WorldWideScience

Sample records for carbide coating formation

  1. Formation mechanism of a silicon carbide coating for a reinforced carbon-carbon composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. C.; Shuford, D. M.; Mueller, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented for a study to determine the mechanisms involved in a high-temperature pack cementation process which provides a silicon carbide coating on a carbon-carbon composite. The process and materials used are physically and chemically analyzed. Possible reactions are evaluated using the results of these analytical data. The coating is believed to develop in two stages. The first is a liquid controlled phase process in which silicon carbide is formed due to reactions between molten silicon metal and the carbon. The second stage is a vapor transport controlled reaction in which silicon vapors react with the carbon. There is very little volume change associated with the coating process. The original thickness changes by less than 0.7%. This indicates that the coating process is one of reactive penetration. The coating thickness can be increased or decreased by varying the furnace cycle process time and/or temperature to provide a wide range of coating thicknesses.

  2. Kinetics of carbide formation in the molybdenum-tungsten coatings used in the ITER-like Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, H.; Rasinski, M.; von Toussaint, U.; Greuner, H.; Böswirth, B.; Balden, M.; Elgeti, S.; Ruset, C.; Matthews, G. F.

    2016-02-01

    The kinetics of tungsten carbide formation was investigated for tungsten coatings on carbon fibre composite with a molybdenum interlayer as they are used in the ITER-like Wall in JET. The coatings were produced by combined magnetron sputtering and ion implantation. The investigation was performed by preparing focused ion beam cross sections from samples after heat treatment in argon atmosphere. Baking of the samples was done at temperatures of 1100 °C, 1200 °C, and 1350 °C for hold times between 30 min and 20 h. It was found that the data can be well described by a diffusional random walk with a thermally activated diffusion process. The activation energy was determined to be (3.34 ± 0.11) eV. Predictions for the isothermal lifetime of this coating system were computed from this information.

  3. Microstructural Study of Titanium Carbide Coating on Cemented Carbide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuorinen, S.; Horsewell, Andy

    1982-01-01

    Titanium carbide coating layers on cemented carbide substrates have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Microstructural variations within the typically 5µm thick chemical vapour deposited TiC coatings were found to vary with deposit thickness such that a layer structure could...... be delineated. Close to the interface further microstructural inhomogeneities were obsered, there being a clear dependence of TiC deposition mechanism on the chemical and crystallographic nature of the upper layers of the multiphase substrate....

  4. Vanadium carbide coatings: deposition process and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borisova, A.; Borisov, Y.; Shavlovsky, E.; Mits, I.; Castermans, L.; Jongbloed, R.

    2001-01-01

    Vanadium carbide coatings on carbon and alloyed steels were produced by the method of diffusion saturation from the borax melt. Thickness of the vanadium carbide layer was 5-15 μm, depending upon the steel grade and diffusion saturation parameters. Microhardness was 20000-28000 MPa and wear resistance of the coatings under conditions of end face friction without lubrication against a mating body of WC-2Co was 15-20 times as high as that of boride coatings. Vanadium carbide coatings can operate in air at a temperature of up to 400 o C. They improve fatigue strength of carbon steels and decrease the rate of corrosion in sea and fresh water and in acid solutions. The use of vanadium carbide coatings for hardening of various types of tools, including cutting tools, allows their service life to be extended by a factor of 3 to 30. (author)

  5. Kinetics and mechanism of oxidation of carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkharov, V.I.; Yar-Mukhamedov, Sh.Kh.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal stability carbidized electrolytic chromium coatings has been studied depending on the conditions of their formation; the specific features of the mechanism of oxidation at 1200 deg in an air atmosphere have been elucidated. It has been established that kinetics of high temperature oxidation of the coatings depends essentially on the conditions of their formation and on the composition of steel to which the coating is applied. It has been shown that two oxidation mechanisms are possible: by diffusion of the residual chromium through a carbide layer along the carbide grain boundaries outwards or, when there is no residual chromium, by chemical reaction of carbon combustion and oxidation of the liberated chromium. The comparison of oxidation kinetic curves of the samples of 38KhMYuA, 35KhGSA, and DI-22 steels with and without coating has shown that the coatings under study have a better protective effect on 38KhMYuA steel than on 35KhGSA, although without coating oxidability of the first steel is higher than that of the second

  6. Laser deposition of carbide-reinforced coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, W.; Martinella, R.; Mor, G.P.; Bianchi, P.; D'Angelo, D.

    1991-01-01

    CO 2 laser cladding with blown powder presents many advantages: fusion bonding with the substrate with low dilution, metallurgical continuity in the metallic matrix, high solidification rates, ease of automation, and reduced environmental contamination. In the present paper, laser cladding experimental results using families of carbides (tungsten and titanium) mixed with metallic alloys are reported. As substrates, low alloy construction steel (AISI 4140) (austenitic stainless steel) samples have been utilized, depending on the particular carbide reinforcement application. The coating layers obtained have been characterized by metallurgical examination. They show low dilution, absence of cracks, and high abrasion resistance. The WC samples, obtained with different carbide sizes and percentages, have been characterized with dry and rubber wheel abrasion tests and the specimen behaviour has been compared with the behaviour of materials used for similar applications. The abrasion resistance proved to be better than that of other widely used hardfacing materials and the powder morphology have a non-negligible influence on the tribological properties. (orig.)

  7. Effect of bond coat and preheat on the microstructure, hardness, and porosity of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermally sprayed coatings are used to improve the surface properties of tool steel materials. Bond coatings are commonly used as intermediate layers deposited on steel substrates (i.e. H13 tool steel) before the top coat is applied in order to enhance a number of critical performance criteria including adhesion of a barrier coating, limiting atomic migration of the base metal, and corrosion resistance. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of nickel bond coat and preheats temperatures (i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C) on microstructure, hardness, and porosity of tungsten carbide coatings sprayed by flame thermal coating. Micro-hardness, porosity and microstructure of tungsten carbide coatings are evaluated by using micro-hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction. The results show that nickel bond coatings reduce the susceptibility of micro crack formation at the bonding area interfaces. The percentage of porosity level on the tungsten carbide coatings with nickel bond coat decreases from 5.36 % to 2.78% with the increase of preheat temperature of the steel substrate of H13 from 200°C to 400°C. The optimum hardness of tungsten carbide coatings is 1717 HVN in average resulted from the preheat temperature of 300°C.

  8. Stress in tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon multilayer coatings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pujada, B.R.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Janssen, G.C.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tungsten carbide-diamond like carbon (WC-DLC) multilayer coatings have been prepared by sputter deposition from a tungsten-carbide target and periodic switching on and off of the reactive acetylene gas flow. The stress in the resulting WC-DLC multilayers has been studied by substrate curvature.

  9. Fracture and Residual Characterization of Tungsten Carbide Cobalt Coatings on High Strength Steel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Parker, Donald S

    2003-01-01

    Tungsten carbide cobalt coatings applied via high velocity oxygen fuel thermal spray deposition are essentially anisotropic composite structures with aggregates of tungsten carbide particles bonded...

  10. Carbon-coated tungsten and molybdenum carbides for electrode of electrochemical capacitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Takahiro; Soneda, Yasushi; Hatori, Hiroaki; Inagaki, Michio

    2007-01-01

    New electrode materials for electrochemical capacitor, tungsten carbide WC and molybdenum carbide Mo 2 C coated by porous carbon, were prepared through a simple heat treatment of the mixture of K 2 WO 4 and K 2 MoO 4 , respectively, with hydroxy propyl cellulose. Carbide changed to hydroxide during the 1st charge-discharge cycle in H 2 SO 4 aqueous electrolyte, which showed redox reaction in further charge-discharge cycles, in addition to electric double layers of the carbon formed on its surface. The carbon-coated carbide gave a high capacitance in 1 mol L -1 H 2 SO 4 electrolyte, as about 350 F cm -3 for carbon-coated WC and 550-750 F cm -3 for carbon-coated Mo 2 C. Coating of carbon inhibits the growth of carbide particles during their formation, of which the small particle size make possible to complete transformation to hydroxides during the 1st charge-discharge cycle, and also disturbs the agglomeration of tungsten and molybdenum hydroxides during charge-discharge cycles, as well as porous carbon coated act as electrode material for electric double layers of electrolyte ions

  11. ELASTO-PLASTIC DEFORMATION OF COMPOSITE POWDERS WITH LAYERED CARBON AND CARBIDE-FORMING ELEMENT COATING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coating structure formation under magnetron spraying of titanium and carbon cathodes and combined cathodes, namely cobalt (EP 131 – nickel, tungsten – carbon have been investigated under conditions of carbide separate synthesis within the temperature range of 650–1200 °C. Usage of cobalt and nickel particles as matrix material leads to their rapid thermal expansion under heating during sintering process in the dilatometer. Subsequent plastic deformation of sintered samples provides obtaining a composite powder material that is a composite with framing structure of cobalt, titanium and tungsten carbides in the coatings.

  12. Tribological Characteristics of Tungsten Carbide Reinforced Arc Sprayed Coatings using Different Carbide Grain Size Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tillmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Tungsten carbide reinforced coatings play an important role in the field of surface engineering to protect stressed surfaces against wear. For thermally sprayed coatings, it is already shown that the tribological properties get mainly determined by the carbide grain size fraction. Within the scope of this study, the tribological characteristics of iron based WC-W2C reinforced arc sprayed coatings deposited using cored wires consisting of different carbide grain size fractions were examined. Microstructural characteristics of the produced coatings were scrutinized using electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses. Ball-on-disk test as well as Taber Abraser and dry sand rubber wheel test were employed to analyze both the dry sliding and the abrasive wear behavior. It was shown that a reduced carbide grain size fraction as filling leads to an enhanced wear resistance against sliding. In terms of the Taber Abraser test, it is also demonstrated that a fine carbide grain size fraction results in an improved wear resistant against abrasion. As opposed to that, a poorer wear resistance was found within the dry sand rubber wheel tests. The findings show that the operating mechanisms for both abrasion tests affect the stressed surface in a different way, leading either to microcutting or microploughing.

  13. Carbide coated fibers in graphite-aluminum composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imprescia, R. J.; Levinson, L. S.; Reiswig, R. D.; Wallace, T. C.; Williams, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    The NASA-supported program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) to develop carbon fiber-aluminum matrix composites is described. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to uniformly deposit thin, smooth, continuous coats of TiC on the fibers of graphite tows. Wet chemical coating of fibers, followed by high-temperature treatment, was also used, but showed little promise as an alternative coating method. Strength measurements on CVD coated fiber tows showed that thin carbide coats can add to fiber strength. The ability of aluminum alloys to wet TiC was successfully demonstrated using TiC-coated graphite surfaces. Pressure-infiltration of TiC- and ZrC-coated fiber tows with aluminum alloys was only partially successful. Experiments were performed to evaluate the effectiveness of carbide coats on carbon as barriers to prevent reaction between alluminum alloys and carbon. Initial results indicate that composites of aluminum and carbide-coated graphite are stable for long periods of time at temperatures near the alloy solidus.

  14. Diffusion mechanism in molten salt baths during the production of carbide coatings via thermal reactive diffusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aliakbar Ghadi; Hassan Saghafian; Mansour Soltanieh; Zhi-gang Yang

    2017-01-01

    The diffusion mechanism of carbide-forming elements from a molten salt bath to a substrate surface was studied in this research, with particular focus on the processes occurring in the molten bath at the time of coating. Metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths were investi-gated, and the coating process was performed on H13 steel substrates. Scanning electron microscopy and electron-probe microanalysis were used to study the coated samples and the quenched salt bath. The thickness of the carbide coating layer was 6.5 ± 0.5, 5.2 ± 0.5, or 5.7 ± 0.5μm depending on whether it was deposited in a metal, oxide, or metal-oxide bath, respectively. The phase distribution of vanadium-rich regions was 63%, 57%, and 74% of the total coating deposited in metal, oxide, and metal-oxide baths, respectively. The results obtained using the metal bath indicated that undissolved suspended metal particles deposited onto the substrate surface. Then, carbon subsequently diffused to the sub-strate surface and reacted with the metal particles to form the carbides. In the oxide bath, oxide powders dissolved in the bath with or without binding to the oxidative structure (Na2O) of borax; they were then reduced by aluminum and converted into metal particles. We concluded that, in the metal and oxide baths, the deposition of metal particles onto the sample surface is an important step in the formation of the coating.

  15. Porosity and wear resistance of flame sprayed tungsten carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Sofyan, Nofrijon; Rooscote, Didi

    2017-06-01

    Thermal-sprayed coatings offer practical and economical solutions for corrosion and wear protection of components or tools. To improve the coating properties, heat treatment such as preheat is applied. The selection of coating and substrate materials is a key factor in improving the quality of the coating morphology after the heat treatment. This paper presents the experimental results regarding the effect of preheat temperatures, i.e. 200°C, 300°C and 400°C, on porosity and wear resistance of tungsten carbide (WC) coating sprayed by flame thermal coating. The powders and coatings morphology were analyzed by a Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDS), whereas the phase identification was performed by X-Ray diffraction technique (XRD). In order to evaluate the quality of the flame spray obtained coatings, the porosity, micro-hardness and wear rate of the specimens was determined. The results showed that WC coating gives a higher surface hardness from 1391 HVN up to 1541 HVN compared to that of the non-coating. Moreover, the wear rate increased from 0.072 mm3/min. to 0.082 mm3/min. when preheat temperature was increased. Preheat on H13 steel substrate can reduce the percentage of porosity level from 10.24 % to 3.94% on the thermal spray coatings.

  16. Performance of HVOF carbide coatings under erosion/corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, S.; Arsenault, B.; Legoux, J.G.; Hawthorne, H.M.

    1999-01-01

    Cermet based materials are known to have an excellent performance under several wear conditions. High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technology allows the deposition of such hard materials in the form of protective coatings onto different surfaces. Under slurry erosion, the performance of the coatings is influenced by the occurrence of corrosion reactions on the metallic matrix. Indeed, wet conditions promote the dissolution of metallic binder resulting in a potential synergic effect between the corrosion and wear mechanisms. The composition of the metallic matrix plays a key role on the stability of the coatings and their degradation rate. In this work, four coatings based on tungsten carbide embedded in different metallic binders were evaluated with regard to corrosion and wear. (author)

  17. Studies on the influence of surface pre-treatments on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, J.P.; Resmi, V.G.; Rajan, T.P.D.; Pavithran, C.; Pai, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Boron carbide is one of the hard ceramic particles which find application as structural materials and neutron shielding material due to its high neutron capture cross section. Copper coating on boron carbide particle is essential for the synthesis of metal-ceramic composites with enhanced sinterability and dispersibility. Surface characteristics of the substrate and the coating parameters play a foremost role in the formation of effective electroless coating. The effect of surface pre-treatment conditions and pH on electroless copper coating of boron carbide particles has been studied. Surface pre-treatement of B 4 C when compared to acid treated and alkali treated particles were carried out. Uniform copper coating was observed at pH 12 in alkali treated particles when compared to others due to the effective removal of inevitable impurities during the production and processing of commercially available B 4 C. A threshold pH 11 was required for initiation of copper coating on boron carbide particles. The growth pattern of the copper coating also varies depending on the surface conditions from acicular to spherical morphology.

  18. On the carbide formation in high-carbon stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mujahid, M.; Qureshi, M.I.

    1996-01-01

    Stainless steels containing high Cr as well as carbon contents in excess of 1.5 weight percent have been developed for applications which require high resistance erosion and environmental corrosion. Formation of carbides is one of important parameters for controlling properties of these materials especially erosion characteristics. Percent work includes the study of different type of carbides which from during the heat treatment of these materials. It has been found that precipitation of secondary carbides and the nature of matrix transformation plays an important role in determining the hardness characteristics of these materials. (author)

  19. ELABORATION OF AN EPOXY COATING REINFORCED WITH ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE NANOSTRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia G. Díaz-Barriga

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the preparation of a transparent epoxy coating reinforced with 200 PPM of zirconium carbide nanostructures. The nanostructures of ZrC were prepared by mechanosynthesis. The additive characteristics analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were presented. Epoxy coating adhesion on a steel plate was analyzed using MEB. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was performed to the reinforced paints between 20-700 °C. The reinforced enamel was compared with an enamel without nanostructures. There is not vaporization of reinforced enamel at a 95 y 100 °C with ZrC particles size of 10 µm y 120 nm respectively. The final enamel degradation is slower when there is a 14% by weight of the residue and 426 °C with 120nm diameter particles.

  20. Friction and wear performance of diamond-like carbon, boron carbide, and titanium carbide coatings against glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniels, B.K.; Brown, D.W.; Kimock, F.M.

    1997-01-01

    Protection of glass substrates by direct ion beam deposited diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings was observed using a commercial pin-on-disk instrument at ambient conditions without lubrication. Ion beam sputter-deposited titanium carbide and boron carbide coatings reduced sliding friction, and provided tribological protection of silicon substrates, but the improvement factor was less than that found for DLC. Observations of unlubricated sliding of hemispherical glass pins at ambient conditions on uncoated glass and silicon substrates, and ion beam deposited coatings showed decreased wear in the order: uncoated glass>uncoated silicon>boron carbide>titanium carbide>DLC>uncoated sapphire. Failure mechanisms varied widely and are discussed. Generally, the amount of wear decreased as the sliding friction decreased, with the exception of uncoated sapphire substrates, for which the wear was low despite very high friction. There is clear evidence that DLC coatings continue to protect the underlying substrate long after the damage first penetrates through the coating. The test results correlate with field use data on commercial products which have shown that the DLC coatings provide substantial extension of the useful lifetime of glass and other substrates. copyright 1997 Materials Research Society

  1. Molybdenum carbide coating electrodeposited from molten fluoride bath

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topor, D.C.; Selman, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Molybdenum carbide has been recently considered as a candidate material for the protection of common steel-based substrates in high-temperature high-sulfur activity applications. Methods to produce coatings of materials such as Mo/sub 2/C are scarce and only the electrodeposition from molten salts can yield dense, pore-free layers on various metallic profiles. Recently Stern reported the deposition of a Mo/sub 2/C coating on nickel substrate form, FLINAK + K/sub 2/MoCl/sub 6/ + Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ mixture at 850 0 C. Electrodeposition of Mo/sub 2/C on a cathode surface proceeds according to a rather complicated mechanism which may involve simultaneous reduction of carbonate to C, of molybdate to Mo and a subsequent chemical reaction between both species. The deposit grows further as a coherent coating. Reduction of CO/sub 2/ or carbonate to carbon in a fused salt medium could follow different paths but Li/sup +/ ions or other highly polarizing ions must be present. A similar situation in which a polyatomic anion discharges at the cathode is encountered when molybdates are used as source of molybdenum. In fluoride melts the chemistry of Mo(VI) species is considered to be much simpler due to the hard fluoride ions. These ions form strong complexes with molybdenum and the resulting solution is more stable

  2. Weibull statistic analysis of bending strength in the cemented carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Yong; Shen Baoluo; Qiu Shaoyu; Li Cong

    2003-01-01

    The theoretical basis using Weibull statistics to analyze the strength of coating has been established that the Weibull distribution will be the asymptotic distribution of strength for coating as the volume of coating increase, provided that the local strength of coating is statistic independent, and has been confirmed in the following test for the bending strength of two cemented carbide coatings. The result shows that Weibull statistics can be well used to analyze the strength of two coatings. (authors)

  3. Deposition of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veligdan, James; Branch, D.; Vanier, P. E.; Barietta, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing involved the use of a CO2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl5 gas near the substrate. The results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described.

  4. Hafnium carbide formation in oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodenbücher, C. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Hildebrandt, E.; Sharath, S. U.; Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Alff, L. [Technische Universität Darmstadt, Institute of Materials Science, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Szot, K. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); University of Silesia, A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, 40-007 Katowice (Poland); Breuer, U. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Central Institute for Engineering, Electronics and Analytics (ZEA-3), 52425 Jülich (Germany); Waser, R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Peter Grünberg Institute (PGI-7), JARA-FIT, 52425 Jülich (Germany); RWTH Aachen, Institute of Electronic Materials (IWE 2), 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2016-06-20

    On highly oxygen deficient thin films of hafnium oxide (hafnia, HfO{sub 2−x}) contaminated with adsorbates of carbon oxides, the formation of hafnium carbide (HfC{sub x}) at the surface during vacuum annealing at temperatures as low as 600 °C is reported. Using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy the evolution of the HfC{sub x} surface layer related to a transformation from insulating into metallic state is monitored in situ. In contrast, for fully stoichiometric HfO{sub 2} thin films prepared and measured under identical conditions, the formation of HfC{sub x} was not detectable suggesting that the enhanced adsorption of carbon oxides on oxygen deficient films provides a carbon source for the carbide formation. This shows that a high concentration of oxygen vacancies in carbon contaminated hafnia lowers considerably the formation energy of hafnium carbide. Thus, the presence of a sufficient amount of residual carbon in resistive random access memory devices might lead to a similar carbide formation within the conducting filaments due to Joule heating.

  5. Investigation on the Tribological Behavior of Arc-Sprayed and Hammer-Peened Coatings Using Tungsten Carbide Cored Wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmann, W.; Hagen, L.; Schröder, P.

    2017-01-01

    Due to their outstanding properties, WC-W2C iron-based cermet coatings are widely used in the field of wear protection. Regarding commonly used WC-W2C reinforced coating systems, it has been reported that their tribological behavior is mainly determined by the carbide grain size fraction. Although the manufacturing route for arc-sprayed WC-W2C cermet coatings is in an advanced state, there is still a lack of knowledge concerning the performance of cored wires with tungsten carbides as filling material and their related coating properties when post-treatment processes are used such as machine hammer peening (MHP). A major objective was to characterize WC-W2C FeCMnSi coatings, deposited with different carbide grain size fractions as a filling using cored wires, with respect to their tribological behavior. Moreover, deposits derived from cored wires with a different amount of hard phases are investigated. According to this, polished MHP surfaces are compared to as-sprayed and polished samples by means of metallographic investigations. With the use of ball-on-disk and dry rubber wheel tests, dry sliding and rolling wear effects on a microscopic level are scrutinized. It has been shown that the MHP process leads to a densification of the microstructure formation. For dry sliding experiments, the MHP coatings obtain lower wear resistances, but lower coefficients of friction than the conventional coatings. In view of abrasion tests, the MHP coatings possess an improved wear resistance. Strain hardening effects at the subsurface area were revealed by the mechanical response using nanoindentation. However, the MHP process has caused a cracking of embedded carbides, which favor breakouts, leading to advanced third-body wear.

  6. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I; Temchenko, Volodymyr P; Kyselov, Vitalii S; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO2) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Encapsulating of high-level radioactive waste with use of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernikov, A.

    2007-01-01

    It is known that high-level radioactive waste (HLW) constitute a real danger to biosphere, especially that their part, which contains transuranium and long-lived radionuclides resulting during reprocessing of nuclear fuel industrial and power reactors. Such waste contains approximately 99 % of long-lived fission products and transplutonium elements. At present, the concept of multi barrier protection of biosphere from radioactive waste is generally acknowledged. The main barriers are the physicochemical form of waste and enclosing strata of geological formation at places of waste-disposal. Applied methods of solidification of HLW with preparation of phosphatic and borosilicate glasses do not guarantee in full measure safety of places of waste-disposal of solidified waste in geological formations during thousand years. One promising way to improve HLW handling safety is placing of radionuclides in mineral-like matrixes similar to natural materials. The other possible way to increase safety of HLW disposal places is suggested for research by experts of Russian research institutes, for example, in the proposal for the Project of ISTC and considered in the present report, is to introduce an additional barrier on a radionuclides migration path by coating of HLW particles. Unique protective properties of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide such as low coefficients of diffusion of gaseous and solid fission products and high chemical and radiation stability [1] attract attention to these materials for coating of solidified HLW. The objective of the Project is the development of method of HLW encapsulating with use of pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings. To gain this end main direction of researches, including analysis of various encapsulation processes of fractionated HLW, and expected results are presented. Realization of the Project will allow to prove experimentally the efficiency of the proposed approach in the solution of the problem of HLW conditioning and ecological

  8. Titanium Carbides Coatings for Wear Resistant Biomedical Devices: Manufacturing and Modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contro, R.; Vena, P.; Gastaldi, D.; Masante, S.; Cavallotti, P. L.; Nobili, L.; Bestetti, M.

    2008-01-01

    Deposition of Titanium Carbide coatings on Ti6Al4V substrate, through the reactive magnetron sputtering technique is here presented. The mechanical characterization of the coatings has been carried out through a set of indentation tests at different maximum applied loads. The elastic stiffness as well as the hardness of the coating-substrate system indicate that these coatings are suitable candidates for wear resistance applications in the orthopaedic field. Numerical simulation of the indentation tests allowed the identification of the constitutive parameters of the titanium carbide. Good agreement was achieved between experimental and numerical results

  9. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr, E-mail: gryshkov@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Klyui, Nickolai I., E-mail: klyuini@ukr.net [College of Physics, Jilin University, 130012 Changchun (China); V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Temchenko, Volodymyr P., E-mail: tvp@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Kyselov, Vitalii S., E-mail: kyselov@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Chatterjee, Anamika, E-mail: chatterjee@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Belyaev, Alexander E., E-mail: belyaev@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Lauterboeck, Lothar, E-mail: lauterboeck@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Iarmolenko, Dmytro, E-mail: iarmolenko.dmytro@isp.kiev.ua [V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine); Glasmacher, Birgit, E-mail: glasmacher@imp.uni-hannover.de [Institute for Multiphase Processes, Leibniz Universität Hannover, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2016-11-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO{sub 2}) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO{sub 2} using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO{sub 2} to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO{sub 2} coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO{sub 2} coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of porous biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from wood • Successful deposition of bioactive calcium phosphate coatings using gas detonation deposition • Porosity and pore size of Si

  10. Porous biomorphic silicon carbide ceramics coated with hydroxyapatite as prospective materials for bone implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryshkov, Oleksandr; Klyui, Nickolai I.; Temchenko, Volodymyr P.; Kyselov, Vitalii S.; Chatterjee, Anamika; Belyaev, Alexander E.; Lauterboeck, Lothar; Iarmolenko, Dmytro; Glasmacher, Birgit

    2016-01-01

    Porous and cytocompatible silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics derived from wood precursors and coated with bioactive hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA-zirconium dioxide (HA/ZrO 2 ) composite are materials with promising application in engineering of bone implants due to their excellent mechanical and structural properties. Biomorphic SiC ceramics have been synthesized from wood (Hornbeam, Sapele, Tilia and Pear) using a forced impregnation method. The SiC ceramics have been coated with bioactive HA and HA/ZrO 2 using effective gas detonation deposition approach (GDD). The surface morphology and cytotoxicity of SiC ceramics as well as phase composition and crystallinity of deposited coatings were analyzed. It has been shown that the porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on initial wood source. The XRD and FTIR studies revealed the preservation of crystal structure and phase composition of in the HA coating, while addition of ZrO 2 to the initial HA powder resulted in significant decomposition of the final HA/ZrO 2 coating and formation of other calcium phosphate phases. In turn, NIH 3T3 cells cultured in medium exposed to coated and uncoated SiC ceramics showed high re-cultivation efficiency as well as metabolic activity. The recultivation efficiency of cells was the highest for HA-coated ceramics, whereas HA/ZrO 2 coating improved the recultivation efficiency of cells as compared to uncoated SiC ceramics. The GDD method allowed generating homogeneous HA coatings with no change in calcium to phosphorus ratio. In summary, porous and cytocompatible bio-SiC ceramics with bioactive coatings show a great promise in construction of light, robust, inexpensive and patient-specific bone implants for clinical application. - Highlights: • Synthesis and characterization of porous biomorphic SiC ceramics derived from wood • Successful deposition of bioactive calcium phosphate coatings using gas detonation deposition • Porosity and pore size of SiC ceramics depend on wood

  11. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke

    2015-01-01

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs

  12. Sintered tantalum carbide coatings on graphite substrates: Highly reliable protective coatings for bulk and epitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Daisuke; Suzumura, Akitoshi; Shigetoh, Keisuke [Toyota Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

    2015-02-23

    Highly reliable low-cost protective coatings have been sought after for use in crucibles and susceptors for bulk and epitaxial film growth processes involving wide bandgap materials. Here, we propose a production technique for ultra-thick (50–200 μmt) tantalum carbide (TaC) protective coatings on graphite substrates, which consists of TaC slurry application and subsequent sintering processes, i.e., a wet ceramic process. Structural analysis of the sintered TaC layers indicated that they have a dense granular structure containing coarse grain with sizes of 10–50 μm. Furthermore, no cracks or pinholes penetrated through the layers, i.e., the TaC layers are highly reliable protective coatings. The analysis also indicated that no plastic deformation occurred during the production process, and the non-textured crystalline orientation of the TaC layers is the origin of their high reliability and durability. The TaC-coated graphite crucibles were tested in an aluminum nitride (AlN) sublimation growth process, which involves extremely corrosive conditions, and demonstrated their practical reliability and durability in the AlN growth process as a TaC-coated graphite. The application of the TaC-coated graphite materials to crucibles and susceptors for use in bulk AlN single crystal growth, bulk silicon carbide (SiC) single crystal growth, chemical vapor deposition of epitaxial SiC films, and metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy of group-III nitrides will lead to further improvements in crystal quality and reduced processing costs.

  13. Effect of Carbide Dissolution on Chlorine Induced High Temperature Corrosion of HVOF and HVAF Sprayed Cr3C2-NiCrMoNb Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantozzi, D.; Matikainen, V.; Uusitalo, M.; Koivuluoto, H.; Vuoristo, P.

    2018-01-01

    Highly corrosion- and wear-resistant thermally sprayed chromium carbide (Cr3C2)-based cermet coatings are nowadays a potential highly durable solution to allow traditional fluidized bed combustors (FBC) to be operated with ecological waste and biomass fuels. However, the heat input of thermal spray causes carbide dissolution in the metal binder. This results in the formation of carbon saturated metastable phases, which can affect the behavior of the materials during exposure. This study analyses the effect of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix of Cr3C2-50NiCrMoNb coatings and its effect on chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. Four coatings were thermally sprayed with HVAF and HVOF techniques in order to obtain microstructures with increasing amount of carbide dissolution in the metal matrix. The coatings were heat-treated in an inert argon atmosphere to induce secondary carbide precipitation. As-sprayed and heat-treated self-standing coatings were covered with KCl, and their corrosion resistance was investigated with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and ordinary high-temperature corrosion test at 550 °C for 4 and 72 h, respectively. High carbon dissolution in the metal matrix appeared to be detrimental against chlorine-induced high-temperature corrosion. The microstructural changes induced by the heat treatment hindered the corrosion onset in the coatings.

  14. Experimental evaluation of chromium-carbide-based solid lubricant coatings for use to 760 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellacorte, Christopher

    1987-01-01

    A research program is described which further developed and investigated chromium carbide based self-lubricating coatings for use to 760 C. A bonded chromium carbide was used as the base stock because of the known excellent wear resistance and the chemical stability of chromium carbide. Additives were silver and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic. The three coating components were blended in powder form, applied to stainless steel substrates by plasma spraying and then diamond ground to the desired coating thickness. A variety of coating compositions was tested to determine the coating composition which gave optimum tribological results. Coatings were tested in air, helium, and hydrogen at temperatures from 25 to 760 C. Several counterface materials were evaluated with the objective of discovering a satisfactory metal/coating sliding combination for potential applications, such as piston ring/cylinder liner couples for Stirling engines. In general, silver and fluoride additions to chromium carbide reduced the friction coefficient and increased the wear resistance relative to the unmodified coating. The lubricant additives acted synergistically in reducing friction and wear.

  15. Multilayered and composite PVD-CVD coatings in cemented carbides manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushkov, V.N.; Anikeev, A.I.; Anikin, V.N.; Vereshchaka, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    Carbide cutting tools with wear-resistant coatings deposited by CVD process are widely employed in mechanical engineering to ensure a substantially longer service life of tool systems. However, the relatively high temperature and long time of the process make the substrate decarburise and, as a result, the bend strength and performance characteristics of a tool decrease. The present study suggests the problem of deteriorated strength of CVD-coated carbide tools be solved by the development of a technology that combines arc-PVD and CVD processes to deposit multilayered coatings of titanium and aluminium compounds. (author)

  16. Oxidation protection and behavior of in-situ zirconium diboride–silicon carbide coating for carbon/carbon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Lu; Li, Hejun; Yin, Xuemin; Chu, Yanhui; Chen, Xi; Fu, Qiangang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ZrB 2 –SiC coating was prepared on C/C composite by in-situ reaction. • A two-layered structure was obtained when the coating was oxidized at 1500 °C. • The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. • The morphology evolution of oxide scale during oxidation was illuminated. - Abstract: To protect carbon/carbon (C/C) composites against oxidation, zirconium diboride–silicon carbide (ZrB 2 –SiC) coating was prepared by in-situ reaction using ZrC, B 4 C and Si as raw materials. The in-situ ZrB 2 –SiC coated C/C presented good oxidation resistance, whose weight loss was only 0.15% after isothermal oxidation at 1500 °C for 216 h. Microstructure evolution of coating at 1500 °C was studied, revealing a two-layered structure: (1) ZrO 2 (ZrSiO 4 ) embedded in SiO 2 -rich glass, and (2) unaffected ZrB 2 –SiC. The formation and collapse of bubbles influenced the coating oxidation greatly. A model based on the evolution of oxide scale was proposed to explain the failure mechanism of coating

  17. Investigations on Wear Mechanisms of PVD Coatings on Carbides and Sialons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staszuk M.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results on the wear resistance of PVD coatings on cutting inserts made from sintered carbide and sialon ceramics. The exploitative properties of coatings in technological cutting trials were defined in the paper, which also examined the adhesion of coatings to the substrate, the thickness of the coating, and the microhardness. As a result, it was found that isomorphic coating with AlN-h phase of covalent interatomic bonds exhibits much better adhesion to the sialon substrate than isomorphic coating with titanium nitride TiN. These coatings assure the high wear resistance of the coated tools, and the high adhesion combined with the high microhardness and fine-grained structure assure an increase in the exploitative life of the coated tools. In the case of coatings on substrate made from sintered carbide, there was a significant influence on the properties of the tools coated with them as concerns the existence of the diffusion zone between the substrate and the coating.

  18. Formation mechanism of spheroidal carbide in ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin-guo Fu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of the spheroidal carbide in the ultra-low carbon ductile cast iron fabricated by the metal mold casting technique was systematically investigated. The results demonstrated that the spheroidal carbide belonged to eutectic carbide and crystallized in the isolated eutectic liquid phase area. The formation process of the spheroidal carbide was related to the contact and the intersection between the primary dendrite and the secondary dendrite of austenite. The oxides of magnesium, rare earths and other elements can act as heterogeneous nucleation sites for the spheroidal carbide. It was also found that the amount of the spheroidal carbide would increase with an increase in carbon content. The cooling rate has an important influence on the spheroidal carbide under the same chemical composition condition.

  19. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Lai, G.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10 -3 and 7.9 mm/s at 816 0 C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  20. Zirconium carbide coating for corium experiments related to water-cooled and sodium-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevacova, K. [CEA, DEN, STRI, LMA, Cadarache, 3108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Journeau, C., E-mail: christophe.journeau@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, STRI, LMA, Cadarache, 3108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Piluso, P. [CEA, DEN, STRI, LMA, Cadarache, 3108 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Zhdanov, V.; Baklanov, V. [IAE, National Nuclear Centre, Material Structure Investigation Dept., Krasnoarmeiskaya, 10, Kurchatov City (Kazakhstan); Poirier, J. [CEMHTI, 1D, av. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

    2011-07-01

    Since the TMI and Chernobyl accidents the risk of nuclear severe accident is intensively studied for existing and future reactors. In case of a core melt-down accident in a nuclear reactor, a complex melt, called corium, forms. To be able to perform experiments with prototypic corium materials at high temperature, a coating which resists to different corium melts related to Generation I and II Water Reactors and Generation IV sodium fast reactor was researched in our experimental platforms both in IAE NNC in Kazakhstan and in CEA in France. Zirconium carbide was selected as protective coating for graphite crucibles used in our induction furnaces: VCG-135 and VITI. The method of coating application, called reactive wetting, was developed. Zirconium carbide revealed to resist well to the (U{sub x}, Zr{sub y})O{sub 2-z} water reactor corium. It has also the advantage not to bring new elements to this chemical system. The coating was then tested with sodium fast reactor corium melts containing steel or absorbers. Undesirable interactions were observed between the coating and these materials, leading to the carburization of the corium ingots. Concerning the resistance of the coating to oxide melts without ZrO{sub 2}, the zirconium carbide coating keeps its role of protective barrier with UO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} below 2000 deg. C but does not resist to a UO{sub 2}-Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} mixture.

  1. Method of accurate thickness measurement of boron carbide coating on copper foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Regmi, Murari

    2017-11-07

    A method is disclosed of measuring the thickness of a thin coating on a substrate comprising dissolving the coating and substrate in a reagent and using the post-dissolution concentration of the coating in the reagent to calculate an effective thickness of the coating. The preferred method includes measuring non-conducting films on flexible and rough substrates, but other kinds of thin films can be measure by matching a reliable film-substrate dissolution technique. One preferred method includes determining the thickness of Boron Carbide films deposited on copper foil. The preferred method uses a standard technique known as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICPOES) to measure boron concentration in a liquid sample prepared by dissolving boron carbide films and the Copper substrates, preferably using a chemical etch known as ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN). Measured boron concentration values can then be calculated.

  2. Comparative study of titanium carbide and nitride coatings grown by cathodic vacuum arc technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devia, D.M.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Arango, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Titanium nitride (TiN), titanium carbide (TiC) thin films and TiC/TiN bilayers have been deposited on AISI 304 stainless steel substrates by plasma assisted physical vapor deposition technique - reactive pulsed vacuum arc method. The coatings were characterized in terms of crystalline structure, microstructure and chemical nature by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. Tribological behavior was investigated using ball on disc technique. The average coefficient of friction was measured, showing lower values for the TiN/TiC bilayer. Dynamic wear curves were performed for each coating, observing a better wear resistance for TiN/TiC bilayers, compared to TiN and TiC monolayers. On the other hand, the TiCN formation in the TiN/TiC bilayer was observed, being attributed to the interdiffusion between TiN and TiC at the interface. Moreover, the substrate temperature influence was analysing observing a good behavior at T S = 115 °C.

  3. Atomic diffusion induced degradation in bimetallic layer coated cemented tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Zirong; Rohwerder, Michael; Choi, Pyuck-Pa; Gault, Baptiste; Meiners, Thorsten; Friedrichs, Marcel; Kreilkamp, Holger; Klocke, Fritz; Raabe, Dierk

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the temporal degradation of PtIr/Cr/WC and PtIr/Ni/WC systems. • Short cut diffusion, segregation, oxidation and interdiffusion reactions occurred. • Outward diffusion of Cr (Ni) via PtIr grain boundaries triggered the degradation. • The microstructure of the PtIr layer controlled the systems stability. • We propose an atomic diffusion induced degradation mechanism. - Abstract: We investigated the temporal degradation of glass moulding dies, made of cemented tungsten carbide coated with PtIr on an adhesive Cr or Ni interlayer, by electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. During the exposure treatments at 630 °C under an oxygen partial pressure of 1.12 × 10"−"2"3 bar, Cr (Ni) was found to diffuse outwards via grain boundaries in the PtIr, altering the surface morphology. Upon dissolution of the interlayer, the WC substrate also started degrading. Extensive interdiffusion processes involving PtIr, Cr (Ni) and WC took place, leading to the formation of intermetallic phases and voids, deteriorating the adhesion of the coating.

  4. Vaporization thermodynamics and enthalpy of formation of aluminum silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, R.G.; Rinehart, G.H.

    1984-01-01

    The vaporization thermodynamics of aluminum silicon carbide was investigated using Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry. Vaporization occurred incongruently to give Al(g), SiC(s), and graphite as reaction products. The vapor pressure of aluminum above (Al 4 SiC 4 + SiC + C) was measured using graphite effusion cells with orifice areas between 1.1 X 10 -2 and 3.9 X 10 -4 cm 2 . The vapor pressure of aluminum obtained between 1427 and 1784 K using an effusion cell with the smallest orifice area, 3.9 X 10 -4 cm 2 , is expressed as log p (Pa) = - (18567 + or - 86) (K/T) + (12.143 + or - 0.054) The third-law calculation of the enthalpy change for the reaction Al 4 SiC 4 (s) = 4Al(g) + SiC(hex) + 3C(s) using the present aluminum pressures gives ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (1455 + or - 79) kJ /SUP ./ mol -1 . The corresponding second-law result is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (1456 + or - 47) kJ /SUP ./ mol -1 . The standard enthalpy of formation of Al 4 SiC 4 (s) from the elements calculated from the present vaporization enthalpy (third-law calculation) and the enthalpies of formation of Al(g) and hexagonal SiC is ΔH 0 /SUB f/ (298.15 K) = -(221 + or - 85) kJ /SUP ./ mol -1 . The standard enthalpy of formation of Al 4 SiC 4 (s) from its constituent carbides Al 4 C 3 (s) and SiC(c, hex) is calculated to be ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (38 + or - 92) KJ /SUP ./ mol -1

  5. Fluidized bed deposition and evaluation of silicon carbide coatings on microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federer, J.I.

    1977-01-01

    The fuel element for the HTGR is an array of closely packed fuel microspheres in a carbonaceous matrix. A coating of dense silicon carbide (SiC), along with pyrocarbon layers, is deposited on the fueled microspheres to serve as a barrier against diffusion of fission products. The microspheres are coated with silicon carbide in a fluidized bed by reaction of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) and hydrogen at elevated temperatures. The principal variables of coating temperature and reactant gas composition (H 2 /MTS ratio) have been correlated with coating rate, morphology, stoichiometry, microstructure, and density. The optimum temperature for depositing highly dense coatings is in the range 1475 to 1675 0 C. Lower temperatures result in silicon-rich deposits, while higher temperatures may cause unacceptable porosity. The optimum H 2 /MTS ratio for highly dense coatings is 20 or more (approximately 5% MTS or less). The amount of grown-in porosity increases as the H 2 /MTS ratio decreases below 20. The requirement that the H 2 /MTS ratio be about 20 or more imposes a practical restraint on coating rate, since increasing the total flow rate would eventually expel microspheres from the coating tube. Evaluation of stoichiometry, morphology, and microstructure support the above mentioned optimum conditions of temperature and reactant gas composition. 18 figures, 3 tables

  6. Modification of NiAl intermetallic coatings processed by PTA with chromium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Diogo Henrique Sepel; Brunetti, Cristiano; Pintaude, Giuseppe; Oliveira, Ana Sofia Climaco Monteiro d'

    2010-01-01

    Equipment that operate under high-temperatures can be protected with NiAl intermetallic coatings mainly because of their metallurgical stability. This study as it evaluates the effect of chromium carbide added to Ni-Al intermetallic coatings processed by PTA. Three Ni-Al-Cr23C6 powder mixtures with different carbide fractions (15, 30 and 45 wt%) and another without carbides were deposited by PTA on an AISI 304 stainless steel plate, using two different current intensities (100 and 150A). Coatings were evaluated regarding the presence of welding defects, and resultant microstructures were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers microhardness and EDS chemical composition were also determined. NiAl and Cr_7C_3 development was confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. A combination of NiAl/Cr-Fe-Ni phases was identified. The hardness was strongly related to the formed phases and their amounts. Besides presenting advances toward the development of coatings which can withstand severe operation conditions, the present study shows that PTA hardfacing is able to produce reinforced intermetallic coatings for high-temperature applications. (author)

  7. Corrosion-electrochemical characteristics of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings formed by electrolytic plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomashov, N.D.; Chukalovskaya, T.V.; Medova, I.L.; Duradzhi, V.N.; Plavnik, G.M.

    1990-01-01

    The composition, structure, microhardness and corrosion-electrochemical properties of oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coatings on titanium in 5n H 2 SO 4 , 50 deg, produced by the method of chemical-heat treatment in electrolytic plasma, containing saturation components of nitrogen and carbon, were investigated. It is shown that the coatings produced have increased hardness, possess high corrosion resistance in sulfuric acid solution at increased temperature, as to their electrochemcial behaviour they are similar to titanium carbide and nitride respectively. It is shown that high corrosion resistance is ensured by electrochemical mechanism of the oxide-carbide and oxide-nitride coating protection

  8. Refractory metal carbide coatings for LMFBR applications: a systems approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotschall, H.L.; Ople, F.S.; Riccardella, P.C.

    1975-01-01

    The selection, testing and improvement of high density, tightly bonded plasma and detonation gun coatings designed to meet LMFBR core component criteria are described. The process descriptions include a review of the important developments in substrate surface preparation which were required to ensure strong bonding and to minimize interface contamination. Coating finishing techniques which were developed to optimize friction behavior are also described

  9. Mechanical properties of molybdenum coated with titanium carbide film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shikama, T.; Shinno, H.; Fukutomi, M.; Fujitsuka, M.; Okada, M.

    1983-01-01

    TiC-coated molybdenum is mechanically tensile tested. The 6 μm thick TiC-coated molybdenum has a higher 0.2% proof strength with a slight decrease in uniform and rupture elongation than the uncoated one. This strengthening effect of the TiC coating can be explained by the constrained effect of the high strength TiC film. The 1.2 μm thick TiC-coated molybdenum starts its plastic deformation at a lower stress than the uncoated one. Also, the coating makes the stress-strain curve more smooth. These effects are attributed to the surface effect, namely, that the interface between the molybdenum substrate and the strong and brittle TiC film acts as a strong dislocation source. The compressive stress in the TiC film will also help the start of plastic deformation at lower external stresses. (author)

  10. Formation Energies and Electronic Properties of Vanadium Carbides Found in High Strength Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Krista; Medvedeva, Julia

    2013-03-01

    Carbide formation and stabilization in steels is of great interest owing to its effect on the microstructure and properties of the Fe-based alloys. The appearance of carbides with different metal/C ratios strongly depends on the carbon concentration, alloy composition as well as the heat treatment. Strong carbide-forming elements such as Ti, V, and Nb have been used in microalloyed steels; with VC showing an increased solubility in the iron matrix as compared with TiC and NbC. This allows for dissolution of the VC into the steel during heating and fine precipitation during cooling. In addition to VC, the primary vanadium carbide with cubic structure, a wide range of non-stoichiometric compositions VCy with y varying from 0.72 to 0.88, has been observed. This range includes two ordered compounds, V8C7 and V6C5. In this study, first-principles density functional theory (DFT) is employed to examine the stability of the binary carbides by calculating their formation energies. We compare the local structures (atomic coordination, bond distances and angles) and the density of states in optimized geometries of the carbides. Further, the effect of alloying additions, such as niobium and titanium, on the carbide stabilization is investigated. We determine the energetically preferable substitutional atom location in each carbide and study the impurity distribution as well as its role in the carbide formation energy and electronic structure.

  11. Low cycle fatigue behavior of titanium carbide coated molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Oku, Tatsuo; Kodaira, Tsuneo; Kikuyama, Toshihiko

    1985-09-01

    Sintered molybdenum coated by TiC is used for the first wall such as a troidal fixed limiter and a magnetic limiter plate in JT-60, that is being operated at JAERI presently. This report describes the low cycle fatigue behavior of sintered molybdenum and the influence of TiC coating on fatigue strength. The low cycle fatigue test was conducted at room temperature and 500 0 C. The test results was also analyzed by fractographic observation, metallography and element analysis using EPMA. The low cycle fatigue strength of the molybdenum coated by TiC at 500 0 C is decreased compared with the one at room temperature. (author)

  12. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel–tungsten composite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M.; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G.; Singh, Raghuvir; Keshri, Anup Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulse electrodeposited Ni–W–SiC coating has been synthesized successfully. • Dome to turtle like structure has been observed on addition of SiC in Ni–W coating. • Formation of W(Ni) solid solution was observed on adding 5 g/l SiC in Ni–W coating. • Corrosion resistance improved for Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. • Texture formation and continuous barrier layer enhanced the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel–tungsten (Ni–W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni–W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, E_c_o_r_r) compared to Ni–W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO_4 and SiO_2.

  13. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel–tungsten composite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M. [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India); Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G. [International Advanced Research Centre for Powder Metallurgy & New Materials (ARCI) Hyderabad, Balapur P.O., Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh 500005 (India); Singh, Raghuvir [CSIR-National Metallurgical Laboratory, Jamshedpur, Jharkhand 831007 (India); Keshri, Anup Kumar, E-mail: anup@iitp.ac.in [Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Navin Government Polytechnic Campus, Patliputra Colony, Patna, Bihar 800013 (India)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Pulse electrodeposited Ni–W–SiC coating has been synthesized successfully. • Dome to turtle like structure has been observed on addition of SiC in Ni–W coating. • Formation of W(Ni) solid solution was observed on adding 5 g/l SiC in Ni–W coating. • Corrosion resistance improved for Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. • Texture formation and continuous barrier layer enhanced the corrosion resistance. - Abstract: Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel–tungsten (Ni–W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni–W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, E{sub corr}) compared to Ni–W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni–W–5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}.

  14. Effect of Interlayer Coating Thickness on the Hardness and Adhesion for the Tungsten Carbide Cutting Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Jawad Kadhim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The thin film of the (Al,TiN coating is studied with the aid of two parameters: hardness and adhesion.  These parameters are very close to each other; however, in deposition field they could be interpreted differently.  Several coatings of (Al,TiN layers are developed on tungsten carbide insert using the standard commercial Al0.67Ti0.33 cathodes in cathodic arc plating system(PVD. The influence of coating layer thickness on the mechanical properties of the coatings was investigated via two parameters: hardness and adhesion are characterized by the Rockwell tester Vickers tester.  The measurements reveal that the highest hardness appears for the (Al,TiN thickness of 5.815 µm while the highest adhesion appears at a thickness of 3.089 µm.  At the opposite extreme, the lowest hardness appears at 2.717 µm and the lowest hardness at 5.815 µm. Overall, the (Al/Ti N coating of the thickness of 5.815 µm is controversial as it exhibits the highest hardness and the lowest adhesion. This result could be related to the effect of the formation of the micro-particle (MPs which has a direct effect on the hardness because these MPs appear mainly on the surface and their presence at the interface is very limited.  In addition, the creation of Ti buffering layer to reduce the delamination has its major effect on the adhesion but has no effect on the morphology of the surface.  For these two reasons and the effect of the bias voltage, the results presented in this paper might show slight differences with other published papers.  The composition of the (Al,TiN layer is characterized and, seemingly, it shows one important result which is showing that the ultimate composition of the (Al,TiN layer (Ti0.62Al0.38 is very close to the original target used in this study (Al0.67Ti0.33.

  15. Microstructural, phase evolution and corrosion properties of silicon carbide reinforced pulse electrodeposited nickel-tungsten composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Swarnima; Sribalaji, M.; Wasekar, Nitin P.; Joshi, Srikant; Sundararajan, G.; Singh, Raghuvir; Keshri, Anup Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced nickel-tungsten (Ni-W) coatings were successfully fabricated on steel substrate by pulse electrodeposition method (PED) and the amount of SiC was varied as 0 g/l, 2 g/l, and 5 g/l in Ni-W coating. Effect of subsequent addition of SiC on microstructures, phases and on corrosion property of the coating was investigated. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) image of the surface morphology of the coating showed the transformation from the dome like structure to turtle shell like structure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC showed the disappearance of (220) plane of Ni(W), peak splitting in major peak of Ni(W) and formation of distinct peak of W(Ni) solid solution. Absence of (220) plane, peak splitting and presence of W(Ni) solid solution was explained by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) images. Tafel polarization plot was used to study the corrosion property of the coatings in 0.5 M NaCl solution. Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating was showed higher corrosion resistance (i.e. ∼21% increase in corrosion potential, Ecorr) compared to Ni-W coating. Two simultaneous phenomena have been identified for the enhanced corrosion resistance of Ni-W-5 g/l SiC coating. (a) Presence of crystallographic texture (b) formation of continuous double barrier layer of NiWO4 and SiO2.

  16. Thermal transitions in Fe-Ti-Cr-C quaternary system used as precursor during laser in situ carbide coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Anshul; Porter, Wallace D.; Dahotre, Narendra B.

    2005-01-01

    The temperature range of thermal transitions within the quaternary system (Fe, Ti, Cr, and C) and the thermal stability of the evolved phases were studied with the help of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). DSC studies indicated that the major exothermic reactions (formation of carbides) take place within 850-1150 deg. C. The evolved phases (TiC, M 7 C 3 , Fe-Cr, and Fe 3 C) were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD). This multicomponent powder mixture was used as a precursor for synthesizing a composite coating on the surface of steel via laser surface engineering (LSE). The intended wear applications of the coating made thermal stability investigations vital. Experimental evaluation of thermal stability of the phases formed was done

  17. Thick boron carbide coatings for protection of tokamak first wall and divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzhinskij, O.I.; Semenets, Yu.M.

    1999-01-01

    A review of characteristics of various types of boron carbide coatings considered as candidate materials for protection of tokamak inner surfaces against high energy heat fluxes is presented. Such coatings are produced by various methods: chemical vapor deposition by means of chloride and fluoride techniques, gas conversion, plasma spray and reaction-sintering. Contrary to pure carbon materials, B 4 C has much lower chemical and high-temperature sputtering, is capable to oxygen gettering and lower hydrogen recycling. In contrast to thin boronization films, the thick coatings can resist high heat fluxes such as in tokamak divertors. Comparative analysis shows that coatings produced by the diffusion methods, such as fluoride CVD and gas conversion, are more resistent to heat loads, and one of the most promising candidates are the fluoride CVD coatings. (orig.)

  18. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A., E-mail: catledge@uab.edu

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2}. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W{sub 2}CoB{sub 2} with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  19. Metal-boride phase formation on tungsten carbide (WC-Co) during microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, Jamin M.; Catledge, Shane A.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A detailed phase analysis after PECVD boriding shows WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2. • EDS of PECVD borides shows boron diffusion into the carbide grain structure. • Nanoindentation hardness and modulus of borides is 23–27 GPa and 600–780 GPa. • Scratch testing shows hard coating with cracking at 40N and spallation at 70N. - Abstract: Strengthening of cemented tungsten carbide by boriding is used to improve the wear resistance and lifetime of carbide tools; however, many conventional boriding techniques render the bulk carbide too brittle for extreme conditions, such as hard rock drilling. This research explored the variation in metal-boride phase formation during the microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at surface temperatures from 700 to 1100 °C. We showed several well-adhered metal-boride surface layers consisting of WCoB, CoB and/or W_2CoB_2 with average hardness from 23 to 27 GPa and average elastic modulus of 600–730 GPa. The metal-boride interlayer was shown to be an effective diffusion barrier against elemental cobalt; migration of elemental cobalt to the surface of the interlayer was significantly reduced. A combination of glancing angle X-ray diffraction, electron dispersive spectroscopy, nanoindentation and scratch testing was used to evaluate the surface composition and material properties. An evaluation of the material properties shows that plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposited borides formed at substrate temperatures of 800 °C, 850 °C, 900 °C and 1000 °C strengthen the material by increasing the hardness and elastic modulus of cemented tungsten carbide. Additionally, these boride surface layers may offer potential for adhesion of ultra-hard carbon coatings.

  20. Microstructural and Mechanical Study of Inconel 625 – Tungsten Carbide Composite Coatings Obtained by Powder Laser Cladding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huebner J.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the investigation of fine (~0.54 μm tungsten carbide particles effect on structural and mechanical properties of laser cladded Inconel 625-WC composite. Three powder mixtures with different Inconel 625 – WC weight ratio (10, 20 and 30 weight % of WC were prepared. Coatings were made using following process parameters: laser beam diameter ø ≈ 500 μm, powder feeder rotation speed – 7 m/min, scanning velocity – 10 m/min, laser power – 220 W changed to 320 W, distance between tracks – 1 mm changed to 0.8 mm. Microstructure and hardness were investigated. Coatings produced by laser cladding were crack and pore free, chemically and structurally homogenous. High cooling rate during cladding process resulted in fine microstructure of material. Hardness improved with addition of WC from 396.3 ±10.5 HV for pure Inconel 625, to 469.9 ±24.9 HV for 30 weight % of WC. Tungsten carbide dissolved in Inconel 625 which allowed formation of intergranular eutectic that contains TCP phases.

  1. Preparation of nickel-coated titanium carbide particulates and their use in the production of reinforced iron matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Danqing; Yu, Pengchao; Hu, Bin; Liu, Huiqun; Wang, Bin; Jiang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Ni-coated TiC composite powders were prepared by electroless plating. • Iron-based composites reinforced by TiC particles was prepared by HIP. • Mechanical and wear properties were improved with the addition of Ni-coated TiC. • The nickel coating promotes the formation and growth of sintering neck. - Abstract: Ni-coated titanium carbide (TiC) composite powders were prepared by electroless plating (EP). Further, using hot isostatic pressing (HIP), iron matrix composites reinforced with 4 wt% Ni-coated TiC particulates with relative density close to 100% were prepared. The microstructure and phase composition of the Ni-coated powders and the composites were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results showed that the TiC particles were distributed uniformly in the matrix and were free of segregation or coarsening. Compared to the TiC particles without Ni coating, the reinforced iron-based composites containing the Ni-coated particles showed higher relative densities and better mechanical properties. The density, hardness, tensile strength, and elongation were enhanced to 99.98%, 243 HV, 565 MPa, and 11.7%, respectively in composites containing Ni-coated TiC particles from 99.70%, 210 HV, 514 MPa, and 10.3%, respectively in composites that were prepared using particles without Ni coating. In addition, the mass losses in the composites containing the Ni-coated particles were reduced by 32–75% in the abrasive wear test with various vertical loads. We propose that the nickel coatings on the particulates had a beneficial effect on the microstructure and properties of the reinforced iron-based composites is due to promotion of neck formation and growth between TiC and iron powders during sintering, which enhanced the density of the sintered compact and the bonding strength between the TiC particles and the iron matrix

  2. Wear behavior of niobium carbide coated AISI 52100 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Casteletti, Luiz Carlos; Oliveira, Carlos Kleber Nascimento de; Lombardi Neto, Amadeu; Totten, George Edward

    2010-01-01

    Bearing steels must have high hardness, good wear resistance and dimensional stability. The aim of this work was to study the effect of NbC coating, produced using the thermo-reactive deposition (TRD) process, on the wear resistance of the AISI 52100 steel. Untreated AISI 52100 samples were ground up to 600 mesh emery paper. The bath was composed of 5wt.% ferroniobium (65 wt.% Nb), 3wt.% aluminum and (Na2B4O7) to 100%. Samples were treated at 1000 deg C for 4h and quenched in oil directly from the bath. The resulting layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and a micro-abrasive wear testing. The thermo-reactive deposition process in molten borax produced a hard and homogeneous layer composed by NbC, which was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The NbC coating produced a great increase in the wear resistance of the AISI 52100 steel, decreasing the wear rate by an order of magnitude in relation to the substrate. For coated and uncoated samples the worn volume and wear rate increases with the load. (author)

  3. TRANSFORMATIONS IN NANO-DIAMONDS WITH FORMATION OF NANO-POROUS SILICON CARBIDE AT HIGH PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kovalevsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains investigations on regularities of diamond - silicon carbide composite structure formation at impact-wave excitation. It has been determined that while squeezing a porous blank containing Si (SiC nano-diamond by explosive detonation products some processes are taking place such as diamond nano-particles consolidation, reverse diamond transition into graphite, fragments formation from silicon carbide. A method for obtaining high-porous composites with the presence of ultra-disperse diamond particles has been developed. Material with three-dimensional high-porous silicon-carbide structure has been received due to nano-diamond graphitation at impact wave transmission and plastic deformation. The paper reveals nano-diamonds inverse transformation into graphite and its subsequent interaction with the silicon accompanied by formation of silicon-carbide fragments with dimensions of up to 100 nm.

  4. High-speed deposition of titanium carbide coatings by laser-assisted metal–organic CVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Yansheng [Faculty of Materials Science and Chemistry, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); Tu, Rong, E-mail: turong@whut.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Goto, Takashi [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, 2-1-1 Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A semiconductor laser was first used to prepare wide-area LCVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. • The effect of laser power for the deposition of TiC{sub x} coatings was discussed. • TiC{sub x} coatings showed a columnar cross section and a dense surface texture. • TiC{sub x} coatings had a 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous reports. • This study gives the possibility of LCVD applying on the preparation of TiC{sub x} coating. - Abstract: A semiconductor laser-assisted chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of titanium carbide (TiC{sub x}) coatings on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrate using tetrakis (diethylamido) titanium (TDEAT) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} as source materials were investigated. The influences of laser power (P{sub L}) and pre-heating temperature (T{sub pre}) on the microstructure and deposition rate of TiC{sub x} coatings were examined. Single phase of TiC{sub x} coatings were obtained at P{sub L} = 100–200 W. TiC{sub x} coatings had a cauliflower-like surface and columnar cross section. TiC{sub x} coatings in the present study had the highest R{sub dep} (54 μm/h) at a relative low T{sub dep} than those of conventional CVD-TiC{sub x} coatings. The highest volume deposition rate (V{sub dep}) of TiC{sub x} coatings was about 4.7 × 10{sup −12} m{sup 3} s{sup −1}, which had 3–10{sup 5} times larger deposition area and 1–4 order lower laser density than those of previous LCVD using CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG and argon ion laser.

  5. Recent Advances in the Deposition of Diamond Coatings on Co-Cemented Tungsten Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Polini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Co-cemented tungsten carbides, namely, hard metals are largely used to manufacture high wear resistant components in several manufacturing segments. Coating hard metals with superhard materials like diamond is of utmost interest as it can further extend their useful lifespan. The deposition of diamond coatings onto WC-Co can be extremely complicated as a result of poor adhesion. This can be essentially ascribed to (i the mismatch in thermal expansion coefficients between diamond and WC-Co, at the typical high temperatures inside the chemical vapour deposition (CVD chamber, generates large residual stresses at the interface; (ii the role of surface Co inside the WC-Co matrix during diamond CVD, which promotes carbon dissolution and diffusion. The present investigation reviews the techniques by which Co-cemented tungsten carbides can be treated to make them prone to receive diamond coatings by CVD. Further, it proposes interesting ecofriendly and sustainable alternatives to further improve the diamond deposition process as well as the overall performance of the coated hard metals.

  6. Performance evaluation of PCBN, coated carbide and mixed ceramic inserts in finish-turning of AISI D2 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Junaid Mir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study compares the performance of three different cutting tools, viz., PCBN, mixed ceramic and coated carbide tool in finish turning of hardened D2 tool steel in terms of tool wear, surface roughness, and economic feasibility under dry cutting conditions. Results showed that tool life of PCBN inserts was better than mixed ceramic and coated carbide inserts. The flank wear of PCBN tools was observed to be lower than mixed ceramic and coated carbide inserts. The surface roughness achieved under all cutting conditions for mixed ceramic and coated-carbide inserts was comparable with that achieved with PCBN inserts and was below 1.6μm. Experimental results showed that the wear mechanism of ceramic tool is pre-dominantly abrasive wear at lower speeds and abrasive wear followed by adhesive wear at medium and higher speeds and for PCBN tools the dominant wear mechanism is abrasive wear and cratering at lower speeds followed by adhesive wear at higher speeds. For carbide tool the dominant wear mechanism was abrasive wear and cratering at lower speeds followed by adhesion and chipping at higher speeds. Obtained results revealed that PCBN tools can outperform both ceramic and carbide tools in terms of tool life under different machinability criteria used.

  7. Fabrication and oxidation resistance of titanium carbide-coated carbon fibres by reacting titanium hydride with carbon fibres in molten salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Z.J.; Li, X.K.; Yuan, G.M.; Cong, Y.; Li, N.; Jiang, Z.Y.; Hu, Z.J.

    2009-01-01

    Using carbon fibres and titanium hydride as a reactive carbon source and a metal source, respectively, a protective titanium carbide (TiC) coating was formed on carbon fibres in molten salts, composed of LiCl-KCl-KF, at 750-950 o C. The structure and morphology of the TiC coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The oxidation resistance of the TiC-coated carbon fibres was measured by thermogravimetric analysis. The results reveal that control of the coating thickness is very important for improvement of the oxidation resistance of TiC-coated carbon fibres. The oxidative weight loss initiation temperature for the TiC-coated carbon fibres increases significantly when an appropriate coating thickness is used. However, thicker coatings lead to a decrease of the carbon fibres' weight loss initiation temperature due to the formation of cracks in the coating. The TiC coating thickness on carbon fibres can be controlled by adjusting the reaction temperature and time of the molten salt synthesis.

  8. Design and simulation of thermal residual stresses of coatings on WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tool substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Anhai; Zhao, Jun; Zang, Jian; Zheng, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Large thermal residual stresses in coatings during the coating deposition process may easily lead to coating delamination of coated carbide tools in machining. In order to reduce the possibility of coating delamination during the tool failure process, a theoretical method was proposed and a numerical method was constructed for the coating design of WC-Co cemented carbide cutting tools. The thermal residual stresses of multi-layered coatings were analytically modeled based on equivalent parameters of coating properties, and the stress distribution of coatings are simulated by Finite element method (FEM). The theoretically calculated results and the FEM simulated results were verified and in good agreement with the experimental test results. The effects of coating thickness, tool substrate, coating type and interlayer were investigated by the proposed geometric and FEM model. Based on the evaluations of matchability of tool substrate and tool coatings, the basic principles of tool coating design were proposed. This provides theoretical basis for the selection and design of coatings of cutting tools in high-speed machining

  9. Modification of the surface of metal products with carbide coatings by electrospark alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshuro, Vladimir A.; Fomina, Marina A.; Fomin, Aleksandr A.

    2018-04-01

    Electrospark alloying (ESA) technology has existed for a long time (since the middle of the 20th century) but its potential has not been exhausted yet. In the present paper it is proposed to increase the mechanical properties of steel and titanium products by doping with a hard carbide alloy based on "WC-TiC-Co" system. As a result, the hardness of coatings obtained by ESA reaches at least 18-22 GPa with a layer thickness of up to 0.5 mm. The proposed solution can improve the functional qualities of various friction surfaces that are used in engineering, as well as in friction elements.

  10. Boron carbide-coated carbon material, manufacturing method therefor and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Hyakki, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plasma facing material suitable to a thermonuclear device. The material comprises a carbon material formed by converting the surface of a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material comprising a carbon matrix and carbon fibers to a boron carbide, the material has a surface comprising vertically or substantially vertically oriented carbon fibers, and the thickness of the surface converted to boron carbide is reduced in the carbon fiber portion than in the carbon matrix portion. Alternatively, a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material containing carbon fibers having a higher graphitizing degree than the carbon matrix is converted to boron carbide on the surface where the carbon fibers are oriented vertically or substantially vertically. The carbon fiber-reinforced material is used as a base material, and a resin material impregnated into a shaped carbon fiber product is carbonized or thermally decomposed carbon is filled as a matrix. The material of the present invention has high heat conduction and excellent in heat resistance thereby being suitable to a plasma facing material for a thermonuclear device. Electric specific resistivity of the entire coating layer can be lowered, occurrence of arc discharge is prevented and melting can be prevented. (N.H.)

  11. Nature of higher chaomium steels tendency to carbide formation during cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereverzev, V.M.; Kolmykov, V.I.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of manganese, chromium and vanadium upon carbide formation in steels during cementation was investigated. It was found that the increase in the tendency of chromium steels to form carbides during cementation is caused by the stabilization of cementite by chromium. As a result of the dissolution of chromium, the isobaric-isothermal potential of cementite increases to such a point, as to make possible the formation, on energy grounds, of granular cementite. The formation of granular cementite in chromium steels is promoted also by a substantial magnitude of the coefficient of thermal activity of chromium in austenite

  12. PVD-Alumina Coatings on Cemented Carbide Cutting Tools: A Study About the Effect on Friction and Adhesion Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Cordes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Crystalline PVD γ-alumina coatings are interesting for machining operations due to their outstanding characteristics, such as high hot hardness, high thermal stability and low tendency to adhesion. In the present work (Ti,AlN/γ-Al2O3-coatings are deposited on cemented carbide by means of MSIP. Objectives of this work are to study the effects of coating and cutting fluid regarding friction in tribological tests and to study the wear mechanisms and cutting performance of γ-Al2O3-based coated cemented carbide cutting tools in machining operations of austenitic stainless steels. Based on the remarkable properties of the coating system the performance of the cutting tools is increasing significantly.

  13. Characterization of hard nitride and carbide titanium and zirconium coatings on high-speed steel cutting tool inserts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.; Kaufherr, N.; Albertson, C.; Mapalo, G.; Nielsen, R.; Kaminsky, M.

    1986-01-01

    Hard nitride and carbide coatings of titanium and zirconium deposited by reactive evaporation and reactive sputtering techniques were characterized by electron microscopy and Auger spectroscopy to determine the effect of coating process on coating composition and microstructure. Analysis of the chemical composition by Auger spectroscopy revealed the coatings were of high purity with slight differences in stoichiometry depending on the coating technique. Both techniques produced coatings with a columnar microstructure. However, the reactive sputtering technique produced coarser (shorter and wider) columnar grains than the reactive evaporation technique. Furthermore, selected area diffraction analysis of reactively sputtered ZrN coatings showed a two-phased zone (hcp Zr and fcc ZrN) near the substrate/coating interface, while TiC coatings deposited by reactive sputtering and evaporation only showed a single-phase region of fcc TiC

  14. A new electrothermal-chemical method for metals, carbides, and ceramics hard coating: Experiment and theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zoler, D.; Bruma, C.; Cuperman, S.

    1999-07-01

    A new method and an experimental device for powders of metals, carbides and ceramics coating of various substrates are presented. The powder-particles are accelerated and heated by a mixture of plasma and gases resulted from the burning of an energetic (propellant). The operating prototype already allows one to obtain coatings of metals, carbides and ceramics. Some of the coatings obtained, especially those by carbides powders, indicate even at the present stage of research, properties (as hardness, porosity) which are comparable to those provided by the presently industrial methods in use. The accelerating-heating agent in the device (the plasma-gas mixture) is characterized by very high densities (up to 120 kg/m{sup 3}), temperatures (up to 20,000 K) and velocities (more than 1,500 m/s). Due to these characteristics, the powder particles are accelerated to velocities significantly higher than those reached in other coating devices as, for example, the detonation (D) gun. Some preliminary experimental data show that the accelerated particle can reach velocities higher than 1,000 m/s. In parallel, in order to better understand the phenomena taking place inside the device and to determine the optimal process parameters leading to high quality coatings an appropriate theoretical model was developed. The model is able to describe the complex processes of plasma-gas-propellant interaction, gas flow and powder particles heating and acceleration. The model gives a detailed description of the gas, propellant and accelerated particle parameters, their spatial distribution and temporal evolution; predicts their dependence on the values of some input quantities such as: the plasma energy, propellant characteristics and accelerated particles type and geometry. The computational results the authors obtained show that, indeed, during the acceleration process the particles are heated, melted and eventually vaporized. One of the most interesting theoretical results is that the

  15. Effect of metallic coating on the properties of copper-silicon carbide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, M.; Pietrzak, K.; Teodorczyk, M.; Nosewicz, S.; Jarząbek, D.; Zybała, R.; Bazarnik, P.; Lewandowska, M.; Strojny-Nędza, A.

    2017-11-01

    In the presented paper a coating of SiC particles with a metallic layer was used to prepare copper matrix composite materials. The role of the layer was to protect the silicon carbide from decomposition and dissolution of silicon in the copper matrix during the sintering process. The SiC particles were covered by chromium, tungsten and titanium using Plasma Vapour Deposition method. After powder mixing of components, the final densification process via Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS) method at temperature 950 °C was provided. The almost fully dense materials were obtained (>97.5%). The microstructure of obtained composites was studied using scanning electron microscopy as well as transmission electron microscopy. The microstructural analysis of composites confirmed that regardless of the type of deposited material, there is no evidence for decomposition process of silicon carbide in copper. In order to measure the strength of the interface between ceramic particles and the metal matrix, the micro tensile tests have been performed. Furthermore, thermal diffusivity was measured with the use of the laser pulse technique. In the context of performed studies, the tungsten coating seems to be the most promising solution for heat sink application. Compared to pure composites without metallic layer, Cu-SiC with W coating indicate the higher tensile strength and thermal diffusitivy, irrespective of an amount of SiC reinforcement. The improvement of the composite properties is related to advantageous condition of Cu-SiC interface characterized by well homogenity and low porosity, as well as individual properties of the tungsten coating material.

  16. Device for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, L.J.; Willey, M.G.; Tiegs, S.M.; Van Cleve, J.E. Jr.

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in hot cells designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel materials, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  17. Method for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lloyd J.; Willey, Melvin G.; Tiegs, Sue M.; Van Cleve, Jr., John E.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in "hot cells" designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel material, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  18. Application of La-ZSM-5 Coated Silicon Carbide Foam Catalyst for Toluene Methylation with Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarpita Ghosal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The performance of toluene methylation reaction was studied on H-ZSM-5 catalyst modified with La, Ce and Nb at different percentage loading. It was found that 10% metal loading produced the best performance in the reaction in terms of toluene conversion. The catalyst was coated on silicon carbide foam support which showed better conversion than the pelleted catalyst. Again, among the treated and untreated H-ZSM-5, the La-ZSM-5 catalyst is chosen for the reaction for its highest selectivity towards xylene, the main product. All catalysts were characterized in terms of surface properties, SEM, XRD and NH3-TPD. Kinetic study was done on La-ZSM-5 catalyst with 10% loading. In this kineticstudy, Langmuir Hinshelwood kinetic model with surface reaction as rate controlling step was selected as the rate equation. The activation energy was found to be 47 kJ/mol. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved. Received: 9th December 2014; Revised: 27th April 2015; Accepted: 29th April 2015  How to Cite: Ghosal, D., Basu, J.K., Sengupta, S. (2015. Application of La-ZSM-5 Coated Silicon Carbide Foam Catalyst for Toluene Methylation with Methanol. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 201-209. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7872.201-209 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.7872.201-209  

  19. Experimental investigation on hard turning of AISI 4340 steel using cemented coated carbide insert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradeep Kumar, J.; Kishore, K. P.; Ranjith Kumar, M.; Saran Karthick, K. R.; Vishnu Gowtham, S.

    2018-02-01

    Hard turning is a developing technology that offers many potential advantages compared to grinding, which remains the standard finishing process for critical hardened surfaces. In this work, an attempt has been made to experimentally investigate hard turning of AISI 4340 steel under wet and dry condition using cemented coated carbide insert. Hardness of the workpiece material is tested using Brinell and Rockwell hardness testers. CNC LATHE and cemented coated carbide inserts of designation CNMG 120408 are used for conducting experimental trials. Significant cutting parameters like cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut are considered as controllable input parameters and surface roughness (Ra), tool wear are considered as output response parameters. Design of experiments is carried out with the help of Taguchi’s L9 orthogonal array. Results of response parameters like surface roughness and tool wear under wet and dry condition are analysed. It is found that surface roughness and tool wear are higher under dry machining condition when compared to wet machining condition. Feed rate significantly influences the surface roughness followed by cutting speed. Depth of cut significantly influences the tool wear followed by cutting speed.

  20. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagle, Denis [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Dajie [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na₃AlF₆] at ~1000°C in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  1. Tribological and Wear Performance of Carbide Tools with TiB2 PVD Coating under Varying Machining Conditions of TiAl6V4 Aerospace Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Mario Paiva

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Tribological phenomena and tool wear mechanisms during machining of hard-to-cut TiAl6V4 aerospace alloy have been investigated in detail. Since cutting tool wear is directly affected by tribological phenomena occurring between the surfaces of the workpiece and the cutting tool, the performance of the cutting tool is strongly associated with the conditions of the machining process. The present work shows the effect of different machining conditions on the tribological and wear performance of TiB2-coated cutting tools compared to uncoated carbide tools. FEM modeling of the temperature profile on the friction surface was performed for wet machining conditions under varying cutting parameters. Comprehensive characterization of the TiB2 coated vs. uncoated cutting tool wear performance was made using optical 3D imaging, SEM/EDX and XPS methods respectively. The results obtained were linked to the FEM modeling. The studies carried out show that during machining of the TiAl6V4 alloy, the efficiency of the TiB2 coating application for carbide cutting tools strongly depends on cutting conditions. The TiB2 coating is very efficient under roughing at low speeds (with strong buildup edge formation. In contrast, it shows similar wear performance to the uncoated tool under finishing operations at higher cutting speeds when cratering wear predominates.

  2. Mullite-based coating on silicon carbide refractory obtained from PMSQ [poly(methylsilsesquioxane)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, Glauson Aparecido Ferreira

    2017-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) presents low thermal expansion, high strength and thermal conductivity. For this reason it is used as kiln furniture for materials sintering. On the other hand, SiC degrades at high temperature under aggressive atmosphere. The use of protective coatings can avoid the right exposition of SiC surface to the furnace atmosphere. Mullite can be a suitable material as protective coating because of its high corrosion resistance and thermal expansion coefficient matching that of SiC (4,7 x 10 -6 /°C e 5,3 x 10 -6 /°C, respectively). In the present work a mullite coating obtained from ceramic precursor polymer and aluminium powder was studied to be applied over SiC refractories. Compositions were prepared with 10, 20, 30 and 50% (vol.) of aluminium powder added to the polymer. They were used aluminium powders with different distributions sizes These compositions were heat treated at different thermal cycles to determine a suitable condition to obtain a high mullite content. The composition with 20% of the smaller particle size Al powder was selected and used to be applied as a suspension over SiC refractory. The applied suspension, after dried, crosslinked and heat treated, formed a mullite coating over SiC refractory. Cycles of thermal shock were performed in coated and uncoated SiC samples to compare each other. They were carried out 26 cycles of thermal shock, in the following conditions: 600°C/30 min. and air cooling to room temperature. After each thermal shock, samples were analysed by mean of optical and electron microscopy, elastic modulus was also determined. After thermal shock cycles the coating presented good adhesion and no significant damage were observed. (author)

  3. Effects of heat treatment on the microstructure of amorphous boron carbide coating deposited on graphite substrates by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Siwei; Zeng Bin; Feng Zude; Liu Yongsheng; Yang Wenbin; Cheng Laifei; Zhang Litong

    2010-01-01

    A two-layer boron carbide coating is deposited on a graphite substrate by chemical vapor deposition from a CH 4 /BCl 3 /H 2 precursor mixture at a low temperature of 950 o C and a reduced pressure of 10 KPa. Coated substrates are annealed at 1600 o C, 1700 o C, 1800 o C, 1900 o C and 2000 o C in high purity argon for 2 h, respectively. Structural evolution of the coatings is explored by electron microscopy and spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that the as-deposited coating is composed of pyrolytic carbon and amorphous boron carbide. A composition gradient of B and C is induced in each deposition. After annealing, B 4 C crystallites precipitate out of the amorphous boron carbide and grow to several hundreds nanometers by receiving B and C from boron-doped pyrolytic carbon. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy proves that the crystallization is controlled by element diffusion activated by high temperature annealing, after that a larger concentration gradient of B and C is induced in the coating. Quantified Raman spectrum identifies a graphitization enhancement of pyrolytic carbon. Transmission electron microscopy exhibits an epitaxial growth of B 4 C at layer/layer interface of the annealed coatings. Mechanism concerning the structural evolution on the basis of the experimental results is proposed.

  4. Performance of PVD-Coated Carbide Tools When Turning Inconel 718 in Dry Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusri Akhyar Ibrahim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 has found its niche in many industries, owing to its unique properties such as high oxidation resistance and corrosion resistance even at very high temperatures. Coated carbide tool with hard layer of PVD TiAlN is used to turn Inconel 718. Taguchi method with the orthogonal array L9 is applied in this experiment with the parameter cutting speed of 60–80 m/min, feed rate of 0.2–0.3 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 0.3–0.5 mm. The results show that depth of cut is a significant influence to the tool life. Cutting speed of 60 m/min, feed rate of 0.2 mm/rev, and depth of cut of 0.3 mm are the optimum parameters. The flank wear, crater wear, notch wear, and nose wear are the wear mechanisms on the carbide tool. Through the SEM, abrasion, attrition, and adhesion are the wear mechanisms which can be seen on the cutting tool.

  5. Effect of polyethylene coated calcium carbide on physiology, photosynthesis, growth and yield of sweet pepper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, W.; Yaseen, M.; Arshad, M.; Shahid, M.

    2014-01-01

    Polyethylene coated calcium carbide (PCC) is a potent and continuous slowly releasing source of acetylene and ethylene. It potentially improves plant growth by affecting physiology of plant. A pot study was conducted to investigate comparative effects of different rates of PCC on growth and yield attributes of sweet pepper. PCC performed better when applied with soil applied fertilizers. Results revealed that hormonal properties of calcium carbide significantly influenced physiological nutrient use efficiency and vegetative growth by affecting photosynthetic and physiological parameters of sweet pepper. Application of 20 mg PCC kg/sup -1/ soil with soil applied recommended dose of NPK fertilizers significantly improved the net photosynthetic rate by 32%, stomatal conductance by 11%, transpiration rate by 14%, carboxylation efficiency by 47%, physiological water use efficiency by 13%, physiological nitrogen use efficiency by 29% over the control treatment. This improvement in physiological attributes resulted in increase in leaf area by 20%, leaf area index by 78%, total plant dry weight by 35%, flower and fruits by 29% and fruit yield by 24% compared to the treatment of alone recommended dose of NPK fertilizers. Present study suggests that application of PCC particularly at the rate of 20mg PCC kg/sup -1/ soil plus recommended dose of NPK fertilizers improved about 25% sweet pepper production compared to its production in the alone recommended fertilizer treatment. (author)

  6. Investigations of carbon diffusion and carbide formation in nickel-based alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulten, R.; Bongartz, K.; Quadakkers, W.J.; Schuster, H.; Nickel, H.

    1989-11-01

    The present thesis describes the carburization behaviour of nickel based alloys in heavily carburizing environments. The mechanisms of carbon diffusion and carbide precipitation in NiCr alloys with and without ternary additions of iron, cobalt or molybdenum have been investigated. Using the results of carburization experiments, a mathematical model which describes carbon diffusion and carbide formation, was developed. The simulation of the carburization process was carried out by an iterative calculation of the local thermodynamic equilibrium in the alloy. An accurate description of the carbon profiles as a function of time became possible by using a finite-difference calculation. (orig.) [de

  7. Deposition and modification of tantalum carbide coatings on graphite by laser interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veligdan, J.; Branch, D.; Vanier, P.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    Graphite surfaces can be hardened and protected from erosion by hydrogen at high temperatures by refractory metal carbide coatings, which are usually prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or chemical vapor reaction (CVR) methods. These techniques rely on heating the substrate to a temperature where a volatile metal halide decomposes and reacts with either a hydrocarbon gas or with carbon from the substrate. For CVR techniques, deposition temperatures must be in excess of 2000 degrees C in order to achieve favorable deposition kinetics. In an effort to lower the bulk substrate deposition temperature, the use of laser interactions with both the substrate and the metal halide deposition gas has been employed. Initial testing, involved the use of a CO 2 laser to heat the surface of a graphite substrate and a KrF excimer laser to accomplish a photodecomposition of TaCl 5 gas near the substrate. Results of preliminary experiments using these techniques are described

  8. Formation of silicon carbide nanorods from wood-based carbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hata, T; Castro, [No Value; Fujisawa, M; Imamura, Y; Bonnamy, S; Bronsveld, P; Kikuchi, H

    2005-01-01

    Man-made ceramic wood similar to petrified wood found in nature can be used at high temperature as the high oxidation rate of carbon above 500 degrees C is suppressed by a mu m thin SiC coating similar to the shuttle's heat shield. Possible applications are in the field of energy production, e.g.,

  9. An experimental study of flank wear in the end milling of AISI 316 stainless steel with coated carbide inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odedeyi, P. B.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Liman, M.

    2017-05-01

    Stainless steel 316 is a difficult-to-machine iron-based alloys that contain minimum of about 12% of chromium commonly used in marine and aerospace industry. This paper presents an experimental study of the tool wear propagation variations in the end milling of stainless steel 316 with coated carbide inserts. The milling tests were conducted at three different cutting speeds while feed rate and depth of cut were at (0.02, 0.06 and 01) mm/rev and (1, 2 and 3) mm, respectively. The cutting tool used was TiAlN-PVD-multi-layered coated carbides. The effects of cutting speed, cutting tool coating top layer and workpiece material were investigated on the tool life. The results showed that cutting speed significantly affected the machined flank wears values. With increasing cutting speed, the flank wear values decreased. The experimental results showed that significant flank wear was the major and predominant failure mode affecting the tool life.

  10. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savalani, M.M.; Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C.

    2012-01-01

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  11. In situ formation of titanium carbide using titanium and carbon-nanotube powders by laser cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savalani, M.M., E-mail: mmfsmm@inet.polyu.edu.hk [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong); Ng, C.C.; Li, Q.H.; Man, H.C. [Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Hong Kong Polytechnic University (Hong Kong)

    2012-01-15

    Titanium metal matrix composite coatings are considered to be important candidates for high wear resistance applications. In this study, TiC reinforced Ti matrix composite layers were fabricated by laser cladding with 5, 10, 15 and 20 wt% carbon-nanotube. The effects of the carbon-nanotube content on phase composition, microstructure, micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coating were studied. Microstructural observation using scanning electron microscopy showed that the coatings consisted of a matrix of alpha-titanium phases and the reinforcement phase of titanium carbide in the form of fine dendrites, indicating that titanium carbide was synthesized by the in situ reaction during laser irradiation. Additionally, measurements on the micro-hardness and dry sliding wear resistance of the coatings indicated that the mechanical properties were affected by the amount of carbon-nanotube in the starting precursor materials and were enhanced by increasing the carbon-nanotube content. Results indicated that the composite layers exhibit high hardness and excellent wear resistance.

  12. Controlled formation of iron carbides and their performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wezendonk, Tim A.

    2018-04-19

    Iron carbides are unmistakably associated with the active phase for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The formation of these carbides is highly dependent on the catalyst formulation, the activation method and the operational conditions. Because of this highly dynamic behavior, studies on active phase performance often lack the direct correlation between catalyst performance and iron carbide phase. For the above reasons, an extensive in situ Mössbauer spectroscopy study on highly dispersed Fe on carbon catalysts (Fe@C) produced through pyrolysis of a Metal Organic Framework was coupled to their FTS performance testing. The preparation of Fe@C catalysts via this MOF mediated synthesis allows control over the active phase formation and therefore provides an ideal model system to study the performance of different iron carbides. Reduction of fresh Fe@C followed by low-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (LTFT) conditions resulted in the formation of the ε′-Fe2.2C, whereas carburization of the fresh catalysts under high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) resulted in the formation of χ-Fe5C2. Furthermore, the different activation methods did not alter other important catalyst properties, as pre- and post-reaction transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization confirmed that the iron nanoparticle dispersion was preserved. The weight normalized activities (FTY) of χ-Fe5C2 and ε′-Fe2.2C are virtually identical, whilst it is found that ε′-Fe2.2C is a better hydrogenation catalyst than χ-Fe5C2. The absence of differences under subsequent HTFT experiments, where χ-Fe5C2 is the dominating phase, is a strong indication that the iron carbide phase is responsible for the differences in selectivity.

  13. Stochastic Computer Simulation of Cermet Coatings Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Solonenko, Oleg P.; Jordan, Vladimir I.; Blednov, Vitaly A.

    2015-01-01

    An approach to the modeling of the process of the formation of thermal coatings lamellar structure, including plasma coatings, at the spraying of cermet powders is proposed. The approach based on the theoretical fundamentals developed which could be used for rapid and sufficiently accurate prediction of thickness and diameter of cermet splats as well as temperature at interface “flattening quasi-liquid cermet particle-substrate” depending on the key physical parameters (KPPs): temperature, ve...

  14. Mechanical and Tribological Properties of PVD-Coated Cemented Carbide as Evaluated by a New Multipass Scratch-Testing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fallqvist

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new test method based on multipass scratch testing has been developed for evaluating the mechanical and tribological properties of thin, hard coatings. The proposed test method uses a pin-on-disc tribometer and during testing a Rockwell C diamond stylus is used as the “pin” and loaded against the rotating coated sample. The influence of normal load on the number of cycles to coating damage is investigated and the resulting coating damage mechanisms are evaluated by posttest scanning electron microscopy. The present study presents the test method by evaluating the performance of Ti0.86Si0.14N, Ti0.34Al0.66N, and (Al0.7Cr0.32O3 coatings deposited by cathodic arc evaporation on cemented carbide inserts. The results show that the test method is quick, simple, and reproducible and can preferably be used to obtain relevant data concerning the fatigue, wear, chipping, and spalling characteristics of different coating-substrate composites. The test method can be used as a virtually nondestructive test and, for example, be used to evaluate the fatigue and wear resistance as well as the cohesive and adhesive interfacial strength of coated cemented carbide inserts prior to cutting tests.

  15. Review of experimental studies of zirconium carbide coated fuel particles for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Ogawa, Toru; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of zirconium carbide(ZrC) coated fuel particles were reviewed from the viewpoints of fuel particle designs, fabrication, characterization, fuel performance, and fission product retentiveness. ZrC is known as a refractory and chemically stable compound, so ZrC is a candidate to replace the silicon carbide(SiC) coating layer of the Triso-coated fuel particles. The irradiation experiments, the postirradiation heating tests, and the out-of-reactor experiments showed that the ZrC layer was less susceptible than the SiC layer to chemical attack by fission products and fuel kernels, and that the ZrC-coated fuel particles performed better than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles at high temperatures, especially above 1600degC. The ZrC-coated fuel particles demonstrated better cesium retention than the standard Triso-coated fuel particles though the ZrC layer showed a less effective barrier to ruthenium than the SiC layer. (author) 51 refs

  16. The effects of applying silicon carbide coating on core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuhair, S.; Setiadipura, Topan [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia, Serpong Tagerang Selatan (Indonesia). Center for Nuclear Reactor Technology and Safety; Su' ud, Zaki [Bandung Institute of Technology (Indonesia). Dept. of Physics

    2017-03-15

    Graphite is used as the moderator, fuel barrier material, and core structure in High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). However, despite its good thermal and mechanical properties below the radiation and high temperatures, it cannot avoid corrosion as a consequence of an accident of water/air ingress. Degradation of graphite as a main HTR material and the formation of dangerous CO gas is a serious problem in HTR safety. One of the several steps that can be adopted to avoid or prevent the corrosion of graphite by the water/air ingress is the application of a thin layer of silicon carbide (SiC) on the surface of the fuel element. This study investigates the effect of applying SiC coating on the fuel surfaces of pebble-bed HTR in water ingress accident from the reactivity points of view. A series of reactivity calculations were done with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX and continuous energy nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII at temperature of 1200 K. Three options of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, and ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2} fuel kernel were considered to obtain the inter comparison of the core reactivity of pebble-bed HTR in conditions of water/air ingress accident. The calculation results indicated that the UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR reactivity was slightly reduced and relatively more decreased when the thickness of the SiC coating increased. The reactivity characteristic of ThO{sub 2}/UO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR showed a similar trend to that of UO{sub 2}, but did not show reactivity peak caused by water ingress. In contrast with UO{sub 2}- and ThO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR, although the reactivity of PuO{sub 2}-fueled pebble-bed HTR was the lowest, its characteristics showed a very high reactivity peak (0.33 Δk/k) and this introduction of positive reactivity is difficult to control. SiC coating on the surface of the plutonium fuel pebble has no significant impact. From the comparison between reactivity characteristics of uranium, thorium and plutonium cores with 0

  17. Fullerene monolayer formation by spray coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cervenka, J.; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Many large molecular complexes are limited in thin film applications by their insufficient thermal stability, which excludes deposition via commonly used vapour phase deposition methods. Here we demonstrate an alternative way of monolayer formation of large molecules by a simple spray coating method

  18. Evaluation on machined surface of hardened stainless steel generated by hard turning using coated carbide tools with wiper geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noordin, M.Y.; Kurniawan, D.; Sharif, S.

    2007-01-01

    Hard turning has been explored to be the finish machining operation for parts made of hardened steel. Its feasibility is determined partially by the quality of the resulting machined surface. This study evaluates the surface integrity of martensitic stainless steel (48 HRC) resulting from hard turning using coated carbide tool with wiper geometry at various cutting speed and feed and compares to that obtained using coated carbide tool with conventional geometry. The wiper coated carbide tool is able to produce machined surface which is of finer finish (Ra is finer than 0.4 μm at most cutting parameters) and yet is similarly inducing only minor microstructural alteration compared to its conventional counterpart. From the view of the chip morphology where continuous type of chip is desired rather than sawtooth chip type, the wiper tool generates continuous chip at almost similar range of cutting parameters compared to the case when using conventional tool. Additionally, the use of wiper tool also induces the preferred compressive residual stress at the machined surface. (author)

  19. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-11-29

    Fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) have been acknowledged as a critical issue in a metallic fuel/steel cladding system due to the formation of low melting intermetallic eutectic compounds between the fuel and cladding steel, resulting in reduction in cladding wall thickness as well as a formation of eutectic compounds that can initiate melting in the fuel at lower temperature. In order to mitigate FCCI, diffusion barrier coatings on the cladding inner surface have been considered. In order to generate the required coating techniques, pack cementation, electroplating, and electrophoretic deposition have been investigated. However, these methods require a high processing temperature of above 700 oC, resulting in decarburization and decomposition of the martensites in a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) cladding steel. Alternatively, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) can be a promising process due to its low processing temperature of below 600 oC. The aim of the project is to conduct applied and fundamental research towards the development of diffusion barrier coatings on the inner surface of F/M fuel cladding tubes. Advanced cladding steels such as T91, HT9 and NF616 have been developed and extensively studied as advanced cladding materials due to their excellent irradiation and corrosion resistance. However, the FCCI accelerated by the elevated temperature and high neutron exposure anticipated in fast reactors, can have severe detrimental effects on the cladding steels through the diffusion of Fe into fuel and lanthanides towards into the claddings. To test the functionality of developed coating layer, the diffusion couple experiments were focused on using T91 as cladding and Ce as a surrogate lanthanum fission product. By using the customized OMCVD coating equipment, thin and compact layers with a few micron between 1.5 µm and 8 µm thick and average grain size of 200 nm and 5 µm were successfully obtained at the specimen coated between 300oC and

  20. Separation of silicon carbide-coated fertile and fissile particles by gas classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1976-07-01

    The separation of 235 U and 233 U in the reprocessing of HTGR fuels is a key feature of the feed-breed fuel cycle concept. This is attained in the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) reactor by coating the fissile (Th- 235 U) particles and the fertile (Th- 233 U) particles separately with silicon carbide (SiC) layers to contain the fission products and to protect the kernels from burning in the head-end reprocessing steps. Pneumatic (gas) classification based on size and density differences is the reference process for separating the SiC-coated particles into fissile and fertile streams for subsequent handling. Terminal velocities have been calculated for the +- 2 sigma ranges of particle sizes and densities for ''Fissile B''--''Fertile A'' particles used in the FSV reactor. Because of overlapping particle fractions, a continuous pneumatic separator appears infeasible; however, a batch separation process can be envisioned. Changing the gas from air to CO 2 and/or the temperature to 300 0 C results in less than 10 percent change in calculated terminal velocities. Recently reported work in gas classification is discussed in light of the theoretical calculations. The pneumatic separation of fissile and fertile particles needs more study, specifically with regard to (1) measuring the recoveries and separation efficiencies of actual fissile and fertile fractions in the tests of the pneumatic classifiers; and (2) improving the contactor design or flowsheet to avoid apparent flow separation or flooding problems at the feed point when using the feed rates required for the pilot plant

  1. Biocompatibility of Hydrogen-Diluted Amorphous Silicon Carbide Thin Films for Artificial Heart Valve Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizal, Umesh; Swain, Bhabani S.; Rameshbabu, N.; Swain, Bibhu P.

    2018-01-01

    Amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC:H) thin films were synthesized using trichloromethylsilane by a hot wire chemical vapor deposition process. The deposited films were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to confirm its chemical bonding, structural network and composition of the a-SiC:H films. The optical microscopy images reveal that hydrogen dilution increased the surface roughness and pore density of a-SiC:H thin film. The Raman spectroscopy and FTIR spectra reveal chemical network consisting of Si-Si, C-C and Si-C bonds, respectively. The XRD spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy indicate a-SiC:H still has short-range order. In addition, in vitro cytotoxicity test ensures the behavior of cell-semiconductor hybrid to monitor the proper coordination. The live-dead assays and MTT assay reveal an increase in green nucleus cell, and cell viability is greater than 88%, respectively, showing non-toxic nature of prepared a-SiC:H film. Moreover, the result indicated by direct contact assay, and cell prefers to adhere and proliferate on a-SiC:H thin films having a positive effect as artificial heart valve coating material.

  2. Multilayer composition coatings for cutting tools: formation and performance properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabakov, Vladimir P.; Vereschaka, Anatoly S.; Vereschaka, Alexey A.

    2018-03-01

    The paper considers the concept of a multi-layer architecture of the coating in which each layer has a predetermined functionality. Latest generation of coatings with multi-layered architecture for cutting tools secure a dual nature of the coating, in which coatings should not only improve the mechanical and physical characteristics of the cutting tool material, but also reduce the thermo-mechanical effect on the cutting tool determining wear intensity. Here are presented the results of the development of combined methods of forming multi-layer coatings with improved properties. Combined method of forming coatings using a pulsed laser allowed reducing excessively high levels of compressive residual stress and increasing micro hardness of the multilayered coatings. The results in testing coated HSS tools showed that the use of additional pulse of laser processing increases tool life up to 3 times. Using filtered cathodic vacuum arc deposition for the generation of multilayer coatings based on TiAlN compound has increased the wear-resistance of carbide tools by 2 fold compared with tool life of cutting tool with commercial TiN coatings. The aim of this study was to develop an innovative methodological approach to the deposition of multilayer coatings for cutting tools with functional architectural selection, properties and parameters of the coating based on sound knowledge of coating failure in machining process.

  3. Laser cladding in-situ carbide particle reinforced Fe-based composite coatings with rare earth oxide addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴朝锋; 马明星; 刘文今; 钟敏霖; 张红军; 张伟明

    2009-01-01

    Particulate reinforced metal matrix composite(PR-MMC) has excellent properties such as good wear resistance,corrosion resistance and high temperature properties.Laser cladding is usually used to form PR-MMC on metal surface with various volume fractions of ceramic particles.Recent literatures showed that laser melting of powder mixture containing carbon and carbide-forming elements,was favorable for the formation of in-situ synthesized carbide particles.In this paper,rare earth oxide(RE2O3) was added into t...

  4. Stochastic Computer Simulation of Cermet Coatings Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg P. Solonenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An approach to the modeling of the process of the formation of thermal coatings lamellar structure, including plasma coatings, at the spraying of cermet powders is proposed. The approach based on the theoretical fundamentals developed which could be used for rapid and sufficiently accurate prediction of thickness and diameter of cermet splats as well as temperature at interface “flattening quasi-liquid cermet particle-substrate” depending on the key physical parameters (KPPs: temperature, velocity and size of particle, substrate temperature, and concentration of finely dispersed solid inclusions uniformly distributed in liquid metal binder. The results are presented, which concern the development of the computational algorithm and the program complex for modeling the process of laying the splats in the coating with regard to the topology of its surface, which varies dynamically at the spraying, as well as the formation of lamellar structure and porosity of the coating. The results of numerical experiments are presented through the example of thermal spraying the cermet TiC-30 vol.% NiCr powder, illustrating the performance of the developed computational technology.

  5. Study of PVD AlCrN Coating for Reducing Carbide Cutting Tool Deterioration in the Machining of Titanium Alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Natalia L; Cue-Sampedro, Rodrigo; Siller, Héctor R; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana M; Rivera-Solorio, Carlos I; Di-Nardo, Santiago

    2013-05-24

    The manufacture of medical and aerospace components made of titanium alloys and other difficult-to-cut materials requires the parallel development of high performance cutting tools coated with materials capable of enhanced tribological and resistance properties. In this matter, a thin nanocomposite film made out of AlCrN (aluminum-chromium-nitride) was studied in this research, showing experimental work in the deposition process and its characterization. A heat-treated monolayer coating, competitive with other coatings in the machining of titanium alloys, was analyzed. Different analysis and characterizations were performed on the manufactured coating by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDXS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Furthermore, the mechanical behavior of the coating was evaluated through hardness test and tribology with pin-on-disk to quantify friction coefficient and wear rate. Finally, machinability tests using coated tungsten carbide cutting tools were executed in order to determine its performance through wear resistance, which is a key issue of cutting tools in high-end cutting at elevated temperatures. It was demonstrated that the specimen (with lower friction coefficient than previous research) is more efficient in machinability tests in Ti6Al4V alloys. Furthermore, the heat-treated monolayer coating presented better performance in comparison with a conventional monolayer of AlCrN coating.

  6. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronesi, Francesca [Laboratory of Preclinical and Surgical Studies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, Bologna 40136 (Italy); Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena [Laboratory of Preclinical and Surgical Studies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, Bologna 40136 (Italy); Laboratory of Biocompatibility, Innovative Technologies and Advanced Therapies, Department Rizzoli RIT, Via Di Barbiano 1/10, Bologna 40136 (Italy); Longo, Giovanni [CNR Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Roma (Italy); Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d' Abusco, Anna [Dept. of Biochemical Sciences, Sapienza University of Roma, Ple A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca [Dept. of Technologies and Health, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Viale Regina Elena, 299 Roma (Italy); Misiano, Carlo [Romana Film Sottili, Anzio, Roma (Italy); Palattella, Alberto [Dept. of Clinical Sciences and Translational Medicine, Tor Vergata University, Via Montpellier 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola [Exotic Animals Clinic, Via S. Giovannini 53, 00137 Roma (Italy); Garbarino, Viola [Dept. of Radiology, S.M. Goretti Hospital, Via G. Reni 2, 04100 Latina (Italy); Politi, Laura [Dept. of Biochemical Sciences, Sapienza University of Roma, Ple A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy); Scandurra, Roberto, E-mail: roberto.scandurra@uniroma1.it [Dept. of Biochemical Sciences, Sapienza University of Roma, Ple A. Moro 5, 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500 nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p < 0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm{sup 2}/μm/day) (p < 0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p < 0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. - Highlights: • Ti implants were coated with a nanostructured film composed of C{sub gr}, TiC and TiO{sub x}. • The TiC layer stimulates adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts. • Uncoated and TiC coated titanium implants were implanted in rabbit femurs. • Bone-implant contacts of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated. • Mineral Apposition Rate of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated.

  7. Osseointegration is improved by coating titanium implants with a nanostructured thin film with titanium carbide and titanium oxides clustered around graphitic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Fini, Milena; Longo, Giovanni; Ioannidu, Caterina Alexandra; Scotto d'Abusco, Anna; Superti, Fabiana; Panzini, Gianluca; Misiano, Carlo; Palattella, Alberto; Selleri, Paolo; Di Girolamo, Nicola; Garbarino, Viola; Politi, Laura; Scandurra, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Titanium implants coated with a 500 nm nanostructured layer, deposited by the Ion Plating Plasma Assisted (IPPA) technology, composed of 60% graphitic carbon, 25% titanium oxides and 15% titanium carbide were implanted into rabbit femurs whilst into the controlateral femurs uncoated titanium implants were inserted as control. At four time points the animals were injected with calcein green, xylenol orange, oxytetracycline and alizarin. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks femurs were removed and processed for histology and static and dynamic histomorphometry for undecalcified bone processing into methylmethacrylate, sectioned, thinned, polished and stained with Toluidine blue and Fast green. The overall bone-implant contacts rate (percentage of bone-implant contacts/weeks) of the TiC coated implant was 1.6 fold than that of the uncoated titanium implant. The histomorphometric analyses confirmed the histological evaluations. More precisely, higher Mineral Apposition Rate (MAR, μm/day) (p < 0.005) and Bone Formation Rate (BFR, μm 2 /μm/day) (p < 0.0005) as well as Bone Implant Contact (Bic) and Bone Ingrowth values (p < 0.0005) were observed for the TiC coated implants compared to uncoated implants. In conclusion the hard nanostructured TiC layer protects the bulk titanium implant against the harsh conditions of biological tissues and in the same time, stimulating adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts, induces a better bone-implant contacts of the implant compared to the uncoated titanium implant. - Highlights: • Ti implants were coated with a nanostructured film composed of C gr , TiC and TiO x . • The TiC layer stimulates adhesion, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts. • Uncoated and TiC coated titanium implants were implanted in rabbit femurs. • Bone-implant contacts of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated. • Mineral Apposition Rate of TiC coated implants were higher than that of uncoated.

  8. Stereological analysis of structure formation for solid WC-Co alloys in the process of carbide powder consolidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyavskij, K S

    1986-03-01

    Evolution of particle size distribution in carbide powders of different technological prehistory is studied in the process of their consolidation as a hard alloy. A successive estimate on identical preparations is used to study a structural powder->alloy transition. Temperature dependences of integral measures of the consolidated structure and characteristics of its heterogeneity are studied. It is shown that all studied structural rearrangements: formation of regular alternation of carbide and binding phases, development of particle-phase interfaces, change in size distribution - more intensely proceed in the high-temperature carbide base alloy.

  9. Influence of a powder feed rate on the properties of the plasma sprayed chromium carbide- 25% nickel chromium coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihailo R. Mrdak

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The plasma spray process is a leading technology of powder depositing in the production of coatings widely used in the aerospace industry for the protection of new parts and for the repair of worn ones. Cermet 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings based on Cr3C2 carbides are widely used to protect parts as they retain high values of hardness, strength and resistance to wear up to a temperature of 850°C. This paper discusses the influence of the parameters of the plasma spray deposition of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr powder on the structure and mechanical properties of the coating. The powder is deposited using plasma spraying at atmospheric pressure (APS. The plasma gas is He, which is an inert gas and does not react with the powder; it produces dense plasma with lower heat content and less incorporated ambient air in the plasma jet thus reducing temperature decomposition and decarburization of Cr3C2 carbide.. In this study, three groups of coatings were deposited with three different powder feed rates of: 30, 45 and 60 g/min. The  coating with the best properties was deposited on the inlet flange parts of the turbo - jet engine TV2-117A to reduce the influence of vibrations and wear. The structures and the mechanical properties of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings are analyzed in accordance with the Pratt & Whitney standard. Studies have shown that powder feed rates have an important influence on the mechanical properties and structures of 75Cr3C2 - 25Ni(Cr coatings

  10. Effect of deposition conditions on the properties of pyrolytic silicon carbide coatings for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.

    1977-10-01

    Silicon carbide coatings on HTGR microsphere fuel act as the barrier to contain metallic fission products. Silicon carbide coatings were applied by the decomposition of CH 3 SiCl 3 in a 13-cm-diam (5-in.) fluidized-bed coating furnace. The effects of temperature, CH 3 SiCl 3 supply rate and the H 2 :CH 3 SiCl 3 ratio on coating properties were studied. Deposition temperature was found to control coating density, whole particle crushing strength, coating efficiency, and microstructure. Coating density and microstructure were also partially determined by the H 2 :CH 3 SiCl 3 ratio. From this work, it appears that the rate at which high quality SiC can be deposited can be increased from 0.2 to 0.5 μm/min

  11. Dependence of silicon carbide coating properties on deposition parameters: preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauf, R.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1980-05-01

    Fuel particles for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) contain a layer of pyrolytic silicon carbide, which acts as a pressure vessel and provides containment of metallic fission products. The silicon carbide (SiC) is deposited by the thermal decomposition of methyltrichlorosilane (CH 3 SiCl 3 or MTS) in an excess of hydrogen. The purpose of the current study is to determine how the deposition variables affect the structure and properties of the SiC layer

  12. The significance of strength of silicon carbide for the mechanical integrity of coated fuel particles for HTRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, K.; Scheer, A.; Schuster, H.; Taeuber, K.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) and pyrocarbon are used as coating material for the HTR fuel particles. The PyC shell having a certain strength acts as a pressure vessel for the fission gases whereas the SiC shell has to retain the solid fission products in the fuel kernel. For measuring the strength of coating material the so-called Brittle Ring Test was developed. Strength and Young's modulus can be measured simultaneously with this method on SiC or PyC rings prepared out of the coating material of real fuel particles. The strength measured on the ring under a certain stress distribution which is characteristic for this method is transformed with the aid of the Weibull formalism for brittle fracture into the equivalent strength of the spherical coating shell on the fuel particle under uniform stress caused by the fission gas pressure. The values measured for the strength of the SiC were high (400-700MN/m 2 ), it could therefore be assumed that a SiC layer might contribute significantly also to the mechanical strength of the fuel coating. This assumption was confirmed by an irradiation test on coated particles with PyC-SiC-PyC coatings. There were several particles with all PyC layers broken during the irradiation, whereas the SiC layers remained intact having to withstand the fission gas pressure alone. This fact can only be explained assuming that the strength of the SiC is within the range of the values measured with the brittle ring test. The result indicates that, in optimising the coating of a fuel particle, the PyC layers of a multilayer coating should be considered alone as prospective layers for the SiC. The SiC shell, besides acting as a fission product barrier, is then also responsible for the mechanical integrity of the particle

  13. Formation and characterization of titanium nitride and titanium carbide films prepared by reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundgren, J.-E.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium has been reactively r.f. sputtered in mixed Ar-N 2 and Ar-CH 4 discharges on to substrates held at 775 K. The films obtained have been characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and by measurements of hardness and electrical resistivity. The compositions of the films have been determined using Auger electron spectroscopy. The processes occurring both on substrates and target surfaces have been studied and it is shown that the latter is of great importance for the composition and structure of deposited films. Titanium nitride films of full density and with electrical resistivity and hardness values close to those of bulk TiN were only obtained in a narrow range close to the stoichiometric composition. Titanium carbide films grown on non-biased substrates were found to have an open structure and thus a low density. A bias applied to the substrate, however, improved the quality of the films. It is also shown that the heat of formation of the compounds plays an important role in the formation of carbides and nitrides. A large value promotes the development of large grains and dense structures. (Auth.)

  14. Contribution to the study of atmospheric projection and under partial vacuum of tungsten carbide particles with cobalt or nickel binder. Application to fretting coatings on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinayo, Maria-Elena

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the plasma spraying (atmospheric, under controlled atmosphere, and under reduced pressure) of tungsten carbides with a metallic binder (WC/Co, WC/Ni; W 2 C/Co). This work comprised an optimisation of the spraying process under reduced pressure, the study of the influence of the powder production process on the physicochemical and micro-structural characteristics as well as on coating fretting properties, and a correlation between spraying parameters in a controlled atmosphere (power and pressure) and coating physico-chemical and micro-structural properties. Results show a high decarburization-oxidation of tungsten carbides during atmospheric spraying, as well as an important evaporation of cobalt. Under reduced pressure, high losses of carbides are noticed. These both phenomena strongly depend on the powder production process. Fretting results highlight remarkable performance of coatings obtained by atmospheric spraying [fr

  15. Deposition of multicomponent chromium carbide coatings using a non-conventional source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Ruiz, Jesus Eduardo, E-mail: jesus.gonzalez@biomat.uh.cu [Biomaterials Center, University of Havana (Cuba); Rodriguez Cristo, Alejandro [Mechanical Plants Company, Road of the Sub-Plan, Farm La Cana, Santa Clara, Villa Clara (Cuba); Ramos, Adrian Paz [Department of Chemistry, Universite de Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Quintana Puchol, Rafael [Welding Research Center, Central University Marta Abreu of Las Villas, Villa Clara (Cuba)

    2017-01-15

    The chromium carbide coatings are widely used in the mechanical industry due to its corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, we evaluated a new source of chromium and silicon with micro-additions of boron on the deposition of multi-component coatings of chromium carbides in W108 steel. The coatings were obtained by the pack cementation method, using a simultaneous deposition at 1000 deg for 4 hours. The coatings were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, optical microscopy, microhardness test method and pin-on-disc wear test. It was found that the coatings formed on W108 steel were mainly constituted by (Cr,Fe){sub 23}C{sub 6} , (Cr,Fe){sub 7} C{sub 3} , Cr{sub 5-x}Si{sub 3-x} C{sub x+z}, Cr{sub 3} B{sub 0,44}C{sub 1,4} and (or) Cr{sub 7} BC{sub 4} . The carbide layers showed thicknesses between 14 and 15 μm and maximum values of microhardness between 15.8 and 18.8 GPa. Also, the micro-additions of boron to the mixtures showed statistically significant influence on the thickness, microhardness and abrasive wear resistance of the carbide coatings. (author)

  16. Microstructure analysis of zirconium carbide layer on pyrocarbon-coated particles prepared by zirconium chloride vapor method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Hongsheng; Liu Bing; Zhang Kaihong; Tang Chunhe

    2012-01-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) layer on pyrocarbon-coated particles was successfully prepared in a fluidized bed coater furnace by chemical vapor deposition using a zirconium chloride (ZrCl 4 ) vapor method and quantitative controlling of the Zr-source through a ZrCl 4 powder feeder. The crystal phase, microstructure and chemical composition of ZrC-coating layer were analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical metallographical microscope, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results show that the deposited ZrC-coating layer has smooth and compact surface, no obvious holes, clear interface with dense pyrocarbon layer, and a thickness of 35 μm. The main phase of ZrC-coating layer is fcc-ZrC crystal, which is composed of small grains with the size of 20–50 nm. The grain size increases monotonously with the deposition temperature increasing. The main elements of ZrC-coating layer are Zr and C, and the Zr/C molar ratio is close to 1:1. The analysis of composition and crystal structure suggest that a stoichiometric fcc-ZrC crystal was obtained and no obvious preferred orientation of the grains was found.

  17. Advanced Characterization Techniques for Silicon Carbide and Pyrocarbon Coatings on Fuel Particles for High Temperature Reactors (HTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basini, V.; Charollais, F. [CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SPUA, BP 1, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Dugne, O. [CEA Marcoule, DEN/DTEC/SCGS BP 17171 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Garcia, C. [Laboratoire des Composites Thermostructuraux (LCTS), UMR CNRS 5801, 3 allee de La Boetie, 33600 Pessac (France); Perez, M. [CEA Grenoble DRT/DTH/LTH, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2008-07-01

    Cea and AREVA NP have engaged an extensive research and development program on HTR (high temperature reactor) fuel. The improving of safety of (very) high temperature reactors (V/HTR) is based on the quality of the fuel particles. This requires a good knowledge of the properties of the four-layers TRISO particles designed to retain the uranium and fission products during irradiation or accident conditions. The aim of this work is to characterize exhaustively the structure and the thermomechanical properties of each unirradiated layer (silicon carbide and pyrocarbon coatings) by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM), selected area electronic diffraction (SEAD), thermo reflectance microscopy and nano-indentation. The long term objective of this study is to define pertinent parameters for fuel performance codes used to better understand the thermomechanical behaviour of the coated particles. (authors)

  18. Structure and properties of selected cemented carbides and cermets covered with TiN/(Ti,Al,SiN/TiN coatings obtained by the cathodic arc evaporation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leszek A. Dobrzañski

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of microstructural examinations, mechanical tests and service performance tests carried out on thin TiN/(Ti,Al,SiN/TiN wear resistance coatings obtained by the CAE process on cermet and cemented carbide substrates. Microstructural examinations of the applied coatings and the substrate were made with an OPTON DSM 940 SEM and a LEICA MEF4A light microscope. Adhesion of the coatings on cemented carbides and cermets was measured using the scratch test. The cutting properties of the materials were determined from service tests in which continuous machining of C45E steel was carried out. The hardness of the substrate and the microhardness of the coatings were determined with a DUH 202 SHIMADZU ultra microhardness tester with a load of 70 mN. Roughness tests were also carried out before applying the coatings and after the PVD process. Cutting tests confirmed the advantages of the TiN/(Ti,Al,SiN/TiN type coatings obtained using the PVD method in the CAE mode on cemented carbides and cermets, as a material that undergoes very low abrasive, thermal and adhesion wear. These coatings extend tool life compared to commercially available uncoated tools with single and multi-layer coatings deposited using PVD/CVD methods.

  19. Formation of Al2O3-HfO2 Eutectic EBC Film on Silicon Carbide Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyosuke Seya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation mechanism of Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure, the preparation method, and the formation mechanism of the eutectic EBC layer on the silicon carbide substrate are summarized. Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic EBC film is prepared by optical zone melting method on the silicon carbide substrate. At high temperature, a small amount of silicon carbide decomposed into silicon and carbon. The components of Al2O3 and HfO2 in molten phase also react with the free carbon. The Al2O3 phase reacts with free carbon and vapor species of AlO phase is formed. The composition of the molten phase becomes HfO2 rich from the eutectic composition. HfO2 phase also reacts with the free carbon and HfC phase is formed on the silicon carbide substrate; then a high density intermediate layer is formed. The adhesion between the intermediate layer and the substrate is excellent by an anchor effect. When the solidification process finished before all of HfO2 phase is reduced to HfC phase, HfC-HfO2 functionally graded layer is formed on the silicon carbide substrate and the Al2O3-HfO2 eutectic structure grows from the top of the intermediate layer.

  20. Investigation of the heating behavior of carbide-bonded graphene coated silicon wafer used for hot embossing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gao; Li, Lihua; Lee, Wing Bun; Ng, Man Cheung; Chan, Chang Yuen

    2018-03-01

    A recently developed carbide-bonded graphene (CBG) coated silicon wafer was found to be an effective micro-patterned mold material for implementing rapid heating in hot embossing processes owing to its superior electrical and thermal conductivity, in addition to excellent mechanical properties. To facilitate the achievement of precision temperature control in the hot embossing, the heating behavior of a CBG coated silicon wafer sample was experimentally investigated. First, two groups of controlled experiments were conducted for quantitatively evaluating the influence of the main factors such as the vacuum pressure and gaseous environment (vacuum versus nitrogen) on its heating performance. The electrical and thermal responses of this sample under a voltage of 60 V were then intensively analyzed, and revealed that it had somewhat semi-conducting properties. Further, we compared its thermal profiles under different settings of the input voltage and current limiting threshold. Moreover, the strong temperature dependence of electrical resistance for this material was observed and determined. Ultimately, the surface temperature of CBG coated silicon wafer could be as high as 1300 ℃, but surprisingly the graphene coating did not detach from the substrate under such an elevated temperature due to its strong thermal coupling with the silicon wafer.

  1. Optimizing the dual elemental thermal reactive deposition time in carbide layer formation on SUJ2 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochtar, Myrna Ariati; Putra, Wahyuaji Narottama; Mahardika, Bayu

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents developments contributing to the improvement of thermo-reactive deposition (TRD) process in producing hard carbide layers, on automotive components application. The problem in using FeV powder as a coating material that has been applied in the industries is it is high cost. In this study, FeCr powder coating material was mixed into FeV powder with a ratio of 35:65 weight percent. The SUJ2 steel pins components are processed at 980° C, with varying TRD time was 4,6,8 and 10 hours. Scanning Electron microscope (SEM), Electron Probe Micro Analyzer (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were applied to analyze the coating layers. The thickness of the carbide layer formed will increase with the longer processing time, which thickness at 4-10 hours is increase from 22.7 to 29.7 micron. The gained thickness tends to be homogeneous. Increasing the TRD process holding time results in a higher hardness of the carbide layerwith hardness at 4, 6, 8 and 10 hours is 2049, 2184, 2175 and 2343 HV. The wear rate at TRD holding time of 4-10 hours with the Ogoshi method was reduced from 5.1 × 10-4 mm3/m to 2.5 × 10-4 mm3/m. Optical microscope observations shows that substrate phases consisting of pearlite and cementite and grains that tend to enlarge with the addition of time. Carbide compounds that are formed are vanadium carbide (V8C7, V6C5, V2C) and chromium carbide (Cr3C2, Cr23C7, Cr3C7). While EDS-Linescan results show complex phase (Fe, V, Cr) xC formed. The research shows that addition of FeCr into FeV powder in TRD process in 980°C with optimum time of 10 hours processing meet the mechanical properties requirement of automotive components.

  2. Plasma Spraying and Characterization of Chromium Carbide-Nickel Chromium Coatings

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ctibor, Pavel; Prantnerová, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 4 (2016), s. 281-290, č. článku PCCC-2016-09-16-339. ISSN 2008-2134 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Plasma spraying * Chromium carbide * Slurry abrasion * Dry rubber wheel test * Friction * Microhardness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass http://www.pccc.icrc.ac.ir/?xid=0113010121000001804&id=976

  3. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) with Silicon-Carbide-Matrix Coated-Particle Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C. W.; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2012-01-01

    The FHR is a new reactor concept that uses coated-particle fuel and a low-pressure liquid-salt coolant. Its neutronics are similar to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The power density is 5 to 10 times higher because of the superior cooling properties of liquids versus gases. The leading candidate coolant salt is a mixture of 7 LiF and BeF 2 (FLiBe) possessing a boiling point above 1300 C and the figure of merit ρC p (volumetric heat capacity) for the salt slightly superior to water. Studies are underway to define a near-term base-line concept while understanding longer-term options. Near-term options use graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel where the graphite is both a structural component and the primary neutron moderator. It is the same basic fuel used in HTGRs. The fuel can take several geometric forms with a pebble bed being the leading contender. Recent work on silicon-carbide-matrix (SiCm) coated-particle fuel may create a second longer-term fuel option. SiCm coated-particle fuels are currently being investigated for use in light-water reactors. The replacement of the graphite matrix with a SiCm creates a new family of fuels. The first motivation behind the effort is to take advantage of the superior radiation resistance of SiC compared to graphite in order to provide a stable matrix for hosting coated fuel particles. The second motivation is a much more rugged fuel under accident, repository, and other conditions.

  4. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  5. Laser cladding of Inconel 625-based composite coatings reinforced by porous chromium carbide particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicki, Damian

    2017-09-01

    Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings were produced via a laser cladding process using Cr3C2 reinforcing particles presenting an open porosity of about 60%. A laser cladding system used consisted of a direct diode laser with a rectangular beam spot and the top-hat beam profile, and an off-axis powder injection nozzle. The microstructural characteristics of the coatings was investigated with the use of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. A complete infiltration of the porous structure of Cr3C2 reinforcing particles and low degree of their dissolution have been achieved in a very narrow range of processing parameters. Crack-free composite coatings having a uniform distribution of the Cr3C2 particles and their fraction up to 36 vol% were produced. Comparative erosion tests between the Inconel 625/Cr3C2 composite coatings and the metallic Inconel 625 coatings were performed following the ASTM G 76 standard test method. It was found that the composite coatings have a significantly higher erosion resistance to that of metallic coatings for both 30° and 90° impingement angles. Additionally, the erosion performances of composite coatings were similar for both the normal and oblique impact conditions. The erosive wear behaviour of composite coatings is discussed and related to the unique microstructure of these coatings.

  6. Pulsed Laser Deposition of Carbide Coatings for Rolling and Sliding Contact Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krzanowski, James

    2003-01-01

    In this research program several new concepts were investigated for improving the mechanical and tribological properties of coatings intended for applications subject to repeated rolling and sliding contacts...

  7. Electrochemical corrosion behaviour of nickel chromium-chromium carbide coating by HVOF process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amudha, A.; Nagaraja, H. S.; Shashikala, H. D.

    2018-04-01

    To overcome the corrosion problem in marine industry, coatings are one of the most economical solutions. In this paper, the corrosion behaviour of 25(NiCr)-75Cr3C2 cermet coating on low carbon steel substrate by HVOF process is studied. Different phases such as Cr7C3 and Cr3C2, along with Ni and chromium oxide(Cr3O2) constituents present in the coating were revealed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis. The morphology of the coating obtained by scanning electron microscope (SEM) gave confirmation for the XRD analysis. Electrochemical corrosion techniques such as Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) were used to study the corrosion behaviour of the cermet in 3.5wt% NaCl electrolyte solution. The corrosion current density of the coated sample and substrate were found to be 6.878µA/cm-2 and 21.091µA/cm-2 respectively. The Nyquist Impedance spectra were used to derive an equivalent circuit to analyze the interaction between the coating and electrolyte. The Bode Impedance plots obtained by EIS for the coating showed a typical passive material capacitive behaviour, indicated by medium to low frequency with phase angle approaching -60o, suggesting that a stable film is formed on the tested material in the electrolyte used.

  8. Adherent diamond coatings on cemented tungsten carbide substrates with new Fe/Ni/Co binder phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polini, Riccardo; Delogu, Michele; Marcheselli, Giancarlo

    2006-01-01

    WC-Co hard metals continue to gain importance for cutting, mining and chipless forming tools. Cobalt metal currently dominates the market as a binder because of its unique properties. However, the use of cobalt as a binder has several drawbacks related to its hexagonal close-packed structure and market price fluctuations. These issues pushed the development of pre-alloyed binder powders which contain less than 40 wt.% cobalt. In this paper we first report the results of extensive investigations of WC-Fe/Ni/Co hard metal sintering, surface pretreating and deposition of adherent diamond films by using an industrial hot filament chemical vapour deposition (HFCVD) reactor. In particular, CVD diamond was deposited onto WC-Fe/Ni/Co grades which exhibited the best mechanical properties. Prior to deposition, the substrates were submitted to surface roughening by Murakami's etching and to surface binder removal by aqua regia. The adhesion was evaluated by Rockwell indentation tests (20, 40, 60 and 100 kg) conducted with a Brale indenter and compared to the adhesion of diamond films grown onto Co-cemented tungsten carbide substrates, which were submitted to similar etching pretreatments and identical deposition conditions. The results showed that diamond films on medium-grained WC-6 wt.% Fe/Ni/Co substrates exhibited good adhesion levels, comparable to those obtained for HFCVD diamond on Co-cemented carbides with similar microstructure

  9. New generation of plasma-sprayed mullite coatings on silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.; Jacobson, Nathan S.

    1995-01-01

    Mullite is promising as a protective coating for silicon-based ceramics in aggressive high-temperature environments. Conventionally plasma-sprayed mullite on SiC tends to crack and debond on thermal cycling. It is shown that this behavior is due to the presence of amorphous mullite in the conventionally sprayed mullite. Heating the SiC substrate during the plasma spraying eliminated the amorphous phase and produced coatings with dramatically improved properties. The new coating exhibits excellent adherence and crack resistance under thermal cycling between room temperature and 1000 to 1400 C. Preliminary tests showed good resistance to Na2CO3-induced hot corrosion.

  10. Application of the laser spallation technique to the measurement of the adhesion strength of tungsten carbide coatings on superalloy substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boustie, M.; Aoroux, E.; Romain, J.-P. [Ecole Nationale Superieure de Mecanique et d' Aerotechnique (ENSMA), 86 - Futuroscope (FR). Lab. de Combustion et de Detonique (LCD)

    2000-10-01

    High power pulsed lasers are used to induce shock waves in Hastelloy X targets coated with tungsten carbide of 70 {mu}m and 50 {mu}m thickness. In suitable irradiation conditions, a debonding of the substrate/coating interface due to the generation of tensile stresses is observed. Experimental results are analyzed with the use of numerical simulations yielding the stress history at interface and its dependence on laser pulse intensity up to 600 GW/cm{sup 2} with 1 ns and 3 ns durations under direct irradiation, and 23 ns with water confinement. As a consequence of shock decay during the propagation through the substrate, a strong variation of incident intensity results in a small variation of tensile stress. This allows an accurate determination of the debonding threshold which is found in the range of 1.0 to 1.3 GPa for short laser pulses (1 and 3 ns) and 0.5 to 0.6 GPa for long laser pulses (23 ns confined). (orig.)

  11. Formation of scandium carbides and scandium oxycarbide from the elements at high-(P, T) conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juarez-Arellano, Erick A.; Winkler, Bjoern; Bayarjargal, Lkhamsuren; Friedrich, Alexandra; Milman, Victor; Kammler, Daniel R.; Clark, Simon M.; Yan Jinyuan; Koch-Mueller, Monika; Schroeder, Florian; Avalos-Borja, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron diffraction experiments with in situ laser heated diamond anvil cells and multi-anvil press synthesis experiments have been performed in order to investigate the reaction of scandium and carbon from the elements at high-(P,T) conditions. It is shown that the reaction is very sensitive to the presence of oxygen. In an oxygen-rich environment the most stable phase is ScO x C y , where for these experiments x=0.39 and y=0.50-0.56. If only a small oxygen contamination is present, we have observed the formation of Sc 3 C 4 , Sc 4 C 3 and a new orthorhombic ScC x phase. All the phases formed at high pressures and temperatures are quenchable. Experimentally determined elastic properties of the scandium carbides are compared to values obtained by density functional theory based calculations. - Graphical Abstract Legend (TOC Figure): Table of Contents Figure Selected images recorded with a MAR345 image plate detector show the reaction of α-Sc and graphite at high-(P,T) conditions. Left: mixture of α-Sc and graphite. Right: recovered sample after laser heated the diamond anvil cell.

  12. Morphological evolution of primary TiC carbide in laser clad TiC reinforced FeAl intermetallic composite coating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈瑶; 王华明

    2003-01-01

    The novel rapidly solidified TiC/FeAl composite coatings were fabricated by laser cladding on the substrate of 1Cr18Ni9Ti stainless steel, particular emphasis has been placed on the growth morphologies of TiC carbide and its growth mechanism under a constant solidification conditions. Results show that the growth morphology of TiC carbide strongly depends upon the nucleation process and mass transportation process of TiC forming elements in laser melt pool. With increasing amount of titanium and carbon in melt pool, the growth morphology of TiC carbide changes from block-like to star-like and well-developed dendrite. As the amount of titanium and carbon increases further, TiC carbide particles are found to be irregular polyhedral block. Although the growth morphologies of TiC are various,their advancing fronts are all faceted, illustrating that TiC carbide grows by the mechanism of lateral ledge growth.

  13. Model of the macrostructure formation of plasma sprayed coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnedovets, A.G.; Kalita, V.I.

    2007-01-01

    A 3D discrete ballistic model of plasma sprayed coatings structure formation is presented. The effect of a spraying angle on porous macrostructure of coatings is investigated by numerical computations.Computer simulation results as well as experimental data show that at a sputtering angle less than 45 deg the mechanism of surface relief formation is changed and the relief consists of valleys and ridges under such conditions of plasma spraying [ru

  14. A study on the formation of uranium carbide in an induction furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, In Young; Lee, Yoon Sang; Kim, Eung Soo; Lee, Don Bae; Kim, Chang Kyu

    2005-01-01

    Uranium is a typical carbide-forming element. Three carbides, UC, U 2 C 3 and UC 2 , are formed in the uranium-carbon system. The most important of these as fuel is uranium monocarbide UC. It is well known that Uranium carbides can be obtained by three basic methods: 1) by reaction of uranium metal with carbon; 2) by reaction of uranium metal powder with gaseous hydrocarbons; 3) by reaction of uranium oxides with carbon. The use of uranium monocarbide, or materials based on it, has great prospects as fuel for nuclear reactors. It is quite possible that uranium dicarbide UC 2 may also acquire great importance as a fuel, particularly in dispersion fuel elements with graphite matrix. In the present study, uranium carbides are obtained by direct reaction of uranium metal with graphite in a high frequency induction furnace

  15. Formation of Porous Silicon Carbide and its Suitability as a Chemical and Temperature Detector

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rittenhouse, Tilghman

    2004-01-01

    .... A novel electroless method of producing porous silicon carbide (PSiC) is presented. Unlike anodic methods of producing PSiC the electroless process does not require electrical contact during etching...

  16. Optimization of cutting parameters in CNC turning of stainless steel 304 with TiAlN nano coated carbide cutting tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durga Prasada Rao, V.; Harsha, N.; Raghu Ram, N. S.; Navya Geethika, V.

    2018-02-01

    In this work, turning was performed to optimize the surface finish or roughness (Ra) of stainless steel 304 with uncoated and coated carbide tools under dry conditions. The carbide tools were coated with Titanium Aluminium Nitride (TiAlN) nano coating using Physical Vapour Deposition (PVD) method. The machining parameters, viz., cutting speed, depth of cut and feed rate which show major impact on Ra are considered during turning. The experiments are designed as per Taguchi orthogonal array and machining process is done accordingly. Then second-order regression equations have been developed on the basis of experimental results for Ra in terms of machining parameters used. Regarding the effect of machining parameters, an upward trend is observed in Ra with respect to feed rate, and as cutting speed increases the Ra value increased slightly due to chatter and vibrations. The adequacy of response variable (Ra) is tested by conducting additional experiments. The predicted Ra values are found to be a close match of their corresponding experimental values of uncoated and coated tools. The corresponding average % errors are found to be within the acceptable limits. Then the surface roughness equations of uncoated and coated tools are set as the objectives of optimization problem and are solved by using Differential Evolution (DE) algorithm. Also the tool lives of uncoated and coated tools are predicted by using Taylor’s tool life equation.

  17. Electrochemical and wear behavior of niobium-vanadium carbide coatings produced on AISI H13 tool steel through thermo-reactive deposition/diffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo Nieto, Fabio Enrique; Olaya Flores, Jhon Jairo; Alfonso Orjuela, Jose Edgar

    2016-01-01

    We deposited of niobium-vanadium carbide coatings on tool steel AISI H13 using the thermo-reactive substrates deposition/diffusion (TRD) technique. The carbides were obtained using salt baths composed of molten borax, ferroniobium, vanadium and aluminum, by heating this mixture at 1020°C for 4 hours. The coatings were characterized morphologically via electron microscopy scanning (SEM), the chemical surface composition was determined through X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX); the crystal structure was analyzed using x-ray diffraction (XRD), the mechanical properties of the coatings were evaluated using nano-indentation, The tribological properties of the coatings obtained were determined using a Pin-on-disk tribometer and the electrochemical behavior was studied through potentiodynamic polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that the hardness of the coated steel increased four times with respect to uncoated steel, and the electrochemical test established that the corrosion current is lower by one order of magnitude for coated steel

  18. Titanium carbide coatings on molybdenum by means of reactive sputtering and electron beam techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obata, T.; Aida, H.; Hirohata, Y.; Mohri, M.; Yamashina, T.

    1982-01-01

    This study is an experimental investigation of TiC coatings on Mo substrate by means of a reactive r.f. sputtering in the presence of CH 4 and a chemical reaction with interdiffusion in the sandwich structure of Ti/C/Mo by electron beam evaporation and heating. Using the reactive sputtering method, a homogeneous TiC coating with stoichiometric composition and good adhesion could be produced in the conditions of the partial pressure range of CH 4 , 2 approx. equal to 5 x 10 -4 Torr (total pressure, Psub(Ar) + Psub(CH) 4 = 5.6 x 10 -2 Torr) at 300 0 C (substrate). By using the electron beams, successively evaporated carbon and Ti on a Mo substrate was heated to 700 0 C to form a TiC surface layer on the top which then remained stable during further heating to 1000 0 C. Godd adhesion was brought about by interdiffusion to produce Mo 2 C layer between TiC layer and Mo substrate. It was also found that further heating of the coating layers subsequent to Ti evaporation on the TiC layer produced thicker TiC layer due to a chemical reaction between Ti and inner carbon layers. This could be a promising method of in situ replenishment for TiC coatings on the first wall and the limiter materials. (orig.)

  19. Effects of Fiber Coating Composition on Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Elderidge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Celsian matrix composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon fibers, precoated with a dual layer of BN/SiC by chemical vapor deposition in two separate batches, were fabricated. Mechanical properties of the composites were measured in three-point flexure. Despite supposedly identical processing, the composite panels fabricated with fibers coated in two batches exhibited substantially different mechanical behavior. The first matrix cracking stresses (sigma(sub mc)) of the composites reinforced with fibers coated in batch 1 and batch 2 were 436 and 122 MPa, respectively. This large difference in sigma(sub mc) was attributed to differences in fiber sliding stresses(tau(sub friction)), 121.2+/-48.7 and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively, for the two composites as determined by the fiber push-in method. Such a large difference in values of tau(sub friction) for the two composites was found to be due to the difference in the compositions of the interface coatings. Scanning Auger microprobe analysis revealed the presence of carbon layers between the fiber and BN, and also between the BN and SiC coatings in the composite showing lower tau(sub friction). This resulted in lower sigma(sub mc) in agreement with the ACK theory. The ultimate strengths of the two composites, 904 and 759 MPa, depended mainly on the fiber volume fraction and were not significantly effected by tau(sub friction) values, as expected. The poor reproducibility of the fiber coating composition between the two batches was judged to be the primary source of the large differences in performance of the two composites.

  20. Effect of the reinforced boron carbide particulate content of AA6061 alloy on formation of the passive film in seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katkar, V.A.; Gunasekaran, G.; Rao, A.G.; Koli, P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Presence of boron carbide increases the corrosion rate of A6061 alloy in seawater. → Increasing the B 4 C content decreases passive layer thickness. → Passive films formed on A6061 and its B 4 C composites are n-type semiconductors. - Abstract: The effect of boron carbide (B 4 C) reinforcement on the corrosion of AA6061 alloy was studied by investigating passive films formed in seawater. The higher passive current and its potential-dependence for these composites indicated formation of porous passive film. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) graph suggests that the alloy surface is partly or totally active. The formed passive film is n-type semiconductor junction in nature. The difference between corrosion potential (E corr ) and potential at zero charge (PZC) suggests that the chloride ions responsible for film breakdown exist within the passive film. A suitable mechanism is proposed for the passive film breakdown.

  1. Formation of hexagonal silicon carbide by high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhuyan, H; Favre, M; Valderrama, E; Avaria, G; Chuaqui, H; Mitchell, I; Wyndham, E; Saavedra, R; Paulraj, M

    2007-01-01

    We report the investigation of high energy ion beam irradiation on Si (1 0 0) substrates at room temperature using a low energy plasma focus (PF) device operating in methane gas. The unexposed and ion exposed substrates were characterized by x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), photothermal beam deflection, energy-dispersive x-ray analysis and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and the results are reported. The interaction of the pulsed PF ion beams, with characteristic energy in the 60-450 keV range, with the Si surface, results in the formation of a surface layer of hexagonal silicon carbide. The SEM and AFM analyses indicate clear step bunching on the silicon carbide surface with an average step height of 50 nm and a terrace width of 800 nm

  2. Fullerene monolayer formation by spray coating

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červenka, Jiří; Flipse, C.F.J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 6 (2010), 065302/1-065302/7 ISSN 0957-4484 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : monolayer * spray coating * fullerene * atomic force microscopy * scanning tunnelling microscopy * electronic structure * graphite * gold Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.644, year: 2010

  3. An analysis of formation mechanism and nano-scale hardness of the laser-induced coating on Ni–17Mo–7Cr based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Yanming; Yang, Jianguo; Fu, Wei; Wang, Limei; Gao, Zengliang

    2016-01-01

    The Ni–17Mo–7Cr based superalloy was laser surface treated in argon atmosphere to enhance its tribological property. The formation mechanism of the coating was revealed and its mechanical properties were characterized. The microstructure and phase identification in the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques. The mechanical properties of the coating, i.e. elastic modulus and hardness, were measured by nanoindentation tests. The SiC particles were used as the coating materials. During the laser treatment, the SiC will first decompose and the decomposition products Si will trigger the formation of MoC carbides in the coating. After complete solidification, the coating consists of the MoC equiaxed dendrites, interdendritic Ni matrix and graphite. Lot of tiny MoC and chromium carbides can also occur in the interdendritic matrix. The elastic modulus and hardness of MoC are characterized to be 394.0 GPa and 22.3 GPa, which are far higher than that of the matrix (E = 246.8 GPa, H = 5.3 GPa). In addition, the volume fraction of hard MoC can reach about 45.3% in the coating. The method reported in this work will provide us a new approach to fabricate the wear-resisting coating. - Highlights: • The SiC will decompose and the released Si atoms can trigger formation of hard MoC. • The coating consists of MoC equiaxed dendrites, interdendritic matrix and graphite. • The elastic modulus and hardness of MoC are measured to be 394.0 GPa and 22.3 GPa. • The volume fraction of hard MoC in the coating can reach approximately 45.3%.

  4. An analysis of formation mechanism and nano-scale hardness of the laser-induced coating on Ni–17Mo–7Cr based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yanming [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, 310014 (China); Yang, Jianguo, E-mail: yangjianguo@hit.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, 310014 (China); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 (China); Fu, Wei [Shanghai Baosteel Industry Technological Service Co., Ltd., Shanghai, 201900 (China); Wang, Limei; Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou, 310014 (China)

    2016-07-15

    The Ni–17Mo–7Cr based superalloy was laser surface treated in argon atmosphere to enhance its tribological property. The formation mechanism of the coating was revealed and its mechanical properties were characterized. The microstructure and phase identification in the coating were investigated by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques. The mechanical properties of the coating, i.e. elastic modulus and hardness, were measured by nanoindentation tests. The SiC particles were used as the coating materials. During the laser treatment, the SiC will first decompose and the decomposition products Si will trigger the formation of MoC carbides in the coating. After complete solidification, the coating consists of the MoC equiaxed dendrites, interdendritic Ni matrix and graphite. Lot of tiny MoC and chromium carbides can also occur in the interdendritic matrix. The elastic modulus and hardness of MoC are characterized to be 394.0 GPa and 22.3 GPa, which are far higher than that of the matrix (E = 246.8 GPa, H = 5.3 GPa). In addition, the volume fraction of hard MoC can reach about 45.3% in the coating. The method reported in this work will provide us a new approach to fabricate the wear-resisting coating. - Highlights: • The SiC will decompose and the released Si atoms can trigger formation of hard MoC. • The coating consists of MoC equiaxed dendrites, interdendritic matrix and graphite. • The elastic modulus and hardness of MoC are measured to be 394.0 GPa and 22.3 GPa. • The volume fraction of hard MoC in the coating can reach approximately 45.3%.

  5. On the melt infiltration of copper coated silicon carbide with an aluminium alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    Pressure-assisted infiltration of porous compacts of Cu coated and uncoated single crystals of platelet shaped alpha (hexagonal) SiC was used to study infiltration dynamics and particulate wettability with a 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration lengths were measured for a range of experimental variables which included infiltration pressure, infiltration time, and SiC size. A threshold pressure (P(th)) for flow initiation through compacts was identified from an analysis of infiltration data; P(th) decreased while penetration lengths increased with increasing SiC size (more fundamentally, due to changes in interparticle pore size) and with increasing infiltration times. Cu coated SiC led to lower P(th) and 60-80 percent larger penetration lengths compared to uncoated SiC under identical processing conditions.

  6. Effect of cutting parameters on sustainable machining performance of coated carbide tool in dry turning process of stainless steel 316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagaber, Salem A.; Yusoff, Ahmed Razlan

    2017-04-01

    The manufacturing industry aims to produce many products of high quality with relatively less cost and time. Different cutting parameters affect the machining performance of surface roughness, cutting force, and material removal rate. Nevertheless, a few studies reported on the effects of sustainable factors such as power consumed, cycle time during machining, and tool life on the dry turning of AISI 316. The present study aims to evaluate the machining performance of coated carbide in the machining of hard steel AISI 316 under the dry turning process. The influence of cutting parameters of cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut with their five (5) levels is established by a central composite design. Highly significant parameters were determined by analysis of variance (ANOVA), and the main effects of power consumed and time during machining, surface roughness, and tool wear were observed. Results showed that the cutting speed was proportional to power consumption and tool wear. Meanwhile, insignificant to surface roughness, feed rate most significantly affected surface roughness and power consumption followed by depth of cut.

  7. Wear characteristics of TiO[sub 2] coating and silicon carbide alloyed layer on Ti-6Al-4V material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamis, M.B. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Erciyes Univ., Kayseri (Turkey))

    1992-08-14

    Wear properties of Ti-6Al-4V material (IMI-318) TiO[sub 2] coated and electron beam alloyed with silicon carbide were tested. Thickness of oxide coating, alloying conditions and properties of the alloyed layer such as hardness, layer thickness and microstructure are described. Wear tests were carried out on a general-purpose wear machine by using a disc-disc sample configuration under lubricated conditions. Counterface materials to oxide-coated and to surface-alloyed specimens were plasma-nitrided AISI 51100 and hardened AISI 4140 respectively. The resulting weight loss and wear resistance were monitored as a function of sliding distance and applied load. Although the electron beam alloying improved the wear resistance of Ti-6Al-4V material, the oxide coatings on the material were not resistant to wear. (orig.).

  8. [Formation of microbial populations on the surface of protective coatings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopteva, Zh P; Zanina, V V; Piliashenko-Novokhatnyĭ, A I; Kopteva, A E; Kozlova, I A

    2001-01-01

    Formation of microbial cenosis on the surface of polyethylene-, polyurethane- and oil-bitumen-based protective coatings was studied in dynamics during 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days. It has been shown that the biofilm was formed on the protective materials during 14 days and consisted of ammonifying, denitrifying, hydrocarbon-oxidizing and sulphate-reducing bacteria referred to Pseudomonas, Arthrobacter, Bacillus and Kesulfovibrio genera. The bacteria which form the biofilm on coatings possess high denitrifying and sulphate-reducing activities. Corrosion inhibitors-biocydes, introduced in composition of oil-bitumen coatings suppressed growth and metabolic activity of corrosion-active bacteria.

  9. Formation of a glassy phase in ceramic-like coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazonova, M.V.; Gorbatova, G.N.

    1986-01-01

    The authors investigate the synthesis directly in coatings of a borosilicate melt that could fill the role of glassy matrix, thereby avoiding fusion and processing of the glassy material. The effect of added boron on the formation of coatings based on molybdenum disilicide and tungsten disilicide in air at 900 degrees C is presented. Without an additive no coating forms; there is no adhesion to the graphite and a continuous film does not form. As a result of boron oxidation an easily fused glassy matrix forms, which bonds the molybdenum disilicide or tungsten disilicide particles together and ensures adhesion to the graphite

  10. Blocking of bacterial biofilm formation by a fish protein coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vejborg, Rebecca Munk; Klemm, Per

    2008-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm formation on inert surfaces is a significant health and economic problem in a wide range of environmental, industrial, and medical areas. Bacterial adhesion is generally a prerequisite for this colonization process and, thus, represents an attractive target for the development......, this proteinaceous coating is characterized with regards to its biofilm-reducing properties by using a range of urinary tract infectious isolates with various pathogenic and adhesive properties. The antiadhesive coating significantly reduced or delayed biofilm formation by all these isolates under every condition...... examined. The biofilm-reducing activity did, however, vary depending on the substratum physicochemical characteristics and the environmental conditions studied. These data illustrate the importance of protein conditioning layers with respect to bacterial biofilm formation and suggest that antiadhesive...

  11. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  12. Formation of Biomimetic Hydroxyapatite Coating on Titanium Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ievgen Volodymyrovych PYLYPCHUK

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydroxyapatite (HA has long been used as a coating material in the implant industry for orthopedic implant applications. HA is the natural inorganic constituent of bone and teeth. By coating titanium (base material of implant engineering because of its lightness and durability with hydroxyapatite, we can provide higher biocompatibility of titanium implants, according to HA ability to form a direct biochemical bond with living tissues. This article reports a biomimetic approach for coating hydroxyapatite with titanium A method of modifying the surface of titanium by organic modifiers (for creating functional groups on the surface, followed by formation "self-assembled" layer of biomimetic hydroxyapatite in simulated body fluid (SBF. FTIR and XPS confirmed the formation of hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium surface. Comparative study of the formation of HA on the surface of titanium plates modified by different functional groups: Ti(≡OH, Ti/(≡Si-OH and Ti/(≡COOH is conducted. It was found that the closest to natural stoichiometric hydroxyapatite Ca/P ratio was obtained on Ti/(≡COOH samples. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.3.4974

  13. Vesicle coating and uncoating: controlling the formation of large COPII-coated carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townley, Anna K; Stephens, David J

    2009-08-26

    The basic mechanisms underlying the formation of coated vesicles are now defined in considerable detail. This article highlights recent developments in our understanding of the problem of exporting large macromolecular cargo such as procollagen from the endoplasmic reticulum and discusses the implications that this has for cell and tissue organisation and human disease.

  14. Thermal analysis of silicon carbide coating on a nickel based superalloy substrate and thickness measurement of top layers by lock-in infrared thermography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjit, Shrestha; Kim, Won Tae [Kongju National University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this paper, we investigate the capacity of the lock-in infrared thermography technique for the evaluation of non-uniform top layers of a silicon carbide coating with a nickel based superalloy sample. The method utilized a multilayer heat transfer model to analyze the surface temperature response. The modelling of the sample was done in ANSYS. The sample consists of three layers, namely, the metal substrate, bond coat and top coat. A sinusoidal heating at different excitation frequencies was imposed upon the top layer of the sample according to the experimental procedures. The thermal response of the excited surface was recorded, and the phase angle image was computed by Fourier transform using the image processing software, MATLAB and Thermofit Pro. The correlation between the coating thickness and phase angle was established for each excitation frequency. The most appropriate excitation frequency was found to be 0.05 Hz. The method demonstrated potential in the evaluation of coating thickness and it was successfully applied to measure the non-uniform top layers ranging from 0.05 mm to 1 mm with an accuracy of 0.000002 mm to 0.045 mm.

  15. Microstructure and abrasive wear properties of M(Cr,Fe7C3 carbides reinforced high-chromium carbon coating produced by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner BUYTOZ

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, high-chromium ferrochromium carbon hypereutectic alloy powder was coated on AISI 4340 steel by the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW process. The coating layers were analyzed by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD, field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, X-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Depending on the gas tungsten arc welding pa-rameters, either hypoeutectic or hypereutectic microstructures were produced. Wear tests of the coatings were carried out on a pin-on-disc apparatus as function of contact load. Wear rates of the all coating layers were decreased as a function of the loading. The improvement of abrasive wear resistance of the coating layer could be attributed to the high hardness of the hypereutectic M7C3 carbides in the microstruc-ture. As a result, the microstructure of surface layers, hardness and abrasive wear behaviours showed different characteristics due to the gas tungsten arc welding parameters.

  16. Growth Law For Peritectic Phases Formation In The Zinc Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzik E.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Some experiments dealing with the isothermal hot dip galvanizing were carried out. The (Zn – coating settled on the Armco-iron substrate were examined after arresting the solidification for different periods of time. The measurement of the thickness of each sub-layer in the coating were performed due to the SEM – analysis. The zinc segregation on the cross-section of the studied sub-layers were also determined by the EDS technique. The growth laws are formulated mathematically for each of the observed sub-layer. The mechanism of the sub-layer formation is also analysed due to the observation of the birth/nucleation of the phases in the sub-layers and the effect of flux onto the sub-layers morphology formation. The appearance of each phase is referred to the Fe-Zn diagram for stable equilibrium according to which these phases are the products of the adequate peritectic transformation.

  17. Neutron diffraction study of the formation of ordered antiphase domains in cubic titanium carbide TiC0.60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khidirov, I.; Parpiev, A. S.

    2013-01-01

    A series of superstructural reflections (described within the sp. gr. Fd3m) are found to be split into three symmetric parts in the neutron powder diffraction pattern of titanium carbide TiC 0.60 annealed at a temperature of 600°C. No splitting of superstructural reflections is observed in the neutron diffraction pattern of TiC 0.60 annealed at relatively high temperatures (780°C). This phenomenon can be explained by that fact that the ordering of carbon atoms at relatively high temperatures (780°C) is accompanied by the formation of randomly oriented rather large antiphase domains (APDs) (450 Å). At relatively low temperatures (600°C), stacking faults arise in the arrangement of partially ordered carbon atoms. In this case, relatively small ordered APDs (290 Å) are formed, along with disordered ones.

  18. Characterizing Suspension Plasma Spray Coating Formation Dynamics through Curvature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidambaram Seshadri, Ramachandran; Dwivedi, Gopal; Viswanathan, Vaishak; Sampath, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    Suspension plasma spraying (SPS) enables the production of variety of microstructures with unique mechanical and thermal properties. In SPS, a liquid carrier (ethanol/water) is used to transport the sub-micrometric feedstock into the plasma jet. Considering complex deposition dynamics of SPS technique, there is a need to better understand the relationships among spray conditions, ensuing particle behavior, deposition stress evolution and resultant properties. In this study, submicron yttria-stabilized zirconia particles suspended in ethanol were sprayed using a cascaded arc plasma torch. The stresses generated during the deposition of the layers (termed evolving stress) were monitored via the change in curvature of the substrate measured using an in situ measurement apparatus. Depending on the deposition conditions, coating microstructures ranged from feathery porous to dense/cracked deposits. The evolving stresses and modulus were correlated with the observed microstructures and visualized via process maps. Post-deposition bi-layer curvature measurement via low temperature thermal cycling was carried out to quantify the thermo-elastic response of different coatings. Lastly, preliminary data on furnace cycle durability of different coating microstructures were evaluated. This integrated study involving in situ diagnostics and ex situ characterization along with process maps provides a framework to describe coating formation mechanisms, process parametrics and microstructure description.

  19. Formation of silicon carbide by laser ablation in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone suspension on silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaleh, Babak; Ghasemi, Samaneh; Torkamany, Mohammad Javad; Salehzadeh, Sadegh; Maleki, Farahnaz

    2018-01-01

    Laser ablation of a silicon wafer in graphene oxide-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (GO-NMP) suspension was carried out with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser (pulse duration = 250 ns, wavelength = 1064 nm). The surface of silicon wafer before and after laser ablation was studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). The results showed that the ablation of silicon surface in liquid by pulsed laser was done by the process of melt expulsion under the influence of the confined plasma-induced pressure or shock wave trapped between the silicon wafer and the liquid. The X-ray diffraction‌ (XRD) pattern of Si wafer after laser ablation showed that 4H-SiC layer is formed on its surface. The formation of the above layer was also confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy‌ (XPS), as well as EDX was utilized. The reflectance of samples decreased with increasing pulse energy. Therefore, the morphological alteration and the formation of SiC layer at high energy increase absorption intensity in the UV‌-vis regions. Theoretical calculations confirm that the formation of silicon carbide from graphene oxide and silicon wafer is considerably endothermic. Development of new methods for increasing the reflectance without causing harmful effects is still an important issue for crystalline Si solar cells. By using the method described in this paper, the optical properties of solar cells can be improved.

  20. Hybrid Perovskite Thin Film Formation: From Lab Scale Spin Coating to Large Area Blade Coating

    KAUST Repository

    Munir, Rahim

    2017-11-22

    Our reliance on semiconductors is on the rise with the ever growing use of electronics in our daily life. Organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide perovskites have emerged as a prime alternative to current standard and expensive semiconductors because of its use of abundant elements and the ease of solution processing. This thesis has shed light on the ink-to-solid conversion during the one-step solution process of hybrid perovskite formulations from DMF. We utilize a suite of in situ diagnostic probes including high speed optical microscopy, optical reflectance and absorbance, and grazing incidence wide angle x-ray scattering (GIWAXS), all performed during spin coating, to monitor the solution thinning behavior, changes in optical absorbance, and nucleation and growth of crystalline phases of the precursor and perovskite. The starting formulation experiences solvent-solute interactions within seconds of casting, leading to the formation of a wet gel with nanoscale features visible by in situ GIWAXS. The wet gel subsequently gives way to the formation of ordered precursor solvates (equimolar iodide and chloride solutions) or disordered precursor solvates (equimolar bromide or 3:1 chloride), depending upon the halide and MAI content. The ordered precursor solute phases are stable and retain the solvent for long durations, resulting in consistent conversion behavior to the perovskite phase and solar-cell performance. In this thesis, we develop a firm understanding of the solvent engineering process in which an anti-solvent is used during the coating process through the solvent mixture of GBL and DMSO in different ratios. It has been shown that solvent engineering produce pin hole-free films, justifying its wide adoption across the field. We then translate our learnings from the lab scale spin coating process to the industrial friendly blade coating process. Here we compare the ink solidification and film formation mechanisms of CH3NH3PbI3 in solutions we used to

  1. Comparative evaluation of particle properties, formation of reactive oxygen species and genotoxic potential of tungsten carbide based nanoparticles in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehnel, Dana, E-mail: dana.kuehnel@ufz.de [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Scheffler, Katja [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Cell Techniques and Applied Stem Cell Biology, University of Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Wellner, Peggy [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Meissner, Tobias; Potthoff, Annegret [Fraunhofer-Institute for Ceramic Technologies and Systems (IKTS), Winterbergstr. 28, 01277 Dresden (Germany); Busch, Wibke [Department of Bioanalytical Ecotoxicology, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research Leipzig - UFZ, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Springer, Armin [Centre for Translational Bone, Cartilage and Soft Tissue Research, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University Dresden, Fetscherstrasse 74, 01307 Dresden (Germany); Schirmer, Kristin [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, 8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); EPF Lausanne, School of Architecture, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); ETH Zuerich, Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Assessment of toxic potential of tungsten carbide-based nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evaluation of ROS and micronuclei induction of three hard metal nanomaterials. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dependency of observed toxic effects on the materials physical-chemical properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differences in several particle properties seem to modulate the biological response. - Abstract: Tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt (Co) are constituents of hard metals and are used for the production of extremely hard tools. Previous studies have identified greater cytotoxic potential of WC-based nanoparticles if particles contained Co. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and micronuclei would help explain the impact on cultured mammalian cells by three different tungsten-based nanoparticles (WC{sub S}, WC{sub L}, WC{sub L}-Co (S: small; L: large)). The selection of particles allowed us to study the influence of particle properties, e.g. surface area, and the presence of Co on the toxicological results. WC{sub S} and WC{sub L}/WC{sub L}-Co differed in their crystalline structure and surface area, whereas WC{sub S}/WC{sub L} and WC{sub L}-Co differed in their cobalt content. WC{sub L} and WC{sub L}-Co showed neither a genotoxic potential nor ROS induction. Contrary to that, WC{sub S} nanoparticles induced the formation of both ROS and micronuclei. CoCl{sub 2} was tested in relevant concentrations and induced no ROS formation, but increased the rate of micronuclei at concentrations exceeding those present in WC{sub L}-Co. In conclusion, ROS and micronuclei formation could not be associated with the presence of Co in the WC-based particles. The contrasting responses elicited by WC{sub S} vs. WC{sub L} appear to be due to large differences in crystalline structure.

  2. Formation Dynamics of Oral Oil Coatings and Their Effect on Subsequent Sweetness Perception of Liquid Stimuli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho, S.; Eck, van Arianne; De Velde, Van Fred; Stieger, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the formation of oral coatings and their influence on subsequent taste perception is necessary to understand possible taste-masking effects by oil coatings. This study investigated (a) the dynamics of the formation of oral oil coatings formed by o/w emulsions and (b) the effect of oral

  3. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kartal, Muhammet, E-mail: kartal@sakarya.edu.tr [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Uysal, Mehmet [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey); Gul, Harun [Duzce University, Gumusova Vocational School, 81850 Duzce (Turkey); Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem [Sakarya University, Engineering Faculty, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering Department, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2015-11-01

    Highlights: • Effect of surfactant concentration on the co-deposited WC was investigated. • In the Ni matrix significantly high hardness was achieved by WC co-deposition. • Optimum surfactant resulted in obtaining superior wear resistance in the Ni. • Friction coefficient was decreased by WC co-deposition in the Ni matrix. - Abstract: A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55–65%).

  4. Effect of surfactant concentration in the electrolyte on the tribological properties of nickel-tungsten carbide composite coatings produced by pulse electro co-deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartal, Muhammet; Uysal, Mehmet; Gul, Harun; Alp, Ahmet; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-11-01

    A nickel plating bath containing WC particles was used to obtain hard and wear-resistant particle reinforced Ni/WC MMCs on steel surfaces for anti-wear applications. Copper substrates were used for electro co-deposition of Ni matrix/WC with the particle size of <1 μm tungsten carbide reinforcements. The influence of surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) concentration on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of composite coatings has been studied. The nickel films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The effects of the surfactant on the zeta potential, co-deposition and distribution of WC particles in the nickel matrix, as well as the tribological properties of composite coatings were also investigated. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited WC composite coatings sliding against M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a CSM Instrument. All friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (relative humidity 55-65%).

  5. Numerical studies of film formation in context of steel coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniszewski, Wojciech; Zaleski, Stephane; Popinet, Stephane

    2017-11-01

    In this work, we present a detailed example of numerical study of film formation in the context of metal coating. Liquid metal is drawn from a reservoir onto a retracting solid sheet, forming a coating film characterized by phenomena such as longitudinal thickness variation (in 3D) or waves akin to that predicted by Kapitza and Kapitza (visible in two dimensions as well). While the industry standard configuration for Zinc coating is marked by coexistence of medium Capillary number (Ca = 0.03) and film Reynolds number above 1000, we present also parametric studies in order to establish more clearly to what degree does the numerical method influence film regimes obtained in the target configuration. The simulations have been performed using Basilisk, a grid-adapting, strongly optimized code derived from Gerris . Mesh adaptation allows for arbitrary precision in relevant regions such as the contact line or the meniscus, while a coarse grid is applied elsewhere. This adaptation strategy, as the results indicate, is the only realistic approach for numerical method to cover the wide range of necessary scales from the predicted film thickness (hundreds of microns) to the domain size (meters).

  6. Formation of carbides and their effects on stress rupture of a Ni-base single crystal superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, L.R.; Jin, T.; Zhao, N.R.; Sun, X.F.; Guan, H.R.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2003-01-01

    Creep tests of a nickel-base single crystal superalloy with minor C addition and non-carbon were carried out at different temperatures and stresses. Correlations between microstructural change and testing temperature and stress were enabled through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), detailing the rafting microstucture and carbides precipitation. The results showed that minor carbon addition prolonged the second stage of creep strain curves and improved creep properties. Some carbide was precipitated during creep tests in modified alloy. M 23 C 6 carbide precipitated at lower temperature (871-982 deg. C), while (M 6 C) 2 carbide precipitated at higher temperature (>1000 deg. C), all of which was considered to be beneficial to creep properties. A small amount of MC carbide formed during solidification and its decomposition product (M 6 C) 1 were detrimental to mechanical properties, which together with micropores provided the site of initiation of cracks and led to the final fracture

  7. Controlled formation of iron carbides and their performance in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis

    KAUST Repository

    Wezendonk, Tim A.; Sun, Xiaohui; Dugulan, A. Iulian; van Hoof, Arno J.F.; Hensen, Emiel J.M.; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2018-01-01

    high-temperature Fischer-Tropsch (HTFT) resulted in the formation of χ-Fe5C2. Furthermore, the different activation methods did not alter other important catalyst properties, as pre- and post-reaction transmission electron microscopy (TEM

  8. Oral coatings: a study on the formation, clearance and perception

    OpenAIRE

    Camacho, S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral coatings are residues of food and beverages that coat the oral mucosa after consumption. Several studies have reported on the lubrication properties in mouth, and the after-feel and after-taste impact of oral coatings. Further, oral coatings have been suggested to influence subsequent taste perception. Although it is well known that oral coatings can influence sensory perception, there was little information available on the chemical composition and physical properties of oral coatings. ...

  9. Wear resistance increase of the modified coatings, deposited in the beam of relativistic electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poletika, I.M.; Perovskaya, M.V.; Balushkina, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The 1.5-3 mm thickness coatings have been obtained by vacuum - free electron beam cladding of tungsten carbide on low - carbon steel sub state. The coatings have an increased hardness but low wear resistance. Adding both nickel and titanium carbide to the tungsten carbide results in essentially improving the wear resistance of the coatings due to austenite-promoting effect of nickel and precipitation of fine Tic particles resulting in the formation of the final and nano grain structure. In the layer of weld one can find 30-100 nm grain - size structures. (authors)

  10. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leparoux, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)], E-mail: susanne.leparoux@empa.ch; Diot, C. [Consultant, allee de Mozart 10, F-92300 Chatillon (France); Dubach, A. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland); Vaucher, S. [Empa, Department of Materials Technology, Feuerwerkerstrasse 39, CH-3602 Thun (Switzerland)

    2007-10-15

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  11. Synthesis of silicon carbide coating on diamond by microwave heating of diamond and silicon powder: A heteroepitaxial growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leparoux, S.; Diot, C.; Dubach, A.; Vaucher, S.

    2007-01-01

    When a powder mixture of diamond and silicon is heated by microwaves, heteroepitaxial growth of SiC is observed on the (1 1 1) as well as on the (1 0 0) faces of the diamond. The SiC over-layer was characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of triangular silicon carbide on the (1 1 1) faces of diamond while prismatic crystals are found on the (1 0 0) faces. The crystal growth seems to be favored in the plane parallel to the face (1 1 1)

  12. Preparation of hafnium carbide by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertz, Dominique.

    1974-01-01

    Hard, adhesive coatings of single-phase hafnium carbide were obtained by chemical vapor reaction in an atmosphere containing hafnium tetrachloride, methane and a large excess of hydrogen. By varying the gas phase composition and temperature the zones of formation of the different solid phases were studied and the growth of elementary hafnium and carbon deposits evaluated separately. The results show that the mechanism of hafnium carbide deposition does not hardly involve phenomene of homogeneous-phase methane decomposition or tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen unless the atmosphere is very rich or very poor in methane with respect to tetrachloride. However, hydrogen acting inversely on these two reactions, affects the stoichiometry of the substance deposited. The methane decomposition reaction is fairly slow, the reaction leading to hafnium carbide deposition is faster and that of tetrachloride reduction by hydrogen is quite fast [fr

  13. Oral coatings: a study on the formation, clearance and perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho, S.

    2015-01-01

    Oral coatings are residues of food and beverages that coat the oral mucosa after consumption. Several studies have reported on the lubrication properties in mouth, and the after-feel and after-taste impact of oral coatings. Further, oral coatings have been suggested to influence subsequent taste

  14. Corrosion behaviors and contact resistances of the low-carbon steel bipolar plate with a chromized coating containing carbides and nitrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Ching-Yuan; Ger, Ming-Der [Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Ta-His, Tao-Yuan, 335 (China); Wu, Min-Sheng [Department of Weapon System Engineering, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, National Defense University, Ta-His, Tao-Yuan, 335 (China)

    2009-08-15

    This work improved the surface performance of low-carbon steel AISI 1020 by a reforming pack chromization process at low temperature (700 C) and investigated the possibility that the modified steels are used as metal bipolar plates (BPP) of PEMFCs. The steel surface was activated by electrical discharge machining (EDM) with different currents before the chromizing procedure. Experimental results indicate that a dense and homogenous Cr-rich layer is formed on the EDM carbon steels by pack chromization. The chromized coating pretreated with electrical discharge currents of 2 A has the lowest corrosion current density, 5.78 x 10{sup -8} Acm{sup -2}, evaluated by potentiodynamic polarization in a 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution and the smallest interfacial contact resistance (ICR), 11.8 m{omega}-cm{sup 2}, at 140 N/cm{sup 2}. The carbon steel with a coating containing carbides and nitrides is promising for application as metal BPPs, and this report presents the first research in producing BPPs with carbon steels. (author)

  15. Microstructure formations in copper-silicon carbide composites during mechanical alloying in a planetary activator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudashov, D.V.; Aksenov, A.A.; Portnoy, V.K.; Zolotorevskii, V.S. [Moscow State Inst. of Steel and Alloys, Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Physical Metallurgy of Non-ferrous Metals; Klemm, V.; Martin, U.; Oettel, H. [Technical Univ., Freiberg (Germany). Inst. of Physical Metallurgy

    2000-12-01

    In the present paper the structure formation process of the powder metallurgical produced copper composite materials was studied. The volume part of the reinforcing SiC particles was varied from 5 to 25 wt.-%. It was discovered that while milling in a planetary activator first of all a ''puff- pastry'' structure appeared. There are important differences between this structure formation process and other known processes of milling. The homogeneous distribution of SiC particles was obtained after 60-100 minutes of treatment in ''Gefest11-3'' planetary activator. Phase composition of the powder and composite samples at the interface SiC/Cu (particles/matrix) was analysed after consolidation of the powder mixture and after the high temperature annealing. It was still determined that not only pure copper powder can be as a starting material for Cu-composites production used, but also the wastes of copper mechanical treatment, for instance, copper shaving. (orig.)

  16. Formation of protective composite coatings with the use of SPTFE suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadaraia, K. V.; Mashtalyar, D. V.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Gnedenkov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    The method of protective composite coatings formation with the use of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) and subsequent treatment in isopropanol or aqueous suspension of the superdispersed polytetrafluoroethylene (SPTFE) have been developed. Morphological, electrochemical and tribological studies, as well as wetting ability of the protective coatings have been carried out. The obtained results corroborated the increase of the corrosion and wear resistance parameters for the polymer-containing coating in comparison with the base PEO-coating and uncoated material.

  17. Formation of vanadium carbide precipitations at the surface of alloys: Thermodynamics and kinetics aspects; Bildung von Vanadiumcarbid-Ausscheidungen auf Legierungsoberflaechen: Thermodynamische und kinetische Aspekte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.; Uebing, C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung GmbH, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    The paper describes the formation of vanadium carbides on the surface layers of Fe-3%V-C(100) alloys. The phase diagram calculated for this alloyed material using the ThermoCalc program package reveals a co-existence of ferritic matrix and V{sub 3}C{sub 2} at temperatures of T{<=}650 C. This carbide is instable at elevated temperatures, leading to co-existence of ferrite and the cubic VC{sub 1-x}. Experimental analyses revealed the formation of a 2D VC compound in the top layers of the surface of Fe-3%V-C(100) alloys, induced by equilibrium segregation. The paper explains the usefulness of thermodynamic and kinetic calculations for interpretation of precipitation phenomena in steels. Mathematically derived and experimental results of analyses for the case of non-equilibrium segregation showed excellent agreement in the determination of carbide thickness (nanometer scale) and time dependence of segregation under fast cooling conditions. (orig./CB) [Deutsch] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wurde die Bildung von Vanadiumcarbiden auf Fe-3%V-C(100)-Legierungsoberflaechen beschrieben. Das anhand des ThermoCalc-Programmpakets fuer diese Legierungszusammensetzung berechnete Phasendiagramm zeigt bei niedrigen Temperaturen T{<=}650 C die Koexistenz von ferritischer Matrix und V{sub 3}C{sub 2}. Bei hoeheren Temperaturen ist dieses Carbid instabil und es liegt Koexistenz von Ferrit und dem kubischen VC{sub 1-x} vor. Die experimentellen Untersuchungen zeigen die Ausbildung einer zweidimensionalen VC-Oberflaechenverbindung auf Fe-3%V-C(100)-Legierungsoberflaechen durch Gleichgewichtssegregation. Diese Arbeit zeigt, dass thermodynamische und kinetische Rechnungen bei der Deutung von Ausscheidungsphaenomenen in Staehlen sinnvoll eingesetzt werden koennen. Bei der Nichtgleichgewichtssegregation wurde bezueglich Carbiddicke (im Nanometerbereich) und Zeitabhaengigkeit der Ausscheidung bei schneller Abkuehlung eine hervorragende Uebereinstimmung zwischen Simulation und Experiment gefunden

  18. Formation, adhesion and mechanical/chemical properties of protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattox, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    Some general considerations for protective coatings are discussed. It is suggested that ceramic coatings may provide a class of coatings applicable to high temperature turbine blades for use in a corrosive/erosive environment. In particular, the ceraming glass materials would seem to hold promise, but little or nothing has been done on depositing these materials by vacuum processes

  19. Deposition of mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide by dual-source metal plasma immersion. Topical report, October 1995--September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, I.G.; Monteiro, O.R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Mullite and mullite-like coatings on silicon carbide have been produced by a Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition (Mepiiid) technique based on two cathodic vacuum arc sources and concurrent pulse biasing of the substrate in an oxygen atmosphere. The deposition was carried out at oxygen partial pressures of between 0.66 and 3.33 Pa. The Al:Si ratio in the films varied from 1:1 to 8:1 and was controlled by varying the pulse duration of the separate plasma guns. High bias voltage was used early in the deposition process in order to produce atomic mixing at the film-substrate interface, while lower bias voltage was used later in the deposition; low ion energy allows control of the physical properties of the film as well as faster deposition rates. The as-deposited films were amorphous, and crystalline mullite was formed by subsequent annealing at 1,100 C for 2 hours in air. Strong adhesion between the mullite and the SiC was achieved, in some cases exceeding the 70 MPa instrumental limit of the pull-tester.

  20. Experimental Evaluation and Optimization of Flank Wear During Turning of AISI 4340 Steel with Coated Carbide Inserts Using Different Cutting Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawal, S. A.; Choudhury, I. A.; Nukman, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The understanding of cutting fluids performance in turning process is very important in order to improve the efficiency of the process. This efficiency can be determined based on certain process parameters such as flank wear, cutting forces developed, temperature developed at the tool chip interface, surface roughness on the work piece, etc. In this study, the objective is to determine the influence of cutting fluids on flank wear during turning of AISI 4340 with coated carbide inserts. The performances of three types of cutting fluids were compared using Taguchi experimental method. The results show that palm kernel oil based cutting fluids performed better than the other two cutting fluids in reducing flank wear. Mathematical models for cutting parameters such as cutting speed, feed rate, depth of cut and cutting fluids were obtained from regression analysis using MINITAB 14 software to predict flank wear. Experiments were conducted based on the optimized values to validate the regression equations for flank wear and 5.82 % error was obtained. The optimal cutting parameters for the flank wear using S/N ratio were 160 m/min of cutting speed (level 1), 0.18 mm/rev of feed (level 1), 1.75 mm of depth of cut (level 2) and 2.97 mm2/s palm kernel oil based cutting fluid (level 3). ANOVA shows cutting speed of 85.36 %; and feed rate 4.81 %) as significant factors.

  1. Characterisation of nuclear dispersion fuels. The non-destructive examination of silicon carbide by selenium immersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambler, J.F.R.; Ferguson, I.F.

    1974-07-15

    The non-destructive microscopic examination of silicon-carbide-coated spheres containing uranium carbide, which involves immersing the coated spheres in selenium, is particularly suited for the examination of flaws in the coats but it is not possible to measure coating thicknesses by this method. Some coats are found to be opaque and this is related to their porosity. (auth)

  2. Magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite formation on (Ti,Mg)N coatings produced by cathodic arc PVD technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Sakip; Kok, Fatma Nese; Kazmanli, Kursat; Urgen, Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    In this study, formation of magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca10-xMgx(PO4)6(OH)2) on (Ti,Mg)N and TiN coating surfaces were investigated. The (Ti1-x,Mgx)N (x=0.064) coatings were deposited on titanium substrates by using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition technique. TiN coated grade 2 titanium substrates were used as reference to understand the role of magnesium on hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. The HA formation experiments was carried out in simulated body fluids (SBF) with three different concentrations (1X SBF, 5X SBF and 5X SBF without magnesium ions) at 37 °C. The coatings and hydroxyapatite films formed were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR Spectroscopy techniques. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses and XRD investigations of the coatings indicated that magnesium was incorporated in the TiN structure rather than forming a separate phase. The comparison between the TiN and (Ti, Mg)N coatings showed that the presence of magnesium in TiN structure facilitated magnesium substituted HA formation on the surface. The (Ti,Mg)N coatings can potentially be used to accelerate the HA formation in vivo conditions without any prior hydroxyapatite coating procedure. © 2013.

  3. Sedimentary controls on modern sand grain coat formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowey, Patrick J.; Worden, Richard H.; Utley, James; Hodgson, David M.

    2017-05-01

    Coated sand grains can influence reservoir quality evolution during sandstone diagenesis. Porosity can be reduced and fluid flow restricted where grain coats encroach into pore space. Conversely pore-lining grain coats can restrict the growth of pore-filling quartz cement in deeply buried sandstones, and thus can result in unusually high porosity in deeply buried sandstones. Being able to predict the distribution of coated sand grains within petroleum reservoirs is thus important to help find good reservoir quality. Here we report a modern analogue study of 12 sediment cores from the Anllóns Estuary, Galicia, NW Spain, collected from a range of sub-environments, to help develop an understanding of the occurrence and distribution of coated grains. The cores were described for grain size, bioturbation and sedimentary structures, and then sub-sampled for electron and light microscopy, laser granulometry, and X-ray diffraction analysis. The Anllóns Estuary is sand-dominated with intertidal sand flats and saltmarsh environments at the margins; there is a shallowing/fining-upwards trend in the estuary-fill succession. Grain coats are present in nearly every sample analysed; they are between 1 μm and 100 μm thick and typically lack internal organisation. The extent of grain coat coverage can exceed 25% in some samples with coverage highest in the top 20 cm of cores. Samples from muddy intertidal flat and the muddy saltmarsh environments, close to the margins of the estuary, have the highest coat coverage (mean coat coverage of 20.2% and 21.3%, respectively). The lowest mean coat coverage occurs in the sandy saltmarsh (10.4%), beyond the upper tidal limit and sandy intertidal flat environments (8.4%), close to the main estuary channel. Mean coat coverage correlates with the concentration of clay fraction. The primary controls on the distribution of fine-grained sediment, and therefore grain coat distribution, are primary sediment transport and deposition processes that

  4. Formation of SiO2/polytetrafluoroethylene hybrid superhydrophobic coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Yansheng; He Yi; Qing Yongquan; Zhuo Zhihao; Mo Qian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The coating showed the water contact angle of 165° and the water sliding angle of 6°. ► The hierarchical structure with the low surface energy leads to surface superhydrophobicity. ► We demonstrated a simple yet efficient approach to preparing superhydrophobic surface. - Abstract: Superhydrophobic coating has been fabricated on the glass substrates with modified SiO 2 sol and polytetrafluoroethylene emulsion through a sol–gel process. SiO 2 sol was modified with γ-glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane. The coatings were characterized by water contact angle measurement, Scanning electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal synthetic analysis. The experimental results show that coatings exhibited superhydrophobic and heat-resistant property with a water average contact angle of 156° and sliding angle of 6°, coating has a rough surface with both micro- and nanoscale structures, γ-glycidoxypropyl trimethoxysilane enhanced the hydrophobicity of the coatings. Low surface energy of polymer and special structure of the coatings were responsible for the hydrophobic of the surfaces.

  5. Formation and properties of chromium nitride coatings on martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendala, B.; Swadzba, L.; Hetmanczyk, M.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper the results of investigation of coatings obtained by ARC-PVD method on martensitic E1961 (13H12NWMFA) steel, which is used on compressor blades in the aircraft engines, were presented. The chemical composition of E1961 was given. The PVT-550 device was used for coating. The protective chromium nitride coatings were tested. The influence of ARC-PVD method parameters for example: bias, pressure and flow rate of reactive gases on the structure and properties of the CrN coatings in corrosion tests were investigated. Technical parameters of obtained CrN coatings were given. The phase analysis of chromium nitride coatings obtained with different technical parameters were tested. The results of phase analysis are given. The pitting corrosion resistance tests in 10% FeCl 3 solution was conducted. The corrosion rate for CrN coated samples were defined. It was found that 50 V and 100 V bias, about 0.5 and 0.7 Pa pressure and 140 sccm (standard cubic centimeter) flow rate of nitride during coating favour the CrN monophase structure while increasing bias to 150 V, decreasing the pressure to about 0.5 Pa and 0.3 Pa and increasing the flow rate of nitride to 160 - 180 sccm favour the CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure. On the basis of corrosion investigations for CrN coatings obtained with different ARC-PVD parameters the best corrosion resistance in 10% FeCl 3 solution for CrN+Cr 2 N diphase structure was found. (author)

  6. Selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palnichenko, A.V.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, M.; Mátéfi-Tempfli, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The selective formation of diamond-like carbon coating by surface catalyst patterning was studied. DLC films was deposited using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, filtered vacuum arc deposition, laser ablation, magnetron sputtering and ion-beam lithography methods. The DLC coatings were...

  7. Magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite formation on (Ti,Mg)N coatings produced by cathodic arc PVD technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onder, Sakip; Kok, Fatma Nese; Kazmanli, Kursat; Urgen, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, formation of magnesium substituted hydroxyapatite (Ca 10−x Mg x (PO 4 ) 6 (OH) 2 ) on (Ti,Mg)N and TiN coating surfaces were investigated. The (Ti 1−x ,Mg x )N (x = 0.064) coatings were deposited on titanium substrates by using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition technique. TiN coated grade 2 titanium substrates were used as reference to understand the role of magnesium on hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. The HA formation experiments was carried out in simulated body fluids (SBF) with three different concentrations (1X SBF, 5X SBF and 5X SBF without magnesium ions) at 37 °C. The coatings and hydroxyapatite films formed were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR Spectroscopy techniques. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analyses and XRD investigations of the coatings indicated that magnesium was incorporated in the TiN structure rather than forming a separate phase. The comparison between the TiN and (Ti, Mg)N coatings showed that the presence of magnesium in TiN structure facilitated magnesium substituted HA formation on the surface. The (Ti,Mg)N coatings can potentially be used to accelerate the HA formation in vivo conditions without any prior hydroxyapatite coating procedure. - Highlights: • Mg incorporated in (Ti,Mg)N coating structure and did not form a separate phase • Mg dissolution in SBF solution facilitated Mg-substituted hydroxyapatite formation • (Ti,Mg)N acted as Mg-source for Mg-substituted hydroxyapatite formation in SBF

  8. Hydrothermal Alteration Products as Key to Formation of Duricrust and Rock Coatings on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, J. L.

    1999-03-01

    A model is presented for the formation of duricrust and rock coatings on Mars. Hydrothermal alteration of volcanic tephra may produce a corrosive agent that attacks rock surfaces and binds dust particles to form duricrust.

  9. Cinnamon Oil and Chitosan Coating on Orthopaedic Implant Surface for Prevention of Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    OpenAIRE

    R Magetsari; P Dewo; BK Saputro; Z Lanodiyu

    2014-01-01

    S. Epidermidis is among the most frequently isolated microorganisms found in -infection related to implanted devices and the formation of biofilm will be more resistantcompared to the planktonic form. This study was carried out determine the effect of coating on stainless steel orthopaedic implants surfaces with cinnamon oil and chitosan as bioadhesive to prevent biofilms formation of S. Epidermidis.The rod shaped stainless steel 316 L orthopaedic implant with 5 mm diameters was coated 2 t...

  10. The structure and formation of functional hard coatings: a short review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diciuc Vlad

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Turning tools come in different shapes and sizes, geometry, base material and coating, according to their destination. They are widely used both for obtaining parts and for machinability tests. In this paper a short review about high-speed steel (HSS turning tools and their coatings is presented. Hard coatings formed on the tool material should be functional depending on the tool final application. Requirements for hard coatings and technological problems for layer formation on the real cutting tool are discussed.

  11. Plasma spraying of zirconium carbide – hafnium carbide – tungsten cermets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brožek, Vlastimil; Ctibor, Pavel; Cheong, D.-I.; Yang, S.-H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2009), s. 49-64 ISSN 1335-8987 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Plasma spraying * cermet coatings * microhardness * zirconium carbide * hafnium carbide * tungsten * water stabilized plasma Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  12. The formation of neodymium conversion coating and the influence of post-treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Xiufang [School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 145 Nantong St., Harbin 150001 (China); Jin Guo, E-mail: jg97721@yahoo.com.cn [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 145 Nantong St., Harbin 150001 (China); Yang Yuyun; Liu Erbao; Lin Lili; Zhong Jinggao [Center for Biomedical Materials and Engineering, School of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, 145 Nantong St., Harbin 150001 (China)

    2012-01-15

    In this paper, neodymium-based conversion coating is used as a substitute for toxic chromate conversion coating on AZ91D magnesium alloys. Its formation and growth were observed via SEM, EDS, XPS, electrochemical tests and weighting experiment. The influence of post-treatment on neodymium conversion coating was measured by FTIR and electrochemical experiments in terms of morphology, component, surface functional group and corrosion resistance. The dissolution of matrix and the deposition of neodymium/magnesium oxides compete with each other in initial time. Then the deposition of neodymium oxides dominates the process. Compact coating is obtained after 20 min immersion and it is mainly made of neodymium oxides and a small amount of magnesium oxides/hydroxides. The coating post-treated is rich in OH{sup -} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3+}. The post-treatment can improve the corrosion resistance of the neodymium conversion coating effectually examined by EIS.

  13. The formation of neodymium conversion coating and the influence of post-treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Xiufang; Jin Guo; Yang Yuyun; Liu Erbao; Lin Lili; Zhong Jinggao

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, neodymium-based conversion coating is used as a substitute for toxic chromate conversion coating on AZ91D magnesium alloys. Its formation and growth were observed via SEM, EDS, XPS, electrochemical tests and weighting experiment. The influence of post-treatment on neodymium conversion coating was measured by FTIR and electrochemical experiments in terms of morphology, component, surface functional group and corrosion resistance. The dissolution of matrix and the deposition of neodymium/magnesium oxides compete with each other in initial time. Then the deposition of neodymium oxides dominates the process. Compact coating is obtained after 20 min immersion and it is mainly made of neodymium oxides and a small amount of magnesium oxides/hydroxides. The coating post-treated is rich in OH - and PO 4 3+ . The post-treatment can improve the corrosion resistance of the neodymium conversion coating effectually examined by EIS.

  14. The Formation of Carbide-Free Bainite in High-Carbon High-Silicon Steel under Isothermal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchenko, N. A.; Yakovleva, I. L.; Mirzaev, D. A.; Buldashev, I. V.

    2017-12-01

    It is shown that a carbide-free bainite structure can be formed in high-carbon steel of the Fe-Si-Mn-Cr-V system using a traditional furnace facility. The structural aspects of bainitic transformation developing under isothermal conditions at 300°C have been studied by the methods of X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Orientation relationships between crystalline lattices of γ and α phases have been established. A superequilibrium carbon concentration in the bainite α phase has been determined.

  15. Formation of hydroxyapatite coating on titanium at 200 C through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    higher than 400◦C to form coatings of good adhesion and crystallinity. As this range of temperatures is ... act as an active interface for bony tissue proliferation. It has ... tions, like poor adherence to the metal surface and the lack of uniformity in ...

  16. Nanostructured thin film coatings with different strengthening effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panfilov Yury

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of articles on strengthening thin film coatings were analyzed and a lot of unusual strengthening effects, such as super high hardness and plasticity simultaneously, ultra low friction coefficient, high wear-resistance, curve rigidity increasing of drills with small diameter, associated with process formation of nanostructured coatings by the different thin film deposition methods were detected. Vacuum coater with RF magnetron sputtering system and ion-beam source and arc evaporator for nanostructured thin film coating manufacture are represented. Diamond Like Carbon and MoS2 thin film coatings, Ti, Al, Nb, Cr, nitride, carbide, and carbo-nitride thin film materials are described as strengthening coatings.

  17. Low temperature CVD deposition of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dariel, M.; Yeheskel, J.; Agam, S.; Edelstein, D.; Lebovits, O.; Ron, Y.

    1991-04-01

    The coating of graphite on silicon carbide from the gaseous phase in a hot-well, open flow reactor at 1150degC is described. This study constitutes the first part of an investigation of the process for the coating of nuclear fuel by chemical vapor deposition (CVD)

  18. Formation of a Spinel Coating on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Maximilian; Simchen, Frank; Scharf, Ingolf; Lampke, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) is a common means for the surface modification of light metals. However, PEO of magnesium substrates in dilute electrolytes generally leads to the formation of coatings consisting of unfavorable MgO magnesium oxide. By incorporation of electrolyte components, the phase constitution of the oxide coatings can be modified. Coatings consisting exclusively of MgAl2O4 magnesium-aluminum spinel are produced by PEO in an electrolyte containing hydroxide, aluminate, and phosphate anions. The hardness of the coatings is 3.5 GPa on Martens scale on average. Compared to the bare substrate, the coatings reduce the corrosion current density in dilute sodium chloride solution by approx. one order of magnitude and slightly shift the corrosion potential toward more noble values.

  19. Delayed-onset of procoagulant signalling revealed by kinetic analysis of COAT platelet formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberio, Lorenzo; Ravanat, Catherine; Hechler, Béatrice; Mangin, Pierre H; Lanza, François; Gachet, Christian

    2017-06-02

    The combined action of collagen and thrombin induces the formation of COAT platelets, which are characterised by a coat of procoagulant and adhesive molecules on their surface. Although recent work has started to highlight their clinical relevance, the exact mechanisms regulating the formation of procoagulant COAT platelets remain unclear. Therefore, we employed flow cytometry in order to visualise in real time surface and intracellular events following simultaneous platelet activation with convulxin and thrombin. After a rapid initial response pattern characterised by the homogenous activation of the fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa in all platelets, starting with a delay of about 2 minutes an increasing fraction transforms to procoagulant COAT platelets. Their surface is characterised by progressive loss of PAC-1 binding, expression of negative phospholipids and retention of α-granule von Willebrand factor. Intracellular events in procoagulant COAT platelets are a marked increase of free calcium into the low micromolar range, concomitantly with early depolarisation of the mitochondrial membrane and activation of caspase-3, while non-COAT platelets keep the intracellular free calcium in the nanomolar range and maintain an intact mitochondrial membrane. We show for the first time that the flow-cytometrically distinct fractions of COAT and non-COAT platelets differentially phosphorylate two signalling proteins, PKCα and p38MAPK, which may be involved in the regulation of the different calcium fluxes observed in COAT versus non-COAT platelets. This study demonstrates the utility of concomitant cellular and signalling evaluation using flow cytometry in order to further dissect the mechanisms underlying the dichotomous platelet response observed after collagen/thrombin stimulation.

  20. Influence of additives on melt viscosity, surface tension, and film formation of dry powder coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Dorothea; McGinity, James W

    2009-06-01

    Limited information on thermally cured dry-powder coatings used for solid dosage forms has been available in the literature. The aim of this study was to characterize the film formation process of Eudragit L 100-55 dry-powder coatings and to investigate the influence of film additives on melt viscosity and surface tension. The coating process employed no liquids and the plasticizer was combined with the polymer using hot melt extrusion. Thermoanalytical methods including differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were used to investigate the thermal properties of the dry-coating formulations. The rheological behavior of the coating formulations were characterized with the extrusion torque, and the surface energy parameters were determined from contact angle measurements. The influence of the level of triethyl citrate (TEC) as plasticizer and polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350 in the polymer film on film formation was investigated using a digital force tester. TGA confirmed thermal stability of all coating excipients at the investigated curing conditions. Increasing TEC levels and the addition of PEG 3350 as a low melting excipient in the coating reduced the viscosity of the polymer. Plasticization of the polymer with TEC increased the surface free energy, whereas the admixture of 10% PEG 3350 did not affect the surface free energy of Eudragit L 100-55. The spreading coefficient of the polymers over two sample tablet formulations was reduced with increasing surface free energy. During the curing process, puncture strength, and elongation of powder-cast films increased. The effect of curing time on the mechanical properties was dependent on the plasticizer content. The incorporation of TEC and PEG 3350 into the Eudragit L 100-55 powder coating formulation improved film formation. Mechanical testing of powder-cast films showed an increase of both elongation and puncture strength over the curing process as criterion for polymer particle fusion

  1. Hybrid Perovskite Thin Film Formation: From Lab Scale Spin Coating to Large Area Blade Coating

    KAUST Repository

    Munir, Rahim

    2017-01-01

    in which an anti-solvent is used during the coating process through the solvent mixture of GBL and DMSO in different ratios. It has been shown that solvent engineering produce pin hole-free films, justifying its wide adoption across the field. We

  2. Preventive effects of a phospholipid polymer coating on PMMA on biofilm formation by oral streptococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Yukie; Yamashita, Yoshihisa; Tsuru, Kanji; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2016-12-01

    The regulation of biofilm formation on dental materials such as denture bases is key to oral health. Recently, a biocompatible phospholipid polymer, poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine-co-n-butyl methacrylate) (PMB) coating, was reported to inhibit sucrose-dependent biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans, a cariogenic bacterium, on the surface of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) denture bases. However, S. mutans is a minor component of the oral microbiome and does not play an important role in biofilm formation in the absence of sucrose. Other, more predominant oral streptococci must play an indispensable role in sucrose-independent biofilm formation. In the present study, the effect of PMB coating on PMMA was evaluated using various oral streptococci that are known to be initial colonizers during biofilm formation on tooth surfaces. PMB coating on PMMA drastically reduced sucrose-dependent tight biofilm formation by two cariogenic bacteria (S. mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus), among seven tested oral streptococci, as described previously [N. Takahashi, F. Iwasa, Y. Inoue, H. Morisaki, K. Ishihara, K. Baba, J. Prosthet. Dent. 112 (2014) 194-203]. Streptococci other than S. mutans and S. sobrinus did not exhibit tight biofilm formation even in the presence of sucrose. On the other hand, all seven species of oral streptococci exhibited distinctly reduced glucose-dependent soft biofilm retention on PMB-coated PMMA. We conclude that PMB coating on PMMA surfaces inhibits biofilm attachment by initial colonizer oral streptococci, even in the absence of sucrose, indicating that PMB coating may help maintain clean conditions on PMMA surfaces in the oral cavity.

  3. Formation of hydroxyapatite on Ti-coated Ti-Zr-Cu-Pd bulk metallic glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, F.X.; Wang, X.M.; Wada, T.; Xie, G.Q.; Asami, K.; Inoue, A.

    2009-01-01

    In this research, Ti coating was conducted on Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 bulk metallic glass (BMG) in order to increase the formation rate of hydroxyapatite layer. The formation behavior of bone-like hydroxyapatite on Ti-coated and uncoated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) was studied. The surface morphology of Ti-coated and uncoated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG was investigated by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results revealed that the alkali pretreatment in 5 M NaOH solution at 60degC for 24 h had a beneficial effect on the formation of porous sodium titanate on Ti-coated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG. A bone-like hydroxyapatite layer was able to form on the alkali-treated Ti-coated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG after a short-time immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF). On the contrary, hydroxyapatite formation was not observed on the uncoated Ti 40 Zr 10 Cu 36 Pd 14 BMG after the same chemical treatments. (author)

  4. Cinnamon Oil and Chitosan Coating on Orthopaedic Implant Surface for Prevention of Staphylococcus Epidermidis Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Magetsari

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available S. Epidermidis is among the most frequently isolated microorganisms found in -infection related to implanted devices and the formation of biofilm will be more resistantcompared to the planktonic form. This study was carried out determine the effect of coating on stainless steel orthopaedic implants surfaces with cinnamon oil and chitosan as bioadhesive to prevent biofilms formation of S. Epidermidis.The rod shaped stainless steel 316 L orthopaedic implant with 5 mm diameters was coated 2 times using a mixture of cinnamon oil and chitosan 3% and 2% respectively with serial concentration of cinnamon from 0.125% to 2%. The coated implants were then put into tubes that contained bacterial suspension and incubated. Subsequently, the implants were washed with PBS solution followed by MTT soulution and isopropanol acid solution that related to biofilm formation. The results were expressed in numbers which represents the absorbance level at ELISA readings on 575 nm (A575 wavelength.The stainless steel implant coated with chitosan and cinnamon oil 2% and 1% has lower absorbance level compared with the absorbance level of S.Epidermidis biofilm only. This study showed that mixture of cinnamon oil and chitosan coated on the surface of stainless steel orthopaedic implant has an effect against S.Epidermidis biofilm formation with minimum cinnamon oil concentration of 1%.

  5. The production of wear protection coatings reinforced with tungsten carbide by temperature-controlled welding with the CO{sub 2} laser; Herstellung wolframkarbidverstaerkter Verschleissschutzschichten durch temperaturgeregeltes Auftragschweissen mit dem CO{sub 2}-Laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, S.; Boddin, G.C.; Luft, A.; Techel, A. [Fraunhofer-Inst. fuer Werkstoffphysik und Schichttechnologie, Dresden (Germany); Uelze, A. [Hochschule fuer Technik und Wirtschaft Dresden (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    Protective coatings can be produced by laser coating with metal alloys reinforced by carbide, whose resistance to abrasive wear with a content of 40 to 50% by volume of hard material is comparable to sintered TC-Co hard metal. Due to the remaining ductile material behaviour and the metallurgical binding to the substrate, the coatings have high impact, fatigue and adhesion strengths. The use of process control leads to a stable coating process and to increased safety and reproduceability when working in narrow parameter areas. (orig./RHM) [Deutsch] Durch das Laserbeschichten mit karbidverstaerkten Metallegierungen koennen Schutzschichten erzeugt werden, deren Widerstand gegen Abrasivverschleiss bereits bei einem Hartstoff-Volumengehalt von 40 bis 50% gesintertem WC-Co-Hartmetall vergleichbar ist. Aufgrund des verbleibenden duktilen Werkstoffverhaltens und der metallurgischen Bindung zum Substrat verfuegen die Schichten ueber hohe Schlag-, Ermuedungs- und Haftfestigkeiten. Der Einsatz der Prozessregelung fuehrt zu einem stabilen Beschichtungsvorgang und zu einer erhoehten Sicherheit und Reproduzierbarkeit beim Arbeiten in eng begrenzten Parameterbereichen. (orig./RHM)

  6. Protein-adsorption and Ca-phosphate formation on chitosan-bioactive glass composite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, V.; Boccaccini, A. R.; Virtanen, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, chitosan-bioactive glass (BG) composites have been developed and investigated as bioactive coatings for orthopedic applications. The increase of bioactivity occurs due to the stimulation of calcium-phosphate/hydroxyapatite formation on the surface while the coating is degrading. In the present work, protein adsorption and its influence on calcium-phosphate precipitation was studied for the first time on such composite coatings. The experiments involved coating of 316L stainless steel substrates with chitosan (Ch) and chitosan-bioactive glass (Ch-BG) and immersion of the coated samples in two different bovine serum albumin (BSA) containing solutions, namely DI H2O (with pH adjusted to about 7.2 with diluted NaOH) and simulated body fluid (SBF). In order to investigate the influence of protein adsorption on calcium-phosphate precipitation, samples were also immersed in DI H2O and in SBF without BSA. Samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Surface analysis revealed that adsorption of BSA takes place on all studied samples and that protein adsorption is influenced by the presence of Ca2+ and PO43- ions. Bioactivity in the form of hydroxyapatite pre-stage formation is significantly increased on Ch-BG composite coating as compared with bare stainless steel surface. However, calcium-phosphate precipitation in SBF is reduced by the presence of BSA.

  7. Electrodeposited Ni-B coatings: Formation and evaluation of hardness and wear resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnaveni, K.; Sankara Narayanan, T.S.N.; Seshadri, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    The formation of electrodeposited Ni-B alloy coatings using a dimethylamine borane (DMAB) modified Watt's nickel bath and evaluation of their structural characteristics, hardness and wear resistance are discussed. The boron content in the electrodeposited Ni-B alloy coating is determined by the ratio of rate of reduction of nickel and rate of decomposition of DMAB. The boron content of the electrodeposited Ni-B coating decreases as the current density increased from 0.4 to 4 A dm -2 . XRD diffraction pattern of electrodeposited Ni-B coatings in their as-plated condition exhibits the presence of Ni (1 1 1) (2 0 0) and (2 2 0) reflections with (1 1 1) texture. Heat treatment at 400 deg. C for 1 h has resulted in the formation of nickel boride phases, which results in an increase in hardness and wear resistance. The mechanism of wear in electrodeposited Ni-B coatings is intensive plastic deformation of the coating due to the ploughing action of the hard counter disk

  8. Silicon effects on formation of EPO oxide coatings on aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.; Nie, X.

    2006-01-01

    Electrolytic plasma processes (EPP) can be used for cleaning, metal-coating, carburizing, nitriding, and oxidizing. Electrolytic plasma oxidizing (EPO) is an advanced technique to deposit thick and hard ceramic coatings on a number of aluminum alloys. However, the EPO treatment on Al-Si alloys with a high Si content has rarely been reported. In this research, an investigation was conducted to clarify the effects of silicon contents on the EPO coating formation, morphology, and composition. Cast hypereutectic 390 alloys (∼ 17% Si) and hypoeutectic 319 alloys (∼ 7% Si) were chosen as substrates. The coating morphology, composition, and microstructure of the EPO coatings on those substrates were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A stylus roughness tester was used for surface roughness measurement. It was found that the EPO process had four stages where each stage was corresponding to various coating surface morphology, composition, and phase structures, characterised by different coating growth mechanisms

  9. Thermodynamic aspects of the coating formation through mechanochemical synthesis in vibration technology systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtyn, S. U.; Lebedev, V. A.; Gorlenko, A. O.

    2017-02-01

    On the basis of thermodynamic concepts of the process, we proposed an energy model that reflects the mechanochemical essence of coating forming in terms of vibration technology systems, which takes into account the contribution to the formation of the coating, the increase of unavailable energy due to the growth of entropy, the increase in the energy of elastic-plastic crystal lattice distortion as a result of the mechanical influence of working environment indenters, surface layer internal energy change which occurs as a result of chemical interaction of the contacting media. We proposed adhesion strength of the local volume modified through processing as a criterion of the energy condition of the formed coating. We established analytical dependence which helps to obtain the coating strength of the material required by operating conditions.

  10. Formation of coatings from a liquid phase on the surface of iron-base alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tatarek

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The study discloses the present state of the art regarding the technology and investigations of the phenomena that take place during the formation and growth of aluminum and zinc coatings hot-dip formed on iron products. In its cognitive aspect, the study offers an in-depth analysis of the partial processes that proceed in metal bath at the solid body – liquid metal interface. It is expected that the present study will help in a more detailed description of the respective phenomena and in full explanation of the mechanism of the coating growth, taking as an example the growth of aluminum coatings. The obtained results can serve as a background for some general conclusions regarding the thickness evolution process in other hot-dip coatings.

  11. Soybean oil in water-borne coatings and latex film formation study by AC impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiratumnukul, Nantana

    Conventional coalescing agents such as butyl cellosolve, butyl carbitol, and TexanolRTM are widely use in the latex coatings industry to facilitate film formation at ambient temperature. Coalescent aids are composed of solvents with low evaporation rates. After water evaporates, coalescent aids would help soften polymer molecules and form continuous films, then gradually evaporates from the film. Coalescent aids, therefore, are considered as volatile organic compounds (VOC), which are of environmental concern. The main purpose of this research project was to prepare a fatty acid glycol ester from soybean oil and glycol (polyols). The soybean oil glycol ester can be used as a coalescent aid in latex paint formulation. The soybean oil glycol ester not only lowered the minimum film formation temperature of latex polymers and continuous film formed at ambient temperature, but also after it has facilitated film formation, does not substantially evaporate, but becomes part of the film. Soybean oil glycol esters, therefore, can reduce the VOC levels and facilitate film formation of latex paints. In the second part of this research AC-Impedance was used to investigate the efficiency of soybean oil coalescent aid in latex film formation relative to the conventional ones. The coating resistance showed that the efficiency of film formation was increased as a function of dry time. The coating resistance also exhibited the effect of soybean oil ester in latex film formation in the same fashion as a conventional coalescent aid, TexanolRTM.

  12. Investigation of the phase formation from nickel coated nanostructured silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilyaeva, Yulia I.; Pyatilova, Olga V.; Berezkina, Alexandra Yu.; Sysa, Artem V.; Dudin, Alexander A.; Smirnov, Dmitry I.; Gavrilov, Sergey A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, the influence of the conditions of chemical and electrochemical nickel plating of nanostructured silicon and subsequent heat treatment on the phase composition of Si/Ni structures with advanced interface is studied. Nanostructured silicon formed by chemical and electrochemical etching was used for the formation of a developed interphase surface. The resulting Si/Ni samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray phase analysis. The experiments have revealed the differences in phase composition of the Si/Ni structures obtained by different methods, both before and after heat treatment.

  13. Formation of alumina-aluminide coatings on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choudhary R.K.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, alumina-aluminide coatings were formed on ferritic-martensitic T91 steel substrate. First, coatings of aluminum were deposited electrochemically on T91 steel in a room temperature AlCl3-1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium chloride ionic liquid, then the obtained coating was subjected to a two stage heat treatment procedure consisting of prolonged heat treatment of the sample in vacuum at 300 ○C followed by oxidative heat treatment in air at 650 ○C for 16 hours. X-ray diffraction measurement of the oxidatively heat treated samples indicated formation of Fe-Al and Cr-Al intermetallics and presence of amorphous alumina. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy measurement confirmed 50 wt- % O in the oxidized coating. Microscratch adhesion test conducted on alumina-aluminide coating formed on T91 steel substrate showed no major adhesive detachment up to 20 N loads. However, adhesive failure was observed at a few discrete points on the coating along the scratch track.

  14. Formation of secondary organic aerosol coating on black carbon particles near vehicular emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Alex K. Y.; Chen, Chia-Li; Liu, Jun; Price, Derek J.; Betha, Raghu; Russell, Lynn M.; Zhang, Xiaolu; Cappa, Christopher D.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) emitted from incomplete combustion can result in significant impacts on air quality and climate. Understanding the mixing state of ambient BC and the chemical characteristics of its associated coatings is particularly important to evaluate BC fate and environmental impacts. In this study, we investigate the formation of organic coatings on BC particles in an urban environment (Fontana, California) under hot and dry conditions using a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS). The SP-AMS was operated in a configuration that can exclusively detect refractory BC (rBC) particles and their coatings. Using the -log(NOx / NOy) ratio as a proxy for photochemical age of air masses, substantial formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) coatings on rBC particles was observed due to active photochemistry in the afternoon, whereas primary organic aerosol (POA) components were strongly associated with rBC from fresh vehicular emissions in the morning rush hours. There is also evidence that cooking-related organic aerosols were externally mixed from rBC. Positive matrix factorization and elemental analysis illustrate that most of the observed SOA coatings were freshly formed, providing an opportunity to examine SOA coating formation on rBCs near vehicular emissions. Approximately 7-20 wt % of secondary organic and inorganic species were estimated to be internally mixed with rBC on average, implying that rBC is unlikely the major condensation sink of SOA in this study. Comparison of our results to a co-located standard high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) measurement suggests that at least a portion of SOA materials condensed on rBC surfaces were chemically different from oxygenated organic aerosol (OOA) particles that were externally mixed with rBC, although they could both be generated from local photochemistry.

  15. The role of hexafluorozirconate in the formation of chromate conversion coatings on aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chidambaram, Devicharan; Clayton, Clive R.; Halada, Gary P.

    2006-01-01

    Aluminum based surfaces are routinely coated with a chromate based layer that provides unparalleled corrosion protection. Widely used conversion coating treatment formulations contain hexafluorozirconate as a major constituent besides chromate, ferricyanide, fluoride, and fluoborate. The function of hexafluorozirconate is the subject of this study as its function is still largely unknown. Hydrophobicity, surface morphology, and the chemistry of the surface, resulting from treatment with hexafluorozirconate, were studied using contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was extensively utilized to determine the chemistry of the surface resulting from the hexafluorozirconate pretreatment. Our results indicate that fluoride ion containing hexafluorozirconate complex does not attack the oxide film in a manner that uncomplexed simple fluoride ion does. Hexafluorozirconate is involved in the formation of an Al-Zr-O-F based hydrated layer that increases the hydrophilicity of the surface, activates the surface, and lowers the corrosion resistance. These factors enhance the interaction of chromate with the alloy surface to result in the formation of a uniform conversion coating. Based on these results, a new model has been proposed for the formation of chromate conversion coatings

  16. The Conserved Spore Coat Protein SpoVM Is Largely Dispensable in Clostridium difficile Spore Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribis, John W; Ravichandran, Priyanka; Putnam, Emily E; Pishdadian, Keyan; Shen, Aimee

    2017-01-01

    The spore-forming bacterial pathogen Clostridium difficile is a leading cause of health care-associated infections in the United States. In order for this obligate anaerobe to transmit infection, it must form metabolically dormant spores prior to exiting the host. A key step during this process is the assembly of a protective, multilayered proteinaceous coat around the spore. Coat assembly depends on coat morphogenetic proteins recruiting distinct subsets of coat proteins to the developing spore. While 10 coat morphogenetic proteins have been identified in Bacillus subtilis , only two of these morphogenetic proteins have homologs in the Clostridia : SpoIVA and SpoVM. C. difficile SpoIVA is critical for proper coat assembly and functional spore formation, but the requirement for SpoVM during this process was unknown. Here, we show that SpoVM is largely dispensable for C. difficile spore formation, in contrast with B. subtilis . Loss of C. difficile SpoVM resulted in modest decreases (~3-fold) in heat- and chloroform-resistant spore formation, while morphological defects such as coat detachment from the forespore and abnormal cortex thickness were observed in ~30% of spoVM mutant cells. Biochemical analyses revealed that C. difficile SpoIVA and SpoVM directly interact, similarly to their B. subtilis counterparts. However, in contrast with B. subtilis , C. difficile SpoVM was not essential for SpoIVA to encase the forespore. Since C. difficile coat morphogenesis requires SpoIVA-interacting protein L (SipL), which is conserved exclusively in the Clostridia , but not the more broadly conserved SpoVM, our results reveal another key difference between C. difficile and B. subtilis spore assembly pathways. IMPORTANCE The spore-forming obligate anaerobe Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrheal disease in the United States. When C. difficile spores are ingested by susceptible individuals, they germinate within the gut and

  17. Effect of deep cryogenic treatment on the formation of nano-sized carbides and the wear behavior of D2 tool steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Kamran; Akhbarizadeh, Amin; Javadpour, Sirus

    2012-09-01

    The effect of deep cryogenic treatment on the microstructure, hardness, and wear behavior of D2 tool steel was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), hardness test, pin-on-disk wear test, and the reciprocating pin-on-flat wear test. The results show that deep cryogenic treatment eliminates retained austenite, makes a better carbide distribution, and increases the carbide content. Furthermore, some new nano-sized carbides form during the deep cryogenic treatment, thereby increasing the hardness and improving the wear behavior of the samples.

  18. Silicon carbide modified carbon materials. Formation of nanocrystalline SiC from thermochemical processes in the system coal tar pitch/poly(carbosilane)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czosnek, C.; Janik, J.F.; Olejniczak, Z. [Stanislaw Staszic University of Mining & Meterology, AGH, Krakow (Poland)

    2002-12-01

    Poly(carbosilane) or PCS, (-CH{sub 2}-SiH(CH{sub 3})-){sub n}, is used as a Si-bearing precursor in combination with a coal tar pitch to study thermally induced transformations toward SiC-modified carbon composites. Following mixing of the components in the molten pitch at 160{sup o}C, the mixture is heated under argon atmosphere at 500{sup o}C yielding a solid carbonizate that is further subjected to separate pyrolysis experiments at 1300{sup o}C or 1650{sup o}C. At temperatures up to 500{sup o}C, the PCS reacts with suitable pitch components as well as undergoing decomposition reactions. At higher temperatures, clusters of prevailingly nanocrystalline beta-SiC are confirmed after the 1650{sup o}C pyrolysis step with indications that the formation of the compound starts at 1300{sup o}C. Si-29 MAS NMR, XRD, FT-IR, XPS, and elemental analysis are used to characterize each pyrolysis step, especially, from the viewpoint of transformation of silicon species to silicon carbide in the carbon matrix evolved from the pitch.

  19. Kinetics of the process of formation and high-temperature oxidation of electrospark coatings on steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verkhoturov, A.D.; Chiplik, V.N.; Egorov, F.F.; Lavrenko, V.A.; Podchernyaeva, I.A.; Shemet, V.Z.

    1986-01-01

    This work is a study of the kinetics of formation and of the heat resistance of electrospark coatings based on the composite TiB 2 -Mo with varying molybdenum content. In the process of electrospark alloying they measured the specific erosion of the anode and the increase in weight of the cathode with an accuracy not worse than 5%. Electrospark coatings of TiB 2 -Mo on steel 45 are marked by improved scaling resistance at temperatures above 900 C. Their scaling resistance and also the effectiveness of the process of electrospark alloying increase with increasing content of the phase B-MoB in the coating because molybdenum borate forms during its high-temperature oxidation. Illustrations and table are included

  20. In situ formation of low friction ceramic coatings on carbon steel by plasma electrolytic oxidation in two types of electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunlong; Jiang Zhaohua

    2009-01-01

    In situ formation of ceramic coatings on Q235 carbon steel was achieved by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) in carbonate electrolyte and silicate electrolyte, respectively. The surface and cross-section morphology, phase and elemental composition of PEO coatings were examined by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The bond strength of the coating was determined using a direct pull-off test. The hardness as well as tribological properties of the ceramic coating was primarily studied. The results indicated that the coating obtained in carbonate electrolyte was Fe 3 O 4 , while the coating achieved from silicate electrolyte was proved to be amorphous. Both kinds of coatings showed coarse and porous surface. The Fe 3 O 4 coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte showed a high bonding strength to the substrate up to 20 ± 2 MPa and the value was 15 ± 2 MPa for the amorphous coatings obtained in carbonate electrolyte. The micro hardness of the amorphous coating and the Fe 3 O 4 coating was 1001 Hv and 1413 Hv, respectively, which was more than two and three times as that of the Q235 alloy substrate (415 Hv). The friction coefficient exhibited by amorphous coating and Fe 3 O 4 coating was 0.13 and 0.11, respectively, both lower than the uncoated Q235 substrate which ranged from 0.17 to 0.35.

  1. Ligand sphere conversions in terminal carbide complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morsing, Thorbjørn Juul; Reinholdt, Anders; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2016-01-01

    Metathesis is introduced as a preparative route to terminal carbide complexes. The chloride ligands of the terminal carbide complex [RuC(Cl)2(PCy3)2] (RuC) can be exchanged, paving the way for a systematic variation of the ligand sphere. A series of substituted complexes, including the first...... example of a cationic terminal carbide complex, [RuC(Cl)(CH3CN)(PCy3)2]+, is described and characterized by NMR, MS, X-ray crystallography, and computational studies. The experimentally observed irregular variation of the carbide 13C chemical shift is shown to be accurately reproduced by DFT, which also...... demonstrates that details of the coordination geometry affect the carbide chemical shift equally as much as variations in the nature of the auxiliary ligands. Furthermore, the kinetics of formation of the sqaure pyramidal dicyano complex, trans-[RuC(CN)2(PCy3)2], from RuC has been examined and the reaction...

  2. Serum albumin coating of demineralized bone matrix results in stronger new bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthy, Dénes B; Vácz, Gabriella; Szabó, Tamás; Szigyártó, Imola C; Toró, Ildikó; Vámos, Boglárka; Hornyák, István; Renner, Károly; Klára, Tamás; Szabó, Bence T; Dobó-Nagy, Csaba; Doros, Attila; Lacza, Zsombor

    2016-01-01

    Blood serum fractions are hotly debated adjuvants in bone replacement therapies. In the present experiment, we coated demineralized bone matrices (DBM) with serum albumin and investigated stem cell attachment in vitro and bone formation in a rat calvaria defect model. In the in vitro experiments, we observed that significantly more cells adhere to the serum albumin coated DBMs at every time point. In vivo bone formation with albumin coated and uncoated DBM was monitored biweekly by computed tomography until 11 weeks postoperatively while empty defects served as controls. By the seventh week, the bone defect in the albumin group was almost completely closed (remaining defect 3.0 ± 2.3%), while uncoated DBM and unfilled control groups still had significant defects (uncoated: 40.2 ± 9.1%, control: 52.4 ± 8.9%). Higher density values were also observed in the albumin coated DBM group. In addition, the serum albumin enhanced group showed significantly higher volume of newly formed bone in the microCT analysis and produced significantly higher breaking force and stiffness compared to the uncoated grafts (peak breaking force: uncoated: 15.7 ± 4 N, albumin 46.1 ± 11 N). In conclusion, this investigation shows that implanting serum albumin coated DBM significantly reduces healing period in nonhealing defects and results in mechanically stronger bone. These results also support the idea that serum albumin coating provides a convenient milieu for stem cell function, and a much improved bone grafting success can be achieved without the use of exogenous stem cells. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effect of Silver or Copper Nanoparticles-Dispersed Silane Coatings on Biofilm Formation in Cooling Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Akiko; Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Sano, Katsuhiko; Sakai, Yoshiyuki; Ishida, Kunimitsu; Beech, Iwona B.; Suzuki, Osamu; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Biofouling often occurs in cooling water systems, resulting in the reduction of heat exchange efficiency and corrosion of the cooling pipes, which raises the running costs. Therefore, controlling biofouling is very important. To regulate biofouling, we focus on the formation of biofilm, which is the early step of biofouling. In this study, we investigated whether silver or copper nanoparticles-dispersed silane coatings inhibited biofilm formation in cooling systems. We developed a closed laboratory biofilm reactor as a model of a cooling pipe and used seawater as a model for cooling water. Silver or copper nanoparticles-dispersed silane coating (Ag coating and Cu coating) coupons were soaked in seawater, and the seawater was circulated in the laboratory biofilm reactor for several days to create biofilms. Three-dimensional images of the surface showed that sea-island-like structures were formed on silane coatings and low concentration Cu coating, whereas nothing was formed on high concentration Cu coatings and low concentration Ag coating. The sea-island-like structures were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy to estimate the components of the biofilm. We found that both the Cu coating and Ag coating were effective methods to inhibit biofilm formation in cooling pipes. PMID:28773758

  4. Mechanical stability and adhesion of ceramic coatings deposited on steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat, M.; Armann, A.; Moberg, L.; Sibieude, F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents the results of two sorts of deformation experiment performed on coating/substrate systems. The coating/substrate systems were constituted by coatings of titanium nitride and chromium carbide, deposited in both cases on steel substrates. The formation experiments were cyclic bending tests on macroscopic samples with chromium carbide coatings, and straining experiments performed in a scanning electron microscope on samples with titanium nitride coatings. By the analysis of our experimental results we develop an attempt to correlate the mechanical stability of the systems with the interfacial adhesion, by taking into account the internal residual stresses as an adhesion parameter. For the samples with chromium carbide coatings, the evolution of internal stresses is detected from X-ray diffractometry and discussed in terms of the observed induced damaging mechanisms, in the cyclic tests. For the samples with titanium nitride coatings, we discussed the adhesion from the microstructural observations and from the critical parameters determined during the in-situ straining experiments. (orig.)

  5. Uniform formation of Au coated polystyrene core-shell structure using metallization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoungseob; Koo, Jonghyun; Roh, Yonghan, E-mail: yhroh@skku.edu

    2011-08-01

    There are several methods for the fabrication of core-shell particles, including chemical reduction and self-assembly. In this study, the chemical reduction method was used to fabricate 100 nm, Au-coated polystyrene nanoparticles. The formation of the gold layer was based on the increase of gold coverage by the reaction with aniline and HAuCl{sub 4}. This method allowed for efficient control of the gold coverage and led to relatively stable products. The formation of Au clusters on the surface of the 100 nm polystyrene beads was characterized by scanning electron microscope and high resolution tunneling electron microscope. As a result, the Au-coated nanoparticles can be used in various applications such as surface plasmon resonators, drug delivery systems and electronic optical devices.

  6. Thermal physics of gas-thermal coatings formation processes. State of investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialko, N.M.; Prokopov, V.G.; Meranova, N.O.; Borisov, Yu.S.; Korzhik, V.N.; Sherenkovskaya, G.P.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of state of investigations of gas-thermal coatings formation processes in presented. Classification of approaches to mathematical simulation of thermal phenomena studies is offered. The general characteristics of three main approaches to the analysis of heat transport processes is given. Some problems of mathematical simulation of single particle thermal interaction with solid surface are considered in details. The main physical assumptions are analysed

  7. Oxide scale formation of modified FeCrAl coatings exposed to liquid lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fetzer, Renate, E-mail: renate.fetzer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Weisenburger, Alfons; Jianu, Adrian; Mueller, Georg [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Modified FeCrAl coatings show oxide scale formation when exposed to liquid lead. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of thin Al-rich oxide scales is promoted by the presence of Y. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FeCrAlY with at least 8 wt.% Al forms thin Al-rich oxide scales. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For low Al content, thick multilayer Fe-based oxide scales are found. - Abstract: Modified FeCrAl coatings were studied with respect to their capability to form a thin protective oxide scale in liquid lead environment. They were manufactured by low pressure plasma spraying and GESA surface melting, thereby tuning the Al content. The specimens were exposed for 900 h to liquid lead containing 10{sup -6} and 10{sup -8} wt.% oxygen, respectively, at various temperatures from 400 to 550 Degree-Sign C. Threshold values for an Al content that guarantees the formation of thin protective Al-rich oxide scales are determined, dependent on the respective chromium content, on the presence of yttrium in the modified coating, and on the exposure conditions.

  8. Specific Features of Chip Making and Work-piece Surface Layer Formation in Machining Thermal Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Yaroslavtsev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of unique engineering structural and performance properties inherent in metallic composites characterizes wear- and erosion-resistant high-temperature coatings made by thermal spraying methods. This allows their use both in manufacturing processes to enhance the wear strength of products, which have to operate under the cyclic loading, high contact pressures, corrosion and high temperatures and in product renewal.Thermal coatings contribute to the qualitative improvement of the technical level of production and product restoration using the ceramic composite materials. However, the possibility to have a significantly increased product performance, reduce their factory labour hours and materials/output ratio in manufacturing and restoration is largely dependent on the degree of the surface layer quality of products at their finishing stage, which is usually provided by different kinds of machining.When machining the plasma-sprayed thermal coatings, a removing process of the cut-off layer material is determined by its distinctive features such as a layered structure, high internal stresses, low ductility material, high tendency to the surface layer strengthening and rehardening, porosity, high abrasive properties, etc. When coatings are machined these coating properties result in specific characteristics of chip formation and conditions for formation of the billet surface layer.The chip formation of plasma-sprayed coatings was studied at micro-velocities using an experimental tool-setting microscope-based setup, created in BMSTU. The setup allowed simultaneous recording both the individual stages (phases of the chip formation process and the operating force factors.It is found that formation of individual chip elements comes with the multiple micro-cracks that cause chipping-off the small particles of material. The emerging main crack in the cut-off layer of material leads to separation of the largest chip element. Then all the stages

  9. Plasma spraying process of disperse carbides for spraying and facing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Kostyukovich, T.G.; Ostapovich, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    A possibility to metallize carbides in plasma of impulsing capacitor discharge is considered. Powders granulation occurs during plasma spraying process, ceramic core being completely capped. X-ray phase and chemical analyses of coatings did not show considerable changes of carbon content in carbides before and after plasma processing. This distinguishes the process of carbides metallization in impulsing plasma from the similar processing in arc and high-frequency plasma generator. Use of powder composites produced in the impulsing capacitor discharge, for plasma spraying and laser facing permits 2-3 times increasing wear resistance of the surface layer as against the coatings produced from mechanical powders mixtures

  10. The Mechanical and Tribology Properties of Sputtered Titanium Aluminum Nitride Coating on the Tungsten Carbide Insert Tool in the Dry Turning of Tool Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esmar Budi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of the sputtering parameters on the mechanical tribology properties of Titanium Aluminum Nitride coating on the tungsten cabide insert tool in the dry turning of tool steel has been investigated. The coating was deposited using a Direct Current magnetron sputtering system with various substrate biases (-79 to -221 V and nitrogen flow rates (30 to 72 sccm. The dry turning test was carried out on a Computer Numeric Code machine using an optimum cutting parameter setting. The results show that the lowest flank wear (~0.4 mm was achieved using a Titanium Aluminum Nitride-coated tool that was deposited at a high substrate bias (-200 V and a high nitrogen flow rate (70 sccm. The lowest flank wear was attributed to high coating hardness.

  11. Liquid phase diffusion bonding of A1070 by using metal formate coated Zn sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, K.; Koyama, S.; shohji, I.

    2017-05-01

    Aluminium alloy have high strength and easily recycle due to its low melting point. Therefore, aluminium is widely used in the manufacturing of cars and electronic devices. In recent years, the most common way for bonding aluminium alloy is brazing and friction stir welding. However, brazing requires positional accuracy and results in the formation of voids by the flax residue. Moreover, aluminium is an excellent heat radiating and electricity conducting material; therefore, it is difficult to bond together using other bonding methods. Because of these limitations, liquid phase diffusion bonding is considered to the suitable method for bonding aluminium at low temperature and low bonding pressure. In this study, the effect of metal formate coating processing of zinc surface on the bond strength of the liquid phase diffusion bonded interface of A1070 has been investigated by SEM observation of the interfacial microstructures and fractured surfaces after tensile test. Liquid phase diffusion bonding was carried out under a nitrogen gas atmosphere at a bonding temperature of 673 K and 713 K and a bonding load of 6 MPa (bonding time: 15 min). As a result of the metal formate coating processing, a joint having the ultimate tensile strength of the base aluminium was provided. It is hypothesized that this is because metallic zinc is generated as a result of thermal decomposition of formate in the bonded interface at lower bonding temperatures.

  12. Characterizations of the Formation of Polydopamine-Coated Halloysite Nanotubes in Various pH Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junran; Fan, Hailong; Zha, Dao-An; Wang, Le; Jin, Zhaoxia

    2016-10-11

    Recent studies demonstrated that polydopamine (PDA) coating is universal to nearly all substrates, and it endows substrates with biocompatibility, postfunctionality, and other useful properties. Surface chemistry of PDA coating is important for its postmodifications and applications. However, there is less understanding of the formation mechanism and surface functional groups of PDA layers generated in different conditions. Halloysite is a kind of clay mineral with tubular nanostructure. Water-swellable halloysite has unique reactivity. In this study, we have investigated the reaction of dopamine in the presence of water-swellable halloysite. We have tracked the reaction progresses in different pH environments by using UV-vis spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The surface properties of PDA on halloysite were clarified by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), SERS, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) characterizations, zeta potential, surface wettability, and morphological characterizations. We noticed that the interaction between halloysite surface and dopamine strongly influences the surface functionality of coated PDA. In addition, pH condition further modulates surface functional groups, resulting in less content of secondary/aromatic amine in PDA generated in weak acidic environment. This study demonstrates that the formation mechanism of polydopamine becomes complex in the presence of inorganic nanomaterials. Substrate property and reaction condition dominate the functionality of obtained PDA together.

  13. Microstructures and formation mechanism of W–Cu composite coatings on copper substrate prepared by mechanical alloying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, Yunfei; Shen, Yifu; Chen, Cheng; Li, Yongcan; Feng, Xiaomei

    2013-01-01

    In the present work, high-energy mechanical alloying (MA) method was applied to prepare tungsten–copper composite coatings on pure copper surface using a planetary ball mill. During mechanical alloying process, grains on the surface layer of substrate were refined and the substrate surface was activated as a result of repeated collisions by a large number of flying balls along with powder particles. The repeated ball-to-substrate collisions resulted in the deposition of coatings. The microstructures and elemental and phase composition of mechanically alloyed coatings at different milling durations during mechanical alloying process were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Microhardness tests were carried out to examine the mechanical properties of the coatings. The results showed that the coatings and the substrates were well bonded, and with the increase of the milling duration, multi-layered coatings with different structures were generated and the coatings became denser. The microhardness tests showed that the maximum microhardness of the coatings reached HV 0.1 228, showing a threefold improvement upon the substrate. And the cross-sectional microhardness values of the processed sample changed gradually, which gave a proof for the cushioning and sustaining functions of the multi-layered coatings. A reasonable formation mechanism of coatings on bulk materials with metallic immiscible system by mechanical alloying method was presented.

  14. Shiga Toxin Increases Formation of Clathrin-Coated Pits through Syk Kinase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Utskarpen, Audrun; Massol, Ramiro; van Deurs, Bo

    2010-01-01

    Clathrin-dependent endocytosis is a main entry mechanism for the glycolipid-binding Shiga toxin (Stx), although clathrin-independent pathways are also involved. Binding of Stx to its receptor Gb3 not only is essential for Stx retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum and toxicity but also...... activates signaling through the tyrosine kinase Syk. We previously described that Syk activity is important for Stx entry, but it remained unclear how this kinase modulates endocytosis of Stx. Here we characterized the effects of Stx and Syk on clathrin-coated pit formation. We found that acute treatment...

  15. Corrosion resistant cemented carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a corrosion resistant cemented carbide composite. It comprises: a granular tungsten carbide phase, a semi-continuous solid solution carbide phase extending closely adjacent at least a portion of the grains of tungsten carbide for enhancing corrosion resistance, and a substantially continuous metal binder phase. The cemented carbide composite consisting essentially of an effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive, from about 4 to about 16 percent by weight metal binder phase, and with the remaining portion being from about 84 to about 96 percent by weight metal carbide wherein the metal carbide consists essentially of from about 4 to about 30 percent by weight of a transition metal carbide or mixtures thereof selected from Group IVB and of the Periodic Table of Elements and from about 70 to about 96 percent tungsten carbide. The metal binder phase consists essentially of nickel and from about 10 to about 25 percent by weight chromium, the effective amount of an anti-corrosion additive being selected from the group consisting essentially of copper, silver, tine and combinations thereof

  16. Formation of ordered microphase-separated pattern during spin coating of ABC triblock copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weihuan; Luo, Chunxia; Zhang, Jilin; Han, Yanchun

    2007-03-14

    In this paper, the authors have systematically studied the microphase separation and crystallization during spin coating of an ABC triblock copolymer, polystyrene-b-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO). The microphase separation of PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO and the crystallization of PEO blocks can be modulated by the types of the solvent and the substrate, the spinning speed, and the copolymer concentration. Ordered microphase-separated pattern, where PEO and P2VP blocks adsorbed to the substrate and PS blocks protrusions formed hexagonal dots above the P2VP domains, can only be obtained when PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO is dissolved in N,N-dimethylformamide and the films are spin coated onto the polar substrate, silicon wafers or mica. The mechanism of the formation of regular pattern by microphase separation is found to be mainly related to the inducement of the substrate (middle block P2VP wetting the polar substrate), the quick vanishment of the solvent during the early stage of the spin coating, and the slow evaporation of the remaining solvent during the subsequent stage. On the other hand, the probability of the crystallization of PEO blocks during spin coating decreases with the reduced film thickness. When the film thickness reaches a certain value (3.0 nm), the extensive crystallization of PEO is effectively prohibited and ordered microphase-separated pattern over large areas can be routinely prepared. When the film thickness exceeds another definite value (12.0 nm), the crystallization of PEO dominates the surface morphology. For films with thickness between these two values, microphase separation and crystallization can simultaneously occur.

  17. Study of 'liquid gold' coatings: Thermal decomposition and formation of metallic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deram, V.; Turrell, S.; Darque-Ceretti, E.; Aucouturier, M.

    2006-01-01

    Organo-metallic solutions called liquid gold are largely used to obtain thin gilded films which are employed for decorative, technological and functional uses. However, these films often prove to be fragile with respect to use, resulting in loss of brilliance or even eventual film removal. An understanding of the behaviour of the layers requires good knowledge of the materials themselves. The present work was undertaken to better understand the evolution of the structural properties of liquid gold as it undergoes heat-processing. Accordingly, we followed the thermal decomposition processes of liquid gold coatings and the formation of the gilded metal layer using a combination of experimental techniques. First, thermal analyses coupled with mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy gave information concerning the decomposition of the organic medium. It has been found that the process of film formation can be decomposed into three steps, the second of which is an abrupt transition between 300 and 350 deg. C. Details on this transition have been obtained using real-time X-ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Above 350 deg. C, the microstructure of the coating is reorganized to obtain a final layer which contains particles, of the size of a few hundreds nanometers, as shown by Transmission Electron Microscopy

  18. The fluoride coated AZ31B magnesium alloy improves corrosion resistance and stimulates bone formation in rabbit model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Guangdao [Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Tan, Lili; Yang, Ke [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Ai, Hongjun, E-mail: aihongjuna@sina.com [Department of Prosthodontics, School of Stomatology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China)

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of fluorine coated Mg alloy and clarify its mechanism in bone formation. We implanted the fluorine coated AZ31B Mg alloy screw (group F) in rabbit mandibular and femur in vivo. Untreated AZ31B Mg alloy screw (group A) and titanium screw (group T) were used as control. Then, scanning electron microscopy, the spectral energy distribution analysis, hard and decalcified bone tissues staining were performed. Immunohistochemistry was employed to examine the protein expressions of bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) and collagen type I in the vicinity of the implant. Compared with the group A, the degradation of the alloy was reduced, the rates of Mg corrosion and Mg ion release were slowed down, and the depositions of calcium and phosphate increased in the group F in the early stage of implantation. Histological results showed that fluorine coated Mg alloy had well osteogenic activity and biocompatibility. Moreover, fluoride coating obviously up-regulated the expressions of collagen type I and BMP-2. This study confirmed that the fluorine coating might improve the corrosion resistance of AZ31B Mg alloy and promote bone formation by up-regulated the expressions of collagen type I and BMP-2. - Highlights: • Fluoride coating inhibited the degradation of the alloy in the early implantation. • Fluorine coating could slow down the rate of Mg corrosion and Mg ion release. • Fluorine coating could promote the deposition of Ca and P in vivo. • Fluorine coated Mg alloy had well osteogenic activity and biocompatibility. • Fluorine coating up-regulated the expression of BMP-2 and collagen type I protein.

  19. Silver-Containing Hydroxyapatite Coating Reduces Biofilm Formation by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Ueno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Biofilm-producing bacteria are the principal causes of infections associated with orthopaedic implants. We previously reported that silver-containing hydroxyapatite (Ag-HA coatings exhibit high antibacterial activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of Ag-HA coating of implant surfaces on biofilm formation. Titanium disks (14-mm diameter, 1-mm thickness, one surface of which was coated with HA or 0.5%–3.0% Ag-HA with a thermal spraying technique, were used. In vitro, the disks were inoculated with an MRSA suspension containing 4×105 CFU and incubated for 1-2 weeks. In vivo, MRSA-inoculated HA and 3% Ag-HA disks (8.8–10.0 × 108 CFU were implanted subcutaneously on the back of rats for 1–7 days. All disks were subsequently stained with a biofilm dye and observed under a fluorescence microscope, and biofilm coverage rates (BCRs were calculated. The BCRs on the Ag-HA coating were significantly lower than those on the HA coating at all time points in vitro (p<0.05. Similar results were observed in vivo (p<0.001 without argyria. Ag-HA coating reduced biofilm formation by MRSA in vitro and in vivo; therefore, Ag-HA coating might be effective for reducing implant-associated infections.

  20. Point defects and transport properties in carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1984-01-01

    Carbides of transition metals and of actinides are interesting and technologically important. The transition-metal carbides (or carbonitrides) are extensively being used as hard materials and some of them are of great interest because of the high transition temperature for superconductivity, e.g. 17 K for Nb(C,N). Actinide carbides and carbonitrides, (U,Pu)C and (U,Pu)(C,N) are being considered as promising advanced fuels for liquid metal cooled fast breeder nuclear reactors. Basic interest exists in all these materials because of their high melting points (e.g. 4250 K for TaC) and the unusually broad range of homogeneity of nonstoichiometric compositions (e.g. from UCsub(0.9) to UCsub(1.9) at 2500 K). Interaction of point defects to clusters and short-range ordering have recently been studied with elastic neutron diffraction and diffuse scattering techniques, and calculations of energies of formation and interaction of point defects became available for selected carbides. Diffusion measurements also exist for a number of carbides, in particular for the actinide carbides. The existing knowledge is discussed and summarized with emphasis on informative examples of particular technological relevance. (Auth.)

  1. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E.

    2013-10-01

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  2. On the formation of protective sulphide coatings on carbon steel surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, C.; Venkateswaran, G.

    1987-01-01

    A chemical method for protecting carbon steel surfaces by forming pyrrhotite/pyrite coatings has been developed. The protective nature of the coatings has been studied by weight loss kinetics, scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements. A comparison is drawn between the protective nature of pyrite coating with that of magnetite coating. (author)

  3. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbel, Raimund; Eggebrecht, Holger; Roguin, Ariel; Schroeder, Erwin; Philipp, Sebastian; Heitzer, Thomas; Schwacke, Harald; Ayzenberg, Oded; Serra, Antonio; Delarche, Nicolas; Luchner, Andreas; Slagboom, Ton

    2014-01-01

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  4. Prospective, multi-center evaluation of a silicon carbide coated cobalt chromium bare metal stent for percutaneous coronary interventions: Two-year results of the ENERGY Registry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbel, Raimund, E-mail: erbel@uk-essen.de [Department of Cardiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Essen (Germany); Eggebrecht, Holger [Cardioangiological Center Bethanien (CCB), Frankfurt (Germany); Roguin, Ariel [Department of Cardiology, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa (Israel); Schroeder, Erwin [Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Cliniques Universitaires de Mont-Godinne, Yvoir (Belgium); Philipp, Sebastian [Department Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Elbe Klinikum Stade, Stade (Germany); Heitzer, Thomas [Department of Cardiology, Heart Center Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany); Schwacke, Harald [Department of Internal Medicine, Diakonissen-Stiftungs- Krankenhaus Speyer (Germany); Ayzenberg, Oded [The Heart Institute, Kaplan Medical Center, Rehovot (Israel); Serra, Antonio [Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, España (Spain); Delarche, Nicolas [Cardiology unit, Pau General Hospital, Pau (France); Luchner, Andreas [Department of Internal Medicine/Cardiology, Universitätsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Slagboom, Ton [Department of Cardiology, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-11-15

    Background: Novel bare metal stents with improved stent design may become a viable alternative to drug-eluting stents in certain patient groups, particularly, when long-term dual antiplatelet therapy should be avoided. Purpose: The ENERGY registry aimed to assess the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating in a large series of patients under real-world conditions. Methods and materials: This prospective registry recruited 1016 patients with 1074 lesions in 48 centers from April to November 2010. The primary endpoint was the rate of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs), a composite of cardiac death, myocardial infarction and clinically driven target lesion revascularization. Results: More than half of the lesions (61.0%) were type A/B1 lesions, mean lesion length was 14.5 ± 6.5 mm and mean reference vessel diameter 3.2 ± 0.5 mm. MACE rates at 6, 12 and 24 months were 4.9%, 8.1% and 9.4%, target lesion revascularization rates 2.8%, 4.9% and 5.4% and definite stent thrombosis rates 0.5%, 0.6% and 0.6%. Subgroups showed significant differences in baseline and procedural characteristics which did not translate into significantly different clinical outcomes. Specifically, MACE rates at 24 months were 13.5% in diabetics, 8.6% in small stents and 9.6% in acute coronary syndrome patients. Conclusion: The population of ENERGY reflects real-world conditions with bare metal stents being mainly used in simple lesions. In this setting, percutaneous coronary intervention using a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with a passive coating showed very good results up to 24 months. (ClinicalTrials.gov:NCT01056120) Summary for annotated table of contents: The ENERGY international registry evaluated the safety and benefits of a cobalt–chromium thin strut bare metal stent with passive coating in 1016 patients under real-world conditions until 2 years. Results were encouraging with a low composite rate of cardiac death

  5. Introduction of Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Particles in Aluminum Metal Matrix Hardfaced by MIG/TIG Processes on Precoated Flux Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kamburov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate an aluminium metal matrix surface layer hardfaced by shielded gas metal arc welding processes applying either metal inert gas (MIG or tungsten inert gas (TIG, with standard wire filler onto the precoated flux layer - a baked resistant film containing electroless nickel coated micro/nano SiC particles. During baking, the components of the flux (MgCl2, NaCl, KCl and Na3AlF6 form a low melting eutectic, which: protects the hardfaced surface from oxidation, provides electrical conductance and keeps the particles on the surface during welding, as well as facilitates particles wettability and their interfacial bonding with the molten metal into the weld puddle.

  6. A Novel Stent Coated with Antibodies to Endoglin Inhibits Neointimal Formation of Porcine Coronary Arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Cui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoglin/CD105 is an accessory protein of the transforming growth factor-β receptor system that plays a critical role in proliferation of endothelial cells and neovasculature. Here, we aimed to assess the effect of novel stents coated with antibodies to endoglin (ENDs on coronary neointima formation. Thirty ENDs, thirty sirolimus-eluting stents (SESs, and thirty bare metal stents (BMSs were randomly assigned and placed in the coronary arteries in 30 juvenile pigs. Histomorphometric analysis and scanning electron microscopy were performed after stent implantation. Our results showed that after 7 days, there was no difference in the neointimal area and percent area stenosis in ENDs compared with SMSs or BMSs. After 14 days, the neointima area and percent area stenosis in ENDs were markedly decreased than those in BMSs or SESs (P<0.05. Moreover, the percentage of reendothelialization was significantly higher in ENDs than that in SESs or BMSs (P<0.01 at 7 and 14 days. The artery injury and the inflammation scores were similar in all groups at 7 and 14 days. In conclusion, our results demonstrated for the first time to our knowledge that endoglin antibody-coated stents can markedly reduce restenosis by enhancing reendothelialization in the porcine model and potentially offer a new approach to prevent restenosis.

  7. Phase formation and microstructure evolution of arc ion deposited Cr2AlC coating after heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.J.; Qian, Y.H.; Niu, D.; Zhang, M.M.; Liu, Z.M.; Li, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cr 2 AlC coating was prepared by arc ion plating combined with post annealing. ► The coating deposited by arc ion plating without heating was amorphous. ► Amorphous coating transformed to crystalline Cr 2 AlC after annealing at 620 °C in Ar. - Abstract: Due to the excellent oxidation and hot corrosion resistance and matched thermal expansion coefficient to normal alloys, Cr 2 AlC has potential applications as high-temperature protective coating. In the present work, the preparation of Cr 2 AlC coating has been achieved through cathodic arc deposition method combined with heat post-treatment. It was found that the coating, deposited from Cr 2 AlC compound target in the unintentional heating condition, was amorphous. After annealing at 620 °C in Ar for 20 h, the amorphous Cr–Al–C coating happened to crystallize and transformed to crystalline Cr 2 AlC as the major phase. It is obvious that the formation temperature of Cr 2 AlC was decreased from about 1050 °C for sintered bulk to around 620 °C for the as-deposited coating, resulting from the homogeneous mixture of the Cr, Al and C at atomic level in the Cr–Al–C coating. Apart from crystalline Cr 2 AlC, the annealed coating also contained AlCr 2 and little Cr 7 C 3 . AlCr 2 formed due to the loss of C during deposition, and little Cr 7 C 3 always existed in the sintered Cr 2 AlC compound target as impurity phase.

  8. Aluminum Oxide Formation On Fecral Catalyst Support By Electro-Chemical Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang H.S.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available FeCrAl is comprised essentially of Fe, Cr, Al and generally considered as metallic substrates for catalyst support because of its advantage in the high-temperature corrosion resistance, high mechanical strength, and ductility. Oxidation film and its adhesion on FeCrAl surface with aluminum are important for catalyst life. Therefore various appropriate surface treatments such as thermal oxidation, Sol, PVD, CVD has studied. In this research, PEO (plasma electrolytic oxidation process was applied to form the aluminum oxide on FeCrAl surface, and the formed oxide particle according to process conditions such as electric energy and oxidation time were investigated. Microstructure and aluminum oxide particle on FeCrAl surface after PEO process was observed by FE-SEM and EDS with element mapping analysis. The study presents possibility of aluminum oxide formation by electro-chemical coating process without any pretreatment of FeCrAl.

  9. Investigation of the Phase Formation of AlSi-Coatings for Hot Stamping of Boron Alloyed Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veit, R.; Kolleck, R.; Hofmann, H.; Sikora, S.

    2011-01-01

    Hot stamping of boron alloyed steel is gaining more and more importance for the production of high strength automotive body parts. Within hot stamping of quenchenable steels the blank is heated up to austenitization temperature, transferred to the tool, formed rapidly and quenched in the cooled tool. To avoid scale formation during the heating process of the blank, the sheet metal can be coated with an aluminium-silicum alloy. The meltimg temperature of this coating is below the austenitization temperature of the base material. This means, that a diffusion process between base material and coating has to take place during heating, leading to a higher melting temperature of the coating.In conventional heating devices, like roller hearth furnaces, the diffusion process is reached by relatively low heating rates. New technologies, like induction heating, reach very high heating rates and offer great potentials for the application in hot stamping. Till now it is not proofed, that this technology can be used with aluminum-silicon coated materials. This paper will present the results of comparative heating tests with a conventional furnace and an induction heating device. For different time/temperature-conditions the phase formation within the coating will be described.

  10. In situ monitoring of structure formation in the active layer of polymer solar cells during roll-to-roll coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea H. Rossander

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The active layer crystallization during roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells is studied in situ. We developed an X-ray setup where the coater unit is an integrated part of the small angle X-ray scattering instrument, making it possible to control the coating process while recording scattering measurements in situ, enabling us to follow the crystal formation during drying. By varying the distance between the coating head and the point where the X-ray beam hits the film, we obtained measurements of 4 different stages of drying. For each of those stages, the scattering from as long a foil as possible is summed together, with the distance from coating head to scattering point kept constant. The results are average crystallographic properties for the active layer coated on a 30 m long foil. With this insight into the dynamics of crystallization in a roll-coated polymer film, we find that the formation of textured and untextured crystallites seems uncorrelated, and happens at widely different rates. Untextured P3HT crystallites form later in the drying process than expected which may explain previous studies speculating that untextured crystallization depends on concentration. Textured crystallites, however, begin forming much earlier and steadily increases as the film dries, showing a development similar to other in situ studies of these materials.

  11. MICROSTRUCTURE FEATURES OF CHROME-NICKEL COATING WELDED WITH FILLER WIRE PL AN-111 WITH A 50% OVERLAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Belik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The paper involves investigation of microstructure features of the coating welded with filler wire PL AN-111 with a 50% beads overlap. Methodology. Wear-resistant layer was formed by means of electric arc deposit welding using filler wire PL AN-111 on the plate from steel 09G2S. Deposit welding was conducted under the following parameters: welding current is of 650-750 A; arc voltage is of 30-34 V; welding speed is of 32 m/h. Microstructure was researched with application of optical microscopies “Neophot-21”, “Nikon Eclipse M200” and electron scanning microscopy JEOL JSM-6510 LV. Microhardness of structural constituentswas measuredwithtesterFM-300 (Future-Tech under loading of 10-50 g. Findings. It is shown that the overlap of the beads leads to the formation of inhomogeneous microstructure in the cross section that varies by zones from free-carbide austenite to hypereutectic microstructure with primary chromium carbides. The analysis of the microhardness of the structural constituents in various coating areas was carried out. It was found that hardness of austenite, carbide eutectic and carbides M7C3 varies in coatings in the range of 3 100-3 850 МPа, 4 100-6 800 МPа and 12 100-15 100 МPа, accordingly. Originality. Authors determined that Cr-Ni coating comprises substantially austenitic-carbide eutectic with different density and thickness of carbide fibers within eutectic colonies. Along the border “base/coating” a single-phase austenitic layer lies which turns into a layer with a hypoeutectic structure. In the heat affected zone from beads fusion austenite disintegration with the granular carbides formation was recorded. This leads to decreasing of matrix corrosion resistance due to chromium depletion. Above the zone of beads fusion, the coating has a hypereutectic structure with the presence of large primary chromium carbides. Practical value. It is shown that deposit welding with filler wire PL AN-111 with a 50

  12. Formation of Ca/P ceramic coatings by Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) on Ti6Al4V ELI alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Jaimes, Y.; Naranjo, D. I.; Blanco, S.; García-Vergara, S. J.

    2017-12-01

    The formation of PEO ceramic coatings on Ti6Al4V ELI alloy was investigated using a phosphate/calcium containing electrolyte at 300 and 400V at 310K for different times. The Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO) coated specimens were then heat treated at 873 and 1073K for 2 hours. Scanning electron microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction analysis were used to study the composition and the morphology of the ceramic coatings. The corrosion behaviour of the coatings was studied by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). The PEO-treated specimens primarily revealed a porous structure with thickness between 4 and 12μm, according to the voltage and process time used. The coatings are mainly composed of hydroxyapatite; however, as the voltage and anodizing time increase, the Ca/P ratio decreases. Generally, the corrosion resistance of the alloy was improved by the PEO-treated coatings, although the specimens treated at 1073K showed the presence of cracks that reduced the protective effect of the coatings.

  13. Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas Species Onto Graphene Oxide-TiO2 Nanocomposite-Coated Catheters: In vitro Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Ananya; Vimala, R.

    The present study focuses on the development of an in vitro model system for biofilm growth by Pseudomonas aerouginosa onto small discs of foley catheter. Catheter disc used for the study was coated with graphene oxide-titanium oxide composite (GO-TiO2) and titanium oxide (TiO2) and characterized through XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy. Morphological analysis was done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biofilm formed on the catheter surface was quantified by crystal violet (CV) staining method and a colorimetric assay (MTT assay) which involves the reduction of tetrazolium salt. The catheter coated with GO-TiO2 showed reduced biofilm growth in comparison to the TiO2-coated and uncoated catheter, thus indicating that it could be successfully used in coating biomedical devices to prevent biofilm formation which is a major cause of nosocomial infection.

  14. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-01-01

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: ► Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. ► Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. ► Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. ► Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  15. Crack formation mechanisms during micro and macro indentation of diamond-like carbon coatings on elastic-plastic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, N.B.; Fischer-Cripps, A.C.; Swain, M.V.

    1998-01-01

    of cracking and the fracture mechanisms taking place. In the study various diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings deposited onto stainless steel and tool steel were investigated. Results primarily for one DLC system will be presented here. (C) 1998 Published by Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.......In the present study crack formation is investigated on both micro and macro scale using spherical indenter tips. in particular, systems consisting of elastic coatings that are well adhered to elastic-plastic substrates are studied. Depth sensing indentation is used on the micro scale and Rockwell...... indentation on the macro scale. The predominant driving force for coating failure and crack formation during indentation is plastic deformation of the underlying substrate. The aim is to relate the mechanisms creating both delamination and cohesive cracking on both scales with fracture mechanical models...

  16. Regularities of Filamentary Channels Formation During Formation of Nanostructured Non-Metallic Inorganic Coatings in Microplasma Galvanostatic Mode in Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamaev, A. I.; Mamaeva, V. A.; Kolenchin, N. F.; Chubenko, A. K.; Kovalskaya, Ya. B.; Konstantinova, T. A.; Dolgova, Yu. N.; Beletskaya, E. Yu.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the theoretical models describing the growth of filamentary channels of nanostructured non-metallic coatings formed by anodizing and microplasma oxidation. The authors identified dependences of the number of pores on the coating thickness. The paper presents graphic dependences of the number of filamentary channels on the process time and the coating thickness. These dependences allow calculating through and surface porosity, and in cases, when the pores are filled with functional material, they allow calculating the concentration distribution of this functional material throughout the coating thickness. The theoretical models enhance our understanding of the nature of anode processes and can be used to describe and forecast the growth and filling of porous coatings, so they can also be used to create functional and bioactive materials.

  17. Reaction of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, A.V.; Melekhin, V.F.; Pegov, V.S.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation results of interaction in the B 4 C-MoSi 2 system during sintering in vacuum are presented. Sintering of boron carbide with molybdenum disilicide is shown to lead to the formation of MoB 2 , SiC, Mo 5 Si 3 compounds, the presence of carbon-containing covering plays an important role in sintering

  18. Formation and properties of composite nanostructured PEO-coatings on metals and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashtalyar Dmitry V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of investigation of the incorporation of zirconia and titanium nitride nanoparticles into the coatings formed on magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation are presented. Comprehensive research of electrochemical and mechanical properties of obtained coatings was carried out. It was established that the polarization resistance of the samples with a coating containing zirconia nanoparticles is in two fold higher than for the sample with base PEO-coating. One of the important reasons for improving the protective properties of coatings formed in electrolytes containing nanoparticles consists in enhanced morphological characteristics, in particular, the porosity decrease and increase of thickness and resistivity of porousless sublayer in comparison with base PEO-layer. Incorporation of zirconia and titanium nitride particles into the coating increases the mechanical performances. The coating containing nanoparticles have greater hardness and are more wear resistant in comparison with the coatings formed in the electrolyte without nanoparticle.

  19. The formation of FHA coating on biodegradable Mg-Zn-Zr alloy using a two-step chemical treatment method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S.T.; Zhang, J.; Shun, S.Z.; Chen, M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Use a two-step chemical treatment method for formation of FHA coating on biodegradable Mg-Zn-Zr alloy;. • We reported the formation mechanism of FHA coating on Mg-Zn-Zr alloy and achieved optimum properties;. • The MgF_2 coating and FHA coating provide effective protection for the Mg alloy substrate and the FHA coating showed better corrosion resistance. - Abstract: To improve the corrosion resistance of the biomedical magnesium alloy, a two-step chemical treatment method has been employed to prepare an FHA coating on the alloy surface. Prior to forming an FHA layer, the samples of Mg-3 wt% Zn-0.5 wt% Zr alloy were soaked in HF with concentration of 20% (v/v) at 37 °C temperature for 2 h, and were then placed into an aqueous solution with 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO_3).4H_2O and 0.06 mol/L NH_4H_2PO_4 at 90 °C to prepare the Ca-P coating. The concentrations of Mg"2"+, F"− ions, and pH variation with immersing time in the solution were investigated to explore the growth mechanism of FHA. The surface morphologies and compositions of the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the alloy surface treated with acid formed a layer of MgF_2 nanoparticles with a thickness of 0.7 μm. The corrosion resistance of coatings in SBF solution was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the substrate with FHA coating had good corrosion resistance. After immersing into the calcium phosphate solution, some small spherical particles were first formed on the surface; these then cover the surface completely after 20 min. Some clusters consisting of needle-like crystal were observed in the spherical particles covering the surface, and the Ca/P ratio of the needle-like crystal was 1.46, clearly growing along the c axis preferred orientation growth. After immersion for 60 min, the FHA coating with

  20. The formation of FHA coating on biodegradable Mg-Zn-Zr alloy using a two-step chemical treatment method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, S.T.; Zhang, J.; Shun, S.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin (China); Chen, M.F., E-mail: mfchentj@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin University of Technology, Tianjin (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Display Materials and Photoelectric Device, Tianjin University of Technology , Tianjin (China)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Use a two-step chemical treatment method for formation of FHA coating on biodegradable Mg-Zn-Zr alloy;. • We reported the formation mechanism of FHA coating on Mg-Zn-Zr alloy and achieved optimum properties;. • The MgF{sub 2} coating and FHA coating provide effective protection for the Mg alloy substrate and the FHA coating showed better corrosion resistance. - Abstract: To improve the corrosion resistance of the biomedical magnesium alloy, a two-step chemical treatment method has been employed to prepare an FHA coating on the alloy surface. Prior to forming an FHA layer, the samples of Mg-3 wt% Zn-0.5 wt% Zr alloy were soaked in HF with concentration of 20% (v/v) at 37 °C temperature for 2 h, and were then placed into an aqueous solution with 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO{sub 3}).4H{sub 2}O and 0.06 mol/L NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4} at 90 °C to prepare the Ca-P coating. The concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}, F{sup −} ions, and pH variation with immersing time in the solution were investigated to explore the growth mechanism of FHA. The surface morphologies and compositions of the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the alloy surface treated with acid formed a layer of MgF{sub 2} nanoparticles with a thickness of 0.7 μm. The corrosion resistance of coatings in SBF solution was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the substrate with FHA coating had good corrosion resistance. After immersing into the calcium phosphate solution, some small spherical particles were first formed on the surface; these then cover the surface completely after 20 min. Some clusters consisting of needle-like crystal were observed in the spherical particles covering the surface, and the Ca/P ratio of the needle-like crystal was 1.46, clearly growing along the c axis preferred orientation growth. After

  1. Nanosized Hydroxyapatite Coating on PEEK Implants Enhances Early Bone Formation: A Histological and Three-Dimensional Investigation in Rabbit Bone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pär Johansson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyether ether ketone (PEEK has been frequently used in spinal surgery with good clinical results. The material has a low elastic modulus and is radiolucent. However, in oral implantology PEEK has displayed inferior ability to osseointegrate compared to titanium materials. One idea to reinforce PEEK would be to coat it with hydroxyapatite (HA, a ceramic material of good biocompatibility. In the present study we analyzed HA-coated PEEK tibial implants via histology and radiography when following up at 3 and 12 weeks. Of the 48 implants, 24 were HA-coated PEEK screws (test and another 24 implants served as uncoated PEEK controls. HA-coated PEEK implants were always osseointegrated. The total bone area (BA was higher for test compared to control implants at 3 (p < 0.05 and 12 weeks (p < 0.05. Mean bone implant contact (BIC percentage was significantly higher (p = 0.024 for the test compared to control implants at 3 weeks and higher without statistical significance at 12 weeks. The effect of HA-coating was concluded to be significant with respect to early bone formation, and HA-coated PEEK implants may represent a good material to serve as bone anchored clinical devices.

  2. Surface metallurgy of cemented carbide tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, K.L.; Kashyap, S.C.; Rao, T.V.; Rajagopalan, S.; Srivastava, P.K.

    1983-01-01

    Transition metal carbides, owing to their high melting point, hardness and wear resistance, are potential candidates for specific application in rockets, nuclear engineering equipment and cutting tools. Tungsten carbide sintered with a binder (either cobalt metal or a mixture of Co + TiC and/or TaC(NbC)) is used for cutting tools. The surface metallurgy of several commercially available cemented carbide tools was studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. The tool surfaces were contaminated by adsorbed oxygen up to a depth of nearly 0.3 μm causing deterioration of the mechanical properties of the tools. Studies of fractured samples indicated that the tool surfaces were prone to oxygen adsorption. The fracture path passes through the cobalt-rich regions. The ineffectiveness of a worn cutting tool is attributed to the presence of excessive iron from the steel workpiece and carbon and oxygen in the surface layers of the tool. The use of appropriate hard coatings on cemented carbide tools is suggested. (Auth.)

  3. Formation of hydrotalcite coating on the aluminum alloy 6060 in spray system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Lingli; Friis, Henrik; Roefzaad, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Coatings with the composition of Li-Al-NO3 hydrotalcite were formed on the Al alloy 6060 using a spray system. The coatings consist of crystals with a typical hydrotalcite structure. Dense, uniform and blade-like flakes cover completely the surface of the Al substrate. The coatings display a multi......-layer structure with average thickness of ∼1000 nm. The hydrotalcite-coated samples performed better than those without coatings in salt-spray and filiform-corrosion tests, and further treatment involving sealing with a Mg acetate solution and dipping in a H2O2 + Ce-based solution improved the corrosion...

  4. The Affordable Pre-Finishing of Silicon Carbide for Optical Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Creare proposes to develop a novel, laser-assisted, pre-finishing process for chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coated silicon-carbide ceramics. Our innovation will...

  5. Structure and properties of Hardox 450 steel with arc welded coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Yu. F.; Konovalov, S. V.; Kormyshev, V. E.; Gromov, V. E.; Teresov, A. D.; Semina, O. A.

    2017-12-01

    The paper reports on a study of the surface structure, phase composition, and microhardness of Hardox 450 steel with coatings deposited by arc welding of powder wires differing in chemical composition. The study shows that to a depth of 6-8 mm, the microhardness of the thus formed coatings is more than two times the microhardness of the base metal and that their higher mechanical properties are provided by martensite structure containing Nb2C and NbC carbides and Fe2B borides as eutectic lamellae with a transverse size of 30-70 nm; their volume reveals a net-like dislocation substructure with a scalar dislocation density of 1011 cm-2. The highest surface hardness is found for the steel coated with boron-containing wire material. Some ideas are suggested on possible mechanisms and temperature for the formation of Nb and B carbides during the process.

  6. Tribology of carbide derived carbon films synthesized on tungsten carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tlustochowicz, Marcin

    Tribologically advantageous films of carbide derived carbon (CDC) have been successfully synthesized on binderless tungsten carbide manufactured using the plasma pressure compaction (P2CRTM) technology. In order to produce the CDC films, tungsten carbide samples were reacted with chlorine containing gas mixtures at temperatures ranging from 800°C to 1000°C in a sealed tube furnace. Some of the treated samples were later dechlorinated by an 800°C hydrogenation treatment. Detailed mechanical and structural characterizations of the CDC films and sliding contact surfaces were done using a series of analytical techniques and their results were correlated with the friction and wear behavior of the CDC films in various tribosystems, including CDC-steel, CDC-WC, CDC-Si3N4 and CDC-CDC. Optimum synthesis and treatment conditions were determined for use in two specific environments: moderately humid air and dry nitrogen. It was found that CDC films first synthesized at 1000°C and then hydrogen post-treated at 800°C performed best in air with friction coefficient values as low as 0.11. However, for dry nitrogen applications, no dechlorination was necessary and both hydrogenated and as-synthesized CDC films exhibited friction coefficients of approximately 0.03. A model of tribological behavior of CDC has been proposed that takes into consideration the tribo-oxidation of counterface material, the capillary forces from adsorbed water vapor, the carbon-based tribofilm formation, and the lubrication effect of both chlorine and hydrogen.

  7. Inhibition of Cariogenic Plaque Formation on Root Surface with Polydopamine-Induced-Polyethylene Glycol Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Lei Mei

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Root caries prevention has been a challenge for clinicians due to its special anatomical location, which favors the accumulation of dental plaque. Researchers are looking for anti-biofouling material to inhibit bacterial growth on exposed root surfaces. This study aimed to develop polydopamine-induced-polyethylene glycol (PEG and to study its anti-biofouling effect against a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on the root dentine surface. Hydroxyapatite disks and human dentine blocks were divided into four groups for experiments. They received polydopamine-induced-PEG, PEG, polydopamine, or water application. Contact angle, quartz crystal microbalance, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to study the wetting property, surface affinity, and an infrared spectrum; the results indicated that PEG was induced by polydopamine onto a hydroxyapatite disk. Salivary mucin absorption on hydroxyapatite disks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was confirmed using spectrophotometry. The growth of a multi-species cariogenic biofilm on dentine blocks with polydopamine-induced-PEG was assessed and monitored by colony-forming units, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The results showed that dentine with polydopamine-induced-PEG had fewer bacteria than other groups. In conclusion, a novel polydopamine-induced-PEG coating was developed. Its anti-biofouling effect inhibited salivary mucin absorption and cariogenic biofilm formation on dentine surface and thus may be used for the prevention of root dentine caries.

  8. Formation of protective composite coatings with the use of solution of TFE telomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashtalyar, D. V.; Gnedenkov, S. V.; Sinebryukhov, S. L.; Nadaraia, K. V.; Kiryukhin, D. P.; Kushch, P. P.; Kichigina, G. A.; Buznik, V. M.

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the method of fabricate and the results of investigation of electrochemical properties and wettability of the composite coatings obtained on the magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) and the use of the solution of tetrafluoroethylene (TFE) telomers. The fluoropolymer-containing coatings decrease corrosion current density, increase contact angle in comparison with the base PEO-coating and the bare alloy.

  9. Radiation stability of proton irradiated zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Dickerson, Clayton A.; Allen, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    The use of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for the deep burn (DB)-TRISO fuel as a replacement for the silicon carbide coating. The radiation stability of ZrC was studied using 2.6 MeV protons, across the irradiation temperature range from 600 to 900degC and to doses up to 1.75 dpa. The microstructural characterization shows that the irradiated microstructure is comprised of a high density of nanometer-sized dislocation loops, while no irradiation induced amorphization or voids are observed. The lattice expansion induced by point defects is found to increase as the dose increases for the samples irradiated at 600 and 800degC, while for the 900degC irradiation, a slight lattice contraction is observed. The radiation hardening is also quantified using a micro indentation technique for the temperature and doses studies. (author)

  10. Formation and oxidation resistance of NbSi2 coatings on niobium by pack cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ming; Song Lixin; Le Jun; Zhang Xiaowei; Pei Baogen; Hu Xingfang

    2005-01-01

    NbSi 2 coatings were formed on niobium by halide-activated pack cementation process. The as-coated niobium samples were oxidized in air up to 1723 K by thermogravimetry method. The surface and cross-sectional morphology, phase composition and element distribution of the NbSi 2 coatings before and after oxidation were characterized by SEM, XRD and EPMA. The results show that the as-formed coatings consist of single phase of hexagonal NbSi 2 and the oxidation resistance of pure niobium can be greatly improved by pack siliconizing. (orig.)

  11. Shock Response of Boron Carbide

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dandekar, D. P. (Dattatraya Purushottam)

    2001-01-01

    .... The present work was undertaken to determine tensile/spall strength of boron carbide under plane shock wave loading and to analyze all available shock compression data on boron carbide materials...

  12. Nanomechanical and in situ TEM characterization of boron carbide thin films on helium implanted substrates: Delamination, real-time cracking and substrate buckling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Framil Carpeño, David, E-mail: david.framil-carpeno@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Ohmura, Takahito; Zhang, Ling [Strength Design Group, Structural Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Leveneur, Jérôme [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Gracefield, Lower Hutt 5010 (New Zealand); Dickinson, Michelle [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand); Seal, Christopher [International Centre for Advanced Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Kennedy, John [National Isotope Centre, GNS Science, 30 Gracefield Road, Gracefield, Lower Hutt 5010 (New Zealand); Hyland, Margaret [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, 20 Symonds Street, Auckland 1010 (New Zealand)

    2015-07-15

    Boron carbide coatings deposited on helium-implanted and unimplanted Inconel 600 were characterized using a combination of nanoindentation and transmission electron microscopy. Real-time coating, cracking and formation of slip bands were recorded using in situ TEM-nanoindentation, allowing site specific events to be correlated with specific features in their load–displacement curves. Cross-sections through the residual indent impression showed a correlation between pop-outs in the load–displacement curves and coating delamination, which was confirmed with cyclic indentation experiments. Inconel exhibits (-11-1) and (1-1-1) twin variants in its deformed region beneath the indenter, organized in bands with a ladder-like arrangement. The nanomechanical properties of the metal–ceramic coating combinations exhibit a marked substrate effect as a consequence of helium implantation.

  13. Nanomechanical and in situ TEM characterization of boron carbide thin films on helium implanted substrates: Delamination, real-time cracking and substrate buckling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Framil Carpeño, David; Ohmura, Takahito; Zhang, Ling; Leveneur, Jérôme; Dickinson, Michelle; Seal, Christopher; Kennedy, John; Hyland, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Boron carbide coatings deposited on helium-implanted and unimplanted Inconel 600 were characterized using a combination of nanoindentation and transmission electron microscopy. Real-time coating, cracking and formation of slip bands were recorded using in situ TEM-nanoindentation, allowing site specific events to be correlated with specific features in their load–displacement curves. Cross-sections through the residual indent impression showed a correlation between pop-outs in the load–displacement curves and coating delamination, which was confirmed with cyclic indentation experiments. Inconel exhibits (-11-1) and (1-1-1) twin variants in its deformed region beneath the indenter, organized in bands with a ladder-like arrangement. The nanomechanical properties of the metal–ceramic coating combinations exhibit a marked substrate effect as a consequence of helium implantation

  14. Flank wear study of coating carbides and cermet inserts during the dry high speed turning of AISI 1045 steel; Estudio del desgaste del flanco de carburos recubiertos y cermet durante el torneado de alta velocidad en seco del acero AISI 1045

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Gonzalez, L. W.; Perez-Rodriguez, R.; Zambrano-Robledo, P.; Guerrero-Mata, M.; Dumitrescu, L.

    2011-07-01

    This work deals with the experimental study of the flank wear evolution of two coating carbide inserts and a cermet insert during the dry finishing turning of AISI 1045 steel with 400, 500 and 600 m/min cutting speeds. The results were analyzed using the variance analysis and lineal regression analysis in order to describe the relationship between the flank wear and machining time, obtaining the adjusted model equation. The investigation demonstrated a significant effect of cutting speed and machining time on the flank wear at high speed machining. The three coating layers insert showed the best performance while the two layers insert had the worst behaviour of the cutting tool wear at high cutting speeds. (Author) 19 refs.

  15. Investigation of Thermostressed State of Coating Formation at Electric Contact Surfacing of “Shaft” Type Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena V. Berezshnaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The forming of coating at electric contact surfacing is considered. The mathematical model of the coating formation is developed. The method of numerical recurrent solution of the finite-difference form of static equilibrium conditions of the selected elementary volume of coating is used. This model considers distribution of thermal properties and geometric parameters along the thermal deformation zone during the process of electric contact surfacing by compact material. It is found that the change of value of speed asymmetry factor leads to increasing of the friction coefficient in zone of surfacing. This provides the forming of the coating of higher quality. The limitation of the technological capabilities of equipment for electric contact surfacing is related to the size of recoverable parts and application of high electromechanical powers. The regulation of the speed asymmetry factor allows for expanding the technological capabilities of equipment for electric contact surfacing. The nomograms for determination of the stress on the roller electrode and the finite thickness of the coating as the function of the initial thickness of the compact material and the deformation degree are shown.

  16. Bacterial biofilm formation versus mammalian cell growth on titanium-based mono- and bi-functional coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Subbiahdoss

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Biomaterials-associated-infections (BAI are serious complications in modern medicine. Although non-adhesive coatings, like polymer-brush coatings, have been shown to prevent bacterial adhesion, they do not support cell growth. Bi-functional coatings are supposed to prevent biofilm formation while supporting tissue integration. Here, bacterial and cellular responses to poly(ethylene glycol (PEG brush-coatings on titanium oxide presenting the integrin-active peptide RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (bioactive “PEG-RGD” were compared to mono-functional PEG brush-coatings (biopassive “PEG” and bare titanium oxide (TiO2 surfaces under flow. Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 35983 was deposited on the surfaces under a shear rate of 11 s-1 for 2 h followed by seeding of U2OS osteoblasts. Subsequently, both S. epidermidis and U2OS cells were grown simultaneously on the surfaces for 48 h under low shear (0.14 s-1. After 2 h, staphylococcal adhesion was reduced to 3.6±1.8 × 103 and 6.0±3.9 × 103 cm-2 on PEG and PEG-RGD coatings respectively, compared to 1.3±0.4 × 105 cm-2 for the TiO2 surface. When allowed to grow for 48 h, biofilms formed on all surfaces. However, biofilms detached from the PEG and PEG-RGD coatings when exposed to an elevated shear (5.6 s-1 U2OS cells neither adhered nor spread on PEG brush-coatings, regardless of the presence of biofilm. In contrast, in the presence of biofilm, U2OS cells adhered and spread on PEG-RGD coatings with a significantly higher surface coverage than on bare TiO2. The detachment of biofilm and the high cell surface coverage revealed the potential significance of PEG-RGD coatings in the context of the “race for the surface” between bacteria and mammalian cells.

  17. Mechanism of yttrium atom formation in electrothermal atomization from metallic and metal-carbide surfaces of a heated graphite atomizer in atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahab, H.S.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    1981-01-01

    Mechanism of Y atom formation from pyrocoated graphite, tantalum and tungsten metal surfaces of a graphite tube atomizer has been studied and a mechanism for the formation for Y atoms is proposed for the first time. (author)

  18. Functionalization and cellular uptake of boron carbide nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, M. W.; Björkdahl, O.; Sørensen, P. G.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present surface modification strategies of boron carbide nanoparticles, which allow for bioconjugation of the transacting transcriptional activator (TAT) peptide and fluorescent dyes. Coated nanoparticles can be translocated into murine EL4 thymoma cells and B16 F10 malignant...

  19. Formation of Silver Nanoplates Layer on Amino Group Grafted Silica Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jurgis PILIPAVICIUS

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study the self-arrangement of Ag nanoplates on (3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES silanized silica coatings was investigated. Silica coatings were made by sol-gel method and silanized in two different ways. The first one includes silanization in acidic 2-propanol solution, the other one – in dry toluene. Coatings were silanized by using different amounts of APTES in case of silanization in 2-propanol. Silver nanoplates layer of functionalized silica coatings was obtained via self-assembly. Coatings were investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM, water contact angle measurements (CA, FT-IR analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Research showed that dense Ag nanoplates arrangement occurs when there is a high amount of amino groups on the surface.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.2.8405

  20. Characterization and formation of hydroxyapatite on Ti6Al4V coated by plasma electrolytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durdu, Salih; Deniz, Ömer Faruk; Kutbay, Işıl; Usta, Metin

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ti6Al4V alloys were coated by PEO in calcium acetate and β-calcium glycerophosphate. ► Hydroxyapatite and calcium apatite based phases were directly formed on Ti6Al4V. ► Hydroxyapatite coatings were characterized systematically for different times. ► After 5 min, hydroxyapatite and calcium based phases begin to form on the coating. ► HAp on the coating is amorphous due to the rapid solidification during PEO. - Abstract: In this study, Ti6Al4V alloy was coated in the solution consisting of calcium acetate (CA) and β-calcium glycerophosphate (β-Ca-GP) by plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) to produce hydroxyapatite and calcium apatite-based composite used as of bioactive and biocompatible materials in biomedical applications. The phase structures, surface morphologies, functional groups of molecules, chemical compositions of the surfaces and the binding energies of atoms in the coating were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), respectively. Anatase, rutile, calcium oxide, titanium phosphide, whitlockite, tri-calcium phosphate (TCP), perovskite calcium titanate and hydroxyapatite phases on the coating were detected by XRD analysis. The surface of coatings produced by PEO method has a porous structure. The amount of amorphous hydroxyapatite is the highest value for the coating produced at 5 min in XPS and ATR-FTIR results, whereas the amount of crystalline hydroxyapatite has the highest value for coating produced at 120 min in XRD results.

  1. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makovec, Darko [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Gyergyek, Sašo, E-mail: saso.gyergyek@ijs.si [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Primc, Darinka [Department for Materials Synthesis, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova ulica 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Plantan, Ivan [Lek Pharmaceuticals d.d., Mengeš (Slovenia)

    2015-03-01

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+}/Fe{sup 2+} ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe{sup 3+} ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles.

  2. The formation of magnetic carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles using precipitation from an aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makovec, Darko; Gyergyek, Sašo; Primc, Darinka; Plantan, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    The formation of spinel iron-oxide nanoparticles during the co-precipitation of Fe 3+ /Fe 2+ ions from an aqueous solution in the presence of carboxymethyldextrane (CMD) was studied. To follow the formation of the nanoparticles, a mixture of the Fe ions, CMD and ammonia was heated to different temperatures, while the samples were taken, quenched in liquid nitrogen, freeze-dried and characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometry (XRD) and magnetometry. The CMD plays a role in the reactions of the Fe ions' precipitation by partially immobilizing the Fe 3+ ions into a complex. At room temperature, the amorphous material is precipitated. Then, above approximately 30 °C, the spinel nanoparticles form inside the amorphous matrix, and at approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles. The CMD bonded to the nanoparticles' surfaces hinders the mass transport and thus prevents their growth. - Highlights: • The carboxymethyl-dextrane coated iron-oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • The carboxymethyl-dextrane significantly modifies formation of the spinel nanoparticles. • The spinel nanoparticles are formed inside the amorphous matrix. • At approximately 40 °C the matrix decomposes into the suspension of carboxymethyl-dextrane-coated iron-oxide nanoparticles

  3. Long-term release of antibiotics by carbon nanotube-coated titanium alloy surfaces diminish biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschfeld, Josefine; Akinoglu, Eser M; Wirtz, Dieter C; Hoerauf, Achim; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Jepsen, Søren; Haddouti, El-Mustapha; Limmer, Andreas; Giersig, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms cause a considerable amount of prosthetic joint infections every year, resulting in morbidity and expensive revision surgery. To address this problem, surface modifications of implant materials such as carbon nanotube (CNT) coatings have been investigated in the past years. CNTs are biologically compatible and can be utilized as drug delivery systems. In this study, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) coated TiAl6V4 titanium alloy discs were fabricated and impregnated with Rifampicin, and tested for their ability to prevent biofilm formation over a period of ten days. Agar plate-based assays were employed to assess the antimicrobial activity of these surfaces against Staphylococcus epidermidis. It was shown that vertically aligned MWCNTs were more stable against attrition on rough surfaces than on polished TiAl6V4 surfaces. Discs with coated surfaces caused a significant inhibition of biofilm formation for up to five days. Therefore, MWCNT-modified surfaces may be effective against pathogenic biofilm formation on endoprostheses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tin, Chin-Che, E-mail: cctin@physics.auburn.ed [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Mendis, Suwan [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Alabama 36849 (United States); Chew, Kerlit [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin [Physical Technical Institute, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700084 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Atabaev, Bakhtiyar [Institute of Electronics, Uzbek Academy of Sciences, 700125 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Adedeji, Victor [Department of Chemistry, Geology and Physics, Elizabeth City State University, North Carolina 27909 (United States); Rusli [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University (Singapore)

    2010-10-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  5. Oxide film assisted dopant diffusion in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin, Chin-Che; Mendis, Suwan; Chew, Kerlit; Atabaev, Ilkham; Saliev, Tojiddin; Bakhranov, Erkin; Atabaev, Bakhtiyar; Adedeji, Victor; Rusli

    2010-01-01

    A process is described to enhance the diffusion rate of impurities in silicon carbide so that doping by thermal diffusion can be done at lower temperatures. This process involves depositing a thin film consisting of an oxide of the impurity followed by annealing in an oxidizing ambient. The process uses the lower formation energy of silicon dioxide relative to that of the impurity-oxide to create vacancies in silicon carbide and to promote dissociation of the impurity-oxide. The impurity atoms then diffuse from the thin film into the near-surface region of silicon carbide.

  6. Inter-diffusion of carbon into niobium coatings deposited on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilai, S.; Raveh, A.; Frage, N.

    2006-01-01

    The inter-diffusion of carbon (originating from a graphite substrate) into a niobium coating and the fabrication of its carbides by heat treatment in the temperature range of 1073-1773 K was studied. The thickness of the Nb 2 C and Nbc phases formed after heat treatment as well as the inter-diffusion coefficients for the formation of the carbide layers were also studied. It was found that the carbide layer growth displayed parabolic behavior patterns inherent in the growth rate constants (K) of Nb 2 C and NbC layers. By assuming that the inter-diffusion coefficients are independent of concentration, it was possible to determine the inter-diffusion coefficients of carbon D c into Nb 2 C and NbC layers as a function of temperature

  7. Electrochemical Formation of Multilayer SnO2-Sb x O y Coating in Complex Electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maizelis, Antonina; Bairachniy, Boris

    2017-12-01

    The multilayer antimony-doped tin dioxide coating was obtained by cathodic deposition of multilayer metal-hydroxide coating with near 100-nm thickness layers on the alloy underlayer accompanied by the anodic oxidation of this coating. The potential regions of deposition of tin, antimony, tin-antimony alloy, and mixture of this metals and their hydroxides in the pyrophosphate-tartrate electrolyte were revealed by the cyclic voltammetric method. The possibility of oxidation of cathodic deposit consisting of tin and Sn(II) hydroxide compounds to the hydrated tin dioxide in the same electrolyte was demonstrated.The operations of alloy underlayer deposition and oxidation of multilayer metal-hydroxide coating were proposed to carry out in the diluted pyrophosphate-tartrate electrolyte, similar to the main electrolyte.The accelerated tests showed higher service life of the titanium electrode with multilayer antimony-doped tin dioxide coating compared to both electrode with single-layer electrodeposited coating and the electrode with the coating obtained using prolonged heat treatment step.

  8. Electrocatalysis on tungsten carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischmann, R.

    1975-01-01

    General concepts of electrocatalysis, the importance of the equilibrium rest potential and its standardization on polished WC-electrodes, the influence of oxygen in the catalysts upon the oxidation of hydrogen, and the attained results of the hydrogen oxidation on tungsten carbide are treated. (HK) [de

  9. Development of diamond coated tool and its performance in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mechanical Engineering Department, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302, India ... chemical inertness of diamond coating towards the work material, did not show any .... CVD diamond coated carbide tools, Ph D Thesis, Indian.

  10. Formation of electrically insulating coatings on aluminided vanadium-base alloys in liquid lithium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Dragel, G.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminide coatings were produced on vanadium and vanadium-base alloys by exposure of the materials to liquid lithium that contained 3-5 at.% dissolved aluminum in sealed capsules at temperatures between 775 and 880 degrees C. Reaction of the aluminide layer with dissolved nitrogen in liquid lithium provides a means of developing an in-situ electrical insulator coating on the surface of the alloys. The electrical resistivity of A1N coatings on aluminided V and V-20 wt.% Ti was determined in-situ

  11. The valve effect of the carbide interlayer of an electric resistance plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakomskii, V.

    1998-01-01

    The welded electric resistance plug (ERP) usually contains a carbide interlayer at the plug-carbon material interface. The interlayer forms during welding the contact metallic alloy with the carbon material when the oxide films of the alloy are reduced on the interface surface by carbon to the formation of carbides and the surface layer of the plug material dissolves carbon to saturation. Subsequently, during solidification of the plug material it forms carbides with the alloy components. The structural composition of the carbide interlayer is determined by the chemical composition of the contact alloy. In alloys developed by the author and his colleagues the carbide forming elements are represented in most cases by silicon and titanium and, less frequently, by chromium and manganese. Therefore, the carbide interlayers in the ERP consisted mainly of silicon and titanium carbides

  12. GENERAL RULES OF SIC FORMATION IN DIAMOND-CONTAINING COMPOSITION AT LOW PRESSURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Zhuk

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of experimental investigations of structure-formation process of «diamond-carbide silicon» composite at low pressure which is obtained by liquid silicon impregnation of a porous blank made of diamond crystals with nano-coatings have made it possible to establish the following general rules of the process concerning a sintering reaction in the coating and composite material: vacuum magnetronic spraying of composite cathodes leads to formation of nano-coating which is made of silicon and hydrogen atoms or clusters, and their subsequent treatment with plasma of glow discharge is accompanied by formation of α-SiC at low temperatures in a hard phase; silicon impregnation at 1500 °C with given pyrolytic carbon in the charge may result in β-SiC matrix formation.The formed «diamond-carbide silicon» composite material contains a frame structure of diamond crystals with nano-coating impregnated by silicon carbide and is characterized by high physical and mechanical properties. 

  13. Stability of MC Carbide Particles Size in Creep Resisting Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vodopivec, F.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical analysis of the dependence microstructure creep rate. Discussion on the effects of carbide particles size and their distribution on the base of accelerated creep tests on a steel X20CrMoV121 tempered at 800 °C. Analysis of the stability of carbide particles size in terms of free energy of formation of the compound. Explanation of the different effect of VC and NbC particles on accelerated creep rate.

  14. Highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, Akio; Suzuki, Yasutaka; Goto, Sumitaka; Saito, Yukio; Jinbo, Ryutaro; Ogiwara, Norio; Saido, Masahiro.

    1996-01-01

    In a composite member for use in walls of a thermonuclear reactor, if carbon fibers and boron carbide are mixed, since they are brought into contact with each other directly, boron is reacted with the carbon fibers to form boron carbide to lower thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers. Then, in the present invention, graphite or amorphous carbon is filled between the carbon fibers to provide a fiber bundle of not less than 500 carbon fibers. Further, the surface of the fiber bundle is coated with graphite or amorphous carbon to suppress diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers or reaction of them. Then, lowering of thermal conductivity of the carbon fibers is prevented, as well as the mixing amount of the carbon fiber bundles with boron carbide, a sintering temperature and orientation of carbon fiber bundles are optimized to provide a highly thermal conductive carbon fiber/boron carbide composite material. In addition, carbide or boride type short fibers, spherical graphite, and amorphous carbon are mixed in the boron carbide to prevent development of cracks. Diffusion or solid solubilization of boron to carbon fibers is reduced or reaction of them if the carbon fibers are bundled. (N.H.)

  15. The study on diamond-coated insert by DC plasma jet CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Kesong; Dai Mingjiang; Song Jinbing; Kuang Tongchun; Liu Zhengyi

    2001-01-01

    Diamond coating were deposited on cemented carbide inserts by DC plasma jet CVD. The cemented carbide inserts were pretreated by methods including chemical etching of Co, Ar/H 2 plasma etching. The characteristics of diamond film, interface structure, adhesion strength and film stress were analysized by different methods such as SEM, XRD, Raman spectrum etc. A comparing experiment of cutting Al - 22 % Si alloy was carried out with diamond-coated cemented carbide inserts and uncoated cemented carbide inserts. The results show that the diamond-coated cemented carbide insert has a great advantage for cutting abrasive high content Al - Si alloy. (author)

  16. Topography and surface energy dependent calcium phosphate formation on Sol-Gel derived TiO2 coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järn, Mikael; Areva, Sami; Pore, Viljami; Peltonen, Jouko; Linden, Mika

    2006-09-12

    Heterogeneous nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate (CaP) on sol-gel derived TiO(2) coatings was investigated in terms of surface topography and surface energy. The topography of the coatings was derived from AFM measurements, while the surface energy was determined with contact angle measurements. The degree of precipitation was examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The precipitation of CaP was found to be dependent on both topography and surface energy. A high roughness value when combining the RMS roughness parameter S(q) with the number of local maxima per unit area parameter S(ds) enhances CaP formation. The hydrophilicity of the coating was also found to be of importance for CaP formation. We suggest that the water contact angle, which is a direct measure of the hydrophilicity of the surface, may be used to evaluate the surface energy dependent precipitation kinetics rather than using the often applied Lewis base parameter.

  17. Mullite-based coating on silicon carbide refractory obtained from PMSQ [poly(methylsilsesquioxane); Recobrimentos à base de mulita em refratário de carbeto de silício obtidos a partir de PMSQ [poli (metilsilsesquioxano)] e alumínio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Glauson Aparecido Ferreira

    2017-07-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) presents low thermal expansion, high strength and thermal conductivity. For this reason it is used as kiln furniture for materials sintering. On the other hand, SiC degrades at high temperature under aggressive atmosphere. The use of protective coatings can avoid the right exposition of SiC surface to the furnace atmosphere. Mullite can be a suitable material as protective coating because of its high corrosion resistance and thermal expansion coefficient matching that of SiC (4,7 x 10{sup -6}/°C e 5,3 x 10{sup -6}/°C, respectively). In the present work a mullite coating obtained from ceramic precursor polymer and aluminium powder was studied to be applied over SiC refractories. Compositions were prepared with 10, 20, 30 and 50% (vol.) of aluminium powder added to the polymer. They were used aluminium powders with different distributions sizes These compositions were heat treated at different thermal cycles to determine a suitable condition to obtain a high mullite content. The composition with 20% of the smaller particle size Al powder was selected and used to be applied as a suspension over SiC refractory. The applied suspension, after dried, crosslinked and heat treated, formed a mullite coating over SiC refractory. Cycles of thermal shock were performed in coated and uncoated SiC samples to compare each other. They were carried out 26 cycles of thermal shock, in the following conditions: 600°C/30 min. and air cooling to room temperature. After each thermal shock, samples were analysed by mean of optical and electron microscopy, elastic modulus was also determined. After thermal shock cycles the coating presented good adhesion and no significant damage were observed. (author)

  18. Phospholipase D is involved in the formation of Golgi associated clathrin coated vesicles in human parotid duct cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Brito de Souza

    Full Text Available Phospholipase D (PLD has been implicated in many cellular functions, such as vesicle trafficking, exocytosis, differentiation, and proliferation. The aim of this study was to characterize the role of PLD in HSY cells, a human cell line originating from the intercalated duct of the parotid gland. As the function and intracellular localization of PLD varies according to cell type, initially, the intracellular localization of PLD1 and PLD2 was determined. By immunofluorescence, PLD1 and PLD2 both showed a punctate cytoplasmic distribution with extensive co-localization with TGN-46. PLD1 was also found in the nucleus, while PLD2 was associated with the plasma membrane. Treatment of cells with the primary alcohol 1-butanol inhibits the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcoline by PLD thereby suppressing phosphatidic acid (PA production. In untreated HSY cells, there was only a slight co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles. When HSY cells were incubated with 1-butanol the total number of clathrin coated vesicles increased, especially in the juxtanuclear region and the co-localization of PLD with the clathrin coated vesicles was augmented. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the number of Golgi-associated coated vesicles was greater. Treatment with 1-butanol also affected the Golgi apparatus, increasing the volume of the Golgi saccules. The decrease in PA levels after treatment with 1-butanol likewise resulted in an accumulation of enlarged lysosomes in the perinuclear region. Therefore, in HSY cells PLD appears to be involved in the formation of Golgi associated clathrin coated vesicles as well as in the structural maintenance of the Golgi apparatus.

  19. Studies of the process of an unsteady formation of hard nitride coatings in an arc plasma flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zake, M.

    1996-01-01

    The kinetic studies of an unsteady formation of hard ZrN and TiN coatings on the surface of metallic (Zr, Ti) samples in an Ar-N plasma flow are carried out. The obtained result is that at the initial stage of an unsteady heating of titanium samples nitrogen atoms penetrate into metal lattice and form interstitial compounds of hard nitrogen solutions in α-phase of Ti. This process is followed by a growth of thin surface layers of titanium nitrides with subsequent changes of surface radiance of exposed samples. Unsteady formation of ZrN is a similar two-stage process which includes the ZrN film growth and formation of a α-hard solution with subsequent changes of total normal emissivity of the surface. (author). 1 ref., 1 fig

  20. Microstructure formation and corrosion behaviour in HVOF-sprayed Inconel 625 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, D.; Harris, S.J.; McCartney, D.G.

    2003-01-01

    The nickel-based alloy Inconel 625 was thermally sprayed by two different variants of the high velocity oxy-fuel process. In this study, coatings deposited by a liquid-fuelled gun were compared with those produced by a gas-fuelled system; in general, the former generates higher particle velocities but lower particle temperatures. Investigations into the microstructural evolution of the coatings, using scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction, are presented along with results on their aqueous corrosion behaviour, obtained from salt spray and potentiodynamic tests. It is inferred from coating microstructures that, during spraying, powder particles generally comprised three separate zones as follows: fully melted regions; partially melted zones; and an unmelted core. However, the relative proportions formed in an individual powder particle depended on its size, trajectory through the gun, the gas dynamics (velocity/temperature) of the thermal spray gun and the type of gun employed. Cr 2 O 3 was the principal oxide phase formed during spraying and the quantity appeared to be directly related to the degree to which particles were melted. The salt spray test provides a sensitive means of determining the presence of interconnected porosity in coatings and those produced with the liquid-fuelled gun exhibited reduced interconnected porosity and increased corrosion resistance compared with deposits obtained from the gas-fuelled system. In addition, potentiodynamic tests revealed that passive current densities are 10-20 times lower in liquid-fuel coatings than in those sprayed with the gas-fuelled gun

  1. Inhibition of Tongue Coat and Dental Plaque Formation by Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide Vs Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse: A Randomized, Triple Blinded Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Seema Roodmal; Kini, Vineet Vaman; Padhye, Ashvini

    2015-09-01

    Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an oxidizing agent with known bactericidal, viricidal and fungicidal properties. Its efficacy in reducing the halitosis has been established by previous literature. However, data evaluating its antiplaque property is scarce. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is considered as the gold standard and an effective adjunctive to mechanical plaque removal. However, it is associated with few reversible side effects. Therefore a study was conducted to assess the antiplaque property of ClO2 containing mouthrinse against CHX mouthrinse. To evaluate the efficacy of stabilized chlorine dioxide containing mouthrinse and CHX containing mouthrinse in inhibition of tongue coat accumulation and dental plaque formation using a four day plaque regrowth model clinically and microbiologically in a healthy dental cohort. A Single Center, Randomized, Triple blinded, Microbiological clinical trial was conducted involving 25 healthy dental students volunteers (11 males, 14 females). Two commercially available mouthrinse: Mouthrinse A - Aqueous based ClO2 mouthrinse Freshchlor(®) and Mouthrinse B - Aqueous based 0.2% CHX mouthrinse Hexidine(®) were selected as the test products. Subjects were asked to rinse and gargle for 1 minute with the allocated mouthrinse under supervision after supragingival scaling, polishing and tongue coat removal. After four hours, smears were taken from the buccal mucosa and tooth surface. On the fifth day from baseline of four day non brushing plaque regrowth model the samples were again taken from buccal mucosa and tooth surface followed by recording of plaque scores by Rastogi Modification of Navy Plaque index, extent of tongue coat by Winkel's tongue coating index and measuring tongue coat wet weight in grams. The samples collected were subjected to microbial analysis and the results were expressed as colony forming units (CFUs) per sample. The Data was analysed using SPSS 16.00 and presented using descriptive statistics. Independent t-test was

  2. Comparison of new bone formation, implant integration, and biocompatibility between RGD-hydroxyapatite and pure hydroxyapatite coating for cementless joint prostheses--an experimental study in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitschnau, Achim; Alt, Volker; Böhner, Felicitas; Heerich, Katharina Elisabeth; Margesin, Erika; Hartmann, Sonja; Sewing, Andreas; Meyer, Christof; Wenisch, Sabine; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2009-01-01

    This is the first work to report on additional Arginin-Glycin-Aspartat (RGD) coating on precoated hydroxyapatite (HA) surfaces regarding new bone formation, implant bone contact, and biocompatibility compared to pure HA coating and uncoated stainless K-wires. There were 39 rabbits in total with 6 animals for the RGD-HA and HA group for the 4 week time period and 9 animals for each of the 3 implant groups for the 12 week observation. A 2.0 K-wire either with RGD-HA or with pure HA coating or uncoated was placed into the intramedullary canal of the tibia. After 4 and 12 weeks, the tibiae were harvested and three different areas of the tibia were assessed for quantitative and qualitative histology for new bone formation, direct implant bone contact, and formation of multinucleated giant cells. Both RGD-HA and pure HA coating showed statistically higher new bone formation and implant bone contact after 12 weeks than the uncoated K-wire. There were no significant differences between the RGD-HA and the pure HA coating in new bone formation and direct implant bone contact after 4 and 12 weeks. The number of multinucleated giant did not differ significantly between the RGD-HA and HA group after both time points. Overall, no significant effects of an additional RGD coating on HA surfaces were detected in this model after 12 weeks. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Joining elements of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method of joining together at least two silicon carbide elements (e.g.in forming a heat exchanger) is described, comprising subjecting to sufficiently non-oxidizing atmosphere and sufficiently high temperature, material placed in space between the elements. The material consists of silicon carbide particles, carbon and/or a precursor of carbon, and silicon, such that it forms a joint joining together at least two silicon carbide elements. At least one of the elements may contain silicon. (author)

  4. Phosphate coating on stainless steel 304 sensitized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz V, J. P.; Vite T, J.; Castillo S, M.; Vite T, M.

    2009-01-01

    The stainless steel 304 can be sensitized when welding processes are applied, that causes the precipitation of chromium carbide in the grain limits, being promoted in this way the formation of galvanic cells and consequently the corrosion process. Using a phosphate coating is possible to retard the physiochemical damages that can to happen in the corrosion process. The stainless steel 304 substrate sensitized it is phosphate to base of Zn-Mn, in a immersion cell very hot. During the process was considered optimization values, for the characterization equipment of X-rays diffraction and scanning electron microscopy was used. The XRD technique confirmed the presence of the phases of manganese phosphate, zinc phosphate, as well as the phase of the stainless steel 304. When increasing the temperature from 60 to 90 C in the immersion process a homogeneous coating is obtained. (Author)

  5. Nanocluster formation by spin coating : quantitative atomic force microscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partridge, A.; Toussaint, S.L.G.; Flipse, C.F.J.; IJzendoorn, van L.J.; Oetelaar, van den L.C.A.

    1996-01-01

    A recently developed spin coating method has been employed to produce a homogeneous distribution of nanometer-sized metal clusters onto a flat oxidic support. The particle size and distribution, and the total amount of material deposited has been studied by comparing the results of atomic force

  6. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C.M. [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Faria, Amanda N. [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia-Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil); Ramos, Ana P., E-mail: anapr@ffclrp.usp.br [Departamento de Química-Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto 14040-901, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CaCO{sub 3} continuous films were deposited on titanium discs using a biomimetic approach. • The coatings origin hydroxyapatite when immersed in simulated body fluid. • The wettability and the free energy of the surfaces were increased after the treatment. • The coated titanium discs are bioactive and non-toxic to osteoblasts. - Abstract: CaCO{sub 3} particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO{sub 3} deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO{sub 3} continuous films on Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca{sup 2+}, exposed to CO{sub 2} (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO{sub 3} film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γ{sub s}) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γ{sub s} of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO{sub 3} thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  7. Calcium carbonate hybrid coating promotes the formation of biomimetic hydroxyapatite on titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz, Marcos Antônio E.; Ruiz, Gilia C.M.; Faria, Amanda N.; Zancanela, Daniela C.; Pereira, Lourivaldo S.; Ciancaglini, Pietro; Ramos, Ana P.

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • CaCO 3 continuous films were deposited on titanium discs using a biomimetic approach. • The coatings origin hydroxyapatite when immersed in simulated body fluid. • The wettability and the free energy of the surfaces were increased after the treatment. • The coated titanium discs are bioactive and non-toxic to osteoblasts. - Abstract: CaCO 3 particles dispersed in liquid media have proven to be good inductors of hydroxyapatite (HAp) growth. However, the use of CaCO 3 deposited as thin films for this propose is unknown. Here, we report the growth of CaCO 3 continuous films on Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) modified titanium surfaces and its use as HAp growth inductor. The Ti surfaces were modified with two, four, and six layers of dihexadecylphosphate (DHP)-LB films containing Ca 2+ , exposed to CO 2 (g) for 12 h. The modified surfaces were immersed in simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for 36 h and submitted to bioactivity studies. This procedure originates bioactive coatings composed by non-stoichiometric HAp as evidenced by Fourier-Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). The presence of the CaCO 3 film as pre-coating diminished the time necessary to growth continuous and homogeneous HAp films using a biomimetic approach. The surface properties of the films regarding their roughness, composition, charge, wettability, and surface free energy (γ s ) were accessed. The presence of HAp increased the wettability and γ s of the surfaces. The coatings are not toxic for osteoblasts as observed for cell viability assays obtained after 7 and 14 days of culture. Moreover, the CaCO 3 thin films promote the recovery of the osteoblasts viability more than the Ti surfaces themselves.

  8. Delayed condensation and frost formation on superhydrophobic carbon soot coatings by controlling the presence of hydrophilic active sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmeryan, Karekin D.; Castano, Carlos E.; Mohammadi, Reza; Lazarov, Yuliyan; Radeva, Ekaterina I.

    2018-02-01

    Condensation frosting is an undesired natural phenomenon that could be impeded efficiently using appropriate wettability and morphologically patterned surfaces. The icephobic properties of carbon soot and the fabrication scalability of its synthesis method are a good foundation for anti-frosting applications; however, the fundamentals of frost growth and spreading on sooted surfaces have not been examined yet. In this study, we investigate the anti-frosting performance of three groups of superhydrophobic soot coatings by means of 16 MHz quartz crystal microbalances (QCMs). The analysis of the real-time sensor signal of each soot coated QCM pattern shows that frost formation and its propagation velocity depend on the quantity of oxygen functionalities and structural defects in the material. In turn, the reduction of both parameters shifts the onset of frost growth to temperatures below  -20 °C, whereas the interdroplet ice bridging is slowed by a factor of four. Moreover, high-resolution scanning electron micrographs of the samples imply delamination upon defrosting of the soot with spherical-like morphology via polar interactions driven mechanism. These results reveal an opportunity for control of frost incipiency on sooted surfaces by adjusting the synthesis conditions and depositing soot coatings with as low as possible content of hydrophilic active sites.

  9. Oxidation of boron carbide at high temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of various types of boron carbides (pellets, powder) were investigated in the temperature range between 1073 and 1873 K. Oxidation rates were measured in transient and isothermal tests by means of mass spectrometric gas analysis. Oxidation of boron carbide is controlled by the formation of superficial liquid boron oxide and its loss due to the reaction with surplus steam to volatile boric acids and/or direct evaporation at temperatures above 1770 K. The overall reaction kinetics is paralinear. Linear oxidation kinetics established soon after the initiation of oxidation under the test conditions described in this report. Oxidation is strongly influenced by the thermohydraulic boundary conditions and in particular by the steam partial pressure and flow rate. On the other hand, the microstructure of the B 4 C samples has a limited influence on oxidation. Very low amounts of methane were produced in these tests

  10. Hadfield steels with Nb and Ti carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vatavuk, J.; Goldenstein, H.

    1987-01-01

    The Hadfield Steels and the mechanisms responsible for its high strain hardening rate were reviewed. Addition of carbide forming alloying elements to the base compostion was discussed, using the matrix sttel concept. Three experimental crusher jaws were cast, with Nb and Nb + Ti added to the usual Hadfiedl compostion, with enough excess carbon to allow the formation of MC carbides. Samples for metallographic analysis were prepared from both as cast and worn out castings. The carbic morphology was described. Partition of alloying elements was qualitatively studied, using Energy Dispersive Espectroscopy in SEM. The structure of the deformed layer near the worn surface was studied by optical metalography and microhardness measurements. The results showed that fatigue cracking is one of the wear mechanisms is operation in association with the ciclic work hardening of the surface of worn crusher jaws. (Author) [pt

  11. Experimental study on the formation and growth of electroless nickel-boron coatings from borohydride-reduced bath on mild steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitry, Veronique, E-mail: veronique.vitry@umons.ac.be [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Sens, Adeline [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Kanta, Abdoul-Fatah [Service de Sciences des Materiaux, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Delaunois, Fabienne [Service de Metallurgie, Universite de Mons, Rue de l' Epargne 56, 7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Initiation mechanism of electroless Ni-B on St-37 steel has been identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different phases of the plating process were observed and identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Influence of chemical heterogeneity on coating morphology was revealed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Batch replenishment of the plating bath induces new germination phase. - Abstract: Quality and homogeneity of electroless nickel-boron coatings are very important for applications in corrosion and electronics and are completely dependent on the formation of the deposit. The growth and formation process of electroless nickel-boron was investigated by immersing mild steel (St-37) samples in an un-replenished bath for various periods of time (from 5 s to 1 h). The coatings obtained at the different stages of the process were then characterized: thickness was measured by SEM, morphology was observed, weight gain was recorded and top composition of the coatings was obtained from XPS. Three main phases were identified during the coating formation and links between plating time, instantaneous deposition rate, chemistry of last formed deposit and morphology were established. The mechanism for initial deposition on steel substrate for borohydride-reduced electroless nickel bath was also observed. Those results were confronted with chemistry evolution in the unreplenished plating bath during the process. This allowed getting insight about phenomena occurring in the plating bath and their influence on coating formation.

  12. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ciobanu, Octavian

    2013-04-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D3, and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Biofilm formation on titanium alloy and anatase-Bactercline® coated titanium healing screws: an in vivo human study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Scarano

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim Bacterial adherence to implants is considered to be an important event in the pathogenesis of bacterial infections. In fact, this infection process is a first stage of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis, and a positive correlation has been found between oral hygiene and marginal bone loss around implants in the edentulous mandible. Surface properties of transgingival implant components are important determinants in bacterial adhesion. The purpose of this study was to characterize the biofilm formation, in vivo, on healing screws made of titanium alloy or coated with a combination of anatase and Bactercline® product. Materials and methods Twenty-five patients, between 21- 37 years, in excellent systemic health, participated in this study. In each of the 25 participants, one anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screw (Test and one titanium alloy (TI6Al4V healing screw (Control were adapted to two different implants. Quantitative and qualitative biofilm formation on healing abutments was analyzed by culture method.Results Bacterial adherence to the two different healing screws used in this study were compared. Statistically significant differences were found between the Control and the Test group for both aerobic and anaerobic bacterial counts (p<0,05. The microflora consisted both of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, and displayed a high variability. The anaerobic S. intermedius, potentially “pathogenic”, was isolated only from the Control group. Both healing screws harbored primarily Gram-positive rods as Actinomyces spp, A. naeslundii, A. viscosus and the Gram-negative rods (Fusobacterium spp, Prevotella spp, Capnocythophaga spp were mostly found on the Control healing screws.Conclusion Anatase-Bactercline® coated healing screws reduce the number of initially adhering bacteria, formed mainly of Gram-positive microorgnisms, while, on the contrary, the microflora covering the titanium alloy healing screws was, for the

  14. Study of 'liquid gold' coatings: Thermal decomposition and formation of metallic thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deram, V. [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, UMR CNRS 8516, Bat C5 - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France) and Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Centre de Mise en Forme des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 7635, BP 207, 06904 Sophia-Antipolis (France)]. E-mail: virginie.deram@ensmp.fr; Turrell, S. [Laboratoire de Spectrochimie Infrarouge et Raman, Universite des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, UMR CNRS 8516, Bat C5 - 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Darque-Ceretti, E. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Paris, Centre de Mise en Forme des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 7635, BP 207, 06904 Sophia-Antipolis (France); Aucouturier, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France, UMR CNRS 171, Palais du Louvre, Porte des Lions, 14 quai F. Mitterrand, 75001 Paris Cedex (France)

    2006-09-25

    Organo-metallic solutions called liquid gold are largely used to obtain thin gilded films which are employed for decorative, technological and functional uses. However, these films often prove to be fragile with respect to use, resulting in loss of brilliance or even eventual film removal. An understanding of the behaviour of the layers requires good knowledge of the materials themselves. The present work was undertaken to better understand the evolution of the structural properties of liquid gold as it undergoes heat-processing. Accordingly, we followed the thermal decomposition processes of liquid gold coatings and the formation of the gilded metal layer using a combination of experimental techniques. First, thermal analyses coupled with mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy gave information concerning the decomposition of the organic medium. It has been found that the process of film formation can be decomposed into three steps, the second of which is an abrupt transition between 300 and 350 deg. C. Details on this transition have been obtained using real-time X-ray Diffraction and Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry. Above 350 deg. C, the microstructure of the coating is reorganized to obtain a final layer which contains particles, of the size of a few hundreds nanometers, as shown by Transmission Electron Microscopy.

  15. Solid-stabilized emulsion formation using stearoyl lactylate coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vengsarkar, Pranav S.; Roberts, Christopher B.

    2014-10-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles can exhibit highly tunable physicochemical properties that are extremely important in applications such as catalysis, biomedicine and environmental remediation. The small size of iron oxide nanoparticles can be used to stabilize oil-in-water Pickering emulsions due to their high energy of adsorption at the interface of oil droplets in water. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of the primary particle characteristics and stabilizing agent chemistry on the stability of oil-in-water Pickering emulsions. Iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by the co-precipitation method using stoichiometric amounts of Fe2+ and Fe3+ salts. Sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL), a Food and Drug Administration approved food additive, was used to functionalize the iron oxide nanoparticles. SSL is useful in the generation of fat-in-water emulsions due to its high hydrophilic-lipophilic balance and its bilayer-forming capacity. Generation of a monolayer or a bilayer coating on the nanoparticles was controlled through systematic changes in reagent concentrations. The coated particles were then characterized using various analytical techniques to determine their size, their crystal structure and surface functionalization. The capacity of these bilayer coated nanoparticles to stabilize oil-in-water emulsions under various salt concentrations and pH values was also systematically determined using various characterization techniques. This study successfully demonstrated the ability to synthesize iron oxide nanoparticles (20-40 nm) coated with SSL in order to generate stable Pickering emulsions that were pH-responsive and resistant to significant destabilization in a saline environment, thereby lending themselves to applications in advanced oil spill recovery and remediation.

  16. Solvent-free formation of hydroxyapatite coated biodegradable particles via nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Masahiro; Fujii, Syuji; Nishimura, Taiki; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Takeda, Shoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles stabilized polymer melt-in-water emulsions without any molecular surfactants. ► Interaction between polymer and HAp played a crucial role. ► HAp-coated polymer particles were obtained from the emulsions without any organic solvents. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particles were fabricated from a nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion in the absence of any molecular surfactants or organic solvents. First, a polymer melt-in-water emulsion was prepared by mixing a water phase containing nanosized HAp particles as a particulate emulsifier and an oil phase consisting of poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) or poly(L-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) above its melting point. It was clarified that the interaction between ester/carboxyl groups of the polymers and the HAp nanoparticles at the polymer–water interface played a crucial role to prepare the nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion. The HAp nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particle (a polymer solid-in-water emulsion) was fabricated by cooling the emulsion. The particle morphology and particle size were evaluated using scanning electron microscope.

  17. Electroerosion formation and technology of cast iron coatings on aluminum alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolentsev Vladislav P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available At present in the course of designing basic production parts and industrial equipment designers pay more and more attention to aluminum alloys having a number of properties compared favorably with other materials. In particular, technological aluminum tool electrodes without coating in the presence of products of processing with alkali in the composition of operation environment are being destroyed at the expense of intensified material dissolution. It is shown in the paper that the method offered by the authors and covered by the patents on cast iron coating of products made of aluminum alloys, allows obtaining on a product surface the layers with high adhesion durability ensuring a high protection against destruction in the friction units including operation in hostile environment. Thereupon, aluminum, as compared with iron-based alloys used at manufacturing technological equipment for electrical methods of processing, has a high electrical and thermal conduction, its application will allow achieving considerable energy-saving in the course of parts production. A procedure for the design of a technological process of qualitative cast iron coatings upon aluminum tool electrodes and parts of basic production used in different branches of mechanical engineering is developed.

  18. Preparation of fiber reinforced titanium diboride and boron carbide composite bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newkirk, L.R.; Riley, R.E.; Sheinberg, H.; Valencia, F.A.; Wallace, T.C.

    1979-01-01

    A process is described for uniformly infiltrating woven carbon cloth with either titanium diboride or boron carbide at reduced pressure (15 to 25 torr). The effects of deposition temperature on the uniformity of penetration and on coating rate are described for temperatures from 750 to 1000 0 C and deposit loadings from 20 to 43 vol. %. For the boron carbides, boron composition is discussed and evidence is presented suggesting that propene is the dominant rate controlling reactant

  19. The growth mechanism of grain boundary carbide in Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hui; Xia, Shuang; Zhou, Bangxin; Peng, Jianchao

    2013-01-01

    The growth mechanism of grain boundary M 23 C 6 carbides in nickel base Alloy 690 after aging at 715 °C was investigated by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The grain boundary carbides have coherent orientation relationship with only one side of the matrix. The incoherent phase interface between M 23 C 6 and matrix was curved, and did not lie on any specific crystal plane. The M 23 C 6 carbide transforms from the matrix phase directly at the incoherent interface. The flat coherent phase interface generally lies on low index crystal planes, such as (011) and (111) planes. The M 23 C 6 carbide transforms from a transition phase found at curved coherent phase interface. The transition phase has a complex hexagonal crystal structure, and has coherent orientation relationship with matrix and M 23 C 6 : (111) matrix //(0001) transition //(111) carbide , ¯ > matrix // ¯ 10> transition // ¯ > carbide . The crystal lattice constants of transition phase are c transition =√(3)×a matrix and a transition =√(6)/2×a matrix . Based on the experimental results, the growth mechanism of M 23 C 6 and the formation mechanism of transition phase are discussed. - Highlights: • A transition phase was observed at the coherent interfaces of M 23 C 6 and matrix. • The transition phase has hexagonal structure, and is coherent with matrix and M 23 C 6 . • The M 23 C 6 transforms from the matrix directly at the incoherent phase interface

  20. Metal Carbides for Biomass Valorization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine E. Chan-Thaw

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transition metal carbides have been utilized as an alternative catalyst to expensive noble metals for the conversion of biomass. Tungsten and molybdenum carbides have been shown to be effective catalysts for hydrogenation, hydrodeoxygenation and isomerization reactions. The satisfactory activities of these metal carbides and their low costs, compared with noble metals, make them appealing alternatives and worthy of further investigation. In this review, we succinctly describe common synthesis techniques, including temperature-programmed reaction and carbothermal hydrogen reduction, utilized to prepare metal carbides used for biomass transformation. Attention will be focused, successively, on the application of transition metal carbide catalysts in the transformation of first-generation (oils and second-generation (lignocellulose biomass to biofuels and fine chemicals.

  1. Reactor irradiation effect on the physical-mechanical properties of zirconium carbides and niobium carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrievskij, R.A.; Vlasov, K.P.; Shevchenko, A.S.; Lanin, A.G.; Pritchin, S.A.; Klyushin, V.V.; Kurushin, S.P.; Maskaev, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the effect of the reactor radiation by a flux of neutrons 1.5x10 20 n/cm 2 (E>=1 meV) at radiation temperatures of 150 and 1100 deg C on the physico-mechanical properties of carbides of zirconium and niobium and their equimolar hard solution. A difference has been discovered in the behaviour of the indicated carbides under the effect of radiation. Under the investigated conditions of radiation the density of zirconium carbide is being decreased, while in the niobium carbide no actual volumetric changes occur. The increase of the lattice period in ZrC is more significant than in NbC. The electric resistance of ZrC is also changed more significantly than in the case of NbC, while for the microhardness a reverse relationship is observed. Strength and elasticity modulus change insignificantly in both cases. Resistance to crack formation shows a higher reduction for ZrC than for NbC, while the thermal strength shows an approximately similar increase. The equimolar hard solution of ZrC and NbC behaves to great extent similar to ZrC, although the change in electric resistance reminds of NbC while thermal strength changes differently. The study of the microstructure of the specimens has shown that radiation causes a large number of etching patterns-dislocations in NbC which are almost absent in ZrC

  2. Influence of Applied Voltage and Film-Formation Time on Microstructure and Corrosion Resistance of Coatings Formed on Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca Bio-magnesium Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yandong, Yu; Shuzhen, Kuang; Jie, Li

    2015-09-01

    The influence of applied voltage and film-formation time on the microstructure and corrosion resistance of coatings formed on a Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy has been investigated by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) treatment. Phase composition and microstructure of as-coated samples were analyzed by the x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. And the porosity and average of micro-pore aperture of the surface on ceramic coatings were analyzed by general image software. Corrosion microstructure of as-coated samples was caught by a microscope digital camera. The long-term corrosion resistance of as-coated samples was tested in simulated body fluid for 30 days. The results showed that the milky white smooth ceramic coating formed on the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy was a compound of MgO, Mg2SiO4 and MgSiO3, and its corrosion resistance was significantly improved compared with that of the magnesium substrate. In addition, when the MAO applied voltage were 450 V and 500 V and film-formation time were 9 min and 11 min, the surface micro-morphology and the corrosion resistance of as-coated samples were relatively improved. The results provided a theoretical foundation for the application of the Mg-Zn-Zr-Ca novel bio-magnesium alloy in biomedicine.

  3. Formation mechanisms and sequence response of authigenic grain-coating chlorite: evidence from the Upper Triassic Xujiahe Formation in the southern Sichuan Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Authigenic grain-coating chlorite is widely distributed in the clastic rocks of many sedimentary basins around the world. These iron minerals were mainly derived from flocculent precipitates formed when rivers flow into the ocean, especially in deltaic environments with high hydrodynamic conditions. At the same time, sandstone sequences with grain-coating chlorites also tend to have relatively high glauconite and pyrite content. EPMA composition analysis shows that glauconites with “high Al and low Fe” content indicate slightly to semi-saline marine environments with weak alkaline and weakly reducing conditions. By analyzing the chlorite-containing sandstone bodies of the southern Sichuan Xujiahe Formation, this study found that chlorite was mainly distributed in sedimentary microfacies, including underwater distributary channels, distributary channels, shallow lake sandstone dams, and mouth bars. Chlorite had a tendency to form in the upper parts of sandstone bodies with signs of increased base level, representing the influence of marine (lacustrine transgression. This is believed to be influenced by megamonsoons in the Middle and Upper Yangtze Region during the Late Triassic Epoch. During periods of abundant precipitation, river discharges increased and more Fe particulates flowed into the ocean (lake. In the meantime, increases or decreases in lake level were only affected by precipitation for short periods of time. The sedimentary environment shifted from weakly oxidizing to weak alkaline, weakly reducing conditions as sea level increased, and Fe-rich minerals as authigenic chlorite and glauconite began to form and deposit.

  4. Effects of duty cycle on microstructure and corrosion behavior of TiC coatings prepared by DC pulsed plasma CVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanaghi, Ali; Rouhaghdam, Ali Reza Sabour; Ahangarani, Shahrokh; Chu, Paul K.; Farahani, Taghi Shahrabi

    2012-01-01

    Titanium carbide coatings are deposited on hot-work steel (H 11 ) by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (PACVD) and the dependence of the corrosion behavior on fabrication parameters is investigated. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Raman and electrochemical tests are used to study the structure as well as corrosion behaviors. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction reveals the (2 0 0) plane implying that the TiC coatings are deposited via the kinetics-limited crystal growth mechanism and under thermodynamically stable conditions. The SEM results indicate that the formation of a homogeneous and uniform titanium carbide nanostructure coatings. Potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance tests performed in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 and 0.05 M NaCl show that the TiC coating produced using a 40% duty cycle possesses high corrosion resistance in both media. The R p values of the TiC coating (50% duty cycle) in 0.05 M NaCl and the other TiC coating (40% duty cycle) in 0.5 M H 2 SO 4 are approximately four and sixteen orders of magnitude higher than that of the bare steel, respectively. Our results reveal that the duty cycles not only affect the structure and morphology of the coatings but also influence the electrochemical properties.

  5. Effect of an intermediate tungsten layer on thermal properties of TiC coatings ion plated onto molybdenum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukutomi, M.; Fujitsuka, M.; Shikama, T.; Okada, M.

    1985-01-01

    Among the various low-Z coating-substrate systems proposed for fusion reactor first-wall applications, molybdenum coated with titanium carbide is considered very promising since it has a good capability of receiving heat from the plasma. The thermal stabilities of TiC layers ion plated onto the molybdenum substrate are discussed with particular reference to the interfacial reaction between the TiC coating and molybdenum. The deposition of an intermediate tungsten layer was found to be very effective in suppressing the formation of reaction layers, resulting in a marked improvement in thermal stabilities of TiC--Mo systems. Thermal shock test using a pulsed electron beam showed that the TiC coatings remained adherent to the molybdenum substrates during energy depositions high enough to melt the substrates within the area of beam deposition. The melt area of the TiC coatings apparently decreased when a tungsten intermediate layer was applied

  6. Determining the minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMurray, Jacob W.; Lindemer, Terrence B.; Brown, Nicholas R.; Reif, Tyler J.; Morris, Robert N.; Hunn, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The minimum required uranium carbide content for HTGR UCO fuel kernels is calculated. • More nuclear and chemical factors have been included for more useful predictions. • The effect of transmutation products, like Pu and Np, on the oxygen distribution is included for the first time. - Abstract: Three important failure mechanisms that must be controlled in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel for certain higher burnup applications are SiC layer rupture, SiC corrosion by CO, and coating compromise from kernel migration. All are related to high CO pressures stemming from O release when uranium present as UO 2 fissions and the O is not subsequently bound by other elements. In the HTGR kernel design, CO buildup from excess O is controlled by the inclusion of additional uranium apart from UO 2 in the form of a carbide, UC x and this fuel form is designated UCO. Here general oxygen balance formulas were developed for calculating the minimum UC x content to ensure negligible CO formation for 15.5% enriched UCO taken to 16.1% actinide burnup. Required input data were obtained from CALPHAD (CALculation of PHAse Diagrams) chemical thermodynamic models and the Serpent 2 reactor physics and depletion analysis tool. The results are intended to be more accurate than previous estimates by including more nuclear and chemical factors, in particular the effect of transmuted Pu and Np oxides on the oxygen distribution as the fuel kernel composition evolves with burnup.

  7. Possibilities of Application of High Pressure Jet Assisted Machining in Hard Turning with Carbide Tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Globočki Lakić

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available High Pressure Jet Assisted Machining (HPJAM in turning is a hybrid machining method in which a high pressure jet of cooling and lubrication fluid, under high pressure (50 MPa, leads to the zone between the cutting tool edge and workpiece. An experimental study was performed to investigate the capabilities of conventional and high pressure cooling (HPC in the turning of hard-to-machine materials: hard-chromed and surface hardened steel Ck45 (58 HRc and hardened bearing steel 100Cr6 (62 HRc. Machining experiments were performed using coated carbide tools and highly cutting speed. Experimental measurements were performed for different input process parameters. The cooling capabilities are compared by monitoring of tool wear, tool life, cooling efficiency, and surface roughness. Connection between the tool wear and surface roughness is established. Experimental research show that the hard turning with carbide cutting tools and HP supply CLF provides numerous advantages from the techno-economic aspect: greater productivity, reduce of temperature in the cutting zone, improved control chip formation, extended tool life, low intensity of tool wear, surface roughness in acceptable limits, significant reduce of production costs related to the CLF.

  8. ENTIRELY AQUEOUS SOLUTION-GEL ROUTE FOR THE PREPARATION OF ZIRCONIUM CARBIDE, HAFNIUM CARBIDE AND THEIR TERNARY CARBIDE POWDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Changrui

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An entirely aqueous solution-gel route has been developed for the synthesis of zirconium carbide, hafnium carbide and their ternary carbide powders. Zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl₂.8H₂O, malic acid (MA and ethylene glycol (EG were dissolved in water to form the aqueous zirconium carbide precursor. Afterwards, this aqueous precursor was gelled and transformed into zirconium carbide at a relatively low temperature (1200 °C for achieving an intimate mixing of the intermediate products. Hafnium and the ternary carbide powders were also synthesized via the same aqueous route. All the zirconium, hafnium and ternary carbide powders exhibited a particle size of ∼100 nm.

  9. Hard coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, J.P.; Boving, H.J.; Hintermann, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Hard, wear resistant and low friction coatings are presently produced on a world-wide basis, by different processes such as electrochemical or electroless methods, spray technologies, thermochemical, CVD and PVD. Some of the most advanced processes, especially those dedicated to thin film depositions, basically belong to CVD or PVD technologies, and will be looked at in more detail. The hard coatings mainly consist of oxides, nitrides, carbides, borides or carbon. Over the years, many processes have been developed which are variations and/or combinations of the basic CVD and PVD methods. The main difference between these two families of deposition techniques is that the CVD is an elevated temperature process (≥ 700 C), while the PVD on the contrary, is rather a low temperature process (≤ 500 C); this of course influences the choice of substrates and properties of the coating/substrate systems. Fundamental aspects of the vapor phase deposition techniques and some of their influences on coating properties will be discussed, as well as the very important interactions between deposit and substrate: diffusions, internal stress, etc. Advantages and limitations of CVD and PVD respectively will briefly be reviewed and examples of applications of the layers will be given. Parallel to the development and permanent updating of surface modification technologies, an effort was made to create novel characterisation methods. A close look will be given to the coating adherence control by means of the scratch test, at the coating hardness measurement by means of nanoindentation, at the coating wear resistance by means of a pin-on-disc tribometer, and at the surface quality evaluation by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Finally, main important trends will be highlighted. (orig.)

  10. TRISO coated fuel particles with enhanced SiC properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Honorato, E.; Tan, J.; Meadows, P.J.; Marsh, G.; Xiao, P.

    2009-01-01

    The silicon carbide (SiC) layer used for the formation of TRISO coated fuel particles is normally produced at 1500-1650 deg. C via fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition from methyltrichlorosilane in a hydrogen environment. In this work, we show the deposition of SiC coatings with uniform grain size throughout the coating thickness, as opposed to standard coatings which have larger grain sizes in the outer sections of the coating. Furthermore, the use of argon as the fluidizing gas and propylene as a carbon precursor, in addition to hydrogen and methyltrichlorosilane, allowed the deposition of stoichiometric SiC coatings with refined microstructure at 1400 and 1300 deg. C. The deposition of SiC at lower deposition temperatures was also advantageous since the reduced heat treatment was not detrimental to the properties of the inner pyrolytic carbon which generally occurs when SiC is deposited at 1500 deg. C. The use of a chemical vapor deposition coater with four spouts allowed the deposition of uniform and spherical coatings.

  11. Computer model of polycrystal structure formation of plasma sprayed Be coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyupkina, O.G.; Meshchankin, N.V.; Sarymsakov, D.A.

    1996-01-01

    One of problems of controlled thermonuclear syntheses reactor creation is obtaining of a material, having significant radiation firmness. Perspective materials from this point of view might be ones obtained by Be plasma spraying on substrate. The analytical method of Be coating durability properties is impossible because of varied inter effective processes, taking place in crystallizing bodies, and experimental one requires significant financial spends. In the present article an attempt is made to estimate the influence of different regimes of cooling on forming polycrystal structure, to analyse dynamics of liquid coating solidifying using method of computer simulation. The research of number and sizes of grain distribution in the layers change was carried out in different regimes of cooling. For this purpose coefficient of heat exchanged was varied in the equation describing process of heat exchange between Be and substrate. Results obtained with proposed model well correspond with pattern observed in practice. Therefore a computer model of crystallization was developed, which allows to obtain characteristics of element acts of crystallization out coming from macroscopic parameters of sample, and to observe the process of melted Be solidifying

  12. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela; Ciobanu, Octavian

    2013-01-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D 3 , and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite was grown on Ti using a modified supersaturated calcification solution (M-SCS). ► Vitamins (A and D3) and collagen in M-SCS have a significant effect on apatite precipitation. ► M-SCS stimulates a biomimetic apatite deposition with 0.5–1 μm thickness in a short time. ► Hydroxyapatite crystallites have thin plate morphologies and size below 1 μm

  13. Investigation on the effect of collagen and vitamins on biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating formation on titanium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciobanu, Gabriela, E-mail: gciobanu03@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi, Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Environmental Protection, Prof. dr. docent Dimitrie Mangeron Rd., no. 63, zip: 700050, Iasi (Romania); Ciobanu, Octavian [“Grigore T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical Bioengineering, Universitatii Str., no. 16, zip: 700115, Iasi (Romania)

    2013-04-01

    This study uses an in vitro experimental approach to investigate the roles of collagen and vitamins in regulating the deposition of hydroxyapatite layer on the pure titanium surface. Titanium implants were coated with a hydroxyapatite layer under biomimetic conditions by using a supersaturated calcification solution (SCS), modified by adding vitamins A and D{sub 3}, and collagen. The hydroxyapatite deposits on titanium were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with X-ray analysis (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The results obtained have shown that hydroxyapatite coatings were produced in vitro under vitamins and collagen influence. - Highlights: ► Hydroxyapatite was grown on Ti using a modified supersaturated calcification solution (M-SCS). ► Vitamins (A and D3) and collagen in M-SCS have a significant effect on apatite precipitation. ► M-SCS stimulates a biomimetic apatite deposition with 0.5–1 μm thickness in a short time. ► Hydroxyapatite crystallites have thin plate morphologies and size below 1 μm.

  14. Formation of structure, phase composition and properties of electro explosion resistant coatings using electron-beam processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanov, Denis A.; Sosnin, Kirill V.; Budovskikh, Evgenij A.; Gromov, Viktor E.; Semin, Alexander P.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, the high intensity electron beam modification of electroexplosion composite coatings of MoCu, MoCCu, WCu, WCCu and TiB 2 Cu systems was done. The studies of phase and elemental composition, defective structure conditions of these coatings were carried out. The regimes of electron-beam processing making possible to form the dense, specular luster surface layers having a submicrocrystalline structure were revealed. It was established that electron-beam processing of elecroexplosion spraying of layer of elecroexplosion spraying carried out in the regime of melting results in the formation of structurally and contrationally homogeneous surface layer. Investigation of the effect of electron-beam processing of electroexplosion electroerosion resistant coatings on their tribological properties (wear resistanse and coefficient of friction) and electroerosion resistance was done. It was shown that all the examined costings demonstrate the increase of electroerosion resistance in spark erosion up to 10 times

  15. Formation of structure, phase composition and properties of electro explosion resistant coatings using electron-beam processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanov, Denis A., E-mail: romanov-da@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru, E-mail: budovskih-ea@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: da-rom@live.ru; Sosnin, Kirill V., E-mail: romanov-da@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru, E-mail: budovskih-ea@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: da-rom@live.ru; Budovskikh, Evgenij A., E-mail: romanov-da@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru, E-mail: budovskih-ea@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: da-rom@live.ru; Gromov, Viktor E., E-mail: romanov-da@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru, E-mail: budovskih-ea@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: da-rom@live.ru; Semin, Alexander P., E-mail: romanov-da@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: kos2906@mail.ru, E-mail: budovskih-ea@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: gromov@physics.sibsiu.ru, E-mail: da-rom@live.ru [Siberian State Industrial University, Novokuznetsk, 654007 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    For the first time, the high intensity electron beam modification of electroexplosion composite coatings of MoCu, MoCCu, WCu, WCCu and TiB{sub 2}Cu systems was done. The studies of phase and elemental composition, defective structure conditions of these coatings were carried out. The regimes of electron-beam processing making possible to form the dense, specular luster surface layers having a submicrocrystalline structure were revealed. It was established that electron-beam processing of elecroexplosion spraying of layer of elecroexplosion spraying carried out in the regime of melting results in the formation of structurally and contrationally homogeneous surface layer. Investigation of the effect of electron-beam processing of electroexplosion electroerosion resistant coatings on their tribological properties (wear resistanse and coefficient of friction) and electroerosion resistance was done. It was shown that all the examined costings demonstrate the increase of electroerosion resistance in spark erosion up to 10 times.

  16. Metallographic detection of carbides in the steel X 41 CrMoV 51 after different austenizing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleer, R.; Rickel, J.; Draugelates, U.

    1979-01-01

    The etchant most suitable for clearly revealing the carbide particles in the developed hardened structure was determined by comparative structural investigations with several etchants in order to be able to undertake the metallographic detection of finely distributed carbides in the structure of the high alloy ultra-high strength steel X 41 CrMoV 51. The characteristic distribution and number of carbides could be revealed as well as the ferrite pearlite matrix. The picric-hydrochloric acid solution which, on a comparative basis, was the most effective, revealed the dependence of the carbide dissolution and structural formation on the temperature. The carbide components of the structure dissolved to an increasing extent at temperatures above 1100 0 C. All carbides up to the large volume mixed carbides appeared to dissolve in the segregation zone after annealing for one hour at 1200 0 C. Considerable grain growth also occurred. (orig./RW) [de

  17. Metal Immiscibility Route to Synthesis of Ultrathin Carbides, Borides, and Nitrides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zixing; Kochat, Vidya; Pandey, Prafull; Kashyap, Sanjay; Chattopadhyay, Soham; Samanta, Atanu; Sarkar, Suman; Manimunda, Praveena; Zhang, Xiang; Asif, Syed; Singh, Abhisek K; Chattopadhyay, Kamanio; Tiwary, Chandra Sekhar; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2017-08-01

    Ultrathin ceramic coatings are of high interest as protective coatings from aviation to biomedical applications. Here, a generic approach of making scalable ultrathin transition metal-carbide/boride/nitride using immiscibility of two metals is demonstrated. Ultrathin tantalum carbide, nitride, and boride are grown using chemical vapor deposition by heating a tantalum-copper bilayer with corresponding precursor (C 2 H 2 , B powder, and NH 3 ). The ultrathin crystals are found on the copper surface (opposite of the metal-metal junction). A detailed microscopy analysis followed by density functional theory based calculation demonstrates the migration mechanism, where Ta atoms prefer to stay in clusters in the Cu matrix. These ultrathin materials have good interface attachment with Cu, improving the scratch resistance and oxidation resistance of Cu. This metal-metal immiscibility system can be extended to other metals to synthesize metal carbide, boride, and nitride coatings. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Composite materials and bodies including silicon carbide and titanium diboride and methods of forming same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillo, Thomas M.; Chu, Henry S.; Harrison, William M.; Bailey, Derek

    2013-01-22

    Methods of forming composite materials include coating particles of titanium dioxide with a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon, and reacting the titanium dioxide with the substance including boron and the substance including carbon to form titanium diboride. The methods may be used to form ceramic composite bodies and materials, such as, for example, a ceramic composite body or material including silicon carbide and titanium diboride. Such bodies and materials may be used as armor bodies and armor materials. Such methods may include forming a green body and sintering the green body to a desirable final density. Green bodies formed in accordance with such methods may include particles comprising titanium dioxide and a coating at least partially covering exterior surfaces thereof, the coating comprising a substance including boron (e.g., boron carbide) and a substance including carbon.

  19. Diamond-like carbon coating under oleic acid lubrication: Evidence for graphene oxide formation in superlow friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Bouchet, Maria Isabel; Martin, Jean Michel; Avila, José; Kano, Makoto; Yoshida, Kentaro; Tsuruda, Takeshi; Bai, Shandan; Higuchi, Yuji; Ozawa, Nobuki; Kubo, Momoji; Asensio, Maria C.

    2017-04-01

    The achievement of the superlubricity regime, with a friction coefficient below 0.01, is the Holy Grail of many tribological applications, with the potential to have a remarkable impact on economic and environmental issues. Based on a combined high-resolution photoemission and soft X-ray absorption study, we report that superlubricity can be realized for engineering applications in bearing steel coated with ultra-smooth tetrahedral amorphous carbon (ta-C) under oleic acid lubrication. The results show that tribochemical reactions promoted by the oil lubrication generate strong structural changes in the carbon hybridization of the ta-C hydrogen-free carbon, with initially high sp3 content. Interestingly, the macroscopic superlow friction regime of moving mechanical assemblies coated with ta-C can be attributed to a few partially oxidized graphene-like sheets, with a thickness of not more than 1 nm, formed at the surface inside the wear scar. The sp2 planar carbon and oxygen-derived species are the hallmark of these mesoscopic surface structures created on top of colliding asperities as a result of the tribochemical reactions induced by the oleic acid lubrication. Atomistic simulations elucidate the tribo-formation of such graphene-like structures, providing the link between the overall atomistic mechanism and the macroscopic experimental observations of green superlubricity in the investigated ta-C/oleic acid tribological systems.

  20. Tribological performance of polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond films on silicon substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Mahtab; Rana, Anwar Manzoor; Ahmed, E.; Malik, Abdul Sattar; Shah, Z. A.; Ahmad, Naseeb; Mehtab, Ujala; Raza, Rizwan

    2018-05-01

    Polycrystalline tantalum-carbide-incorporated diamond coatings have been made on unpolished side of Si (100) wafer by hot filament chemical vapor deposition process. Morphology of the coatings has been found to vary from (111) triangular-facetted to predominantly (111) square-faceted by increasing the concentration of tantalum carbide. The results have been compared to those of a diamond reference coating with no tantalum content. An increase in roughness has been observed with the increase of tantalum carbide (TaC) due to change in morphology of the diamond films. It is noticed that roughness of the coatings increases as grains become more square-faceted. It is found that diamond coatings involving tantalum carbide are not as resistant as diamond films with no TaC content and the coefficient of friction for such coatings with microcrystalline grains can be manipulated to 0·33 under high vacuum of 10-7 Torr. Such a low friction coefficient value enhances tribological behavior of unpolished Si substrates and can possibly be used in sliding applications.

  1. Ammonia formation and W coatings interaction with deuterium/nitrogen plasmas in the linear device GyM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laguardia, L., E-mail: laguardia@ifp.cnr.it [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Caniello, R.; Cremona, A. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Dellasega, D. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Dell’Era, F.; Ghezzi, F.; Gittini, G.; Granucci, G.; Mellera, V.; Minelli, D.; Pallotta, F. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Passoni, M. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy); Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, Milan (Italy); Ricci, D.; Vassallo, E. [CNR, Istituto di Fisica del Plasma“P. Caldirola”, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    In this work results of the first D{sub 2}/N{sub 2} experiments in GyM, a linear device able to produce plasmas of interest for the ITER divertor (n{sub e} 5 ⋅ 10{sup 10} cm{sup −3}, Te 5 eV, ion flux 3–5 ⋅ 10{sup 20} m{sup −2}s{sup −1}) are presented. Plasmas simulating a N-seeding scenario have been performed to evaluate ammonia formation and its effect on exposed W coatings. The presence of ND emission lines in the plasma can be correlated with the formation of ammonia, further directly detected and quantified by chromatography analysis of the exhaust. Four different W specimens were exposed in GyM to a plasma fluence of 8.78 ⋅ 10{sup 23} m{sup −2}. XPS analysis evidenced the formation of W{sub x}N{sub y} layers with nitrogen concentration in the range of 1–10% depending on the initial morphology and structure of the W samples. In all analyzed cases, nitrogen was bound and retained within the first 6 nm below the surface and no further diffusion of N into the bulk was observed.

  2. Mineralogical characteristics of Mn coatings from different weathering environments in China: clues on their formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoming; Ding, Hongrui; Li, Yan; Lu, Anhuai; Li, Yan; Wang, Changqiu

    2018-03-01

    Identification of Mn oxides in natural Mn coatings is very difficult due to their poor crystallinity, fine grains, complex chemistry and tiny amounts. In this work, we investigated three types of Mn coatings including rock varnish, dendrite and soil Fe-Mn cutan from different weathering environments in China. Optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectrometer were employed to achieve non-destructive, sensitive, in-situ and micro analysis on their mineral assemblages, micromorphological features and elemental distribution characteristics. The observed results suggest that rock varnish and soil cutan comprise birnessite, while dendrite is mainly composed of hollandite. Rock varnish with a layered structure has a clear boundary with its substrate, and microlaminations which arise from the fluctuations in Mn content (6.42-17.07 wt%) within the sample profile are obvious on closer inspection. Branch-like dendrite is rich in Mn (32.53-42.96 wt%) but poor in Si and Al, which shows a pilotaxitic texture with its substrate. Soil Fe-Mn cutan can be further divided into an outer black Mn-rich (8.26-13.58 wt%) belt and an inner yellowish-brown Fe-rich (2.06-4.85 wt%) belt, and a clear border can be identified between these two belts. Mn in the substrate of rock varnish and soil cutan is below detection limit while it can be detected in the substrate of dendrite (1.43-7.83 wt%). Our in-situ analysis provides more precise results than traditional powder test. These mineralogical characteristics indicate that dendrite is most likely endogenic, while rock varnish and soil cutan are external accretion formed under different weathering environments.

  3. Investigations on diffusion-controlled transformations in creep resistant steels and graded cemented carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat Borquez, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    resistant thin films by (CVD). The production of a graded outer-surface layer is necessary in order to ensure good adhesion of the coating to the cemented carbide and to avoid crack propagation. The formation of the graded outer-layer is a diffusioncontrolled process. DICTRA calculations were carried out to model the formation of the graded layers. The particular objectives of the investigations were: a) to simulate the growth kinetics of the graded layer for different periods of sintering time, b) to observe the influence of the mobility values on the kinetics of layer formation, c) to adjust the mobilities of the diffusing elements in order to have a good fitting with the experimental results.

  4. Evaluation of various metallic coatings on steel to mitigate biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Hideyuki; Ikigai, Hajime; Yoshitake, Michiko

    2009-02-01

    In marine environments and water systems, it is easy for many structures to form biofilms on their surfaces and to be deteriorated due to the corrosion caused by biofilm formation by bacteria. The authors have investigated the antibacterial effects of metallic elements in practical steels so far to solve food-related problems, using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. However, from the viewpoint of material deterioration caused by bacteria and their antifouling measures, we should consider the biofilm behavior as aggregate rather than individual bacterium. Therefore, we picked up Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas carageenovara in this study, since they easily form biofilms in estuarine and marine environments. We investigated what kind of metallic elements could inhibit the biofilm formation at first and then discussed how the thin films of those inhibitory elements on steels could affect biofilm formation. The information would lead to the establishment of effective antifouling measures against corrosion in estuarine and marine environments.

  5. Evaluation of Various Metallic Coatings on Steel to Mitigate Biofilm Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajime Ikigai

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In marine environments and water systems, it is easy for many structures to form biofilms on their surfaces and to be deteriorated due to the corrosion caused by biofilm formation by bacteria. The authors have investigated the antibacterial effects of metallic elements in practical steels so far to solve food-related problems, using Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. However, from the viewpoint of material deterioration caused by bacteria and their antifouling measures, we should consider the biofilm behavior as aggregate rather than individual bacterium. Therefore, we picked up Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Pseudoalteromonas carageenovara in this study, since they easily form biofilms in estuarine and marine environments. We investigated what kind of metallic elements could inhibit the biofilm formation at first and then discussed how the thin films of those inhibitory elements on steels could affect biofilm formation. The information would lead to the establishment of effective antifouling measures against corrosion in estuarine and marine environments.

  6. Chromium carbide-CNT nanocomposites with enhanced mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Virendra; Diaz, Rene; Balani, Kantesh; Agarwal, Arvind; Seal, Sudipta

    2009-01-01

    Chromium carbide is widely used as a tribological coating material in high-temperature applications requiring high wear resistance and hardness. Herein, an attempt has been made to further enhance the mechanical and wear properties of chromium carbide coatings by reinforcing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as a potential replacement of soft binder matrix using plasma spraying. The microstructures of the sprayed CNT-reinforced Cr 3 C 2 coatings were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The mechanical properties were assessed using micro-Vickers hardness, nanoindentation and wear measurements. CNT reinforcement improved the hardness of the coating by 40% and decreased the wear rate of the coating by almost 45-50%. Cr 3 C 2 reinforced with 2 wt.% CNT had an elastic modulus 304.5 ± 29.2 GPa, hardness of 1175 ± 60 VH 0.300 and a coefficient of friction of 0.654. It was concluded that the CNT reinforcement increased the wear resistance by forming intersplat bridges while the improvement in the hardness was attributed to the deformation resistance of CNTs under indentation

  7. MC Carbide Characterization in High Refractory Content Powder-Processed Ni-Based Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, Stoichko; Chen, Wei; Huo, Jiajie; Feng, Qiang; Isheim, Dieter; Seidman, David N.; Sun, Eugene; Tin, Sammy

    2018-04-01

    Carbide precipitates in Ni-based superalloys are considered to be desirable phases that can contribute to improving high-temperature properties as well as aid in microstructural refinement of the material; however, they can also serve as crack initiation sites during fatigue. To date, most of the knowledge pertaining to carbide formation has originated from assessments of cast and wrought Ni-based superalloys. As powder-processed Ni-based superalloys are becoming increasingly widespread, understanding the different mechanisms by which they form becomes increasingly important. Detailed characterization of MC carbides present in two experimental high Nb-content powder-processed Ni-based superalloys revealed that Hf additions affect the resultant carbide morphologies. This morphology difference was attributed to a higher magnitude of elastic strain energy along the interface associated with Hf being soluble in the MC carbide lattice. The composition of the MC carbides was studied through atom probe tomography and consisted of a complex carbonitride core, which was rich in Nb and with slight Hf segregation, surrounded by an Nb carbide shell. The characterization results of the segregation behavior of Hf in the MC carbides and the subsequent influence on their morphology were compared to density functional theory calculations and found to be in good agreement, suggesting that computational modeling can successfully be used to tailor carbide features.

  8. Method of coating the interior surface of hollow objects with a diffusion coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Shawn D.; Senor, David J.; Forbes, Steven V.; Johnson, Roger N.; Hollenberg, Glenn W.

    2005-03-15

    A method for forming a diffusion coating on the interior of surface of a hollow object wherein a filament, extending through a hollow object and adjacent to the interior surface of the object, is provided, with a coating material, in a vacuum. An electrical current is then applied to the filament to resistively heat the filament to a temperature sufficient to transfer the coating material from the filament to the interior surface of the object. The filament is electrically isolated from the object while the filament is being resistively heated. Preferably, the filament is provided as a tungsten filament or molybdenum filament. Preferably, the coating materials are selected from the group consisting of Ag, Al, As, Au, Ba, Be, Bi, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Dy, Er, Eu, Fe, Ga, Ge, Hg, In, K, Li, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni P, Pb, Pd, Pr, S, Sb, Sc, Se, Si, Sn, Sr, Te, Tl, Y, Yb, Zn, and combinations thereof. The invention additionally allows for the formation of nitrides, hydrides, or carbides of all the possible coating materials, where such compounds exist, by providing a partial pressure of nitrogen, hydrogen, hydrocarbons, or combination thereof, within the vacuum.

  9. Hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroeter, W.

    1981-01-01

    Intermetallic compounds of metals with non-metals such as C, N, and B show different hardness. Wagner's interaction parameter characterizes manner and extent of the interaction between the atoms of the substance dissolved and the additional elements in metallic mixed phases. An attempt has been made to correlate the hardness of carbides, nitrides, and borides (data taken from literature) with certain interaction parameters and associated thermodynamic quantities (ΔH, ΔG). For some metals of periods 4, 5, and 6 corresponding relations were found between microhardness, interaction parameters, heat of formation, and atomic number

  10. Microstructure Changes of ZrO{sub 2}/W/Mo Coating Layers on Graphite after Heat Treatment at 2100 ℃

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Gyu Baek; Choe, Kyeong Hwan; Cho, Gue Serb [Korea Institute of Industrial Technology, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Sub [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    A tungsten coating was deposited onto a graphite substrate using the atmospheric plasma spraying (APS) technique. In order to increase the adhesion strength between the metallic tungsten(W) and graphite, a molybdenum (Mo) interlayer was pre-deposited onto the graphite surface by utilizing the APS technique. Also, after deposition of a APS-W coating, a zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) was deposited onto the W coating layer. For the APS process, argon and helium were used as the plasma-forming gases, and argon was used as the shield gas to protect the plasma from oxidation. After the APS coating process, heat exposure treatment was performed at 2100 ℃ for 360 h within a sapphire single crystal-growing furnace in order to evaluate the thermal stability of the coatings. After heat treatment, the ZrO{sub 2}/W/Mo coating layers were bound with the graphite without any peeling off. The microvickers hardness of the APS-W coating layer was increased after heat treatment due to the formation of carbides. Also, carbide phases such as Mo{sub 2}C, WC, ZrC and Mo{sub 3}C{sub 2} were identified by XRD diffraction and EDS analysis, by analyzing the depths below the coating surface. It was considered that the Mo interlayer served as a good buffer layer between the APS-W coating and the graphite after the heat exposure treatment because the lattice structure of the molybdenum carbide was similar to that of the graphite.

  11. A Functional DNase I Coating to Prevent Adhesion of Bacteria and the Formation of Biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swartjes, Jan J. T. M.; Das, Theerthankar; Sharifi, Shahriar; Subbiahdoss, Guruprakash; Sharma, Prashant K.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Busscher, Henk J.; van der Mei, Henny C.

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are detrimental in many industrial and biomedical applications and prevention of biofilm formation has been a prime challenge for decades. Biofilms consist of communities of adhering bacteria, supported and protected by extracellular-polymeric-substances (EPS), the so-called house of

  12. Method of producing silicon carbide articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, J.V.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity

  13. Formation mechanism and adhesive strength of a hydroxyapatite/TiO{sub 2} composite coating on a titanium surface prepared by micro-arc oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shimin, E-mail: lshm1216@163.com [Department of Gem and Material Technique, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China); Li, Baoe; Liang, Chunyong; Wang, Hongshui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Qiao, Zhixia [School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin University of Commerce, Tianjin 300134 (China)

    2016-01-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite/TiO{sub 2} composite coating was prepared by one-step micro-arc oxidation. • The formation mechanism of composite coating was investigated. • Higher bonding strength between hydroxyapatite and TiO{sub 2} layer was obtained. - Abstract: A hydroxyapatite (HA)/TiO{sub 2} composite coating was prepared on a titanium surface by one-step micro-arc oxidation (MAO). The formation mechanism of the composite coating was investigated and the adhesion of the coating to the substrate was also measured. The results showed that flocculent structures could be obtained during the early stages of treatment. As the treatment period extended, increasing amounts of Ca–P precipitate appeared on the surface, and the flocculent morphology transformed into a plate-like morphology. Then the plate-like calcium and phosphate salt self-assembled to form flower-like apatite. The Ca/P atomic ratio gradually decreased, indicating that the amounts of Ca{sup 2+} ions which diffused into the coating decreased more rapidly than that of PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} or HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−}. The adhesive strength between the apatite and TiO{sub 2} coating was improved. This improvement is attributed to the interlocking effect between the apatite and TiO{sub 2} layer which formed simultaneously during the early stages of the one-step MAO. This study shows that it is a promising method to prepare bioactive coating on a titanium surface.

  14. Tungsten--carbide critical assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, G.E.; Paxton, H.C.

    1975-06-01

    The tungsten--carbide critical assembly mainly consists of three close-fitting spherical shells: a highly enriched uranium shell on the inside, a tungsten--carbide shell surrounding it, and a steel shell on the outside. Ideal critical specifications indicate a rather low computed value of k/sub eff/. Observed and calculated fission-rate distributions for 235 U, 238 U, and 237 Np are compared, and calculated leakage neutrons per fission in various energy groups are given. (U.S.)

  15. Tantalum-based multilayer coating on cobalt alloys in total hip and knee replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balagna, C., E-mail: cristina.balagna@polito.it [Institute of Materials Engineering and Physics, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24,10129 Torino (Italy); Faga, M.G. [Istituto di Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali Ceramici, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Strada delle Cacce 73, 10135 Torino (Italy); Spriano, S. [Institute of Materials Engineering and Physics, Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24,10129 Torino (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CoCrMo) alloys are widely used in total hip and knee joint replacement, due to high mechanical properties and resistance to wear and corrosion. They are able to form efficient artificial joints by means of coupling metal-on-polymer or metal-on-metal contacts. However, a high concentration of stress and direct friction between surfaces leads to the formation of polyethylene wear debris and the release of toxic metal ions into the human body, limiting, as a consequence, the lifetime of implants. The aim of this research is a surface modification of CoCrMo alloys in order to improve their biocompatibility and to decrease the release of metal ions and polyethylene debris. Thermal treatment in molten salts was the process employed for the deposition of tantalum-enriched coating. Tantalum and its compounds are considered biocompatible materials with low ion release and high corrosion resistance. Three different CoCrMo alloys were processed as substrates. An adherent coating of about 1 {mu}m of thickness, with a multilayer structure consisting of two tantalum carbides and metallic tantalum was deposited. The substrates and modified layers were characterized by means of structural, chemical and morphological analysis. Moreover nanoindentation, scratch and tribological tests were carried out in order to evaluate the mechanical behavior of the substrates and coating. The hardness of the coated samples increases more than double than the untreated alloys meanwhile the presence of the coating reduced the wear volume and rate of about one order of magnitude. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal treatment in molten salts deposits a Ta-based coating on Co-based alloys. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coating is composed by one or two tantalum carbides and/or metallic tantalum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The coating structure depends on thermal temperature and substrates carbon content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Coating is able to

  16. Photoactive TiO2 Films Formation by Drain Coating for Endosulfan Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Tapia-Orozco

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous photocatalysis is an advanced oxidation process in which a photoactive catalyst, such as TiO2, is attached to a support to produce free radical species known as reactive oxygen species (ROS that can be used to break down toxic organic compounds. In this study, the draining time, annealing temperature, and draining/annealing cycles for TiO2 films grown by the drain coating method were evaluated using a 23 factorial experimental design to determine the photoactivity of the films via endosulfan degradation. The TiO2 films prepared with a large number of draining/annealing cycles at high temperatures enhanced (P>0.05 endosulfan degradation and superoxide radical generation after 30 minutes of illumination with UV light. We demonstrated a negative correlation (R2=0.69; P>0.01 between endosulfan degradation and superoxide radical generation. The endosulfan degradation rates were the highest at 30 minutes with the F6 film. In addition, films prepared using conditions F1, F4, and F8 underwent an adsorption/desorption process. The kinetic reaction constants, Kapp (min−1, were 0.0101, 0.0080, 0.0055, 0.0048, and 0.0035 for F6, F2, F5, F3, and F1, respectively. The endosulfan metabolites alcohol, ether, and lactone were detected and quantified at varying levels in all photocatalytic assays.

  17. Formation of Outburst Structure in Hot Dip Galvannealed Coatings on IF Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollárová, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Outburst structure in two industrially produced hot dip galvanized interstitial free steel sheets for automotive industry after additional annealing has been examined. Ti IF steel was found to form weak outburst structure in the early stage of annealing, followed by frontal growth of Fe-Zn phases during further heating. The high reactivity of this steel was confirmed by rapid G-phase formation. Under the same conditions, Ti-Nb-P IF steel exhibited frontal growth of Fe-Zn compounds without G-phase formation due to relatively high phosphorous content, which is known as inhibitor of Fe-Zn reaction, but simultaneously significant occurrence of undesired outburst structures was recorded. It was assumed that the phosphorous content was insufficient and/or ferrite grain was very fine.

  18. Model of formation of droplets during electric arc surfacing of functional coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarychev, Vladimir D.; Granovskii, Alexei Yu; Nevskii, Sergey A.; Gromov, Victor E.

    2016-01-01

    The mathematical model was developed for the initial stage of formation of an electrode metal droplet in the process of arc welding. Its essence lies in the fact that the presence of a temperature gradient in the boundary layer of the molten metal causes thermo-capillary instability, which leads to the formation of electrode metal droplets. A system of equations including Navier-Stokes equations, heat conduction and Maxwell's equations was solved as well as the boundary conditions for the system electrodes-plasma. Dispersion equation for thermo-capillary waves in the linear approximation for the plane layer was received and analyzed. The values of critical wavelengths, at which thermo-capillary instability appears in the nanometer wavelength range, were found. The parameters at which the mode of a fine-droplet transfer of the material takes place were theoretically defined.

  19. Nonmetal effect on ordering structures in titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.; Ehm, V.T.; Savenko, B.M.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of oxygen and nitrogen atoms on formation of intermediate, cubic and trigonal ordering structures in the titanium carbide is studied through the roentgenography and neutron radiography methods. Metal atoms in the TiC 0.545 O 0.08 , TiC 0.545 N 0.09 samples under study are shifted from ideal positions in the direction from vacancies to metalloid atoms. In the intermediate cubic phase the values of the titanium atoms free parameter in both samples are identical, but they differ from analogous values in the titanium carbide

  20. N-Acetyl-D-glucosamine-coated polyamidoamine dendrimer modulates antibody formation via natural killer cell activation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Huliková, Katarína; Benson, Veronika; Svoboda, Jan; Šíma, Petr; Fišerová, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 6 (2009), s. 792-799 ISSN 1567-5769 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/06/0477; GA AV ČR IAA500200509; GA AV ČR IAA500200620 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : GlcNAc(8) * antibody formation * NK cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 2.214, year: 2009

  1. Chip formation in turning S45C medium carbon steel in cryogenic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaharah A. Ghani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the tribology issue regarding the chip formation in machining medium carbon steel (S45C using a coated and uncoated carbide tools. The machining parameters under investigation were cutting speed, feed rate, and depth of cut under dry and cryogenic cutting condition using coated and uncoated carbide tools. The chip shape was largely depended on the combination of machining parameters, especially at high depth of cut and feed rate; the favorable chip was produced. Larger value of shear angle results in smaller shear plane area that provides benefits of lower cutting force needed to shear off the chips and lower cutting temperature being generated during the machining process.

  2. Highly Electrically Conducting Glass-Graphene Nanoplatelets Hybrid Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, E; Nistal, A; Khalifa, A; Essa, Y; Martín de la Escalera, F; Osendi, M I; Miranzo, P

    2015-08-19

    Hybrid coatings consisting of a heat resistant Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 (YAS) glass containing 2.3 wt % of graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were developed by flame spraying homogeneous ceramic powders-GNP granules. Around 40% of the GNPs survived the high spraying temperatures and were distributed along the splat-interfaces, forming a percolated network. These YAS-GNP coatings are potentially interesting in thermal protection systems and electromagnetic interference shields for aerospace applications; therefore silicon carbide (SiC) materials at the forefront of those applications were employed as substrates. Whereas the YAS coatings are nonconductive, the YAS-GNP coatings showed in-plane electrical conductivity (∼10(2) S·m(-1)) for which a low percolation limit (below 3.6 vol %) is inferred. Indentation tests revealed the formation of a highly damaged indentation zone showing multiple shear displacements between adjacent splats probably favored by the graphene sheets location. The indentation radial cracks typically found in brittle glass coatings are not detected in the hybrid coatings that are also more compliant.

  3. Chemical vapor deposited fiber coatings and chemical vapor infiltrated ceramic matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kmetz, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) and Organometallic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) were employed to deposit a series of interfacial coatings on SiC and carbon yarn. Molybdenum, tungsten and chromium hexacarbonyls were utilized as precursors in a low temperature (350[degrees]C) MOCVD process to coat SiC yarn with Mo, W and Cr oxycarbides. Annealing studies performed on the MoOC and WOC coated SiC yarns in N[sub 2] to 1,000[degrees]C establish that further decomposition of the oxycarbides occurred, culminating in the formation of the metals. These metals were then found to react with Si to form Mo and W disilicide coatings. In the Cr system, heating in N[sub 2] above 800[degrees]C resulted in the formation of a mixture of carbides and oxides. Convention CVD was also employed to coat SiC and carbon yarn with C, Bn and a new interface designated BC (a carbon-boron alloy). The coated tows were then infiltrated with SiC, TiO[sub 2], SiO[sub 2] and B[sub 4]C by a chemical vapor infiltration process. The B-C coatings were found to provide advantageous interfacial properties over carbon and BN coatings in several different composite systems. The effectiveness of these different coatings to act as a chemically inert barrier layer and their relationship to the degree of interfacial debonding on the mechanical properties of the composites were examined. The effects of thermal stability and strength of the coated fibers and composites were also determined for several difference atmospheres. In addition, a new method for determining the tensile strength of the as-received and coated yarns was also developed. The coated fibers and composites were further characterized by AES, SEM, XPS, IR and X-ray diffraction analysis.

  4. Cavitation Erosion of Plasma -sprayed Coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J. J.; Park, J. S.; Jeon, S. B.

    1991-01-01

    Tungsten Carbide, chromium carbide and chromium oxide coatings were obtained on a 304 stainless steel substrate by plasma spraying technique. The coated samples were exposed to cavitation generated in distilled water by a 20KHz ultrasonic horn. The results of investigation reveal that all the samples tested are significantly eroded even within ten minutes of exposure, indicative of a short incubation period. The eroded surfaces can be characterized as having large pits and flat smooth areas. The latter may be associated with the poor cohesive strength of the coatings, which leads to the failures between individual lamellae

  5. Anticorrosion performance of chromized coating prepared by pack cementation in simulated solution with H2S and CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qin-Ying; Behnamian, Yashar; Luo, Hong; Wang, Xian-Zong; Leitch, Michael; Zeng, Hongbo; Luo, Jing-Li

    2017-10-01

    A hash service environment containing H2S and CO2 in oil industry usually causes corrosion of carbon steel. In this study, the chromized coatings with different deposited time were prepared on the surface of carbon steel by the method of pack cementation to enhance its corrosion resistance. Then the microstructure, hardness, corrosion resistance as well as the semiconductor behavior of coatings in the simulated solution with saturated H2S and CO2 were investigated. The results show that the content of Cr in coating was increased by prolonging deposited time, and both chromium carbides and chromium nitrides were formed. Furthermore, coatings display higher polarization resistance, Rp, than that of the substrate, indicating a higher resistance to charge transfer on coating surface. The corrosion rates of coatings with different deposited time were significantly lower than that of substrate. Chemical analysis showed the formation of heavy sulfides on the surface of substrates after corrosion, while the least corrosion products were detected on the surface of coating with deposited time of 12 h. Mott-Schottky results indicated that coating of 12 h displayed less defects than the other two coatings with deposited time of 4 h and 8 h, which will be beneficial to improve corrosion resistance. The investigation showed that chromized coatings exhibited high corrosion resistance and owned a potential application in oil industry for corrosion prevention.

  6. Comparison among the mineralogic characteristics of Corumbatai formation and a mass for via humidity ceramic coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, R.R.; Zanardo, A.; Moreno, M.M.T.

    2009-01-01

    The mineralogy of the raw materials used in the production of ceramic tiles is a matter of great importance considering the constant necessity of finding alternatives to reduce costs and to improve the product quality. The ceramic industry of Santa Gertrudes could see a dramatic growth due to reasons that include the natural characteristics of the raw materials found in the region which are suitable for the production of ceramic tiles through the dry grinding process. In order to understand the ease of use of such clays which are sedimentary rocks of Corumbatai Formation, their plastic components made up primarily of clay minerals such as illite and smectite, and non-plastic components, including quartz (inert), feldspars (fluxe) and some contaminants, were identified with the use of X-ray diffraction. When comparing the properties of the formulation made with clays from Corumbatai Formation with that made with raw materials for the wet process, it was possible to note the ease of use and the relative characteristics of both processes. (author)

  7. A two layer coating system for metallic substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Plasma deposited cermet coatings are used for protecting components in sodium or helium cooled reactors. An inner layer of cermet made from a powder mixture of chromium carbide and a nickel -20% chromium and an outer layer of chromium carbide is preferred. (UK)

  8. Formation of abrasion-resistant coatings of the AlSiFe{sub x}Mny intermetallic compound type on the AISI 304L alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Peralez, L. G.; Flores-Valdes, A.; Salinas-Rodriguez, A.; Ochoa-Palacios, R. M.; Toscano-giles, J. A.; Torres-Torres, J.

    2016-05-01

    The α-Al{sub 9}FeMnSi and α-Al{sub 9}FeMn{sub 2}Si intermetallics formed by reactive sintering of Al, Si, Mn, Fe, Cr and Ni powders have been used in AISI 304L steels to enhance microhardness. Processing variables of the reactive sintering treatment were temperature (600, 650, 700, 750 and 800 degree centigrade), pressure (5, 10 y 20 MPa) and holding time (3600, 5400 y 7200 seconds). Experimental results show that temperature is the most important variable affecting the substrate/coating formation, while pressure does not appear to have a significant effect. The results show the optimum conditions of the reactive sintering that favor the substrate/coating formation are 800 degree centigrade, 20 MPa and 7200 seconds. Under these conditions, the reaction zone between the substrate and coating is more compacted and well-adhered, with a microhardness of 1300 Vickers. The results of SEM and X-Ray diffraction confirmed the formation of β-Al{sub 9}FeMnSi and β-Al{sub 9}FeMn{sub 2}Si intermetallics in the substrate/coating interface as well as the presence of Cr and Ni, indicating diffusion of these two elements from the substrate to the interface. (Author)

  9. Wear resistance of nano- and micro-crystalline diamond coatings onto WC-Co with Cr/CrN interlayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polini, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy); Barletta, Massimiliano, E-mail: barletta@ing.uniroma2.i [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy); Cristofanilli, Giacomo [Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Universita di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 1, Rome, 00133 (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Cr/CrN bi-layers have been used recently to promote the growth of high quality Hot Filament Chemical Vapour Deposition (HFCVD) diamond coatings onto Co-cemented tungsten carbide (WC-6 wt.%Co) substrates. In the present investigation, the influence of the crystalline size of the diamond coatings on their wear endurance is looked into. Nano- (NDC) and micro-crystalline Diamond Coatings (MDC) were deposited by HFCVD onto untreated and Fluidized Bed (FB) treated Cr/CrN interlayers. NDCs, characterized by a cauliflower-like morphology, showed improved wear resistance. However, the superimposition of NDCs onto Cr/CrN interlayers micro-corrugated by FB treatment was found to be the most promising choice, leading to the formation of highly adherent and wear resistant coatings.

  10. Effect of carbon coating on spontaneous C12A7 whisker formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikovskii, Vladimir I.; Volodin, Alexander M.; Stoyanovskii, Vladimir O.; Cherepanova, Svetlana V.; Vedyagin, Aleksey A.

    2018-06-01

    A carbon nanoreactor concept was applied to study the stabilization effect of carbon shell on phase composition and morphology of dodecacalcium hepta-aluminate Ca12Al14O33. The starting C12A7 powder was obtained using aluminum and calcium hydroxides as precursors. Carbon shell was formed by a chemical vapor deposition of divinyl at 550 °C. After the calcination at 1400 °C, the product was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). It was observed for a first time that spontaneous formation of calcium aluminate whiskers take place under the conditions described. Each whisker consists of a 'head' (globular particle of 0.5 microns in diameter) and a 'tail' (prolonged whisker of few microns in length and 0.1-0.2 microns in diameter). According to HRTEM, the 'head' is characterized with microcrystal lattice of Ca12Al14O33 compound. XRD data show the presence of CaAl2O4 phase traces. The 'head' and 'tail' of the whisker are covered with structured graphene layers of 10 nm and 3 nm, correspondingly.

  11. Natural precursor based hydrothermal synthesis of sodium carbide for reactor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swapna, M. S.; Saritha Devi, H. V.; Sebastian, Riya; Ambadas, G.; Sankararaman, S.

    2017-12-01

    Carbides are a class of materials with high mechanical strength and refractory nature which finds a wide range of applications in industries and nuclear reactors. The existing synthesis methods of all types of carbides have problems in terms of use of toxic chemical precursors, high-cost, etc. Sodium carbide (Na2C2) which is an alkali metal carbide is the least explored one and also that there is no report of low-cost and low-temperature synthesis of sodium carbide using the eco-friendly, easily available natural precursors. In the present work, we report a simple low-cost, non-toxic hydrothermal synthesis of refractory sodium carbide using the natural precursor—Pandanus. The formation of sodium carbide along with boron carbide is evidenced by the structural and morphological characterizations. The sample thus synthesized is subjected to field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), x-ray powder diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet (UV)—visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman, and photoluminescent (PL) spectroscopic techniques.

  12. Carbide Transformation in Haynes 230 during Long-term Exposure at High Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jung; Kim, Hyunmyung; Hong, Sunghoon; Jang, Changheui

    2014-01-01

    Long-term aging behaviors of a solid solution hardened Ni-base superalloy, Haynes 230 at high temperature have not been fully investigated yet. In this study, long-term aging tests of Haynes 230 was carried out to evaluate microstructure changes especially in carbide evolution. In addition, its consequential effects on tensile property such as tensile strength and elongation were discussed. In Haynes 230, a nucleation of the secondary carbides was dominant at 800 .deg. C ageing while growth at 900 .deg. C ageing. In addition, after aging at 800 .deg. C, transition of primary W-rich M 6 C carbides (break down) were observed and it showed high W content (up to 70 at.% W) compared to un-aged W-rich M 6 C carbides (around 30 at.% W). Coarsened Cr- and Ni-rich phase surrounded by carbide depleted region and high W-rich M 6 C carbide along the grain boundary were formed only at 900 .deg. C after long-term exposure above 10000 h. Tensile strength of aged Haynes 230 increased at 800 .deg. C while decreased at 900 .deg. C due to the formation of secondary carbide within the grains at 800 .deg. C. Decrease in elongation would be resulted from the coarsened and continuous carbides at the grain boundary as well as Cr- and Ni-rich phase along the grain boundary

  13. Porous silicon carbide (SIC) semiconductor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Porous silicon carbide is fabricated according to techniques which result in a significant portion of nanocrystallites within the material in a sub 10 nanometer regime. There is described techniques for passivating porous silicon carbide which result in the fabrication of optoelectronic devices which exhibit brighter blue luminescence and exhibit improved qualities. Based on certain of the techniques described porous silicon carbide is used as a sacrificial layer for the patterning of silicon carbide. Porous silicon carbide is then removed from the bulk substrate by oxidation and other methods. The techniques described employ a two-step process which is used to pattern bulk silicon carbide where selected areas of the wafer are then made porous and then the porous layer is subsequently removed. The process to form porous silicon carbide exhibits dopant selectivity and a two-step etching procedure is implemented for silicon carbide multilayers.

  14. Formation of titanium oxide coatings on NiTi shape memory alloys by selective oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, M.; Glogowski, T.; Kuehn, S.; Hessing, C.; Unterumsberger, F.

    2008-01-01

    Materials used for medical devices that are in contact with human tissue must have good corrosion resistance and biocompatibility. NiTi shape memory alloys (SMAs) are often used in medical applications due to their special functional and mechanical properties (shape memory effect, pseudo elasticity). Because of the high Ni content in nearly stoichiometric NiTi SMAs, the possibility of Ni being released needs to be considered as Ni may cause problems in the human body. SMAs exhibit a high intrinsic corrosion resistance because of the thermodynamic stability of Ni (thermodynamic reason) and the low degree of disorder in a thin protective TiO 2 -layer (kinetic reason). While therefore there is no need to be concerned too much about a normal corrosive attack in the human body, it has to be kept in mind that in medical applications, these materials represent one part of a tribological system where wear processes need to be considered. The formation of a uniform TiO 2 -layer can be beneficial in this respect. The selective oxidation of Ti to TiO 2 on the surface is a promising method to decrease the Ni release significantly. This can be achieved by controlling the partial pressure of oxygen during a controlled oxidation process. The atmosphere must be adjusted so that TiO 2 is stable while NiO cannot yet form. The result of a selective oxidation is a TiO 2 -layer that has an excellent degree of purity and represents a safe barrier against Ni emission

  15. Formation of Nano scale Bio imprints of Muscle Cells Using UV-Cured Spin-Coated Polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsuri, F.; Alkaisi, M.M.; Mitchell, J.S.; Evans, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    We report a nano scale replication method suitable for biological specimens that has potential in single cell studies and in formation of 3D biocompatible scaffolds. Earlier studies using a heat-curable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) or a UV-curable elastomer introduced Bio imprint replication to facilitate cell imaging. However, the replicating conditions for thermal polymerization are known to cause cell dehydration during curing. In this study, a UV-cured methacrylate copolymer was developed for use in creating replicas of living cells and was tested on rat muscle cells. Bio imprints of muscle cells were formed by spin coating under UV irradiation. The polymer replicas were then separated from the muscle cells and were analyzed under an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), in tapping mode, because it has low tip-sample forces and thus will not destroy the fine structures of the imprint. The new polymer is biocompatible with higher replication resolution and has a faster curing process than other types of silicon-based organic polymers such as PDMS. High resolution images of the muscle cell imprints showed the micro-and nano structures of the muscle cells, including cellular fibers and structures within the cell membranes. The AFM is able to image features at nano scale resolution with the potential for recognizing abnormalities on cell membranes at early stages of disease progression.

  16. Silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles impair proteasome activity and increase the formation of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phukan, Geetika; Shin, Tae Hwan; Shim, Jeom Soon; Paik, Man Jeong; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Choi, Sangdun; Kim, Yong Man; Kang, Seong Ho; Kim, Hyung Sik; Kang, Yup; Lee, Soo Hwan; Mouradian, M. Maral; Lee, Gwang

    2016-01-01

    The potential toxicity of nanoparticles, particularly to neurons, is a major concern. In this study, we assessed the cytotoxicity of silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles containing rhodamine B isothiocyanate dye (MNPs@SiO2(RITC)) in HEK293 cells, SH-SY5Y cells, and rat primary cortical and dopaminergic neurons. In cells treated with 1.0 μg/μl MNPs@SiO2(RITC), the expression of several genes related to the proteasome pathway was altered, and proteasome activity was significantly reduced, compared with control and with 0.1 μg/μl MNPs@SiO2(RITC)-treated cells. Due to the reduction of proteasome activity, formation of cytoplasmic inclusions increased significantly in HEK293 cells over-expressing the α–synuclein interacting protein synphilin-1 as well as in primary cortical and dopaminergic neurons. Primary neurons, particularly dopaminergic neurons, were more vulnerable to MNPs@SiO2(RITC) than SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular polyamines, which are associated with protein aggregation, were significantly altered in SH-SY5Y cells treated with MNPs@SiO2(RITC). These findings highlight the mechanisms of neurotoxicity incurred by nanoparticles. PMID:27378605

  17. Helium generation and diffusion in graphite and some carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, J.B.; Guinan, M.W.; Hosmer, D.W.; Condit, R.H.; Borg, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    The cross section for the generation of helium in neutron irradiated carbon was found to be 654 mb at 14.4 MeV and 744 mb at 14.9 MeV. Extrapolating to 14.1 MeV (the fusion reactor spectrum) gives 615 mb. The diffusion of helium in dense polycrystalline graphite and in pyrographite was measured and found to be D = 7.2 x 10 -7 m 2 s -1 exp (-80 kJ/RT). It is assumed that diffusion is primarily in the basal plane direction in crystals of the graphite. In polycrystalline graphite the path length is a factor of √2 longer than the measured distance due to the random orientation mismatch between successive grains. Isochronal anneals (measured helium release as the specimen is steadily heated) were run and maximum release rates were found at 200 0 C in polycrystalline graphite, 1000 0 C in pyrographite, 1350 0 C in boron carbide, and 1350 0 and 2400 0 C (two peaks) in silicon carbide. It is concluded that in these candidates for curtain materials in fusion reactors the helium releases can probably occur without bubble formation in graphites, may occur in boron carbide, but will probably cause bubble formation in silicon carbide. 7 figures

  18. Parameters optimization, microstructure and micro-hardness of silicon carbide laser deposited on titanium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Adebiyia, DI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide (SiC), has excellent mechanical properties such as high hardness and good wear resistance, and would have been a suitable laser-coating material for titanium alloy to enhance the poor surface hardness of the alloy. However, SiC has...

  19. New Icosahedral Boron Carbide Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria Mora, Elena Maria

    Novel semiconductor boron carbide films and boron carbide films doped with aromatic compounds have been investigated and characterized. Most of these semiconductors were formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The aromatic compound additives used, in this thesis, were pyridine (Py), aniline, and diaminobenzene (DAB). As one of the key parameters for semiconducting device functionality is the metal contact and, therefore, the chemical interactions or band bending that may occur at the metal/semiconductor interface, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy has been used to investigate the interaction of gold (Au) with these novel boron carbide-based semiconductors. Both n- and p-type films have been tested and pure boron carbide devices are compared to those containing aromatic compounds. The results show that boron carbide seems to behave differently from other semiconductors, opening a way for new analysis and approaches in device's functionality. By studying the electrical and optical properties of these films, it has been found that samples containing the aromatic compound exhibit an improvement in the electron-hole separation and charge extraction, as well as a decrease in the band gap. The hole carrier lifetimes for each sample were extracted from the capacitance-voltage, C(V), and current-voltage, I(V), curves. Additionally, devices, with boron carbide with the addition of pyridine, exhibited better collection of neutron capture generated pulses at ZERO applied bias, compared to the pure boron carbide samples. This is consistent with the longer carrier lifetimes estimated for these films. The I-V curves, as a function of external magnetic field, of the pure boron carbide films and films containing DAB demonstrate that significant room temperature negative magneto-resistance (> 100% for pure samples, and > 50% for samples containing DAB) is possible in the resulting dielectric thin films. Inclusion of DAB is not essential for significant negative magneto

  20. Production of silicon carbide bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, K.

    1981-01-01

    A body consisting essentially of a coherent mixture of silicon carbide and carbon for subsequent siliconising is produced by casting a slip comprising silicon carbide and carbon powders in a porous mould. Part of the surface of the body, particularly internal features, is formed by providing within the mould a core of a material which retains its shape while casting is in progress but is compressed by shrinkage of the cast body as it dries and is thereafter removable from the cast body. Materials which are suitable for the core are expanded polystyrene and gelatinous products of selected low elastic modulus. (author)

  1. High yield silicon carbide prepolymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baney, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    Prepolymers which exhibit good handling properties, and are useful for preparing ceramics, silicon carbide ceramic materials and articles containing silicon carbide, are polysilanes consisting of 0 to 60 mole% (CH 3 ) 2 Si units and 40 to 100 mole% CH 3 Si units, all Si valences being satisfied by CH 3 groups, other Si atoms, or by H atoms, the latter amounting to 0.3 to 2.1 weight% of the polysilane. They are prepared by reducing the corresponding chloro- or bromo-polysilanes with at least the stoichiometric amount of a reducing agent, e.g. LiAlH 4 . (author)

  2. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. K.; Choi, D. J.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Chun, J. H. [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    Zirconium carbide has been chosen and studied as an advanced material of silicon carbide. In order to collect data on the basic properties and characteristics of Zirconium carbide, studies have been conducted using various methods. As a result of chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl4) and using methane(CH4) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere, graphite film is deposited.. Zirconium carbide was deposited on the sample where silicon carbide was deposited on a graphite substrate using Zirconium sponge as a Zirconium source. In terms of physical characteristics, the deposited Zirconium carbide showed higher strength, but slightly lower elastic modulus than silicon carbide. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of a coating layer in pre-irradiation step, internal pressure induced method and direct strength measurement method is carried out. In the internal pressure induced method, in order to produce the requirement pressure, pressure media is used. In the direct strength measurement method, the indentation experiment that indent on a hemisphere shell with plate indenter is conducted. For this method, the finite element analysis is used and the analysis is verified by indentation experiments. To measure the strength of TRISO particle SiC coating, SiC hemisphere shell is performed through grinding and heat treatment. Through the finite element analysis, strength evaluation equation is suggested. Using suggested equation, Strength evaluation is performed and the strength value shows 1025MPa as a result of statistical analysis.

  3. Deposition and Characterization of TRISO Coating Layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, D. K.; Choi, D. J.; Lee, H. K.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, J. H.; Chun, J. H.

    2007-03-01

    Zirconium carbide has been chosen and studied as an advanced material of silicon carbide. In order to collect data on the basic properties and characteristics of Zirconium carbide, studies have been conducted using various methods. As a result of chemically vapor deposed subliming zirconium tetrachloride(ZrCl4) and using methane(CH4) as a source in hydrogen atmosphere, graphite film is deposited.. Zirconium carbide was deposited on the sample where silicon carbide was deposited on a graphite substrate using Zirconium sponge as a Zirconium source. In terms of physical characteristics, the deposited Zirconium carbide showed higher strength, but slightly lower elastic modulus than silicon carbide. In order to evaluate the mechanical properties of a coating layer in pre-irradiation step, internal pressure induced method and direct strength measurement method is carried out. In the internal pressure induced method, in order to produce the requirement pressure, pressure media is used. In the direct strength measurement method, the indentation experiment that indent on a hemisphere shell with plate indenter is conducted. For this method, the finite element analysis is used and the analysis is verified by indentation experiments. To measure the strength of TRISO particle SiC coating, SiC hemisphere shell is performed through grinding and heat treatment. Through the finite element analysis, strength evaluation equation is suggested. Using suggested equation, Strength evaluation is performed and the strength value shows 1025MPa as a result of statistical analysis

  4. Transition metal carbide and boride abrasive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdsaar, H.

    1978-01-01

    Abrasive particles and their preparation are discussed. The particles consist essentially of a matrix of titanium carbide and zirconium carbide, at least partially in solid solution form, and grains of crystalline titanium diboride dispersed throughout the carbide matrix. These abrasive particles are particularly useful as components of grinding wheels for abrading steel. 1 figure, 6 tables

  5. Formation of the outer layer of the Dictyostelium spore coat depends on the inner-layer protein SP85/PsB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Talibah; Kelley, Karen; Erdos, Gregory W; Kaplan, Lee; West, Christopher M

    2003-02-01

    The Dictyostelium spore is surrounded by a 220 microm thick trilaminar coat that consists of inner and outer electron-dense layers surrounding a central region of cellulose microfibrils. In previous studies, a mutant strain (TL56) lacking three proteins associated with the outer layer exhibited increased permeability to macromolecular tracers, suggesting that this layer contributes to the coat permeability barrier. Electron microscopy now shows that the outer layer is incomplete in the coats of this mutant and consists of a residual regular array of punctate electron densities. The outer layer is also incomplete in a mutant lacking a cellulose-binding protein associated with the inner layer, and these coats are deficient in an outer-layer protein and another coat protein. To examine the mechanism by which this inner-layer protein, SP85, contributes to outer-layer formation, various domain fragments were overexpressed in forming spores. Most of these exert dominant negative effects similar to the deletion of outer-layer proteins, but one construct, consisting of a fusion of the N-terminal and Cys-rich C1 domain, induces a dense mat of novel filaments at the surface of the outer layer. Biochemical studies show that the C1 domain binds cellulose, and a combination of site-directed mutations that inhibits its cellulose-binding activity suppresses outer-layer filament induction. The results suggest that, in addition to a previously described early role in regulating cellulose synthesis, SP85 subsequently contributes a cross-bridging function between cellulose and other coat proteins to organize previously unrecognized structural elements in the outer layer of the coat.

  6. Simultaneous aluminizing and chromizing of steels to form (Fe,Cr){sub 3}Al coatings and Ge-doped silicide coatings of Cr-Zr base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, M.; He, Y.R.; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    A halide-activated cementation pack involving elemental Al and Cr powders has been used to achieve surface compositions of approximately Fe{sub 3}Al plus several percent Cr for low alloy steels (T11, T2 and T22) and medium carbon steel (1045 steel). A two-step treatment at 925 C and 1150 C yields the codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium to form dense and uniform ferrite coatings of about 400 {micro}m thickness, while preventing the formation of a blocking chromium carbide at the substrate surfaces. Upon cyclic oxidation in air at 700 C, the coated steel exhibits a negligible 0.085 mg/cm{sup 2} weight gain for 1900 one-hour cycles. Virtually no attack was observed on coated steels tested at ABB in simulated boiler atmospheres at 500 C for 500 hours. But coatings with a surface composition of only 8 wt% Al and 6 wt% Cr suffered some sulfidation attack in simulated boiler atmospheres at temperatures higher than 500 C for 1000 hours. Two developmental Cr-Zr based Laves phase alloys (CN129-2 and CN117(Z)) were silicide/germanide coated. The cross-sections of the Ge-doped silicide coatings closely mimicked the microstructure of the substrate alloys. Cyclic oxidation in air at 1100 C showed that the Ge-doped silicide coating greatly improved the oxidation resistance of the Cr-Zr based alloys.

  7. Surface Oxidation of the High-Strength Steels Electrodeposited with Cu or Fe and the Resultant Defect Formation in Their Coating during the Following Galvanizing and Galvannealing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yun-Il; Beom, Won-Jin; Park, Chan-Jin; Paik, Doojin; Hong, Moon-Hi

    2010-12-01

    This study examined the surface oxidation of high-strength steels electrodeposited with Cu or Fe and the resultant defect formation in their coating during the following galvanizing and galvannealing processes. The high-strength steels were coated with an Cu or Fe layer by the electroplating method. Then, the coated steels were annealed in a reducing atmosphere, dipped in a molten zinc, and finally transformed into galvannealed steels through the galvannealing process. The formation of Si and Mn oxides on the surface of the high-strength steel was effectively suppressed, and the density of surface defects on the galvanized steel was significantly reduced by the pre-electrodeposition of Cu and Fe. This effect was more prominent for the steels electrodeposited at higher cathodic current densities. The finer electrodeposit layer formed at higher cathodic current density on the steels enabled the suppression of partial surface oxidation by Mn or Si and better wetting of Zn on the surface of the steels in the following galvanizing process. Furthermore, the pre-electrodeposited steels exhibited a smoother surface without surface cracks after the galvannealing process compared with the untreated steel. The diffusion of Fe and Zn in the Zn coating layer in the pre-electrodeposited steels appears to occur more uniformly during the galvannealing process due to the low density of surface defects induced by oxides.

  8. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  9. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  10. Mechanism of formation of humus coatings on mineral surfaces 3. Composition of adsorbed organic acids from compost leachate on alumina by solid-state 13C NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wershaw, R. L.; Llaguno, E.C.; Leenheer, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The adsorption of compost leachate DOC on alumina is used as a model for elucidation of the mechanism of formation of natural organic coatings on hydrous metal oxide surfaces in soils and sediments. Compost leachate DOC is composed mainly of organic acid molecules. The solid-state 13C NMR spectra of these organic acids indicate that they are very similar in composition to aquatic humic substances. Changes in the solid-state 13C NMR spectra of compost leachate DOC fractions adsorbed on alumina indicate that the DOC molecules are most likely adsorbed on metal oxide surfaces through a combination of polar and hydrophobic interaction mechanisms. This combination of polar and hydrophobic mechanism leads to the formation of bilayer coatings of the leachate molecules on the oxide surfaces.

  11. The Formation of Composite Ti-Al-N Coatings Using Filtered Vacuum Arc Deposition with Separate Cathodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Shulepov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Ti-Al-N coatings were deposited on high-speed steel substrates by filtered vacuum arc deposition (FVAD during evaporation of aluminum and titanium cathodes. Distribution of elements, phase composition, and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-N coatings were investigated using Auger electron spectroscopy (AES, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and nanoindentation, respectively. Additionally, tribological tests and scratch tests of the coatings were performed. The stoichiometry of the coating changes from Ti0.6Al0.4N to Ti0.48Al0.52N with increasing aluminum arc current from 70 A to 90 A, respectively. XRD and TEM showed only face-centered cubic Ti-Al-N phase with preferred orientation of the crystallites in (220 direction with respect to the sample normal and without precipitates of AlN or intermetallics inside the coatings. Incorporation of Al into the TiN lattice caused shifting of the (220 reflex to a higher 2θ angle with increasing Al content. Low content and size of microdroplets were obtained using coaxial plasma filters, which provides good mechanical and tribological properties of the coatings. The highest value of microhardness (36 GPa and the best wear-resistance were achieved for the coating with higher Al content, thus for Ti0.48Al0.52N. These coatings exhibit good adhesive properties up to 30 N load in the scratch tests.

  12. Outgassing characteristics of TiC coated materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukenobu, S.; Gomay, Y.

    1982-01-01

    The outgassing characteristics of TiC-coated materials (POCO graphite, and molybdenum) were studied. In the case of molybdenum substrate, thin TiN layer was coated before TiC coating to avoid molybdenum carbide formation. The outgassing characteristics of the sample materials were studied by a baking process at 250 degree C for 24 hours. The samples were inserted in a 304 stainless steel vacuum chamber with a thin aperture, and the gas through-put from this chamber was estimated by measuring the pressure before and after the aperture. A residual gas analyzer was installed on the low pressure side of the aperture. It can be concluded that the out-gassing rate of these TiC-coated materials was about 10 -12 Torr.Fl/s.Fcm"2 after baking at 250 degree C for 24 hours. Residual gas analysis showed that the main outgas species were H 2 and CO after baking. The TiC-coated POCO graphite and molybdenum are applicable to fusion devices as far as the outgassing characteristics are concerned. (Kato, T.)

  13. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leenaers, A., E-mail: aleenaer@sckcen.be [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V. [Nuclear Materials Science Institute, SCK-CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Detavernier, C. [Department of Solid State Sciences, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281/S1, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK• CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% {sup 235}U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL–matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium–Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)–matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  14. Fuel swelling and interaction layer formation in the SELENIUM Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) dispersion fuel plates irradiated at high power in BR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Van den Berghe, S.; Koonen, E.; Kuzminov, V.; Detavernier, C.

    2015-03-01

    In the framework of the SELENIUM project two full size flat fuel plates were produced with respectively Si and ZrN coated U(Mo) particles and irradiated in the BR2 reactor at SCK•CEN. Non-destructive analysis of the plates showed that the fuel swelling profiles of both SELENIUM plates were very similar to each other and none of the plates showed signs of pillowing or excessive swelling at the end of irradiation at the highest power position (local maximum 70% 235U). The microstructural analysis showed that the Si coated fuel has less interaction phase formation at low burn-up but at the highest burn-ups, defects start to develop on the IL-matrix interface. The ZrN coated fuel, shows a virtual absence of reaction between the U(Mo) and the Al, up to high fission densities after which the interaction layer formation starts and defects develop in the matrix near the U(Mo) particles. It was found and is confirmed by the SELENIUM (Surface Engineering of Low ENrIched Uranium-Molybdenum) experiment that there are two phenomena at play that need to be controlled: the formation of an interaction layer and swelling of the fuel. As the interaction layer formation occurs at the U(Mo)-matrix interface, applying a diffusion barrier (coating) at that interface should prevent the interaction between U(Mo) and the matrix. The U(Mo) swelling, observed to proceed at an accelerating rate with respect to fission density accumulation, is governed by linear solid state swelling and fission gas bubble swelling due to recrystallization of the fuel. The examination of the SELENIUM fuel plates clearly show that for the U(Mo) dispersion fuel to be qualified, the swelling rate at high burn-up needs to be reduced.

  15. Formation of Cr-modified silicide coatings on a Ti-Nb-Si based ultrahigh-temperature alloy by pack cementation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yanqiang; Guo, Xiping

    2010-10-01

    Cr-modified silicide coatings were prepared on a Ti-Nb-Si based ultrahigh temperature alloy by Si-Cr co-deposition at 1250 °C, 1350 °C and 1400 °C for 5-20 h respectively. It was found that both coating structure and phase constituents changed significantly with increase in the co-deposition temperature and holding time. The outer layers in all coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 5-20 h consisted of (Ti,X) 5Si 3 (X represents Nb, Cr and Hf elements). (Ti,X) 5Si 4 was found as the only phase constituent in the intermediate layers in both coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 5 and 10 h, but the intermediate layers in the coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 15 and 20 h were mainly composed of (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase that was derived from the decomposition of (Ti,X) 5Si 4 phase. In the coating prepared at 1350 °C for 5 h, single (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase was found in its outmost layer, the same as that in the outer layers in the coatings prepared at 1250 °C; but in the coatings prepared at 1350 °C for 10-20 h, (Nb 1.95Cr 1.05)Cr 2Si 3 ternary phase was found in the outmost layers besides (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase. In the coatings prepared at 1400 °C for 5-20 h, (Nb 1.95Cr 1.05)Cr 2Si 3 ternary phase was the single phase constituent in their outmost layers. The phase transformation (Ti,X) 5Si 4 → (Ti,X) 5Si 3 + Si occurred in the intermediate layers of the coatings prepared at 1350 and 1400 °C with prolonging co-deposition time, similar to the situation in the coatings prepared at 1250 °C for 15 and 20 h, but this transformation has been speeded up by increase in the co-deposition temperature. The transitional layers were mainly composed of (Ti,X) 5Si 3 phase in all coatings. The influence of co-deposition temperature on the diffusion ability of Cr atoms was greater than that of Si atoms in the Si-Cr co-deposition processes investigated. The growth of coatings obeyed inverse logarithmic laws at all three co-deposition temperatures. The Si-Cr co-deposition coating prepared at 1350

  16. Formation of Cr-modified silicide coatings on a Ti-Nb-Si based ultrahigh-temperature alloy by pack cementation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao Yanqiang [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China); Guo Xiping, E-mail: xpguo@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2010-10-01

    -deposition processes investigated. The growth of coatings obeyed inverse logarithmic laws at all three co-deposition temperatures. The Si-Cr co-deposition coating prepared at 1350 deg. C for 10 h showed a good oxidation resistance due to the formation of SiO{sub 2} and Nb, Cr-doped TiO{sub 2} scale after oxidation at 1250 deg. C for 10 h.

  17. Creation of leak-proof silicon carbide diffusion barriers by means of pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinecke, A.-M.; Lustfeld, M.; Lippmann, W., E-mail: wolfgang.lippmann@tu-dresden.de; Hurtado, A.

    2014-05-01

    TRISO (tristructural isotropic) coated fuel particles are a crucial element of the HTR safety concept. While TRISO coated particles have been proven as a very efficient barrier for a large range of fission products in HTR experimental reactors, some particular fission products could still diffuse at a considerable rate. Most importantly, radioactive silver {sup 110m}Ag was found to be released from coated particles. In future HTRs with active components like a gas turbine in the primary circuit, such silver contamination may severely limit maintainability of these parts with the result of reduced life-time performance. So far, experimental analyses on silver diffusion through silicon carbide have led to contradictory results. In this work, an alternative method was used to generate silicon carbide layers as a basis for analysis of silver diffusion. With pulsed laser deposition (PLD), it is possible to generate coatings of different materials and various kinds of compounds. In particular, this technology allows the generation of layers very well defined with respect to their composition, purity and density. The microstructure can precisely be manipulated through various parameters. Based on different silicon carbide coatings with well-defined properties, we are going to investigate the silver diffusion process. Our goal is to derive the properties of an ideal silicon carbide coating preventing silver diffusion entirely. In this paper we present the major aspects of our work creating crystalline SiC layers as well as silver and CsI layers both on plane and spherical substrates. Analyses with X-ray diffraction, X-ray spectrometry and secondary ion mass spectrometry show that complex multilayer systems comprising a graphite substrate, a crystalline SiC layer and an intermediate silver layer were successfully created. Major challenges to approach in the future are the handling of high-level intrinsic stresses forming in the layer structure as well as the high vapour

  18. The formation of quiescent glomerular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro is strongly dependent on the choice of extracellular matrix coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla, E-mail: kpaj@novonordisk.com [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark); Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Nielsen, Malik Nygaard [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark); Hansen, Troels Krarup [Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Williams, Julie M. [Global Research, Novo Nordisk A/S, Måløv (Denmark)

    2017-04-01

    Background and aims: Nephropathy involves pathophysiological changes to the glomerulus. The primary glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) have emerged as an important tool for studying glomerulosclerotic mechanisms and in the screening process for drug-candidates. The success of the studies is dependent on the quality of the cell model. Therefore, we set out to establish an easy, reproducible model of the quiescent endothelial monolayer with the use of commercially available extracellular matrices (ECMs). Methods: Primary hGEnCs were seeded on various ECMs. Cell adhesion was monitored by an impedance sensing system. The localization of junctional proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence and the barrier function by passage of fluorescent dextrans and magnitude of VEGF response. Results: All ECM matrices except recombinant human laminin 111 (rhLN111) supported comparable cell proliferation. Culturing hGEnCs on rhLN521, rhLN511 or fibronectin resulted in a physiologically relevant barrier to 70 kDa dextrans which was 82% tighter than that formed on collagen type IV. Furthermore, only hGEnCs cultured on rhLN521 or rhLN511 showed plasma-membrane localized zonula occludens-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin indicative of proper tight and adherens junctions (AJ). Conclusion: We recommend culturing hGEnCs on the mature glomerular basement membrane laminin - rhLN521 – which, as the only commercially available ECM, promotes all of the characteristics of the quiescent hGEnC monolayer: cobblestone morphology, well-defined AJs and physiological perm-selectivity. - Highlights: • rhLN521, rhLN511 and hFN assure physiologically relevant permeability. • rhLN521 and rhLN511 ensure best cell morphology and adherens junction formation. • Collagen IV and I based coating results in disorganized hGEnC monolayer. • Physiologically relevant ECM may lead to down-regulation of self-produced matrices.

  19. Atmospheric weathering and silica-coated feldspar: analogy with zeolite molecular sieves, granite weathering, soil formation, ornamental slabs, and ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J V

    1998-03-31

    Feldspar surfaces respond to chemical, biological, and mechanical weathering. The simplest termination is hydroxyl (OH), which interacts with any adsorption layer. Acid leaching of alkalis and aluminum generated a silica-rich, nanometers-thick skin on certain feldspars. Natural K, Na-feldspars develop fragile surfaces as etch pits expand into micrometer honeycombs, possibly colonized by lichens. Most crystals have various irregular coats. Based on surface-catalytic processes in molecular sieve zeolites, I proposed that some natural feldspars lose weakly bonded Al-OH (aluminol) to yield surfaces terminated by strongly bonded Si-OH (silanol). This might explain why some old feldspar-bearing rocks weather slower than predicted from brief laboratory dissolution. Lack of an Al-OH infrared frequency from a feldspar surface is consistent with such a silanol-dominated surface. Raman spectra of altered patches on acid-leached albite correspond with amorphous silica rather than hydroxylated silica-feldspar, but natural feldspar may respond differently. The crystal structure of H-exchanged feldspar provides atomic positions for computer modeling of complex ideas for silica-terminated feldspar surfaces. Natural weathering also depends on swings of temperature and hydration, plus transport of particles, molecules, and ionic complexes by rain and wind. Soil formation might be enhanced by crushing granitic outcrops to generate new Al-rich surfaces favorable for chemical and biological weathering. Ornamental slabs used by architects and monumental masons might last longer by minimizing mechanical abrasion during sawing and polishing and by silicifying the surface. Silica-terminated feldspar might be a promising ceramic surface.

  20. The formation of quiescent glomerular endothelial cell monolayer in vitro is strongly dependent on the choice of extracellular matrix coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nielsen, Malik Nygaard; Hansen, Troels Krarup; Williams, Julie M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Nephropathy involves pathophysiological changes to the glomerulus. The primary glomerular endothelial cells (GEnCs) have emerged as an important tool for studying glomerulosclerotic mechanisms and in the screening process for drug-candidates. The success of the studies is dependent on the quality of the cell model. Therefore, we set out to establish an easy, reproducible model of the quiescent endothelial monolayer with the use of commercially available extracellular matrices (ECMs). Methods: Primary hGEnCs were seeded on various ECMs. Cell adhesion was monitored by an impedance sensing system. The localization of junctional proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence and the barrier function by passage of fluorescent dextrans and magnitude of VEGF response. Results: All ECM matrices except recombinant human laminin 111 (rhLN111) supported comparable cell proliferation. Culturing hGEnCs on rhLN521, rhLN511 or fibronectin resulted in a physiologically relevant barrier to 70 kDa dextrans which was 82% tighter than that formed on collagen type IV. Furthermore, only hGEnCs cultured on rhLN521 or rhLN511 showed plasma-membrane localized zonula occludens-1 and vascular endothelial cadherin indicative of proper tight and adherens junctions (AJ). Conclusion: We recommend culturing hGEnCs on the mature glomerular basement membrane laminin - rhLN521 – which, as the only commercially available ECM, promotes all of the characteristics of the quiescent hGEnC monolayer: cobblestone morphology, well-defined AJs and physiological perm-selectivity. - Highlights: • rhLN521, rhLN511 and hFN assure physiologically relevant permeability. • rhLN521 and rhLN511 ensure best cell morphology and adherens junction formation. • Collagen IV and I based coating results in disorganized hGEnC monolayer. • Physiologically relevant ECM may lead to down-regulation of self-produced matrices.

  1. Influence of nonstoichiometry and ordering on basic structure parameter of cubic titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zueva, L.V.; Gusev, A.I.

    1999-01-01

    Effect of nonstoichiometry and phase transformations of the disorder-order type on the basis (B1 type) structure period of TiC y (0.5 y titanium carbide with formation of the Ti 2 C and Ti 3 C 2 superstructures leads to growth of the basic crystal lattice period as compared to disordered carbide. The problem on trends in static atomic displacement near vacancy is discussed with an account of the lattice period change [ru

  2. Elemental profiling of laser cladded multilayer coatings by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednev, V. N.; Sdvizhenskii, P. A.; Filippov, M. N.; Grishin, M. Ya.; Filichkina, V. A.; Stavertiy, A. Ya.; Tretyakov, R. S.; Bunkin, A. F.; Pershin, S. M.

    2017-09-01

    Multilayer tungsten carbide wear resistant coatings were analyzed by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Coaxial laser cladding technique was utilized to produce tungsten carbide coating deposited on low alloy steel substrate with additional inconel 625 interlayer. EDX and LIBS techniques were used for elemental profiling of major components (Ni, W, C, Fe, etc.) in the coating. A good correlation between EDX and LIBS data was observed while LIBS provided additional information on light element distribution (carbon). A non-uniform distribution of tungsten carbide grains along coating depth was detected by both LIBS and EDX. In contrast, horizontal elemental profiling showed a uniform tungsten carbide particles distribution. Depth elemental profiling by layer-by-layer LIBS analysis was demonstrated to be an effective method for studying tungsten carbide grains distribution in wear resistant coating without any sample preparation.

  3. Coatings for fast breeder reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.N.

    1984-04-01

    Several types of metallurgical coatings are used in the unique environments of the fast breeder reactor. Most of the coatings have been developed for tribological applications, but some also serve as corrosion barriers, diffusion barriers, or radionuclide traps. The materials that have consistently given the best performance as tribological coatings in the breeder reactor environments have been coatings based on chromium carbide, nickel aluminide, or Tribaloy 700 (a nickel-base hard-facing alloy). Other coatings that have been qualified for limited applications include chromium plating for low temperature galling protection and nickel plating for radionuclide trapping

  4. Degradation of Silicon Carbide Reflective Surfaces in the LEO Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mileti, Sandro; Coluzzi, Plinio; Marchetti, Mario

    2009-01-01

    Space mirrors in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) encounter a degradation problem caused by the impact of atomic oxygen (ATOX) in the space environment. This paper presents an experiment of the atomic oxygen impact degradation and UV synergic effects on ground simulation. The experiment was carried out in a dedicated ATOX simulation vacuum chamber. As target materials, a polished CVD Beta-silicon carbide (SiC) coating was investigated. The selection of silicon carbide is due to its high potential candidate as a mirror layer substrate material for its good reflectance at UV wavelengths and excellent thermal diffusivity. It has highly desirable mechanical and thermal properties and can achieve an excellent surface finish. The deposition of the coatings were on carbon-based material substrate; i.e., silicon impregnated carbon fiber composite (C/SiC). Mechanical and thermal properties of the coatings such as hardness and Coefficient of Thermal Expansion (CTE) were achieved. Several atomic oxygen impact angles were studied tilting the target samples respect to the flux direction. The various impact angles permitted to analyze the different erosion rates and typologies which the mirrors would encounter in LEO environment. The degradation was analyzed in various aspects. Macroscopic mass loss per unit area, surface roughness and morphology change were basically analyzed. The exposed surfaces of the materials were observed through a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Secondly, optical diagnostic of the surfaces were performed in order to investigate their variation in optical properties as the evaluation of reflectance degradation. The presence of micro-cracks caused by shrinkage, grinding, polishing or thermal cycling and the porosity in the coatings, could have led to the undercutting phenomenon. Observation of uprising of undercutting was also conducted. Remarks are given regarding capabilities in short-term mission exposures to the LEO environment of this coating.

  5. Carbon in palladium catalysts: A metastable carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seriani, Nicola; Mittendorfer, Florian; Kresse, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic activity of palladium towards selective hydrogenation of hydrocarbons depends on the partial pressure of hydrogen. It has been suggested that the reaction proceeds selectively towards partial hydrogenation only when a carbon-rich film is present at the metal surface. On the basis of first-principles simulations, we show that carbon can dissolve into the metal because graphite formation is delayed by the large critical nucleus necessary for graphite nucleation. A bulk carbide Pd 6 C with a hexagonal 6-layer fcc-like supercell forms. The structure is characterized by core level shifts of 0.66-0.70 eV in the core states of Pd, in agreement with experimental x-ray photoemission spectra. Moreover, this phase traps bulk-dissolved hydrogen, suppressing the total hydrogenation reaction channel and fostering partial hydrogenation. (author)

  6. Ordering effects in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatnikov, V.N.; Zueva, L.V.; Gusev, A.I.; Kottar, A.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of nonstoichiometry and ordering on crystalline structure and specific electric resistance (ρ) of TiC y (0.52≤y≤0.98) is studied within the temperature range of 300-1100 K. It is shown that the titanium carbide ordering in the areas 0.52≤y≤0.55, 0.56≤y≤0.58 and 0.62≤y≤0.68 leads to formation of the Ti 2 C cubic and trigonal ordered phase and the Ti 3 C 2 rhombic ordered phase correspondingly. Availability of hysteresis on the ρ(T) dependences in the area of the disorder-order reversible equilibrium transition points out to the fact that the TiC y ↔Ti 2 C and TiC y ↔Ti 3 C 2 transformations are the first order phase transitions [ru

  7. Formation and investigation of multilayer nanostructured coatings TiN/MoN for different layers thicknesses with c-pvd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogrebnyak, A.D.; Bondar, O.V.; Postol'nyj, B.A.; Andreev, A.A.; Abadias, G.; Beresnev, V.M.; Sobol', O.B.

    2013-01-01

    Multilayer coatings based on TiN/MoN were obtained using the vacuum arc evaporation cathode method (C-PVD). Multilayers thickness was in the range 6,7 ÷ 8,7 μm and monolayers thickness was 2, 10, 20 and 40 nm. Vacuum-arc unit Bulat 6 was used for depositions. For the analysis of multilayer structures and properties of nanostructured coatings XRD analysis method was used (D8 ADVANCE, Bruker). For elemental composition and morphology investigation of the surface layers and multilayered coatings SEM (JEOL-7001F) with EDX attachment was used. Also HRTEM method was used to analyze the phase composition. In addition, this article provides investigation of hardness by Micro-Hardness Tester CSM (Switzerland). AFM was used for additional analysis of the topography and surface roughness of these coatings. This investigation have revealed the relationship between the layers thicknesses, substrate potential, the annealing process, physical and mechanical properties of samples. (authors)

  8. Novel fabrication of silicon carbide based ceramics for nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek Kumar

    Advances in nuclear reactor technology and the use of gas-cooled fast reactors require the development of new materials that can operate at the higher temperatures expected in these systems. These materials include refractory alloys based on Nb, Zr, Ta, Mo, W, and Re; ceramics and composites such as SiC--SiCf; carbon--carbon composites; and advanced coatings. Besides the ability to handle higher expected temperatures, effective heat transfer between reactor components is necessary for improved efficiency. Improving thermal conductivity of the fuel can lower the center-line temperature and, thereby, enhance power production capabilities and reduce the risk of premature fuel pellet failure. Crystalline silicon carbide has superior characteristics as a structural material from the viewpoint of its thermal and mechanical properties, thermal shock resistance, chemical stability, and low radioactivation. Therefore, there have been many efforts to develop SiC based composites in various forms for use in advanced energy systems. In recent years, with the development of high yield preceramic precursors, the polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) method has aroused interest for the fabrication of ceramic based materials, for various applications ranging from disc brakes to nuclear reactor fuels. The pyrolysis of preceramic polymers allow new types of ceramic materials to be processed at relatively low temperatures. The raw materials are element-organic polymers whose composition and architecture can be tailored and varied. The primary focus of this study is to use a pyrolysis based process to fabricate a host of novel silicon carbide-metal carbide or oxide composites, and to synthesize new materials based on mixed-metal silicocarbides that cannot be processed using conventional techniques. Allylhydridopolycarbosilane (AHPCS), which is an organometal polymer, was used as the precursor for silicon carbide. Inert gas pyrolysis of AHPCS produces near-stoichiometric amorphous

  9. Fabricating porous silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Joseph S. (Inventor); Kurtz, Anthony D. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The formation of porous SiC occurs under electrochemical anodization. A sample of SiC is contacted electrically with nickel and placed into an electrochemical cell which cell includes a counter electrode and a reference electrode. The sample is encapsulated so that only a bare semiconductor surface is exposed. The electrochemical cell is filled with an HF electrolyte which dissolves the SiC electrochemically. A potential is applied to the semiconductor and UV light illuminates the surface of the semiconductor. By controlling the light intensity, the potential and the doping level, a porous layer is formed in the semiconductor and thus one produces porous SiC.

  10. Titanium composite conversion coating formation on CRS In the presence of Mo and Ni ions: Electrochemical and microstructure characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eivaz Mohammadloo, H.; Sarabi, A.A., E-mail: Sarabi@aut.ac.ir

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Eco-friendly protective thin films for covering the CRS substrates were presented. • Comprehensive analyses were performed to evaluate the surface characteristics. • Promising approach for the surface modification of CRS substrate by Ti-based conversion coatings. - Abstract: There have been an increasing interest in finding a replacement for the chromating process due to environmental and health concerns. Hence, in this study Chrome-free chemical conversion coatings were deposited on the surface of cold-rolled steel (CRS) on the basis of Titanium (TiCC), Titanium-Nickel (TiNiCC) and titanium-molybdate (TiMoCC) based conversion coating solutions. The surface characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measuring device. Also, the corrosion behavior was assessed by the means of potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurements. FESEM and AFM study show that the TiNiCC is denser and more uniform than that TiCC and TiMoCC since, TiMoCC conversion coating presents network feature, and there were abundant micro-cracks on the surface of the coating. XPS results confirmed the precipitation of Ti and Ni oxide/hydroxide, Mn dioxide/trioxide on the surface of different Ti-based conversion coatings. Electrochemical results revealed that all Ti-based conversion coatings have better anti-corrosion properties than bare CRS. Moreover, TiNiCC treatment inhibited the corrosion of CRS to a significant degree (polarization resistance (R{sub p}) = 5510 Ω cm{sup 2}) in comparison with TiCC (R{sub p} = 2705 Ω cm{sup 2}) and TiMoCC (R{sub p} = 805 Ω cm{sup 2}).

  11. Superconductivity in borides and carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, Takahiro

    2007-01-01

    It was thought that intermetallic superconductors do not exhibit superconductivity at temperatures over 30 K because of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) limit; therefore, researchers have been interested in high-T c cuprates. Our group discovered high-T c superconductivity in MgB 2 at 39 K in 2001. This discovery has initiated a substantial interest in the potential of high-T c superconductivity in intermetallic compounds that include 'light' elements (borides, carbides, etc.). (author)

  12. The Effect of Pigment Volume Concentration on Film Formation and the Mechanical Properties of Coatings Based on Water-Dispersion Paint and Varnish Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasyanenko, I. M.; Kramarenko, V. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The effect of pigment volume concentration (PVC) on the film formation process and properties of coatings based on the water dispersion of an Acronal 290D styrene-acrylate copolymer and a pigment/filler system used for paint materials in construction was investigated. An analysis of the results obtained is performed within the framework of the concept of the critical PVC. It is shown that the initiation and development of internal stresses occurs the faster, the higher the PVC, but the position of the maximum or the inflection point of the internal stress-drying time curve complies with a universal value of the solid volume content in the compositions. It is found that the internal stresses and Young's modulus of coatings are characterized by an extreme concentration relation that, for the reduced elastic modulus, can be described by a system of equations based on the Halpin-Tsai equation.

  13. Physically vapor deposited coatings on tools: performance and wear phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, W.; Fritsch, R.; Kammermeier, D.

    1991-01-01

    Coatings produced by physical vapor deposition (PVD) enhance the performance of tools for a broad variety of production processes. In addition to TiN, nowadays (Ti,Al)N and Ti(C,N) coated tools are available. This gives the opportunity to compare the performance of different coatings under identical machining conditions and to evaluate causes and phenomena of wear. TiN, (Ti,Al)N and Ti(C,N) coatings on high speed steel (HSS) show different performances in milling and turning of heat treated steel. The thermal and frictional properties of the coating materials affect the structure, the thickness and the flow of the chips, the contact area on the rake face and the tool life. Model tests show the influence of internal cooling and the thermal conductivity of coated HSS inserts. TiN and (Ti,Zr)N PVD coatings on cemented carbides were examined in interrupted turning and in milling of heat treated steel. Experimental results show a significant influence of typical time-temperature cycles of PVD and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coating processes on the physical data and on the performance of the substrates. PVD coatings increase tool life, especially towards lower cutting speeds into ranges which cannot be applied with CVD coatings. The reason for this is the superior toughness of the PVD coated carbide. The combination of tough, micrograin carbide and PVD coating even enables broaching of case hardened sliding gears at a cutting speed of 66 m min -1 . (orig.)

  14. Helium diffusion in irradiated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.

    1981-03-01

    Boron carbide has been internationally adopted as the neutron absorber material in the control and safety rods of large fast breeder reactors. Its relatively large neutron capture cross section at high neutron energies provides sufficient reactivity worth with a minimum of core space. In addition, the commercial availability of boron carbide makes it attractive from a fabrication standpoint. Instrumented irradiation experiments in EBR-II have provided continuous helium release data on boron carbide at a variety of operating temperatures. Although some microstructural and compositional variations were examined in these experiments most of the boron carbide was prototypic of that used in the Fast Flux Test Facility. The density of the boron carbide pellets was approximately 92% of theoretical. The boron carbide pellets were approximately 1.0 cm in diameter and possessed average grain sizes that varied from 8 to 30 μm. Pellet centerline temperatures were continually measured during the irradiation experiments

  15. Formation of Apatite Coatings on an Artificial Ligament Using a Plasma- and Precursor-Assisted Biomimetic Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Oyane

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A plasma- and precursor-assisted biomimetic process utilizing plasma and alternate dipping treatments was applied to a Leed-Keio artificial ligament to produce a thin coating of apatite in a supersaturated calcium phosphate solution. Following plasma surface modification, the specimen was alternately dipped in calcium and phosphate ion solutions three times (alternate dipping treatment to create a precoating containing amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP which is an apatite precursor. To grow an apatite layer on the ACP precoating, the ACP-precoated specimen was immersed for 24 h in a simulated body fluid with ion concentrations approximately equal to those in human blood plasma. The plasma surface modification was necessary to create an adequate apatite coating and to improve the coating adhesion depending on the plasma power density. The apatite coating prepared using the optimized conditions formed a thin-film that covered the entire surface of the artificial ligament. The resulting apatite-coated artificial ligament should exhibit improved osseointegration within the bone tunnel and possesses great potential for use in ligament reconstructions.

  16. Magnetic susceptibility as a method of investigation of short-range order in strongly nonstoichiometric carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarova, S.Z.; Gusev, A.I.

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility in disordered and ordered carbides of transition metals (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta) was studied, the results are generalized. It was ascertained that the change in carbide susceptibility induced by deviation from stoichiometry stems from specific features of electronic spectra of the compounds. The use of magnetic susceptibility for determining structural disorder-order transitions is discussed. It is shown that change in the contribution made by orbital paramagnetism, resulting from short-range order formation, is the reason of decrease in susceptibility of nonstoichiometric carbides during the ordering. Experimentally obtained data on susceptibility permitted evaluating short- and far-range order parameters in NbC y , TaC y , TiC y and HfC y carbides [ru

  17. Crystallization of nodular cast iron with carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a crystallization process of nodular cast iron with carbides having a different chemical composition have been presented. It have been found, that an increase of molybdenum above 0,30% causes the ledeburutic carbides crystallization after (γ+ graphite eutectic phase crystallization. When Mo content is lower, these carbides crystallize as a pre-eutectic phase. In this article causes of this effect have been given.

  18. Metal-carbide multilayers for molten Pu containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, T.S.E.; Curtis, P.G.; Juntz, R.S.; Krueger, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    Multilayers composed of nine or ten alternating layers of Ta or W and TaC were studied for the feasibility of their use in containing molten plutonium (Pu) at 1200 degrees C. Single layers of W and TaC were also investigated. A two-source electron beam evaporation process was developed to deposit these coatings onto the inside surface of hemispherical Ta cups about 38 mm in diameter. Pu testing was done by melting Pu in the coated hemispherical cups and holding them under vacuum at 1200 degrees C for two hours. Metallographic examination and microprobe analysis of cross sections showed that Pu had penetrated to the Ta substrate in all cases to some extent. Full penetration to the outer surface of the Ta substrate, however, occurred in only a few of the samples. The fact that full penetration occurred in any of the samples suggests that it would have occurred in uncoated Ta under these testing conditions which in turn suggests that the multilayer coatings do afford some protection against Pu attack. The TaC used for these specimens was wet by Pu under these testing conditions, and following testing, Pu was found uniformly distributed throughout the carbide layers which appeared to be rather porous. Pu was seen in the W and Ta layers only when exposed directly to molten Pu during testing or near defects suggesting that Pu penetrated the multilayers at defects in the coating and traveled parallel to the layers along the carbide layers. These results indicate that the use of alternating metal and ceramic layers for Pu containment should be possible through the use of nonporous ceramic that is not wet by molten Pu and defect-free films

  19. Formation of a hydrophobic and corrosion resistant coating on magnesium alloy via a one-step hydrothermal method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Tianxu; Hu, Yaobo; Zhang, Yuxin; Pan, Fusheng

    2017-11-01

    A hydrophobic coating was fabricated on the surface of magnesium alloy using a simple one-step hydrothermal method with the use of environmentally friendly agent. Scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle test were used to characterize the surfaces. Corrosion behavior in a 3.5wt.% NaCl solution was evaluated using OCP time curves test, potentiodynamic polarization test and EIS analysis. The findings show that the substrate is covered by the coating of magnesium hydroxide and magnesium stearate, reaching a contact angle of around 146°. Corrosion behavior show huge improvement, the progress with increase of treatment time could be related to the increased growth rate of coating. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Zr-based conversion layer on Zn-Al-Mg alloy coated steel sheets: insights into the formation mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lostak, Thomas; Maljusch, Artjom; Klink, Björn; Krebs, Stefan; Kimpel, Matthias; Flock, Jörg; Schulz, Stephan; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Zr-based conversion layers are considered as environmentally friendly alternatives replacing trication phosphatation in the automotive industry. Based on excellent electronic barrier properties they provide an effective corrosion protection of the metallic substrate. In this work, thin protective layers were grown on novel Zn-Al-Mg alloy coated steel sheets by increasing the local pH-value at the sample surface leading to deposition of a Zr-based conversion layer. For this purpose Zn-Al-Mg alloy (ZM) coated steel sheets were treated in an aqueous model conversion solution containing well-defined amounts of hexafluorozirconic acid (H 2 ZrF 6 ) and characterized after different immersion times with SKPFM and field emission SEM (FE-SEM)/EDX techniques. A deposition mechanism of Zr-based conversion coatings on microstructural heterogeneous Zn-Al-Mg alloy surfaces was proposed

  1. Quantifying the influence of polymer coatings on the serum albumin corona formation around silver and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treuel, Lennart; Malissek, Marcelina; Grass, Stefan; Diendorf, Jörg; Mahl, Dirk; Meyer-Zaika, Wolfgang; Epple, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    When nanoparticles (NPs) come into contact with biological fluids, proteins, and other biomolecules interact with their surface. Upon exposure to biological fluids a layer of proteins adsorbs onto their surface, the so-called protein corona, and interactions of biological systems with NPs are therefore mediated by this corona. Here, interactions of serum albumin with silver and gold NPs were quantitatively investigated using circular dichroism spectroscopy. Moreover, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy was used for further elucidation of protein binding to silver surfaces. The decisive role of poly(vinylpyrrolidone), coatings on the protein adsorption was quantitatively described for the first time and the influential role of the polymer coatings is discussed. Research in nanotoxicology may benefit from such molecular scale data as well as scientific approaches seeking to improve nanomedical applications by using a wide range of polymer surface coatings to optimize biological transport and medical action of NPs.

  2. FORMATION AND RESEARCH OF MULTI-LAYER COMPOSITE PLASMA OXIDE COATINGS BASED ON ELEMENTS OF SCREEN METEROID PTOTECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Okovity

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research for influence of plasma jet parameters (current, spraying distance, plasmasupporting nitrogen gas consumption, fractional composition of an initial powder and cooling degree by compressed air on characteristics of anti-meteorite coatings, subsequent processing modes by pulsed plasma. Properties of the obtained coatings and results of ballistic tests have been given in the paper. The proposed methodology has been based on complex metallographic, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopic investigations of anti-meteorite aluminum oxide coating. Optimization of air plasma spraying parameters for NiAl and Al2O3 materials has been carried out in the paper. The spraying parameters optimization has been executed on the basis of obtaining maximum materials utilization factor. Surface treatment of model screen elements with a double-layer composite coating (adhesive metal NiAl layer and hard ceramic oxide Al2O3 layer has been fulfilled while using compression plasma stream. Nitrogen has been used as working gas. Composite hard ceramic oxide Al2O3 coating is represented by porous structure consisting of 10–15 µm-size fused Al2O3 particles. Metallic inclusions formed due to erosion of plasmatron electrodes have been observed in the space between the particles. Surface of bilayer composite coatings has been processed by a compression plasma stream and due to nonsteady processes of melting and recrystallization high strength polycrystalline layer has been formed on their surface. In this context, those areas of the polycrystalline layer which had metal inclusions have appeared to be painted in various colors depending on chemical composition of the inclusions.

  3. The formation of FHA coating on biodegradable Mg-Zn-Zr alloy using a two-step chemical treatment method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, S. T.; Zhang, J.; Shun, S. Z.; Chen, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    To improve the corrosion resistance of the biomedical magnesium alloy, a two-step chemical treatment method has been employed to prepare an FHA coating on the alloy surface. Prior to forming an FHA layer, the samples of Mg-3 wt% Zn-0.5 wt% Zr alloy were soaked in HF with concentration of 20% (v/v) at 37 °C temperature for 2 h, and were then placed into an aqueous solution with 0.1 mol/L Ca(NO3).4H2O and 0.06 mol/L NH4H2PO4 at 90 °C to prepare the Ca-P coating. The concentrations of Mg2+, F- ions, and pH variation with immersing time in the solution were investigated to explore the growth mechanism of FHA. The surface morphologies and compositions of the coatings were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The results showed that the alloy surface treated with acid formed a layer of MgF2 nanoparticles with a thickness of 0.7 μm. The corrosion resistance of coatings in SBF solution was evaluated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and potentiodynamic polarization. The results showed that the substrate with FHA coating had good corrosion resistance. After immersing into the calcium phosphate solution, some small spherical particles were first formed on the surface; these then cover the surface completely after 20 min. Some clusters consisting of needle-like crystal were observed in the spherical particles covering the surface, and the Ca/P ratio of the needle-like crystal was 1.46, clearly growing along the c axis preferred orientation growth. After immersion for 60 min, the FHA coating with completely uniform growth was obtained on the Mg-Zn-Zr alloy surface with its thickness reaching about 120 μm.

  4. Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide (MXene) as Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarycheva, Asia [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Makaryan, Taron [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Maleski, Kathleen [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Satheeshkumar, Elumalai [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan); National Institute of Technology-Trichy, Tamil Nadu (India); Melikyan, Armen [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) State Univ., Yerevan (Armenia); Minassian, Hayk [A. Alikhanian National Science Lab., Yerevan (Armenia); Yoshimura, Masahiro [National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan); Gogotsi, Yury G. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-08-22

    Here, noble metal (gold or silver) nanoparticles or patterned films are typically used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Two-dimensional (2D) carbides and nitrides (MXenes) exhibit unique electronic and optical properties, including metallic conductivity and plasmon resonance in the visible or near-infrared range, making them promising candidates for a wide variety of applications. Herein, we show that 2D titanium carbide, Ti3C2Tx, enhances Raman signal from organic dyes on a substrate and in solution. As a proof of concept, MXene SERS substrates were manufactured by spray-coating and used to detect several common dyes, with calculated enhancement factors reaching ~106. Titanium carbide MXene demonstrates SERS effect in aqueous colloidal solutions, suggesting the potential for biomedical or environmental applications, where MXene can selectively enhance positively charged molecules.

  5. Contribution to the study of zirconium self-diffusion in zirconium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Chul

    1972-01-01

    The objective of this research thesis is to determine experimental conditions allowing the measurement of the self-diffusion coefficient of zirconium in zirconium carbide. The author reports the development of a method of preparation of zirconium carbide samples. He reports the use of ion implantation as technique to obtain a radio-tracer coating. The obtained results give evidence of the impossibility to use sintered samples with small grains because of the demonstrated importance of intergranular diffusion. The self-diffusion coefficient is obtained in the case of zirconium carbide with grains having a diameter of few millimetres. The presence of 95 Nb from the disintegration of 95 Zr indicates that these both metallic elements have very close diffusion coefficients at 2.600 C [fr

  6. Adhesion of Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 coatings to typical aerospace substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marraco-Borderas, C.; Nistal, A.; Garcia, E.; Sainz, M.A.; Martin de la Escalera, F.; Essa, Y.; Miranzo, P.

    2016-01-01

    High performance lightweight materials are required in the aerospace industry. Silicon carbide, carbon fiber reinforced carbon and slicon carbide composites comply with those requirements but they suffer from oxidation at the high temperature of the service conditions. One of the more effective approaches to prevent this problem is the use of protecting ceramic coatings, where the good adhesion between substrates and coatings are paramount to guarantee the optimal protection performance. In the present work, the adhesion between those substrates and glass coatings of the Y2O3-Al2O3-SiO2 system processed by oxyacetylene flame spraying is analyzed. Increasing load scratch tests are employed for determining the failure type, maximum load and their relation with the elastic and mechanical properties of the coatings. The results points to the good adhesion of the coatings to silicon carbide and carbon fibre reinforced silicon carbide while the carbon fiber reinforced carbon is not a suitable material to be coated. (Author)

  7. Investigation of Coated Cutting Tool Performance during Machining of Super Duplex Stainless Steels through 3D Wear Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassmin Seid Ahmed

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the wear mechanisms and tribological performance of uncoated and coated carbide tools were investigated during the turning of super duplex stainless steel (SDSS—Grade UNS S32750, known commercially as SAF 2507. The tool wear was evaluated throughout the cutting tests and the wear mechanisms were investigated using an Alicona Infinite Focus microscope and a scanning electron microscope (SEM equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS. Tribo-film formation on the worn rake surface of the tool was analyzed using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS. In addition, tribological performance was evaluated by studying chip characteristics such as thickness, compression ratio, shear angle, and undersurface morphology. Finally, surface integrity of the machined surface was investigated using the Alicona microscope to measure surface roughness and SEM to reveal the surface distortions created during the cutting process, combined with cutting force analyses. The results obtained showed that the predominant wear mechanisms are adhesion and chipping for all tools investigated and that the AlTiN coating system exhibited better performance in all aspects when compared with CVD TiCN + Al2O3 coated cutting insert and uncoated carbide insert; in particular, built-up edge formation was significantly reduced.

  8. Machinability and scratch wear resistance of carbon-coated WC inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazhanivel, B., E-mail: palcecri@yahoo.co.in; Kumar, T. Prem; Sozhan, G.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Cemented WC inserts were coated with carbon by CVD. • The deposits were either loosely held MWCNTs or adherent carbides. • Co-efficient of friction (ramp load; 1–13 N); 0.2 and 0.1 μ, respectively, for the uncoated and carbide-coated inserts. • The carbide-coated insert exhibited better machinability and surface finish than a commercial TiCN-coated insert. - Abstract: In this work, cemented tungsten carbide (WC) inserts were coated with nanocarbons/carbides by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and their machinability and scratch wear resistance were investigated. The hardness and surface conditions of the WC substrate were studied before and after coating. The CVD-generated nanocarbons on the insert surfaces were examined by SEM, FE-SEM and TEM. The electron microscopic images revealed that the carbons generated were multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or carbides depending on the experimental conditions. In both the cases, the cutting edges of the inserts had dense deposits. Scratch wear test with the coated inserts showed that the co-efficient of friction was 0.1 μ as against 0.2 μ for the uncoated inserts under a ramp load of 1–13 N. The machinability characteristics of commercially available TiCN-coated inserts and the carbon-coated WC inserts were compared by using a CNC machine and a Rapid I vision inspection system. It was found that the carbide-coated inserts exhibited machinability with better surface finish comparable to that of the TiCN-coated inserts while the MWCNT-coated inserts showed inferior adhesion properties.

  9. High temperature oxidation of carbide-carbon materials of NbC-C, NbC-TiC-C systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afonin, Yu.D.; Shalaginov, V.N.; Beketov, A.R.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of titanium carbide additions on the oxidation of carbide - carbon composition NbC-TiC-C in oxygen under the pressure of 10 mm Hg and in the air at atmospheric pressure in the temperature range 800-1300 deg is studied. It is shown that the region of negative temperature coefficient during oxidation in the system NbC+C is determined by the processes of sintering and polymorphous transformation. The specific character of the oxide film, formed during oxidation of Nbsub(x)Tisub(y)C+C composites is connected with non-equilibrium nature of carbide grain in its composition. Carbon gasification takes place with the formation of carbon dioxide. Composite materials, containing titanium carbide in complex carbide up to 50-83 mol. %, are the most corrosion resisting ones [ru

  10. Laser-induced reaction alumina coating on ceramic composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chenghe

    Silicon carbide ceramics are susceptible to corrosion by certain industrial furnace environments. It is also true for a new class of silicon carbide-particulate reinforced alumina-matrix composite (SiCsb(P)Alsb2Osb3) since it contains more than 55% of SiC particulate within the composite. This behavior would limit the use of SiCsb(P)Alsb2Osb3 composites in ceramic heat exchangers. Because oxide ceramics corrode substantially less in the same environments, a laser-induced reaction alumina coating technique has been developed for improving corrosion resistance of the SiCsb(P)Alsb2Osb3 composite. Specimens with and without the laser-induced reaction alumina coating were subjected to corrosion testing at 1200sp°C in an air atmosphere containing Nasb2COsb3 for 50 ˜ 200 hours. Corroded specimens were characterized via x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The uncoated SiCsbP/Alsb2Osb3 composite samples experienced an initial increase in weight during the exposure to Nasb2COsb3 at 1200sp°C due to the oxidation of residual aluminum metal in the composite. There was no significant weight change difference experienced during exposure times between 50 and 200 hours. The oxidation layer formed on the as-received composite surface consisted of Si and Alsb2Osb3 (after washing with a HF solution). The oxidation layer grew outward and inward from the original surface of the composite. The growth rate in the outward direction was faster than in the inward direction. The formation of the Si/Alsb2Osb3 oxidation layer on the as-received composite was nonuniform, and localized corrosion was observed. The coated samples experienced very little mass increase. The laser-induced reaction alumina coating effectively provided protection for the SiCsbP/Alsb2Osb3 composite by keeping the corrodents from contacting the composite and by the formation of some refractory compounds such as Nasb2OAlsb2Osb3SiOsb2 and Nasb2Alsb{22}Osb

  11. Synthesis of transfer-free graphene on cemented carbide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiang; Zhang, Zhen; Liu, Fei; Ren, Yi

    2018-03-19

    Direct growth of spherical graphene with large surface area is important for various applications in sensor technology. However, the preparation of transfer-free graphene on different substrates is still a challenge. This study presents a novel approach for the transfer-free graphene growth directly on cemented carbide. The used simple thermal annealing induces an in-situ transformation of magnetron-sputtered amorphous silicon carbide films into the graphene matrix. The study reveals the role of Co, a binding phase in cemented carbides, in Si sublimation process, and its interplay with the annealing temperature in development of the graphene matrix. A detailed physico-chemical characterisation was performed by structural (XRD analysis and Raman spectroscopy with mapping studies), morphological (SEM) and chemical (EDS) analyses. The optimal bilayer graphene matrix with hollow graphene spheres on top readily grows at 1000 °C. Higher annealing temperature critically decreases the amount of Si, which yields an increased number of the graphene layers and formation of multi-layer graphene (MLG). The proposed action mechanism involves silicidation of Co during thermal treatment, which influences the existing chemical form of Co, and thus, the graphene formation and variations in a number of the formed graphene layers.

  12. Electronic and vibrational hopping transport in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emin, D.

    1991-01-01

    General concepts of hopping-type transport and localization are reviewed. Disorder, electronic correlations and atomic displacements, effects ignored in electronic band structure calculations, foster localization of electronic charge carriers. Examples are given that illustrate the efficacy of these effects in producing localization. This introduction is followed by a brief discussion of the relation between hopping-type transport and localization. The fundamentals of the formation, localization, and hopping transport of small polarons and/or bipolarons is then described. Electronic transport in boron carbides is presented as an example of the adiabatic hopping of small bipolarons. Finally, the notion of vibrational hopping is introduced. The high-temperature thermal diffusion in boron carbides is presented as a potential application of this idea

  13. Protective film formation on AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy by leaching of lithium carbonate from an organic coating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Y.; Visser, P.; Zhou, X.; Lyon, S.B.; Hashimoto, T.; Curioni, M.; Gholinia, A.; Thompson, G.E.; Smyth, G.; Gibbon, S.R.; Graham, D.; Mol, J.M.C.; Terryn, H.A.

    2015-01-01

    An investigation into corrosion inhibition properties of a primer coating containing lithium carbonate as corrosion inhibitive pigment for AA2024 aluminum alloy was conducted. It was found that, during neutral salt spray exposure, a protective film of about 0.2 to 1.5 ?m thickness formed within the

  14. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-01-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450ee)C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC-based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800ee)C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation

  15. Infiltration processing of metal matrix composites using coated ceramic particulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Patino, Carlos Alberto

    2001-07-01

    A new process was developed to fabricate particulate metal matrix composites (MMCs). The process involves three steps: (1) modifying the particulate surface by metal coating, (2) forming a particulate porous compact; and (3) introducing metal into the channel network by vacuum infiltration. MMCs with different reinforcements, volume fractions, and sizes can be produced by this technique. Powders of alumina and silicon carbide were successfully coated with nickel and copper in preparation for infiltration with molten aluminum. Electroless Ni and Cu deposition was used since it enhances the wettability of the reinforcements for composite fabrication. While Cu deposits were polycrystalline, traces of phosphorous co-deposited from the electroless bath gave an amorphous Ni-P coating. The effect of metal coating on wetting behavior was evaluated at 800°C on plain and metal-coated ceramic plates using a sessile drop technique. The metallic films eliminated the non-wetting behavior of the uncoated ceramics, leading to equilibrium contact angles in the order of 12° and below 58° for Ni and Cu coated ceramics, respectively. The spreading data indicated that local diffusion at the triple junction was the governing mechanism of the wetting process. Precipitation of intermetallic phases in the drop/ceramic interface delayed the formation of Al4C3. Infiltration with molten Al showed that the coated-particulates are suitable as reinforcing materials for fabricating MMCs, giving porosity-free components with a homogeneously distributed reinforcing phase. The coating promoted easy metal flow through the preform, compared to the non-infiltration behavior of the uncoated counterparts. Liquid state diffusion kinetics due to temperature dependent viscosity forces controlled the infiltration process. Microstructural analysis indicated the formation of intermetallic phases such as CuAl 2, in the case of Cu coating, and Ni2Al3 and NiAl 3 when Ni-coated powders were infiltrated. The

  16. Muonium states in silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, B.D.; Baumeler, H.; Keller, H.; Kiefl, R.F.; Kuendig, W.; Odermatt, W.; Schneider, J.W.; Estle, T.L.; Spencer, D.P.; Savic, I.M.

    1986-01-01

    Implanted muons in samples of silicon carbide have been observed to form paramagnetic muonium centers (μ + e - ). Muonium precession signals in low applied magnetic fields have been observed at 22 K in a granular sample of cubic β-SiC, however it was not possible to determine the hyperfine frequency. In a signal crystal sample of hexagonal 6H-SiC, three apparently isotropic muonium states were observed at 20 K and two at 300 K, all with hyperfine frequencies intermediate between those of the isotropic muonium centers in diamond and silicon. No evidence was seen of an anisotropic muonium state analogous to the Mu * state in diamond and silicon. (orig.)

  17. Vapor pressure and thermodynamics of beryllium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinehart, G.H.; Behrens, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The vapor pressure of beryllium carbide has been measured over the temperature range 1388 to 1763 K using Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry. Vaporization occurs incongruently according to the reaction Be 2 C(s) = 2Be(g) + C(s). The equilibrium vapor pressure above the mixture of Be 2 C and C over the experimental temperature range is (R/J K -1 mol -1 )ln(p/Pa) = -(3.610 +- 0.009) x 10 5 (K/T) + (221.43 +- 1.06). The third-law enthalpy change for the above reaction obtained from the present vapor pressures is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (740.5 +- 0.1) kJ mol -1 . The corresponding second-law result is ΔH 0 (298.15 K) = (732.0 +- 1.8) kJ mol -1 . The enthalpy of formation for Be 2 C(s) calculated from the present third-law vaporization enthalpy and the enthalpy of formation of Be(g) is ΔH 0 sub(f)(298.15 K) = -(92.5 +- 15.7) kJ mol -1 . (author)

  18. Low temperature study of nonstoichiometric titanium carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashmetov, M.Yu.

    2005-05-01

    By low temperature neutron diffraction method was studied structure in nonstoichiometric titanium carbide from room temperature up to 12K. It is found of low temperature phase in titanium carbide- TiC 0.71 . It is established region and borders of this phase. It is determined change of unit cell parameter. (author)

  19. Elastic modulus and fracture of boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Walther, G.

    1978-12-01

    The elastic modulus of hot-pressed boron carbide with 1 to 15% porosity was measured at room temperature. K/sub IC/ values were determined for the same porosity range at 500 0 C by the double torsion technique. The critical stress intensity factor of boron carbide with 8% porosity was evaluated from 25 to 1200 0 C

  20. Chemical vapor deposition of tantalum on graphite cloth for making hot pressed fiber reinforced carbide-graphite composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollabaugh, C.M.; Davidson, K.V.; Radosevich, C.L.; Riley, R.E.; Wallace, T.C.

    1977-01-01

    Conditions for the CVD of a uniform coating of Ta on fibers of a woven graphite cloth were established. The effect of gas composition, pressure, and temperature were investigated, and the conditions that gave the desired results are presented. Several layers of the coated cloth were hot pressed to produce a TaC--C composite having uniformly dispersed, fine-grained TaC in graphite. Three compositions were hot pressed: 15, 25, and 40 volume percent carbide. 8 figures, 2 tables

  1. Plasma Sprayed Coatings for RF Wave Absorption

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nanobashvili, S.; Matějíček, Jiří; Žáček, František; Stöckel, Jan; Chráska, Pavel; Brožek, Vlastimil

    307-311, - (2002), s. 1334-1338 ISSN 0022-3115 Grant - others: COST (XE) Euratom DV4/04(TWO) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : boron carbide, thermal spray coatings, fusion materials, RF wave absorption Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.730, year: 2002

  2. High-performance Fuel Cell with Stretched Catalyst-Coated Membrane: One-step Formation of Cracked Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Moon; Ahn, Chi-Yeong; Cho, Yong-Hun; Kim, Sungjun; Hwang, Wonchan; Jang, Segeun; Shin, Sungsoo; Lee, Gunhee; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-05-23

    We have achieved performance enhancement of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) though crack generation on its electrodes. It is the first attempt to enhance the performance of PEMFC by using cracks which are generally considered as defects. The pre-defined, cracked electrode was generated by stretching a catalyst-coated Nafion membrane. With the strain-stress property of the membrane that is unique in the aspect of plastic deformation, membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) was successfully incorporated into the fuel cell. Cracked electrodes with the variation of strain were investigated and electrochemically evaluated. Remarkably, mechanical stretching of catalyst-coated Nafion membrane led to a decrease in membrane resistance and an improvement in mass transport, which resulted in enhanced device performance.

  3. Laser formation of titanium nitride films as a result of Ti coating modification in a nitrogen atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskin, Sergei

    1998-12-01

    Laser treatment of the 303 and 416 stainless steels with Ti precoating was studied. CW CO2 and UV ArF excimer lasers were used. The TiN films were formed at a treatment velocity of 0.5 to 3 - 5 cm/sec and a power density of CO2 laser at (3 - 5) 104 W/cm2. X-ray diffractometry, x-ray mapping and Auger electron spectroscopy techniques indicated a TiN phase on the surface with oxygen content 12 - 25 at%. The thickness of the TiN film was 0.3 - 0.4 micrometers after treatment of the 5 micrometers Ti coating and about 900 angstroms for the 0.3 micrometers coating. Some characteristics of TiN films were examined and features of the nitriding process are discussed.

  4. Temperature effect on the formation of a relief of diamond-like carbon coatings and its modification by ion bombardment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubshtein, A.P.; Trakhtenberg, I.Sh.; Yugov, V.A.; Vladimirov, A.B.; Plotnikov, S.A.; Ponosov, Yu.S

    2006-01-01

    Using the method of pulsed arc sputtering of a graphite target the diamond-like coatings (DLC) ∼1.5 μm thick are deposited on a steel R6M5 substrate. The relief of the coatings obtained under various temperature conditions is investigated. Variations of carbon DLC surfaces are followed after their bombardment with accelerated argon or chemically active oxygen ions. Argon ion bombardment is established to be preferred for producing a smoothed-out DLC relief. It is shown that a DLC relief should be taken into account when measuring microhardness. It is recommended that transformation of interatomic bonds in irradiated subsurface layers be taken into consideration if information index of methods applied constitutes several monolayers [ru

  5. Phosphate coating on stainless steel 304 sensitized;Recubrimiento fosfatado sobre acero inoxidable 304 sensibilizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz V, J. P. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Altamira, Km. 14.5 Carretera Tampico-Puerto Industrial Altamira, 89600 Altamira, Tamaulipas (Mexico); Vite T, J. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Castillo S, M.; Vite T, M., E-mail: jpcruz@ipn.m [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Unidad Profesional -Adolfo Lopez Mateos-, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    The stainless steel 304 can be sensitized when welding processes are applied, that causes the precipitation of chromium carbide in the grain limits, being promoted in this way the formation of galvanic cells and consequently the corrosion process. Using a phosphate coating is possible to retard the physiochemical damages that can to happen in the corrosion process. The stainless steel 304 substrate sensitized it is phosphate to base of Zn-Mn, in a immersion cell very hot. During the process was considered optimization values, for the characterization equipment of X-rays diffraction and scanning electron microscopy was used. The XRD technique confirmed the presence of the phases of manganese phosphate, zinc phosphate, as well as the phase of the stainless steel 304. When increasing the temperature from 60 to 90 C in the immersion process a homogeneous coating is obtained. (Author)

  6. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pietrowski

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen.The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  7. Microsegregation in Nodular Cast Iron with Carbides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietrowski S.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of microsegregation in the newly developed nodular cast iron with carbides are presented. To investigate the pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The distribution of linear elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. To investigate the microsegregation pearlitic and bainitic cast iron with carbides obtained by Inmold method were chosen. The linear distribution of elements on the eutectic cell radius was examined. Testing of the chemical composition of cast iron metal matrix components, including carbides were carried out. The change of graphitizing and anti-graphitizing element concentrations within eutectic cell was determined. It was found, that in cast iron containing Mo carbides crystallizing after austenite + graphite eutectic are Si enriched.

  8. Template-directed formation of functional complex metal-oxide nanostructures by combination of sol-gel processing and spin coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Y.C.; Kim, J.; Bu, S.D.

    2006-01-01

    We report the template-based formation of functional complex metal-oxide nanostructures by a combination of sol-gel processing and spin coating. This method employs the spin-coating of a sol-gel solution into an anodic aluminum oxide membrane (SSAM). Various metal-oxide nanowires and nanotubes with a high aspect-ratio were prepared. The aspect-ratios of the PbO 2 nanowires and Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 nanowires were about 300 and 400, respectively, and their diameters were about 50 nm. The fabricated PbTiO 3 nanotubes have a relatively constant wall thickness of about 20 nm with an outer diameter of about 60 nm. The deposition time for all of the fabricated metal-oxide nanowires and nanotubes is less than 120 s, which is far shorter than those required in both the sol-gel dipping and sol-gel electrophoretic methods. These results indicate that the SSAM method can be a versatile pathway to prepare functional complex metal-oxide nanowires and nanotubes with a high aspect-ratio. The possible formation process for the one-dimensional nanostructures by SSAM is discussed

  9. Understanding the wetting properties of nanostructured selenium coatings: the role of nanostructured surface roughness and air-pocket formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran PA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phong A Tran,1,2 Thomas J Webster31Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2The Particulate Fluid Processing Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Wetting properties of biomaterials, in particular nanomaterials, play an important role, as these influence interactions with biological elements, such as proteins, bacteria, and cells. In this study, the wetting phenomenon of titanium substrates coated with selenium nanoparticles was studied using experimental and mathematical modeling tools. Importantly, these selenium-coated titanium substrates were previously reported to increase select protein adsorption (such as vitronectin and fibronectin, to decrease bacteria growth, and increase bone cell growth. Increased selenium nanoparticle coating density resulted in higher contact angles but remained within the hydrophilic regime. This trend was found in disagreement with the Wenzel model, which is widely used to understand the wetting properties of rough surfaces. The trend also did not fit well with the Cassie–Baxter model, which was developed to understand the wetting properties of composite surfaces. A modified wetting model was thus proposed in this study, to understand the contributing factors of material properties to the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of these nanostructured selenium-coated surfaces. The analysis and model created in this study can be useful in designing and/or understanding the wetting behavior of numerous biomedical materials and in turn, biological events (such as protein adsorption as well as bacteria and mammalian cell functions.Keywords: hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, Wenzel model, Cassie–Baxter model, free energy, implant material, proteins, cells, bacteria

  10. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian; Hummel, Helga; Bruns, Michael; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm

    2016-06-01

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N'-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N'-diphenyl-(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  11. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina Peters

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs. Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl-4,4’-diamine and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline-(4-phenylphenoxyaluminum, originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  12. Formation of blade and slot die coated small molecule multilayers for OLED applications studied theoretically and by XPS depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Katharina; Raupp, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.raupp@kit.edu; Scharfer, Philip; Schabel, Wilhelm [Institute of Thermal Process Engineering, Thin Film Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Hummel, Helga [Philips Technologie GmbH Innovative Technologies, Aachen (Germany); Bruns, Michael [Institute for Applied Materials and Karlsruhe Nano Micro Facility (KNMF), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Slot die coaters especially designed for low material consumption and doctor blades were used to process small molecule solutions for organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Optimum process parameters were developed for the large-scale coating techniques to generate stable single and multiple layers only a few nanometers thick. Achieving a multilayer architecture for solution-processed OLEDs is the most challenging step. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy sputter depth profiling was performed to determine defined interfaces between coated organic layers. Commercially available small molecules NPB (N,N’-Di(1-naphthyl)-N,N’-diphenyl-(1,1’-biphenyl)-4,4’-diamine) and BAlq (Bis(8-hdroxy-2methylquinoline)-(4-phenylphenoxy)aluminum), originally developed for vacuum deposition, were used as hole, respectively electron transport material. Defined double-layers were processed with both scalable coating methods using the orthogonal solvent approach. The use of non-orthogonal solvents resulted in complete intermixing of the material. The results are explained by calculations of solubilities and simulating drying and diffusion kinetics of the small molecule solutions.

  13. Silver diffusion through silicon carbide in microencapsulated nuclear fuels TRISO; Difusion de plata a traves de carburo de silicio en combustibles nucleares microencapsulados TRISO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancino T, F.; Lopez H, E., E-mail: Felix.cancino@cinvestav.edu.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Unidad Saltillo, Av. Industria Metalurgica No. 1062, Col. Ramos Arizpe, 25900 Saltillo, Coahuila (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The silver diffusion through silicon carbide is a challenge that has persisted in the development of microencapsulated fuels TRISO (Tri structural Isotropic) for more than four decades. The silver is known as a strong emitter of gamma radiation, for what is able to diffuse through the ceramic coatings of pyrolytic coal and silicon carbide and to be deposited in the heat exchangers. In this work we carry out a recount about the art state in the topic of the diffusion of Ag through silicon carbide in microencapsulated fuels and we propose the role that the complexities in the grain limit can have this problem. (Author)

  14. Carbide characterization in a Nb-microalloyed advanced ultrahigh strength steel after quenching-partitioning-tempering process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.D.; Xu, W.Z.; Guo, Z.H.; Wang, L.; Rong, Y.H.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the observations of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, four kinds of carbides were identified in a Nb-microalloyed steel after quenching-partitioning-tempering treatment. In addition to transitional epsilon carbide that usually forms in silicon-free carbon steel, other three types of niobium carbides (NbC) formed at various treatment stages respectively. They are incoherent NbC inclusion that nucleated at solidification mainly, fine NbC that nucleated in lath martensite at tempering stage and regular polygonal NbC that nucleated in austenite before quenching. Their formation mechanisms on steel were discussed briefly based on thermodynamics.

  15. The role of current characteristics of the arc evaporator in formation of the surface metal-coating composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plikhunov, V V; Petrov, L M; Grigorovich, K V

    2016-01-01

    The influence of current characteristics of the vacuum arc evaporator on the interaction process of plasma streams with the surface under treatment during generation of the physicochemical properties of the formed metal-coating composite is considered. It is shown that the interaction of plasma streams with the processed surface provides surface heating, defects elimination, change in energy properties, and mass transfer of plasma stream elements activating surface diffusion processes whose intensity is evaluated by the arc current magnitude and location of the processed surface relative to the cathode axis. (paper)

  16. Influence of carbon chemical bonding on the tribological behavior of sputtered nanocomposite TiBC/a-C coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abad, M.D.; Sanchez-Lopez, J.C.; Brizuela, M.; Garcia-Luis, A.; Shtansky, D.V.

    2010-01-01

    The tribological performance of nanocomposite coatings containing Ti-B-C phases and amorphous carbon (a-C) are studied. The coatings are deposited by a sputtering process from a sintered TiB 2 :TiC target and graphite, using pulsed direct current and radio frequency sources. By varying the sputtering power ratio, the amorphous carbon content of the coatings can be tuned, as observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Raman spectroscopy. The crystalline component consists of very disordered crystals with a mixture of TiB 2 /TiC or TiB x C y phases. A slight increase in crystalline order is detected with the incorporation of carbon in the coatings that is attributed to the formation of a ternary TiB x C y phase. An estimation of the carbon present in the form of carbide (TiB x C y or TiC) and amorphous (a-C) is performed using fitting analysis of the C 1s XPS peak. The film hardness (22 to 31 GPa) correlates with the fraction of the TiB x C y phase that exists in the coatings. The tribological properties were measured by a pin-on-disk tribometer in ambient conditions, using 6 mm tungsten carbide balls at 1 N. The friction coefficients and the wear rates show similar behavior, exhibiting an optimum when the fraction of C atoms in the amorphous phase is near 50%. This composition enables significant improvement of the friction coefficients and wear rates (μ ∼ 0.1; k -6 mm 3 /Nm), while maintaining a good value of hardness (24.6 GPa). Establishing the correlation between the lubricant properties and the fraction of a-C is very useful for purposes of tailoring the protective character of these nanocomposite coatings to engineering applications.

  17. Self-cleaning behavior in polyurethane/silica coatings via formation of a hierarchical packed morphology of nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejazi, Iman [Department of Polymer Engineering & Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875/4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mir Mohamad Sadeghi, Gity, E-mail: Gsadeghi@aut.ac.ir [Department of Polymer Engineering & Color Technology, Amirkabir University of Technology, P.O. Box 15875/4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyfi, Javad [Department of Chemical Engineering, Shahrood Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 36155-163, Shahrood (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari, Seyed-Hassan [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Tehran, P.O. Box 11155-4563, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khonakdar, Hossein Ali [Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute, P.O. Box 14965/115, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Self-cleaning behavior was imparted to the hydrophilic polyurethane. • A hierarchical packed morphology is responsible for the superhydrophobicity. • Prolonged pressing process cannot lead to superhydrophobicity due to migration of TPU. • Samples exhibited excellent stability against media with a wide range of pH values. - Abstract: In the current research, a hierarchical morphology comprising of packed assembly of nanoparticles was induced in thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU)/silica nanocomposite coatings in order to achieve self-cleaning behavior. Moderately hydrophilic behavior of TPU hinders its transforming to a superhydrophobic material. In the presented method, a very thin layer of silica nanoparticles is applied to the surface of TPU sheets under elevated temperature and pressure. As temperature and pressure of the process remain unchanged, processing time was considered as a main variable. Based on scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy results, it was found that at a certain processing time, nanoparticles can form an utterly packed morphology leading to a self-cleaning behavior. Once the process was prolonged, TPU macromolecules found the chance to migrate onto the coating's top layer due to the enhanced mobility of chains at high temperature. This observation was further proved by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and cross-sectional morphology. The presented method has promising potentials in transforming intrinsically hydrophilic polymers into superhydrophobic materials with self-cleaning behavior.

  18. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulescu, H.

    2001-01-01

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report

  19. Evaluation of Codisposal Viability for TH/U Carbide (Fort Saint Vrain HTGR) DOE-Owned Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. radulescu

    2001-09-28

    There are more than 250 forms of US Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Due to the variety of the spent nuclear fuel, the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program has designated nine representative fuel groups for disposal criticality analyses based on fuel matrix, primary fissile isotope, and enrichment. The Fort Saint Vrain reactor (FSVR) SNF has been designated as the representative fuel for the Th/U carbide fuel group. The FSVR SNF consists of small particles (spheres of the order of 0.5-mm diameter) of thorium carbide or thorium and high-enriched uranium carbide mixture, coated with multiple, thin layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide, which serve as miniature pressure vessels to contain fission products and the U/Th carbide matrix. The coated particles are bound in a carbonized matrix, which forms fuel rods or ''compacts'' that are loaded into large hexagonal graphite prisms. The graphite prisms (or blocks) are the physical forms that are handled in reactor loading and unloading operations, and which will be loaded into the DOE standardized SNF canisters. The results of the analyses performed will be used to develop waste acceptance criteria. The items that are important to criticality control are identified based on the analysis needs and result sensitivities. Prior to acceptance to fuel from the Th/U carbide fuel group for disposal, the important items for the fuel types that are being considered for disposal under the Th/U carbide fuel group must be demonstrated to satisfy the conditions determined in this report.

  20. Plasma metallization of refractory carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroleva, E.B.; Klinskaya, N.A.; Rybalko, O.F.; Ugol'nikova, T.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of treatment conditions in plasma on properties of produced metallized powders of titanium, tungsten and chromium carbides with the main particle size of 40-80 μm is considered. It is shown that plasma treatment permits to produce metallized powders of carbide materials with the 40-80 μm particle size. The degree of metallization, spheroidization, chemical and phase composition of metallized carbide powders are controlled by dispersivity of the treated material, concentration of a metal component in the treated mixtures, rate of plasma flow and preliminary spheroidization procedure

  1. Formation of boride layers on steel substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stergioudis, G.

    2006-01-01

    Boronizing coatings were prepared by means of pack cementation technique. It was found that using the appropriate substrate and controlling parameters of the boribing process such as boron activity of the mixture, temperature and time of treatment, it is possible to obtain a structure predominantly consisting of the Fe 2 B phase. In the present study low alloy ferritic steels were chosen as substrates. Changing the boron carbide concentration in the mixture and the temperature and time of boronizing process the conditions of the boronizing were altered. As a result the formation of the Fe 2 B phase is enhanced. Characterization of the as-borided steels is discussed based on X-ray diffraction and Curie temperature measurements. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V2C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V2C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  3. Vanadium diffusion coating on HT-9 cladding for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo, Wei-Yang; Yang, Yong, E-mail: yongyang@ufl.edu

    2014-08-01

    Fuel cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) has been identified as one of the crucial issues for developing Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) stainless steel claddings for metallic fuels in a fast reactor. The anticipated elevated temperature and high neutron flux can significantly aggravate the FCCI, in terms of formation of inter-diffusion and lower melting point eutectic phases. To mitigate the FCCI, vanadium carbide coating as a diffusion barrier was deposited on the HT-9 substrate using a pack cementation diffusion coating (PCDC) method, and the processing temperature was optimized down to 730 °C. A solid metallurgical bonding between the coating layer and substrate was achieved, and the coating is free from through depth cracks. The microstructural characterizations using SEM and TEM show a nanostructured grain structure. EDS/WDS and XRD analysis confirm the phase of coating layer as V{sub 2}C. Diffusion couple tests at 660 °C for 100 h demonstrate that V{sub 2}C layer with a thickness of less than 5 μm can effectively eliminate the inter-diffusion between the lanthanide cerium and HT-9 steel.

  4. Formation process of micro arc oxidation coatings obtained in a sodium phytate containing solution with and without CaCO{sub 3} on binary Mg-1.0Ca alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, R.F. [School of Material and Electromechanics, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Zhang, Y.Q. [Zhejiang DunAn Light Alloy Technology CO,.LTD, Zhuji 311835 (China); Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Zhang, S.F.; Qu, B. [School of Material and Electromechanics, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China); Guo, S.B. [Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Xiang, J.H., E-mail: xiangjunhuai@163.com [School of Material and Electromechanics, Jiangxi Science and Technology Normal University, Nanchang 330013 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Compared to the Mg phase, the area of Mg{sub 2}Ca phase is much smaller. • The coatings are preferentially developed on the area adjacent to Mg{sub 2}Ca phase. • During MAO process, some sodium phytate molecules are hydrolyzed. • Anodic coatings are developed from uneven to uniform. - Abstract: Micro arc oxidation (MAO) is an effective method to improve the corrosion resistance of magnesium alloys. In order to reveal the influence of alloying element Ca and CaCO{sub 3} electrolyte on the formation process and chemical compositions of MAO coatings on binary Mg-1.0Ca alloy, anodic coatings after different anodizing times were prepared on binary Mg-1.0Ca alloy in a base solution containing 3 g/L sodium hydroxide and 15 g/L sodium phytate with and without addition of CaCO{sub 3}. The coating formation was studied by using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that Mg-1.0Ca alloy is composed of two phases, the Mg phase and Mg{sub 2}Ca phase. After treating for 5 s, the coating began to develop and was preferentially formed on the area nearby Mg{sub 2}Ca phase, which may be resulted from the intrinsic electronegative potential of the Mg phase than that of Mg{sub 2}Ca phase. Anodic coatings unevenly covered the total surface after 20 s. After 80 s, the coatings were uniformly developed on Mg-1.0Ca alloy with micro pores. During MAO process, some sodium phytate molecules are hydrolyzed into inorganic phosphate. CaCO{sub 3} has minor influence on the calcium content of the obtained MAO coatings.

  5. Synthesis and phase transformation mechanism of Nb{sub 2}C carbide phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vishwanadh, B., E-mail: visubathula@gmail.com [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Murthy, T.S.R.Ch. [Materials Processing Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 094 (India); Arya, A.; Tewari, R.; Dey, G.K. [Materials Science Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 094 (India)

    2016-06-25

    In the present work, Niobium carbide samples were prepared through powder metallurgy route using spark plasma sintering technique. Some of these samples were heat treated at 900 °C up to 7 days. In order to investigate the phase transformation in Nb{sub 2}C carbide, the as-prepared and heat treated samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscopy techniques. EBSD could index the same area of the sample in terms of any of the three allotropes of Nb{sub 2}C carbide phases (γ-Nb{sub 2}C, β-Nb{sub 2}C and α-Nb{sub 2}C) with good confidence index. From the EBSD patterns orientation relationships (OR) among γ, β and α-Nb{sub 2}C have been determined. Based on this OR when crystals of the three allotropes were superimposed, it has revealed that the basic Nb metal atom lattice (hcp lattice) in all the Nb{sub 2}C phases is same. The only difference exists in the carbides is the ordering of carbon atoms and vacancies in the octahedral positions of the hcp Nb metal atom lattice. Crystallographic analysis showed that for the transformation of γ-Nb{sub 2}C → β-Nb{sub 2}C → α-Nb{sub 2}C, large movement of Nb atoms is not required; but only by ordering of carbon atoms ensues the phase transformation. Literature shows that in the Nb–C system formation of the α-Nb{sub 2}C is not well established. Therefore, first principle calculations were carried out on these carbides. It revealed that the formation energy for α-Nb{sub 2}C is lower than the β and γ-Nb{sub 2}C carbides which indicate that the formation of α-Nb{sub 2}C is thermodynamically feasible. - Highlights: • Nb{sub 2}C carbide was produced by Spark Plasma Sintering in a single process. • Phase transformation mechanism of different Nb{sub 2}C carbide phases is studied. • In all the three Nb{sub 2}C carbides (γ, β, α), the base Nb lattice remains same. • Among γ, β and α-Nb{sub 2}C

  6. Ion beam figuring of CVD silicon carbide mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gailly, P.; Collette, J.-P.; Fleury Frenette, K.; Jamar, C.

    2017-11-01

    Optical and structural elements made of silicon carbide are increasingly found in space instruments. Chemical vapor deposited silicon carbide (CVD-SiC) is used as a reflective coating on SiC optics in reason of its good behavior under polishing. The advantage of applying ion beam figuring (IBF) to CVD-SiC over other surface figure-improving techniques is discussed herein. The results of an IBF sequence performed at the Centre Spatial de Liège on a 100 mm CVD-SiC mirror are reported. The process allowed to reduce the mirror surface errors from 243 nm to 13 nm rms . Beside the surface figure, roughness is another critical feature to consider in order to preserve the optical quality of CVD-SiC . Thus, experiments focusing on the evolution of roughness were performed in various ion beam etching conditions. The roughness of samples etched at different depths down to 3 ≠m was determined with an optical profilometer. These measurements emphasize the importance of selecting the right combination of gas and beam energy to keep roughness at a low level. Kaufman-type ion sources are generally used to perform IBF but the performance of an end-Hall ion source in figuring CVD-SiC mirrors was also evaluated in this study. In order to do so, ion beam etching profiles obtained with the end-Hall source on CVD-SiC were measured and used as a basis for IBF simulations.

  7. Electron microscopy study of radiation effects in boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoto, T.

    1987-03-01

    Boron carbide is a disordered non-stoechiometric material with a strongly microtwinned polycristallyne microstructure. This ceramic is among the candidate materials for the first wall coating in fusion reactor and is used as a neutron absorber in the control rods of fast breeder reactors. The present work deals with the nature of radiation damage in this solid. Because of helium internal production, neutron irradiated boron carbide is affected by swelling and by a strong microcracking which can break up a pellet in fine powder. These processes are rather intensitive to the irradiation parameters (temperature, flux and even neutron spectrum). Transmission electron microscopy of samples irradiated by the fast neutrons of a reactor, the electrons of a high voltage electron microscope and of samples implanted with helium ions was used to understand the respective roles of helium and point defects in the processes of swelling and microcracking. The design of an irradiation chamber for helium implantation at controlled temperature from 600 to 1700 0 C was an important technical part of this work [fr

  8. Investigation of magnetism in aluminum-doped silicon carbide nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Chegel, Raad

    2013-11-01

    The effect of aluminum doping on the structural, electronic and magnetic properties of (8,0) silicon carbide nanotube (SiCNT) is investigated using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found from the calculation of the formation energies that aluminum substitution for silicon atom is preferred. Our results show that the magnetization depends on the substitutional site, aluminum substitution at silicon site does not introduce any spin-polarization, whereas the aluminum substitution for carbon atom yields a spin polarized, almost dispersionless π band within the original band gap.

  9. Single layer and multilayer wear resistant coatings of (Ti,Al)N: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PalDey, S.; Deevi, S.C.

    2003-01-01

    We review the status of (Ti,Al)N based coatings obtained by various physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques and compare their properties. PVD techniques based on sputtering and cathodic arc methods are widely used to deposit wear resistant (Ti,Al)N coatings. These techniques were further modified to improve the metal ionization rate and to eliminate macrodroplets from plasma streams. We summarize manufacture of target/cathode, substrate materials for deposition of coatings, deposition parameters, and the effect of deposition parameters on the physical and mechanical properties of (Ti,Al)N coatings. It is shown that (Ti,Al)N coatings by PVD enhance the wear, thermal, and oxidation resistance of a wide variety of tool materials. We discuss the wear resistant properties of (Ti,Al)N for various machining applications as compared with coatings such as TiN, Ti(C,N) and (Ti,Zr)N. High hardness (∼28-32 GPa), relatively low residual stress (∼5 GPa), superior oxidation resistance, high hot hardness, and low thermal conductivity make (Ti,Al)N coatings most desirable in dry machining and machining of abrasive alloys at high speeds. Multicomponent coatings based on different metallic and nonmetallic elements combine the benefit of individual components leading to a further refinement of coating properties. Alloying additions such as Cr and Y drastically improve the oxidation resistance, Zr and V improve the wear resistance, whereas, Si increases the hardness and resistance to chemical reactivity of the film. Addition of boron improves the abrasive wear behavior of Ti-Al based coatings due to the formation of TiB 2 and BN phases depending on the deposition conditions. Hafnium based nitrides and carbides have potential for resistance to flank and crater wear. The presence of a large number of interfaces between individual layers of a multilayered structure results in a drastic increase in hardness and strength. (Ti,Al)N multilayer super lattice coatings with lattice

  10. Plasma sprayed thermoregulating coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, V.V.; Puzanov, A.A.; Zambrzhitskij, A.P.; Soboleva, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Shown is the possibility of plasma spraying application for thermoregulating coating formation. Given are test results of service properties of BeO, Al 2 O 2 plasma coatings on the substrates of the MA2-1 magnesium alloy. Described is a device for studying durability of coating optical parameters under ultraviolet irradiation in deep vacuum. Dynamics of absorption coefficient, growth caused by an increase in absorption centers amount under such irradiation is investigated

  11. Environmental effects on the tensile strength of chemically vapor deposited silicon carbide fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Kraitchman, M. D.

    1985-01-01

    The room temperature and elevated temperature tensile strengths of commercially available chemically vapor-deposited (CVD) silicon carbide fibers were measured after 15 min heat treatment to 1600 C in various environments. These environments included oxygen, air, argon and nitrogen at one atmosphere and vacuum at 10/9 atmosphere. Two types of fibers were examined which differed in the SiC content of their carbon-rich coatings. Threshold temperature for fiber strength degradation was observed to be dependent on the as-received fiber-flaw structure, on the environment and on the coating. Fractographic analyses and flexural strength measurements indicate that tensile strength losses were caused by surface degradation. Oxidation of the surface coating is suggested as one possible degradation mechanism. The SiC fibers containing the higher percentage of SiC near the surface of the carbon-rich coating show better strength retention and higher elevated temperature strength.

  12. Silver release from coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, P.E.; Nabielek, H.

    1977-03-01

    The fission product Ag-110 m released from coated particles can be the dominant source of radioactivity from the core of a high temperature reactor in the early stages of the reactor life and possibly limits the accessability of primary circuit components. It can be shown that silver is retained in oxide fuel by a diffusion process (but not in carbide or carbon-diluted fuel) and that silver is released through all types of pyrocarbon layers. The retention in TRISO particles is variable and seems to be mainly connected with operating temperature and silicon carbide quality. (orig.) [de

  13. Mechanical alloying and sintering of nanostructured tungsten carbide-reinforced copper composite and its characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusoff, Mahani; Othman, Radzali; Hussain, Zuhailawati

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → W 2 C phase was formed at short milling time while WC only appears after longer milling time. → Cu crystallite size decreased but internal strain increased with increasing milling time. → Increasing milling time induced more WC formation, thus improving the hardness of the composite. → Electrical conductivity is reduced due to powder refinement and the presence of carbide phases. -- Abstract: Elemental powders of copper (Cu), tungsten (W) and graphite (C) were mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill with different milling durations (0-60 h), compacted and sintered in order to precipitate hard tungsten carbide particles into a copper matrix. Both powder and sintered composite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and assessed for hardness and electrical conductivity to investigate the effects of milling time on formation of nanostructured Cu-WC composite and its properties. No carbide peak was detected in the powder mixtures after milling. Carbide WC and W 2 C phases were precipitated only in the sintered composite. The formation of WC began with longer milling times, after W 2 C formation. Prolonged milling time decreased the crystallite size as well as the internal strain of Cu. Hardness of the composite was enhanced but electrical conductivity reduced with increasing milling time.

  14. Optical characterisation of cubic silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, S.M.

    1998-09-01

    The varied properties of Silicon Carbide (SiC) are helping to launch the material into many new applications, particularly in the field of novel semiconductor devices. In this work, the cubic form of SiC is of interest as a basis for developing integrated optical components. Here, the formation of a suitable SiO 2 buried cladding layer has been achieved by high dose oxygen ion implantation. This layer is necessary for the optical confinement of propagating light, and hence optical waveguide fabrication. Results have shown that optical propagation losses of the order of 20 dB/cm are obtainable. Much of this loss can be attributed to mode leakage and volume scattering. Mode leakage is a function of the effective oxide thickness, and volume scattering related to the surface layer damage. These parameters have been shown to be controllable and so suggests that further reduction in the waveguide loss is feasible. Analysis of the layer growth mechanism by RBS, XTEM and XPS proves that SiO 2 is formed, and that the extent, of formation depends on implant dose and temperature. The excess carbon generated is believed to exit the oxide layer by a number of varying mechanisms. The result of this appears to be a number of stable Si-C-O intermediaries that, form regions to either depth extreme of the SiO 2 layer. Early furnace tests suggest a need to anneal at, temperatures approaching the melting point of the silicon substrate, and that the quality of the virgin material is crucial in controlling the resulting oxide growth. (author)

  15. Stable carbides in transition metal alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the present work different techniques were employed for the identification of stable carbides in two sets of transition metal alloys of wide technological application: a set of three high alloy M2 type steels in which W and/or Mo were total or partially replaced by Nb, and a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy. The M2 steel is a high speed steel worldwide used and the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy is the base material for the pressure tubes in the CANDU type nuclear reactors. The stability of carbide was studied in the frame of Goldschmidt's theory of interstitial alloys. The identification of stable carbides in steels was performed by determining their metallic composition with an energy analyzer attached to the scanning electron microscope (SEM). By these means typical carbides of the M2 steel, MC and M 6 C, were found. Moreover, the spatial and size distribution of carbide particles were determined after different heat treatments, and both microstructure and microhardness were correlated with the appearance of the secondary hardening phenomenon. In the Zr-Nb alloy a study of the α and β phases present after different heat treatments was performed with optical and SEM metallographic techniques, with the guide of Abriata and Bolcich phase diagram. The α-β interphase boundaries were characterized as short circuits for diffusion with radiotracer techniques and applying Fisher-Bondy-Martin model. The precipitation of carbides was promoted by heat treatments that produced first the C diffusion into the samples at high temperatures (β phase), and then the precipitation of carbide particles at lower temperature (α phase or (α+β)) two phase field. The precipitated carbides were identified as (Zr, Nb)C 1-x with SEM, electron microprobe and X-ray diffraction techniques. (Author) [es

  16. Effect of nanoporous TiO2 coating and anodized Ca2+ modification of titanium surfaces on early microbial biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wennerberg Ann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The soft tissue around dental implants forms a barrier between the oral environment and the peri-implant bone and a crucial factor for long-term success of therapy is development of a good abutment/soft-tissue seal. Sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2 coatings have been shown to enhance soft-tissue attachment but their effect on adhesion and biofilm formation by oral bacteria is unknown. Methods We have investigated how the properties of surfaces that may be used on abutments: turned titanium, sol-gel nanoporous TiO2 coated surfaces and anodized Ca2+ modified surfaces, affect biofilm formation by two early colonizers of the oral cavity: Streptococcus sanguinis and Actinomyces naeslundii. The bacteria were detected using 16S rRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization together with confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results Interferometry and atomic force microscopy revealed all the surfaces to be smooth (Sa ≤ 0.22 μm. Incubation with a consortium of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii showed no differences in adhesion between the surfaces over 2 hours. After 14 hours, the level of biofilm growth was low and again, no differences between the surfaces were seen. The presence of saliva increased the biofilm biovolume of S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii ten-fold compared to when saliva was absent and this was due to increased adhesion rather than biofilm growth. Conclusions Nano-topographical modification of smooth titanium surfaces had no effect on adhesion or early biofilm formation by S. sanguinis and A. naeslundii as compared to turned surfaces or those treated with anodic oxidation in the presence of Ca2+. The presence of saliva led to a significantly greater biofilm biovolume but no significant differences were seen between the test surfaces. These data thus suggest that modification with sol-gel derived nanoporous TiO2, which has been shown to improve osseointegration and soft-tissue healing in vivo, does not cause greater biofilm

  17. Nitro-PAH formation studied by interacting artificially PAH-coated soot aerosol with NO 2 in the temperature range of 295-523 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Matteo; Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Niessner, Reinhard

    2010-10-01

    Diesel particulate matter poses a threat to human health, and in particular nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAHs) found within and on the surface of these particles. Although diesel particulate filters (DPFs) have been designed and implemented to reduce these and other harmful diesel emissions, the particle loaded filters may act as a reaction chamber for the enhanced production of NPAHs from the nitration of PAHs with NO 2. Focus is on the investigation of the heterogeneous reactions that occur on soot particles by exposing laboratory produced pyrene- or benzo(a)pyrene-coated spark discharge soot particles to varying concentrations of NO 2 and temperatures while following the formation of products over time. The sole nitration product that was observed throughout the experiments with pyrene-coated soot was 1-nitropyrene (1-NPYR), which increased linearly with reaction time for all NO 2 concentrations chosen (0.11, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 ppm, m m -1). Resulting 1-NPYR formation rate increased exponentially with [NO 2]. Throughout the 3-h experiments less than 10% of pyrene has been converted to 1-NPYR and the partial reaction order with regard to [NO 2] was estimated to 1.52. Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) was more reactive than pyrene. After 3 h reaction time almost 80% of the BaP has been converted to 6-NBaP. Highest 1-NPYR concentrations on particles were detected at 373 K, and at higher temperatures a considerable decrease in particulate 1-NPYR was observed. A similar trend was observed in a DPF simulation system (PM-Kat ®-like) with BaP-coated soot. In this case, highest 6-NBaP concentration on particles was detected at 423 K. Backed by corroborating results from separate gas/solid-phase partition experiments with 1-NPYR and 6-NBaP, it is likely that the newly formed 1-NPYR and 6-NBaP became transferred from particle to gas phase at higher temperatures. Results from this study confirm the presence of 1-NPYR and 6-NBaP in particulate and gas phase under conditions

  18. Thermal evolution behavior of carbides and γ′ precipitates in FGH96 superalloy powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Liu Hengsan; He Xinbo; Rafi-ud-din; Qu Xuanhui; Qin Mingli; Li Zhou; Zhang Guoqing

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of rapidly solidified FGH96 superalloy powder and the thermal evolution behavior of carbides and γ′ precipitates within powder particles were investigated. It was observed that the reduction of powder size and the increase of cooling rate had transformed the solidification morphologies of atomized powder from dendrite in major to cellular structure. The secondary dendritic spacing was measured to be 1.02–2.55 μm and the corresponding cooling rates were estimated to be in the range of 1.4 × 10 4 –4.7 × 10 5 K·s −1 . An increase in the annealing temperature had rendered the phase transformation of carbides evolving from non-equilibrium MC′ carbides to intermediate transition stage of M 23 C 6 carbides, and finally to thermodynamically stable MC carbides. The superfine γ′ precipitates were formed at the dendritic boundaries of rapidly solidified superalloy powder. The coalescence, growth, and homogenization of γ' precipitates occurred with increasing annealing temperature. With decreasing cooling rate from 650 °C·K −1 to 5 °C·K −1 , the morphological development of γ′ precipitates had been shown to proceed from spheroidal to cuboidal and finally to solid state dendrites. Meanwhile, a shift had been observed from dendritic morphology to recrystallized structure between 900 °C and 1050 °C. Moreover, accelerated evolution of carbides and γ' precipitates had been facilitated by the formation of new grain boundaries which provide fast diffusion path for atomic elements. - Highlights: ► Microstructural characteristic of FGH96 superalloy powder was investigated. ► The relation between microstructure, particle size, and cooling rate was studied. ► Thermal evolution behavior of γ′ and carbides in loose FGH96 powder was studied.

  19. Efficacy of a small cell-binding peptide coated hydroxyapatite substitute on bone formation and implant fixation in sheep

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Ming; Andreasen, Christina Møller; Dencker, Mads L.

    2015-01-01

    hydroxyapatite (ABM/P-15); hydroxyapatite + βtricalciumphosphate+ Poly-Lactic-Acid (HA/βTCP-PDLLA); or ABM/P-15+HA/βTCP-PDLLA. After nine weeks, bone-implant blocks were harvested and sectioned for micro-CT scanning, push-out test, and histomorphometry. Significant bone formation and implant fixation could...

  20. Formation of abrasion-resistant coatings of the AlSiFexMny intermetallic compound type on the AISI 304L alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Perales, Laura G.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The α-Al9FeMnSi and β-Al9FeMn2Si intermetallics formed by reactive sintering of Al, Si, Mn, Fe, Cr and Ni powders have been used in AISI 304L steels to enhance microhardness. Processing variables of the reactive sintering treatment were temperature (600, 650, 700, 750 and 800 °C, pressure (5, 10 y 20 MPa and holding time (3600, 5400 y 7200 seconds. Experimental results show that temperature is the most important variable affecting the substrate/coating formation, while pressure does not appear to have a significant effect. The results show the optimum conditions of the reactive sintering that favor the substrate/coating formation are 800 °C, 20 MPa and 7200 seconds. Under these conditions, the reaction zone between the substrate and coating is more compacted and well-adhered, with a microhardness of 1300 Vickers. The results of SEM and X-Ray diffraction confirmed the formation of α-Al9FeMnSi and β-Al9FeMn2Si intermetallics in the substrate/coating interface as well as the presence of Cr and Ni, indicating diffusion of these two elements from the substrate to the interface.Los intermetálicos α-Al9FeMnSi y β-Al9FeMn2Si formados por sinterización reactiva de polvos Al, Si, Mn, Fe, Cr, Ni se han utilizado en aceros AISI 304L para mejorar la microdureza. Las variables de procesamiento de sinterización reactiva fueron temperatura (600, 650, 700, 750, y 800 °C, presión (5, 10 y 20 MPa y el tiempo de retención (3600, 5400 7200 segundos. Los resultados experimentales muestran que la temperatura es la variable más importante que afecta a la formación del sustrato/recubrimiento, mientras que la presión no parece tener un efecto significativo una influencia significativa. Los resultados muestran las condiciones óptimas de la sinterización reactiva que favorecen la formación del sustrato/recubrimiento a 800 °C, 20 MPa y 7200 segundos. En estas condiciones, la zona de reacción entre el sustrato y el recubrimiento es más compacta y bien

  1. Tribological wear behavior of diamond reinforced composite coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkateswarlu, K.; Ray, Ajoy Kumar; Gunjan, Manoj Kumar; Mondal, D.P.; Pathak, L.C.

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, diamond reinforced composite (DRC) coating has been applied on mild steel substrate using thermal spray coating technique. The composite powder consists of diamond, tungsten carbide, and bronze, which was mixed in a ball mill prior deposition by thermal spray. The microstructure and the distribution of diamond and tungsten carbide particle in the bronze matrix were studied. The DRC-coated mild steel substrates were assessed in terms of their high stress abrasive wear and compared with that of uncoated mild steel substrates. It was observed that when sliding against steel, the DRC-coated sample initially gains weight, but then loses the transferred counter surface material. In case of abrasive wear, the wear rate was greatly reduced due to the coating; wherein the wear rate decreased with increase in diamond content

  2. Formation of hydrophobic coating on glass surface using atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma in ambient air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Z; Qiu, Y; Kuffel, E

    2004-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas under atmospheric pressure are of great interest in material surface processing because of their convenience, effectiveness and low cost. In this paper, the treatment of a glass surface for improving hydrophobicity using a non-thermal plasma generated by a dielectric barrier corona discharge (DBCD) with a needle array-to-plane electrode arrangement in atmospheric air is conducted, and the surface properties of the glass before and after the DBCD treatment are studied using contact angle measurement, surface resistance measurement and the wet flashover voltage test. The effects of the plasma dose (the product of average discharge power and treatment time) of DBCD on the surface modification are studied, and the mechanism of interaction between the plasma and glass surface is discussed. It is found that a layer of hydrophobic coating is formed on the glass surface through DBCD treatment, and the improvement of hydrophobicity depends on the plasma dose of the DBCD. It seems that there is an optimum plasma dose for the surface treatment. The test results of thermal ageing and chemical ageing show that the hydrophobic layer has quite stable characteristics

  3. The development of CVR coatings for PBR fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, R. E.; Vanier, P. E.; Dowell, M. B.; Lennartz, J. A.

    Particle bed reactors (PBR's) are being developed for both space power and propulsion applications. These reactors operate with exhaust gas temperatures of 2500 to 3000 K and fuel temperatures hundreds of degrees higher. One fuel design for these reactors consists of uranium carbide encapsulated in either carbon or graphite. This fuel kernel must be protected from the coolant gas, usually H2, both to prevent attack of the kernel and to limit fission product release. Refractory carbide coatings have been proposed for this purpose. The typical coating process used for this is a chemical vapor deposition. Testing of other components have indicated the superiority of refractory carbide coatings applied using a chemical vapor reaction (CVR) process, however technology to apply these coatings to large numbers of fuel particles with diameters on the order of 500 pm were not readily available. A process to deposit these CVR coatings on surrogate fuel consisting of graphite particles is described. Several types of coatings have been applied to the graphite substrate: NbC in various thicknesses and a bilayer coating consisting of NbC and TaC with a intermediate layer of pyrolytic graphite. These coated particles have been characterized prior to test; results are presented.

  4. Laser cladding of Ti-6Al-4V with various carbide powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Folkes, J.A.; Shibata, K.

    1994-01-01

    Laser cladding Ti-6Al-4V can be achieved with various weight percentages of different carbide powders. The microstructure and morphology of the clad layer is determined by the cladding powder composition, for a given set of laser parameters, such that 10 and 20 wt% Cr 3 C 2 results in a β + TiC clad microstructure; 10 and 20 wt% WC results in an α + TiC clad microstructure (plus some original WC); and Mo 2 C gives an α + β + TiC or β + TiC structure, depending on the weight percentage of Mo 2 C. The morphology of the TiC in all cases is dendritic or feathery, depending on the carbide content. The microstructure observed in all cases agreed well with that theoretically predicted from the energetics of carbide formation and β-stabilizing properties of each element

  5. Creep cavity and carbide studies during creep of a 12%CrMoV-steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, Henrik; Storesund, J.; Seitisleam, F.

    1997-03-01

    Uniaxial creep tests of a X20CrMoV 12 1 steel has been carried out. The work was performed as a follow-up on earlier investigations on a similar steel with lower creep ductility. A comparison with this previous work is included. Both interrupted and rupture tests were performed and studies were made of cavity formation processes and carbide transformations. The creep curves could be reproduced using an analytical model. No secondary creep was observed. Cavities were found to form already at a strain of 1%. The cavity density, mean diameter and cavitated area fraction were found to have a linear relationship with the strain for strains up to about 10%. The mean carbide diameter was observed to be a function of time at temperature. A small decrease in carbide density with strain was detected 12 refs, 28 figs, 6 tabs

  6. Reinforced Carbon Carbon (RCC) oxidation resistant material samples - Baseline coated, and baseline coated with tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) impregnation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantz, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Reinforced carbon-carbon material specimens were machined from 19 and 33 ply flat panels which were fabricated and processed in accordance with the specifications and procedures accepted for the fabrication and processing of the leading edge structural subsystem (LESS) elements for the space shuttle orbiter. The specimens were then baseline coated and tetraethyl orthosilicate impregnated, as applicable, in accordance with the procedures and requirements of the appropriate LESS production specifications. Three heater bars were ATJ graphite silicon carbide coated with the Vought 'pack cementation' coating process, and three were stackpole grade 2020 graphite silicon carbide coated with the chemical vapor deposition process utilized by Vought in coating the LESS shell development program entry heater elements. Nondestructive test results are reported.

  7. Carbides precipitated from the melt in a Zr-2.5 Nb alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrkowski, R.; Garcia, E.A.; Vigna, G.L.; Bermudez, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    An experimental method is presented which leads to the formation of carbides similar in size (3 to 8 microns) and composition to those observed in some pressure tubes of CANDU type reactors. The method is based on melting the Zr-2.5 Nb alloy in a graphite crucible, where isothermal C diffusion in the Zr-Nb melt took place. It can be inferred that the carbides observed in pressure tubes could be originated in high temperature stages of the manufacture process. Otherwise, they could have been incorporated in the Zr sponge. As a result of the diffusion couple Liquid Zr-2.5 Nb/Solid Graphite, a carbide layer, up to 100μm thick, grew attached to the crucible wall, together with carbide particles whose size was in the some microns range. The smallest particles were arranged in rows determined by the prior β phase grains. The main carbide phase detected was the cubic MC 1-x ; the hexagonal M 2 C was also detected; M for metal. (Author)

  8. Boron carbide nanostructures: A prospective material as an additive in concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Paviter; Kaur, Gurpreet; Kumar, Rohit; Kumar, Umesh; Singh, Kulwinder; Kumar, Manjeet; Bala, Rajni; Meena, Ramovatar; Kumar, Akshay

    2018-05-01

    In recent decades, manufacture and ingestion of concrete have increased particularly in developing countries. Due to its low cost, safety and strength, concrete have become an economical choice for protection of radiation shielding material in nuclear reactors. As boron carbide has been known as a neutron absorber material makes it a great candidate as an additive in concrete for shielding radiation. This paper presents the synthesis of boron carbide nanostructures by using ball milling method. The X-ray diffraction pattern, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscope analysis confirms the formation of boron carbide nanostructures. The effect of boron carbide nanostructures on the strength of concrete samples was demonstrated. The compressive strength tests of concrete cube B4C powder additives for 0 % and 5 % of total weight of cement was compared for different curing time period such as 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. The high compressive strength was observed when 5 wt % boron carbide nanostructures were used as an additive in concrete samples after 28 days curing time and showed significant improvement in strength.

  9. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Katrin; Bhide, Amey S; Tekleyohans, Dawit G; Wittkop, Benjamin; Snowdon, Rod J; Becker, Annette

    2016-01-01

    Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2) are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16) is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK) for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner.

  10. The MADS Box Genes ABS, SHP1, and SHP2 Are Essential for the Coordination of Cell Divisions in Ovule and Seed Coat Development and for Endosperm Formation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Ehlers

    Full Text Available Seed formation is a pivotal process in plant reproduction and dispersal. It begins with megagametophyte development in the ovule, followed by fertilization and subsequently coordinated development of embryo, endosperm, and maternal seed coat. Two closely related MADS-box genes, SHATTERPROOF 1 and 2 (SHP1 and SHP2 are involved in specifying ovule integument identity in Arabidopsis thaliana. The MADS box gene ARABIDOPSIS BSISTER (ABS or TT16 is required, together with SEEDSTICK (STK for the formation of endothelium, part of the seed coat and innermost tissue layer formed by the maternal plant. Little is known about the genetic interaction of SHP1 and SHP2 with ABS and the coordination of endosperm and seed coat development. In this work, mutant and expression analysis shed light on this aspect of concerted development. Triple tt16 shp1 shp2 mutants produce malformed seedlings, seed coat formation defects, fewer seeds, and mucilage reduction. While shp1 shp2 mutants fail to coordinate the timely development of ovules, tt16 mutants show less peripheral endosperm after fertilization. Failure in coordinated division of the innermost integument layer in early ovule stages leads to inner seed coat defects in tt16 and tt16 shp1 shp2 triple mutant seeds. An antagonistic action of ABS and SHP1/SHP2 is observed in inner seed coat layer formation. Expression analysis also indicates that ABS represses SHP1, SHP2, and FRUITFUL expression. Our work shows that the evolutionary conserved Bsister genes are required not only for endothelium but also for endosperm development and genetically interact with SHP1 and SHP2 in a partially antagonistic manner.

  11. Sol-gel derived C-SiC composites and protective coatings for sustained durability in the space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruvy, Yair; Liedtke, Volker

    2003-09-01

    Composites and coatings were produced via the fast sol-gel process of a mixture of alkoxysilane precursors. The composites were comprised of carbon fibers, fabrics, or their precursors as reinforcement, and sol-gel-derived silicon carbide as matrix, aiming at high-temperature stable ceramics that can be utilized for re-entry structures. The protective coatings were comprised of fluorine-rich sol-gel derived resins, which exhibit high flexibility and coherence to provide sustained ATOX protection necessary for LEO space-exposed elements. For producing the composites, the sol-gel-derived resin is cast onto the reinforcement fibers/fabrics mat (carbon or its precursors) to produce a 'green' composite that is being cured. The 'green' composite is converted into a C-SiC composite via a gradual heat-pressure process under inert atmosphere, during which the organic substituents on the silicon atoms undergo internal oxidative pyrolysis via the schematic reaction: (SiRO3/2)n -> SiC + CO2 + H2O. The composition of the resultant silicon-oxi-carbide is tailorable via modifying the composition of the sol-gel reactants. The reinforcement, when made of carbon precursors, is converted into carbon during the heat-and-pressure processing as well. The C-SiC composites thus derived exhibit superior thermal stability and comparable thermal conductivity, combined with good mechanical strength features and failure resistance, which render them greatly applicable for re-entry shielding, heat-exchange pipes, and the like. Fluorine rich sol-gel derived coatings were developed as well, via the use of HF rich sol-gel process. These coatings provide oxidation-protection via the silica formation process, together with flexibility that allows 18,000 repetitive folding of the coating without cracking.

  12. Assessment of NDE methods for detecting cracks and damage in environmental barrier coated CMC tested under tension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Wroblewski, Adam C.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Gorican, Daniel; Rauser, Richard W.

    2015-03-01

    For validating physics based analytical models predicting spallation life of environmental barrier coating (EBC) on fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites, the fracture strength of EBC and kinetics of crack growth in EBC layers need to be experimentally determined under engine operating conditions. In this study, a multi layered barium strontium aluminum silicate (BSAS) based EBC-coated, melt infiltrated silicon carbide fiber reinforced silicon carbide mat