alloy have been investigated in detail. Since cutting tool wear is directly affected by tribological phenomena occurring between the surfaces of the workpiece and the cutting tool, the performance of the cutting tool is strongly associated with the conditions of the machining process. The present work shows the effect of different machining conditions on the tribological and wear performance of TiB2-coated cutting tools compared to uncoated carbide tools. FEM modeling of the temperature profile on the friction surface was performed for wet machining conditions under varying cutting parameters. Comprehensive characterization of the TiB2 coated vs. uncoated cutting tool wear performance was made using optical 3D imaging, SEM/EDX and XPS methods respectively. The results obtained were linked to the FEM modeling. The studies carried out show that during machining of the TiAl6V4 alloy, the efficiency of the TiB2 coating application for carbide cutting tools strongly depends on cutting conditions. The TiB2 coating is very efficient under roughing at low speeds (with strong buildup edge formation. In contrast, it shows similar wear performance to the uncoated tool under finishing operations at higher cutting speeds when cratering wear predominates.

  6. Silicon-doped boron nitride coated fibers in silicon melt infiltrated composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corman, Gregory Scot; Luthra, Krishan Lal

    1999-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced silicon--silicon carbide matrix composite having improved oxidation resistance at high temperatures in dry or water-containing environments is produced. The invention also provides a method for protecting the reinforcing fibers in the silicon--silicon carbide matrix composites by coating the fibers with a silicon-doped boron nitride coating.

  7. A method of producing a body comprising porous alpha silicon carbide and the body produced by the method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of producing porous alpha-SiC containing shaped body and porous alpha-SiC containing shaped body produced by that method. The porous alpha-SiC containing shaped body shows a characteristic microstructure providing a high degree of mechanical stability...

  8. Microstructure And Properties Of WC-Co HVAF Coatings Obtained From Standard, Superfine And Modified By Sub-Micrometric Carbide Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myalska H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, microstructure and some properties of various coatings based on WC-Co obtained by the High Velocity Air Fuel technique are discussed. Initially, two WC-Co 83-17 powders of standard and superfine size were examined as a feedstock for a coatings deposition on a steel substrate. A standard Amperit 526.074 powder and an Inframat superfine powder were applied. Then three different sub-micrometric powders, WC, Cr3C2 and TiC were applied to modify the microstructure of WC-Co (Amperit 526.074. The aim of the investigations was to compare the microstructure and basic properties of coatings deposited from different components. The influence of sub-micrometric additions on mechanical properties of basic coatings was analyzed. Microstructure characterization of powders by using SEM and characterization of their technological properties as well, are presented. For all manufactured coatings obtained by a High Velocity Air Fuel method, the microhardness, porosity, adhesion to a substrate, and fracture toughness were determined. An improvement in WC-Co coating properties, as a result of sub-micrometric carbides addition, was revealed.

  9. Thermal analysis of silicon carbide coating on a nickel based superalloy substrate and thickness measurement of top layers by lock-in infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate the capacity of the lock-in infrared thermography technique for the evaluation of non-uniform top layers of a silicon carbide coating with a nickel based superalloy sample. The method utilized a multilayer heat transfer model to analyze the surface temperature response. The modelling of the sample was done in ANSYS. The sample consists of three layers, namely, the metal substrate, bond coat and top coat. A sinusoidal heating at different excitation frequencies was imposed upon the top layer of the sample according to the experimental procedures. The thermal response of the excited surface was recorded, and the phase angle image was computed by Fourier transform using the image processing software, MATLAB and Thermofit Pro. The correlation between the coating thickness and phase angle was established for each excitation frequency. The most appropriate excitation frequency was found to be 0.05 Hz. The method demonstrated potential in the evaluation of coating thickness and it was successfully applied to measure the non-uniform top layers ranging from 0.05 mm to 1 mm with an accuracy of 0.000002 mm to 0.045 mm.

  10. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-11-29

    500 oC, respectively. The coating layer contains both carbon and vanadium elements as quantified by WED, and the phases mainly consist of a mixture of V2C and VC, which was confirmed using X-ray diffraction patterns. In addition, the ratio between V and C varies with processing temperature, and it was observed that a higher temperature promotes the carbon adsorption and increases thickness of the coating. With optimized deposition conditions, we can apply the coating technique toward the actual T91 cladding materials, and provide the possibilities for the real application in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). Diffusion couple experiments were performed at both 550 oC and 690 oC, which corresponds to normal and aggressive operating temperatures, respectively. The results show that vanadium carbide coating with wider thickness (8 µm) and lower carbon concentration (27 at.%) reduced the width of the inter diffusion region, indicating that vanadium carbide coating can mitigate FCCI effectively. In specific, inter-diffusion between Fe and Ce was prohibited over most area, but Ce diffusion occurred toward the coating and the Fe substrate through thinner coating layer, which needs further optimization in terms of uniform coating thickness. Overall, it is concluded that this coating process can be successfully applied onto the inner surface of HT9 cladding tubes and the FCCI can be effectively mitigated if not totally eliminated.

  11. Optically transparent, superhydrophobic, biocompatible thin film coatings and methods for producing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Beth L.; Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Simpson, John T.; Hillesheim, Daniel A.; Trammell, Neil E.

    2017-09-05

    An optically transparent, hydrophobic coating, exhibiting an average contact angle of at least 100 degrees with a drop of water. The coating can be produced using low-cost, environmentally friendly components. Methods of preparing and using the optically transparent, hydrophobic coating.

  12. Structure-property relationship of ceramic coatings on metals produced by laser processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; van den Burg, M.; Mazumder, J; Conde, O; Villar, R; Steen, W

    1996-01-01

    This paper concentrates on the mechanical performance of various ceramic coatings of Cr2O3 on steel (SAF2205), as produced by CO2 laser processing. The thickness of the coating that can be applied by laser coating is limited to about 200 mu m setting a limit to the maximum strain energy release rate

  13. Utilization of calcite produced in Turkey for paper coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüdaverdi Eroğlu

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate is one of the coating pigments widely used in paper industry. Especially, in recent years calcium carbonate filler has gained high importance in alkaline pulping. In Turkey industry actually imports calcium carbonate; whereas, there are rich calcite reservoirs in the country. In this study two different types of domestic ground (GCC calcite samples were used. Physical and chemical properties of calcite samples were tested firstly. CaCO3 percentages of both samples were 97.3 % and 97.6 % (min. 95 % CaCO3. MgCO3 and Fe2O3 percentages were within the desired limits. Brightness values were 95.5 % and 94.5 % and yellowness 1.1 % and 1.5 % elrepho. These values also were within the requested limits. Under 2 microns particle size and over 10 microns particle size fractions were 95 % and 89 % (min. 80 and 1 % and 2 % (max. 2 respectively. Dry matter rates were between 40 %-65 %, for the pilot plant-coating machine. During the preparation of coating color calcium carbonate has been used together with kaolin. The ratios of calcium carbonate to kaolin were 30/70, 40/60, 50/50, 60/40, 70/30, 100/0. In coating color preparation latex was used as a binder because of its wide applications. Latex percentages were 11, 12, and 13 %. Coated papers were glossed and physically tested. As a result, both calcium carbonate samples were found suitable for using in coating color preparation. By the utilization of domestic calcium carbonate in coated paper production, there will be foreign currencies saving.

  14. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leparoux, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)], E-mail: susanne.leparoux@empa.ch; Diot, C. [Consultant, allee de Mozart 10, F-92300 Chatillon (France); Dubach, A. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Vaucher, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2007-10-15

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  15. Explanation of the Wear Behaviour of NCD Coated Carbide Tools Facilitated by Appropriate Methods for Assessing the Coating Adhesion Deterioration at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-D. Bouzakis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the temperature dependent interface fatigue strength of Nano-Crystalline Diamond (NCD coatings facilitates a thorough understanding of the NCD coated cutting tools wear mechanisms. In the present paper, the fatigue strength of the interface region between a NCD film and its hardmetal substrate was investigated by inclined impact tests at various temperatures. Depending upon the impact load and the applied temperature, after a certain number of impacts, damages in the film-substrate interface develop, resulting in coating detachment and lifting. These effects were attributed among others to the release of highly compressive residual stresses in the NCD coating structure. The attained inclined impact test’s results contributed to the explanation of the wear-evolution of NCD-coated tools with diverse film-substrate adhesion qualities. The related milling experiments using as work material AA 7075 T6 verified the dominant effect of the film adhesion on the NCD coated tool life.

  16. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Longo, Giovanni; Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d'Abusco, Anna; Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca; Misiano, Carlo; Palattella, Alberto; Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Garbarino, Viola; Politi, Laura; Scandurra, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p<0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm 2 /μm/day) (p<0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p<0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. New coating material for producing virgin coconut oil (VCO microcapsules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin, Z.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the microencapsulation efficiency (MEE of different grades of broken rice (RB and breadfruit (BB-based maltodextrin as a coating material, using virgin coconut oil (VCO as a model system. The VCO was generally found to be well microencapsulated using BB, RB or commercial (COM maltodextrin at a core/wall material ratio of 1:3. In comparison to a different dextrose equivalent (DE group, both RB and BB maltodextrins with DE values of 10-14 showed higher MEE values (84.81-94.39% than maltodextrins with DE value of 15-19 (78.23-79.65%. Low DE value maltodextrins were shown higher glass transition temperatures than high DE value maltodextrins under the same moisture content. Both RB and BB maltodextrins were found to be compatible with COM maltodextrin as shown in the microstructure appearance when viewed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM.

  18. Electrically-controlled near-field radiative thermal modulator made of graphene-coated silicon carbide plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Wang, Liping

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we propose a hybrid near-field radiative thermal modulator made of two graphene-covered silicon carbide (SiC) plates separated by a nanometer vacuum gap. The near-field photon tunneling between the emitter and receiver is modulated by changing graphene chemical potentials with symmetrically or asymmetrically applied voltage biases. The radiative heat flux calculated from fluctuational electrodynamics significantly varies with graphene chemical potentials due to tunable near-field coupling strength between graphene plasmons across the vacuum gap. Thermal modulation and switching, which are the key functionalities required for a thermal modulator, are theoretically realized and analyzed. Newly introduced quantities of the modulation factor, the sensitivity factor and switching factor are studied quite extensively in a large parameter range for both graphene chemical potential and vacuum gap distance. This opto-electronic device with faster operating mode, which is in principle only limited by electronics and not by the thermal inertia, will facilitate the practical application of active thermal management, thermal circuits, and thermal computing with photon-based near-field thermal transport.

  19. Hard coating of ultrananocrystalline diamond/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films on cemented tungsten carbide by coaxial arc plasma deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naragino, Hiroshi; Egiza, Mohamed; Tominaga, Aki; Murasawa, Koki; Gonda, Hidenobu; Sakurai, Masatoshi; Yoshitake, Tsuyoshi

    2016-08-01

    Ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD)/nonhydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C) composite (UNCD/a-C) films were deposited on cemented carbide containing Co by coaxial arc plasma deposition. With decreasing substrate temperature, the hardness was enhanced accompanied by an enhancement in the sp3/(sp2 + sp3). Energy-dispersive X-ray and secondary ion mass spectrometry spectroscopic measurements exhibited that the diffusion of Co atoms from the substrates into the films hardly occurs. The film deposited at room temperature exhibited the maximum hardness of 51.3 GPa and Young's modulus of 520.2 GPa, which evidently indicates that graphitization induced by Co in the WC substrates, and thermal deformation from sp3 to sp2 bonding are suppressed. The hard UNCD/a-C films can be deposited at a thickness of approximately 3 μm, which is an order larger than that of comparably hard a-C films. The internal compressive stress of the 51.3-GPa film is 4.5 GPa, which is evidently smaller than that of comparably hard a-C films. This is a reason for the thick deposition. The presence of a large number of grain boundaries in the film, which is a structural specific to UNCD/a-C films, might play a role in releasing the internal stress of the films.

  20. Processing development of 4 tantalum carbide-hafnium carbide and related carbides and borides for extreme environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaballa, Osama Gaballa Bahig

    Carbides, nitrides, and borides ceramics are of interest for many applications because of their high melting temperatures and good mechanical properties. Wear-resistant coatings are among the most important applications for these materials. Materials with high wear resistance and high melting temperatures have the potential to produce coatings that resist degradation when subjected to high temperatures and high contact stresses. Among the carbides, Al4SiC4 is a low density (3.03 g/cm3), high melting temperature (>2000°C) compound, characterized by superior oxidation resistance, and high compressive strength. These desirable properties motivated this investigation to (1) obtain high-density Al4SiC4 at lower sintering temperatures by hot pressing, and (2) to enhance its mechanical properties by adding WC and TiC to the Al4SiC4. Also among the carbides, tantalum carbide and hafnium carbide have outstanding hardness; high melting points (3880°C and 3890°C respectively); good resistance to chemical attack, thermal shock, and oxidation; and excellent electronic conductivity. Tantalum hafnium carbide (Ta4HfC 5) is a 4-to-1 ratio of TaC to HfC with an extremely high melting point of 4215 K (3942°C), which is the highest melting point of all currently known compounds. Due to the properties of these carbides, they are considered candidates for extremely high-temperature applications such as rocket nozzles and scramjet components, where the operating temperatures can exceed 3000°C. Sintering bulk components comprised of these carbides is difficult, since sintering typically occurs above 50% of the melting point. Thus, Ta4 HfC5 is difficult to sinter in conventional furnaces or hot presses; furnaces designed for very high temperatures are expensive to purchase and operate. Our research attempted to sinter Ta4HfC5 in a hot press at relatively low temperature by reducing powder particle size and optimizing the powder-handling atmosphere, milling conditions, sintering

  1. Mg-containing hydroxyapatite coatings produced by plasma electrolytic oxidation of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonio, Cesar Augusto; Rangel, Elidiane Cipriano; Durrant, Steven Frederick; Cruz, Nilson Cristino da, E-mail: cesar.augustoa@hotmail.com [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Plasmas Tecnologicos; Delgado-Silva, Adriana de Oliveira [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), Sorocaba, SP (Brazil); Tabacniks, Manfredo H. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2017-07-15

    Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) is promising for the processing of biomaterials because it enables the production of surfaces with adjustable composition and structure. In this work, aimed at the improvement of the bioactivity of titanium, PEO has been used to grow calcium phosphide coatings on titanium substrates. The effects of the addition of magnesium acetate to the electrolytes on the composition of the coatings produced during 120 s on Ti disks using bipolar voltage pulses and solutions of calcium and magnesium acetates and sodium glycerophosphate as electrolytes have been studied. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry with Rietveld refinement and profilometry were used to characterize the modified samples. Coatings composed of nearly 50 % of Mg-doped hydroxyapatite have been produced. In certain conditions up to 4% Mg can be incorporated into the coating without any observable significant structural modifications of the hydroxyapatite. (author)

  2. Conversion Coatings Produced on AZ61 Magnesium Alloy by Low-Voltage Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak M.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The resultes of anodic oxide conversion coatings on wrought AZ61 magnesium alloy production are describe. The studies were conducted in a solution containing: KOH (80 g/l and KF (300 g/l using anodic current densities of 3, 5 and 10 A/dm2 and different process durations. The obtained coatings were examined under a microscope and corrosion tests were performed by electrochemical method. Based on these results, it was found that the low-voltage process produces coatings conferring improved corrosion resistance to the tested magnesium alloy.

  3. Investigating the Possibility to Reduce the Residual Stress Level in 2.5D Cutting Using Titanium Coated Carbide Ball End Mill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Masmiati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available End milling is a multipoint cutting process in which material is removed from a workpiece by a rotating tool. It is widely used in cutting 2.5D profiles such as point-to-point, contouring, and pocketing operations. 2.5D machining possesses the capability to translate in all 3 axes but can perform the cutting operation in only 2 of the 3 axes at a time. This study focuses on optimizing the cutting parameters, such as machined surface inclinationangle, axial depth of cut, spindle speed, and feed rate for better surface integrity, namely, microhardness, residual stress, and microstructure in 2.5D cutting utilizing a titanium-coated carbide ball end mill. An optimization method known as Taguchi optimization, which includes planning, conducting, and analyzing results of matrix experiments, was used in order to achieve the best cutting parameter level. Data analysis was conducted using signal-to-noise (S/N and target performance measurement (TPM response analysis and analysis of variance (Pareto ANOVA. The optimum condition results obtained through analysis show improvements in microhardness of about 0.7%, residual stress in the feed direction of about 18.6%, and residual stress in the cutting direction of about 15.4%.

  4. Modeling and optimization of surface roughness and productivity thru RSM in face milling of AISI 1040 steel using coated carbide inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Fnides

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of factors such as cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut on surface roughness and Material Removed Rate (MRR when machining in dry face milling AISI 1040 steel with coated carbide inserts GC1030 using the response surface methodology (RSM. For this purpose, a number of machining experiments based on statistical three-factor and three-level factorial experiment designs, completed (L27 with a statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA, were performed in order to develop mathematical models and to identify the significant factors of these technological parameters. Multi-objective optimization procedure for minimizing Ra, Ry and Rz and maximizing MRR using desirability approach has been also implementented. The current study was also carried out to investigate the tool life of the inserts. The models found the relationship between the cutting parameters (Vc, fz and ap and the studied technological parameters. It has been found that the cutting speed was the most affecting surface roughness which is due to the geometry of the insert which has a scraping edge and enables to obtain low roughness even at important feed rate, followed by the feed rate and the depth of cut at the end. The optimal combination of cutting parameters were cutting speed of 314 m/min, feed rate of 0.16 mm/tooth and depth of cut of 0.6 mm with a composite desirability of 0.924.

  5. MoS2 PARTICLES MODIFIED WITH POLYSTYRENE FOR PRODUCING Ni–PS/MoS2 COATINGS

    OpenAIRE

    ZHONGJIA HUANG; DANGSHENG XIONG

    2008-01-01

    The MoS2 particles were coated with polystyrene and can be written as PS/MoS2 hereinafter. Ni–PS/MoS2 coatings and Ni–MoS2 coatings were produced by PC electrodeposition technique. The surface morphology of Ni–PS/MoS2 coating was examined and compared with those of Ni–MoS2 coating. The effect of particle concentrations on the volume percent of particles incorporated in the coatings was investigated. And the microhardness of coatings was also investigated. Results show that the surface morphol...

  6. Novel Alkyd-Type Coating Resins Produced Using Cationic Polymerization [PowerPoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chisholm, Bret; Kalita, Harjyoti; Alam, Samim; Jayasooriyamu, Anurad; Fernando, Shashi; Samanata, Satyabrata; Bahr, James; Selvakumar, Sermadurai; Sibi, Mukund; Vold, Jessica; Ulven, Chad

    2014-04-07

    Novel, partially bio-based poly(vinyl ether) copolymers derived from soybean oil and cyclohexyl vinyl ether (CHVE) were produced by cationic polymerization and investigated for application as alkyd-type surface coatings. Compared to conventional alkyd resins, which are produced by high temperature melt condensation polymerization, the poly(vinyl ether)s provide several advantages. These advantages include miler, more energy efficient polymer synthesis, elimination of issues associated with gelation during polymer synthesis, production of polymers with well-defined composition and relatively narrow molecular weight distribution, and elimination of film formation and physical property issues associated with entrained monomers, dimers, trimmers, etc. The results of the studied showed that the thermal, mechanical, and physical properties of the coatings produced from these novel polymers varied considerable as a function of polymer composition and cure temperature. Overall, the results suggest a good potential for these novel copolymers to be used for coatings cured by autoxidation.

  7. New method for synthesis of metal carbides, nitrides and carbonitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koc, R.; Folmer, J.S.; Kodambaka, S.K. [Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale, IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a novel synthesis method using a carbothermic reduction reaction of carbon coated precursors for producing high purity, submicron, non-agglomerated powders of metal carbide, metal nitride and metal boride systems. The authors also want to demonstrate the advantages of the process and provide information on the applicability of the process for synthesizing related advanced ceramic powders (e.g. SiC, WC, TiN, TiB{sub 2}, Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). During the FY96 of the project, steps are taken to investigate the reaction mechanisms and phase evolution during the formation of TiC from carbon coated titania precursors and to produce submicron TiC powders with desired stoichiometries. Depending on the carbon content in the coated titania precursor, TiC powder was produced with different stoichiometries (different amount of oxygen and free carbon).

  8. Microstructure and wear resistance of Al2O3-M7C3/Fe composite coatings produced by laser controlled reactive synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Luo, Zhen; Li, Yang; Yan, Fuyu; Duan, Rui

    2015-05-01

    Based on the principle of thermite reaction of Al and Fe2O3 powders, the Al2O3 ceramic reinforced Fe-based composite coatings were fabricated on a steel substrate by laser controlled reactive synthesis and cladding. The effects of different additions of thermite reactants on the phase transition, microstructure evolution, microhardness and wear resistance of the composite coatings were investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Vickers microhardness and block-on-ring wear test, respectively. The results show that Al2O3 ceramic and M7C3 carbide are in situ synthesized via the laser controlled reactive synthesis. The Al2O3 ceramic and M7C3 carbides prefer to distribute along the γ-Fe phase boundary continuously, which separates the γ-Fe matrix and is beneficial to the grain refinement. With the increase of thermite reactants, the amount of Al2O3 ceramic and M7C3 carbide in the composite coatings increases gradually. Moreover the cladding layer changes from dendritic structure to columnar structure and martensite structure in the heat affected zone becomes coarse. The increased thermite reactants improve the microhardness and wear resistance of the in situ composite coatings obviously and enhance the hardness of the heat affected zone, which should be ascribed to the grain refinement, ceramic and carbide precipitation and solid solution strengthening.

  9. The corrosion resistance of 140MXC, 530AS and 560AS coatings produced by thermal spraying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin Alexis López Covaleda

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Three commercial materials were deposited using electric arc thermal spraying: 140MXC (with Fe, W, Cr, Nb, 530AS (AISI 1015 steel and 560AS (AISI 420 steel on AISI 4340 steel. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the best strategy for improving a coating-substrate system’s corrosion resistance, using the following combinations: homogeneous single coatings, bilayers consisting of 530AS or 560AS under 140MXC and 140MXC + 530AS and 140MXC + 560AS coatings deposited simultaneously. The coatings were characterised using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Corrosion resistance was evaluated through potentiodynamic polarisation and hardness by using the Vickers test. Corrosion resistance depends on the amount of microstructure defects, the deposition strategy and the alloy elements. However, corrosion resistance was similar in single coatings of 140MXC and bilayers, having -630 V corrosion potential and 708 nA corrosion current. The details and corrosion mechanism of the coatings so produced are described in this paper.

  10. Magnetoconductivity and electrical transport of polyaniline coated ternary carbide Ti0.9Al0.1C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, P. S.; Gupta, K.; Rana, D.; Meikap, A. K.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we report the mechanism of electrical transport properties of polyaniline coated Ti0.9Al0.1C prepared by chemical route. Samples are characterized by X-ray diffraction technique and morphology has been observed by field emission scanning electron microscope. Semiconducting behavior is obtained for the samples and this behavior has been analyzed by different existing models. Out of different models the Mott's variable range hopping is the most suitable for analyzing the dc conductivity at lower temperatures. Correlated barrier hopping type of charge transfer process is followed in alternating current conductivity. We observe a transformation from negative to positive dc and ac magnetoconductivity by incorporating Ti0.9Al0.1C in polyaniline. Dielectric properties and impedance analysis are described by Maxwell-Wagner capacitor model. We determine different parameters like localization length, hopping distance, density of states from the analysis of the experimental data. The theory regarding magnetic field dependent ac conductivity is insufficient. This result will be a significant hint for a new theoretical challenge.

  11. Beryllium coating produced by evaporation-condensation method and some their properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepekin, G.I.; Anisimov, A.B.; Chernikov, A.S.; Mozherinn, S.I.; Pirogov, A.A. [SRI SIA Lutch., Podolsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-01-01

    The method of vacuum evaporation-condensation for deposition of beryllium coatings on metal substrates, considered in the paper, side by side with a plasma-spray method is attractive fon ITER application. In particular this technique may be useful for repair the surface of eroded tiles which is operated in a strong magnetic field. The possibility of deposition of beryllium coatings with the rate of layer growth 0.1-0.2 mm/h is shown. The compatibility of beryllium coating with copper or stainless steel substrate is provided due to intermediate barrier. The results of examination of microstructure, microhardness, porosity, thermal and physical properties and stability under thermal cycling of beryllium materials are presented. The value of thermal expansion coefficient and thermal conductivity of condensed beryllium are approximately the same as for industrial grade material produced by powder mettalurgy technique. However, the condensed beryllium has higher purity (up to 99.9-99.99 % wt.). (author)

  12. Cryogenic Far-IR Laser Absorptivity Measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory Telescope Mirror Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, J.; Klaassen, T.O.; Hovenier, J.W.; Jakob, G.; Poglitsch, A.; Sternberg, O.

    2004-01-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples

  13. Silicon carbide fibers and articles including same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnier, John E; Griffith, George W

    2015-01-27

    Methods of producing silicon carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a silicon-containing gas in a reaction chamber at a temperature ranging from approximately 1500.degree. C. to approximately 2000.degree. C. A partial pressure of oxygen in the reaction chamber is maintained at less than approximately 1.01.times.10.sup.2 Pascal to produce continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers. Continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers and articles formed from the continuous alpha silicon carbide fibers are also disclosed.

  14. Solar selective absorber coating for high service temperatures, produced by plasma sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanxner, Michael; Elgat, Zvi

    1990-08-01

    Spectrally selective absorber coatings, deposited on engineering material substrates such as stainless steel, have been developed for service as efficient solar photothermal energy converters. The selective solar absorber is based on a multilayer of thin films, produced by sputtering. The main solar absorber is a metal/ceramic (cermet) composite, such as, Mo/Al2th or Mo/Si02, with a graded metal concentration. Such a cermet layer, strongly absorbs radiation over most of the range of the solar spectrum but is transparent to longer wavelength radiation. The cermet layer is deposited on a highly reflecting infrared metal layer. Two more layers were added: An AhO diffusion barrier layer which is deposited first on the substrate and an AI2O or a Si02 antireflection layer which is deposited on the top of the cermet film. In order to better understand the spectral reflectivity of the multilayered selective coating, a procedure for the calculation of the optical properties was developed. After the R&D development phase was successfully completed, a full scale production coating machine was constructed. The production machine is a linear in line coater. The selective coating is deposited on stainless steel tubes, translating in the coating machine while rotating about their axes, along their axial direction. Measurements of reflectance, solar absorptivity, a, thermal emissivity, C, and high temperature durability, are all parts of the quality control routine. The results show values of a in the range 0.96 - 0.98. The thermal emissivity at 350CC is in the range 0.16 - 0.18. Thermal durability tests, show no degradation of the coating when subjected to up to 65O in vacuum for one month and when passed through a temperature cycling test which includes 1200 cycles between temperatures of 150CC and 450CCfor a period of two months.

  15. Growth and Physical Structure of Amorphous Boron Carbide Deposited by Magnetron Sputtering on a Silicon Substrate with a Titanium Interlayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Caniello

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multilayer amorphous boron carbide coatings were produced by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering on silicon substrates. To improve the adhesion, titanium interlayers with different thickness were interposed between the substrate and the coating. Above three hundreds nanometer, the enhanced roughness of the titanium led to the growth of an amorphous boron carbide with a dense and continuing columnar structure, and no delamination effect was observed. Correspondingly, the adhesion of the coating became three time stronger than in the case of a bare silicon substrate. Physical structure and microstructural proprieties of the coatings were investigated by means of a scan electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the films was measured by a scratch tester.

  16. Corrosion resistance of Cu-Al coatings produced by thermal spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Marcela Dimaté Castellanos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many components in the shipbuilding industry are made of copper-based alloys. These pieces tend to break due to corrosion generated by a marine environment; such components can be salvaged through surface engineering, through deposition of suitable coatings. This paper studied the influence of three surface preparation methods involving phosphor bronze substrates concerning the corrosion resistance of commercial coatings having Al-Cu +11% Fe chemical composition. The surface was prepared using three methods: sand blasting, shot blasting and metal polishing with an abrasive disk (with and without a base layer. The deposited coatings were micro-structurally characterised by x-ray diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Corrosion resistance was evaluated by electrochemical test electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Surfaces prepared by sandblasting showed the best resistance to corrosion, so these systems could be a viable alternative for salvaging certain parts in the marine industry. The corrosion mechanisms for the coatings produced are discussed in this research.

  17. Review on materials & methods to produce controlled release coated urea fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Babar; KuShaari, KuZilati; Man, Zakaria B; Basit, Abdul; Thanh, Trinh H

    2014-05-10

    With the exponential growth of the global population, the agricultural sector is bound to use ever larger quantities of fertilizers to augment the food supply, which consequently increases food production costs. Urea, when applied to crops is vulnerable to losses from volatilization and leaching. Current methods also reduce nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by plants which limits crop yields and, moreover, contributes towards environmental pollution in terms of hazardous gaseous emissions and water eutrophication. An approach that offsets this pollution while also enhancing NUE is the use of controlled release urea (CRU) for which several methods and materials have been reported. The physical intromission of urea granules in an appropriate coating material is one such technique that produces controlled release coated urea (CRCU). The development of CRCU is a green technology that not only reduces nitrogen loss caused by volatilization and leaching, but also alters the kinetics of nitrogen release, which, in turn, provides nutrients to plants at a pace that is more compatible with their metabolic needs. This review covers the research quantum regarding the physical coating of original urea granules. Special emphasis is placed on the latest coating methods as well as release experiments and mechanisms with an integrated critical analyses followed by suggestions for future research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Carbide braze cladding for titanium components; Auftragloeten von Karbiden fuer Verschleissschutz von Titanbauteilen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobzin, K.; Ernst, F.; Roesing, J.; Rojas, Y. [RWTH Aachen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The abrasion resistance of pure titanium and titanium alloys is not always sufficient for applications where wear resistance demands play an important roll, especially for systems which involve relative sliding tribosystems such as valves, piping connections, etc. Because of this and due to the increasing interest on light materials for structural purposes, the necessity to develop innovative coating techniques in order to increase lifetime and performance of tools keeps on arising. Surface coatings produced by combining braze filler metal with carbide particles increase surface hardness and wear resistance of pure titanium and titanium alloys, which result to be of considerable interest for many engineering applications. This study shows different composite systems based on silver braze and titanium braze alloys, which were especially designed for commercial titanium alloys. The produced carbide/brazing mixtures were brazed and characterised by means of microscopy and ball-on-disc tests, showing an improvement on the wear resistant properties when compared to titanium. (orig.)

  19. Clinical investigation into the observation that silicon carbide coating on cobalt chromium stents leads to early differentiating functional endothelial layer, increased safety and DES-like recurrent stenosis rates: results of the PRO-Heal Registry (PRO-Kinetic enhancing rapid in-stent endothelialisation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahm, Johannes B; Willems, Tine; Wolpers, Hans Georg; Nordbeck, Hans; Becker, Jürgen; Ruppert, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Recurrent stenosis and stent thrombosis are still major concerns after drug eluting stent placement which inhibits not only the restenostic process but endothelialisation as well. In contrast, through accelerating rapid endothelialisation and development of an earlier functional endothelial layer, passive coatings have shown encouraging results. The objective of the present study was to investigate the clinical outcome and rate of recurrent stenosis of silicon carbide passive coated cobalt chromium stents (PROKinetic Coronary Stent with PROBIO coating, Biotronik AG, Switzerland) on restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Percutaneous coronary stent deployment was carried out in 161 lesions in 145 consecutive patients. The primary combined endpoint was the rate of target-lesion revascularisation (TLR) and late lumen loss; the secondary endpoints were the procedural success and the major adverse cardiac events at 6-months follow-up. Out of 145 patients, 141 were successfully amenable to a silicon carbide coated stent (PRO-Kinetic, Biotronik AG, Switzerland) implantation (97.2% procedural success). At follow-up, the late loss was 0.75 +/- 0.71 mm. (in-stent) respectively 0.79 +/- 0.72 mm (in-segment), TLR was 4.9% and MACE was 5.6%. By augmenting rapid endothelialisation and development of an earlier functional endothelial layer, silicon carbide (PROBIO) as a passive coating on cobalt chromium stents has shown encouraging results relative to success rates, clinical outcome, TLR and late-loss in a cohort of patients with extended coronary artery disease.

  20. Process for preparing fine-grain metal carbide powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C.R.; Jeffers, F.P.

    Fine-grain metal carbide powder suitable for use in the fabrication of heat resistant products is prepared by coating bituminous pitch on SiO/sub 2/ or Ta/sub 2/O/sub 5/ particles, heating the coated particles to convert the bituminous pitch to coke, and then heating the particles to a higher temperature to convert the particles to a carbide by reaction of said coke therewith.

  1. The Mechanical and Tribology Properties of Sputtered Titanium Aluminum Nitride Coating on the Tungsten Carbide Insert Tool in the Dry Turning of Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmar Budi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sputtering parameters on the mechanical tribology properties of Titanium Aluminum Nitride coating on the tungsten cabide insert tool in the dry turning of tool steel has been investigated. The coating was deposited using a Direct Current magnetron sputtering system with various substrate biases (-79 to -221 V and nitrogen flow rates (30 to 72 sccm. The dry turning test was carried out on a Computer Numeric Code machine using an optimum cutting parameter setting. The results show that the lowest flank wear (~0.4 mm was achieved using a Titanium Aluminum Nitride-coated tool that was deposited at a high substrate bias (-200 V and a high nitrogen flow rate (70 sccm. The lowest flank wear was attributed to high coating hardness.

  2. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  3. Investigation of coatings of austenitic steels produced by supersonic laser deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorunov, A. I.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2017-02-01

    The structure and properties of stainless austenitic steel coatings obtained by the supersonic laser deposition are studied in the paper. Implantation of the powder particles into the substrate surface and simultaneous plastic deformation at partial melting improved the mechanical properties of the coatings - tensile strength limit was 650 MPa and adhesion strength was 105 MPa. It was shown that insufficient laser power leads to disruption of the deposition process stability and coating cracking. Surface temperature increase caused by laser heating above 1300 °C resulted in coating melting. The X-ray analysis showed that radiation intensifies the cold spray process and does not cause changes in the austenitic base structure.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of binder-free Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} coatings on nickel-based alloys for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brupbacher, Michael C.; Zhang, Dajie [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Buchta, William M. [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Graybeal, Mark L. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD 21005 (United States); Rhim, Yo-Rhin [The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Nagle, Dennis C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Spicer, James B., E-mail: spicer@jhu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Under various conditions, chromium carbides appear to be relatively stable in the presence of molten fluoride salts and this suggests that their use in corrosion resistant coatings for fluoride salt environments could be beneficial. One method for producing these coatings is the carburization of sprayed Cr coatings using methane-containing gaseous precursors. This process has been investigated for the synthesis of binder-free chromium carbide coatings on nickel-based alloy substrates for molten fluoride salt corrosion resistance. The effects of the carburization process on coating microstructure have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Both plasma-sprayed and cold-sprayed Cr coatings have been successfully converted to Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, with the mechanism of conversion being strongly influenced by the initial porosity in the as-deposited coatings.

  5. Feasibility of Electrochemical Deposition of Nickel/Silicon Carbide Fibers Composites over Nickel Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, E. P.; Abdul Karim, M. R.; Pavese, M.; Biamino, S.; Badini, C.; Fino, P.

    2017-05-01

    Nickel superalloys are typical materials used for the hot parts of engines in aircraft and space vehicles. They are very important in this field as they offer high-temperature mechanical strength together with a good resistance to oxidation and corrosion. Due to high-temperature buckling phenomena, reinforcement of the nickel superalloy might be needed to increase stiffness. For this reason, it was thought to investigate the possibility of producing composite materials that might improve properties of the metal at high temperature. The composite material was produced by using electrochemical deposition method in which a composite with nickel matrix and long silicon carbide fibers was deposited over the nickel superalloy. The substrate was Inconel 718, and monofilament continuous silicon carbide fibers were chosen as reinforcement. Chemical compatibility was studied between Inconel 718 and the reinforcing fibers, with fibers both in an uncoated condition, and coated with carbon or carbon/titanium diboride. Both theoretical calculations and experiments were conducted, which suggested the use of a carbon coating over the fibers and a buffer layer of nickel to avoid unwanted reactions between the substrate and silicon carbide. Deposition was then performed, and this demonstrated the practical feasibility of the process. Yield strength was measured to detect the onset of interface debonding between the substrate and the composite layer.

  6. Preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Quanchao [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yunnan Copper Smelting and Processing Complex, Yunnan Copper (Group) CO., LTD., Kunming 650102 (China); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Peng, Jinghui [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Xu, Lei, E-mail: xulei_kmust@aliyun.com [National Local Joint Laboratory of Engineering Application of Microwave Energy and Equipment Technology, Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Mechanical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); International Joint Research Center of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming Academician Workstation of Advanced Preparation of Superhard Materials Field, Kunming 650093 (China); Srinivasakannan, C. [Chemical Engineering Department, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); and others

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • The Ti-Coated diamond particles have been prepared using by microwave heating. • The uniform and dense coating can be produced, and the TiC species was formed. • With increases the temperature results in the thickness of coating increased. • The coating/diamond interfacial bonding strength increased with temperature increasing until 760 °C, then decreased. - Abstract: Depositing strong carbide-forming elements on diamond surface can dramatically improve the interfacial bonding strength between diamond grits and metal matrix. In the present work, investigation on the preparation of Ti-coated diamond particles by microwave heating has been conducted. The morphology, microstructure, and the chemical composition of Ti-coated diamond particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometer (EDX). The thickness of Ti coating was measured and the interfacial binding strength between Ti coating and diamond was analyzed. The results show that the surface of the diamond particles could be successfully coated with Ti, forming a uniform and continuous Ti-coated layer. The TiC was found to form between the surface of diamond particles and Ti-coated layer. The amount of TiC as well as the thickness of coating increased with increasing coating temperature, furthermore, the grain size of the coating also grew gradually. The interfacial bonding strength between coating and diamond was found to be best at the temperature of 760 °C.

  7. Silica coating of polymer nanowires produced via nanoimprint lithography from femtosecond laser machined templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajput, Deepak; Costa, Lino; Terekhov, Alexander; Lansford, Kathleen; Hofmeister, William

    2012-03-16

    In this paper we report on the fabrication of regular arrays of silica nanoneedles by deposition of a thin layer of silica on patterned arrays of polymer nanowires (or polymer nanohair). An array of high-aspect-ratio nanoscale diameter holes of depths greater than 10 µm was produced at the surface of a fused silica wafer by an amplified femtosecond laser system operated in single-pulse mode. Cellulose acetate (CA) film was imprinted into the nanoholes and peeled off to form a patterned array of standing CA nanowires, a negative replica of the laser machined nanoholes. The cellulose acetate replica was then coated with silica in a chemical vapor deposition process using silicon tetrachloride vapor at 65 °C. Field emission scanning electron microscopy, focused ion beam sectioning, energy dispersive x-ray analysis and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the silica nanoneedles. Precisely patterned, functionalized arrays of standing silica nanoneedles are useful for a number of applications.

  8. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  9. Lubricated sliding wear behaviour of Ni-P-W multilayered alloy coatings produced by pulse plating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panagopoulos, C. N.; Papachristos, V. D.; Christoffersen, Lasse

    2000-01-01

    The lubricated sliding wear behaviour of Ni-P-W multilayered alloy coatings sliding against hardened steel discs was studied, in a pin-on-disc set-up. The multilayered coatings had been deposited on mild steel pins by pulse plating and they consisted of ternary Ni-P-W layers of high and low W...

  10. Microstructure Characterization of WCCo-Mo Based Coatings Produced Using High Velocity Oxygen Fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan Islak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study has been carried out in order to investigate the microstructural properties of WCCo-Mo composite coatings deposited onto a SAE 4140 steel substrate by high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF thermal spray. For this purpose, the Mo quantity added to the WCCo was changed as 10, 20, 30 and 40 wt. % percents. The coatings are compared in terms of their phase composition, microstructure and hardness. Phase compound and microstructure of coating layers were examined using X-ray diffractometer (XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM. XRD results showed that WCCo-Mo composite coatings were mainly composed of WC, W2C, Co3W3C, Mo2C, MoO2, Mo and Co phases. The average hardness of the coatings increased with increasing Mo content.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of W reinforced carbon coatings produced by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruset, C., E-mail: ruset@infim.r [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele-Bucharest, Code 077125 (Romania); Grigore, E.; Luculescu, C. [National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, PO Box MG-36, Magurele-Bucharest, Code 077125 (Romania); Li, X.; Dong, H. [University of Birmingham, School of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    W-containing carbon coatings were deposited on plain carbon steel and titanium substrates by Combined Magnetron Sputtering and Ion Implantation (CMSII) technique. A target made of fine grain graphite with cylindrical tungsten pins mounted in the area of maximum sputtering rate was used. High voltage pulses (- 30 kV, 20 {mu}s, and 25 Hz) were superposed over the DC bias. By adjusting the processing parameters nanocomposite nc-WC{sub 1-x}/a-C coatings with a W content from 20 to 45 at.%, with a hardness of 12-22 GPa and a friction coefficient in the range of 0.12-0.22 were produced. These coatings have a thickness of 10-13 {mu}m, good wear resistance and a good thermal stability up to 673 K.

  12. Method of producing an oxide dispersion strengthened coating and micro-channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Bruce S; Chyu, Minking K; Alvin, Mary Anne; Gleeson, Brian M

    2013-12-17

    The disclosure provides a method for the production of composite particles utilizing a mechano chemical bonding process following by high energy ball milling on a powder mixture comprised of coating particles, first host particles, and second host particles. The composite particles formed have a grain size of less than one micron with grains generally characterized by a uniformly dispersed coating material and a mix of first material and second material intermetallics. The method disclosed is particularly useful for the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened coatings, for example using a powder mixture comprised of Y.sub.2O.sub.3, Cr, Ni, and Al. This particular powder mixture may be subjected to the MCB process for a period generally less than one hour following by high energy ball milling for a period as short as 2 hours. After application by cold spraying, the composite particles may be heat treated to generate an oxide-dispersion strengthened coating.

  13. Effect of Boron on Microstructure and Microhardness Properties of Mo-Si-B Based Coatings Produced Via TIG Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Mo-Si-B based coatings were produced using tungsten inert gas (TIG process on the medium carbon steel because the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of these alloys are particularly favourable for high-temperature structural applications. It is aimed to investigate of microstructure and microhardness properties of Mo-Si-B based coatings. Optical microscopy (OM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used to characterize the microstructures of Mo-Si-B based coatings. The XRD results showed that microstructure of Mo–Si–B coating consists of α-Mo, α-Fe, Mo2B, Mo3Si and Mo5SiB2 phases. It was reported that the grains in the microstructure were finer with increasing amounts of boron which caused to occur phase precipitations in the grain boundary. Besides, the average microhardness of coatings changed between 735 HV0.3 and 1140 HV0.3 depending on boron content.

  14. A MICROPOROUS COATING OR STRUCTURE AND A PROCESS FOR PRODUCING IT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    A microporous coating or structure is established as a thin metallic layer by deposition of one or more alloys on a metallic substrate, each of said alloys consisting of two or more phases, one of which can be selectively dissolved in a solution that will not significantly attack the other phase...... or phases. Such microporous coatings or structures are useful in the production of various product types, such as fuel cells, catalysts, microfilters, heat exchangers, micro-components and heat transfer devices....

  15. Micro-morphometric assessment of titanium plasma-sprayed coating removal using burs for the treatment of peri-implant disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimondini, L; Cicognani Simoncini, F; Carrassi, A

    2000-04-01

    This study evaluated, in vitro, the effectiveness of diamond and carbide burs, and bur sequences to remove the plasma-sprayed titanium coating from IMZ fixture surfaces. Fifteen polishing procedures were tested. They included the use of 12, 16, 30 bladed carbide burs or bevered carbide burs and 30, 15, 8 microns mean-particles-size diamond burs. The treated surfaces were evaluated with profilometer and SEM. Worn burs and titanium debris produced by the grinding were observed with SEM. All procedures produce smoother surfaces than baseline plasma-sprayed surfaces for both Ra and Rz(DIN) parameters (P < 0.001). A roughening effect of the 8 microns mean-grit diamond bur and 30 bladed burs were noted. The single carbide burs produce polished surfaces affected by waviness. Waviness was minimized by sequence or diamond bur use. The carbide bur blades were variously damaged after their use. In contrast, the grit of diamond burs was observed to be clogged by titanium debris whose amount seemed to be inversely related to the diamond mean particle size. Debris produced by diamond burs was granular whereas that produced by carbide bladed burs showed needle or flake morphology. In conclusion, the most effective titanium plasma sprayed removal were obtained by 30 microns and 15 microns mean-particle-size diamond burs, i.e. 30 microns plus 15 microns diamond burs and carbide 12 plus 16 bladed burs used in sequence.

  16. Sol-gel coatings: An alternative route for producing planar optical waveguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rey-Garcia, F.; Gomez-Reino, C. [Unidad Asociada de Optica and Microoptica GRIN (CSIC-ICMA), Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escola Universitaria de Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur s/n, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Flores-Arias, M.T., E-mail: maite.flores@usc.es [Unidad Asociada de Optica and Microoptica GRIN (CSIC-ICMA), Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Escola Universitaria de Optica e Optometria, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Campus Sur s/n, E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); De La Fuente, G.F., E-mail: xerman@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon (CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza), Maria de Luna 3, E-50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Duran, A. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (CSIC), Kelsen 5, E-28049, Madrid (Spain); Castro, Y., E-mail: castro@icv.csic.es [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (CSIC), Kelsen 5, E-28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-01

    Inorganic and hybrid planar waveguides with different compositions (silica-titania, methacrylate-silica-cerium oxide, zirconia-cerium oxide and silica-zirconia) have been obtained by sol-gel synthesis followed by dip-coating. Soda-lime glass slides and conventional commercial window glass were used as substrates. The thickness and refractive index of the coatings were determined by profilometry and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry. Waveguide efficiency was measured at ca. 70.8% with a He-Ne laser beam, coupled with an optical microscope objective into and out of the waveguiding layer via a double prism configuration. Thicknesses between 150 and 2000 nm, along with refractive index values ranging between 1.45 and {approx} 1.99 ({lambda} = 633 nm) were obtained depending on the sol composition and the dip-coating conditions. This wide range of values allows designing multilayered guides that can be used in a variety of applications.

  17. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: two-year results of the ENERGY Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbel, Raimund; Eggebrecht, Holger; Roguin, Ariel; Schroeder, Erwin; Philipp, Sebastian; Heitzer, Thomas; Schwacke, Harald; Ayzenberg, Oded; Serra, Antonio; Delarche, Nicolas; Luchner, Andreas; Slagboom, Ton

    2014-01-01

    Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt-chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5±6.5mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2±0.5mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt-chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) SUMMARY FOR ANNOTATED TABLE OF CONTENTS: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt-chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization, even

  18. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbel, Raimund, E-mail: erbel@uk-essen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eggebrecht, Holger [Cardioangiological Center Bethanien (CCB), Frankfurt (Germany); Roguin, Ariel [Department of Cardiology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Schroeder, Erwin [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Philipp, Sebastian [Department Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Elbe Klinikum Stade, Stade (Germany); Heitzer, Thomas [Department of Cardiology, Heart Center Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Schwacke, Harald [Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonissen-Stiftungs- Krankenhaus Speyer (Germany); Ayzenberg, Oded [The Heart Institute, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (Israel); Serra, Antonio [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España (Spain); Delarche, Nicolas [Cardiology unit, Pau General Hospital, Pau (France); Luchner, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Slagboom, Ton [Department of Cardiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  19. Use of gamma-irradiation technology in combination with edible coating to produce shelf-stable foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouattara, B.; Sabato, S. F.; Lacroix, M.

    2002-03-01

    This research was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of low-dose gamma-irradiation combined with edible coatings to produce shelf-stable foods. Three types of commercially distributed food products were investigated: precooked shrimps, ready to cook pizzas, and fresh strawberries. Samples were coated with various formulations of protein-based solutions and irradiated at total doses between 0 and 3 kGy. Samples were stored at 4°C and evaluated periodically for microbial growth. Sensorial analysis was also performed using a nine-point hedonic scale to evaluate the organoleptic characteristics (odor, taste and appearance). The results showed significant ( p⩽0.05) combined effect of gamma-irradiation and coating on microbial growth (APCs and Pseudomonas putida). The shelf-life extension periods ranged from 3 to 10 days for shrimps and from 7 to 20 days for pizzas, compared to uncoated/unirradiated products. No significant ( p>0.05) detrimental effect of gamma-irradiation on sensorial characteristics (odor, taste, appearance) was observed. In strawberries, coating with irradiated protein solutions resulted in significant reduction of the percentage of mold contamination.

  20. Enteric coated spheres produced by extrusion/spheronization provide effective gastric protection and efficient release of live therapeutic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, João M S; Lechner, Tabea; Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Edwards, Alexander D

    2015-09-30

    We present a novel but simple enteric coated sphere formulation containing probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Oral delivery of live bacterial cells (LBC) requires live cells to survive firstly manufacturing processes and secondly GI microbicidal defenses including gastric acid. We incorporated live L. casei directly in the granulation liquid, followed by granulation, extrusion, spheronization, drying and spray coating to produce dried live probiotic spheres. A blend of MCC, calcium-crosslinked alginate, and lactose was developed that gave improved live cell survival during manufacturing, and gave excellent protection from gastric acid plus rapid release in intestinal conditions. No significant loss of viability was observed in all steps except drying, which resulted in approximately 1 log loss of viable cells. Eudragit coating was used to protect dried live cells from acid, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was combined with sodium alginate to achieve efficient sphere disintegration leading to rapid and complete bacterial cell release in intestinal conditions. Viability and release of L. casei was evaluated in vitro in simulated GI conditions. Uncoated spheres gave partial acid protection, but enteric coated spheres effectively protected dried probiotic LBC from acid for 2h, and subsequently released all viable cells within 1h of transfer into simulated intestinal fluid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thick metallic coatings produced by coaxial and side laser cladding : Processing and properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ocelík, V.; De Hosson, J.T.M.

    2010-01-01

    Cobalt and iron-based, defect-free coatings with thicknesses from 1 to 3.3. mm were created by a laser cladding process on different steel substrates. Extensive laser cladding experiments with a gradual change of laser power were used to study relations between main processing parameters and

  2. Producing Durable Continuously Reinforced Concrete Pavement using Glass-ceramic Coated Reinforcing Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-01

    surrounding concrete Steel Reinforcement BUILDING STRONG® Properties of Coating  Covers the reinforcement with an insulator  Does not delaminate...The enameled rebar can be manufactured using the conventional enamel application methods and modification of standard alkali-resistant porcelain

  3. for zeolite coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Renato Rambo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Biotemplating is the processing of microcellular ceramics by reproduction of natural morphologies, where the microstructural features of the biotemplate are maintained in the biomorphic ceramic. Different biotemplates with distinct pore anatomies were used to produce biomorphic supports for the zeolite coating: wood, cardboard, sea-sponge and sisal. The biomorphic ceramics were produced by distinguished processing routes: Al-gas infiltration-reaction, liquid-metal infiltration, dip-coating and sol-gel synthesis, in order to produce nitrides, carbides and oxides, depending on the processing conditions. The zeolite coating was performed by hydrothermal growth of MFI-type (Silicalite-1 and ZSM-5 zeolite crystals onto the internal pore walls of the biomorphic templates. The final biomorphic ceramic-zeolite composites were physically characterized, evaluated in terms of their gas adsorption capabilities and correlated to their microstructure and specific pore anatomy. The combination of the properties of the biomorphic ceramics with the adsorption properties of zeolites results in materials with distinct properties as potential candidates for adsorption and catalytic applications due to their characteristic porosity, molecular sieving capabilities and high thermo-mechanical strength.

  4. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  5. Measurement of Turbulent Skin Friction Drag Coefficients Produced by Distributed Surface Roughness of Pristine Marine Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zafiryadis, Frederik; Meyer, Knud Erik; Gökhan Ergin, F.

    Skin friction drag coefficients are determined for marine antifouling coatings in pristine condition by use of Constant Temperature Anemometry (CTA) with uni-directionalhot-wires. Mean flow behaviour for varying surface roughness is analysed in zero pressure gradient, flat plate, turbulentboundary...... drag coefficients as well as roughness Reynolds numbers for the various marine coatings across the range of Rex by fitting of the van Driest profile. The results demonstrate sound agreement with the present ITTC method for determining skin friction coefficients for practically smooth surfaces at low...... layers for Reynolds numbers from Rex =1:91x105 to Rex = 9:54x105. The measurements were conducted at the Technical University of Denmark in a closed-loop wind tunnel redesigned for investigations as this. Ensemble averages of the boundary layer velocity profiles allowed for determination of skin friction...

  6. Decreased Bacterial Attachment and Protein Adsorption to Coatings Produced by Low Enegy Plasma Polymerization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, T.E.; Kingshott, Peter; Benter, M.

    adsorption and bacteria attachment/colonization. This is emphasized by the fact that long dwelling urinary catheters, which is a typical silicone medical device, causes 5% per day incidence of urinary tract infection [1,2]. A demand therefore exists for surface modifications providing the silicone material......Introduction Silicone rubber is among the most biocompatible materials available, exhibiting low levels of extractables, absence of plasticizers and additives and fairly low activation of blood thrombogenesis components. However untreated silicone rubber does not efficiently resist protein...... and Methods: Coatings: Plasma polymerized poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) (PP-PVP), poly(2-methoxyethyl methacrylate) (PPPMEA) or an inorganic oxide (10) coating were applied onto medical grade silicon rubber sheets (Silopren LSR 2050, Momentive Performance Materials Inc.). Plasma polymerization chamber...

  7. Silicon Carbide Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Andrew Trunek has focused on supporting the Sic team through the growth of Sic crystals, making observations and conducting research that meets the collective needs and requirements of the team while fulfilling program commitments. Cancellation of the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) program has had a significant negative impact on resources and research goals. This report highlights advancements and achievements made with this cooperative agreement over the past year. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) continues to make advances in silicon carbide (SiC) research during the past year. Step free surfaces were used as substrates for the deposition of GaN epilayers that yielded very low dislocation densities. Defect free 3C- SiC was successfully nucleated on step free mesas and test diodes were fabricated. Web growth techniques were used to increase the usable surface area of dislocation free SiC by approximately equal to 40%. The greatest advancement has been attained on stepped surfaces of SiC. A metrology standard was developed using high temperature etching techniques titled "Nanometer Step Height Standard". This development culminated in being recognized for a 2004 R&D100 award and the process to produce the steps received a NASA Space Act award.

  8. Compositions of corrosion-resistant Fe-based amorphous metals suitable for producing thermal spray coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Joseph C; Wong, Frank M.G.; Haslam, Jeffery J; Ji, Xiaoyan; Day, Sumner D; Blue, Craig A; Rivard, John D.K.; Aprigliano, Louis F; Kohler, Leslie K; Bayles, Robert; Lemieux, Edward J; Yang, Nancy; Perepezko, John H; Kaufman, Larry; Heuer, Arthur; Lavernia, Enrique J

    2013-09-03

    A method of coating a surface comprising providing a source of amorphous metal that contains manganese (1 to 3 atomic %), yttrium (0.1 to 10 atomic %), and silicon (0.3 to 3.1 atomic %) in the range of composition given in parentheses; and that contains the following elements in the specified range of composition given in parentheses: chromium (15 to 20 atomic %), molybdenum (2 to 15 atomic %), tungsten (1 to 3 atomic %), boron (5 to 16 atomic %), carbon (3 to 16 atomic %), and the balance iron; and applying said amorphous metal to the surface by a spray.

  9. Carbon coated nickel nanoparticles produced in high-frequency arc plasma at ambient pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vnukova, Natalia; Dudnik, Alexander; Komogortsev, Sergey; Velikanov, Dmitry; Nemtsev, Ivan; Volochaev, Michael; Osipova, Irina; Churilov, Grigory

    2017-10-01

    The nickel particles with the mean size about 10-20 nm coated with carbon were extracted by the treatment of the carbon condensate with nitric and hydrochloric acids. The initial carbon condensate containing nickel nanoparticles with a graphite conversion was synthesized in the high-frequency carbon-helium arc plasma at ambient pressure with the nickel nanoparticles as a catalyst. The nickel content in the nanoparticles was 84.6 wt%. Magnetic properties of the nanoparticles are characterized by the high hysteresis and thermal stability. The sample of compacted nanoparticles is characterized by electrical resistance much higher than it in of compacted initial condensate.

  10. TEM Microstructure and Chemical Composition of Transition Zone Between Steel Tube and An Inconel 625 Weld Overlay Coating Produced by CMT Method

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. Rozmus-Górnikowska; M. Blicharski

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the microstructure and chemical composition of the transition zone between 16Mo3 steel and Inconel 625 weld overlay coating produced by the Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) method...

  11. The Affordable Pre-Finishing of Silicon Carbide for Optical Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Creare proposes to develop a novel, laser-assisted, pre-finishing process for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coated silicon-carbide ceramics. Our innovation will...

  12. Mechanical characteristics of microwave sintered silicon carbide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In firing of products by conventionally sintered process, SiC grain gets oxidized producing SiO2 (∼ 32 wt%) and deteriorates the quality of the product substantially. Partially sintered silicon carbide by such a method is a useful material for a varieties of applications ranging from kiln furniture to membrane material.

  13. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemond, J E; Hannink, G; Verdonschot, N; Buma, P

    2013-03-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and bone implant contact specimens were implanted in the femoral condyle of goats. For mechanical push out tests to analyse mechanical implant fixation specimens were implanted in the iliac crest. The follow up periods were 4 (7 goats) and 15 weeks (7 goats). Both the SLM and EBM produced trabecular-like structures showed a variable bone ingrowth after 4 weeks. After 15 weeks good bone ingrowth was found in both implant types. Irrespective to the follow up period, and the presence of a coating, no histological differences in tissue reaction around SLM and EBM produced specimens was found. Histological no coating was detected at 4 and 15 weeks follow up. At both follow up periods the mechanical push out strength at the bone implant interface was significantly lower for the coated SLM specimens compared to the uncoated SLM specimens. The expected better ingrowth characteristics and mechanical fixation strength induced by the coating were not found. The lower mechanical strength of the coated specimens produced by SLM is a remarkable result, which might be influenced by the gross morphology of the specimens or the coating characteristics, indicating that further research is necessary.

  14. Whole blood treated with riboflavin and ultraviolet light: quality assessment of all blood components produced by the buffy coat method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Peter; Culibrk, Brankica; Karwal, Simrath; Serrano, Katherine; Levin, Elena; Bu, Daniel; Bhakta, Varsha; Sheffield, William P; Goodrich, Raymond P; Devine, Dana V

    2015-04-01

    Pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies are currently licensed for use with platelet (PLT) and plasma components. Treatment of whole blood (WB) would be of benefit to the blood banking community by saving time and costs compared to individual component treatment. However, no paired, pool-and-split study directly assessing the impact of WB PI on the subsequently produced components has yet been reported. In a "pool-and-split" study, WB either was treated with riboflavin and ultraviolet (UV) light or was kept untreated as control. The buffy coat (BC) method produced plasma, PLT, and red blood cell (RBC) components. PLT units arising from the untreated WB study arm were treated with riboflavin and UV light on day of production and compared to PLT concentrates (PCs) produced from the treated WB units. A panel of common in vitro variables for the three types of components was used to monitor quality throughout their respective storage periods. PCs derived from the WB PI treatment were of significantly better quality than treated PLT components for most variables. RBCs produced from the WB treatment deteriorated earlier during storage than untreated units. Plasma components showed a 3% to 44% loss in activity for several clotting factors. Treatment of WB with riboflavin and UV before production of components by the BC method shows a negative impact on all three blood components. PLT units produced from PI-treated WB exhibited less damage compared to PLT component treatment. © 2014 AABB.

  15. Flank wear study of coating carbides and cermet inserts during the dry high speed turning of AISI 1045 steel; Estudio del desgaste del flanco de carburos recubiertos y cermet durante el torneado de alta velocidad en seco del acero AISI 1045

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. W.; Perez-Rodriguez, R.; Zambrano-Robledo, P.; Guerrero-Mata, M.; Dumitrescu, L.

    2011-07-01

    This work deals with the experimental study of the flank wear evolution of two coating carbide inserts and a cermet insert during the dry finishing turning of AISI 1045 steel with 400, 500 and 600 m/min cutting speeds. The results were analyzed using the variance analysis and lineal regression analysis in order to describe the relationship between the flank wear and machining time, obtaining the adjusted model equation. The investigation demonstrated a significant effect of cutting speed and machining time on the flank wear at high speed machining. The three coating layers insert showed the best performance while the two layers insert had the worst behaviour of the cutting tool wear at high cutting speeds. (Author) 19 refs.

  16. The effect of colouring agent on the physical properties of glass ceramic produced from waste glass for antimicrobial coating deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juoi, J. M.; Ayoob, N. F.; Rosli, Z. M.; Rosli, N. R.; Husain, K.

    2016-07-01

    Domestic waste glass is utilized as raw material for the production of glass ceramic material (GCM) via sinter crystallisation route. The glass ceramic material in a form of tiles is to be utilized for the deposition of Ag-TiO2 antimicrobial coating. Two types of soda lime glass (SLG) that are non-coloured and green SLG are utilised as main raw materials during the batch formulation in order to study the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the physical and mechanical properties of glass ceramic produced. Glass powder were prepared by crushing bottles using hammer milled with milling machine and sieved until they passed through 75 µm sieve. The process continues by mixing glass powder with ball clay with ratio of 95:5 wt. %, 90:10 wt. % and 85:15 wt. %. Each batch mixture was then uniaxial pressed and sintered at 800°C, 825 °C and 850 °C. The physical and mechanical properties were then determined and compared between those produced from non-coloured and green coloured SLG in order to evaluate the effect of colouring agent (Fe2O3) on the GCM produced. The optimum properties of non-coloured SLG is produced with smaller ball clay content (10 wt. %) compared to green SLG (15 wt. %). The physical properties (determined thru ASTM C373) of the optimized GCM produced from non-coloured SLG and green SLG are 0.69 % of porosity, 1.92 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.36 % of water absorption; and 1.96 % of porosity, 2.69 g/cm3 of bulk density, 0.73 % of water absorption; respectively. Results also indicate that the most suitable temperature in producing GCM from both glasses with optimized physical and mechanical properties is at 850 °C.

  17. Microstructure and microhardness characterization of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-SiC coatings produced by the plasma transferred arc method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islak, Serkan [Kastamonu Univ. (Turkey). Cide Rifat Ilgaz Vocational High School; Eski, Oezkan [Kastamonu Univ. (Turkey). Kastamonu Vocational High School; Buytoz, Soner [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Karagoez, Muzaffer [Bartin Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Stokes, Joseph [Dublin City Univ. (Ireland). School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the coatings made of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} and SiC powder manufactured on AISI 304 stainless steel applied by the plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding process. SiC content in the produced coated layer was varied between 0-100 wt. % and the effect of SiC concentration on the microstructure and hardness of the coating was measured experimentally. SEM analyses revealed that the composite coatings had a homogeneous, nonporous, and crack-free microstructure. Dendrites and interdendrite eutectics formed on the coating layer, subject to the temperature gradient and the solidification ratio. There was a significant increase in the hardness of coating layers with the effect of the {gamma}-(Fe,Ni), Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6}, Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, Cr{sub 3}Si, CrSi{sub 2}, Fe{sub 0.64}Ni{sub 0.36}, CFe{sub 15.1}, C-(Fe,Cr)-Si phases formed in the microstructure. In comparison to the substrate, the microhardness of the coatings produced by PTA were 2.5-3.5 times harder. (orig.)

  18. CrAlN coatings deposited by cathodic arc evaporation at different substrate bias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Gomez, M.A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Grupo de Corrosion y Proteccion, Universidad de Antioquia, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia); Esteve, J. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain); Montala, F. [Tratamientos Termicos Carreras, TTC S.A., C/Doctor Almera 85, E-08205 Sabadell, Catalunya (Spain); Carreras, L. [Tratamientos Termicos Carreras, TTC S.A., C/Doctor Almera 85, E-08205 Sabadell, Catalunya (Spain); Grifol, M. [Tratamientos Termicos Carreras, TTC S.A., C/Doctor Almera 85, E-08205 Sabadell, Catalunya (Spain); Lousa, A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Avda. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalunya (Spain)]. E-mail: alousa@ub.edu

    2006-09-25

    CrAlN is a good candidate as an alternative to conventional CrN coatings especially for high temperature oxidation-resistance applications. Different CrAlN coatings were deposited on hardened steel substrates by cathodic arc evaporation (CAE) from chromium-aluminum targets in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere at negative substrate bias between - 50 and - 400 V. The negative substrate bias has important effects on the deposition growth rate and crystalline structure. All our coatings presented hardness higher than conventional CrN coatings. The friction coefficient against alumina and tungsten carbide balls was around 0.6. The sliding wear coefficient of the CrAlN coatings was very low while an important wear was observed in the balls before a measurable wear were produced in the coatings. This effect was more pronounced as the negative substrate bias was increased.

  19. Microstructure, phase composition and corrosion resistance of Ni2O3 coatings produced using laser alloying method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Przestacki, Damian; Chwalczuk, Tadeusz

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the studies' results of microstructure, microhardness, cohesion, phase composition and the corrosion resistance analysis of C45 steel after laser alloying with nickel oxide (Ni2O3). The aim of the laser alloying was to obtain the surface layer with new properties through covering C45 steel by precoat containing modifying compound, and then remelting this precoat using laser beam. As a result of this process the surface layer consisting of remelted zone and heat affected zone was obtained. In the remelted zone an increased amount of modifying elements was observed. It was also found that the surface layer formed during the laser alloying with Ni2O3 was characterized by good corrosion resistance. This property has changed depending on the thickness of the applied precoat. It was observed that the thickness increase of nickel oxides precoat improves corrosion resistance of produced coatings.

  20. Microstructure, phase composition and corrosion resistance of Ni2O3 coatings produced using laser alloying method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartkowska Aneta

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the studies' results of microstructure, microhardness, cohesion, phase composition and the corrosion resistance analysis of C45 steel after laser alloying with nickel oxide (Ni2O3. The aim of the laser alloying was to obtain the surface layer with new properties through covering C45 steel by precoat containing modifying compound, and then remelting this precoat using laser beam. As a result of this process the surface layer consisting of remelted zone and heat affected zone was obtained. In the remelted zone an increased amount of modifying elements was observed. It was also found that the surface layer formed during the laser alloying with Ni2O3 was characterized by good corrosion resistance. This property has changed depending on the thickness of the applied precoat. It was observed that the thickness increase of nickel oxides precoat improves corrosion resistance of produced coatings.

  1. Ultra-long-duration local anesthesia produced by injection of lecithin-coated methoxyflurane microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, D H; Kirkpatrick, A F

    1985-11-01

    This study was designed to evaluate a new drug delivery system. The authors undertook to determine if microdroplets prepared by encapsulating volatile anesthetics with a membrane of lecithin could be used for local anesthesia. Local anesthesia was determined by monitoring the response of the rat to tail clamping and electrical stimulation of the skin following the intradermal injection of the microdroplets. Microdroplets were prepared from isoflurane, enflurane, halothane, methoxyflurane, diethyl ether, chloroform, and heptane. Although all microdroplet preparations produced local anesthesia, only methoxyflurane microdroplets produced an ultra-long duration of local anesthesia (approximately 24 h). Further characterization of the methoxyflurane microdroplets revealed two important differences from conventional local anesthetics. First, the local anesthetic effect of methoxyflurane reached a plateau that did not change significantly for 20 h while the injection of lidocaine and bupivacaine resulted in a peak effect that returned to baseline within 1 and 3 h, respectively. Second, the anesthetic effect of methoxyflurane remained essentially localized to the site of injection, while the anesthetic effect of lidocaine and bupivacaine migrated 15 cm in less than 1 h. The toxicity and safety of methoxyflurane were evaluated. When administered over the dosage range 1-16% (v/v) intradermally, or by injections into muscle, or by repeat injections every 4 days for 16 days, all animals regained their pretreatment response to painful stimulations, and there was no evidence of gross injury to tissue. Deliberate intravenous injection of 0.8 ml of 6.7% (v/v) methoxyflurane microdroplets had no apparent anesthetic or toxic effect. The present study demonstrates that methoxyflurane microdroplets produce an anesthetic effect that is highly localized, stable in intensity, ultra-long in duration, and reversible.

  2. Imidazole, a New Tunable Reagent for Producing Nanocellulose, Part I: Xylan-Coated CNCs and CNFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Mao

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Imidazole is reported to be an effective reactant for the production of nanocellulose from hardwood pulp. The morphologies and surface properties of the nanocellulose can be simply tailored according to the water content in the imidazole system: with pure imidazole, cellulose nanofibrils (CNFs in a yield of 10 wt % can be produced. With 25 wt % of water in imidazole, cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs are obtained in 20 wt % yield. Both nanocelluloses exhibit crystallinity indices in the order of 70%. Interestingly, they retain the original xylan from the pulp with ca. 9–10 wt % of residual xylan content.

  3. Oxidation-resistant interface coatings for SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, E.R.; Hurley, J.W. [and others

    1996-06-01

    The characteristics of the fiber-matrix interfaces in ceramic matrix composites control the mechanical behavior of these composites. Finite element modeling (FEM) was performed to examine the effect of interface coating modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion on composite behavior. Oxide interface coatings (mullite and alumina-titania) produced by a sol-gel method were chosen for study as a result of the FEM results. Amorphous silicon carbide deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is also being investigated for interface coatings in SiC-matrix composites. Processing routes for depositing coatings of these materials were developed. Composites with these interfaces were produced and tested in flexure both as-processed and after oxidation to examine the suitability of these materials as interface coatings for SiC/SiC composites in fossil energy applications.

  4. Oxidation-resistant interface coatings for SiC/SiC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, E.R.; Hurley, J.W.; Lowden, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    The characteristics of the fiber-matrix interfaces in ceramic matrix composites control the mechanical behavior of these composites. Finite element modeling (FEM) was performed to examine the effect of interface coating modulus and coefficient of thermal expansion on composite behavior. Oxide interface coatings (mullite and alumina-titania) produced by a sol-gel method were chosen for study as a result of the FEM results. Amorphous silicon carbide deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is also being investigated for interface coatings in SiC-matrix composites. Processing routes for depositing coatings of these materials were developed. Composites with these interfaces were produced and tested in flexure both as-processed and after oxidation to examine the suitability of these materials as interface coatings for SiC/SiC composites in fossil energy applications.

  5. Development of diamond coated tool and its performance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... could maintain low level of cutting forces and remarkably improved surface finish. It has been further revealed that success of the diamond coated tool depends primarily on adhesion of the diamond coating with the carbide substrate and this is strongly influenced by the pre-treatment of the carbide substrate surface before ...

  6. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  7. Application of polymer-powder slurry for fabrication of abrasion resistant coatings on tool materials

    OpenAIRE

    G. Matula

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Development of a new generation tool materials on the basis of M2 high speed-steel or 41Cr4 steel covered with the carbides. Application of pressureless forming of powder as a manufacturing method of anti-wear coatings gives the possibility to produce this materials with relative low cost of production.Design/methodology/approach: Powder metallurgy, pressureless forming of powder, sintering, microstructure examination, X-ray dispersive energy examination, hardness examination.Finding...

  8. Thermal Expansion of Hafnium Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1960-01-01

    Since hafnium carbide (HfC) has a melting point of 7029 deg. F, it may have many high-temperature applications. A literature search uncovered very little information about the properties of HfC, and so a program was initiated at the Lewis Research Center to determine some of the physical properties of this material. This note presents the results of the thermal expansion investigation. The thermal-expansion measurements were made with a Gaertner dilatation interferometer calibrated to an accuracy of +/- 1 deg. F. This device indicates expansion by the movement of fringes produced by the cancellation and reinforcement of fixed wave-length light rays which are reflected from the surfaces of two parallel quartz glass disks. The test specimens which separate these disks are three small cones, each approximately 0.20 in. high.

  9. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Oxidation at High Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Nadia; Zhu, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Nanotubes (SiCNTs) have high mechanical strength and also have many potential functional applications. In this study, SiCNTs were investigated for use in strengthening high temperature silicate and oxide materials for high performance ceramic nanocomposites and environmental barrier coating bond coats. The high · temperature oxidation behavior of the nanotubes was of particular interest. The SiCNTs were synthesized by a direct reactive conversion process of multiwall carbon nanotubes and silicon at high temperature. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to study the oxidation kinetics of SiCNTs at temperatures ranging from 800degC to1300degC. The specific oxidation mechanisms were also investigated.

  10. Wear and corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-TiO2 coatings produced by flame thermal projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forero-Duran, M.; Dulce-Moreno, H. J.; Ferrer-Pacheco, M.; Vargas-Galvis, F.

    2017-12-01

    Evaluated the wear resistance and the coatings corrosion behaviour of Al2O3-TiO2 prepared by thermal spraying by flame on AISI 1020 carbon steel substrates, previously coated with an alloy base Ni. For this purpose, were controlled parameters of thermal spraying and the use of powders of similar but different chemical composition is taken as a variable commercial reference for ceramic coating. SEM images allowed to know the morphology of the powders and coatings. Electrochemical techniques (Tafel) were applied to evaluate the protection against corrosion. Coatings were tested for wear with a tribometer configuration bola-disco. It was determined that the phases present in coatings are directly relate to the behaviour against corrosion and wear them. Keywords: wear, corrosion, thermal imaging.

  11. Stoichiometry and tribological behavior of thick Ta(N) coatings produced by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Niu, Yunsong; Chen, Minghui; Sun, Wenyao; Zhu, Shenglong; Wang, Fuhui

    2018-01-01

    Thick Ta(N) coating of 51 μm has been successfully obtained by DCMS technology. Ta(N) is a kind of distorted Ta matrix, which is inter-soluble with N-defect lattice structure, forming the disabled bcc structure. From the XRD and XPS investigations, the composition of Ta(N) coating is consisted of bcc-Ta and bcc-TaN0.06, while that of Ta coating mainly contains β-Ta phase. It can be concluded from wear test, nanoindentation test and SEM observations, wear resistance of Ta(N) coating is much better than that of Ta coating, due to its high hardness, H/E, H3/E2 value and low COF value. The wear mechanism of Ta coating is the compound fatigue and abrasive wear, while that of Ta(N) coating is transformed into adhesive wear mechanism. The secondary adhesion of the plastic deformation for the Ta(N) coating can reinforce the coated surface, to improve the load-bearing and anti-wear capacities, and thus improve the wear resistance.

  12. Review on Sintering Process of WC-Co Cemented Carbide in Metal Injection Molding Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathabrao, M.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to give an overview on sintering process of WC-Co cemented carbides in metal injection molding technology. Metal injection molding is an advanced and promising technology in producing cemented nanostructured carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide (WC-Co) hard metal is known for its high hardness and wear resistance in various applications. Moreover, areas include fine grained materials, alternative binders, and alternative sintering techniques has been discussed in this paper.

  13. Bone ingrowth potential of electron beam and selective laser melting produced trabecular-like implant surfaces with and without a biomimetic coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.E.; Hannink, G.J.; Verdonschot, N.J.; Buma, P.

    2013-01-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of trabecular-like implant surfaces produced by either selective laser melting (SLM) or electron beam melting (EBM), with or without a biomimetic calciumphosphate coating, was examined in goats. For histological analysis and histomorphometry of bone ingrowth depth and

  14. TEM Microstructure and Chemical Composition of Transition Zone Between Steel Tube and An Inconel 625 Weld Overlay Coating Produced by CMT Method

    OpenAIRE

    Rozmus-Górnikowska M.; Blicharski M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the microstructure and chemical composition of the transition zone between 16Mo3 steel and Inconel 625 weld overlay coating produced by the Cold Metal Transfer (CMT) method. Investigations were primarily carried out through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on thin foils prepared by FIB (Focus Ion Beam).

  15. TEM Microstructure and Chemical Composition of Transition Zone Between Steel Tube and An Inconel 625 Weld Overlay Coating Produced by CMT Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozmus-Górnikowska M.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the microstructure and chemical composition of the transition zone between 16Mo3 steel and Inconel 625 weld overlay coating produced by the Cold Metal Transfer (CMT method. Investigations were primarily carried out through transmission electron microscopy (TEM on thin foils prepared by FIB (Focus Ion Beam.

  16. Evaluation of drilling Al/B4C composites with carbide drills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rıza Motorcu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, cutting forces and torque was evaluated through Taguchi Method (TM in the drilling of the high density B4C particle reinforced composites, which were produced through powder metallurgy-hot pressing method, with coated and uncoated carbide drills. Cutting speed (18, 25 and 35 m/min, feed rate (0.08, 0.112 and 0.16 mm/rev, coating properties (coated and uncoated and the amounts of particle reinforcement (5%, 10% and 15% B4C were used as the control factors. It was observed that the increased feed rate and particle reinforcement increased the axial force and torque, and decreased the cutting speed. The uncoated drills had a better performance than the coated drills. The amount of B4C reinforcement was observed to be the most effective parameter on the axial force and torque with the contribution ratios of 96.6% and 49.1%, respectively. Moreover, the correlation coefficients (R2 of the first order predictive equations developed for the axial force and torque were calculated as 0.895 and 0.854, respectively.

  17. Porous SiO2/HAp Coatings on Cp-Titanium Grade 1 Surfaces Produced by Electrophoretic Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moskalewicz T.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Porous hydroxyapatite doped SiO2 coatings were electrophoretically deposited (EPD on commercially pure titanium. The influence of EPD parameters on coatings quality was investigated. Microstructural observation was done using transmission and scanning electron microscopy as well as X-ray diffractometry.

  18. Synthesis of high active catalytic systems based on double molybdenum carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Dolmatov Vladimir; Kuznetsov Sergey; Rebrov Evgeny; Schouten Jacob Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    A new two-stage synthesis of double molybdenum and nickel carbides and high active and stable catalytic coatings of nickelpromoter molybdenum carbide in molten salts is developed. The first stage includes the formation of molybdenum–nickel alloys by an electrolytic method and currentless transfer in chloride melts. The second stage consists in the carbonization of the alloys in chloride-carbonate melt under various synthesis conditions. The stabilities of the nickel-promoter catalyti...

  19. Nanocomposited coatings produced by laser-assisted process to prevent silicone hydogels from protein fouling and bacterial contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Guobang; Chen, Yi; Zhang, Jin, E-mail: jzhang@eng.uwo.ca

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Nanocomposited-coating was deposited on silicone hydrogel by using the matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) process. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel, and can inhibit the bacterial growth efficiently. - Highlights: • We developed a nanocomposited coating to prevent silicone hydrogel from biofouling. • Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation can deposit inorganic–organic nanomaterials. • The designed nanocomposited coating reduces protein absorption by over 50%. • The designed nanocomposited coating shows significant antimicrobial efficiency. - Abstract: Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles incorporating with polyethylene glycol (PEG) were deposited together on the surface of silicone hydrogel through matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). In this process, frozen nanocomposites (ZnO–PEG) in isopropanol were irradiated under a pulsed Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm for 1 h. Our results indicate that the MAPLE process is able to maintain the chemical backbone of polymer and prevent the nanocomposite coating from contamination. The ZnO–PEG nanocomposited coating reduces over 50% protein absorption on silicone hydrogel. The cytotoxicity study shows that the ZnO–PEG nanocomposites deposited on silicone hydrogels do not impose the toxic effect on mouse NIH/3T3 cells. In addition, MAPLE-deposited ZnO–PEG nanocomposites can inhibit the bacterial growth significantly.

  20. Formation of optically transparent nanocomposite protective coatings on glass produced by ionic implantation and magnetron sputtering methods for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, V. P.; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Bozhko, I. A.; Rybalko, E. V.; Sergeev, O. V.; Voronov, A. V.; Fedorischeva, M. V.

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this research is design of a magnetron deposition technology for quartz glasses of optically transparent nanocomposite protective coatings based on Al-Si-N with preliminary modification of the substrate surface by a high-energy Ni+ ion beam. The coating improves the mechanical properties and resistance of the glass to the impact of highspeed iron microparticles. The structural-phase state and elemental composition of the coatings and the surface layer of the substrate are investigated by electron microscopy, electron-probe analysis, and secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  1. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  2. Antibacterial and Tribological Performance of Carbonitride Coatings Doped with W, Ti, Zr, or Cr Deposited on AISI 316L Stainless Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Sun-Hui; Su, Yen-Liang; Lai, Yu-Cheng

    2017-10-17

    Carbonitride (CNx) coatings have existed for several decades but are not well understood. Related studies have indicated that CNx coatings exhibit behaviors comparable to diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings. Metal-doped CNx coatings are expected to show superior performance to single CNx coatings. In this study, a CNx coating and a group of CNx coatings with 6 at. % metal doping (W, Ti, Zr, or Cr) were prepared on biograde AISI 316L stainless steel (SS316L) substrates, and they were then characterized and studied for antibacterial and wear performance. The microstructure, constituent phase, nanohardness, adhesion, surface roughness, and contact angle were evaluated. The antimicrobial test used Staphylococcus aureus and followed the Japanese Industrial Standard JIS Z 2801:2010. Finally, the wear behavior was assessed. The results showed that the CNx coating was a composite of amorphous CNx and amorphous C structures. The metal doping caused crystalline metal carbides/nitrides to form in the CNx coatings, which weakened their overall integrity. All the coatings showed antimicrobial ability for the SS316L samples. The CNx-Zr coating, the surface of which had the highest hydrophilicity, produced the best antibacterial performance. However, the CNx-Zr coating showed lower wear resistance than the CNx-W and CNx-Ti coatings. The CNx-Ti coating with a highly hydrophilic surface exhibited the lowest antibacterial ability.

  3. Characterization of Nanometric-Sized Carbides Formed During Tempering of Carbide-Steel Cermets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matus K.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article of this paper is to present issues related to characterization of nanometric-sized carbides, nitrides and/or carbonitrides formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. Closer examination of those materials is important because of hardness growth of carbide-steel cermet after tempering. The results obtained during research show that the upswing of hardness is significantly higher than for high-speed steels. Another interesting fact is the displacement of secondary hardness effect observed for this material to a higher tempering temperature range. Determined influence of the atmosphere in the sintering process on precipitations formed during tempering of carbide-steel cermets. So far examination of carbidesteel cermet produced by powder injection moulding was carried out mainly in the scanning electron microscope. A proper description of nanosized particles is both important and difficult as achievements of nanoscience and nanotechnology confirm the significant influence of nanocrystalline particles on material properties even if its mass fraction is undetectable by standard methods. The following research studies have been carried out using transmission electron microscopy, mainly selected area electron diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The obtained results and computer simulations comparison were made.

  4. Physics properties of TiO{sub 2} films produced by dip-coating technique; Propriedades fisicas de filmes de TiO{sub 2} produzidos pela tecnica de dip-coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teloeken, A.C.; Alves, A.K.; Berutti, F.A.; Tabarelli, A.; Bergmann, C.P., E-mail: acteloeken@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS),RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Ceramicos; Regonini, D.; Graule, T.; Clemens, F. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    The use of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) as a photocatalyst to produce hydrogen has been of great interest because of their chemical stability, low cost and non-toxicity. TiO{sub 2} occurs in three different crystal forms: rutile, anatase and brokita. Among these, the anatase phase generally exhibits the best photocatalytic behavior, while the rutile phase is the most stable. Among the various techniques of deposition, dip-coating technique produces films with good photocatalytic properties, using simple and inexpensive equipment. In this work TiO{sub 2} films were obtained by dip-coating. The films were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, profilometry, contact angle measurements and photocurrent. The microstructure and physical properties were evaluated in relation of the temperature and the addition of an additive. (author)

  5. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  6. Plasma-Chemical Synthesis of Nanosized Powders-Nitrides, Carbides, Oxides, Carbon Nanotubes and Fullerenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katerina, Zaharieva; Gheorghi, Vissokov; Janis, Grabis; Slavcho, Rakovsky

    2012-11-01

    In this article the plasma-chemical synthesis of nanosized powders (nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes) is reviewed. Nanosized powders - nitrides, carbides, oxides, carbon nanotubes and fullerenes have been successfully produced using different techniques, technological apparatuses and conditions for their plasma-chemical synthesis.

  7. Guidelines for Synthesis and Processing of 2D Titanium Carbide (Ti3C2Tx MXene)

    KAUST Repository

    Alhabeb, Mohamed

    2017-08-25

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal carbides, carbonitrides and nitrides (MXenes) were discovered in 2011. Since the original discovery, more than 20 different compositions have been synthesized by the selective etching of MAX phase and other precursors and many more theoretically predicted. They offer a variety of different properties, making the family promising candidates in a wide range of applications, such as energy storage, electromagnetic interference shielding, water purification, electrocatalysis and medicine. These solution-processable materials have the potential to be highly scalable, deposited by spin, spray or dip coating, painted or printed, or fabricated in a variety of ways. Due to this promise, the amount of research on MXenes has been increasing, and methods of synthesis and processing are expanding quickly. The fast evolution of the material can also be noticed in the wide range of synthesis and processing protocols that determine the yield of delamination, as well as the quality of the 2D flakes produced. Here we describe the experimental methods and best practices we use to synthesize the most studied MXene, titanium carbide (Ti3C2Tx), using different etchants and delamination methods. We also explain effects of synthesis parameters on the size and quality of Ti3C2Tx and suggest the optimal processes for the desired application.

  8. Silicon Carbide Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neudeck, P. G.

    2001-01-01

    The status of emerging silicon carbide (SiC) widebandgap semiconductor electronics technology is briefly surveyed. SiC-based electronic devices and circuits are being developed for use in high-temperature, high-power, and/or high-radiation conditions under which conventional semiconductors cannot function. Projected performance benefits of SiC electronics are briefly illustrated for several applications. However, most of these operational benefits of SiC have yet to be realized in actual systems, primarily owing to the fact that the growth techniques of SiC crystals are relatively immature and device fabrication technologies are not yet sufficiently developed to the degree required for widespread, reliable commercial use. Key crystal growth and device fabrication issues that limit the performance and capability of high-temperature and/or high-power SiC electronics are identified. The electrical and material quality differences between emerging SiC and mature silicon electronics technology are highlighted.

  9. Gold nanoparticles: BSA (Bovine Serum Albumin) coating and X-ray irradiation produce variable-spectrum photoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kuo-Hao [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Lai, Sheng-Feng [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering Science, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Lin, Yan-Cheng; Chou, Wu-Ching [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Ong, Edwin B.L. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Tan, Hui-Ru [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Tok, Eng Soon [Physics Department, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); Yang, C.S. [Center for Nanomedicine, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli 350, Taiwan (China); Margaritondo, G. [Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Hwu, Y., E-mail: phhwu@sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronic Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2015-01-15

    We show that by using different x-ray irradiation times of BSA-coated Au nanoparticles (NPs) we can change their ultraviolet-stimulated photoluminescence and shift the spectral weight over the visible spectral range. This is due to the interplay of two emission bands, one due to BSA and the other related to gold. The emission properties did not change with time over a period of several months. - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) coated with Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) are synthesized by x-ray irradiation. • BSA coated AuNPs with ∼1 nm size show strong photoluminescence in red by UV excitation. • The blue photoluminescence of BSA increase with x-ray irradiation. • Increase x-ray irradiation time during the synthesis shift the color of the colloid from red to blue.

  10. Coating Nanoparticles with Plant-Produced Transferrin-Hydrophobin Fusion Protein Enhances Their Uptake in Cancer Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reuter, Lauri J.; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Makila, Ermei M.

    2017-01-01

    to a surfactant phase in an aqueous two-phase system, and the transferrin moiety was able to reversibly bind iron. Coating porous silicon nanoparticles with the fusion protein resulted in uptake of the nanoparticles in human cancer cells. This study provides a proof-of concept for the functionalization......The encapsulation of drugs to nanoparticles may offer a solution for targeted delivery. Here, we set out to engineer a self assembling targeting ligand by combining the functional properties of human transferrin and fungal hydrophobins in a single fusion protein. We showed that human transferrin...... of hydrophobin coatings with transferrin as a targeting ligand....

  11. Graphene Nanoplatelet Reinforced Tantalum Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-27

    et. al. Ultrahigh-pressure consolidation and deformation of tantalum carbide at ambient and high temperatures. Acta Materialia 61-11 (2013) 4001-4009...matrix to reinfor- cement . Al–5BNNT exhibits high deformability as it undergoes 75% thickness reduction in a single pass of cold rolling without...4009Ultrahigh-pressure consolidation and deformation of tantalum carbide at ambient and high temperatures Debrupa Lahiri a, Virendra Singh b, Giovani

  12. Corrosion resistance of Al-based coatings in flowing Pb–15.7Li produced by aluminum electrodeposition from ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Erik Wulf

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Reduced activation ferritic–martensitic steels are intended to serve as structural materials in different blanket designs, e.g. HCLL, DCLL and WCLL. In these designs the material is supposed to be in direct contact with the flowing liquid breeder material Pb–15.7Li at an operating temperature of up to 550°C. These conditions will lead to severe corrosion attack of the steel and high corrosion rates of up to 400µm per year are reported in the literature. To avoid or reduce corrosion Al-based corrosion barriers were developed in the last years by using electrochemical techniques to deposit aluminum. Until now two processes have been developed. The first one, so called ECA process, is based on volatile toluene electrolytes. Long-term corrosion experiments on these coatings indicated reduced corrosion rates compared to bare Eurofer steel in flowing Pb–15.7Li. However, these Fe–Al scales showed inhomogeneous corrosion attack of the corrosion barrier itself. In this study the improved ECX process was applied to produce Al-based coatings. The short-term corrosion behavior of such barrier coatings was analyzed for up to 4000h by diameter measurements and metallographic examinations. The investigation revealed uniform corrosion in comparison to inhomogeneous attack in case of ECA coated samples and reduced corrosion rates of around 20µm/a even for low exposure times of 4000h.

  13. A novel anti-frictional multiphase layer produced by plasma nitriding of PVD titanium coated ZL205A aluminum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C.; Yao, J. W.; Wang, Y. X.; Zhu, Y. D.; Guo, J. H.; Wang, Y.; Fu, H. Y.; Chen, Z. B.; Yan, M. F.

    2018-02-01

    The heat treatment (consisting of solid solution and aging), is integrated with the nitriding process of titanium coated ZL205A aluminum alloy to improve the surface and matrix mechanical properties simultaneously. Two-step duplex treatment is adopted to prepare the gradient multiphase layer on a magnesium-free ZL205A aluminum-copper based alloy. Firstly, pure titanium film is deposited on the aluminum alloy substrate using magnetron sputtering. Secondly, the Ti-coated specimen is nitrided at the solid solution temperature of the substrate alloying elements in a gas mixture of N2 and H2 and aged at 175 °C. The microstructure evolution, microhardness as well as the wear resistance of obtained multiphase layers are investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), microhardness tester and pin-on-disc tribometer. The multiphase layer, dominated by TiN0.3 or Al3Ti, is prepared with significantly increased layer depth after duplex treatment. The surface hardness of multiphase layer is remarkably improved from 23.7HV to 457HV. The core matrix hardness is also increased to 65HV after aging. The wear rate of the multiphase layer decreases about 55.22% and 49.28% in comparison with the aged and Ti coated specimens, respectively. The predominant wear mechanism for the multiphase layer is abrasive and oxidation, but severe adhesive wear for the aged and Ti coated specimens.

  14. The analysis of impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Nerosin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of irregularity in radionuclide coating of scaffold on the distribution of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was analyzed. On engineering software MATHCAD the program for calculation of absorbed dose produced by grid of microsources was created. To verify this algorithm the calculation model for MCNP code was established and represented the area consisted of soft biological tissue or any other tissue in which the grid of microsources was incorporated. Using the developed system the value of possible systematic irregular coating of radioactivity on the microsource’s core was analyzed. The distribution of activity along the surface of microsource was simulated to create distribution of absorbed dose rate corresponding to experimental data on radiation injury. The obtained model of microsource with irregular distribution of activity was compared to conventional microsource with core coated regularly along the entire area of the silver stem by main dosimetry characteristics. The results showed that even for extremely irregular distribution of activity the distribution of dose rate produced by microsource in the tumor area was not substantially different from dose-rate field obtained for microsource with regularly coated activity. The differences in dose rates (up to 10% in areas which were the nearest to the center of the grid were significantly lower than its decline from center to periphery of the grid. For spatial distribution of absorbed dose for specific configuration of microsource set and tracing of curves of equal level by selected cut-off the program SEEDPLAN was developed. The developed program represents precisely enough the spatial distribution of selected configuration set of microsources using results of calculation data for absorbed dose around the single microsource as basic data and may be used for optimal planning of brachytherapy with microsources. 

  15. A new titanium based alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Marcio W D; Ágreda, Carola G; Bressiani, Ana H A; Bressiani, José C

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti-27Nb-13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for >3 days in the SBF solution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Microstructural evaluation of the NbC-20Ni cemented carbides during sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, D. [BRATS Sintered Filters and Metallic Powders, Cajamar, SP (Brazil); Cannizza, E. [EHT Cannizza Consultoria Em Engenharia Ltda, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Fine carbides in a metallic matrix (binder) form the microstructure of the cemented carbides. Grain size and binder content are the main variables to adjust hardness and toughness. These products are produced by Powder Metallurgy, and traditional route involves mixing carbides with binder by high energy milling, pressing and sintering. During sintering, a liquid phase promotes densification, and a final relative density higher than 99% is expected. Sintering is carried out at high temperatures, and dissolution of the carbides changes the chemical composition of the binder. To control grain growth of the main carbide, which reduces hardness, small quantities of secondary carbides are used. These additives limit dissolution and precipitation of the main carbides reducing the final grain size. This paper focused the structural and chemical evolution during sintering using NbC-20Ni cermets. Mixtures of very fine NbC carbides and carbonyl Ni powders were produce by intense milling. These mixtures were pressed using uniaxial pressures from 50 to 200MPa. Shrinkage was evaluated using dilatometric measurements under an atmosphere of dynamic argon. Samples were also sintered under vacuum in high temperature industrial furnace. The sintered samples were characterized in terms of density hardness, toughness and microstructure. DRX was the main tool used to evaluate the structural evolution of the binder. In situ chemical analysis helped to understand the dissolution mechanisms. (author)

  17. Influence of Nitrided Layer on The Properties of Carbon Coatings Produced on X105CrMo17 Steel Under DC Glow-Discharge Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz BOROWSKI

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In most cases, machine components, which come in contact with each other, are made of steel. Common steel types include 100Cr6 and X105CrMo17 are widely used in rolling bearings, which are subjected to high static loads. However, more and more sophisticated structural applications require increasingly better performance from steel. The most popular methods for improving the properties of steel is carburisation or nitriding. Unfortunately, when very high surface properties of steel are required, this treatment may be insufficient. Improvement of tribological properties can be achieved by increasing the hardness of the surface, reducing roughness or reducing the coefficient of friction. The formation of composite layers on steel, consisting of a hard nitride diffusion layer and an external carbon coating with a low coefficient of friction, seems to be a prospect with significant potential. The article describes composite layers produced on X105CrMo17 steel and defines their morphology, surface roughness and their functional properties such as: resistance to friction-induced wear, coefficient of friction and corrosion resistance. The layers have been formed at a temperature of 370°C in successive processes of: nitriding in low-temperature plasma followed by deposition of a carbon coating under DC glow-discharge conditions. An evaluation was also made of the impact of the nitrided layers on the properties and morphology of the carbon coatings formed by comparing them to coatings formed on non-nitrided X105CrMo17 steel substrates. A study of the surface topography, adhesion, resistance to friction-induced wear and corrosion shows the significant importance of the substrate type the carbon coatings are formed on.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.3.7532

  18. Coating Nanoparticles with Plant-Produced Transferrin-Hydrophobin Fusion Protein Enhances Their Uptake in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Lauri J; Shahbazi, Mohammad-Ali; Mäkilä, Ermei M; Salonen, Jarno J; Saberianfar, Reza; Menassa, Rima; Santos, Hélder A; Joensuu, Jussi J; Ritala, Anneli

    2017-06-21

    The encapsulation of drugs to nanoparticles may offer a solution for targeted delivery. Here, we set out to engineer a self-assembling targeting ligand by combining the functional properties of human transferrin and fungal hydrophobins in a single fusion protein. We showed that human transferrin can be expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana plants as a fusion with Trichoderma reesei hydrophobins HFBI, HFBII, or HFBIV. Transferrin-HFBIV was further expressed in tobacco BY-2 suspension cells. Both partners of the fusion protein retained their functionality; the hydrophobin moiety enabled migration to a surfactant phase in an aqueous two-phase system, and the transferrin moiety was able to reversibly bind iron. Coating porous silicon nanoparticles with the fusion protein resulted in uptake of the nanoparticles in human cancer cells. This study provides a proof-of-concept for the functionalization of hydrophobin coatings with transferrin as a targeting ligand.

  19. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, Larry [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, Bill [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Wolfe, Doug [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fratoni, Max [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Raj, Rishi [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Plunkett, Kenneth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hollis, Kendall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Comstock, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Partezana, Jonna [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Whittle, Karl [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Donnelly, Stephen [Univ. of Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Syndney (Australia)

    2017-02-14

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as well as

  20. Fluorescent silicon carbide materials for white LEDs and photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Ou, Haiyan; Wellmann, Peter

    the luminescence appears in the visible region which is used to produce a white LED with pure white light without need of phosphors [2]. The cubic silicon carbide polytype is challenging to master, and we have explored the growth of this crystal structure. It has a lower bandgap, and by a similar doping concept...... in cubic silicon carbide. The impurity photovoltaic effect could lead to devices with efficiencies comparable to those of tandem systems, and could open a new road for very-high-efficiency solar cells. Such high performance can be reached only if the host material has a large energy gap, like cubic silicon...

  1. Highly permeable and mechanically robust silicon carbide hollow fiber membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, Patrick; Kappert, Emiel; Lohaus, T.; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) membranes have shown large potential for applications in water treatment. Being able to make these membranes in a hollow fiber geometry allows for higher surface-to-volume ratios. In this study, we present a thermal treatment procedure that is tuned to produce porous silicon

  2. Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide for Industrial Applicaitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Z. Zak Fang, H. Y. Sohn

    2009-03-10

    This report contains detailed information of the research program entitled "Development of Bulk Nanocrystalline Cemented Tungsten Carbide Materials for Industrial Applications". The report include the processes that were developed for producing nanosized WC/Co composite powders, and an ultrahigh pressure rapid hot consolidation process for sintering of nanosized powders. The mechanical properties of consolidated materials using the nanosized powders are also reported.

  3. Combustion chemical vapor desposited coatings for thermal barrier coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampikian, J.M.; Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The new deposition process, combustion chemical vapor deposition, shows a great deal of promise in the area of thermal barrier coating systems. This technique produces dense, adherent coatings, and does not require a reaction chamber. Coatings can therefore be applied in the open atmosphere. The process is potentially suitable for producing high quality CVD coatings for use as interlayers between the bond coat and thermal barrier coating, and/or as overlayers, on top of thermal barrier coatings.

  4. Microstructure of WC/C coatings deposited on steel substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Hosson, J.T.M.; Carvalho, N.J.M.; Brebbia, CA

    2001-01-01

    Electron microscopy, including scanning (SEM), transmission (TEM) and high-resolution (HRTEM) were employed to characterise slightly different tungsten carbide/carbon coatings deposited onto steel substrates. Complementary techniques, such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Auger electron spectroscopy

  5. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...... melanoma cells in amounts as high as 0.3 wt. % and 1 wt. %, respectively. Neutron irradiation of a test system consisting of untreated B16 cells mixed with B16 cells loaded with boron carbide nanoparticles were found to inhibit the proliferative capacity of untreated cells, showing that cells loaded...... with boron-containing nanoparticles can hinder the growth of neighboring cells upon neutron irradiation. This could provide the first step toward a T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy....

  6. Friction and wear of radiofrequency-sputtered borides, silicides, and carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainard, W. A.; Wheeler, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    The friction and wear properties of several refractory compound coatings were examined. These compounds were applied to 440 C bearing steel surfaces by radiofrequency (RF) sputtering. The refractory compounds were the titanium and molybdenum borides, the titanium and molybdenum silicides, and the titanium, molybdenum, and boron carbides. Friction testing was done with a pin-on-disk wear apparatus at loads from 0.1 to 5.0 newtons. Generally, the best wear properties were obtained when the coatings were bias sputtered onto 440 C disks that had been preoxidized. Adherence was improved because of the better bonding of the coatings to the iron oxide formed during preoxidation. As a class the carbides provided wear protection to the highest loads. Titanium boride coatings provided low friction and good wear properties to moderate loads.

  7. A review of producing hard coatings by means of duplex treatments using an electroplated coating–thermochemical treatment combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Cifuentes Aya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Duplex treatments have been developed to overcome the disadvantages presented by simple treatments to surfaces of different materials and have, in a combined and complementary way, the properties that each of these methods supplies individually. The difference between thermal expansion coefficients for Fe and Cr in hard chrome plating leads to crack formation in the deposited coat, through which corrosive agents migrate and reduce the system’s integrity.Direct deposition by physical vapour deposition (PVD, used for obtaining chromium nitride films on steel substrates, is limited by high production costs, the low thickness obtained and low resistance to corrosion due to the presence of micro pores. Some studies have combined an electroplated chromium with thermochemical treatments made in a controlled atmosphere or vacuum furnaces or by plasma. This kind of duplex treatment allows compounds such as CrxN, CrxCyN and CrxCy to be obtained from chemical and micro structural transformation of chromium with nitrogen and/or carbon, the sealing of cracks in the coating and increasing the magnitude of properties like hardness and density, improving wear and abrasion and corrosion resistance.

  8. INCREASING THE EFFICIENCY OF THE ALLOYED LAYER FORMATION WHEN HARDENING TUNGSTEN CARBIDE WITH COMBINED METHODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Anatoly D. Verkhoturov

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the research aimed at improving the tungsten carbide durability with the help of spark alloying methods, arc welding and laser processing. The paper presents the formation of the alloyed layer thickness of more than 1400 mm with gradient transition properties. The parameters of the islet coating formation for durability improvement by laser processing are represented.

  9. Parameters optimization, microstructure and micro-hardness of silicon carbide laser deposited on titanium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyia, DI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC), has excellent mechanical properties such as high hardness and good wear resistance, and would have been a suitable laser-coating material for titanium alloy to enhance the poor surface hardness of the alloy. However, SiC has...

  10. Silicon carbide as platform for energy applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Syväjärvi, Mikael; Jokubavicius, Valdas; Sun, Jianwu

    Silicon carbide is emerging as a novel material for a range of energy and environmental technologies. Previously, silicon carbide was considered as a material mainly for transistor applications. We have initiated the use of silicon carbide material towards optoelectronics in general lighting and ...

  11. Residual stress, mechanical and microstructure properties of multilayer Mo{sub 2}N/CrN coating produced by R.F Magnetron discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouaouina, B., E-mail: b.bouaouina@gmail.com [Department of physic, research unite UR-MPE, Boumerdes University 35000 (Algeria); Besnard, A. [Arts et Metiers ParisTech—LaBoMaP, 71250 Cluny (France); Abaidia, S.E. [Department of physic, research unite UR-MPE, Boumerdes University 35000 (Algeria); Haid, F. [CDTA, Plasma discharges Group, Baba hassen, Algers (Algeria)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Depositing of crystallized molybdenum nitride and chromium nitride multilayer at room temperature. • Correlation between stress measurement and the shift of the XRD diffraction peak (1 1 1) of Mo{sub 2}N. • Studied the effect of the bi-layer thickness on the mechanical properties. - Abstract: We have investigated the effect of the period thickness of the multilayer Mo{sub 2}N/CrN deposited on Si substrate produced by reactive magnetron sputtering. Mo{sub 2}N presents a face centered cubic structure and CrN an orthorhombic one. The residual stress of the coatings was determined by the measurement of the substrate curvature. The microstructure of the multilayer was investigated from the X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (cross section images). The residual stresses resulting from the deposition of the different bi-layer thickness were measured and correlated to the structural properties of the coating as well as the nanoindentation analysis of the coating. The stresses are compressive and tensile for the individual Mo{sub 2}N and CrN layer respectively. The result shows that an increase of the multilayer coatings Mo{sub 2}N/CrN thicknesses induce an increase of the hardness and the elastic modulus, in the other hand the tensile stress increases. The shift of the XRD diffraction peak (1 1 1) of Mo{sub 2}N at high angle which means the reduction of the residual stress is in good agreement with the residual stresses measurements.

  12. The Effect of Dispersion Phases of SiC and Al2O3 on the Properties of Galvanic Nickel Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozik A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Ni, Ni-SiC and Ni-Al2O3 coatings were electroplated on the 2xxx series aluminium alloy. The following parameters of the electroplating process were applied: current density - 4A/dm2, time - 60 minutes, and temperature - 60°C. Hard particles of submicrometric size were used. The results of the research showing the effect of the addition of hard particles (introduced into the nickel bath as a dispersed phase on the properties of coatings, including the effect of the type (SiC or Al2O3 and content (0, 25, 50 g / l of these particles, were discussed. Based on extensive investigations, it was found that the type of ceramic particles significantly affects the structure of produced coatings. The dispersed particles incorporated into the nickel coatings improve their abrasion resistance. Improving of the corrosion properties were observed only in the case of coatings containing silicon carbide particles.

  13. Effect of Heating Rate on Accelerated Carbide Spheroidisation (ASR in 100CrMnSi6-4 Bearing Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauserova D.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Typical processing routes for bearing steels include a soft annealing stage, the purpose of which is to obtain a microstructure containing globular carbides in ferritic matrix. A newly developed process called ASR cuts the carbide spheroidisation times several fold, producing considerably finer globular carbides than conventional soft annealing. The present paper explores the effect of the heating rate and temperature on the accelerated carbide spheroidisation process and on the resulting hardness. Accelerated spheroidisation was achieved by thermal cycling for several minutes around various temperatures close to the transformation temperature at various heating rates applied by induction heating.

  14. A new titanium based alloy Ti–27Nb–13Zr produced by powder metallurgy with biomimetic coating for use as a biomaterial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Marcio W.D., E-mail: mwdmendes@ipen.com; Ágreda, Carola G.; Bressiani, Ana H.A.; Bressiani, José C.

    2016-06-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical applications due to their excellent properties such as high strength, good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. Titanium alloys with alloying elements such as Nb and Zr are biocompatible and have Young's modulus close to that of human bone. To increase the bioactivity of titanium alloy surfaces is used chemical treatment with NaOH followed by immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). The purpose of this study was to produce the alloy Ti–27Nb–13Zr with low Young's modulus by powder metallurgy using powders produced by the HDH process. The formation of biomimetic coatings on samples immersed in SBF for 3, 7, 11 and 15 days was evaluated. Characterization of the coating was performed by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and scanning electron microscope. The microstructure and composition of the alloy were determined using SEM and XRD, while the mechanical properties were evaluated by determining the elastic modulus and the Vickers microhardness. The sintered alloys were composed of α and β phases, equiaxed grains and with density around 97.8% of its theoretical density. The Vickers microhardness and elasticity modulus of the alloy were determined and their values indicate that this alloy can be used as a biomaterial. Analysis of the coating revealed the presence of calcium phosphate layers on samples immersed for > 3 days in the SBF solution. - Highlights: • The alloy is classified as α + β and the milling time influences the formation of these phases. • Dissolution of Nb is related to the mechanical properties of the alloy. • It's possible to form apatite on all samples immersed in SBF from 3 days. • The alloy can be used in orthopedic applications or in dental applications.

  15. Catalytic Conversion of Syngas into Higher Alcohols over Carbide Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    2012-01-01

    This work investigates the use of the bulk carbides Mo2C, WC, and NbC as catalysts for the conversion of syngas into higher alcohols. K2CO3/WC produces mainly CH3OH and CH4 with a low activity. NbC has a very low activity in CO hydrogenation. K2CO3/Mo2C produces mixed alcohols with a reasonable...

  16. Magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide: A potential material for pollutants removal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mambrini, Raquel V.; Fonseca, Thales L. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Ouro Preto, MG 35400-000 (Brazil); Oliveira, Luiz C.A.; Araujo, Maria Helena [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil); Moura, Flavia C.C., E-mail: flaviamoura@ufmg.br [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG 31270-901 (Brazil)

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New magnetic molybdenum carbide composites can be prepared by CVD from ethanol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic molybdenum carbide shows promising results for pollutants removal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The carbide composites can be easily recovered magnetically and reused. - Abstract: New magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide, Ni/Mo{sub 2}C, have been produced via catalytic chemical vapor deposition from ethanol. Scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies suggest that the CVD process occurs in a single step. This process involves the reduction of NiMo oxides at different temperatures (700, 800 and 900 Degree-Sign C) with catalytic deposition of carbon from ethanol producing molybdenum carbide on Ni surface. In the absence of molybdenum the formation of Ni/C was observed. The magnetic molybdenum carbide was successfully used as pollutants removal by adsorption of sulfur and nitrogen compounds from liquid fuels and model dyes such as methylene blue and indigo carmine. The dibenzothiofene adsorption process over Ni/Mo{sub 2}C reached approximately 20 mg g{sup -1}, notably higher than other materials described in the literature and also removed almost all methylene blue dye. The great advantage of these carbide composites is that they may be easily recovered magnetically and reused.

  17. Effect of Mo ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Shie; Wang Xiao Ping; Li Hui; Ma Bing Xian; Qin Guang Yong; Zhang Bing Lin

    2002-01-01

    Diamond coatings were deposited on the cobalt-cemented tungsten carbide (YG6) substrates, which have been implanted with Mo ions, by microwave plasma CVD (MPCVD) method. The effect of ion-implantation on the adhesion of diamond coatings was studied. The results showed that the chemical compositions of cemented carbide substrate surfaces change obviously after Mo ion-implantation; and the adhesion strength between the CVD diamond coatings and the substrates implanted with Mo ions in proper concentration is improved remarkably

  18. Electrochemical characterization of V{sub x}Nb{sub y}C{sub z}/Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coatings produced through thermo-reactive diffusion and the sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro H, S. A.; Alfonso, J. E.; Olaya, J. J., E-mail: jealfonso@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, AA-14490 Bogota (Colombia)

    2016-11-01

    We present and experimental study of the structural evolution of a bilayer V{sub x}Nb{sub y}C{sub z}/Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coating produced via thermo-reactive diffusion (TRD) and the RF sputtering process on D-2 steel substrate. The TRD treatments were carried out in a molten mixture consisting of borax, ferro-niobium, ferro-vanadium, and aluminum, at 1313 K for 3 hours, using a resistance-heating furnace. Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coatings were deposited using RF magnetron sputtering on TRD coatings, in order to carry out a study of the corrosion behavior of this compound. The crystallographic structure of the coatings was determined via X-ray diffraction, the corrosion resistance was analyzed through the potentiodynamic polarization test (Tafel Extrapolation) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic analysis (EIS). X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the ternary coating (VNbC{sub 2}) was preferentially oriented along the [200] direction with a cubic-centered face structure, and the Bi{sub x}Ti{sub y}O{sub z} coatings were amorphous. The electrochemical studies showed that the resistance corrosion of the coatings increased with respect to the bare substrate, and that polarization resistance in the bilayer coatings increased with respect to the ternary coatings, suggesting that the titanate has anti corrosive barrier effects. (Author)

  19. Improved silicon carbide for advanced heat engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, Thomas J.

    1987-01-01

    This is the second annual technical report entitled, Improved Silicon Carbide for Advanced Heat Engines, and includes work performed during the period February 16, 1986 to February 15, 1987. The program is conducted for NASA under contract NAS3-24384. The objective is the development of high strength, high reliability silicon carbide parts with complex shapes suitable for use in advanced heat engines. The fabrication methods used are to be adaptable for mass production of such parts on an economically sound basis. Injection molding is the forming method selected. This objective is to be accomplished in a two-phase program: (1) to achieve a 20 percent improvement in strength and a 100 percent increase in Weibull modulus of the baseline material; and (2) to produce a complex shaped part, a gas turbine rotor, for example, with the improved mechanical properties attained in the first phase. Eight tasks are included in the first phase covering the characterization of the properties of a baseline material, the improvement of those properties and the fabrication of complex shaped parts. Activities during the first contract year concentrated on two of these areas: fabrication and characterization of the baseline material (Task 1) and improvement of material and processes (Task 7). Activities during the second contract year included an MOR bar matrix study to improve mechanical properties (Task 2), materials and process improvements (Task 7), and a Ford-funded task to mold a turbocharger rotor with an improved material (Task 8).

  20. Ultrasmall Carbide Nanospheres - Formation and Electronic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Petra; Monazami, Ehsan; McClimon, John

    2015-03-01

    Metallic nanoparticles are highly coveted but are subject to rapid Ostwald ripening even at moderate temperatures limiting study of their properties. Ultrasmall transition metal carbide ``nanospheres'' are synthesized by a solid-state reaction between fullerene as carbon scaffold, and a W surface. This produces nanospheres with a narrow size distribution below 2.5 nm diameter. The nanosphere shape is defined by the scaffold and densely packed arrays can be achieved. The metal-fullerene reaction is temperature driven and progresses through an intermediate semiconducting phase until the fully metallic nanospheres are created at about 350 C. The reaction sequence is observed with STM, and STS maps yield the local density of states. The reaction presumably progresses by stepwise introduction of W-atoms in the carbon scaffold. The results of high resolution STM/STS in combination with DFT calculations are used to unravel the reaction mechanism. We will discuss the transfer of this specific reaction mechanism to other transition metal carbides. The nanospheres are an excellent testbed for the physics and chemistry of highly curved surfaces.

  1. Acceptance Test Data for BWXT Coated Particle Batch 93164A Defective IPyC Fraction and Pyrocarbon Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Coated particle fuel batch J52O-16-93164 was produced by Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT) for possible selection as fuel for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), or may be used as demonstration production-scale coated particle fuel for other experiments. The tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coatings were deposited in a 150-mm-diameter production-scale fluidizedbed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace onto 425-μm-nominal-diameter spherical kernels from BWXT lot J52L-16-69316. Each kernel contained a mixture of 15.5%-enriched uranium carbide and uranium oxide (UCO) and was coated with four consecutive CVD layers: a ~50% dense carbon buffer layer with 100-μm-nominal thickness, a dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness, a silicon carbide (SiC) layer with 35-μm-nominal thickness, and a dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness. The TRISO-coated particle batch was sieved to upgrade the particles by removing over-sized and under-sized material, and the upgraded batch was designated by appending the letter A to the end of the batch number (i.e., 93164A).

  2. Syntesis of nitrides and carbides at surface of titanium by Nd-YAG pulsed laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covelli, L.; Pierdominici, F.; Smurov, I.; Tosto, S.

    1991-12-31

    Microstructural SEM observations were carried out on samples of Ti irradiated with a Nd-YAG pulsed laser in the range of 10-40 J energy and 3-10 msec pulse length. The treatments were carried out on samples exposed to an atmosphere of nitrogen and on samples coated with graphite; it was thus possible to obtain nitrides and carbides as a consequence of laser irradiation. The morphology and distribution of the phases allowed research to obtain information about the fluid dynamics within the melt pool. It was found that the mechanisms of Ti nitride and carbide formation and growth are basically the same.

  3. Effect of adhesive properties of buffy coat on the quality of blood components produced with Top & Top and Top & Bottom bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerelli, Eugenio; Nocera, Martina; Di Bartolomeo, Erminia; Panzani, Paola; Baricchi, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The Transfusion Medicine Unit of Reggio Emilia currently collects whole blood using conventional quadruple Fresenius Top & Top bags. In this study, new Fresenius Top & Bottom bags were assessed and compared to the routine method with regards to product quality and operational requirements. Twenty-one whole blood units were collected with both the new and the traditional bags, and then separated. Quality control data were evaluated and compared in order to estimate yield and quality of final blood components obtained with the two systems. We collected other bags, not included in the ordinary quality control programme, for comparison of platelet concentrates produced by pools of buffy coat. Compared to the traditional system, the whole blood units processed with Top & Bottom bags yielded larger plasma volumes (+5.7%) and a similar amount of concentrated red blood cells, but with a much lower contamination of lymphocytes (-61.5%) and platelets (-86.6%). Consequently, the pooled platelets contained less plasma (-26.3%) and were significantly richer in platelets (+17.9%). This study investigated the effect of centrifugation on the adhesiveness of the buffy coat to the bag used for whole blood collection. We analysed the mechanism by which this undesirable phenomenon affects the quality of packed red blood cells in two types of bags. We also documented the incomparability of measurements on platelet concentrates performed with different principles of cell counting: this vexing problem has important implications for biomedical research and for the establishment of universal product standards. Our results support the conclusion that the Top & Bottom bags produce components of higher quality than our usual system, while having equal operational efficiency. Use of the new bags could result in an important quality improvement in blood components manufacturing.

  4. Characterization of Transition Metal Carbide Layers Synthesized by Thermo-reactive Diffusion Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Mads Brink; Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    be transformed into a layer much richer in Cr7C3 and poorer in Cr23C6 by a subsequent heat treatment. The produced chromium-, vanadium- and titanium carbide layers have hardness values of 2116±37HV, 3022±119HV and 3951±66HV respectively, and subsequent hardening and tempering of treated materials can be done......Hard wear resistant surface layers of transition metal carbides can be produced by thermo-reactive diffusion processes where interstitial elements from a steel substrate together with external sources of transition metals (Ti, V, Cr etc.) form hard carbide and/or nitride layers at the steel surface....... In this study halide-activated pack cementation techniques were used on tool steel Vanadis 6 and martensitic stainless steel AISI 420 in order to produce hard layers of titanium carbide (TiC), vanadium carbide (V8C7) and chromium carbides (Cr23C6 and Cr7C3). Surface layers were characterized by scanning...

  5. Investigation of the Microstructure and the Mechanical Properties of Cu-NiC Composite Produced by Accumulative Roll Bonding and Coating Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Ali; Toroghinejad, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, Cu-1.8 wt.% NiC (nickel coating) composite was produced by the combination of two methods, including accumulative roll bonding (ARB) and electroplating processes. Electroplating process was done on copper strips in order to produce a nickel-particle-reinforced composite. Microstructure, texture, and the mechanical properties of the produced composite were evaluated during various cycles of ARB using optical and scanning electron microscopes, x-ray diffraction, microhardness, and tensile tests. In addition, the results were compared with Cu-Cu and also Cu-NiS (nickel sheet) samples. It was found that nickel layers were fractured from the first cycle of the process, and nickel fragments were distributed in the copper matrix as the number of cycles was increased. Variation of orientation density of α-, β-, and τ-fibers for the produced composite was examined in different cycles. Microhardness for different elements in different cycles of Cu-NiC was also evaluated. Also, the investigation of the mechanical properties showed that by proceeding the ARB process, the tensile strength of the produced Cu-NiC and Cu-Cu samples was increased. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of composite samples was more noticeable due to the reinforcing effect of nickel particles. The elongation of composite samples showed a decrease in the primary cycles, unlike Cu-Cu ones; however, it was then increased. Finally, by using scanning electron microscopy, the fracture surfaces of Cu-NiC composite were studied to disclose the fracture mechanism of the samples.

  6. Pathology of silicon carbide pneumoconiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massé, S; Bégin, R; Cantin, A

    1988-03-01

    Silicon carbide is a widely used synthetic abrasive manufactured by heating silica and coke in electric furnaces at 2400 degrees C. Until recently it had been considered a relatively inert dust in humans and animals. However, several roentgenologic surveys had revealed lesions similar to low-grade silicosis. A recent epidemiological study has revealed a 35% incidence of pulmonary problems. Tissues from three such workers were available for light microscopy. A mixed pneumoconiosis was found, and lesions can be summarized as follows: (a) abundance of intraalveolar macrophages associated with a mixture of inhaled particles including carbon, silicon, pleomorphic crystals, silicon carbide, and ferruginous bodies showing a thin black central core; (b) nodular fibrosis, generally profuse, containing silica and ferruginous bodies and associated with large amount of carbon pigment; (c) interstitial fibrosis, less prominent than the nodular form; (d) carcinoma in two cases. We believe this pneumoconiosis is sufficiently characteristic to be recognized as a distinct entity. The Stanton hypothesis on fiber properties and carcinogenesis could be applied to silicon carbide dust. At present, it appears that the occupational hazard is limited to the manufacturing process and powdered product used in some industries.

  7. Adhesion of Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 coatings to typical aerospace substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marraco-Borderas, C.; Nistal, A.; Garcia, E.; Sainz, M.A.; Martin de la Escalera, F.; Essa, Y.; Miranzo, P.

    2016-07-01

    High performance lightweight materials are required in the aerospace industry. Silicon carbide, carbon fiber reinforced carbon and slicon carbide composites comply with those requirements but they suffer from oxidation at the high temperature of the service conditions. One of the more effective approaches to prevent this problem is the use of protecting ceramic coatings, where the good adhesion between substrates and coatings are paramount to guarantee the optimal protection performance. In the present work, the adhesion between those substrates and glass coatings of the Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system processed by oxyacetylene flame spraying is analyzed. Increasing load scratch tests are employed for determining the failure type, maximum load and their relation with the elastic and mechanical properties of the coatings. The results points to the good adhesion of the coatings to silicon carbide and carbon fibre reinforced silicon carbide while the carbon fiber reinforced carbon is not a suitable material to be coated. (Author)

  8. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Boron carbide (B4C) powder has been produced by carbothermal reduction of boric acid–citric acid gel. Initially a gel of boric acid–citric acid is prepared in an oven at 100°C. This gel is pyrolyzed in a high temperature furnace over a temperature range of 1000–1800°C. The reaction initiation temperature range for B4C ...

  9. Silicon-Carbide Power MOSFET Performance in High Efficiency Boost Power Processing Unit for Extreme Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikpe, Stanley A.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Carr, Gregory A.; Hunter, Don; Ludwig, Lawrence L.; Wood, William; Del Castillo, Linda Y.; Fitzpatrick, Fred; Chen, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide device technology has generated much interest in recent years. With superior thermal performance, power ratings and potential switching frequencies over its Silicon counterpart, Silicon-Carbide offers a greater possibility for high powered switching applications in extreme environment. In particular, Silicon-Carbide Metal-Oxide- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors' (MOSFETs) maturing process technology has produced a plethora of commercially available power dense, low on-state resistance devices capable of switching at high frequencies. A novel hard-switched power processing unit (PPU) is implemented utilizing Silicon-Carbide power devices. Accelerated life data is captured and assessed in conjunction with a damage accumulation model of gate oxide and drain-source junction lifetime to evaluate potential system performance at high temperature environments.

  10. THE MACHINING OF HARDENED CARBON STEELS BY COATED CUTTING TOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf ŞAHİN

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of machining AISI 1050 carbon steels hardened to the 60 HRC hardness was carried out to determine the tool life and wear behaviour of the various cutting tools under different conditions. These experiments were conducted at using coated ceramic cutting tools and carbide cutting tools. The experimental results showed that the coated ceramic tools exhibited better performance than those of the coated carbide tools when machining the hardened steels. Moreover, wear behaviour of cutting tools were investigated in a scanning electron microscope. Electron microscopic examination also indicated that flank wear, thermal cracks on the tool nose combined with the nose deformation on the tools were responsible for the wear behaviour of the ceramic tools. For the carbide tools, however, removal of coated material from the substrate tool and combined with the crater wear were effective for the machining the hardened steel.

  11. Helium behaviour in implanted boron carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motte Vianney

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When boron carbide is used as a neutron absorber in nuclear power plants, large quantities of helium are produced. To simulate the gas behaviour, helium implantations were carried out in boron carbide. The samples were then annealed up to 1500 °C in order to observe the influence of temperature and duration of annealing. The determination of the helium diffusion coefficient was carried out using the 3He(d,p4He nuclear reaction (NRA method. From the evolution of the width of implanted 3He helium profiles (fluence 1 × 1015/cm2, 3 MeV corresponding to a maximum helium concentration of about 1020/cm3 as a function of annealing temperatures, an Arrhenius diagram was plotted and an apparent diffusion coefficient was deduced (Ea = 0.52 ± 0.11 eV/atom. The dynamic of helium clusters was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM of samples implanted with 1.5 × 1016/cm2, 2.8 to 3 MeV 4He ions, leading to an implanted slab about 1 μm wide with a maximum helium concentration of about 1021/cm3. After annealing at 900 °C and 1100 °C, small (5–20 nm flat oriented bubbles appeared in the grain, then at the grain boundaries. At 1500 °C, due to long-range diffusion, intra-granular bubbles were no longer observed; helium segregates at the grain boundaries, either as bubbles or inducing grain boundaries opening.

  12. Development and Processing of Nickel Aluminide-Carbide Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newport, Timothy Scott

    1996-01-01

    With the upper temperature limit of the Ni-based superalloys attained, a new class of materials is required. Intermetallics appear as likely candidates because of their attractive physical properties. With a relatively low density, high thermal conductivity, excellent oxidation resistance, high melting point, and simple crystal structure, nickel aluminide (NiAl) appears to be a potential candidate. However, NiAl is limited in structural applications due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor elevated temperature strength. One approach to improving these properties has been through the application of eutectic composites. Researchers have shown that containerless directional solidification of NiAl-based eutectic alloys can provide improvement in both the creep strength and fracture toughness. Although these systems have shown improvements in the mechanical properties, the presence of refractory metals increases the density significantly in some alloys. Lower density systems, such as the carbides, nitrides, and borides, may provide NiAl-based eutectic structure. With little or no information available on these systems, experimental investigation is required. The objective of this research was to locate and develop NiAl-carbide eutectic alloys. Exploratory arc-melts were performed in NiAl-refractory metal-C systems. Refractory metal systems investigated included Co, Cr, Fe, Hf, Mo, Nb, Ta, Ti, W, and Zr. Systems containing carbides with excellent stability (i.e.,HfC, NbC, TaC, TiC, and ZrC) produced large blocky cubic carbides in an NiAl matrix. The carbides appeared to have formed in the liquid state and were randomly distributed throughout the polycrystalline NiAl. The Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and W systems contained NiAl dendrites with a two-phase interdendritic microconstituent present. Of these systems, the NiAl-Mo-C system had the most promising microstructure for in-situ composites. Three processing techniques were used to evaluate the NiAl-Mo-C system

  13. Hydroxide catalysis bonding of silicon carbide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veggel, A.A. van; Ende, D.A. van den; Bogenstahl, J.; Rowan, S.; Cunningham, W.; Gubbels, G.H.M.; Nijmeijer, H.

    2008-01-01

    For bonding silicon carbide optics, which require extreme stability, hydroxide catalysis bonding is considered [Rowan, S., Hough, J. and Elliffe, E., Silicon carbide bonding. UK Patent 040 7953.9, 2004. Please contact Mr. D. Whiteford for further information: D.Whiteford@admin.gla.ac.uk]. This

  14. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO; Difusion de plata a traves de carburo de silicio en combustibles nucleares microencapsulados TRISO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E., E-mail: Felix.cancino@cinvestav.edu.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalurgica No. 1062, Col. Ramos Arizpe, 25900 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  15. The importance of coating standardization in gastro-resistant capsules produced in magistral pharmacy - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v35i2.14581

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen Cristina Franco

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastro-resistant capsules are often used for several purposes, such as protection of unstable drugs in acid medium to the action of gastric fluids or protection of the gastric mucosa to irritants drugs. The aim of this study was to verify the variation of preparations of capsules coating with cellulose acetate phthalate and methacrylic acid copolymer, without drug addition, in 7-10% coating concentrations, prepared manually with four or five immersions in tested coating solution. Results were analyzed considering the formulation’s disintegration test. Within the context of formulations under analysis, it was observed that the capsules coated with cellulose acetate phthalate 10% complied with the pharmacopeia’s disintegration specifications. However, capsules coated with methacrylic acid copolymer did not show accordance with the pharmacopeia’s specifications. The results emphasize the need for the standardization of coating methodology.

  16. Frictional Performance Assessment of Cemented Carbide Surfaces Textured by Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, S.; Llanes, L.; Klein, S.; Gachot, C.; Rosenkranz, A.; Bähre, D.; Mücklich, F.

    2017-10-01

    Cemented carbides are advanced engineering materials often used in industry for manufacturing cutting tools or supporting parts in tribological system. In order to improve service life, special attention has been paid to change surface conditions by means of different methods, since surface modification can be beneficial to reduce the friction between the contact surfaces as well as to avoid unintended damage. Laser surface texturing is one of the newly developed surface modification methods. It has been successfully introduced to fabricate some basic patterns on cemented carbide surfaces. In this work, Direct Laser Interference Patterning Technique (DLIP) is implemented to produce special line-like patterns on a cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) based cemented tungsten carbide grade. It is proven that the laser-produced patterns have high geometrical precision and quality stability. Furthermore, tribology testing using a nano-tribometer unit shows that friction is reduced by the line-like patterns, as compared to the polished one, under both lubricated and dry testing regimes, and the reduction is more pronounced in the latter case.

  17. Femtosecond laser induced breakdown spectroscopy of silver within surrogate high temperature gas reactor fuel coated particles

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, DE

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The detection of metallic silver on Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) grown silicon carbide and in Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) supplied tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) coated particles (with 500 µm diameter zirconium oxide surrogate kernel) has...

  18. Improving tribological properties of (Zn–Ni)/nano Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite coatings produced by ultrasonic assisted pulse plating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ataie, Sayed Alireza, E-mail: ataie_s_alireza@metaleng.iust.ac.ir; Zakeri, Alireza

    2016-07-25

    In this study pulse electroplating was used to deposit the composite coating of (Zn–Ni) strengthened by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles on mild steel plate. The effect of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fraction and ultrasonic irradiation on the properties of the composite coating was also investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques were employed to characterize the morphology and composition of the coating. Topography and surface roughness were investigated by atomic force microscopy. Also in order to evaluate the mechanical properties of the coating micro hardness and wear tests were conducted. It was found that coating hardness was increased from 538 HV to 750 HV and friction coefficient was decreased from 0.588 to 0.392. Results revealed that tribological properties of coating could be improved significantly by using suitable ultrasonic intensity simultaneously with pulse plating. - Highlights: • SEM indicated on the elimination of cracks and pores when ultrasounds were used. • XRD result showed nano sized grains of Zn–Ni matrix was developed in this research. • Simultaneous pulse plating and ultrasonic conditions improved the properties of the coating. • A (Zn–Ni)/nano alumina uniform composite coating for especial applications was developed. • Micro hardness and wear behavior of the coating was modified by intensifying the ultrasound.

  19. The effect of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behaviour of industrially produced hot-dip galvanized coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bakhtiari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to identify the influence of zinc bath temperature on the morphology, texture and corrosion behavior of hot-dip galvanized coatings. Hot-dip galvanized samples were prepared at temperature in the range of 450-480 °C in steps of 10 °C, which is the conventional galvanizing temperature range in the galvanizing industries. The morphology of coatings was examined with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The composition of the coating layers was determined using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS analysis. The texture of the coatings was evaluated using X-ray diffraction. Corrosion behavior was performed using salt spray cabinet test and Tafel extrapolation test. From the experimental results, it was found that increasing the zinc bath temperature affects the morphology of the galvanized coatings provoking the appearance of cracks in the coating structure. These cracks prevent formation of a compact structure. In addition, it was concluded that (00.2 basal plane texture component was weakened by increasing the zinc bath temperature and, conversely, appearance of (10.1 prism component, (20.1 high angle pyramidal component and low angle component prevailed. Besides, coatings with strong (00.2 texture component and weaker (20.1 components have better corrosion resistance than the coatings with weak (00.2 and strong (20.1 texture components. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of the galvanized coatings was decreased by increasing the zinc bath temperature.

  20. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  1. Influence of melt treatments and polished CVD diamond coated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    At present, the cemented carbide inserts alone or with. TiN, TiC or TiN + .... Carbide grade. Uncoated insert-K-10: 94%WC + 6%CO. Polished CVD diamond coated, Ra, 0⋅14–0⋅16 μm the present work and geometry of the inserts are given in table 3. .... duces a chip and plastic deformation of the chip and the workpiece ...

  2. Neutron-Absorbing Coatings for Safe Storage of Fissile Materials with Enhanced Shielding & Criticality Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J; Farmer, J; Lee, C; Fischer, L; Boussoufi, M; Liu, B; Egbert, H

    2007-07-03

    Neutron-absorbing Fe-based amorphous-metal coatings have been developed that are more corrosion resistant than other criticality-control materials, including Al-B{sub 4}C composites, borated stainless steels, and Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloys. The presence of relatively high concentration of boron in these coatings not only enhances its neutron-absorption capability, but also enables these coatings to exist in the amorphous state. Exceptional corrosion resistance has been achieved with these Fe-based amorphous-metal alloys through additions of chromium, molybdenum, and tungsten. The addition of rare earth elements such as yttrium has lowered the critical cooling rate of these materials, thereby rendering them more easily processed. Containers used for the storage of nuclear materials, and protected from corrosion through the application of amorphous metal coatings, would have greatly enhanced service lives, and would therefore provide greater long-term safety. Amorphous alloy powders have been successfully produced in multi-ton quantities with gas atomization, and applied to several half-scale spent fuel storage containers and criticality control structures with the high-velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray process. Salt fog testing and neutron radiography of these prototypes indicates that such an approach is viable for the production of large-scale industrial-scale facilities and containers. The use of these durable neutron-absorbing materials to coat stainless steel containers and storage racks, as well as vaults, hot-cell facilities and glove boxes could substantially reduce the risk of criticality in the event of an accident. These materials are particularly attractive for shielding applications since they are fire proof. Additionally, layers of other cold and thermal sprayed materials that include carbon and/or carbides can be used in conjunction with the high-boron amorphous metal coatings for the purpose of moderation. For example, various carbides, including boron

  3. In Vivo Assessment of Bone Ingrowth Potential of Three-Dimensional E-Beam Produced Implant Surfaces and the Effect of Additional Treatment by Acid Etching and Hydroxyapatite Coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biemond, J.E.; Hannink, G.; Jurrius, A.M.G.; Verdonschot, Nicolaas Jacobus Joseph; Buma, P.

    2012-01-01

    The bone ingrowth potential of three-dimensional E-beam-produced implant surfaces was examined by histology and compared to a porous plasma-sprayed control. The effects of acid etching and a hydroxyapatite (HA) coating were also evaluated by histology. Specimens were implanted in the distal femur of

  4. Rapid Fabrication of Carbide Matrix/Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brian E.; Bernander, Robert E.

    2007-01-01

    Composites of zirconium carbide matrix material reinforced with carbon fibers can be fabricated relatively rapidly in a process that includes a melt infiltration step. Heretofore, these and other ceramic matrix composites have been made in a chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process that takes months. The finished products of the CVI process are highly porous and cannot withstand temperatures above 3,000 F (approx.1,600 C). In contrast, the melt-infiltration-based process takes only a few days, and the composite products are more nearly fully dense and have withstood temperatures as high as 4,350 F (approx.2,400 C) in a highly oxidizing thrust chamber environment. Moreover, because the melt- infiltration-based process takes much less time, the finished products are expected to cost much less. Fabrication begins with the preparation of a carbon fiber preform that, typically, is of the size and shape of a part to be fabricated. By use of low-temperature ultraviolet-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, the carbon fibers in the preform are coated with one or more interfacial material(s), which could include oxides. The interfacial material helps to protect the fibers against chemical attack during the remainder of the fabrication process and against oxidation during subsequent use; it also enables slippage between the fibers and the matrix material, thereby helping to deflect cracks and distribute loads. Once the fibers have been coated with the interfacial material, the fiber preform is further infiltrated with a controlled amount of additional carbon, which serves as a reactant for the formation of the carbide matrix material. The next step is melt infiltration. The preform is exposed to molten zirconium, which wicks into the preform, drawn by capillary action. The molten metal fills most of the interstices of the preform and reacts with the added carbon to form the zirconium carbide matrix material. The zirconium does not react with the underlying fibers because they

  5. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. radulescu

    2001-09-28

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report.

  6. Uranium Carbide Powder Ignition Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthinier, C.; Coullomb, S.; Rado, C.; Le Guyadec, F. [CEA, DEN, DTEC, SDTC, LEME, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France); Chatillon, C.; Blanquet, E.; Boichot, R. [SIMAP, Sciences et Ingenierie des Materiaux et Procedes, INPG-CNRS-UJF ENSEEG, BP 75, 38402 St Martin-d' Heres (France)

    2009-06-15

    Mixed (U, Pu) carbide, constituted by means of 80% of uranium monocarbide (UC), is considered as a possible fuel material for future gas fast reactors or sodium fast reactor. However, UC undergoes a strong exothermic reaction with air and fine powders of UC are pyrophoric. Thus, it is necessary to understand this high reactivity in order to determine safe handling conditions for the production and reprocessing of carbide fuels. UC powder was obtained by arc melting and milling. The reactivity of uranium carbide was studied in oxidizing atmosphere and different experimental devices were used to determine ignition temperatures. The phases formed at the various observed stages of the oxidation process were determined by post-mortem X ray diffraction analysis. Studies were first performed using small quantities of UC powder (around 50 mg) in Differential Thermal Analysis / Thermogravimetric Analysis (DTA/TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). Experiments were realized using different parameters, such as heating rate and gas flow rate and composition, to determine their influence on pyro-phoricity. Results obtained with small quantities (tens of milligrams) revealed that UC powder is highly reactive in air in the range 200- 250 deg. C. Studies were also performed in the 'Pyro' test facility multi-function furnace allowing CCD camera recording, during heating and ignition, through view-ports. Lower ignition temperatures, around 100 deg. C, were obtained using around 1 g UC powder samples. Results are discussed and analysed with theory of burning curve ignition and numerical simulations. Simulations aim to understand the influence of the different parameters on pyro-phoricity. Small scale simulations (on a spherical grain) confirm the influence of UC grains size, heat rate and gas composition on powder ignition temperature with small quantities. The issue is now to understand the influence of grain pile form factor and volume on the pyro-phoricity of

  7. Microstructure and mechanical properties of proton irradiated zirconium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Yong [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: yyang@cae.wisc.edu; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Swoboda, Hannah [Material Science Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Miller, Brandon; Allen, Todd R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Zirconium carbide is a candidate ceramic being considered for metal-carbide-base composite-type fuels, as well as for an alternative coating material for TRISO particle fuels. Ensuring adequate mechanical properties and dimensional stability in response to radiation is a key part in developing a practical ZrC-base fuel. The existing available radiation response data for ZrC is limited and insufficient. In the present study, ZrC was irradiated with a 2.6 MeV proton beam at 800 deg. C to doses of 0.7 and 1.5 dpa. Following radiation, the radiation induced damage microstructure is comprised of a high density of nanometer-sized Frank loops, but no irradiation induced amorphization, voids, or precipitates were observed. A slight lattice expansion was found in the irradiated ZrC, in good agreement with the reported results from neutron irradiation. The changes in microhardness and fracture toughness properties induced in the irradiated samples were measured using indentation techniques. The hardness and the fracture toughness both increase with increasing radiation dose.

  8. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Fleury Frenette, K.; Jamar, C.

    2017-11-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms . Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC . Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 ≠m was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  9. Monitoring the thin film formation during sputter deposition of vanadium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufholz, Marthe, E-mail: marthe.kaufholz@kit.edu; Krause, Bärbel; Kotapati, Sunil; Köhl, Martin [ANKA/Institut für Photonenforschung und Synchrotronstrahlung, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Mantilla, Miguel F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Stuttgart (Germany); Stüber, Michael; Ulrich, Sven [Institut für Angewandte Materialien - Angewandte Werkstoffphysik, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Schneider, Reinhard; Gerthsen, Dagmar [Laboratorium für Elektronenmikroskopie, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany); Baumbach, Tilo [ANKA/Institut für Photonenforschung und Synchrotronstrahlung, Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The theoretical description and the experimental realisation of in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements during thin film deposition of polycrystalline vanadium carbide coatings are presented. The thin film formation of magnetron sputtered polycrystalline coatings was monitored by in situ X-ray reflectivity measurements. The measured intensity was analyzed using the Parratt algorithm for time-dependent thin film systems. Guidelines for the on-line interpretation of the data were developed. For thick coatings, the experimental resolution needs to be included in the data evaluation in order to avoid misinterpretations. Based on a simple layer model, the time-dependent mean electron density, roughness and growth velocity were extracted from the data. As an example, the method was applied to the hard coating material vanadium carbide. Both instantaneous and slowly varying changes of the coating could be detected. It was shown that the growth velocity is proportional to the DC power. Significant changes of the microstructure induced by the working gas pressure are mainly driven by the chemical composition.

  10. Chitosan: a green carbon source for the synthesis of graphitic nanocarbon, tungsten carbide and graphitic nanocarbon/tungsten carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Baoli; Tian Chuigui; Wang Lei; Wang Ruihong; Fu Honggang, E-mail: fuhg@vip.sina.com [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2010-01-15

    In this paper, a simple approach was proposed to fabricate graphitic carbon nanocapsules, tungsten carbide and tungsten carbides/graphitic carbon composites by using chitosan, a green and renewable biopolymer, as a carbon source. The route includes, first, fabrication of the precursors that consist of chitosan coordinated with a certain metal ion (or metal complex anion) followed by carbonizing the precursors under N{sub 2} atmosphere. The composition of the final products could be regulated by changing the type and ratio of the metal source (cations or complex anions) combined with the chitosan in the precursors. The experimental results showed that uniform carbon nanocapsules could be obtained when Ni{sup 2+} was introducing in the precursors, while incorporating [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-} (PW{sub 12}) with chitosan led to the formation of WC nanoparticles. As the Ni{sup 2+} and PW{sub 12} are simultaneously coordinated with chitosan, the composites of tungsten carbide/graphitic carbon were successfully produced. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that the graphitic carbon nanocapsules are about 45 nm in diameter; uniform WC nanoparticles with a average size of 40 nm are observed. Moreover, the particle size of WC in the tungsten carbide/graphitic carbon composite is about 10 nm, which is smaller than that of the pure WC particles. Furthermore, the performance of the sample-loaded Pt nanoparticles for methanol electro-oxidation was studied in detail. The results indicated that the samples could act as good carriers for Pt in the methanol electro-oxidation reaction with high effectivity and improved stability.

  11. Effects of silicon carbide on the phase developments in mullite-carbon ceramic composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the addition of silicon carbide and sintering temperatures on the phases developed, in sintered ceramic composite produced from kaolin and graphite was investigated. The kaolin and graphite of known mineralogical composition were thoroughly blended with 4 and 8 vol % silicon carbide. From the homogeneous mixture of kaolin, graphite and silicon carbide, standard samples were prepared via uniaxial compaction. The test samples produced were subjected to firing (sintering at 1300°C, 1400°C and 1500°C. The sintered samples were characterized for the developed phases using x‐ray diffractometry analysis, microstructural morphology using ultra‐high resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (UHRFEGSEM. It was observed that microstructural morphology of the samples revealed the evolution of mullite, cristobalite and microcline. The kaolinite content of the raw kaolin undergoes transformation into mullite and excess silica, the mullite and the silica phases contents increased with increased sintering temperature. It is also generally observed that the graphite content progressively reduced linearly with increased sintering temperature. It is concluded that silicon carbide acts as anti-oxidant for the graphite, this anti-oxidant effect was more effective at 4 vol % silicon carbide.

  12. ALD Produced B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} Coatings on Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} Burnable Poison Nanoparticles and Carbonaceous TRISO Coating Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weimer, Alan

    2012-11-26

    This project will demonstrate the feasibility of using atomic layer deposition (ALD) to apply ultrathin neutron-absorbing, corrosion-resistant layers consisting of ceramics, metals, or combinations thereof, on particles for enhanced nuclear fuel pellets. Current pellet coating technology utilizes chemical vapor deposition (CVD) in a fluidized bed reactor to deposit thick, porous layers of C (or PyC) and SiC. These graphitic/carbide materials degrade over time owing to fission product bombardment, active oxidation, thermal management issues, and long-term irradiation effects. ALD can be used to deposit potential ceramic barrier materials of interest, including ZrO{sub 2}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and TiO{sub 2}, or neutron-absorbing materials, namely B (in BN or B{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Gd (in Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}). This project consists of a two-pronged approach to integrate ALD into the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) fuel pellet manufacturing process:

  13. Nanostructured thin film coatings with different strengthening effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilov Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of articles on strengthening thin film coatings were analyzed and a lot of unusual strengthening effects, such as super high hardness and plasticity simultaneously, ultra low friction coefficient, high wear-resistance, curve rigidity increasing of drills with small diameter, associated with process formation of nanostructured coatings by the different thin film deposition methods were detected. Vacuum coater with RF magnetron sputtering system and ion-beam source and arc evaporator for nanostructured thin film coating manufacture are represented. Diamond Like Carbon and MoS2 thin film coatings, Ti, Al, Nb, Cr, nitride, carbide, and carbo-nitride thin film materials are described as strengthening coatings.

  14. Research on SiC-coatings for graphitic surfaces in HTRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, B. [Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Alkan, Z. [Institute of Reactor Safety and Technology, RWTH Aachen, Aachen (Germany); Pott, G. [Hot Cells, Research Centre Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    1998-09-01

    In HTR-plants graphite materials are used for fuel elements and reflector structures. During the operation of HTR-plants (AVR,THTR) these graphitic components were extensively tested. Although the operation experiences of these graphitic components were very well, the research for improvement should continue. In certain cases of hypothetical accidents, e.g. massive air ingress it is possible that the graphite of the fuel elements will be corroded in such a manner that eventually a release of fission products is possible. Therefore it is suggested for future nuclear plants to protect the outer surface of the graphite fuel-elements by SiC-coating The main intention of SiC-coatings is to realize a corrosion resistance for graphitic structures, especially for graphitic fuel-elements (spheres), in the range of operating-and accident-temperatures. Different graphite qualities, e.g. A3-3, IG-110 and others have been used for the coating with silicon carbide. The coatings were produced by chemical vapour deposition or paste silicon methods. Several tests were carried out to test corrosion, mechanical and irradiation properties.The results show that SiC-coatings on certain graphites are corrosion-resistant and mechanically safe. The irradiation experiments have been performed, but the post-irradiation tests are not yet finished. 10 refs.

  15. Scatter in Carbon/Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Composites Quantified

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC) composites processed by chemical vapor infiltration are candidate materials for aerospace thermal structures. Carbon fibers can retain properties at very high temperatures, but they are known to have poor oxidation resistance in adverse, high-temperature environments. Nevertheless, the combination of CVI-SiC matrix with higher stiffness and oxidation resistance, the interfacial coating, and additional surface-seal coating provides the necessary protection to the carbon fibers, and makes the material viable for high-temperature space applications operating under harsh environments. Furthermore, C/SiC composites, like other ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), exhibit graceful non-catastrophic failure because of various inherent energy dissipating mechanisms. The material exhibits nonlinearity in deformation even at very low stress levels. This is the result of the severe matrix microcracking present in the as processed composite because of large differences between the coefficients of thermal expansion of the fiber and the matrix. Utilization of these advanced composites in next generation space vehicles will require innovative structural configurations, updated materials, and refined analyses. Structural safety issues for these vehicles are in direct competition with performance and cost. One would have to quantify the uncertainties associated with the design using formal probabilistic methods. Specifically four fundamental aspects on which analyses are based-- (1) loading conditions, (2) material behavior, (3) geometrical configurations, and (4) structural connections between the composite components and baseline structure--are stochastic in nature. A direct way to formally account for uncertainties is to develop probabilistic structural analysis methods where all participating variables are described by appropriate probability density functions. The present work, however, focuses on analyzing the stochastic

  16. Synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from calcium carbide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhewang; Yu, Dingyi; Sum, Yin Ngai; Zhang, Yugen

    2012-04-01

    AHA Erlebnis: CaC(2), used to produce acetylene until several decades ago, is re-emerging as a cheap, sustainable resource synthesized from coal and lignocellulosic biomass. We report efficient catalytic protocols for the synthesis of functional acetylene derivatives from CaC(2) through aldehyde, alkyne, and amine (AAA) as well as alkyne, haloalkane, and amine (AHA) couplings, and in addition demonstrate its use in click and Sonogashira chemistry, showing that calcium carbide is a sustainable and cost-efficient carbon source. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Growth of Vanadium Carbide by Halide-Activated Pack Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter

    The present work investigates growth of vanadium carbide (VC) layers by the pack diffusion method on a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The VC layers were produced by pack diffusion at 1000°C for 1, 4 and 16 hours. The VC layers were characterized with optical and electron microscopy, Vickers hardness tests...... and X-ray diffraction. Homogeneous VC mono-phase layers with Vickers hardness of more than 2400 HV were obtained. Hardening and tempering of the vanadized Vanadis 6 steel did not affect the VC layers....

  18. A comparative study of thin coatings of Au/Pd, Pt and Cr produced by magnetron sputtering for FE-SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokroos, I; Kalicharan, D; Van Der Want, J J; Jongebloed, W L

    1998-01-01

    Visualization of structural details of specimens in field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) requires optimal conductivity. This paper reports on the differences in conductive layers of Au/Pd, Pt and Cr, with a thickness of 1.5–3.0 nm, deposited by planar magnetron sputtering devices. The coating units were used under standard conditions for source–substrate distance, current, HT and argon pressure. Carbon films, deposited by high-vacuum evaporation on small, freshly cleaved pieces of mica, were used as substrate and mounted on copper grids for TEM and SEM inspection. Au/Pd, Pt and, to a lesser extent, Cr coatings varied in particle density, size and shape. Au/Pd coatings have a slightly more granular appearance than Cr and Pt coatings, but this is strongly dependent on the type of sputtering device employed. In FE-SEM images there is almost no difference in contrast and particle size between the Au/Pd layer and the Pt layers of a similar thickness. The nuclei of Au/Pd are rather small with almost no growth to the sides or in height, making Au/Pd coatings a good alternative to chromium and platinum for FE-SEM of biological tissues because of its higher yield of secondary electrons.

  19. Tribological properties of B{sub 4}C-TiB{sub 2}-TiC-Ni cermet coating produced by HVOF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiei, Mahdi [Islamic Azad Univ., Najafabad (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Depr. of Materials Engineering; Shamanian, Morteza; Salehi, Mehdi [Isfahan Univ. of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Depr. of Materials Engineering; Mostaan, Hossein [Arak Univ., Arak (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

    2017-08-15

    In this study, B{sub 4}C-TiB{sub 2}-TiC-Ni coating was sprayed on the surface of 4130 steel by high velocity oxy-fuel torch. The tribological behavior of samples was studied by ball on disk wear testing. Structural evolution of the coating was analyzed by X-ray diffractometry. The microstructure of the coating, wear track and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ball was investigated by scanning electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy. Elemental analysis of the wear track was done by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. It was found that a cermet coating containing B{sub 4}C, TiB{sub 2}, TiC and Ni phases with good bonding to the 4130 steel substrate with no sign of any cracking or pores was formed. The wear mechanism of the composite coating was delamination. The friction coefficient of samples was decreased with increasing load because of higher frictional heat and creation of more oxide islands.

  20. Properties of amorphous SiC coatings deposited on WC-Co substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costa A.K.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, silicon carbide films were deposited onto tungsten carbide from a sintered SiC target on a r.f. magnetron sputtering system. Based on previous results about the influence of r.f. power and argon pressure upon the properties of films deposited on silicon substrates, suitable conditions were chosen to produce high quality films on WC-Co pieces. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to obtain high deposition rates (about 30 nm/min at 400 W rf power and acceptable residual stresses (1.5 GPa. Argon pressure affects the energy of particles so that films with higher hardness (30 GPa were obtained at low pressures (0.05 Pa. Wear rates of the coated pieces against a chromium steel ball in a diamond suspension medium were found to be about half of the uncoated ones. Hardness and wear resistance measurements were done also in thermally annealed (200-800 °C samples revealing the effectiveness of SiC coatings to protect tool material against severe mechanical degradation resulting of high temperature (above 500 °C oxidation.

  1. Dynamics of carbide formation in iron-supported catalysts of the Fischer-Tropsch process promoted by copper and potassium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazak, V. O.; Pankina, G. V.; Chernavskii, P. A.; Lunin, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    The kinetics of the formation of iron carbides during the activation of iron-coated catalyst for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis promoted by copper and potassium, and by carbon monoxide and syngas, is studied. It is established that the presence of copper lowers the initial temperature of hematite reduction to magnetite and leads to the formation of carbide in both CO and CO/H2. Potassium slows the rate of magnetite formation, but it accelerates the formation of iron oxide. It is shown that the rate of carbide formation during magnetite reduction for catalysts is half that in the reaction of hematite reduction to magnetite in both CO and CO/H2.

  2. Corrosion protection of SiC-based ceramics with CVDMullite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarin, V.; Auger, M. [Boston Univ., MA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Silicon carbide ceramics are the leading candidate materials for use as heat exchangers in advanced combined cycle power plants because of their unique combination of high temperature strength, high thermal conductivity, excellent thermal shock resistance, and good high temperature stability and oxidation resistance. Ceramic coatings are being considered for diesel engine cylinder liners, piston caps, valve faces and seats, piston rings, and for turbine components such as combustors, blades, stators, seals, and bearings. Under such conditions ceramics are better suited to high temperature environments than metals. For the first time, adherent crystalline mullite coatings have been chemically vapor deposited onto SiC substrates to enhance its corrosion/oxidation resistance. Thermodynamic and kinetic considerations have been utilized to produce mullite coatings with a variety of growth rates, compositions, and morphologies. The flexibility of processing can be exploited to produce coated ceramics with properties tailored to specific applications and varied corrosive environments. These corrosive environments include thermal, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, O{sub 2} and coal slag.

  3. Flexible Antibacterial Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musil, Jindřich

    2017-05-16

    This article reviews the present state of the art in the field of flexible antibacterial coatings which efficiently kill bacteria on their surfaces. Coatings are formed using a reactive magnetron sputtering. The effect of the elemental composition and structure of the coating on its antibacterial and mechanical properties is explained. The properties of Cr-Cu-O, Al-Cu-N, and Zr-Cu-N antibacterial coatings are used as examples and described in detail. The efficiency of killing of bacteria was tested for the Escherichia coli bacterium. The principle of the formation of thick, flexible antibacterial coatings which are resistant to cracking under bending is explained. It is shown that magnetron sputtering enables production of robust, several-micrometer thick, flexible antibacterial coatings for long-term use. The antibacterial coatings produced by magnetron sputtering present huge potential for many applications.

  4. Coated Aerogel Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  5. Nanostructures obtained from a mechanically alloyed and heat treated molybdenum carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz Barriga Arceo, L. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico) and ESIQIE-UPALM, IPN Apdo Postal 118-395, C.P. 07051 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: luchell@yahoo.com; Orozco, E. [Instituto de Fisica UNAM, Apdo Postal 20-364, C.P. 01000 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: eorozco@fisica.unam.mx; Mendoza-Leon, H. [ESIQIE-UPALM, IPN Apdo Postal 118-395, C.P. 07051 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: luchell@yahoo.com; Palacios Gonzalez, E. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: epalacio@imp.mx; Leyte Guerrero, F. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fleyte@imp.mx; Garibay Febles, V. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, I.M.P. Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730 D.F. Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: vgaribay@imp.mx

    2007-05-31

    Mechanical alloying was used to prepare molybdenum carbide. Microstructural characterization of samples was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. Molybdenum carbide was heated at 800 {sup o}C for 15 min in order to produce carbon nanotubes. Nanoparticles of about 50-140 nm in diameter and nanotubes with diameters of about 70-260 nm and 0.18-0.3 {mu}m in length were obtained after heating at 800 {sup o}C, by means of this process.

  6. Tool life of the edges coated with the c-BN+h-BN coatings with different structures during hard machinable steel machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kupczyk, M.

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available In the presented paper the experimental results concerning the functional quality (durability during steel machining of thin, superhard coatings produced on the cutting edges are described. Differences among mentioned properties of coatings mainly result from a coating structure. But the structure of coatings results from deposition parameters Superhard boron nitride coatings were deposited on insert cutting edges made of cemented carbides by the pulse-plasma method applying different values of the discharge voltage. The comparative investigations of mentioned coatings have been concerned of tool life of edges during hard machinable material machining (nitriding steel hardened in oil. In these investigations for the purpose of additional increase of coatings adhesion to substrates an interfacial layers were applied.

    En este trabajo se describen los resultados experimentales referentes a la calidad funcional (durabilidad durante el mecanizado del acero de recubrimientos delgados, de elevada dureza del filo de corte. Las diferencias en las propiedades de los recubrimientos se deben, principalmente, a la estructura del recubrimiento. No obstante, la estructura del recubrimiento está relacionada con los parámetros de la deposición. Recubrimientos de nitruro de boro de elevada dureza se depositaron sobre filos de corte insertados, fabricados con carburos cementados mediante el método de pulsos de plasma aplicando diferentes valores de voltaje de descarga. Las investigaciones comparativas de los mencionados recubrimientos han relacionado la vida del filo de la herramienta durante el mecanizado del material (acero nitrurado endurecido en aceite. En estas investigaciones se aplicaron capas interfaciales para aumentar la adherencia del recubrimiento.

  7. Influence of powder particle injection velocity on the microstructure of Al-12Si/SiCp coatings produced by laser cladding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anandkumar, R.; Almeida, A.; Vilar, R.; Ocelik, V.; De Hosson, J. Th M.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of powder particle injection velocity on the microstructure of coatings consisting of an Al-Si matrix reinforced with SiC particles prepared by laser cladding from mixtures of powders of Al-12 wt.% Si alloy and SiC was investigated both experimentally and by modeling. At low injection

  8. Method for producing evaporation inhibiting coating for protection of silicon--germanium and silicon--molybdenum alloys at high temperatures in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, P.J.

    1974-01-01

    A method is given for protecting Si--Ge and Si-- Mo alloys for use in thermocouples. The alloys are coated with silicon to inhibit the evaporation of the alloys at high tempenatures in a vacuum. Specific means and methods are provided. (5 fig) (Official Gazette)

  9. Boron Carbide: Stabilization of Highly-Loaded Aqueous Suspensions, Pressureless Sintering, and Room Temperature Injection Molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Cano, Andres

    Boron carbide (B4C) is the third hardest material after diamond and cubic boron nitride. It's unique combination of properties makes B4C a highly valuable material. With hardness values around 35 MPa, a high melting point, 2450°C, density of 2.52 g/cm3, and high chemical inertness, boron carbide is used in severe wear components, like cutting tools and sandblasting nozzles, nuclear reactors' control rots, and finally and most common application, armor. Production of complex-shaped ceramic component is complex and represents many challenges. Present research presents a new and novel approach to produce complex-shaped B4C components. Proposed approach allows forming to be done at room temperatures and under very low forming pressures. Additives and binder concentrations are kept as low as possible, around 5Vol%, while ceramics loadings are maximized above 50Vol%. Given that proposed approach uses water as the main solvent, pieces drying is simple and environmentally safe. Optimized formulation allows rheological properties to be tailored and adjust to multiple processing approaches, including, injection molding, casting, and additive manufacturing. Boron carbide samples then were pressureless sintered. Due to the high covalent character of boron carbide, multiples sintering aids and techniques have been proposed in order to achieve high levels of densification. However, is not possible to define a clear sintering methodology based on literature. Thus, present research developed a comprehensive study on the effect of multiple sintering aids on the densification of boron carbide when pressureless sintered. Relative densities above 90% were achieved with values above 30MPa in hardness. Current research allows extending the uses and application of boron carbide, and other ceramic systems, by providing a new approach to produce complex-shaped components with competitive properties.

  10. Nanoporous, Metal Carbide, Surface Diffusion Membranes for High Temperature Hydrogen Separations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Way, J. Douglas [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering; Wolden, Colin A. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Colorado School of Mines (CSM) developed high temperature, hydrogen permeable membranes that contain no platinum group metals with the goal of separating hydrogen from gas mixtures representative of gasification of carbon feedstocks such as coal or biomass in order to meet DOE NETL 2015 hydrogen membrane performance targets. We employed a dual synthesis strategy centered on transition metal carbides. In the first approach, novel, high temperature, surface diffusion membranes based on nanoporous Mo2C were fabricated on ceramic supports. These were produced in a two step process that consisted of molybdenum oxide deposition followed by thermal carburization. Our best Mo2C surface diffusion membrane achieved a pure hydrogen flux of 367 SCFH/ft2 at a feed pressure of only 20 psig. The highest H2/N2 selectivity obtained with this approach was 4.9. A transport model using “dusty gas” theory was derived to describe the hydrogen transport in the Mo2C coated, surface diffusion membranes. The second class of membranes developed were dense metal foils of BCC metals such as vanadium coated with thin (< 60 nm) Mo2C catalyst layers. We have fabricated a Mo2C/V composite membrane that in pure gas testing delivered a H2 flux of 238 SCFH/ft2 at 600 °C and 100 psig, with no detectable He permeance. This exceeds the 2010 DOE Target flux. This flux is 2.8 times that of pure Pd at the same membrane thickness and test conditions and over 79% of the 2015 flux target. In mixed gas testing we achieved a permeate purity of ≥99.99%, satisfying the permeate purity milestone, but the hydrogen permeance was low, ~0.2 SCFH/ft2.psi. However, during testing of a Mo2C coated Pd alloy membrane with DOE 1 feed gas mixture a hydrogen permeance of >2 SCFH/ft2.psi was obtained which was stable during the entire test, meeting the permeance associated with

  11. Silicon Carbide Etching Using Chlorine Trifluoride Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habuka, Hitoshi; Oda, Satoko; Fukai, Yasushi; Fukae, Katsuya; Takeuchi, Takashi; Aihara, Masahiko

    2005-03-01

    The etch rate, chemical reactions and etched surface of β-silicon carbide are studied in detail using chlorine trifluoride gas. The etch rate is greater than 10 μm min-1 at 723 K with a flow rate of 0.1 \\ell min-1 at atmospheric pressure in a horizontal reactor. The maximum etch rate at a substrate temperature of 773 K is 40 μm min-1 with a flow rate of 0.25 \\ell min-1. The step-like pattern that initially exists on the β-silicon carbide surface tends to be smoothed; the root-mean-square surface roughness decreases from its initial value of 5 μm to 1 μm within 15 min; this minimum value is maintained for more than 15 min. Therefore, chlorine trifluoride gas is considered to have a large etch rate for β-silicon carbide associated with making a rough surface smooth.

  12. 1976 scientific progress report. [Fuel and coating materials for HTGR]; Wissenschaftlicher Ergebnisberict 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, H.

    1976-07-01

    Activities at the Institute for Reactor Materials in the production and properties of high temperature gas cooled reactor fuel and coating materials are summarized. Major emphasis was placed on investigations of pyrocarbon, BISO and TRISO coatings, uranium and thorium oxides and carbides, and graphite and matrix materials. A list of publications is included. (HDR)

  13. Novel Base Metal-Palladium Catalytic Diesel Filter Coating with NO2 Reducing Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, K.; Dahl, S.; Mogensen, G.

    2007-01-01

    price structure. The novel base metal/palladium catalytic coat has been applied on commercial silicon carbide wall flow diesel filters and tested in an engine test bench. Results from engine bench tests concerning soot combustion, HC-, CO-, NO2- removal with the novel coat will are compared to present...

  14. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  15. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  16. Silicon carbide microsystems for harsh environments

    CERN Document Server

    Wijesundara, Muthu B J

    2011-01-01

    Silicon Carbide Microsystems for Harsh Environments reviews state-of-the-art Silicon Carbide (SiC) technologies that, when combined, create microsystems capable of surviving in harsh environments, technological readiness of the system components, key issues when integrating these components into systems, and other hurdles in harsh environment operation. The authors use the SiC technology platform suite the model platform for developing harsh environment microsystems and then detail the current status of the specific individual technologies (electronics, MEMS, packaging). Additionally, methods

  17. Lead-Free Sn-Ce-O Composite Coating on Cu Produced by Pulse Electrodeposition from an Aqueous Acidic Sulfate Electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashutosh; Das, Karabi; Das, Siddhartha

    2017-10-01

    Pulse-electrodeposited Sn-Ce-O composite solder coatings were synthesized on a Cu substrate from an aqueous acidic solution containing stannous sulfate (SnSO4·3H2O), sulfuric acid (H2SO4), and Triton X-100 as an additive. The codeposition was achieved by adding nano-cerium oxide powder in varying concentrations from 5 g/L to 20 g/L into the electrolytic bath. Microstructural characterization was carried out using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The XRD analysis showed that the deposits consist mainly of tetragonal β (Sn) with reduced cerium oxide species. The composite coatings thus obtained exhibit a smaller grain size, possess higher microhardness, and a lower melting point than the monolithic Sn coating. The electrical resistivity of the developed composites increases, however, but lies within the permissible limits for current lead-free solder applications. Also, an optimum balance of properties in terms of microhardness, adhesion, melting point and resistivity can be obtained with 0.9 wt.% cerium oxide in the Sn matrix, which enables potential applications in solder joints and packaging.

  18. Generation and Characteristics of IV-VI transition Metal Nitride and Carbide Nanoparticles using a Reactive Mesoporous Carbon Nitride

    KAUST Repository

    Alhajri, Nawal Saad

    2016-02-22

    Interstitial nitrides and carbides of early transition metals in groups IV–VI exhibit platinum-like electronic structures, which make them promising candidates to replace noble metals in various catalytic reactions. Herein, we present the preparation and characterization of nano-sized transition metal nitries and carbides of groups IV–VI (Ti, V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, and W) using mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-C3N4), which not only provides confined spaces for restricting primary particle size but also acts as a chemical source of nitrogen and carbon. We studied the reactivity of the metals with the template under N2 flow at 1023 K while keeping the weight ratio of metal to template constant at unity. The produced nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, CHN elemental analysis, nitrogen sorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that Ti, V, Nb, Ta, and Cr form nitride phases with face centered cubic structure, whereas Mo and W forme carbides with hexagonal structures. The tendency to form nitride or carbide obeys the free formation energy of the transition metal nitrides and carbides. This method offers the potential to prepare the desired size, shape and phase of transition metal nitrides and carbides that are suitable for a specific reaction, which is the chief objective of materials chemistry.

  19. Structure and Abrasive Wear of Composite HSS M2/WC Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Gnyusov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Features of phase-structure formation and abrasive wear resistance of composite coatings “WC-M2 steel” worn against tungsten monocarbide have been investigated. It was established that adding 20 wt.% WC to the deposited powder mixture leads to the increase in M6C carbide content. These carbides show a multimodal size distribution consisting of ~5.9 μm eutectic carbides along the grain boundaries, ~0.25 μm carbides dispersed inside the grains. Also a greater amount of metastable austenite (~88 vol.% is found. The high abrasive wear resistance of these coatings is provided by γ→α′-martensitic transformation and multimodal size distribution of reinforcing particles.

  20. Synthesis and Processing of Ultra-High Temperature Metal Carbide and Metal Diboride Nanocomposite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-15

    been used to produce metal carbides, including phenolic resins, furfuryl alcohol, sugar, corn starch , petroleum pitch, polyacrylonitrile (PAN) polymers...carboxylates. Metal-organic compounds are usually subjected to hydrolysis and condensa- tion reactions to produce polymeric or colloidal metal-oxide...prior to solvent removal. The hydrolysis time, temperature, and atmosphere can be altered to control the grain size and phase distribu- tion in the

  1. Magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide: a potential material for pollutants removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mambrini, Raquel V; Fonseca, Thales L; Dias, Anderson; Oliveira, Luiz C A; Araujo, Maria Helena; Moura, Flávia C C

    2012-11-30

    New magnetic composites based on metallic nickel and molybdenum carbide, Ni/Mo(2)C, have been produced via catalytic chemical vapor deposition from ethanol. Scanning electron microscopy, thermal analysis, Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies suggest that the CVD process occurs in a single step. This process involves the reduction of NiMo oxides at different temperatures (700, 800 and 900°C) with catalytic deposition of carbon from ethanol producing molybdenum carbide on Ni surface. In the absence of molybdenum the formation of Ni/C was observed. The magnetic molybdenum carbide was successfully used as pollutants removal by adsorption of sulfur and nitrogen compounds from liquid fuels and model dyes such as methylene blue and indigo carmine. The dibenzothiofene adsorption process over Ni/Mo(2)C reached approximately 20 mg g(-1), notably higher than other materials described in the literature and also removed almost all methylene blue dye. The great advantage of these carbide composites is that they may be easily recovered magnetically and reused. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Friction Force Microscopy Analysis of Self-Adaptive W-S-C Coatings: Nanoscale Friction and Wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekonyte, Jurgita; Polcar, Tomas

    2015-09-30

    Transition metal dichalcogenides (TMD) are increasingly popular due to unique structural and mechanical properties. They belong, together with graphene and similar 2D materials, to a small family of solid lubricants with potential to produce ultralow friction state. At the macroscale, low friction stems from the ability to form well-oriented films on the sliding surface (typically up to 10 nm thick), with the TMD basal planes aligned parallel to the surface. In this study, we quantitatively evaluate tribological properties of three sputtered tungsten-sulfur-carbon (W-S-C) coatings at a nanoscale using friction force microscopy. In particular, we investigate possible formation of well-ordered tungsten disulfide (WS2) layers on the coating surface. The coefficient of friction decreased with increasing load independently of coating composition or mechanical properties. In contrast, hard coatings with high tungsten carbide content were more resistant to wear. We successfully identified a WS2 tribolayer at the sliding interface, which peeled off as ultrathin flakes and attached to AFM tip. Nanoscale tribological behavior of WSC coatings replicates deviation of Amonton's law observed in macroscale testing and strongly suggests that the tribolayer is formed almost immediately after the start of sliding.

  3. Surface analysis and osteoblasts response of a titanium oxi-carbide film deposited on titanium by ion plating plasma assisted (IPPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, L; Bemporad, E; Misiano, C; Pepe, F; Santini, P; Scandurra, R

    2011-10-01

    Titanium is the most widely used material in orthopaedic and dental implantoprosthesis due to its superior physical properties and enhanced biocompatibility due to the spontaneous formation of a passivating layer of titanium oxides which, however, does not form good chemical bonds with bone and tends to brake exposing bulk titanium to harsh body fluids releasing titanium particles which may prime an inflammation response and a fibrotic tissue production. In order to avoid these possible problems and to enhance the biocompatibility of titanium implants, modifications of titanium surfaces by many different materials as hydroxyapatite, titanium nitride, titanium oxide and titanium carbide have been proposed. The latter is shown to be an efficient protection for the titanium implant in the harsh conditions of biological tissues and, compared to untreated titanium, acting like an osteoblast stimulation factor increasing in vitro production of proteins involved in osteogenesis. These results were confirmed by in vivo experiments in rabbits: implants covered by the titanium carbide (TiC) layer were faster and better osseointegrated than untreated titanium implants. The TiC layer was deposited by a Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) device which allowed only one deposition per cycle, shown to be unsuitable for industrial applications. Therefore the main objective of the present work was to replace PLD process with an Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) deposition process, which is suitable for industrial upgrading. By this technique, nanostructured TiOx-TiCy-C has been deposited on titanium after sandblasting with 120 micron zirconia spheres. XPS analyses revealed the presence of about 33% carbon (50% of which is present as free carbon), 39% oxygen and 28% titanium (37% of which is bound to carbon to form TiC and 63% is bound to oxygen to form non stoichiometric oxides). Surface mechanical response of as-deposited coatings has been performed by nanoindentation techniques

  4. Methods and systems for utilizing carbide lime or slag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devenney, Martin; Fernandez, Miguel; Chen, Irvin; Calas, Guillaume; Weiss, Michael Joseph; Tester, Chantel Cabrera

    2018-02-27

    Provided herein are methods comprising a) treating a slag solid or carbide lime suspension with an ammonium salt in water to produce an aqueous solution comprising calcium salt, ammonium salt, and solids; b) contacting the aqueous solution with carbon dioxide from an industrial process under one or more precipitation conditions to produce a precipitation material comprising calcium carbonate and a supernatant aqueous solution wherein the precipitation material and the supernatant aqueous solution comprise residual ammonium salt; and c) removing and optionally recovering ammonia and/or ammonium salt using one or more steps of (i) recovering a gas exhaust stream comprising ammonia during the treating and/or the contacting step; (ii) recovering the residual ammonium salt from the supernatant aqueous solution; and (iii) removing and optionally recovering the residual ammonium salt from the precipitation material.

  5. Sol–gel processing of carbidic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Carbon incorporation into the silicate network results in the formation of rigid carbidic glasses with improved physical, mechanical and thermal properties. This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. In the present studies, sol–gel.

  6. Sol–gel processing of carbidic glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon incorporation into the silicate network results in the formation of rigid carbidic glasses with improved physical, mechanical and thermal properties. This generated great interest in the development of these heteroatom structured materials through different processing routes. In the present studies, sol–gel processing ...

  7. Casimir forces from conductive silicon carbide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sedighi Ghozotkhar, Mehdi; Svetovoy, V. B.; Broer, W. H.; Palasantzas, G.

    2014-01-01

    Samples of conductive silicon carbide (SiC), which is a promising material due to its excellent properties for devices operating in severe environments, were characterized with the atomic force microscope for roughness, and the optical properties were measured with ellipsometry in a wide range of

  8. Silicon Carbide Power Devices and Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Samsel, Isaak; LaBel, Ken; Chen, Yuan; Ikpe, Stanley; Wilcox, Ted; Phan, Anthony; Kim, Hak; Topper, Alyson

    2017-01-01

    An overview of the NASA NEPP Program Silicon Carbide Power Device subtask is given, including the current task roadmap, partnerships, and future plans. Included are the Agency-wide efforts to promote development of single-event effect hardened SiC power devices for space applications.

  9. Visible light emission from porous silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan; Lu, Weifang

    2017-01-01

    Light-emitting silicon carbide is emerging as an environment-friendly wavelength converter in the application of light-emitting diode based white light source for two main reasons. Firstly, SiC has very good thermal conductivity and therefore a good substrate for GaN growth in addition to the small...

  10. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...... found to be quite sluggish and of first order in both RuC and cyanide with a rate constant of k = 0.0104(6) M–1 s–1. Further reaction with cyanide leads to loss of the carbide ligand and formation of trans-[Ru(CN)4(PCy3)2]2–, which was isolated and structurally characterized as its PPh4+ salt....

  11. Pyrotechnic Smoke Compositions Containing Boron Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-10

    approach the performance of the AN-M8 HC composition (Al/ZnO/C2Cl6). 15. SUBJECT TERMS smoke, pyrotechnic, boron carbide 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION ...reduction of phosphate. This hypothesis was confirmed in an unexpected and alarming way, when the strong fishy- garlic odor of phosphorus and phosphines

  12. The Effect of High Temperature Annealing on the Grain Characteristics of a Thin Chemical Vapor Deposition Silicon Carbide Layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isabella J van Rooyen; Philippus M van Rooyen; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar

    2013-08-01

    The unique combination of thermo-mechanical and physiochemical properties of silicon carbide (SiC) provides interest and opportunity for its use in nuclear applications. One of the applications of SiC is as a very thin layer in the TRi-ISOtropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles for high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This SiC layer, produced by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), is designed to withstand the pressures of fission and transmutation product gases in a high temperature, radiation environment. Various researchers have demonstrated that macroscopic properties can be affected by changes in the distribution of grain boundary plane orientations and misorientations [1 - 3]. Additionally, various researchers have attributed the release behavior of Ag through the SiC layer as a grain boundary diffusion phenomenon [4 - 6]; further highlighting the importance of understanding the actual grain characteristics of the SiC layer. Both historic HTGR fission product release studies and recent experiments at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) [7] have shown that the release of Ag-110m is strongly temperature dependent. Although the maximum normal operating fuel temperature of a HTGR design is in the range of 1000-1250°C, the temperature may reach 1600°C under postulated accident conditions. The aim of this specific study is therefore to determine the magnitude of temperature dependence on SiC grain characteristics, expanding upon initial studies by Van Rooyen et al, [8; 9].

  13. Coatings synthesised by the pulsed laser ablation of a B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} ceramic composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadadjeu Sokeng, I., E-mail: ifriky@tlabs.ac.za [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, French South African Institute of Technology/Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville campus, PO Box 1906, Bellville, 7530 (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Ngom, B.D. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanofrabrication, Groupes de physique du Solide et Sciences des Matriaux (GPSSM), Facult des sciences et Techniques Universit Cheikh Anta Diop de Dakar (UCAD), B.P. 25114 Dakar, Fann Dakar (Senegal); Msimanga, M. [iThemba LABS Gauten, Private Bag 11, WITS 2050 Johannesburg (South Africa); Nuru, Z.Y.; Kotsedi, L.; Maaza, M. [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, PO Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, PO Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Van Zyl, R.R. [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, French South African Institute of Technology/Cape Peninsula University of Technology, Bellville campus, PO Box 1906, Bellville, 7530 (South Africa)

    2015-10-30

    A pellet of B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} ceramic composite was characterised and subjected to pulsed laser ablation for the deposition of coatings on corning glass substrates. We reports an attempt to produce coatings from B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The thermal, electric and mechanical properties of B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} suggest that coatings synthesised from this composite can be used for space applications. The samples were characterised using X-ray Diffraction, Atomic Force Microscopy and Heavy Ion Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis. The characterisation of the samples deposited on soda lime corning glass showed that the laser energy used in this PLD was enough to obtain non amorphous coatings formed by some alteration of the tungsten carbide crystal lattice at room temperature, and that there was no stoichiometry transfer as would be expected from PLD. The coating also showed space applicable features worth investigating. - Highlights: • B{sub 4}C/W{sub 2}B{sub 5} ceramic composite was ablated for deposition on corning glass subtrates. • Non-amorphous coating was obtained at room temperature. • There was no stoichiometry transfer as would be expected from Pulsed Laser Deposition.

  14. Carbide-based fuel system for undersea vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, A. Alan; Carreiro, Louis G.; Greene, Eric S. [Naval Undersea Warfare Center, Division Newport (NUWCDIVNPT), 1176 Howell Street, Building 1302/2, Newport, RI 02841 (United States)

    2008-01-21

    In underwater applications such as unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV) propulsion, mass and volume constraints often dictate system energy density and specific energy, which are targeted to exceed 300 Wh L{sup -1} and 300 Wh kg{sup -1}, respectively, in order to compete with state-of-the-art battery technologies. To address this need, a novel carbide-based fuel system (CFS) intended for use with a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is under development that is capable of achieving these energy metrics as well as sequestering carbon dioxide. The proposed CFS uses calcium carbide and calcium hydride that react with water to generate acetylene and hydrogen as the fuel and calcium hydroxide as a carbon dioxide scrubber. The acetylene is hydrogenated to ethane and then reformed to syngas (carbon monoxide and hydrogen) before being utilized by the SOFC. Carbon dioxide effluent from the SOFC is reacted with the calcium hydroxide to produce a storable solid, calcium carbonate, thus eliminating gas evolution from the UUV. A system configuration is proposed and discussion follows concerning energy storage metrics, operational parameters and preliminary safety analysis. (author)

  15. Detonation Synthesis of Alpha-Variant Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenderfer, Martin; Johnson, Catherine; Fahrenholtz, William; Mochalin, Vadym

    2017-06-01

    A recent research study has been undertaken to develop facilities for conducting detonation synthesis of nanomaterials. This process involves a familiar technique that has been utilized for the industrial synthesis of nanodiamonds. Developments through this study have allowed for experimentation with the concept of modifying explosive compositions to induce synthesis of new nanomaterials. Initial experimentation has been conducted with the end goal being synthesis of alpha variant silicon carbide (α-SiC) in the nano-scale. The α-SiC that can be produced through detonation synthesis methods is critical to the ceramics industry because of a number of unique properties of the material. Conventional synthesis of α-SiC results in formation of crystals greater than 100 nm in diameter, outside nano-scale. It has been theorized that the high temperature and pressure of an explosive detonation can be used for the formation of α-SiC in the sub 100 nm range. This paper will discuss in detail the process development for detonation nanomaterial synthesis facilities, optimization of explosive charge parameters to maximize nanomaterial yield, and introduction of silicon to the detonation reaction environment to achieve first synthesis of nano-sized alpha variant silicon carbide.

  16. Tantalum-based thin film coatings for wear resistant arthroprostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balagna, C; Faga, M G; Spriano, S

    2011-10-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloys with high carbon content (HC-CoCrMo) are widely used as materials for arthroprosthesis, in particular in metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joints. In spite of their good wear and corrosion resistance, production of metallic wear particles and metal ion release will occur on a large time-scale. An enhancement of the metal ion level in the patient's blood and urine is often reported in clinical data. Hypersensitivity, inflammatory response and cell necrosis can occur as consequence. So implants on young patients and women on childbearing age are not so widespread. The aim of this research is the realization of a thin film coating in order to improve the biocompatibility of Co-based alloys and to reduce debris production, ion release and citotoxicity. The innovative process consists of a thermal treatment in molten salts, in order to obtain a tantalum enriched thin film coating. Tantalum is chosen because it is considered a biocompatible metal with high corrosion resistance and low ion release. Three HC-CoCrMo alloys, produced by different manufacturing processes, are tested as substrates. The coating is a thin film of TaC or it can be composed by a multilayer of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum, depending on the temperature of the treatment and on the carbon content of the substrate. The thin films as well the substrates are characterized from the structural, chemical and morphological point of view. Moreover mechanical behaviour of treated and untreated materials is analyzed by means of nanohardness, scratch and ball-on-disc wear tests. The coating increases the mechanical and tribological properties of HC-CoCrMo.

  17. Effect of Particle Morphology on Cold Spray Deposition of Chromium Carbide-Nickel Chromium Cermet Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Ruben; Jodoin, Bertrand

    2017-08-01

    Nickel chromium-chromium carbide coatings provide good corrosion and wear resistance at high temperatures, making them ideal for applications where a harsh environment and high temperatures are expected. Thermal spray processes are preferred as deposition technique of cermets, but the high process temperatures can lead to decarburization and reduction of the coatings properties. Cold spray uses lower temperatures preventing decarburization. Since the metallic phase remains solid, the feedstock powder morphology becomes crucial on the deposition behavior. Six commercially available powders were studied, varying in morphology and metal/ceramic ratios. The powders were categorized into 4 groups depending on their morphology. Spherical powders lead to substrate erosion due to their limited overall ductility. Porous agglomerated and sintered powders lead to severely cracked coatings. For dense agglomerated and sintered powders, the outcome depended on the initial metal/ceramic ratio: powders with 25 wt.% NiCr led to substrate erosion while 35 wt.% NiCr powders led to dense coatings. Finally, blended ceramic-metal mixtures also lead to dense coatings. All coatings obtained had lower ceramic content than the initial feedstock powders. Interrupted spray tests, combined with FEA, helped drawing conclusions on the deposition behavior to explain the obtained results.

  18. Surface science and electrochemical studies of metal-modified carbides for fuel cells and hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas Glenn

    Carbides of the early transition metals have emerged as low-cost catalysts that are active for a wide range of reactions. The surface chemistry of carbides can be altered by modifying the surface with small amounts of admetals. These metal-modified carbides can be effective replacements for Pt-based bimetallic systems, which suffer from the drawbacks of high cost and low thermal stability. In this dissertation, metal-modified carbides were studied for reactions with applications to renewable energy technologies. It is demonstrated that metal-modified carbides possess high activity for alcohol reforming and electrochemical hydrogen production. First, the surface chemistry of carbides towards alcohol decomposition is studied using density functional theory (DFT) and surface science experiments. The Vienna Ab initio Simulation Package (VASP) was used to calculate the binding energies of alcohols and decomposition intermediates on metal-modified carbides. The calculated binding energies were then correlated to reforming activity determined experimentally using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the case of methanol decomposition, it was found that tungsten monocarbide (WC) selectively cleaved the C-O bond to produce methane. Upon modifying the surface with a single layer of metal such as Ni, Pt, or Rh, the selectivity shifted towards scission of the C-H bonds while leaving the C-O bond intact, producing carbon monoxide (CO) and H2. High resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) was used to examine the bond breaking sequence as a function of temperature. From HREELS, it was shown that the surfaces followed an activity trend of Rh > Ni > Pt. The Au-modified WC surface possessed too low of a methanol binding energy, and molecular desorption of methanol was the most favorable pathway on this surface. Next, the ability of Rh-modified WC to break the C-C bond of C2 and C3 alcohols was demonstrated. HREELS showed that ethanol decomposed through an acetaldehyde

  19. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2}. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  20. Design and fabrication of an advanced TRISO fuel with ZrC coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, Ian E., E-mail: porteri@email.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Knight, Travis W., E-mail: knighttw@cec.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Dulude, Michael C., E-mail: dulude@email.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Roberts, Elwyn, E-mail: robertse@cec.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208, United Sates (United States); Hobbs, Jim, E-mail: JSHobbs@nuclearfuelservices.com [Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc., 1205 Banner Hill Road, Erwin, TN 37650 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    Highlights: • Zirconium carbide was deposited on surrogate zirconia and UO{sub 2} kernels. • Deposition rates were found to be dependent on temperature and gas concentration. • Calcining and sintering parameters were optimized to reduce cracking in UO{sub 2} kernel production. -- Abstract: Very high temperature reactors (VHTRs) are expected to achieve coolant outlet temperatures up to 1000 °C, allowing for increased plant efficiency as well as the ability to use the process heat for hydrogen production and various uses in the process chemical industry. The feasibility of using VHTRs as part of the next generation of nuclear reactors greatly depends on the reliability of tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) fuel particles to retain both gaseous and metallic fission products created in irradiated uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}). This work sought the deposition parameters necessary to produce an additional zirconium carbide (ZrC) layer used in advanced coated particle fuels. The additional ZrC layer will act as an oxygen getter to prevent typical TRISO failure mechanisms including over pressurization of the particle and kernel migration of the kernel within the particle, also known as the amoeba effect. In this study, ZrC coatings were applied to surrogate zirconia kernels as well as UO{sub 2} kernels using a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized bed reactor, and the deposition characteristics were analyzed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The ZrC layer was confirmed through X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The calcining and sintering of urania kernels for use in these coating experiments is also discussed.

  1. Growth and characterization of thick cBN coatings on silicon and tool substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bewilogua, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, D-38108 Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: bew@ist.fraunhofer.de; Keunecke, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, D-38108 Braunschweig (Germany); Weigel, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films, D-38108 Braunschweig (Germany); Wiemann, E. [Institute for Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University Berlin (Germany)

    2004-12-22

    Recently some research groups have achieved progress in the deposition of cubic boron nitride (cBN) coatings with a thickness of 2 {mu}m and more, which is necessary for cutting tool applications. In our laboratory, thick cBN coatings were sputter deposited on silicon substrates using a boron carbide target. Following a boron carbide interlayer (few 100 nm thick), a gradient layer with continuously increasing nitrogen content was prepared. After the cBN nucleation, the process parameters were modified for the cBN film growth to a thickness of more than 2 {mu}m. However, the transfer of this technology to technically relevant substrates, like cemented carbide cutting inserts, required some further process modifications. At first, a titanium interlayer had to be deposited followed by a more than 1-{mu}m-thick boron carbide layer. The next steps were identical to those on silicon substrates. The total coating thickness was in the range of 3 {mu}m with a 0.5- to nearly 1-{mu}m-thick cBN top layer. In spite of the enormous intrinsic stress, both the coatings on silicon and on cemented carbide exhibited a good adhesion and a prolonged stability in humid air. Oxidation experiments revealed a stability of the coating system on cemented carbide up to 700 deg. C and higher. Coated cutting inserts were tested in turning operations with different metallic workpiece materials. The test results will be compared to those of well-established cutting materials, like polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) and oxide ceramics, considering the wear of coated tools.

  2. Micro and nanomecanical behavior of mullite-based environmental barrier coatings

    OpenAIRE

    Botero Vega, Carlos Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Mullite coatings deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) have been introduced and proven as excellent candidates to protect silicon carbide (SiC) from severe pitting corrosion and recession, becoming part of the new generation of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs). In these coatings mullite columns nucleate from a thin vitreous silicon layer in contact with the substrate and can grow over a wide range of increasing Al/Si ratios in constant or graded compositions. This feature allows f...

  3. NIBSORB {sup registered}: A coating for the production of absorber elements subjected to corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patzelt, M. [Metallveredlung GmbH und Co. KG, Solingen (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    NIBSORB {sup registered}. technology stands for an application-specific process for the production of absorber elements. An electrolytic plating process is used to incorporate the neutron poison boron carbide very homogenously and in high concentration into a thick nickel coating. Highly absorbent and corrosion-resistant coatings can be achieved in this way. Applied to base materials of any shape and size, these coatings allow absorbers to be developed which are carefully tailored to the requirements in any given case.

  4. Application of a Coated Film Catalyst Layer Model to a High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell with Low Catalyst Loading Produced by Reactive Spray Deposition Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D. Myles

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a semi-empirical model is presented that correlates to previously obtained experimental overpotential data for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC. The goal is to reinforce the understanding of the performance of the cell from a modeling perspective. The HT-PEMFC membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs were constructed utilizing an 85 wt. % phosphoric acid doped Advent TPS® membranes for the electrolyte and gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs manufactured by Reactive Spray Deposition Technology (RSDT. MEAs with varying ratios of PTFE binder to carbon support material (I/C ratio were manufactured and their performance at various operating temperatures was recorded. The semi-empirical model derivation was based on the coated film catalyst layer approach and was calibrated to the experimental data by a least squares method. The behavior of important physical parameters as a function of I/C ratio and operating temperature were explored.

  5. Preparation and characterization of Boron carbide nanoparticles for use as a novel agent in T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Sørensen, P. G.; Björkdahl, O.

    2006-01-01

    Boron carbide nanoparticles are proposed as a system for T cell-guided boron neutron capture therapy. Nanoparticles were produced by ball milling in various atmospheres of commercially available boron carbide. The physical and chemical properties of the particles were investigated using...... melanoma cells incubated with sub-100 nm nanoparticles (381.5 microg/g (10)B) induces complete cell death. The nanoparticles alone induce no toxicity....

  6. Method Developed for Improving the Thermomechanical Properties of Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; DiCarlo, James A.

    2004-01-01

    Today, a major thrust for achieving engine components with improved thermal capability is the development of fiber-reinforced silicon-carbide (SiC) matrix composites. These materials are not only lighter and capable of higher use temperatures than state-of-the-art metallic alloys and oxide matrix composites (approx. 1100 C), but they can provide significantly better static and dynamic toughness than unreinforced silicon-based monolithic ceramics. However, for successful application in advanced engine systems, the SiC matrix composites should be able to withstand component service stresses and temperatures for the desired component lifetime. Since the high-temperature structural life of ceramic materials is typically controlled by creep-induced flaw growth, a key composite property requirement is the ability to display high creep resistance under these conditions. Also, because of the possibility of severe thermal gradients in the components, the composites should provide maximum thermal conductivity to minimize the development of thermal stresses. State-of-the-art SiC matrix composites are typically fabricated via a three-step process: (1) fabrication of a component-shaped architectural preform reinforced by high-performance fibers, (2) chemical vapor infiltration of a fiber coating material such as boron nitride (BN) into the preform, and (3) infiltration of a SiC matrix into the remaining porous areas in the preform. Generally, the highest performing composites have matrices fabricated by the CVI process, which produces a SiC matrix typically more thermally stable and denser than matrices formed by other approaches. As such, the CVI SiC matrix is able to provide better environmental protection to the coated fibers, plus provide the composite with better resistance to crack propagation. Also, the denser CVI SiC matrix should provide optimal creep resistance and thermal conductivity to the composite. However, for adequate preform infiltration, the CVI SiC matrix

  7. Comparison of diffusion coefficients and activation energies for Ag diffusion in silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Goo Kim

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The migration of silver (Ag in silicon carbide (SiC and 110mAg through SiC of irradiated tri-structural isotropic (TRISO fuel has been studied for the past three to four decades. However, there is no satisfactory explanation for the transport mechanism of Ag in SiC. In this work, the diffusion coefficients of Ag measured and/or estimated in previous studies were reviewed, and then pre-exponential factors and activation energies from the previous experiments were evaluated using Arrhenius equation. The activation energy is 247.4 kJ·mol−1 from Ag paste experiments between two SiC layers produced using fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD, 125.3 kJ·mol−1 from integral release experiments (annealing of irradiated TRISO fuel, 121.8 kJ·mol−1 from fractional Ag release during irradiation of TRISO fuel in high flux reactor (HFR, and 274.8 kJ·mol−1 from Ag ion implantation experiments, respectively. The activation energy from ion implantation experiments is greater than that from Ag paste, fractional release and integral release, and the activation energy from Ag paste experiments is approximately two times greater than that from integral release experiments and fractional Ag release during the irradiation of TRISO fuel in HFR. The pre-exponential factors are also very different depending on the experimental methods and estimation. From a comparison of the pre-exponential factors and activation energies, it can be analogized that the diffusion mechanism of Ag using ion implantation experiment is different from other experiments, such as a Ag paste experiment, integral release experiments, and heating experiments after irradiating TRISO fuel in HFR. However, the results of this work do not support the long held assumption that Ag release from FBCVD-SiC, used for the coating layer in TRISO fuel, is dominated by grain boundary diffusion. In order to understand in detail the transport mechanism of Ag through the coating layer, FBCVD

  8. Corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel bipolar plate with chromiumcarbide coating in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.B. Huang

    Full Text Available Stainless steel with chromium carbide coating is an ideal candidate for bipolar plates. However, the coating still cannot resist the corrosion of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC environment. In this work, the corrosion kinetics of 316L stainless steel with chromium carbide is investigated in simulated PEMFC cathodic environment by combining electrochemical tests with morphology and microstructure analysis. SEM results reveal that the steel’s surface is completely coated by Cr and chromium carbide but there are pinholes in the coating. After the coated 316L stainless steel is polarized, the diffraction peak of Fe oxide is found. EIS results indicate that the capacitive resistance and the reaction resistance first slowly decrease (2–32 h and then increase. The potentiostatic transient curve declines sharply within 2000 s and then decreases slightly. The pinholes, which exist in the coating, result in pitting corrosion. The corrosion kinetics of the coated 316L stainless steel are modeled and accords the following equation: i0 = 7.6341t−0.5, with the corrosion rate controlled by ion migration in the pinholes. Keywords: PEMFC, Metal bipolar plate, Chromium carbide coating, Corrosion kinetics, Pitting corrosion

  9. High Density Infrared (HDI) Transient Liquid Coatings for Improved Wear and Corrosion Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald W. Smith

    2007-07-05

    This report documents a collaborative effort between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Materials Resources International and an industry team of participants to develop, evaluate and understand how high density infrared heating technology could be used to improve infiltrated carbide wear coatings and/or to densify sprayed coatings. The research included HDI fusion evaluations of infiltrated carbide suspensions such (BrazeCoat® S), composite suspensions with tool steel powders, thermally sprayed Ni-Cr- B-Si (self fluxing alloy) and nickel powder layers. The applied work developed practical HDI / transient liquid coating (TLC) procedures on test plates that demonstrated the ability to fuse carbide coatings for industrial applications such as agricultural blades, construction and mining vehicles. Fundamental studies helped create process models that led to improved process understanding and control. The coating of agricultural blades was demonstrated and showed the HDI process to have the ability to fuse industrial scale components. Sliding and brasive wear tests showed that high degree of wear resistance could be achieved with the addition of tool steel powders to carbide particulate composites.

  10. Effect of deposition current on microstructure and properties of CoCrWC alloy PTA coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. G. Paes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cobalt-Based alloys are largely applied to the surface of components as welded coatings. Carbides reinforced CoCrWC system is used to extend the service life under harsh environments involving wear and corrosion in different media. This work aims to evaluate the effect of deposition current on the microstructure and properties of PTA coatings. So, CoCrWC alloy (Stellite #6 was processed on AISI316L stainless steel plates with the following main arc current: 100, 120, 150, 180 and 200A. So, different interaction with the substrate must be expected and its effect on coatings features was evaluated. The geometry of single track coatings, dilution, formed phases and phase volume fraction was assessed by laser Confocal, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Vickers hardness and wear tests were carried out to correlate microstructure to properties of coatings. Coatings showed microstructure composed by hypoeutectic dendrites of Cobalt solid solution and interdendrictic carbides. Dilution increased with deposition current from 11,8 e 56,5% which reduced the carbides fraction and increased the Cobalt solid solution areas, resulting in hardness decrease from 500 to 310HV0,5. Higher deposition current induced mass loss rate increase on pin-on-disc sliding wear tests, arising 44,38% increment on wear coefficient, as a consequence of the lower carbides fraction and solid solution alloying and refinement degree of the microstructure.

  11. Carbide and boride laser modification of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Boguslaw; Ebner, Reinhold

    1997-10-01

    Microstructure modification by laser remelting or laser alloying was studied on carbon Ck45 and high speed steels. Laser remelting of Ck45 by overlapping laser tracks led to a great refinement of martensitic structure, especially in the heat affected zone of subsequent laser track. High speed steel (HSS) M2 after laser remelting showed, beside the tetragonal martensite, the diffraction lines of cubic carbides of the M6C and M12C types. Laser alloying of M2 HSS using vanadium carbide (VC) additions caused increasing of eutectic in the interdendritic space, which was accompanied with reduction of the M6C and rising of the MC. M2 HSS laser alloyed with molybdenum carbide (Mo2C) showed formation of the M6C for the hipereutectic compositions while at the highest concentrations of molybdenum, primary dendrites of the M2C and stabilized ferrite were stated. High additions of borides: CrB or VB2; developed formation of the primary borides of blocky type containing a high amount of W, Cr or W, V, respectively. Laser alloying of Ck45 by means of: CrB, VB2 and B4C showed: in the case of CrB an eutectic (alpha) '/M3(C,B)/M2B as well as primary precipitates of the M2B phase for hipereutectic compositions; by adding VB2, the M3B2 and M2B phases were identified experimentally for hipereutectic concentrations; for alloying using B4C, the cellular dendritic structure together with primary borides of the (tau) -M23(C,B)6 phase were stated for hipereutectic compositions. The phase diagrams of M2 HSS + (VC or Mo2C) as well as Ck45 + B4C systems were calculated to predict changes of the constitutions due to laser alloying. Comparison of the solidification structures established experimentally with the calculated phase diagrams revealed a good correlation for the carbides, especially.

  12. Manufacturing technology for contacts to silicon carbide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kudryk Ya.Ya.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The authors classified the results of investigations of resistivity of ohmic contacts to silicon carbide made without any semiconductor surface modification. A set of contacts with better parameters were analysed. From the results of this analysis, some recommendations were made concerning optimal contact-forming layers for p- and n-SiC types of 4H, 6H, 3C, 15R, 21R polytypes.

  13. Low blow Charpy impact of silicon carbides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, H.; Chandan, H. C.; Bradt, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    The room-temperature impact resistance of several commercial silicon carbides was examined using an instrumented pendulum-type machine and Charpy-type specimens. Energy balance compliance methods and fracture toughness approaches, both applicable to other ceramics, were used for analysis. The results illustrate the importance of separating the machine and the specimen energy contributions and confirm the equivalence of KIc and KId. The material's impact energy was simply the specimen's stored elastic strain energy at fracture.

  14. Process of making titanium carbide (TiC) nano-fibrous felts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, Hao; Zhang, Lifeng; Zhao, Yong; Zhu, Zhengtao

    2015-01-13

    A method of synthesizing mechanically resilient titanium carbide (TiC) nanofibrous felts comprising continuous nanofibers or nano-ribbons with TiC crystallites embedded in carbon matrix, comprising: (a) electrospinning a spin dope for making precursor nanofibers with diameters less than 0.5 J.Lm; (b) overlaying the nanofibers to produce a nanofibrous mat (felt); and then (c) heating the nano-felts first at a low temperature, and then at a high temperature for making electrospun continuous nanofibers or nano-ribbons with TiC crystallites embedded in carbon matrix; and (d) chlorinating the above electrospun nano-felts at an elevated temperature to remove titanium for producing carbide derived carbon (CDC) nano-fibrous felt with high specific surface areas.

  15. Incidence of Lettuce mosaic virus in lettuce and its detection by polyclonal antibodies produced against recombinant coat protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prachi; Sharma, Susheel; Singh, Jasvir; Saha, Swati; Baranwal, V K

    2016-04-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus of family Potyviridae, causes mosaic disease in lettuce has recently been identified in India. The virus is seed borne and secondary infection occurs through aphids. To ensure virus freedom in seeds it is important to develop diagnostic tools, for serological methods the production of polyclonal antibodies is a prerequisite. The coat protein (CP) gene of LMV was amplified, cloned and expressed using pET-28a vector in Escherichia coli BL21DE3 competent cells. The LMV CP was expressed as a fusion protein containing a fragment of the E. coli His tag. The LMV CP/His protein reacted positively with a commercial antiserum against LMV in an immunoblot assay. Polyclonal antibodies purified from serum of rabbits immunized with the fusion protein gave positive results when LMV infected lettuce (Lactuca sativa) was tested at 1:1000 dilution in PTA-ELISA. These were used for specific detection of LMV in screening lettuce accessions. The efficacy of the raised polyclonal antiserum was high and it can be utilized in quarantine and clean seed production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. EUV nanosecond laser ablation of silicon carbide, tungsten and molybdenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolov, Oleksandr; Kolacek, Karel; Schmidt, Jiri; Straus, Jaroslav; Choukourov, Andrei; Kasuya, Koichi

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present results of study interaction of nanosecond EUV laser pulses at wavelength of 46.9 nm with silicon carbide (SiC), tungsten (W) and molybdenum (Mo). As a source of laser radiation was used discharge-plasma driver CAPEX (CAPillary EXperiment) based on high current capillary discharge in argon. The laser beam is focused with a spherical Si/Sc multilayer-coated mirror on samples. Experimental study has been performed with 1, 5, 10, 20 and 50 laser pulses ablation of SiC, W and Mo at various fluence values. Firstly, sample surface modification in the nanosecond time scale have been registered by optical microscope. And the secondly, laser beam footprints on the samples have been analyzed by atomic-force microscope (AFM). This work supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Contract GA14-29772S and by the Grant Agency of the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic under Contract LG13029.

  17. Stereology of carbide phase in modified hypereutectic chromium cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Suchoń

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In paper are presented results of studies of carbide phase stereology modified hypereutectic wear resistance chromium cast iron which contains carbon about 3,5% and chromium about 25%. Three substances were applied to the modification: boron carbide (B4C, ferroniobium (FeNb and mixture of ferroniobium and rare-earth (RE. The measurements of geometrical features of carbides were conducted on microsection taken from castings wich were cooled with various velocities.

  18. High-temperature mechanical properties of aluminium alloys reinforced with boron carbide particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoro, J. [Dept. Ingenieria y Ciencia de los Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: javier.onoro@upm.es; Salvador, M.D. [Dept. Ingenieria Mecanica y de Materiales, ETSI Industriales, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Cambronero, L.E.G. [Dept. Ingenieria de Materiales, ETSI Minas, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, c/Rios Rosas 21, 28003 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-01-15

    The mechanical properties of particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites based on aluminium alloys (6061 and 7015) at high temperatures were studied. Boron carbide particles were used as reinforcement. All composites were produced by hot extrusion. The tensile properties and fracture analysis of these materials were investigated at room temperature and at high temperature to determine their ultimate strength and strain to failure. The fracture surface was analysed by scanning electron microscopy.

  19. Effect of precursor mass on product phase composition in plasma dynamic synthesis of tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatrova, K. N.; Sivkov, A. A.; Shanenkov, I. I.; Saigash, A. S.

    2017-05-01

    An interest in WC1-x cubic tungsten carbide results from its catalytic properties similar to those of platinum group metals and the synergistic effect between WC1-x and Pt in reactions of hydrogen evolution and hydrogen oxidation. However, according to the phase diagram of the W-C system, the cubic phase WC1-x only exists in a narrow range of temperature stability (about 2798-3058 K), which makes it difficult for being obtained. To date, there are different methods for synthesizing tungsten carbide powder with a low content of cubic phase that complicates the study of WC1-x properties. A direct plasma dynamic synthesis is known as one of the promising methods to produce WC1-x. The aim of this work is to find the optimal amount of tungsten precursor to obtain cubic tungsten carbide with a high purity by plasma dynamic method. The synthesized products were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The XRD patterns showed that the main phase was cubic tungsten carbide with negligible content of hexagonal tungsten carbide W2C and pure tungsten W. According to a quantitative analysis of synthesized products, which were obtained using masses of initial tungsten equal to 1.0, 0.7, 0.6 and 0.5 gram, the yield of WC1-x phase was 84, 89, 95 and 92 wt%, respectively. The results of TEM displayed that the synthesized powders consist of crystallites, having the size less than 100 nm (WC1-x), and a carbon matrix. This carbon was not detected in XRD due to its presence as an amorphous phase.

  20. Application of hard coatings for blanking and piercing tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podgornik, B.; Zajec, B.; Bay, Niels

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to examine the possibility of reducing lubrication and replacing expensive tungsten carbide material in blanking/piercing through introduction of hard tool coatings. Results show that hard PVD coatings can be successfully used in blanking/piercing...... critical value under dry friction conditions and leads to tool failure. Therefore, at present oxidation and temperature resistant hard coatings can give improved wear resistance of stamping tools, but elimination of lubricants in blanking and piercing processes is still not feasible....

  1. Silicon Carbide Corrugated Mirrors for Space Telescopes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Trex Enterprises Corporation (Trex) proposes technology development to manufacture monolithic, lightweight silicon carbide corrugated mirrors (SCCM) suitable for...

  2. Carbides in Nodular Cast Iron with Cr and Mo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In these paper results of elements microsegregation in carbidic nodular cast iron have been presented. A cooling rate in the centre of the cross-section and on the surface of casting and change of moulding sand temperature during casting crystallization and its self-cooling have been investigated. TDA curves have been registered. The linear distribution of elements concentration in an eutectic grain, primary and secondary carbides have been made. It was found, that there are two kinds of carbides: Cr and Mo enriched. A probable composition of primary and secondary carbides have been presented.

  3. Fort Saint Vrain HTGR (Th/U carbide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Larry Lorin

    2001-01-01

    DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments and total fuel mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. For the HTGR group, the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) reactor fuel has been chosen for the evaluation of viability for waste co-disposal. The FSV reactor was operated by Public Service of Colorado as a licensed power reactor. The FSV fuel employs a U/Th carbide matrix in individually pyrolytic carbon-coated particles. These individual particles are in turn coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and contained within fuel compacts, that are in turn embedded in graphite blocks that comprised the structural core of the reactor.

  4. Biological characteristics of the MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells on composite tantalum carbide/amorphous carbon films.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Yu Chang

    Full Text Available Tantalum (Ta is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C, was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics.

  5. Biological Characteristics of the MG-63 Human Osteosarcoma Cells on Composite Tantalum Carbide/Amorphous Carbon Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yin-Yu; Huang, Heng-Li; Chen, Ya-Chi; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Shieh, Tzong-Ming; Tsai, Ming-Tzu

    2014-01-01

    Tantalum (Ta) is a promising metal for biomedical implants or implant coating for orthopedic and dental applications because of its excellent corrosion resistance, fracture toughness, and biocompatibility. This study synthesizes biocompatible tantalum carbide (TaC) and TaC/amorphous carbon (a-C) coatings with different carbon contents by using a twin-gun magnetron sputtering system to improve their biological properties and explore potential surgical implant or device applications. The carbon content in the deposited coatings was regulated by controlling the magnetron power ratio of the pure graphite and Ta cathodes. The deposited TaC and TaC/a-C coatings exhibited better cell viability of human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 than the uncoated Ti and Ta-coated samples. Inverted optical and confocal imaging was used to demonstrate the cell adhesion, distribution, and proliferation of each sample at different time points during the whole culture period. The results show that the TaC/a-C coating, which contained two metastable phases (TaC and a-C), was more biocompatible with MG-63 cells compared to the pure Ta coating. This suggests that the TaC/a-C coatings exhibit a better biocompatible performance for MG-63 cells, and they may improve implant osseointegration in clinics. PMID:24760085

  6. HIP Joining of Cemented Carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derby, B.; Miodownik, M.

    1999-04-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is investigated as a technique for joining the cermet WC-15% Co to itself. Encapsulation of the specimens prior to HIPing was carried out using steel encapsulation, glass encapsulation and self encapsulation. The bonds were evaluated using a four point bend method. It is shown that the glass and steel encapsulation methods have a number of inherent problems which make them inappropriate for near net shape processing. In contrast the novel self encapsulation method, described for the first time in this communication, is both simple and effective, producing joined material with bulk strength. The concept of self encapsulation is potentially widely applicable for joining composite materials.

  7. Spray-Deposited Superconductor/Polymer Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wise, Stephanie A.; Tran, Sang Q.; Hooker, Matthew W.

    1993-01-01

    Coatings that exhibit the Meissner effect formed at relatively low temperature. High-temperature-superconductor/polymer coatings that exhibit Meissner effect deposited onto components in variety of shapes and materials. Simple, readily available equipment needed in coating process, mean coatings produced economically. Coatings used to keep magnetic fields away from electronic circuits in such cryogenic applications as magnetic resonance imaging and detection of infrared, and in magnetic suspensions to provide levitation and/or damping of vibrations.

  8. Characterization of silicon-silicon carbide ceramic derived from carbon-carbon silicon carbide composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Vijay K. [Indian Institute of Technology, Varanasi (India). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Krenkel, Walter [Univ. of Bayreuth (Germany). Dept. of Ceramic Materials Engineering

    2013-04-15

    The main objective of the present work is to process porous silicon - silicon carbide (Si - SiC) ceramic by the oxidation of carboncarbon silicon carbide (C/C - SiC) composites. Phase studies are performed on the oxidized porous composite to examine the changes due to the high temperature oxidation. Further, various characterization techniques are performed on Si- SiC ceramics in order to study the material's microstructure. The effects of various parameters such as fiber alignment (twill weave and short/chopped fiber) and phenolic resin type (resol and novolak) are characterized.

  9. The influence of annealing in the ferrite-plus-austenite phase field on the stability of vanadium carbide precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locci, I. E.; Michal, G. M.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of rapid excursions into the ferrite-plus-austenite two-phase field on V4C3 precipitates formed by tempering in the ferrite phases was investigated. Heat treatments were first performed to produce a starting microstructure of fine vanadium carbide particles precipitated in a ferrite matrix, and the microstructure was then subjected to various short-time heat treatment cycles that transformed part of the matrix to austenite. TEM was used to determine the effects of the matrix change on the size, morphology, and distribution of the vanadium carbide particles.

  10. Friction stir surfacing of cast A356 aluminium–silicon alloy with boron carbide and molybdenum disulphide powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Srinivasu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Good castability and high strength properties of Al–Si alloys are useful in defence applications like torpedoes, manufacture of Missile bodies, and parts of automobile such as engine cylinders and pistons. Poor wear resistance of the alloys is major limitation for their use. Friction stir processing (FSP is a recognized surfacing technique as it overcomes the problems of fusion route surface modification methods. Keeping in view of the requirement of improving wear resistance of cast aluminium–silicon alloy, friction stir processing was attempted for surface modification with boron carbide (B4C and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 powders. Metallography, micro compositional analysis, hardness and pin-on-disc wear testing were used for characterizing the surface composite coating. Microscopic study revealed breaking of coarse silicon needles and uniformly distributed carbides in the A356 alloy matrix after FSP. Improvement and uniformity in hardness was obtained in surface composite layer. Higher wear resistance was achieved in friction stir processed coating with carbide powders. Addition of solid lubricant MoS2 powder was found to improve wear resistance of the base metal significantly.

  11. Differences of platelet adhesion and thrombus activation on amorphous silicon carbide, magnesium alloy, stainless steel, and cobalt chromium stent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansi, Christopher; Arab, Amina; Rzany, Alexander; Ahrens, Ingo; Bode, Christoph; Hehrlein, Christoph

    2009-03-01

    Coronary stenting is considered to be the gold standard of percutaneous coronary interventions, because stents are able to reduce early and late elastic recoil (negative remodeling) and restenosis in comparison with balloon angioplasty alone. It is known that stent thrombogenicity and neointimal formation are determined by the surface characteristics of the stent platform, electrochemical features of the stent surface, and the degree of degradation after implantation. Metallic stents coated with amorphous silicon carbide and biodegradable stents made of magnesium alloy have been introduced clinically, but there are no data available comparing the biocompatibility of these novel stent materials with conventional stents. We demonstrate simple and reproducible in vitro methods assessing the rate of platelet adhesion and thrombus activation for biocompatibility tests of different stent surfaces. We show that amorphous silicon carbide and magnesium alloy stent surfaces markedly lower the rate of platelet adhesion and platelet/fibrin activation when compared with uncoated stainless steel or cobalt chromium alloy surfaces. Semiconductor materials on the stent surface reduce platelet and fibrin activation by increasing the critical electron gap to greater than 0.9 eV resulting in a lower electron transfer out of the stent material. Passive stent coatings with specific semiconducting properties such as amorphous silicon carbide or magnesium alloy reduce thrombogenicity and may improve biocompatibility of a stent platform.

  12. Effective optimization of surface passivation on porous silicon carbide using atomic layer deposited Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Weifang; Iwasa, Yoshimi; Ou, Yiyu

    2017-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide (B–N co-doped SiC) produced by anodic oxidation showed strong photoluminescence (PL) at around 520 nm excited by a 375 nm laser. The porous SiC samples were passivated by atomic layer deposited (ALD) aluminum oxide (Al2O3) films, resulting in a significant enhancement...

  13. Optimization of tribological performance of SiC embedded composite coating via Taguchi analysis approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleque, M. A.; Bello, K. A.; Adebisi, A. A.; Akma, N.

    2017-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas (TIG) torch is one of the most recently used heat source for surface modification of engineering parts, giving similar results to the more expensive high power laser technique. In this study, ceramic-based embedded composite coating has been produced by precoated silicon carbide (SiC) powders on the AISI 4340 low alloy steel substrate using TIG welding torch process. A design of experiment based on Taguchi approach has been adopted to optimize the TIG cladding process parameters. The L9 orthogonal array and the signal-to-noise was used to study the effect of TIG welding parameters such as arc current, travelling speed, welding voltage and argon flow rate on tribological response behaviour (wear rate, surface roughness and wear track width). The objective of the study was to identify optimal design parameter that significantly minimizes each of the surface quality characteristics. The analysis of the experimental results revealed that the argon flow rate was found to be the most influential factor contributing to the minimum wear and surface roughness of the modified coating surface. On the other hand, the key factor in reducing wear scar is the welding voltage. Finally, a convenient and economical Taguchi approach used in this study was efficient to find out optimal factor settings for obtaining minimum wear rate, wear scar and surface roughness responses in TIG-coated surfaces.

  14. Closed field magnetron sputtering: new generation sputtering process for optical coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, D. R.; Brinkley, I.; Waddell, E. M.; Walls, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    "Closed field" magnetron (CFM) sputtering offers a flexible and high throughput deposition process for optical coatings and thin films. CFM sputtering uses two or more different metal targets to deposit multilayers comprising a wide range of dielectrics, metals and conductive oxides. Moreover, CFM provides a room temperature deposition process with high ion current density, low bias voltage and reactive oxidation in the entire volume around the rotating substrate drum carrier, thereby producing films over a large surface area at high deposition rate with excellent and reproducible optical properties. Machines based on the Closed Field are scaleable to meet a range of batch and in-line size requirements. Typically, thin film thickness control to <+/-1% is accomplished simply using time, although optical monitoring can be used for more demanding applications. Fine layer thickness control and deposition of graded index layers is also assisted with a specially designed rotating shutter mechanism. This paper presents data on optical properties for CFM deposited optical coatings, including anti-reflection, thermal control filters, graded coatings, narrowband filters as well as conductive transparent oxides such as indium tin oxide and carbide films. Benefits of the CFM sputter process are described.

  15. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining silicon carbide to silicon carbide and silicon nitride to silicon nitride for advanced heat engine applications Phase 2. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.; Vartabedian, A.M.; Wade, J.A.; White, C.S. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

    1994-10-01

    The purpose of joining, Phase 2 was to develop joining technologies for HIP`ed Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with 4wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (NCX-5101) and for a siliconized SiC (NT230) for various geometries including: butt joins, curved joins and shaft to disk joins. In addition, more extensive mechanical characterization of silicon nitride joins to enhance the predictive capabilities of the analytical/numerical models for structural components in advanced heat engines was provided. Mechanical evaluation were performed by: flexure strength at 22 C and 1,370 C, stress rupture at 1,370 C, high temperature creep, 22 C tensile testing and spin tests. While the silicon nitride joins were produced with sufficient integrity for many applications, the lower join strength would limit its use in the more severe structural applications. Thus, the silicon carbide join quality was deemed unsatisfactory to advance to more complex, curved geometries. The silicon carbide joining methods covered within this contract, although not entirely successful, have emphasized the need to focus future efforts upon ways to obtain a homogeneous, well sintered parent/join interface prior to siliconization. In conclusion, the improved definition of the silicon carbide joining problem obtained by efforts during this contract have provided avenues for future work that could successfully obtain heat engine quality joins.

  16. Catalytic activity of tungsten carbide-carbon (WC@C) core-shell structured for ethanol electro-oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, Gourav, E-mail: gsinghla@gmail.com; Singh, K., E-mail: kusingh@thapar.edu; Pandey, O.P., E-mail: oppandey@thapar.edu

    2017-01-15

    In this study, carbon coated WC (WC@C) was synthesized through solvothermal reactions in the presence of reducing agent magnesium (Mg) by employing tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) as a precursor, acetone (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O) as a carbon source. The formation of WC@C nano particles is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. The thermal stability of the synthesized powder examined in air shows its stability up to 550 °C. In this method, in-situ produced outer carbon layer increase the surface area of materials which is 52.6 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} with pore volume 0.213 cm{sup 3} g{sup −1}. The Electrocatalytic activity of ethanol oxidation on a synthesized sample with and without Pt nano particles have been investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The CV results show the enhancement in oxidation stability of WC@C in acidic media as well as better CO-tolerance for ethanol oxidation after the deposition of Pt nanoparticles as compared to without Pt nano particles. - Highlights: • Tungsten carbide nano powder was synthesized using acetone as carbon source. • In-situ produced outer carbon layer increase the surface area of materials. • Mesoporous WC with surface areas 52.6 m{sup 2}/g obtained. • Pt modified WC powder showed higher electrochemical stability. • Better CO-tolerance for ethanol oxidation after the deposition of Pt nanoparticles.

  17. Methods for Coating Particulate Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  18. Direct Electrochemical Preparation of Cobalt, Tungsten, and Tungsten Carbide from Cemented Carbide Scrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiangjun; Xi, Xiaoli; Nie, Zuoren; Zhang, Liwen; Ma, Liwen

    2017-02-01

    A novel process of preparing cobalt, tungsten, and tungsten carbide powders from cemented carbide scrap by molten salt electrolysis has been investigated in this paper. In this experiment, WC-6Co and NaCl-KCl salt were used as sacrificial anode and electrolyte, respectively. The dissolution potential of cobalt and WC was determined by linear sweep voltammetry to be 0 and 0.6 V ( vs Ag/AgCl), respectively. Furthermore, the electrochemical behavior of cobalt and tungsten ions was investigated by a variety of electrochemical techniques. Results of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square-wave voltammetry show that the cobalt and tungsten ions existed as Co2+ and W2+ on melts, respectively. The effect of applied voltage, electrolysis current, and electrolysis times on the composition of the product was studied. Results showed that pure cobalt powder can be obtained when the electrolysis potential is lower than 0.6 V or during low current and short times. Double-cathode and two-stage electrolysis was utilized for the preparation of cobalt, tungsten carbide, and tungsten powders. Additionally, X-ray diffraction results confirm that the product collected at cathodes 1 and 2 is pure Co and WC, respectively. Pure tungsten powder was obtained after electrolysis of the second part. Scanning electron microscope results show that the diameters of tungsten, tungsten carbide, and cobalt powder are smaller than 100, 200, and 200 nm, respectively.

  19. Chemical and mechanical analysis of boron-rich boron carbide processed via spark plasma sintering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhollon, Tyler Lee

    Boron carbide is a material of choice for many industrial and specialty applications due to the exceptional properties it exhibits such as high hardness, chemical inertness, low specific gravity, high neutron cross section and more. The combination of high hardness and low specific gravity makes it especially attractive for high pressure/high strain rate applications. However, boron carbide exhibits anomalous behavior when high pressures are applied. Impact pressures over the Hugoniot elastic limit result in catastrophic failure of the material. This failure has been linked to amorphization in cleavage planes and loss of shear strength. Atomistic modeling has suggested boron-rich boron carbide (B13C2) may be a better performing material than the commonly used B4C due to the elimination of amorphization and an increase in shear strength. Therefore, a clear experimental understanding of the factors that lead to the degradation of mechanical properties as well as the effects of chemistry changes in boron carbide is needed. For this reason, the goal of this thesis was to produce high purity boron carbide with varying stoichiometries for chemical and mechanical property characterization. Utilizing rapid carbothermal reduction and pressure assisted sintering, dense boron carbides with varying stoichiometries were produced. Microstructural characteristics such as impurity inclusions, porosity and grain size were controlled. The chemistry and common static mechanical properties that are of importance to superhard materials including elastic moduli, hardness and fracture toughness of the resulting boron-rich boron carbides were characterized. A series of six boron carbide samples were processed with varying amounts of amorphous boron (up to 45 wt. % amorphous boron). Samples with greater than 40 wt.% boron additions were shown to exhibit abnormal sintering behavior, making it difficult to characterize these samples. Near theoretical densities were achieved in samples with

  20. The High-Temperature Wear and Oxidation Behavior of CrC-Based HVOF Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houdková, Šárka; Česánek, Zdeněk; Smazalová, Eva; Lukáč, František

    2018-01-01

    Three commercially available chromium carbide-based powders with different kinds of matrix (Cr3C2-25%NiCr; Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY and Cr3C2-50%NiCrMoNb) were deposited by an HVOF JP-5000 spraying gun, evaluated and compared. The influence of heat treatment on the microstructure and properties, as well as the oxidation resistance in a hot steam environment ( p = 24 MPa; T = 609 °C), was evaluated by SEM and XRD with respect to their potential application in the steam power industry. The sliding wear resistance measured at room and elevated ( T = 600 °C) temperatures according to ASTM G-133. For all three kinds of chromium carbide-based coatings, the precipitation of secondary carbides from the supersaturated matrix was observed during the heat treatment. For Cr3C2-25%NiCr coating annealed in hot steam environment as well as for Cr3C2-25%CoNiCrAlY coating in both environments, the inner carbide oxidation was recorded. The sliding wear resistance was found equal at room temperature, regardless of the matrix composition and content, while at elevated temperatures, the higher wear was measured, varying in dependence on the matrix composition and content. The chromium carbide-based coating with modified matrix composition Cr3C2-50%NiCrMoNb is suitable to replace the Cr3C2-25%NiCr coating in a hot steam environment to eliminate the risk of failure caused by inner carbide oxidation.

  1. Production of boron carbide powder by carbothermal synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TECS

    structure with 12-atom icosahedral clusters which are linked by direct covalent bonds and through three-atom interico- sahedral chains. Boron carbide has single phase ... in nuclear industry due to its high neutron absorption co- efficient (Sinha et al 2002). Boron carbide can be prepared by reaction of elemental boron and ...

  2. Production of nano structured silicon carbide by high energy ball ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The size, shape and texture of the fresh as well as nano structured Silicon carbide powder were studied using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The fresh Silicon carbide powder particles were mostly angular in shape. The shape of the 50h milled particles is irregular and the surface morphology is rough.

  3. SEM investigation of minor constituents of carbide materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shungite is a black, precambrian poorly crystalline minera- loid composed mainly of a natural mixture of amorphous carbon and silicate minerals, mainly quartz, .... Microchemical analysis of carbide composite material prepared from a mixture of carbidized shungite and alumina. Pointa. Elemental composition (EDS data)b ...

  4. Stochastic Distribution of Wear of Carbide Tools during Machining ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing awareness of wear of carbide tools during machining operation has created doubts about the ability of this tool material to withstand stress and strain induced by the machining process. Manufacturers are beginning to question their dependence on carbide tools, seeing that they no longer meet their expected ...

  5. Size dependence of nanoscale wear of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiyapat Tangpatjaroen; David Grierson; Steve Shannon; Joseph E. Jakes; Izabela Szlufarska

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale, single-asperity wear of single-crystal silicon carbide (sc- SiC) and nanocrystalline silicon carbide (nc-SiC) is investigated using single-crystal diamond nanoindenter tips and nanocrystalline diamond atomic force microscopy (AFM) tips under dry conditions, and the wear behavior is compared to that of single-crystal silicon with both thin and thick native...

  6. Synergistic methods for the production of high-strength and low-cost boron carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Charles Schenck

    2011-12-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) is a non-oxide ceramic in the same class of nonmetallic hard materials as silicon carbide and diamond. The high hardness, high elastic modulus and low density of B4C make it a nearly ideal material for personnel and vehicular armor. B4C plates formed via hot-pressing are currently issued to U.S. soldiers and have exhibited excellent performance; however, hot-pressed articles contain inherent processing defects and are limited to simple geometries such as low-curvature plates. Recent advances in the pressureless sintering of B4C have produced theoretically-dense and complex-shape articles that also exhibit superior ballistic performance. However, the cost of this material is currently high due to the powder shape, size, and size distribution that are required, which limits the economic feasibility of producing such a product. Additionally, the low fracture toughness of pure boron carbide may have resulted in historically lower transition velocities (the projectile velocity range at which armor begins to fail) than competing silicon carbide ceramics in high-velocity long-rod tungsten penetrator tests. Lower fracture toughness also limits multi-hit protection capability. Consequently, these requirements motivated research into methods for improving the densification and fracture toughness of inexpensive boron carbide composites that could result in the development of a superior armor material that would also be cost-competitive with other high-performance ceramics. The primary objective of this research was to study the effect of titanium and carbon additives on the sintering and mechanical properties of inexpensive B4C powders. The boron carbide powder examined in this study was a sub-micron (0.6 mum median particle size) boron carbide powder produced by H.C. Starck GmbH via a jet milling process. A carbon source in the form of phenolic resin, and titanium additives in the form of 32 nm and 0.9 mum TiO2 powders were selected. Parametric studies of

  7. White light emission from engineered silicon carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ou, Haiyan

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide indirect bandgap semiconductor. The light emission efficiency is low in nature. But this material has very unique physical properties like good thermal conductivity, high break down field etc in addition to its abundance. Therefore it is interesting to engineer its...... is demonstrated. After optimizing the passivation conditions, strong blue-green emission from porous SiC is demonstrated as well. When combining the yellow emission from co-doped SiC and blue-green from porous SiC, a high color rendering index white light source is achieved....

  8. Silicon carbide nanowires: synthesis and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huczko, Andrzej; Dabrowska, Agnieszka [Department of Chemistry, Warsaw University (Poland); Savchyn, Volodymyr; Karbovnyk, Ivan [Department of Electronics, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv (Ukraine); Popov, Anatoli I. [Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, Riga (Latvia)

    2009-12-15

    Silicon carbide nanowires have been synthesized via a combustion synthesis route. Structural studies showed that obtained SiC nanowires belong dominantly to 3C polytype with zincblend structure. Cathodoluminescence spectra from these nanostructures within the temperature range of 77..300 K, show obvious differences with respect to the bulk materials. The exciton band of the bulk 3C-SiC is significantly damped and the prevailing line is found to be at 1.99 eV (77 K), proving the key role of defect centers in optical properties of the investigated nanomaterial. Purified SiC nanowires. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Neutron-rich isotope production using a uranium carbide - carbon nanotubes SPES target prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradetti, S.; Biasetto, L.; Manzolaro, M.; Scarpa, D.; Carturan, S.; Andrighetto, A.; Prete, G.; Vasquez, J.; Zanonato, P.; Colombo, P.; Jost, C. U.; Stracener, D. W.

    2013-05-01

    The SPES (Selective Production of Exotic Species) project, under development at the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL), is a new-generation Isotope Separation On-Line (ISOL) facility for the production of radioactive ion beams by means of the proton-induced fission of uranium. In the framework of the research on the SPES target, seven uranium carbide discs, obtained by reacting uranium oxide with graphite and carbon nanotubes, were irradiated with protons at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). In the following, the yields of several fission products obtained during the experiment are presented and discussed. The experimental results are then compared to those obtained using a standard uranium carbide target. The reported data highlights the capability of the new type of SPES target to produce and release isotopes of interest for the nuclear physics community.

  10. High-performance circular sawing of AISI 1045 steel with cermet and tungsten carbide inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrao, A. M.; Rubio, J. C. Campos; Moreira, C.; Faria, P. E. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-10-15

    This work investigated the influence of cutting speed and feed rate on cutting forces, surface roughness, and slot width circular sawing of AISI 1045 steel. The effects of tool material (cermet and tungsten carbide) and geometry (chip breaker flute and pre-cutting/postcutting teeth) were also investigated. Thrust and radial forces generally tended to decrease as the cutting speed increased and tended to increase with the feed rate. The lowest values of thrust and radial forces were obtained using a tungsten carbide saw ground with precutting and post-cutting teeth. With regard to the quality of the machined wall, the lowest surface roughness was obtained by applying the highest cutting speed and lowest feed rate and employing a cermet brazed saw. Under this condition, roughness values comparable to face turning and parting off operations were obtained. The cermet brazed saw was responsible for producing the narrowest slot widths.

  11. Supported molybdenum carbide for higher alcohol synthesis from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2013-01-01

    carbide, while the selectivity to methanol follows the opposite trend. The effect of Mo2C loading on the alcohol selectivity at a fixed K/Mo molar ratio of 0.14 could be related to the amount of K2CO3 actually on the active Mo2C phase and the size, structure and composition of the supported carbide......Molybdenum carbide supported on active carbon, carbon nanotubes, and titanium dioxide, and promoted by K2CO3, has been prepared and tested for methanol and higher alcohol synthesis from syngas. At optimal conditions, the activity and selectivity to alcohols (methanol and higher alcohols) over...... supported molybdenum carbide are significantly higher compared to the bulk carbide. The CO conversion reaches a maximum, when about 20wt% Mo2C is loaded on active carbon. The selectivity to higher alcohols increases with increasing Mo2C loading on active carbon and reaches a maximum over bulk molybdenum...

  12. Growth Kinetics of In Situ Fabricated Dense NbC Coatings on Gray Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liuliu; Xu, Yunhua; Zhao, Nana; Zhao, Ziyuan; Zhong, Lisheng; Song, Ke; Cai, Xiaolong; Wang, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, dense niobium carbide (NbC) coatings are fabricated by in situ techniques on gray cast iron (Fe) substrates at 1150 °C for 5 min, followed by a heat treatment at 990, 1010 and 1030 °C for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. The microstructure, element composition and metallographic phase of the coating are characterized by scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectral and x-ray diffraction, respectively. Results show that the coating consists of NbC and α-Fe phases. NbC coating thickness ranges from 12.51 ± 1.4 to 29.17 ± 2.0 µm depending on the heat treatment temperature and time. In addition, the growth kinetics of dense niobium carbide coatings are estimated. A diffusion model based on Fick's laws is used to explore the carbon diffusion coefficients of the dense NbC coating in the range of heat treatment temperatures in which the experimental results of the kinetics of the niobium carbide coating are in good agreement with those estimated using diffusion model.

  13. Effect of V addition on the hardness, adherence and friction coefficient of VC coatings produced by thermo-reactive diffusion deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredy Alejandro Orjuela-Guerrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Se produjeron recubrimientos de carburo de vanadio (VC sobre sustratos de acero AISI H13 y acero AISI D2 mediante deposito termoreactiva/ difusión (TRD con el fin de evaluar sus propiedades mecánicas como una función del contenido de vanadio. Los recubrimientos se producen con diferentes porcentajes de concentración de ferrovanadio. La composición química de los recubrimientos se determinó mediante fluorescencia de rayos X (XRF, la estructura cristalina se analizó utilizando difracción de rayos X (XRD, la morfología se caracterizó usando microscopía electrónica de barrido (SEM, la dureza se midió a través de nanoindentaciòn, y las propiedades tribológicas mediante la prueba de bola sobre disco. El análisis XRF indicó que los recubrimientos crecidos en acero D2 disminuyó el porcentaje atómico de vanadio cuando el recubrimiento se produce con 20% de ferrovanadio. El análisis XRD estableció que los recubrimientos eran policristalinos, con una estructura cúbica. Las imágenes de SEM revelaron que los recubrimientos crecidos en acero D2 eran más compactos que los crecidos en el acero H13. Finalmente, las pruebas de desgaste establecieron que el coeficiente de fricción disminuyó con un aumento de vanadio en el recubrimiento.

  14. SILICON CARBIDE CERAMICS FOR COMPACT HEAT EXCHANGERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DR. DENNIS NAGLE; DR. DAJIE ZHANG

    2009-03-26

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials are prime candidates for high temperature heat exchangers for next generation nuclear reactors due to their refractory nature and high thermal conductivity at elevated temperatures. This research has focused on demonstrating the potential of liquid silicon infiltration (LSI) for making SiC to achieve this goal. The major advantage of this method over other ceramic processing techniques is the enhanced capability of making high dense, high purity SiC materials in complex net shapes. For successful formation of net shape SiC using LSI techniques, the carbon preform reactivity and pore structure must be controlled to allow the complete infiltration of the porous carbon structure which allows complete conversion of the carbon to SiC. We have established a procedure for achieving desirable carbon properties by using carbon precursors consisting of two readily available high purity organic materials, crystalline cellulose and phenolic resin. Phenolic resin yields a glassy carbon with low chemical reactivity and porosity while the cellulose carbon is highly reactive and porous. By adjusting the ratio of these two materials in the precursor mixtures, the properties of the carbons produced can be controlled. We have identified the most favorable carbon precursor composition to be a cellulose resin mass ratio of 6:4 for LSI formation of SiC. The optimum reaction conditions are a temperature of 1800 C, a pressure of 0.5 Torr of argon, and a time of 120 minutes. The fully dense net shape SiC material produced has a density of 2.96 g cm{sup -3} (about 92% of pure SiC) and a SiC volume fraction of over 0.82. Kinetics of the LSI SiC formation process was studied by optical microscopy and quantitative digital image analysis. This study identified six reaction stages and provided important understanding of the process. Although the thermal conductivity of pure SiC at elevated temperatures is very high, thermal conductivities of most commercial Si

  15. Thin TaC layer produced by ion mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barna, Árpád; Kotis, László; Pécz, Béla

    2012-01-01

    Ion-beam mixing in C/Ta layered systems was investigated. C 8nm/Ta 12nm and C 20nm/Ta 19nm/C 20nm layer systems were irradiated by Ga+ ions of energy in the range of 2–30keV. In case of the 8nm and 20nm thick C cover layers applying 5–8keV and 20–30keV Ga+ ion energy, respectively resulted...... in strongly asymmetric ion mixing; the carbon was readily transported to the Ta layer, while the reverse process was much weaker. Because of the asymmetrical transport the C/TaC interface remained sharp independently from the applied fluence. The carbon transported to the Ta layer formed Ta......Cx. The stoichiometry of the carbide produced varied along the depth. The TaCx layer contained implanted Ga, the concentration of which decreased with increasing depth. The thickness of the TaCx layer could be tailored by the ion fluence and energy making possible to produce coating layer of desired thickness....

  16. Preliminary Evaluation of PS300: A New Self-Lubricating High Temperature Composite Coating for Use to 800 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, C.; Edmonds, B. J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces PS300, a plasma sprayed, self-lubricating composite coating for use in sliding contacts at temperatures to 800 C. PS300 is a metal bonded chrome oxide coating with silver and BaF2/CaF2 eutectic solid lubricant additives. PS300 is similar to PS200, a chromium carbide based coating, which is currently being investigated for a variety of tribological applications. In pin-on-disk testing up to 650 C, PS300 exhibited comparable friction and wear properties to PS200. The PS300 matrix, which is predominantly chromium oxide rather than chromium carbide, does not require diamond grinding and polishes readily with silicon carbide abrasives greatly reducing manufacturing costs compared to PS200. It is anticipated that PS300 has potential for sliding bearing and seal applications in both aerospace and general industry.

  17. Tribology and Microstructure of PS212 with a Cr2O3 Seal Coat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Benoy, Patricia A.; Korenyi-Both, Andras; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    PS212 is a plasma sprayed metal bonding chrome carbide coating with solid lubricant additives which has lubricating properties at temperatures up to about 900 deg C. The coating is diamond ground to achieve an acceptable tribological surface. But, as with many plasma spray coatings, PS212 is not fully-dense. In this study, a chromium oxide base seal coating is used in an attempt to seal any porosity that is open to the surface of the PS212 coating, and to study the effect of the sealant on the tribological properties of PS212. The results indicate that the seal coating reduces friction and wear when it is applied and then diamond ground leaving a thin layer of seal coating which fills in the surface pits of the PS212 coating.

  18. Deposition, microstructure, and properties of nanocrystalline Ti(C,O,N) coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppi, S.; Larsson, A.

    2003-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition of Ti(C,N) coatings from the TiCl4- CH3CN- N2-H2 system on cemented carbide substrates was studied. The morphology and grain size of the coatings were modified using carbon monoxide (CO). Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that grain refinement of the Ti(C,N) coatings could be obtained by means of CO doping and nanocrystalline coatings were obtained at CO levels exceeding 6%. CO doping resulted in the incorporation of oxygen in the structure, but no segregation of oxygen to grain boundaries was observed. The coatings appeared to be of homogeneous composition even at the highest CO levels. Both improved coating hardness and surface quality were obtained with decreasing grain size. However, the coatings exhibited clearly lower crater wear resistance in the nanograined region. This was explained by an increased tendency for grain-boundary sliding in the nanocrystalline coatings leading to more pronounced plastic deformation.

  19. Porous silicon carbide and aluminum oxide with unidirectional open porosity as model target materials for radioisotope beam production

    CERN Document Server

    Czapski, M; Tardivat, C; Stora, T; Bouville, F; Leloup, J; Luis, R Fernandes; Augusto, R Santos

    2013-01-01

    New silicon carbide (SiC) and aluminum oxide (Al2O3) of a tailor-made microstructure were produced using the ice-templating technique, which permits controlled pore formation conditions within the material. These prototypes will serve to verify aging of the new advanced target materials under irradiation with proton beams. Before this, the evaluation of their mechanical integrity was made based on the energy deposition spectra produced by FLORA codes. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A Review of Metal Injection Molding- Process, Optimization, Defects and Microwave Sintering on WC-Co Cemented Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbudin, S. N. A.; Othman, M. H.; Amin, Sri Yulis M.; Ibrahim, M. H. I.

    2017-08-01

    This article is about a review of optimization of metal injection molding and microwave sintering process on tungsten cemented carbide produce by metal injection molding process. In this study, the process parameters for the metal injection molding were optimized using Taguchi method. Taguchi methods have been used widely in engineering analysis to optimize the performance characteristics through the setting of design parameters. Microwave sintering is a process generally being used in powder metallurgy over the conventional method. It has typical characteristics such as accelerated heating rate, shortened processing cycle, high energy efficiency, fine and homogeneous microstructure, and enhanced mechanical performance, which is beneficial to prepare nanostructured cemented carbides in metal injection molding. Besides that, with an advanced and promising technology, metal injection molding has proven that can produce cemented carbides. Cemented tungsten carbide hard metal has been used widely in various applications due to its desirable combination of mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Moreover, areas of study include common defects in metal injection molding and application of microwave sintering itself has been discussed in this paper.

  1. Development of a new family of cemented carbides for geothermal drilling. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowcliff, D.J.

    1983-10-01

    The contractor fabricated samples of cemented carbides based on tantalum carbide and niobium carbide with cobalt and nickel binders. These materials were evaluated for use as rock-bit inserts in geothermal drilling. Carbon content in the niobium carbide (NbC/sub x/) and the tantalum carbide (TaC/sub x/) was varied (x is 0.83 to 1.0) and the effect of these changes on the carbides' mechanical properties was examined. Hardness, toughness, and abrasive wear resistance of the new materials were measured and compared to properties of tungsten carbide grades used in rock-bit inserts.

  2. Computational Studies of Physical Properties of Boron Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lizhi Ouyang

    2011-09-30

    The overall goal is to provide valuable insight in to the mechanisms and processes that could lead to better engineering the widely used boron carbide which could play an important role in current plight towards greener energy. Carbon distribution in boron carbide, which has been difficult to retrieve from experimental methods, is critical to our understanding of its structure-properties relation. For modeling disorders in boron carbide, we implemented a first principles method based on supercell approach within our G(P,T) package. The supercell approach was applied to boron carbide to determine its carbon distribution. Our results reveal that carbon prefers to occupy the end sites of the 3-atom chain in boron carbide and further carbon atoms will distribute mainly on the equatorial sites with a small percentage on the 3-atom chains and the apex sites. Supercell approach was also applied to study mechanical properties of boron carbide under uniaxial load. We found that uniaxial load can lead to amorphization. Other physical properties of boron carbide were calculated using the G(P,T) package.

  3. Precipitation behavior of carbides in high-carbon martensitic stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Qin-tian; Li, Jing; Shi, Cheng-bin; Yu, Wen-tao; Shi, Chang-min [University of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Advanced Metallurgy; Li, Ji-hui [Yang Jiang Shi Ba Zi Group Co., Ltd, Guangdong (China)

    2017-01-15

    A fundamental study on the precipitation behavior of carbides was carried out. Thermo-calc software, scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to study the precipitation and transformation behaviors of carbides. Carbide precipitation was of a specific order. Primary carbides (M7C3) tended to be generated from liquid steel when the solid fraction reached 84 mol.%. Secondary carbides (M7C3) precipitated from austenite and can hardly transformed into M23C6 carbides with decreasing temperature in air. Primary carbides hardly changed once they were generated, whereas secondary carbides were sensitive to heat treatment and thermal deformation. Carbide precipitation had a certain effect on steel-matrix phase transitions. The segregation ability of carbon in liquid steel was 4.6 times greater that of chromium. A new method for controlling primary carbides is proposed.

  4. Absorptive coating for aluminum solar panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmet, D.; Jason, A.; Parr, A.

    1979-01-01

    Method for coating forming coating of copper oxide from copper component of sheet aluminum/copper alloy provides strong durable solar heat collector panels. Copper oxide coating has solar absorption characteristics similar to black chrome and is much simpler and less costly to produce.

  5. A silicon carbide array for electrocorticography and peripheral nerve recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Botia, C. A.; Luna, L. E.; Neely, R. M.; Chamanzar, M.; Carraro, C.; Carmena, J. M.; Sabes, P. N.; Maboudian, R.; Maharbiz, M. M.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Current neural probes have a limited device lifetime of a few years. Their common failure mode is the degradation of insulating films and/or the delamination of the conductor-insulator interfaces. We sought to develop a technology that does not suffer from such limitations and would be suitable for chronic applications with very long device lifetimes. Approach. We developed a fabrication method that integrates polycrystalline conductive silicon carbide with insulating silicon carbide. The technology employs amorphous silicon carbide as the insulator and conductive silicon carbide at the recording sites, resulting in a seamless transition between doped and amorphous regions of the same material, eliminating heterogeneous interfaces prone to delamination. Silicon carbide has outstanding chemical stability, is biocompatible, is an excellent molecular barrier and is compatible with standard microfabrication processes. Main results. We have fabricated silicon carbide electrode arrays using our novel fabrication method. We conducted in vivo experiments in which electrocorticography recordings from the primary visual cortex of a rat were obtained and were of similar quality to those of polymer based electrocorticography arrays. The silicon carbide electrode arrays were also used as a cuff electrode wrapped around the sciatic nerve of a rat to record the nerve response to electrical stimulation. Finally, we demonstrated the outstanding long term stability of our insulating silicon carbide films through accelerated aging tests. Significance. Clinical translation in neural engineering has been slowed in part due to the poor long term performance of current probes. Silicon carbide devices are a promising technology that may accelerate this transition by enabling truly chronic applications.

  6. Iron carbide as a source of carbon for graphite and diamond formation under lithospheric mantle P-T parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataleva, Yuliya V.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Bayukov, Oleg A.; Zdrokov, Evgeniy V.

    2017-08-01

    Experimental modeling of natural carbide-involving reactions, implicated in the graphite and diamond formation and estimation of the iron carbide stability in the presence of S-bearing fluids, sulfide melts as well as mantle silicates and oxides, was performed using a multi-anvil high-pressure split-sphere apparatus. Experiments were carried out in the carbide-sulfur (Fe3C-S), carbide-sulfur-oxide (Fe3C-S-SiO2-MgO) and carbide-sulfide (Fe3C-FeS2) systems, at pressure of 6.3 GPa, temperatures in the range of 900-1600 °C and run time of 18-40 h. During the interaction of cohenite with S-rich reduced fluid or pyrite at 900-1100 °C, extraction of carbon from carbide was realized, resulting in the formation of graphite in assemblage with pyrrhotite and cohenite. At higher temperatures complete reaction of cohenite with newly-formed sulfide melt was found to produce metal-sulfide melt with dissolved carbon (Fe64S27C9 (1200 °C)-Fe54S40C6 (1500 °C), at.%), which acted as a crystallization medium for graphite (1200-1600 °C) and diamond growth on seeds (1300-1600 °C). Reactions of cohenite and oxides with S-rich reduced fluid resulted in the formation of graphite in assemblage with highly ferrous orthopyroxene and pyrrhotite (900-1100 °C) or in hypersthene formation, as well as graphite crystallization and diamond growth on seeds in the Fe-S-C melt (1200-1600 °C). We show that the main processes of carbide interaction with S-rich fluid or sulfide melt are recrystallization of cohenite (900-1100 °C), extraction of carbon and iron in the sulfide melt, and graphite formation and diamond growth in the metal-sulfide melt with dissolved carbon. Our results evidence that iron carbide can act as carbon source in the processes of natural graphite and diamond formation under reduced mantle conditions. We experimentally demonstrate that cohenite in natural environments can be partially consumed in the reactions with mantle silicates and oxides, and is absolutely unstable in

  7. Comparison Between Cemented Carbide and PCD Tools on Machinability of a High Silicon Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, R. B.; de Jesus, A. M. P.; Neto, R. J. L.; Chirita, B.; Rosa, P. A. R.; Reis, A.

    2017-09-01

    The high content of silicon of aluminum casting alloys challenges the tool life of conventional cemented carbide inserts, and polycrystalline diamond (PCD) tools appear as an interesting material to machine these alloys because they improve substantially the durability of cutting tools and consequently the productivity of machining. However, the surface roughness, cutting forces and chip morphology are equally important factors in machining evaluation. Therefore, an experimental study is performed aiming at comparing the performance of cemented carbide and PCD tools taking into account cutting forces, surface roughness and chip morphology, under dry longitudinal turning, performed for the AlSi9Cu3 alloy produced by permanent mold casting process. Different chip breaker geometries were also considered, and their influence on the referred parameters was also investigated. Analysis of variance was employed to study the different contributions of inserts, cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and their interactions in machinability performance. The results show low cutting forces and better results for surface roughness for uncoated cemented carbide tools, with simpler chip breakers and flat rake face PCD tool, but an efficient chip control was obtained for inserts with small grooves with high cutting forces and power consumption. Nevertheless, the feed rate and depth of cut have the highest influence on the machinability performance of the alloy under investigation.

  8. Use of Acoustic Emission and Pattern Recognition for Crack Detection of a Large Carbide Anvil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Large-volume cubic high-pressure apparatus is commonly used to produce synthetic diamond. Due to the high pressure, high temperature and alternative stresses in practical production, cracks often occur in the carbide anvil, thereby resulting in significant economic losses or even casualties. Conventional methods are unsuitable for crack detection of the carbide anvil. This paper is concerned with acoustic emission-based crack detection of carbide anvils, regarded as a pattern recognition problem; this is achieved using a microphone, with methods including sound pulse detection, feature extraction, feature optimization and classifier design. Through analyzing the characteristics of background noise, the cracked sound pulses are separated accurately from the originally continuous signal. Subsequently, three different kinds of features including a zero-crossing rate, sound pressure levels, and linear prediction cepstrum coefficients are presented for characterizing the cracked sound pulses. The original high-dimensional features are adaptively optimized using principal component analysis. A hybrid framework of a support vector machine with k nearest neighbors is designed to recognize the cracked sound pulses. Finally, experiments are conducted in a practical diamond workshop to validate the feasibility and efficiency of the proposed method.

  9. Room-temperature Electrochemical Synthesis of Carbide-derived Carbons and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogotsi, Yury [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Nanomaterials Group. Materials Science and Engineering Dept.

    2015-02-28

    This project addresses room-temperature electrochemical etching as an energy-efficient route to synthesis of 3D nanoporous carbon networks and layered 2D carbons and related structures, as well as provides fundamental understanding of structure and properties of materials produced by this method. Carbide-derived-carbons (CDCs) are a growing class of nanostructured carbon materials with properties that are desirable for many applications, such as electrical energy and gas storage. The structure of these functional materials is tunable by the choice of the starting carbide precursor, synthesis method, and process parameters. Moving from high-temperature synthesis of CDCs through vacuum decomposition above 1400°C and chlorination above 400°C, our studies under the previous DOE BES support led to identification of precursor materials and processing conditions for CDC synthesis at temperatures as low as 200°C, resulting in amorphous and highly reactive porous carbons. We also investigated synthesis of monolithic CDC films from carbide films at 250-1200°C. The results of our early studies provided new insights into CDC formation, led to development of materials for capacitive energy storage, and enabled fundamental understanding of the electrolyte ions confinement in nanoporous carbons.

  10. Thermal Spray Coatings for Fusion Applications — Review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Chráska, Pavel; Linke, J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2007), s. 64-83 ISSN 1059-9630 Grant - others:-(XE) EFDA Task DV4/04 (TW0; -(XE) EFDA Task TW5-TVM-PSW Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : beryllium * boron carbide * plasma facing components * plasma sprayed coatings * thermonuclear fusion * tungsten Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 1.204, year: 2007

  11. Carbide inclusions in delta-phase plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baros, T. (Thomas); Davis, C. C. (Charles C.); Hawkins, H. T. (Heather T.); Ruggiero, M. J. (Matthew J.); Valentine, S. J. (Scott J.); Storey, B. G. (Bradford G.); Roybal, L. (Lawrence)

    2004-01-01

    Inclusions in plutonium alloys are common and depend on the processing parameters and age of the material. Plutonium-bearing compounds frequently observed as inclusions include: hydrides, nitrides, oxides, and carbides. Optical metallography and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were used to characterize plutonium carbide (PuC) inclusions in delta-phase plutonium. The structural complexities of plutonium combined with its radioactivity, pyrophoric nature, and toxicity create a unique challenge to revealing and interpreting its microstructures. Samples of delta-phase Pu-239 were used in this study. Note that the delta phase is stabilized to room temperature by the addition of {approx}1 wt% gallium. After samples are cut, mounted in epoxy, ground, and polished, they are then electropolished at 40 V in an etchant of 10 vol.% nitric acid and 90 vol.% dimethylformamide and electroetched at 6 V in the same etchant. Optical micrographs were collected using an inverted metallograph equipped with a digital camera. Back-scattered electron images and elemental maps of the plutonium, carbon, and gallium content were collected using an EPMA equipped with wavelength dispersive spectrometers. After reviewing our data and consulting work done by Cramer and Bergin it was determined that the inclusions were acicular plutonium carbides and were formed during the casting process at the time the material was manufactured. It is believed that these inclusions would affect the high strain-rate properties. The response of plutonium alloys during implosion is critical to the performance and reliability of a nuclear weapon. We plan to further investigate these inclusions to gather information about orientation, composition, structure, and concentration. An x-ray diffractometer with a 10 {micro}m beam diameter will be used to gather information on the orientation and structure of individual inclusions. A field-emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) with a WDS will be used at low

  12. Amorphous silicon carbide ultramicroelectrode arrays for neural stimulation and recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deku, Felix; Cohen, Yarden; Joshi-Imre, Alexandra; Kanneganti, Aswini; Gardner, Timothy; Cogan, Stuart

    2017-09-27

    Foreign body response to indwelling cortical microelectrodes limits the reliability of neural stimulation and recording, particularly for extended chronic applications in behaving animals. The extent to which this response compromises the chronic stability of neural devices depends on many factors including the materials used in the electrode construction, the size, and geometry of the indwelling structure. Here, we report on the development of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) based on amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC). This technology utilizes a-SiC for its chronic stability and employs semiconductor manufacturing processes to create MEAs with small shank dimensions. The a-SiC films were deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and patterned by thin-film photolithographic techniques. To improve stimulation and recording capabilities with small contact areas, we investigated low impedance coatings on the electrode sites. The assembled devices were characterized in phosphate buffered saline for their electrochemical properties. MEAs utilizing a-SiC as both the primary structural element and encapsulation were fabricated successfully. These a-SiC MEAs had 16 penetrating shanks. Each shank has a cross-sectional area less than 60 µm2 and electrode sites with a geometric surface area varying from 20-200 μm2. Electrode coatings of TiN and SIROF reduced 1 kHz electrode impedance to less than 100 kΩ from ~2.8 MΩ for 100 µm2 Au electrode sites and increased the charge injection capacities to values greater than 3 mC/cm2. Finally, we demonstrated functionality by recording neural activity from basal ganglia nucleus of Zebra Finches and motor cortex of rat. The a-SiC MEAs provide a significant advancement in the development of microelectrodes that over the years has relied on silicon platforms for device manufacture. These flexible a-SiC MEAs have the potential for decreased tissue damage and reduced foreign body

  13. Boron containing combination tool coatings-characterization and application tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keunecke, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: keunecke@ist.fraunhofer.de; Bewilogua, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany); Wiemann, E. [Institute for Machine Tools and Factory Management, Technical University Berlin (Germany); Weigel, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany); Wittorf, R. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany); Thomsen, H. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2006-01-03

    The requirements for durable tool coatings continuously increase. In many cases, tool coatings combining different phases or several layers could provide an improvement in tool life. The broad range of mechanical properties of materials in the B-C-N and Ti-B-N ternary systems, from very soft to superhard, presents many possibilities to generate various combination coatings. Such coatings were prepared using reactive sputter techniques with different target materials. An outstanding example is a superhard 3 {mu}m thick coating system with a 0.5 to 0.8 {mu}m thick cBN top layer deposited on cutting inserts. Soft coatings like hexagonal boron nitride were found to be essential for machining operations under dry conditions. The coatings were characterized with respect to hardness, abrasive wear rate and friction coefficients. The correlation between properties and composition was revealed. Application test results of B-C-N and Ti-B-N coating systems on tools obtained under near production conditions will be reported. Specifically, turning tests performed with cemented carbide cutting inserts coated with a superhard coating system with a cBN top layer will be discussed.

  14. Hugoniot equation of state and dynamic strength of boron carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grady, Dennis E. [Applied Research Associates, Southwest Division, 4300 San Mateo Blvd NE, A-220, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110-129 (United States)

    2015-04-28

    Boron carbide ceramics have been particularly problematic in attempts to develop adequate constitutive model descriptions for purposes of analysis of dynamic response in the shock and impact environment. Dynamic strength properties of boron carbide ceramic differ uniquely from comparable ceramics. Furthermore, boron carbide is suspected, but not definitely shown, to undergoing polymorphic phase transformation under shock compression. In the present paper, shock-wave compression measurements conducted over the past 40 years are assessed for the purpose of achieving improved understanding of the dynamic equation of state and strength of boron carbide. In particular, attention is focused on the often ignored Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Hugoniot measurements performed on porous sintered boron carbide ceramic. The LANL data are shown to exhibit two compression anomalies on the shock Hugoniot within the range of 20–60 GPa that may relate to crystallographic structure transitions. More recent molecular dynamics simulations on the compressibility of the boron carbide crystal lattice reveal compression transitions that bear similarities to the LANL Hugoniot results. The same Hugoniot data are complemented with dynamic isentropic compression data for boron carbide extracted from Hugoniot measurements on boron carbide and copper granular mixtures. Other Hugoniot measurements, however, performed on near-full-density boron carbide ceramic differ markedly from the LANL Hugoniot data. These later data exhibit markedly less compressibility and tend not to show comparable anomalies in compressibility. Alternative Hugoniot anomalies, however, are exhibited by the near-full-density data. Experimental uncertainty, Hugoniot strength, and phase transformation physics are all possible explanations for the observed discrepancies. It is reasoned that experimental uncertainty and Hugoniot strength are not likely explanations for the observed differences. The notable

  15. The all boron carbide diode neutron detector: Comparison with theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, A.N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, University of Nebraska, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, 116 Brace Laboratory, University of Nebraska, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); College of Engineering, N245 Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th Vine Street, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States); Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering, North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND 58102 (United States); Dowben, P.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Behlen Laboratory of Physics, University of Nebraska, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States) and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, 116 Brace Laboratory, University of Nebraska, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States)]. E-mail: pdowben@unl.edu; Balkir, S. [Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, 116 Brace Laboratory, University of Nebraska, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, 237N Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th Vine Street, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States); Schemm, Nathan [Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, 116 Brace Laboratory, University of Nebraska, P.O. Box 880111, Lincoln, NE 68588-0111 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering, 237N Walter Scott Engineering Center, 17th Vine Street, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0511 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-11-25

    A boron carbide diode detector, fabricated from two different polytypes of semiconducting boron carbide, will detect neutrons in reasonable agreement with theory. Small deviations from the model calculations occur due to the detection efficiencies of the {sup 10}B capture products Li plus {alpha} sum signal differing somewhat from expectation in the thin diodes. The performance of the all boron carbide neutron detector does depart from the behavior of devices where a boron rich neutron capture layer is distinct from the diode charge collection region (i.e. a conversion layer solid state detector), as is expected.

  16. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Ronald Baney

    2008-12-15

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

  17. Toxicity in vitro of some silicon carbides and silicon nitrides: whiskers and powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, I; Artursson, E; Leanderson, P; Berglind, R; Lindgren, F

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the toxicity of silicon carbide whiskers and powders and silicon nitride whiskers and powders and to compare their toxicity with the toxicity of crocidolite. The effects studied were inhibition of the cloning efficiency of V79 cells, formation of DNA strand breaks by means of a nick translation assay, formation of oxygen radicals in three different assays, and the ability to stimulate neutrophils to produce hydroxyl radicals. All materials showed concentration-dependent inhibition of the cloning efficiency of V79 cells. The inhibition by the most toxic whiskers was in the same order of magnitude as that of crocidolite. Milled whiskers and powders were less toxic than the whiskers. There was a high DNA breaking potential for crocidolite and four of the silicon carbide whiskers and a rather low one for the other materials. Formation of hydroxyl radicals was found for crocidolite and one of the silicon carbide whiskers. In the neutrophil activation test, there was a great variation in the different materials' abilities to activate neutrophils. There was also a good correlation between chemiluminescence and H2O2 formation. The highest activation was found in neutrophils exposed to two of the silicon carbide whiskers and one milled whisker. The conclusion of the investigation is that some of the ceramic materials studied had damaging biological effects comparable to or greater than those of crocidolite. The results from the investigation clearly imply that caution is needed in the introduction of new ceramic fiber materials, so that the correct precautions and protective devices are used in order to avoid harm to the personnel handling the material.

  18. Metal and Metal Carbide Nanoparticle Synthesis Using Electrical Explosion of Wires Coupled with Epoxide Polymerization Capping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Elseddik M; Jelliss, Paul A; Buckner, Steven W

    2015-06-15

    In this study, metal-containing nanoparticles (NPs) were produced using electrical explosion of wires (EEW) in organic solvents. The explosion chamber was constructed from Teflon to withstand the shockwave, allow growth and reaction of the incipient NPs in various organic solvents containing dissolved ligands, and allow a constant flow of argon to maintain an inert environment. A survey of different transition d-block metals was conducted with metals from groups 4-8, affording metal carbide NPs, while metals from groups 9-12 gave elemental metallic NPs. Tungsten carbide phase WC1-x, which has not been previously isolated as a single-phase material, was exclusively formed during EEW. We used polymerization initiation by electron-rich metallic nanoparticles (PIERMEN) as a capping technique for the nascent NPs with an alkyl epoxide employed as the monomers. Transmission electron microscopy showed spherical particles with the metallic core embedded in a polymer matrix with predominantly smaller particles (100 nm). Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) was used to confirm the identity of the metallic NPs. The capping agents were characterized using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. No evidence is observed for the formation of crystalline oxides during EEW for any metals used. Differential scanning calorimetry/thermal gravimetric analysis was used to study the NP's behavior upon heating under an air flow up to 800 °C with the product oxides characterized by PXRD. The bifurcation between metal-carbide NPs and metal NPs correlates with the enthalpy of formation of the product carbides. We observed PIERMEN capping of elemental metal NPs only when the metal has negative standard electrode potentials (relative to a bis(biphenyl) chromium(I)/(0) reference electrode).

  19. Nanoporous carbons derived from binary carbides and their optimization for hydrogen storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Ranjan Kumar

    On-board hydrogen storage is one of the major hurdles for success of hydrogen economy. Hydrogen storage using physisorption technique demands highly porous materials. Carbide derived carbons (CDC), a new class of porous carbons produced by thermo chemical etching of metal atoms from carbides were selected as a method for producing highly porous material for hydrogen storage. In order to synthesize tunable nanoporous carbon and to establish a structure-property relation between initial metal carbide and resultant nanoporous carbon, CDCs were synthesized from four metal carbides, two that have uniform carbon to carbon distance in the lattice structure (ZrC, TiC and SiC) and one that has a non-uniform carbon distribution in the lattice (B4C). It was shown that a uniform distribution of carbon atoms in the carbide is important for obtaining a narrow pore size distribution (PSD). CDC derived from B 4C had a relatively broad PSD and contained mesopores even at the lowest synthesis temperature, while the CDC produced from SiC maintained a narrow PSD even at the synthesis temperature of 1200°C. CDC produced from ZrC and TiC has a narrow PSD at low synthesis temperature and pores gets wider at higher temperatures. Comparison of CDCs produced from ZrC, TiC and B 4C shows that CDCs produced from ZrC and TiC show a lower degree of ordering than that from B4C at high temperatures. Unlike CDCs produced from ZrC and TiC, the PSD of CDCs from B4C does not change appreciably in the 600-1200°C range. CDCs produced from ZrC and TiC can have both narrowly distributed micropores (pores smaller than 2 nm) and mesopores (pores larger than 2 nm), depending on synthesis temperature. In this work, it is demonstrated that porosity of CDC can be fine tuned with a high accuracy by using different starting carbides and varying the synthesis temperatures. This is very important in many applications of porous carbon, especially for gas storage. CDC from ZrC, TiC, B4C and SiC resulted in a

  20. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    CERN Document Server

    Foret, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also tri...

  1. Stable field emission from nanoporous silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Myung-Gyu; Lezec, Henri J.; Sharifi, Fred

    2013-02-01

    We report on a new type of stable field emitter capable of electron emission at levels comparable to thermal sources. Such an emitter potentially enables significant advances in several important technologies which currently use thermal electron sources. These include communications through microwave electronics, and more notably imaging for medicine and security where new modalities of detection may arise due to variable-geometry x-ray sources. Stable emission of 6 A cm-2 is demonstrated in a macroscopic array, and lifetime measurements indicate these new emitters are sufficiently robust to be considered for realistic implementation. The emitter is a monolithic structure, and is made in a room-temperature process. It is fabricated from a silicon carbide wafer, which is formed into a highly porous structure resembling an aerogel, and further patterned into an array. The emission properties may be tuned both through control of the nanoscale morphology and the macroscopic shape of the emitter array.

  2. Silicon carbide devices for radiation hard applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMullin, P.G.; Barrett, D.L.; Hopkins, R.H.; Spitznagel, J.A. (Westinghouse Sciences and Technology Center, 1310 Beulah Road, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15235 (United States)); Powell, J.A. (NASA Lewis Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Road, Cleveland Ohio 44135 (United States)); Thome, F.V. (Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States))

    1993-01-15

    Silicon carbide has long been recognized as a favorable material for applications at high temperatures and in radiation environments, but device development has been hindered by lack of adequate substrates. This paper reviews the current Westinghouse material development effort aimed at the growth of high quality 6H boules and describes 6H SiC devices fabricated on Westinghouse substrates. MESFET and MOSFET transistors were made in a microwave power design layout. The MESFET and MOSFET transistors were subjected to a total gamma irradiation of 1 megaGray (100 megarad) and exhibited threshold voltage shifts of about 0.4 and 1.2 Volts respectively with little change in bulk material parameters.

  3. Silicon carbide devices for radiation hard applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullin, Paul G.; Barrett, Donovan L.; Hopkins, Richard H.; Spitznagel, John A.; Powell, J. Anthony; Thome, Frank V.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon carbide has long been recognized as a favorable material for applications at high temperatures and in radiation environments, but device development has been hindered by lack of adequate substrates. This paper reviews the current Westinghouse material development effort aimed at the growth of high quality 6H boules and describes 6H SiC devices fabricated on Westinghouse substrates. MESFET and MOSFET transistors were made in a microwave power design layout. The MESFET and MOSFET transistors were subjected to a total gamma irradiation of 1 megaGray (100 megarad) and exhibited threshold voltage shifts of about 0.4 and 1.2 Volts respectively with little change in bulk material parameters.

  4. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L.; Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides the first known observation of silicon carbide fully amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60 C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2}. Amorphization was seen in both materials, as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction, and x-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density ({minus}10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique ({minus}45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation ({minus}45%), and standard Vickers hardness ({minus}24%). Similar property changes are observed for the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than 130 C.

  5. Arsenic carbide monolayer: First principles prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mosayeb

    2017-11-01

    Using the first principles calculation, a new pentagonal indirect band gap semiconductor namely arsenic carbide monolayer (As2C) is predicted. The calculated cohesive energy of -5.69 eV/atom the thermodynamic stability of the predicted monolayer. Furthermore, the kinetic stability of the monolayer is examined by phonon dispersion calculation, where the absence of imaginary modes and high value of maximum phonon frequency confirms the high dynamic stability of the proposed monolayer. Investigating in the electronic properties of the As2C monolayer indicates that it is a semiconductor with an indirect band gap of 1.62 eV. Analyzing the optical properties of the As2C monolayer imply that the monolayer has high UV light absorption, however, it has an almost zero absorption in visible region of electromagnetic spectra. The specific electronic and optical properties imply that As2C monolayer may be used in new generation of nano-optoelectronic technology design.

  6. Possibilities of Application of High Pressure Jet Assisted Machining in Hard Turning with Carbide Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Globočki Lakić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High Pressure Jet Assisted Machining (HPJAM in turning is a hybrid machining method in which a high pressure jet of cooling and lubrication fluid, under high pressure (50 MPa, leads to the zone between the cutting tool edge and workpiece. An experimental study was performed to investigate the capabilities of conventional and high pressure cooling (HPC in the turning of hard-to-machine materials: hard-chromed and surface hardened steel Ck45 (58 HRc and hardened bearing steel 100Cr6 (62 HRc. Machining experiments were performed using coated carbide tools and highly cutting speed. Experimental measurements were performed for different input process parameters. The cooling capabilities are compared by monitoring of tool wear, tool life, cooling efficiency, and surface roughness. Connection between the tool wear and surface roughness is established. Experimental research show that the hard turning with carbide cutting tools and HP supply CLF provides numerous advantages from the techno-economic aspect: greater productivity, reduce of temperature in the cutting zone, improved control chip formation, extended tool life, low intensity of tool wear, surface roughness in acceptable limits, significant reduce of production costs related to the CLF.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of iron, iron oxide and iron carbide nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snovski, Ron; Grinblat, Judith; Sougrati, Moulay-Tahar; Jumas, Jean-Claude; Margel, Shlomo

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4 and γ-Fe2O3) and iron carbide (Fe3C) nanoparticles of different geometrical shapes: cubes, spheres, rods and plates, have been prepared by thermal decomposition of a mixture containing the metal precursor Fe(CO)5 and the stabilizer polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) at 300 °C in a sealed cell under inert atmosphere. The thermal decomposition process was performed for 4 or 24 h at ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) (w/v) ratio of 1:1 or 1:5. Elemental iron nanospheres embedded within a mixture of amorphous and graphitic carbon coating were obtained by hydrogen reduction of the prepared iron oxide and iron carbide nanoparticles at 450 °C. The formation of the graphitic carbon phase at such a low temperature is unique and probably obtained by catalysis of the elemental iron nanoparticles. Changing the annealing time period and the ([PVP]/[Fe(CO)5]) ratio allowed control of the composition, size, size distribution, crystallinity, geometrical shape and magnetic properties of the different magnetic nanoparticles.

  8. The structure and mechanical properties of multilayer nanocrystalline TiN/ZrN coatings obtained by vacuum-arc deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Demchyshyn

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available TiN/ZrN multilayered condensates on BK-8 carbide tips substrates (62 HRC were produced by the vacuumarc deposition technique, using Ti and Zr plasma flows in reactive nitrogen gas medium with working pressure of 6.6·10–1 Pa. The TiN/ZrN multilayered condensates consist of TiN and ZrN sublayers, which have a thickness of ~100 nm, controlled by the processing parameters of the used deposition technique. The obtained coatings have hardness of 45 GPa and Young’s modulus of 320 GPa. The obtained results show that mechanical properties of such multilayered composites are considerably improved in comparison to those for the single-component coatings, TiN and ZrN. The dependence of hardness and Young’s modulus of the composites on sublayer thickness within a range of 100 nm was determined. The investigated structure and improved mechanical properties of the TiN/ZrN multilayered condensates would be very good platform for finding their industrial application, such as hard coatings with different purposes.

  9. Oxidation behaviour of boron carbide powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.Q. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, New Model Road 5, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China)]. E-mail: Li.Yuanqiang@nims.go.jp; Qiu, T. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, New Model Road 5, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China)

    2007-01-25

    Isothermal oxidation behaviour of powdered boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) with the fine (1.52 {mu}m), medium (22.5 {mu}m) and coarse (59.6 {mu}m) particle size has been studied in air ranging from 500 to 800 deg. C. The oxidation rate strongly depends on the particle size of boron carbide and temperature. The smaller particle size the higher oxidation rate of B{sub 4}C powder due to its larger surface area. When B{sub 4}C powder is oxidized in air, a B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass film is formed on the surface of B{sub 4}C grain which retards the further oxidation reaction. The oxidation kinetics is approximately fitted to the diffusion-controlled rate law which can be described by the Jander's equation. The apparent activation energy for the fine-, medium- and coarse-B{sub 4}C powders is 209.4 {+-} 11.4, 212.7 {+-} 35.8 and 219.2 {+-} 45.3 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively, slightly varying with the impurity content of B{sub 4}C powders. The type of rate law suggests that the diffusion of oxygen through the oxide layer is the rate-limiting step in the oxidation reactions. In addition, the change in the oxidation process at higher oxidation fraction might associate with the B{sub 2}O{sub 3} volatilization at higher temperatures.

  10. Wear resistance of Fe-Nb-Cr-W, Nb, AISI 1020 and AISI 420 coatings produced by thermal spray wire arc; Resistencia al desgaste de recubrimientos Fe-Nb-Cr-W, Nb, AISI 1020 y AISI 420 producidos por proyeccion termica por arco electrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Covaleda, E. A.; Mercado-Veladia, J. L.; Olaya-Florez, J. J.

    2013-07-01

    The commercial materials 140MXC (with iron, tungsten, chrome, niobium), 530AS (AISI 1015 steel) and 560AS (AISI 420 steel) on AISI 4340 steel were deposited using thermal spray with arc. The aim of work was to evaluate the best strategy abrasive wear resistance of the system coating-substrate using the following combinations: (1) homogeneous coatings and (2) coatings depositing simultaneously 140MXC + 530AS and 140MXC + 560AS. The coatings microstructure was characterized using Optical microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy and Laser con focal microscopy. The wear resistance was evaluated through dry sand rubber wheel test (DSRW). We found that the wear resistance depends on the quantity of defects and the mechanical properties like hardness. For example, the softer coatings have the biggest wear rates and the failure mode was characterized by plastic deformation caused by particles indentation, and the other hand the failure mode at the harder materials was grooving. The details and wear mechanism of the coatings produced are described in this investigation. (Author)

  11. Novel Manufacturing Process for Unique Mixed Carbide Refractory Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR Phase I project will establish the feasibility of an innovative manufacturing process to fabricate a range of unique hafnium/silicon based carbide...

  12. Stereological Analysis of Carbides in Hypoeutectic Chromium Cast Iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gromczyk M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of research on stereological parameters of carbides in modified hypoeutectic chromium cast iron were shown in the paper. The effect of distance the casting heat centre of casting to the carbide phase morphology was examined. The samples for metallographic examination were taken from various locations of the model casting prepared in a special tester. This model casting was designed to simulate the solidification of heavy castings. Using the proposed methodology the relation of the distance from the model mould and the size, perimeter, length, width and the shape factor of carbides was examined. During the analysis, the values of stereological parameters of carbides changed on various sections of the model casting.

  13. Exploring a novel approach to fabricate vanadium carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    -shell structure; composite materials; mesoporous material; solid-state reaction. ... A novel approach to the fabrication of vanadium carbide encapsulated into carbon nanotube (VC@C) core-shell structured composite by thermal treatment with ...

  14. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  15. Bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In these paper the possibility of upper and lower bainite obtaining in cast iron with carbides castings are presented. Conditions, when in cast iron with carbides castings during continuous free air cooling austenite transformation to upper bainite or its mixture with lower bainte proceeds, have been given. A mechanism of this transformation has been given, Si, Ni, Mn and Mo distribution in the eutectic cell has been tested and hardness of tested castings has been determined.

  16. Microwave Sintering and Its Application on Cemented Carbides

    OpenAIRE

    Rumman Md Raihanuzzaman; Lee Chang Chuan; Zonghan Xie; Reza Ghomashchi

    2015-01-01

    Cemented carbides, owing to their excellent mechanical properties, have been of immense interest in the field of hard materials for the past few decades. A number of processing techniques have been developed to obtain high quality carbide tools, with a wide range of grain size depending on the application and requirements. Microwave sintering is one of the heating processes, which has been used to prepare a wide range of materials including ceramics. A deep understanding ...

  17. Processes and applications of silicon carbide nanocomposite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, D. G.; Cho, K. Y.; Jin, E. J.; Riu, D. H.

    2011-10-01

    Various types of SiC such as nanowires, thin films, foam, and continuous fibers have been developed since the early 1980s, and their applications have been expanded into several new applications, such as for gas-fueled radiation heater, diesel particulate filter (DPF), ceramic fiber separators and catalyst/catalyst supports include for the military, aerospace, automobile and electronics industries. For these new applications, high specific surface area is demanded and it has been tried by reducing the diameter of SiC fiber. Furthermore, functional nanocomposites show potentials in various harsh environmental applications. In this study, silicon carbide fiber was prepared through electrospinning of the polycarbosilane (PCS) with optimum molecular weight distribution which was synthesized by new method adopting solid acid catalyst such as ZSM-5 and γ-Al2O3. Functional elements such as aluminum, titanium, tungsten and palladium easily doped in the precursor fiber and remained in the SiC fiber after pyrolysis. The uniform SiC fibers were produced at the condition of spinning voltage over 20 kV from the PCS solution as the concentration of 1.3 g/ml in DMF/Toluene (3:7) and pyrolysis at 1200°C. Pyrolyzed products were processed into several interesting applications such as thermal batteries, hydrogen sensors and gas filters.

  18. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  19. Self-lubricating coatings for high-temperature applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Some present-day aeropropulsion systems impose severe demands on the thermal and oxidative stability of lubricant, bearing, and seal materials. These demands will be much more severe for operational systems around the turn of the century. Solid lubricants with maximum temperature capabilities of about 1100 C are known. Unfortunately, none of the solid lubricants with the highest temperature capabilities are effective below approximately 400 C. However, research shows that silver and stable fluorides, such as calcium and barium fluoride act synergistically to provide lubrication from below room temperature to approximately 900 C. Plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating composite coatings that were developed at Lewis are described. Background information is given on coatings, designed as PS100 and PS101, that contain the solid lubricants in a Nichrome matrix. These coatings have low friction coefficients over a wide temperature range, but they have inadequate wear resistance for some long-duration applications. Wear resistance was dramatically improved in a recently developed coating PS200, by replacing the Nichrome matrix material with metal-bonded chromium carbide containing dispersed silver and calcium fluoride/barium fluoride eutectic (CaF2/BaF2). The lubricants control friction and the carbide matrix provides excellent wear resistance. Successful tests of these coatings are discussed.

  20. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  1. Cryogenic far-infrared laser absorptivity measurements of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope mirror coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jacqueline; Klaassen, Tjeerd; Hovenier, Niels; Jakob, Gerd; Poglitsch, Albrecht; Sternberg, Oren

    2004-07-01

    Far-infrared laser calorimetry was used to measure the absorptivity, and thus the emissivity, of aluminum-coated silicon carbide mirror samples produced during the coating qualification run of the Herschel Space Observatory telescope to be launched by the European Space Agency in 2007. The samples were measured at 77 K to simulate the operating temperature of the telescope in its planned orbit about the second Lagrangian point, L2, of the Earth-Sun system. Together, the telescope's equilibrium temperature in space and the emissivity of the mirror surfaces will determine the far-infrared-submillimeter background and thus the sensitivity of two of the three astronomical instruments aboard the observatory if stray-light levels can be kept low relative to the mirror emission. Absorptivities of both clean and dust-contaminated samples were measured at 70, 118, 184, and 496 microm. Theoretical fits to the data predict absorptivities of 0.2-0.4% for the clean sample and 0.2-0.8% for the dusty sample, over the spectral range of the Herschel Space Observatory instruments.

  2. Development and Evaluation of Mixed Uranium-Refractory Carbide/Refractory Carbide Cer-Cer Fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this proposal a new carbide-based fuel is introduced with outstanding potential to eliminate the loss of uranium, minimizes the loss of uranium, and retains...

  3. Carbides and possible hydrogen irreversible trapping sites in ultrahigh strength round steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X Y; Li, H; Cheng, X B

    2017-12-01

    The carbides in ultrahigh strength round steel have been investigated by using laser-assisted atom probe tomography (APT) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) in this paper. Two kinds of carbides are found and one is iron carbide M6C, where carbide formation elements Cr, Mn and Mo replace partial Fe, while the other is niobium carbide MC, where M includes V and Mo besides Nb. These two carbides, due to their different evaporation field, have various densities in reconstructed image of APT. After correction, the hydrogen content within these two carbides illustrates that M6C cannot trap hydrogen, while MC can. The different behaviors in trapping hydrogen between these two carbides may result from elements Fe or Cr in M6C carbide having weaker affinity for hydrogen than Nb and V have in MC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Spinodal decomposition of tungsten-containing phases in functional coatings obtained via high-energy implantation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydov, S. V.; Petrov, E. V.

    2017-08-01

    We have studied structural and phase transformations in tungsten-containing functional coatings of carbon steels obtained during the high-energy processes of implanting tungsten carbide micropowders by the method of complex pulse electromechanical processing and micropowders of tungsten by technology of directed energy of explosion based on the effect of superdeep penetration of solid particles (Usherenko effect). It has been shown that, during thermomechanical action, intensive steel austenization occurs in the deformation zone with the dissolution of tungsten carbide powder, the carbidization of tungsten powder, and the subsequent formation of composite gradient structures as a result of the decay of supercooled austenite supersaturated by tungsten according to the diffusion mechanism and the mechanism of spinodal decomposition. Separate zones of tungsten-containing phases of the alloy are in the liquid-phase state, as well as undergo spinodal decomposition with the formation of highly disperse carbide phases of globular morphology.

  5. Influence of Material Coating on the Heat Transfer in a Layered Cu-SiC-Cu Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strojny-Nędza A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the process of obtaining Cu-SiC-Cu systems by way of spark plasma sintering. A monocrystalline form of silicon carbide (6H-SiC type was applied in the experiment. Additionally, silicon carbide samples were covered with a layer of tungsten and molybdenum using chemical vapour deposition (CVD technique. Microstructural examinations and thermal properties measurements were performed. A special attention was put to the metal-ceramic interface. During annealing at a high temperature, copper reacts with silicon carbide. To prevent the decomposition of silicon carbide two types of coating (tungsten and molybdenum were applied. The effect of covering SiC with the aforementioned elements on the composite’s thermal conductivity was analyzed. Results were compared with the numerical modelling of heat transfer in Cu-SiC-Cu systems. Certain possible reasons behind differences in measurements and modelling results were discussed.

  6. Controlled reactions between chromia and coating on alloy surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren

    1996-01-01

    An electrically conducting Sr-doped lanthanum chromite (LSC) coating has been produced by reacting a coating of fine particles of La oxide and Sr oxide with chromia formed as an external scale on a metallic alloy. In addition to the formation of LSC the coating also resulted in much reduced...... buckling of the underlying chromia layer compared with a non-coated alloy....

  7. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  8. SOLIDIFICATION CHARACTERISTIC OF TITANIUM CARBIDE PARTICULATE REINFORCED ALUMINIUM ALLOY MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. FATCHURROHMAN

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research solidification characteristic of metal matrix composites consisted of titanium carbide particulate reinforced aluminium-11.8% silicon alloy matrix is performed. Vortex mixing and permanent casting method are used as the manufacturing method to produce the specimens. Temperature measurements during the casting process are captured and solidification graphs are plotted to represent the solidification characteristic. The results show, as volume fraction of particulate reinforcement is increased, solidification time is faster. Particulate reinforcement promotes rapid solidification which will support finer grain size of the casting specimen. Hardness test is performed and confirmed that hardness number increased as more particulate are added to the system.

  9. Rf-plasma synthesis of nanosize silicon carbide and nitride. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buss, R.J.

    1997-02-01

    A pulsed rf plasma technique is capable of generating ceramic particles of 10 manometer dimension. Experiments using silane/ammonia and trimethylchlorosilane/hydrogen gas mixtures show that both silicon nitride and silicon carbide powders can be synthesized with control of the average particle diameter from 7 to 200 nm. Large size dispersion and much agglomeration appear characteristic of the method, in contrast to results reported by another research group. The as produced powders have a high hydrogen content and are air and moisture sensitive. Post-plasma treatment in a controlled atmosphere at elevated temperature (800{degrees}C) eliminates the hydrogen and stabilizes the powder with respect to oxidation or hydrolysis.

  10. In vitro genotoxic effects of different combinations of cobalt and metallic carbide particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boeck, Marlies; Lombaert, Noömi; De Backer, Sofie; Finsy, Robert; Lison, Dominique; Kirsch-Volders, Micheline

    2003-03-01

    Occupational exposure to hard metal dust, consisting of tungsten carbide (WC) and metallic cobalt particles (Co), is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer, while no increased risk was observed in workers exposed to Co alone. In vitro, in human peripheral blood mononucleated cells (PBMC), we previously demonstrated that WC-Co is more genotoxic than Co and WC alone. A possible mechanism underlying this higher genotoxicity is a specific physicochemical interaction between Co and WC particles leading to the enhanced short-term formation of active oxygen species. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro genotoxicity of other combinations of Co with metal carbide particles in comparison with WC-Co. The ability of Cr(3)C(2), Mo(2)C and NbC and of their powder mixtures with Co to induce DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites was assessed by the alkaline Comet assay and their potential to induce chromosome(/genome) mutations by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus test on human PBMC from two donors. PBMC were treated in vitro for 15 min, 24 h after the onset of PHA stimulation. In the micronucleus test, while the metal carbides alone did not increase the micronucleus frequency, Co alone and the four tested carbide-Co mixtures induced a statistically significant concentration-dependent increase in micronucleated binucleates. In addition to WC, NbC and Cr(3)C(2) particles were able to interact with Co, producing a higher mutagenic effect than the individual metal particles. Mo(2)C particles did not display interactive mutagenicity with Co in the micronucleus test, possibly related to their small specific surface area, compactness and/or spherical shape. With the Comet assay, applied directly at the end of the treatment, less clear results, due to inter-experimental and inter-donor variation, were obtained. These data indicate that particular interaction of a metal carbide with Co leading to enhanced mutagenicity is not specific for WC.

  11. On the use of Raman spectroscopy and instrumented indentation for characterizing damage in machined carbide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Benjamin Peter

    Machining is a necessary post-processing step in the manufacturing of many ceramic materials. Parts are machined to meet specific dimensions, with tight tolerances, not attainable from forming alone, as well as to achieve a desired surface finish. However, the machining process is very harsh, often employing the use of high temperatures and pressures to achieve the wanted result. In the case of silicon carbide, a material with extremely high hardness and stiffness, machining is very difficult and requires machining conditions that are highly aggressive. This can leave behind residual stresses in the surface of the material, cause unwanted phase transformations, and produce sub-surface deformation that can lead to failure. This thesis seeks to determine the effect of various machining conditions on the Raman spectra and elastic properties of sintered silicon carbide materials. Sample sets examined included hot-pressed silicon carbide tiles with four different surface finishes, as well as "ideal" single crystal silicon carbide wafers. The surface finishes studied were as follows: an as-pressed finish; a grit blast finish; a harsh rotary ground finish; and a mirror polish. Each finish imparts a different amount, as well as type, of deformation to the sample and are each utilized for a specific application. The sample surfaces were evaluated using a combination of Raman spectroscopy, for phase identification and stress analysis, and nanoindentation, for obtaining elastic properties and imparting uniform controlled deformation to the samples. Raman spectroscopy was performed over each sample surface using 514- and 633-nm wavelength excitation, along with confocal and non-confocal settings to study depth variation. Surfaces stresses were determined using peak shift information extracted from Raman spectra maps, while other spectral variations were used to compare levels of machining damage. Elastic modulus, hardness, and plastic work of indentation maps were generated

  12. MICROSTRUCTURE FEATURES OF CHROME-NICKEL COATING WELDED WITH FILLER WIRE PL AN-111 WITH A 50% OVERLAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Belik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper involves investigation of microstructure features of the coating welded with filler wire PL AN-111 with a 50% beads overlap. Methodology. Wear-resistant layer was formed by means of electric arc deposit welding using filler wire PL AN-111 on the plate from steel 09G2S. Deposit welding was conducted under the following parameters: welding current is of 650-750 A; arc voltage is of 30-34 V; welding speed is of 32 m/h. Microstructure was researched with application of optical microscopies “Neophot-21”, “Nikon Eclipse M200” and electron scanning microscopy JEOL JSM-6510 LV. Microhardness of structural constituentswas measuredwithtesterFM-300 (Future-Tech under loading of 10-50 g. Findings. It is shown that the overlap of the beads leads to the formation of inhomogeneous microstructure in the cross section that varies by zones from free-carbide austenite to hypereutectic microstructure with primary chromium carbides. The analysis of the microhardness of the structural constituents in various coating areas was carried out. It was found that hardness of austenite, carbide eutectic and carbides M7C3 varies in coatings in the range of 3 100-3 850 МPа, 4 100-6 800 МPа and 12 100-15 100 МPа, accordingly. Originality. Authors determined that Cr-Ni coating comprises substantially austenitic-carbide eutectic with different density and thickness of carbide fibers within eutectic colonies. Along the border “base/coating” a single-phase austenitic layer lies which turns into a layer with a hypoeutectic structure. In the heat affected zone from beads fusion austenite disintegration with the granular carbides formation was recorded. This leads to decreasing of matrix corrosion resistance due to chromium depletion. Above the zone of beads fusion, the coating has a hypereutectic structure with the presence of large primary chromium carbides. Practical value. It is shown that deposit welding with filler wire PL AN-111 with a 50

  13. Quality of Coated Particles : Physical - Mechanical Characterization of Polymeric Film Coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perfetti, G.

    2012-01-01

    All coated particle producers, when applying the coating layer(s) would like to know precisely what is the best coating system to use in order to answer customer’s requests. It is, therefore, of very high relevance for many industries, to have a clear understanding of what are the parameters I need

  14. Synthesis and characterization of AlTiSiN/CrSiN multilayer coatings by cathodic arc ion-plating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, B.; Tian, C. X.; Wan, Q.; Yan, S. J.; Liu, H. D.; Wang, R. Y.; Li, Z. G.; Chen, Y. M.; Fu, D. J.

    2014-09-01

    AlTiSiN/CrSiN multilayer coatings were deposited on Si (1 0 0) and cemented carbide substrates using Cr, AlTi cathodes and SiH4 gases by cathodic arc ion plating system. The influences of SiH4 gases flowrate on the structural and mechanical properties of the coatings were investigated, systematically. AlTiSiN/CrSiN coatings exhibit a B1 NaCl-type nano-multilayered structure in which the CrSiN nano-layers alternate with AlTiSiN nano-layers with multiple orientations of crystal planes indicated by XRD patterns and TEM. Si contents of the coatings increase with increasing SiH4 flowrate. The hardness of the coatings increases to the maximum value of 3500 Hv0.05 with increasing SiH4 flowrate from 20 to 40 sccm and then decreases with further addition of SiH4 gases. A higher adhesive force of 73 N is obtained at the flowrate of 48 sccm. The coatings exhibit different tribological performance when the mating materials were varied from Si3N4 to cemented carbide balls and the variation of friction coefficients of the coatings against Si3N4 influenced by SiH4 flowrate are not obvious as against cemented carbide balls.

  15. Thick c-BN coatings - Preparation, properties and application tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keunecke, M. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany)]. E-mail: martin.keunecke@ist.fraunhofer.de; Wiemann, E. [Institute for Machine Tools and Factory Management (IWF), Berlin University of Technology (Germany); Weigel, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany); Park, S.T. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany); Bewilogua, K. [Fraunhofer Institute for Surface Engineering and Thin Films (IST), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2006-11-23

    Due to the outstanding properties of cubic boron nitride (c-BN) - c-BN is the second hardest of all known materials, has a high wear resistance and a high thermal stability - this material is very promising for a broad range of applications, especially for cutting tools, both as bulk and as a coating material. The state-of-the-art is the use of sintered cutting inserts with c-BN grains. Such c-BN grains are synthesized in an expensive high-pressure-high-temperature process. The requirements for cutting tools continuously increase in production engineering and this leads to a strong demand for new super hard tool coatings. Cubic boron nitride coatings could be an attractive solution. Unfortunately, the preparation of thick c-BN coatings, on the {mu}m scale, is difficult, due to some serious drawbacks and has been successful only in the last years for a few research groups worldwide. PVD processes allow the preparation of c-BN films thicker than 2 {mu}m on silicon and 1 {mu}m c-BN top layers on pre-coated cemented carbide cutting inserts. Measurements of mechanical properties like hardness and Young's modulus reveal that the properties of the c-BN coatings, with hardness of about 60 GPa, are nearly identical to those of c-BN bulk material. Results of systematic turning and milling tests of different coatings in combination with a c-BN top-layer on cemented carbide cutting inserts will be presented in detail. The new results confirm the high potential of c-BN coatings on cutting tools.

  16. Low-pressure RF remote plasma cleaning of carbon-contaminated B4C-coated optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Fernández, H.; Thomasset, M.; Sauthier, G.; Rogler, D.; Dietsch, R.; Barrett, R.; Carlino, V.; Pellegrin, E.

    2017-05-01

    Boron carbide (B4C) - due to its exceptional mechanical properties - is one of the few existing materials that can withstand the extremely high brilliance of the photon beam from free electron lasers (FELs) and is thus of considerable interest for optical applications in this field. However, as in the case of many other optics operated at modern accelerator-, plasma-, or laser-based light source facilities, B4C-coated optics are subject to ubiquitous carbon contaminations. These contaminations - that are presumably produced via cracking of CHx and CO2 molecules by photoelectrons emitted from the optical components - represent a serious issue for the operation of the pertinent high performance beamlines due to a severe reduction of photon flux and beam coherence, not necessarily restricted to the photon energy range of the carbon K-edge. Thus, a variety of B4C cleaning technologies have been developed at different laboratories with varying success [1]. Here, we present a study regarding the low-pressure RF plasma cleaning of a series of carbon-contaminated B4C test samples via an inductively coupled O2/Ar and Ar/H2 remote RF plasma produced using the IBSS GV10x plasma source following previous studies using the same RF plasma source [2, 3]. Results regarding the chemistry, morphology as well as other aspects of the B4C optical coatings and surfaces before and after the plasma cleaning process are reported.

  17. Acceptance Test Data for BWXT Coated Particle Batches 93172B and 93173B—Defective IPyC and Pyrocarbon Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunn, John D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Helmreich, Grant W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dyer, John A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Schumacher, Austin T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Skitt, Darren J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Coated particle batches J52O-16-93172B and J52O-16-93173B were produced by Babcock and Wilcox Technologies (BWXT) as part of the production campaign for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification (AGR) Program’s AGR-5/6/7 irradiation test in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), but were not used in the final fuel composite. However, these batches may be used as demonstration production-scale coated particle fuel for other experiments. Each batch was coated in a 150-mm-diameter production-scale fluidized-bed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) furnace. Tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coatings were deposited on 425-μm-nominal-diameter spherical kernels from BWXT lot J52R-16-69317 containing a mixture of 15.5%-enriched uranium carbide and uranium oxide (UCO). The TRISO coatings consisted of four consecutive CVD layers: a ~50% dense carbon buffer layer with 100-μm-nominal thickness, a dense inner pyrolytic carbon (IPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness, a silicon carbide (SiC) layer with 35-μm-nominal thickness, and a dense outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer with 40-μm-nominal thickness. The TRISO-coated particle batches were sieved to upgrade the particles by removing over-sized and under-sized material, and the upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter A to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93172A). Secondary upgrading by sieving was performed on the A-designated batches to remove particles with missing or very-thin buffer layers that were identified during previous analysis of the individual batches for defective IPyC, as reported in the acceptance test data report for the AGR-5/6/7 production batches [Hunn et al. 2017b]. The additionally-upgraded batches were designated by appending the letter B to the end of the batch number (e.g., 93172B).

  18. Titanium Carbide Nanofibers-Reinforced Aluminum Compacts, a New Strategy to Enhance Mechanical Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Abdelrazek Khalil

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available TiC nanofibers reinforced Al matrix composites were produced by High Frequency Induction Heat Sintering (HFIHS.The titanium carbide nanofibers with an average diameter of 90 nm are first prepared by electrospinning technique and high temperature calcination process. A composite solution containing polyacrylonitrile and titanium isopropoxide is first electrospun into the nanofibers, which are subsequently stabilized and then calcined to produce the desired TiC nanofibers. The X-ray diffraction pattern and transmission electron microscopy results show that the main phase of the as-synthesized nanofibers is titanium carbide. The TiC nanofibers is then mixed with the aluminum powders and introduced into high frequency induction heat sintering (HFIHS to produce composites of TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix. The potential application of the TiC nanofibers reinforced aluminum matrix composites was systematically investigated. 99.5% relative density and around 85 HV (833 MPa Vickers hardness of the Al reinforced with 5 wt % TiC nanofiber has been obtained. Furthermore, the sample of Al contains 5 wt % TiC, has the highest value of compression and yield strength of about 415 and 350 MPa, respectively. The ductility of the Al/5 wt % TiC showed increasing with increasing the TiC contents.

  19. Fine Structure Study of the Plasma Coatings B4C-Ni-P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornienko, E. E.; Bezrukova, V. A.; Kuz’min, V. I.; Lozhkin, V. S.; Tutunkova, M. K.

    2017-12-01

    The article considers structure of coatings formed of the B4C-Ni-P powder. The coatings were deposited using air-plasma spraying with the unit for annular injection of powder. The pipes from steel 20 (0.2 % C) were used as a substrate. The structure and phase composition of the coatings were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. It is shown that high-density composite coatings consisting of boron carbide particles distributed in the nickel boride metal matrix are formed using air-plasma spraying. The areas with round inclusions characterized by the increased amount of nickel, phosphorus and boron are located around the boron carbide particles. Boron oxides and nickel oxides are also present in the coatings. Thin interlayers with amorphous-crystalline structure are formed around the boron carbide particles. The thickness of these interlayers does not exceed 1 μm. The metal matrix material represents areas with nanocrystalline structure and columnar crystals.

  20. Study of high resistance inorganic coatings on graphite fibers. [for graphite-epoxy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galasso, F. S.; Veltri, R. D.; Scola, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    Coatings made of boron, silicon carbide, silica, and silica-like materials were studied to determine their ability to increase resistance of graphite fibers. The most promising results were attained by chemical vapor depositing silicon carbide on graphite fiber followed by oxidation, and drawing graphite fiber through ethyl silicate followed by appropriate heat treatments. In the silicon carbide coating studies, no degradation of the graphite fibers was observed and resistance values as high as three orders of magnitude higher than that of the uncoated fiber was attained. The strength of a composite fabricated from the coated fiber had a strength which compared favorably with those of composites prepared from uncoated fiber. For the silica-like coated fiber prepared by drawing the graphite fiber through an ethyl silicate solution followed by heating, coated fiber resistances about an order of magnitude greater than that of the uncoated fiber were attained. Composites prepared using these fibers had flexural strengths comparable with those prepared using uncoated fibers, but the shear strengths were lower.

  1. B{sub 4}C protective coating under irradiation by QSPA-T intensive plasma fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzhinskij, O. I.; Barsuk, V. A. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Begrambekov, L. B., E-mail: lbb@plasma.mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute) (Russian Federation); Klimov, N. S.; Otroshchenko, V. G.; Putric, A. B. [Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    The effect of the QSPA-T pulsed plasma irradiation on the crystalline boron carbide B{sub 4}C coating was examined. The duration of the rectangular plasma pulses was 0.5 ms with an interval of 5–10 min between pulses. The maximum power density in the central part of plasma stream was 1 GW/m{sup 2}. The coating thickness varied from 20 to 40 μm on different surface areas. Modification of the surface layers and transformation of the coating at elevated temperature under plasma pulse irradiation during four successive series of impulses are described. It is shown that the boron carbide coating withstood the full cycle of tests under irradiation with 100 plasma pulses with peak power density of 1GW/m{sup 2}. Constitutive surface deterioration was not detected and the boron carbide coating kept crystal structure B{sub 4}C throughout the irradiation zone at the surface depth no less 2 μm.

  2. Neutron irradiation induced amorphization of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snead, L. L.; Hay, J. C.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides the properties of bulk stoichiometric silicon carbide which has been amorphized under neutron irradiation. Both high purity single crystal hcp and high purity, highly faulted (cubic) chemically vapor deposited (CVD) SiC were irradiated at approximately 60°C to a total fast neutron fluence of 2.6 × 10 25 n/m 2. Amorphization was seen in both materials as evidenced by TEM, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction techniques. Physical properties for the amorphized single crystal material are reported including large changes in density (-10.8%), elastic modulus as measured using a nanoindentation technique (-45%), hardness as measured by nanoindentation (-45%), and standard Vickers hardness (-24%). Similar property changes are observed for the amorphized CVD SiC. Using measured thermal conductivity data for the CVD SiC sample, the critical temperature for amorphization at this neutron dose and flux, above which amorphization is not possible, is estimated to be greater than ˜125°C.

  3. Feasibility study of fluxless brazing cemented carbides to steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, W.; Sievers, N.

    2017-03-01

    One of the most important brazing processes is the joints between cemented carbides and steel for the tool industry such as in rotary drill hammers or saw blades. Even though this technique has already been used for several decades, defects in the joint can still occur and lead to quality loss. Mostly, the joining process is facilitated by induction heating and the use of a flux to enhance the wetting of the filler alloy on the surface of the steel and cemented carbide in an ambient atmosphere. However, although the use of flux enables successful joining, it also generates voids within the joint, which reduces the strength of the connection while the chemicals within the flux are toxic and polluting. In this feasibility study, a fluxless brazing process is used to examine the joint between cemented carbides and steel for the first time. For this, ultrasound is applied during induction heating to enable the wetting between the liquid filler metal and the surfaces of the cemented carbide and steel. The ultrasound generates cavitations within the liquid filler metal, which remove the oxides from the surface. Several filler metals such as a silver based alloy Ag449, pure Zn, and an AlSi-alloy were used to reduce the brazing temperature and to lower the thermal residual stresses within the joint. As a result, every filler metal successfully wetted both materials and led to a dense connection. The ultrasound has to be applied carefully to prevent a damage of the cemented carbide. In this regard, it was observed that single grains of the cemented carbide broke out and remained in the joint. This positive result of brazing cemented carbides to steel without a flux but using ultrasound, allows future studies to focus on the shear strength of these joints as well as the behavior of the thermally induced residual stresses.

  4. Conductive two-dimensional titanium carbide `clay' with high volumetric capacitance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghidiu, Michael; Lukatskaya, Maria R.; Zhao, Meng-Qiang; Gogotsi, Yury; Barsoum, Michel W.

    2014-12-01

    Safe and powerful energy storage devices are becoming increasingly important. Charging times of seconds to minutes, with power densities exceeding those of batteries, can in principle be provided by electrochemical capacitors--in particular, pseudocapacitors. Recent research has focused mainly on improving the gravimetric performance of the electrodes of such systems, but for portable electronics and vehicles volume is at a premium. The best volumetric capacitances of carbon-based electrodes are around 300 farads per cubic centimetre; hydrated ruthenium oxide can reach capacitances of 1,000 to 1,500 farads per cubic centimetre with great cyclability, but only in thin films. Recently, electrodes made of two-dimensional titanium carbide (Ti3C2, a member of the `MXene' family), produced by etching aluminium from titanium aluminium carbide (Ti3AlC2, a `MAX' phase) in concentrated hydrofluoric acid, have been shown to have volumetric capacitances of over 300 farads per cubic centimetre. Here we report a method of producing this material using a solution of lithium fluoride and hydrochloric acid. The resulting hydrophilic material swells in volume when hydrated, and can be shaped like clay and dried into a highly conductive solid or rolled into films tens of micrometres thick. Additive-free films of this titanium carbide `clay' have volumetric capacitances of up to 900 farads per cubic centimetre, with excellent cyclability and rate performances. This capacitance is almost twice that of our previous report, and our synthetic method also offers a much faster route to film production as well as the avoidance of handling hazardous concentrated hydrofluoric acid.

  5. Transparent nanocrystalline diamond coatings and devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Khan, Adam

    2017-08-22

    A method for coating a substrate comprises producing a plasma ball using a microwave plasma source in the presence of a mixture of gases. The plasma ball has a diameter. The plasma ball is disposed at a first distance from the substrate and the substrate is maintained at a first temperature. The plasma ball is maintained at the first distance from the substrate, and a diamond coating is deposited on the substrate. The diamond coating has a thickness. Furthermore, the diamond coating has an optical transparency of greater than about 80%. The diamond coating can include nanocrystalline diamond. The microwave plasma source can have a frequency of about 915 MHz.

  6. Reactions of water and C1 molecules on carbide and metal-modified carbide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Weiming; Tackett, Brian M; Chen, Jingguang G

    2017-04-03

    The formation of carbides can significantly modify the physical and chemical properties of the parent metals. In the current review, we summarize the general trends in the reactions of water and C1 molecules over transition metal carbide (TMC) and metal-modified TMC surfaces and thin films. Although the primary focus of the current review is on the theoretical and experimental studies of reactions of C1 molecules (CO, CO2, CH3OH, etc.), the reactions of water will also be reviewed because water plays an important role in many of the C1 transformation reactions. This review is organized by discussing separately thermal reactions and electrochemical reactions, which provides insights into the application of TMCs in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis, respectively. In thermal reactions, we discuss the thermal decomposition of water and methanol, as well as the reactions of CO and CO2 over TMC surfaces. In electrochemical reactions, we summarize recent studies in the hydrogen evolution reaction, electrooxidation of methanol and CO, and electroreduction of CO2. Finally, future research opportunities and challenges associated with using TMCs as catalysts and electrocatalysts are also discussed.

  7. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  8. An Analysis of the Weldability of Ductile Cast Iron Using Inconel 625 for the Root Weld and Electrodes Coated in 97.6% Nickel for the Filler Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Javier Cárcel-Carrasco

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the weldability of ductile cast iron when the root weld is applied with a tungsten inert gas (TIG welding process employing an Inconel 625 source rod, and when the filler welds are applied with electrodes coated with 97.6% Ni. The welds were performed on ductile cast iron specimen test plates sized 300 mm × 90 mm × 10 mm with edges tapered at angles of 60°. The plates were subjected to two heat treatments. This article analyzes the influence on weldability of the various types of electrodes and the effect of preheat treatments. Finally, a microstructure analysis is made of the material next to the weld in the metal-weld interface and in the weld itself. The microstructure produced is correlated with the strength of the welds. We treat an alloy with 97.6% Ni, which prevents the formation of carbides. With a heat treatment at 900 °C and 97.6% Ni, there is a dissolution of all carbides, forming nodules in ferritic matrix graphite.

  9. Thin coatings for heavy industry: Advanced coatings for pipes and valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernhes, Luc

    characteristics suitable for applications such as pipes and valves. From these general objectives, three specific objectives were derived: 1) to select and assess the best candidates for alternatives to hard chromium electroplating, which has been classified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as an environmentally unfriendly process; 2) to investigate recurrent failures occurring in the field with thermal sprayed HVOF Cr3C 2-NiCr coating applied to Inconel 718 PH when exposed to supercritical steam lines and thermal shocks in supercritical power plants (determining the root causes of coating failures and assessing potential coating alternatives to alleviate these issues); and 3) to develop new coating architectures, including complex microstructures and interfaces, and to better understand and optimize complex tribomechanical properties. The main results are presented in the form of articles in peer-reviewed journals. In the first article, a variety of chromium-free protective coatings were assessed as alternatives to hard chromium (HC) electroplating, such as nanostructured cobalt-phosphor (NCP) deposited by electroplating and tungsten/tungsten carbide (W/WC) applied by chemical vapor deposition. In order to compare performance across the coatings, a series of laboratory tests were performed, including hardness, microscratch, pin-on-disk, and electrochemical polarization measurements. Mechanical and fatigue resistance were also determined using prototype valves with coated ball under severe tribocorrosion conditions. It was found that W/WC coating exhibits superior wear and corrosion resistance due to high hardness and high pitting resistance, respectively, whereas NCP exhibits better wear resistance than HC with alumina ball as well as low corrosion potential, making it suitable for use as sacrificial protective coating. Both nanostructured coatings exhibited superior tribomechanical and functional characteristics compared to HC. The second article presents an

  10. Application of Hard Coatings for Improved Tribological Performance of Blanking and Piercing Tools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podgornik, B.; Zajec, B.; Bay, Niels

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to examine the possibility of reducing lubrication and replacing expensive tungsten carbide material in blanking/piercing through introduction of hard tool coatings. Results show that hard PVD coatings can be successfully used in blanking/piercing...... critical value under dry friction conditions and leads to tool failure. Therefore, at present oxidation and temperature resistant hard coatings can give improved wear resistance of stamping tools, but elimination of lubricants in blanking and piercing processes is still not feasible....

  11. Plasma of a vacuum-arc discharge for obtaining carbon-based coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikus, M. I.; Lisenkov, A. A.; Kostrin, D. K.; Trifonov, S. A.

    2017-11-01

    Formation of the carbon films and coatings of different structural modifications can be efficiently achieved by sputtering graphite in a vacuum-arc plasma source. In this case the plasma flux is shaped in a form of a current-carrying jet with fairly distinct lateral borders. Spectral analysis shows that this plasma flux contains positively charged, excited and neutral carbon particles. In this paper is shown that for a technological cycle of deposition of a carbon-based coating it is possible to form a sublayer of the substrate material carbide, providing a possibility for the later growth of a well-formed coating.

  12. Nano powders, components and coatings by plasma technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Timothy N. (Inventor); Antony, Leo V. M. (Inventor); O'Dell, Scott (Inventor); Power, Chris (Inventor); Tabor, Terry (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Ultra fine and nanometer powders and a method of producing same are provided, preferably refractory metal and ceramic nanopowders. When certain precursors are injected into the plasma flame in a reactor chamber, the materials are heated, melted and vaporized and the chemical reaction is induced in the vapor phase. The vapor phase is quenched rapidly to solid phase to yield the ultra pure, ultra fine and nano product. With this technique, powders have been made 20 nanometers in size in a system capable of a bulk production rate of more than 10 lbs/hr. The process is particularly applicable to tungsten, molybdenum, rhenium, tungsten carbide, molybdenum carbide and other related materials.

  13. Field assisted sintering of refractory carbide ceramics and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gephart, Sean

    materials. While FAST sintered materials showed higher average values, in general they also showed consistently larger variation in the scattered data and consequently larger standard deviation for the resulting material properties. In addition, dynamic impact testing (V50 test) was conducted on the resulting materials and it was determined that there was no discernable correlation between observed mechanical properties of the ceramic materials and the resulting dynamic testing. Another study was conducted on the sintering of SiC and carbon fiber reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) using FAST. There has been much interest recently in fabricating high strength, low porosity SiC CMC.s for high temperature structural applications, but the current methods of production, namely chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), melt infiltration (MI), and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), are considered time consuming and involve material related shortcomings associated with their respective methodologies. In this study, SiC CMC.s were produced using the 25 ton laboratory unit with a target sample size of 40 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness, as well as on the larger 250 ton industrial FAST system targeting a sample size of 101.6 x 101.6 x 3 mm3 to investigate issues associated with scaling. Several sintering conditions were explored including: pressure of 35-65 MPa, temperature of 1700-1900°C, and heating rates between 50-400°C/min. The SiC fibers used in this study were coated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with boron nitride (BN) and pyrolytic carbon to act as a barrier layer and preserve the integrity of the fibers during sintering. Then the barrier coating was coated by an outer layer of SiC to enhance the bonding between the fibers and the SiC matrix. Microstructures of the sintered samples were examined by FE-SEM. Mechanical properties including flexural strength-deflection and stress-strain were characterized using 4-point bend testing. Tensile testing was

  14. Structure and corrosion properties of PVD Cr-N coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, C; Ziegele, H; Leyland, A; Matthews, A

    2002-01-01

    PVD Cr-N coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) are increasingly used for mechanical and tribological applications in various industrial sectors. These coatings are particularly attractive for their excellent corrosion resistance, which further enhances the lifetime and service quality of coated components. PVD Cr-N coated steels in an aqueous solution are usually corroded by galvanic attack via through-coating 'permeable' defects (e.g., pores). Therefore, the corrosion performance of Cr-N coated steel is determined by a number of variables of the coating properties and corrosive environment. These variables include: (i) surface continuity and uniformity; (ii) through-coating porosity; (iii) film density and chemical stability; (iv) growth stresses; (v) interfacial and intermediate layers; (vi) coating thickness; (vii) coating composition; and (viii) substrate properties. In this article, PVD Cr-N coatings were prepared, by electron-beam PVD and sputter deposition, with different compositions, t...

  15. High-temperature protective coatings for C/SiC composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Yang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC composites were well-established light weight materials combining high specific strength and damage tolerance. For high-temperature applications, protective coatings had to provide oxidation and corrosion resistance. The literature data introduced various technologies and materials, which were suitable for the application of coatings. Coating procedures and conditions, materials design limitations related to the reactivity of the components of C/SiC composites, new approaches and coating systems to the selection of protective coatings materials were examined. The focus of future work was on optimization by further multilayer coating systems and the anti-oxidation ability of C/SiC composites at temperatures up to 2073 K or higher in water vapor.

  16. Heat-Resistance of the Powder Cobalt Alloys Reinforced by Niobium or Titanium Carbide

    OpenAIRE

    Cherepova, T.S.; Dmitrieva, G.P.; V.K. Nosenko

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of heat-resistance of powder cobalt alloys at 1100 °C were investigated. These alloys were developed for the protection of workers banding shelves GTE blades from wear. The alloys were prepared by hot pressing powders of cobalt, chromium, aluminum, iron and niobium or titanium carbides. The values of heat resistance alloys containing carbides between 30 and 70% (vol.) depend on the type made of carbide alloys: alloys with titanium carbide superior in heat-resistant alloy o...

  17. Dilatometry Analysis of Dissolution of Cr-Rich Carbides in Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qiuliang; Volkova, Olena; Biermann, Horst; Mola, Javad

    2017-12-01

    The dissolution of Cr-rich carbides formed in the martensitic constituent of a 13 pct Cr stainless steel was studied by dilatometry and correlative electron channeling contrast examinations. The dissolution of carbides subsequent to the martensite reversion to austenite was associated with a net volume expansion which in turn increased the dilatometry-based apparent coefficient of thermal expansion (CTEa) during continuous heating. The effects of carbides fraction and size on the CTEa variations during carbides dissolution are discussed.

  18. Diamond and silicon carbide in impact melt rock from the Ries impact crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, R. M.; Gilmour, I.; Pillinger, C. T.; Arden, J. W.; Gilkess, K. W. R.; Yuan, J.; Milledge, H. J.

    1995-11-01

    SHOCK-PRODUCED diamond and lonsdaleite (the hexagonal polymorph) were first observed in experiments involving explosions1. Several classes of meteorites2,3 contain microcrystalline diamond aggregates that are thought to be produced by impacts with the Earth or in space. Diamonds have also been found in association with several Russian impact craters4 and in Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary impact ejecta5,6; these too have most often been interpreted as having formed by shock in the solid state4. Here we report the occurrence of diamond lonsdaleite plates and cubic diamond in association with silicon carbide, in impact melts from the Ries crater in southern Germany. We interpret these occurrences as evidence that these phases can be formed by chemical vapour deposition from the ejecta plume of an impact crater. It follows that cubic diamond and silicon carbide may be formed at any impact site from vaporized carbon-bearing rocks, and hence may be used as a reliable diagnostic tool for hypervelocity impact on Earth. This process may also explain the occurrence of diamonds found in sediments (carbonados7), which may result from the 'heavy bom-bardment' period of early Earth history, rather than from mantle-derived diatremes8.

  19. In situ X-Ray reflectivity measurements during DC sputtering of vanadium carbide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufholz, Marthe; Krause, Baerbel; Kotapati, Sunil; Baumbach, Tilo [ISS, Karlsruher Institute for Technology (Germany); Ulrich, Sven; Stueber, Michael [IAM-AWP, Karlsruher Institute for Technology (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Vanadium Carbide (VC) is a promising candidate for new hard coatings used e.g. in medical applications. For optimising the coating properties, the relation between the microstructure formation, deposition conditions and mechanical properties has to be understood. In situ X-Ray Reflectivity (XRR) is a powerful tool to investigate the changes in thickness, electron density and roughness during deposition. In situ XRR measurements during sputtering were performed at ANKA (MPI-Beamline). Several VC films were deposited on Si with different growth conditions. Before and after deposition a full specular XRR curve was taken. During sputtering, the intensity changes e.g. due to the thickness increase were measured at fixed angular position of the detector. For the analysis of the angle - and time-dependent XRR a simulation tool is used based on the Parratt Algorithm. This tool can be adapted to other materials and deposition techniques. First measurements show that the electron density of the thin films depends strongly on the plasma properties during the deposition. This might give the possibility of a controlled growth of layers with different electron density by tuning the plasma conditions.

  20. Elastic and piezoresistive properties of nickel carbides from first principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelling, Jeffrey; Zahn, Peter; Schuster, Jörg; Gemming, Sibylle

    2017-01-01

    The nickel-carbon system has received increased attention over the past years due to the relevance of nickel as a catalyst for carbon nanotube and graphene growth, where nickel carbide intermediates may be involved or carbide interface layers form in the end. Nickel-carbon composite thin films comprising Ni3C are especially interesting in mechanical sensing applications. Due to the metastability of nickel carbides, formation conditions and the coupling between mechanical and electrical properties are not yet well understood. Using first-principles electronic structure methods, we calculated the elastic properties of Ni3C ,Ni2C , and NiC , as well as changes in electronic properties under mechanical strain. We observe that the electronic density of states around the Fermi level does not change under the considered strains of up to 1%, which correspond to stresses up to 3 GPa . Relative changes in conductivity of Ni3C range up to maximum values of about 10%.

  1. Structure-Property Relationship in Metal Carbides and Bimetallic Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguan [University of Delaware

    2014-03-04

    The primary objective of our DOE/BES sponsored research is to use carbide and bimetallic catalysts as model systems to demonstrate the feasibility of tuning the catalytic activity, selectivity and stability. Our efforts involve three parallel approaches, with the aim at studying single crystal model surfaces and bridging the “materials gap” and “pressure gap” between fundamental surface science studies and real world catalysis. The utilization of the three parallel approaches has led to the discovery of many intriguing catalytic properties of carbide and bimetallic surfaces and catalysts. During the past funding period we have utilized these combined research approaches to explore the possibility of predicting and verifying bimetallic and carbide combinations with enhanced catalytic activity, selectivity and stability.

  2. Analysis of carbides and inclusions in high speed tool steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Therkildsen, K.T.; Dahl, K.V.

    2002-01-01

    The fracture surfaces of fatigued specimens were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The aim was to quantify the distribution of cracked carbides and non-metallic inclusions on the fracturesurfaces as well as on polished cross...... sections. The specimens were made of Böhler P/M steel grade 390s and 690s in both micro-clean and conventional grades. The results show that the content of non-metallic inclusions are higher in the conventionalgrades than in the microclean grades, but there were found to be no link between non-metallic...... inclusions and the crack initiation. Surprisingly, no differences were found between the carbide size distributions of the micro-clean and conventional grades.Also, the distribution of the fractured carbides was found to be the same regardless of steel type, manufacturing method or location on the specimen....

  3. Ordering of carbon atoms in boron carbide structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomarev, V. I., E-mail: i2212@yandex.ru; Kovalev, I. D.; Konovalikhin, S. V.; Vershinnikov, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Structural Macrokinetics and Materials Science (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    Boron carbide crystals have been obtained in the entire compositional range according to the phase diagram by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS). Based on the results of X-ray diffraction investigations, the samples were characterized by the unit-cell metric and reflection half-width in the entire range of carbon concentrations. A significant spread in the boron carbide unit-cell parameters for the same carbon content is found in the data in the literature; this spread contradicts the structural concepts for covalent compounds. The SHS samples have not revealed any significant spread in the unit-cell parameters. Structural analysis suggests that the spread of parameters in the literary data is related to the unique process of ordering of carbon atoms in the boron carbide structure.

  4. Pentek metal coating removal system: Baseline report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-31

    The Pentek coating removal technology was tested and is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers evaluation conducted for safety and health issues. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. The Pentek coating removal system consisted of the ROTO-PEEN Scaler, CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign}, and VAC-PAC{reg_sign}. They are designed to remove coatings from steel, concrete, brick, and wood. The Scaler uses 3M Roto Peen tungsten carbide cutters while the CORNER-CUTTER{reg_sign} uses solid needles for descaling activities. These hand tools are used with the VAC-PAC{reg_sign} vacuum system to capture dust and debris as removal of the coating takes place. The safety and health evaluation during the testing demonstration focused on two main areas of exposure: dust and noise. Dust exposure minimal, but noise exposure was significant. Further testing for each exposure is recommended because of the environment where the testing demonstration took place. It is feasible that the dust and noise levels will be higher in an enclosed operating environment of different construction. In addition, other areas of concern found were arm-hand vibration, whole-body, ergonomics, heat stress, tripping hazards, electrical hazards, machine guarding, and lockout/tagout.

  5. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0⋅39 µm. (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0⋅5 wt ...

  6. Sintering of nano crystalline α silicon carbide by doping with boron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable nano silicon carbide powders of mean particle size (37 nm) were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type alpha silicon carbide having mean particle size of 0.39 m (390 nm). Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of boron carbide of 0.5 wt% together ...

  7. Method and apparatus for coating thin foil with a boron coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.

    2018-01-16

    An apparatus and a process is disclosed for applying a boron coating to a thin foil. Preferably, the process is a continuous, in-line process for applying a coating to a thin foil comprising wrapping the foil around a rotating and translating mandrel, cleaning the foil with glow discharge in an etching chamber as the mandrel with the foil moves through the chamber, sputtering the foil with boron carbide in a sputtering chamber as the mandrel moves through the sputtering chamber, and unwinding the foil off the mandrel after it has been coated. The apparatus for applying a coating to a thin foil comprises an elongated mandrel. Foil preferably passes from a reel to the mandrel by passing through a seal near the initial portion of an etching chamber. The mandrel has a translation drive system for moving the mandrel forward and a rotational drive system for rotating mandrel as it moves forward. The etching chamber utilizes glow discharge on a surface of the foil as the mandrel moves through said etching chamber. A sputtering chamber, downstream of the etching chamber, applies a thin layer comprising boron onto the surface of the foil as said mandrel moves through said sputtering chamber. Preferably, the coated foil passes from the mandrel to a second reel by passing through a seal near the terminal portion of the sputtering chamber.

  8. Nanostructured TaxC interlayer synthesized via double glow plasma surface alloying process for diamond deposition on cemented carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Wolong; Hei, Hongjun; Zhong, Qiang; Shen, Yanyan; Liu, Xiaoping; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Bing; He, Zhiyong; Yu, Shengwang

    2015-12-01

    The aim in this work was to improve the adhesion of diamond coating with pre-deposition of a TaxC interlayer on cemented carbide (WC-Co) substrate by double glow plasma surface alloying technique. The following deposition of diamond coating on the interlayer was performed in a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. TaxC interlayer with an inner diffusion layer and an outer deposition layer was composed of Ta2C and TaC nanocrystalline, and it exhibited a special compact surface morphology formed of flower-shaped pits. As the gradual element distributions existed in the diffusion layer, the interlayer displayed a superior adherence to the substrate with significantly enhanced surface microhardness to the original substrate. After CVD process, the preferred orientation of TaC changed from (2 2 2) to (2 0 0) plane, and a uniform and tense diamond coating with adhesion referred to class HF 2 at least (Verein Deutscher Ingenieure 3198 norm) was obtained on the interlayered substrate. It indicated that the diffusion of Co was effectively inhibited by the formation of TaxC diffusion-deposition interlayer. The TaxC interlayer is most likely to improve the performance of diamond coatings used in cutting tools.

  9. Formation of Silicon Carbide in the Silicomanganese Process

    OpenAIRE

    Davidsen, Jens Erik

    2011-01-01

    As the silicon content in a silicomanganese alloy increase, silicon carbide becomes the stable carbon phase. Little work is published on the formation of silicon carbide in the SiMn process. This thesis examines the formation of SiC through the reaction between slag, metal and coke. The goal of the thesis has been to determine where and how SiC is formed in the silicomanganese process. Focus has been given to formation through liquid-solid reactions.The investigation was carried out by heatin...

  10. Ultrathin fiber poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, modified by silicon carbide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Krutikova, A. A.; Goldshtrakh, M. A.; Staroverova, O. V.; Iordanskii, A. L.; Ischenko, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    The article presents the results of studies the composite fibrous material based on poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) and nano-size silicon carbide obtained by the electrospinning method. Size distribution of the silicon carbide nanoparticles in the fiber was estimated by X-ray diffraction technique. It is shown that immobilization of the SiC nanoparticles to the PHB fibers contributes to obtaining essentially smaller diameter of fibers, high physical-mechanical characteristics and increasing resistance to degradation in comparison with the fibers of PHB.

  11. Properties of Plasma and HVOF Sprayed Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciech Żórawski

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The work compares the properties of plasma and HVOF thermally sprayed coatings obtained by blending the NiCrBSi and Fe2O3 powders. The deposition was performed by means of the Plancer PN-120 and the Diamond Jet guns for plasma spraying and HVOF spraying respectively. The SEM (EDS method was employed to study the microstructure of the produced coatings. Although the blended powders differ in particle size, shape, and distribution, it is possible to obtain composite coatings with an NiCrBSi matrix containing iron oxides. Except for a different microstructure, plasma and HVOF coatings have a different phase composition, which was examined using the Bruker D-8 Advance diffractometer. Studies of the coatings wear and scuffing resistance showed that an optimal content of Fe2O3 is about 26 % for plasma sprayed coatings and 22.5 % for HVOF deposited coatings.

  12. Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littman, Howard (Inventor); Plawsky, Joel L. (Inventor); Paccione, John D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for coating particulate material are provided. The apparatus includes a vessel having a top and a bottom, a vertically extending conduit having an inlet in the vessel and an outlet outside of the vessel, a first fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a transfer fluid, a second fluid inlet in the bottom of the vessel for introducing a coating fluid, and a fluid outlet from the vessel. The method includes steps of agitating a material, contacting the material with a coating material, and drying the coating material to produce a coated material. The invention may be adapted to coat aerogel beads, among other materials. A coated aerogel bead and an aerogel-based insulation material are also disclosed.

  13. The erosion performance of cold spray deposited metal matrix composite coatings with subsequent friction stir processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This study forms an initial investigation into the development of SprayStir, an innovative processing technique for generating erosion resistant surface layers on a chosen substrate material. Tungsten carbide - cobalt chromium, chromium carbide - nickel chromium and aluminium oxide coatings were successfully cold spray deposited on AA5083 grade aluminium. In order to improve the deposition efficiency of the cold spray process, coatings were co-deposited with powdered AA5083 using a twin powder feed system that resulted in thick (>300 μm) composite coatings. The deposited coatings were subsequently friction stir processed to embed the particles in the substrate in order to generate a metal matrix composite (MMC) surface layer. The primary aim of this investigation was to examine the erosion performance of the SprayStirred surfaces and demonstrate the benefits of this novel process as a surface engineering technique. Volumetric analysis of the SprayStirred surfaces highlighted a drop of approx. 40% in the level of material loss when compared with the cold spray deposited coating prior to friction stir processing. Micro-hardness testing revealed that in the case of WC-CoCr reinforced coating, the hardness of the SprayStirred material exhibits an increase of approx. 540% over the unaltered substrate and 120% over the as-deposited composite coating. Microstructural examination demonstrated that the increase in the hardness of the MMC aligns with the improved dispersion of reinforcing particles throughout the aluminium matrix.

  14. Analytical and Experimental Evaluation of Joining Silicon Carbide to Silicon Carbide and Silicon Nitride to Silicon Nitride for Advanced Heat Engine Applications Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundberg, G.J.

    1994-01-01

    Techniques were developed to produce reliable silicon nitride to silicon nitride (NCX-5101) curved joins which were used to manufacture spin test specimens as a proof of concept to simulate parts such as a simple rotor. Specimens were machined from the curved joins to measure the following properties of the join interlayer: tensile strength, shear strength, 22 C flexure strength and 1370 C flexure strength. In parallel, extensive silicon nitride tensile creep evaluation of planar butt joins provided a sufficient data base to develop models with accurate predictive capability for different geometries. Analytical models applied satisfactorily to the silicon nitride joins were Norton's Law for creep strain, a modified Norton's Law internal variable model and the Monkman-Grant relationship for failure modeling. The Theta Projection method was less successful. Attempts were also made to develop planar butt joins of siliconized silicon carbide (NT230).

  15. Graded composite diamond coatings with top-layer nanocrystallinity and interfacial integrity: Cross-sectional Raman mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumpala, Ravikumar [Manufacturing Engineering Section, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Ramamoorthy, B. [Manufacturing Engineering Section, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Rao, M.S. Ramachandra, E-mail: msrrao@iitm.ac.in [Nano Functional Materials Technology Centre, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India)

    2014-01-15

    Cross-sectional structural characteristics of the CVD diamond coatings deposited on the tungsten carbide (WC-Co) substrates were analysed using Raman imaging technique. The grain size of the nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) coatings was observed to deviate from the nanocrystallinity with increasing thickness and exhibited the surface characteristics of microcrystalline diamond (MCD). However, thick diamond coatings with surface nanocrystallinity is the key requirement for load-bearing tribological applications. Tribological tests have clearly indicated the significance and need for the top-layer nanocrystallinity. Graded composite diamond coatings with an architecture of NCD/transition-layer/MCD/WC-Co are potentail candiadates to realize thick diamond coatings with top-layer nanocrystallinity. Residual stresses along the cross-section of the graded composite diamond coatings were analysed using Raman imaging technique, which confirmed the improved interfacial integrity of the graded composite diamond coatings.

  16. Tungsten carbide encapsulated in nitrogen-doped carbon with iron/cobalt carbides electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jie; Chen, Jinwei, E-mail: jwchen@scu.edu.cn; Jiang, Yiwu; Zhou, Feilong; Wang, Gang; Wang, Ruilin, E-mail: rl.wang@scu.edu.cn

    2016-12-15

    Graphical abstract: A hybrid catalyst was prepared via a quite green and simple method to achieve an one-pot synthesis of the N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides. It exhibited comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability and ability to methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C to ORR. - Highlights: • A novel type of hybrid Fe/Co/WC@NC catalysts have been successfully synthesized. • The hybrid catalyst also exhibited better durability and methanol tolerance. • Multiple effective active sites of Fe{sub 3}C, Co{sub 3}C, WC, and NC help to improve catalytic performance. - Abstract: This work presents a type of hybrid catalyst prepared through an environmental and simple method, combining a pyrolysis of transition metal precursors, a nitrogen-containing material, and a tungsten source to achieve a one-pot synthesis of N-doping carbon, tungsten carbides, and iron/cobalt carbides (Fe/Co/WC@NC). The obtained Fe/Co/WC@NC consists of uniform Fe{sub 3}C and Co{sub 3}C nanoparticles encapsulated in graphitized carbon with surface nitrogen doping, closely wrapped around a plate-like tungsten carbide (WC) that functions as an efficient oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The introduction of WC is found to promote the ORR activity of Fe/Co-based carbide electrocatalysts, which is attributed to the synergistic catalysts of WC, Fe{sub 3}C, and Co{sub 3}C. Results suggest that the composite exhibits comparable electrocatalytic activity, higher durability, and ability for methanol tolerance compared with commercial Pt/C for ORR in alkaline electrolyte. These advantages make Fe/Co/WC@NC a promising ORR electrocatalyst and a cost-effective alternative to Pt/C for practical application as fuel cell.

  17. Confectionery coating with an electrohydrodynamic (EHD) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marthina, Kumala; Barringer, Sheryl A

    2012-01-01

    In the confectionery coating industry, hard butters are frequently used as cocoa butter replacers. An electrohydrodynamic (EHD) system, which forms fine droplets with a relatively narrow size distribution, may be beneficial in confectionery coating to produce more even coverage. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of lecithin content and fat type on electrical resistivity and apparent viscosity, and the effect of these variables under EHD (25kV) and non-EHD coating on droplet size, width of coating area, thickness, and minimum flow rate to produce complete coverage. Total of 3 different types of fat were used: cocoa butter, cocoa butter equivalent, and lauric butter. As lecithin content increased, resistivity and apparent viscosity decreased, except all samples showed a local apparent viscosity minimum at 0.5% lecithin. EHD coating was more efficient than non-EHD as a smaller droplet size and thinner coating was formed. Due to repulsive forces between the like-charges on the droplets during EHD, it spread over wider areas which lead to a higher minimum flow rate to get complete coverage. Under EHD, increasing resistivity significantly increased the droplet size, but only at the highest resistivities. There was no correlation between resistivity and droplet size or width of coating under non-EHD. The width of coating under EHD decreased significantly as resistivity increased. Thickness and minimum flow rate to produce complete coverage, significantly correlated to resistivity, for EHD coating, and to apparent viscosity, for 2 of the 3 fat types during both EHD and non-EHD. Electrohydrodynamic (EHD) spraying offers great potential improvement to the food industry especially in the confectionery area. From the quality point of view, EHD offers greater and more complete coverage than non-EHD coating. From the economic point of view, lower cost can be achieved for coated food because during EHD, smaller droplet size and thinner coating is produced.

  18. TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 coated nanopores and nanotubes produced by ALD in etched ion-track membranes for transport measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spende, Anne; Sobel, Nicolas; Lukas, Manuela; Zierold, Robert; Riedl, Jesse C.; Gura, Leonard; Schubert, Ina; Montero Moreno, Josep M.; Nielsch, Kornelius; Stühn, Bernd; Hess, Christian; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, Maria E.

    2015-08-01

    Low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO2, SiO2, and Al2O3 was applied to modify the surface and to tailor the diameter of nanochannels in etched ion-track polycarbonate membranes. The homogeneity, conformity, and composition of the coating inside the nanochannels are investigated for different channel diameters (18-55 nm) and film thicknesses (5-22 nm). Small angle x-ray scattering before and after ALD demonstrates conformal coating along the full channel length. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy provide evidence of nearly stoichiometric composition of the different coatings. By wet-chemical methods, the ALD-deposited film is released from the supporting polymer templates providing 30 μm long self-supporting nanotubes with walls as thin as 5 nm. Electrolytic ion-conductivity measurements provide proof-of-concept that combining ALD coating with ion-track nanotechnology offers promising perspectives for single-pore applications by controlled shrinking of an oversized pore to a preferred smaller diameter and fine-tuning of the chemical and physical nature of the inner channel surface.

  19. spin coating

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROJET SOJA

    Intense UV photoluminescence is observed for intrinsic ZnO film. Keywords : thin films, oxidize zinc doped aluminium (ZnO:Al), sol-gel, spin coating, structural analysis, electric and optical properties. 1. Introduction. Depuis ces vingt dernières années les couches minces d'oxyde de zinc ont connu un intérêt croissant dans ...

  20. Initial Assessment of Environmental Barrier Coatings for the Prometheus Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Frederick

    2005-12-15

    Depending upon final design and materials selections, a variety of engineering solutions may need to be considered to avoid chemical degradation of components in a notional space nuclear power plant (SNPP). Coatings are one engineered approach that was considered. A comprehensive review of protective coating technology for various space-reactor structural materials is presented, including refractory metal alloys [molybdenum (Mo), tungsten (W), rhenium (Re), tantalum (Ta), and niobium (Nb)], nickel (Ni)-base superalloys, and silicon carbide (Sic). A summary description of some common deposition techniques is included. A literature survey identified coatings based on silicides or iridium/rhenium as the primary methods for environmental protection of refractory metal alloys. Modified aluminide coatings have been identified for superalloys and multilayer ceramic coatings for protection of Sic. All reviewed research focused on protecting structural materials from extreme temperatures in highly oxidizing conditions. Thermodynamic analyses indicate that some of these coatings may not be protective in the high-temperature, impure-He environment expected in a Prometheus reactor system. Further research is proposed to determine extensibility of these coating materials to less-oxidizing or neutral environments.

  1. Hydrogen evolution activity and electrochemical stability of selected transition metal carbides in concentrated phosphoric acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomás García, Antonio Luis; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2014-01-01

    Alternative catalysts based on carbides of Group 5 (niobium and tantalum) and 6 (chromium, molybdenum and tungsten) metals were prepared as films on the metallic substrates. The electrochemical activities of these carbide electrodes towards the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in concentrated...... phosphoric acid were investigated in a temperature range from 80 to 170°C. A significant dependence of the activities on temperature was observed for all five carbide samples. Through the entire temperature range Group 6 metal carbides showed higher activity than that of the Group 5 metal carbides...

  2. Recent developments and on-line tests of uranium carbide targets for production of nuclides far from stability

    CERN Document Server

    Panteleev, V.N; Barzakh, A.E; Fedorov, D.V; Ionan, A.M; Ivanov, V.S; Mezilev, K.A; Molkanov, P.L; Moroz, F.V; Orlov, S.Yu; Volkov, Yu.M; Alyakrinskiy, O; Lanchais, A; Lau, C; Lhersonneau, G; Rizzi, V; Stroe, L; Tecchio, L.B; Dubois, M; Eleon, C; Gaubert, G; Jardin, P; Saint Laurent, M.G; Villari, A.C.C; Essabaa, S; O. Bajeat; Mhamed, C; Leroy, R; 10.1140/epjst/e2007-00328-y

    2007-01-01

    The capacity of uranium carbide target materials of different structure and density for production of neutron-rich and heavy neutron-deficient nuclides have been investigated. The yields of Cs and Fr produced by a 1 GeV proton beam of the PNPI synchrocyclotron and release properties of different targets have been measured. The comparison of the yields and release efficiencies of Cs and Fr produced from a high density UC target material and from low density UCx prepared by the ISOLDE method at IRIS in the collaboration with PARRNe group from Orsay are presented. The yields from ISOLDE original target are presented for comparison as well.

  3. Nanoparticles and nanorods of silicon carbide from the residues of corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qadri, S. B.; Gorzkowski, E.; Rath, B. B.; Feng, J.; Qadri, S. N.; Kim, H.; Caldwell, J. D.; Imam, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the thermally induced transformation of various residues of the corn plant into nanoparticles and nanorods of different silicon carbide (SiC) polytypes. This has been accomplished by both microwave-induced and conventional furnace pyrolysis in excess of 1450 °C in an inert atmosphere. This simple process of producing nanoparticles of different polytypes of SiC from the corn plant opens a new method of utilizing agricultural waste to produce viable industrial products that are technologically important for nanoelectronics, molecular sensors, nanophotonics, biotechnology, and other mechanical applications. Using x-ray and Raman scattering characterization, we have demonstrated that the processed samples of corn husk, leaves, stalks, and cob consist of SiC nanostructures of the 2H, 3C, 4H, and 6H polytypes.

  4. Improvement of Surface Properties of Inconel718 by HVOF Coating with WC-Metal Powder and by Laser Heat Treatment of the Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Gon Chun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF thermal spray coating with WC-metal powder was carried out by using optimal coating process on an Inconel718 surface for improvement of the surface properties, friction, wear, and corrosion resistance. Binder metals such as Cr and Ni were completely melted and WC was decomposed partially to W2C and graphite during the high temperature (up to 3500°C thermal spraying. The melted metals were bonded with WC and other carbides and were formed as WC-metal coating. The graphite and excessively sprayed oxygen formed carbon oxide gases, and these gases formed porous coating by evolution of the gases. The surface properties were improved by HVOF coating and were improved further by CO2 laser heat treatment (LH. Wear resistance of In718 surface was improved by coating and LH at 25°C and an elevated temperature of 450°C, resulting in reduction of wear trace traces, and was further improved by LH of the coating in reducing wear depth. Corrosion resistance due to coating in sea water was improved by LH. HVOF coating of WC-metal powder on a metal surface and a LH of the coating were highly recommended for the improvement of In718 surface properties, the friction behavior, and wear resistance.

  5. Tough ceramic coatings: Carbon nanotube reinforced silica sol-gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A.J., E-mail: antoniojulio.lopez@urjc.es [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain); Rico, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Rams, J. [Dept. de Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, C/Tulipan s/n, Mostoles 28933, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-08-15

    Silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes were produced via sol-gel route using two mixing techniques of the sol-gel precursors, mechanical and ultrasonic mixing, and dip-coating as deposition process on magnesium alloy substrates. Effective incorporation and distribution of 0.1 wt.% of carbon nanotubes in the amorphous silica matrix of the coatings were achieved using both techniques. Fabrication procedure determines the morphological aspects of the coating. Only mechanical mixing process produced coatings dense and free of defects. Nanoindentation technique was used to examine the influence of the fabrication process in the mechanical features of the final coatings, i.e. indentation fracture toughness, Young's modulus and hardness. A maximum toughening effect of about 24% was achieved in silica coatings reinforced with carbon nanotubes produced by the mechanical mixing route. Scanning electron microscopy investigation revealed that the toughening of these reinforced coatings was mainly due to bridging effect of the reinforcement.

  6. Chemical and Morphological Characterization of Magnetron Sputtered at Different Bias Voltages Cr-Al-C Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei Obrosov

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available MAX phases (M = transition metal, A = A-group element, and X = C/N are of special interest because they possess a unique combination of the advantages of both metals and ceramics. Most attention is attracted to the ternary carbide Cr2AlC because of its excellent high-temperature oxidation, as well as hot corrosion resistance. Despite lots of publications, up to now the influence of bias voltage on the chemical bonding structure, surface morphology, and mechanical properties of the film is still not well understood. In the current study, Cr-Al-C films were deposited on silicon wafers (100 and Inconel 718 super alloy by dc magnetron sputtering with different substrate bias voltages and investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, and nanoindentation. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM was used to analyze the correlation between the growth of the films and the coating microstructure. The XPS results confirm the presence of Cr2AlC MAX phase due to a negative shift of 0.6–0.9 eV of the Al2p to pure aluminum carbide peak. The XRD results reveal the presence of Cr2AlC MAX Phase and carbide phases, as well as intermetallic AlCr2. The film thickness decreases from 8.95 to 6.98 µm with increasing bias voltage. The coatings deposited at 90 V exhibit the lowest roughness (33 nm and granular size (76 nm combined with the highest hardness (15.9 GPa. The ratio of Al carbide to carbide-like carbon state changes from 0.12 to 0.22 and correlates with the mechanical properties of the coatings. TEM confirms the columnar structure, with a nanocrystalline substructure, of the films.

  7. stabilization of ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use as pavement material. Atterberg's limits test, California bearing ratio (CBR) and unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests were conducted on the natural laterite and the treated soil specimens. The plasticity ...

  8. Erratum to: Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bull. Mater. Sci., Vol. 39, No. 4, August 2016, p. 961. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12034-016-1267-y. Erratum to: Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires by. HFCVD method. S H MORTAZAVI. ∗. , M GHORANNEVISS, M DADASHBABA and R ALIPOUR. Plasma Physics Research Center, ...

  9. Influence of nanometric silicon carbide on phenolic resin composites ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Department of Polymer Science & Rubber Technology,. Cochin University of Science and Technology. [32] Perez J M, Echeverria J M, Oliet M, Alonso M V and. Rodriguez F 2007 BioResources 2 270. [33] Janz S 2006 Amorphous silicon carbide for photovoltaic applications (Masters Thesis). Fakultät für Physik Universität.

  10. Effect of tempering after cryogenic treatment of tungsten carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    #Department of Industrial and Production Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar 144 001, India. MS received 10 ... Tungsten carbide is the most commonly used cutting tool material in the industry and the tech- nique can also be ..... in the WC-Co inserts and was present in the form of clusters of particles ...

  11. Erratum to: Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Erratum to: Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires by HFCVD method. S H MORTAZAVI M GHORANNEVISS M DADASHBABA R ALIPOUR. Volume 39 Issue 4 August 2016 pp 961-961 ...

  12. On Measurement and Interpretation of Toughness Behaviour of Carbide Tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kals, H.J.J.

    1981-01-01

    The actual significance of any definition of toughness behaviour of carbide tools depends on the existence of an interrelation between the quality as defined and the occurrence of chipping and premature failure in cutting. While at present there is no adequate analysis available and the existing

  13. Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires by HFCVD ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 4. Synthesis and investigation of silicon carbide nanowires by HFCVD ... Also Mountains Map Premium (64-bit version)software is used to investigate morphological features of samples. In this context, the analysis of the motifs, depth histograms, statistical ...

  14. Indentation fatigue in silicon nitride, alumina and silicon carbide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Repeated indentation fatigue (RIF) experiments conducted on the same spot of different structural ceramics viz. a hot pressed silicon nitride (HPSN), sintered alumina of two different grain sizes viz. 1 m and 25 m, and a sintered silicon carbide (SSiC) are reported. The RIF experiments were conducted using a Vicker's ...

  15. Stabilization of Ikpayongo laterite with cement and calcium carbide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laterite obtained from Ikpayongo was stabilized with 2-10 % cement and 2-10 % Calcium Carbide waste, for use as pavement material. Atterberg's limits test, California bearing ratio (CBR) and unconfined compressive strength (UCS) tests were conducted on the natural laterite and the treated soil specimens. The plasticity ...

  16. RICE-HUSK ASH-CARBIDE-WASTE STABILIZATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper present results of the laboratory evaluation of the characteristics of carbide waste and rice husk ash stabilized reclaimed asphalt pavement waste with a view to determine its suitability for use as flexible pavement material. The mixtures were subjected to British Standard heavy compactive effort to determine the ...

  17. Carbide-fluoride-silver self-lubricating composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material is described for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900 C in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  18. Carbide/fluoride/silver self-lubricating composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliney, Harold E. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite material for use over a wide temperature spectrum from cryogenic temperature to about 900.degree. C. in a chemically reactive environment comprising silver, barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic, and metal bonded chromium carbide.

  19. SEM investigation of minor constituents of carbide materials ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is revealed that the noble metals phases occur as separate microsized grains, most of which have been indicated as Au–Ag–Hg amalgam and rarely as Pt-rich compounds. The obtained data can be mainly used to advance technologies for manufacturing carbide-based composite materials from natural carbonaceous ...

  20. Sintering of nano crystalline o silicon carbide doping with

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sinterable silicon carbide powders were prepared by attrition milling and chemical processing of an acheson type -SiC. Pressureless sintering of these powders was achieved by addition of aluminium nitride together with carbon. Nearly 99% sintered density was obtained. The mechanism of sintering was studied by ...