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Sample records for carbamide peroxide bleaching

  1. Shear bond strength after dentin bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide agents

    OpenAIRE

    Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Freitas, Patrícia Moreira de; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2004-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS) of dentin treated with two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents 15 days after bleaching and storage in artificial saliva. Dentin fragments were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20) for the treatment with the two different bleaching agents (Rembrandt 10% or Opalescence 10%) or with a placebo agent, applied to the tooth surface for 8 hours a day. During the remaining time, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva. After 42 ...

  2. Effect of protective coating on marginal integrity of nanohybrid composite during bleaching with carbamide peroxide: A microleakage study

    OpenAIRE

    A Ashok Kumar; V P Hariharavel; Ashwin Narayanan; S Murali

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the microleakage on the marginal integrity of nanohybrid composite during bleaching with carbamide peroxide after applying a protective coating of G-Coat plus (GC, Japan). Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared and restored with nanohybrid composite restoration in 60 freshly extracted noncarious premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. Then they were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 - bleaching with carbamide peroxide without G co...

  3. Ion release from a composite resin after exposure to different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents

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    Renata Plá Rizzolo Bueno

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This in vitro study evaluated the influence of two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents - a commercial product (Opalescence PF; Ultradent Products, Inc. and a bleaching agent prepared in a compounding pharmacy - on the chemical degradation of a light-activated composite resin by determining its release of ions before and after exposure to the agents. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Thirty composite resin (Filtek Z250; 3M/ESPE samples were divided into three groups: group I (exposed to Opalescence PF commercial bleaching agent, group II (exposed to a compounded bleaching agent and group III (control - Milli-Q water. After 14 days of exposure, with a protocol of 8 h of daily exposure to the bleaching agents and 16 h of immersion in Milli-Q water, the analysis of ion release was carried out using a HP 8453 spectrophotometer. The values were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, Tukey's test and the paired t-tests. The significance level was set at 5%. RESULTS: After 14 days of the experiment, statistically significant difference was found between group II and groups I and III, with greater ion release from the composite resin in group II. CONCLUSIONS: The compounded bleaching agent had a more aggressive effect on the composite resin after 14 days of exposure than the commercial product and the control (no bleaching.

  4. Effect of a 16% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Gel on Enamel Staining Susceptibility

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    M. Ghavamnasiri

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Due to the growing popularity of vital bleaching by CarbamidePeroxide it is imperative to understand the effect of such agents on enamel and dentine.Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel; Vivastyle on enamel staining susceptibility.Materials and Methods: Thirty bovine specimens were selected and randomly divided into two groups of fifteen. The experimental group was subjected to Vivastyle gel and then was immersed in coffee, for half an hour daily for three weeks. The control group was only immersed in coffee. The teeth were evaluated by colorimeter readings to measure L*, a*, b* of each tooth. Total color differences between two colors (ΔE were calculated using the following formula: ΔE= [(ΔL* 2 + (Δa* 2+ (Δb* 2].ΔE1 represent color difference after bleaching; ΔE2: bleached and immersed in coffee,and ΔE3 immersed in coffee.Results: Mean color difference were: 9.478, 13.808, and 7.230 for ΔE1, ΔE2, and ΔE3 respectively. Paired comparison by Duncan test showed that there was a significant difference between ΔE1 and ΔE2 (P0.000. t-test showed that there was no significant difference between ΔE3 and ΔE1. (P=0.08, however, ΔE3 had significant difference with ΔE2 (P0.000.Conclusion: After vital bleaching, the enamel staining susceptibility is significantly increased.

  5. Effect of protective coating on marginal integrity of nanohybrid composite during bleaching with carbamide peroxide: A microleakage study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A Ashok; Hariharavel, V P; Narayanan, Ashwin; Murali, S

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the microleakage on the marginal integrity of nanohybrid composite during bleaching with carbamide peroxide after applying a protective coating of G-Coat plus (GC, Japan). Class V cavities were prepared and restored with nanohybrid composite restoration in 60 freshly extracted noncarious premolars extracted for orthodontic reasons. Then they were divided into 3 groups. Group 1 - bleaching with carbamide peroxide without G coat plus (n = 20), Group 2 - bleaching with carbamide peroxide with G-Coat plus (n = 20), Group 3 - without bleaching procedure (n = 20) (control group). In Group 2, G coat plus was applied over the restorative surface and margins. Then all teeth in Groups 1 and 2 were taken and mounted in dental stone. Bleaching trays were custom fabricated over the cast with the help of a heated vacuum-forming machine. 10% carbamide peroxide (opalescence PF) was applied over the tooth, and the bleaching process was done for about 2 weeks. Then all samples underwent thermocycling and were then immersed in the 2% methylene blue solution for 24 h and observed under a stereomicroscope to evaluate the amount of dye penetration. Data were compared using Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney test using SPSS Inc.; Chicago, IL, USA, Version 17.0. Mann-Whitney test shows that the difference in microleakage between Group 1-Group 2 and Group 2-Group 3 is statistically significant (P < 0.05). Significant reduction in microleakage was seen in Group 2 when compared to other groups.

  6. [Effect of carbamide peroxide bleaching agents on micro-leakage of composite resin interface in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-ling; Xu, Juan; Zhao, Xin-yi; He, Hui-ming

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agents at different concentrations and with different carriers on the micro-leakage of composite resin interface. Class V cavity (2 mm in diameter and 2 mm in depth) preparations were made at the enamelo-cemental junction on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 extracted human premolars. The cavities were filled with hybrid composite resin. The teeth were stored for 24 h in distilled water at 37 degrees celsius; before thermocyling for 500 times between 5 and 55 degrees celsius;. The teeth were then randomly assigned into 7 groups, and in groups 1-6, the bleaching gels containing 10% or 20% of CP were applied on the buccal and lingual surface of the teeth for two weeks (6-8 h/day, 37 degrees celsius;, 100% relative humidity) using Carbopol, PVP or Poloxamer as the thickening carriers, respectively. The seventh group served as the control without bleaching treatment. Nail polish was applied to the surface of the tooth, and all the teeth were immersed in ammoniacal silver nitrate solution followed by developing solution. The teeth were finally sectioned through the midline of the restoration and observed under stereomicroscope. SEM micrographs were also made to observe the interface. With the same bleaching agent, the micro-leakage in the gingival wall was slightly greater than in the occlusive wall, but the difference was not significant. Only 20% CP with Poloxamer as the thickening agent significantly increased the leakage of dentine-resin composite interface, and 10% and 20% CP with Carbopol or PVP as the thickening agents and 10% CP with Poloxamer produced minimal effects on filling the micro-leakage. Thickening carriers and the concentration of CP (20% or below) have no significant effect on micro-leakage of composite resin.

  7. Effect of Hydrogen and Carbamide Peroxide in Bleaching, Enamel Morphology, and Mineral Composition: In vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llena, Carmen; Esteve, Irene; Forner, Leopoldo

    2017-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the bleaching effect, morphological changes, and variations in calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) in the enamel with hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP) after the use of different application regimens. Four groups of five teeth were randomly assigned, according to the treatment protocol: HP 37.5% applied for 30 or 60 minutes (HP30, HP60), CP 16% applied for 14 or 28 hours (CP14, CP28). Changes in dental color were evaluated, according to the following formula: ΔE = [(L a -L b ) 2 +(a a -a b ) 2 + (b a -b b ) 2 ] 1/2 . Enamel morphology and Ca and P compositions were evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscope and environmental scanning electron microscopy. ΔE HP30 was significantly greater than CP14 (10.37 ± 2.65/8.56 ± 1.40), but not between HP60 and CP28. HP60 shows greater morphological changes than HP30. No morphological changes were observed in the groups treated with CP. The reduction in Ca and P was significantly greater in HP60 than in CP28 (p tooth color; HP produced morphological changes and Ca and P a gradual decrease, while CP produced no morphological changes, and the decrease in mineral component was smaller. CP 16% applied during 2 weeks could be equally effective and safer for tooth whitening than to administer two treatment sessions with HP 37.5%.

  8. EFFECTIVITY OF TWO BLEACHING AGENT OF 10% CARBAMIDE PEROXIDE WITH AND WITHOUT POTASSIUM NITRATE-FLUORIDE (CLINICAL STUDY

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    Ayus Lusiyanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Tooth bleaching has become a popular treatment for esthetic improvement in dentistry. There are several 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents that are available in Indonesia which contained potassium nitrate-fluoride or without potassium nitrate-fluoride. However, there was no clinical report about these products in Indonesia. This study was conducted to compare the effectiveness of two bleaching and sensitivity of tooth and gingiva. Sixty-four participants were divided into 2 groups. The first group was treated with bleaching agent that contained potassium nitrate-fluoride (Opalescence PF, Ultradent. Bleaching treatment was done for 6-8 hours per night over a 2 week-period. Evaluations were performed at the baseline and at 3, 7, 14 day afterwards. Color change was measured using a value-ordered Vita classic shade guide; tooth and gingival sensitivity were examine using Electric Pulp Tester, Gingival Index and patient log. The results showed that there were no statistical differences in degree of color change between the two products. The mean color change after 2 weeks was 7-8 tabs lighter than baseline. Also there was no statistical difference in tooth and gingival sensitivity between the products. It can be concluded that 10% carbamide peroxide containing potassium nitrate-fluoride has the same effectiveness compared to other agent without potassium nitrate-fluoride for tooth color change and tooth and gingival sensitivity.

  9. A Clinical Study of the Effectiveness of Two Different 10% Carbamide Peroxide Bleaching Products: A 6-Month Followup

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    S. R. Grobler

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of two different 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching products just after treatment and after a 6-month follow-up period. Methods. Two 10% carbamide peroxide products (Opalescence PF and Nite White ACP were applied nightly for 14 days, according to the manufacturers' instructions. The color of teeth 11 and 21 of thirty-four subjects having A2 or darker teeth were measured with a spectrophotometer (L∗;a∗;b∗ before treatment, just after treatment (14 days and after 6 months. Results and Conclusions. Both products produced significant whitening of teeth with total color change (ΔEab∗ of approximately 5.20 units. There was a significant improvement in all 3 color coordinates (L*,a*, and b∗ for up to 6 months postbleaching (P<.05. Nite White showed a higher degree of relapse (27% than Opalescence (18% over the 6-month period. It is suggested that rebleaching after 6 months is not necessary.

  10. Effect of fluoride-treated enamel on indirect cytotoxicity of a 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel to pulp cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Lima, Adriano Fonseca; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of fluoride solutions applied to enamel to protect pulp cells against the trans-enamel and transdentinal cytotoxicity of a 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching gel. The CP gel was applied to enamel/dentin discs adapted to aicial pulp chambers (8 h/day) during 1, 7 or 14 days, followed by fluoride (0.05% or 0.2%) application for 1 min. The extracts (culture medium in contact with dentin) were applied to MDPC-23 cells for 1 h, and cell metabolism (MTT assay), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and cell membrane damage (flow cytometry) were analyzed. Knoop microhardness of enamel was also evaluated. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis tests (α=0.05). For the MTT assay and ALP activity, significant reductions between the control and the bleached groups were observed (p0.05), regardless of fluoride application or treatment days. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated 30% of cell membrane damage in all bleached groups. After 14 days of treatment, the fluoride-treated enamel presented significantly higher microhardness values than the bleached-only group (pfluoride solutions, the treated enamel surface did not prevent the toxic effects caused by the 16% CP gel to odontoblast-like cells.

  11. REMINERALIZATION POTENTIAL OF A CARBAMIDE BLEACHING AGENT

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    Marinova-Takorova Borislavova Mirela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching has gradually became a popular procedure for people searching for aesthetic improvement. The aim of this in vitro study was to investigate the effect of bleaching with 45% carbamide peroxide on the level of mineralization of enamel, using laser fluorescence. Materials and methods: Sixty extracted human teeth were treated with 45% carbamid peroxide (Opalescence, Ultradent, 4 consecutive days for one hour each day. The effect of the bleaching agent on the level of mineralization of enamel was measured with DIAGNO dent pen. The statistical method we use was descriptive analysis. Results: The average values, measured before the applications of the carbamid peroxide were 6.33. On the first day they were 5.41, on the second 5.38, on the third 5.11 and 5.35 on the forth. Conclusion: There was observed a slight remineralization effect due to the incorporated Ca2+ and F- ions in the bleaching agent that we have used.

  12. Microhardness and Roughness of Enamel Bleached with 10% Carbamide Peroxide and Brushed with Different Toothpastes: An In Situ Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carolina França de Medeiros; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background: This in situ study evaluated the roughness and microhardness of enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide (PC10) and brushed with different toothpastes. Materials and Methods: Two groups of volunteers received PC10 and placebo agents for 21 days in two phases in a crossover 2 × 3 study. Fragments of human enamel were distributed among intraoral removable appliances (IRA). Nine fragments, divided into three triplets, were used in each IRA, and these were brushed with toothpastes R (Colgate), W (Colgate Total 12 Whiteness Gel) or BS (Colgate Whitening Oxygen Bubbles Fluoride). Treatments agents were applied for 8 h overnight. After brushing, the volunteers used the IRA for about 16 h/day. After a washout period, new IRAs were distributed and the volunteers were crossed over to the alternate agent for 21 days. Roughness and microhardness were measured before and after each phase. Results: According to the paired Student’s t-test, roughness of enamel increased and microhardness decreased (P Enamel microhardness and surface roughness are altered when PC10 bleaching is associated with tooth brushing using toothpastes BS, R, and W. PMID:25214727

  13. Effect of In-Office Carbamide Peroxide-Based Tooth Bleaching System on Wear Resistance of Silorane-Based and Methacrylate-Based Dental Composites

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    Masoumeh Hasani Tabatabaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Several studies have assessed the characteristics and properties of silorane-based composites and adhesive systems. Considering the extensive application of tooth-whitening agents, possible deteriorative effects of tooth bleaching agents on these restorative materials must be studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an in-office carbamide peroxide-based tooth bleaching agent on the wear resistance of a silorane-based and a conventional microhybrid dimethyl methacrylate-based dental composite with two different application times.  Materials and Methods: Thirty cylindrical specimens were made of Z250 and P90 dental composite resins (n=15 for each composite. Samples made of each composite were divided into three groups (n=5 for immersion in an in-office bleaching agent (Opalescence® Quick 45% for either three or eight hours or saline solution (control. Wear tests were conducted after bleaching using a pin-on disk apparatus under the load of 40N at a constant sliding speed of 0.5 ms-1 for a sliding distance of 300 m. The samples were weighed before and after the wear test. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to statistically analyze the obtained data (α=0.05.Results: There was a significant decrease in the weight of samples after the wear test (P<0.001. However, no significant difference was found among groups in the mean weight of samples before and after the wear test (P>0.05. Conclusion: Bleaching for three or eight hours using 45% carbamide peroxide had no deteriorative effect on the wear resistance of Z250 and P90 composites.

  14. Effects of conditioners on microshear bond strength to enamel after carbamide peroxide bleaching and/or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, O A; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    2007-11-01

    To evaluate (a) the enamel microshear bond strength (MSBS) of a universal adhesive and (b) the effects of conditioning with a self-etching primer adhesive with/without prior bleaching and/or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) application. Thirty-five molars were cut into four sections, assigned randomly to four groups (no treatment; 16% carbamide peroxide bleaching; CPP-ACP-containing paste (Tooth Mousse, TM); bleaching and TM) and treated accordingly. Specimens were divided into two for bonding with either a self-etching primer (Clearfil SE Bond, CSE) or a total-etch adhesive (Single Bond, SB). Specimens for CSE bonding were subdivided for one of four preconditioning treatments (no conditioning; 30-40% phosphoric acid (PA); 15% EDTA; 20% polyacrylic acid conditioner (Cavity conditioner, CC) and treated. The adhesives were applied and resin composite bonded to the enamel using microtubes (internal diameter 0.75mm). Bonds were stressed in shear until failure, mean MSBS calculated and data analysed using ANOVA with Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05). The modes of bond failure were assessed and classified. Two-way ANOVA revealed significant differences between treatments (Padhesive system on treated enamel may significantly improve bond strengths.

  15. Comparison of efficacy of tray-delivered carbamide and hydrogen peroxide for at-home bleaching: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Martinez, Issis; Reis, Alessandra; Schroeder, Marcos; Muñoz, Miguel Angel; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Masterson, Danielle; Maia, Lucianne C

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the color change produced by tray-delivered carbamide peroxide [CP] versus hydrogen peroxide products [HP] for at-home bleaching through a systematic review and meta-analysis. MEDLINE via PubMeb, Scopus, Web of Science, Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (LILACS), Brazilian Library in Dentistry (BBO), and Cochrane Library and Grey literature were searched without restrictions. The abstracts of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR) and unpublished and ongoing trial registries were also searched. Dissertations and theses were explored using the ProQuest Dissertations and Periodicos Capes Theses databases. We included randomized clinical trials that compared tray-delivered CP versus HP for at-home dental bleaching. The color change in shade guide units (SGU) and ΔE were the primary outcomes, and tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation were the secondary outcomes. The risk of bias tool of the Cochrane Collaboration was used for quality assessment. After duplicate removal, 1379 articles were identified. However, only eight studies were considered to be at "low" risk of bias in the key domains of the risk bias tool and they were included in the analysis. For ΔE, the standardized mean difference was -0.45 (95 % CI -0.69 to -0.21), which favored tray-delivered CP products (p whitening efficacy than HP-based products in terms of ΔE, but they were similar in terms of ΔSGU. Both whitening systems demonstrated equal level of gingival irritation and tooth sensitivity. Tray-delivered CP gels have a slightly better whitening efficacy than HP-based products in terms of ΔE. This should be interpreted with caution as the data of ΔSGU did not show statistical difference between the products.

  16. Effects of 35% Carbamide Peroxide Gel on Surface Roughness and Hardness of Composite Resins

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    F. Sharafeddin

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bleaching agents may not be safe for dental materials. The purpose of this invitro study was to evaluate the effects of Opalescent Quick "in-office bleaching gel" containing 35% carbamide peroxide on the surface roughness and hardness of microfilled(Heliomolar and hybride (Spectrum TPH composite resins.Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens of Spectrum TPH composite resins and twenty Heliomolar composite resins were fabricated using a metallic ring (6.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm thickness and light cured, then their surfaces were polished. Specimens of each composite resin were divided into two equal groups. Ten specimens of each type of composite were stored in water at 37°C as the control groups and 35% carbamide peroxide gel (Opalescence Quick as the other group for 30 minutes a week for 3 weeks. Then the specimens were subject to roughness and hardness tests.Results: This study revealed that using 35% carbamide peroxide bleaching gels had no significant effect on the surface roughness of Spectrum TPH "hybrid" and Heliomolar "microfilled" composite resins. The surface hardness of Spectrum TPH composite treated with the subject gel significantly increased compared to heliomolar, which had no significant change after treatment with this bleaching gel.Conclusion: If tooth color matching of the composite had been satisfactory after office bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide gel, this material would have been acceptable because it has no adverse effect on Heliomolar and Spectrum TPH composite resins.

  17. Effects of 35% Carbamide Peroxide Gel on Surface Roughness and Hardness of Composite Resins

    OpenAIRE

    Sharafeddin, F.; Jamalipour, GR.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Bleaching agents may not be safe for dental materials. The purpose of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the effects of Opalescent Quick ?in-office bleaching gel? containing 35% carbamide peroxide on the surface roughness and hardness of microfilled (Heliomolar) and hybride (Spectrum TPH) composite resins. Materials and Methods: Twenty specimens of Spectrum TPH composite resins and twenty Heliomolar composite resins were fabricated using a metallic ring (6.5 mm diameter and 2.5 mm...

  18. Shear bond strength after dentin bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide agents Resistência ao cisalhamento da dentina após clareamento com peróxido de carbamida a 10%

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    Roberta Tarkany Basting

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength (SBS of dentin treated with two 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agents 15 days after bleaching and storage in artificial saliva. Dentin fragments were randomly divided into 3 groups (n = 20 for the treatment with the two different bleaching agents (Rembrandt 10% or Opalescence 10% or with a placebo agent, applied to the tooth surface for 8 hours a day. During the remaining time, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva. After 42 days, the fragments were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. Another group (n = 20 was exposed to distilled and deionized water for 56 days. An adhesive system and microhybrid composite resin were used to prepare specimens for the SBS test. SBS tests were performed and the fractured surfaces were visually examined using a stereoscope at 30 X magnification. The analysis of variance (ANOVA and SIDAK tests showed higher SBS values for dentin treated with Opalescence 10% than for dentin treated with Rembrandt 10% or placebo. Groups treated with Rembrandt 10%, Opalescence 10% or placebo did not differ from the group treated with distilled and deionized water. Ten percent carbamide peroxide agents or a placebo agent caused no differences in SBS of dentin after 15 days of storage in artificial saliva.Este estudo in vitro avaliou a resistência ao cisalhamento da dentina submetida ao tratamento com dois agentes clareadores contendo peróxido de carbamida a 10% depois de 15 dias de clareamento e armazenagem em saliva artificial. Fragmentos de dentina foram aleatoriamente distribuídos em 3 grupos (n = 20 para receber o tratamento com dois diferentes agentes clareadores (Rembrandt a 10% ou Opalescence a 10% ou com um agente placebo, aplicados na superfície dental por 8 horas diárias. No restante do tempo, os espécimens permaneceram imersos em saliva artificial. Após o tratamento por 42 dias, os fragmentos foram armazenados em saliva artificial por 14 dias. Outro

  19. A clinical assessment of the effects of 10% carbamide peroxide gel on human pulp tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D G; Chiego, D J; Glickman, G N; McCauley, L K

    1999-04-01

    Bleaching vital teeth with 10% carbamide peroxide gel is a routine procedure in which there has been no evidence of associated permanent pulpal damage. Synthesis of the enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) is increased after exposure of eukaryotic cells to conditions of oxidative stress (including H2O2) as a defense against the damaging effects of free radicals. Dental pulps were evaluated for HO-1 (aka Heat Shock Protein 32) presence in teeth treated with 10% carbamide peroxide. Seventeen intact first premolars scheduled for orthodontic extraction were bleached for 4 h immediately preceding extraction. Fourteen additional premolars from the same individuals were not bleached. All 31 teeth were extracted, fixed, demineralized, frozen, sectioned, and immunostained with anti-HO-1 antibody using a standard ABC protocol. There was no significant difference in the presence of HO-1 between total bleached versus total unbleached teeth using the Fisher's Exact Test (p pulp proper may have the potential to respond to oxidative stress by increasing the synthesis of HO-1 (HSP32). This could represent a component of an initial defensive response by specific cells in strategic locations in the pulp that precedes classical inflammatory pathways.

  20. Evaluation of human dental loss caused by carbamide peroxide bleacher compared with phosphoric acid conditioning - radioactive method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Eduardo Makoto; Yousseff, Michel Nicolau; Saiki, Mitiko

    2002-01-01

    The radiometric method was applied to the evaluation of dental loss caused by carbamide peroxide when it is applied on the surface layers of enamel and dentin tissues. Also the dental loss caused by the etching with 37% phosphoric acid procedure used in aesthetic restoration was assessed for comparison with those results obtained. The tooth samples irradiated with a P standard in a thermal neutron flux of the nuclear reactor were placed in contact with 10% carbamide peroxide or with 37% phosphoric acid solution. The radioactivity of 32 P transferred from the radioactive teeth to the bleaching gel or to etching acid was measured using a Geiger Muller detector to calculate the mass of P removed in this treatment and losses were calculated after obtaining their P concentrations. Results obtained indicated that enamel and dentin exposed to carbamide peroxide bleaching agent lose phosphorus. The extent of enamel loss was smaller than that obtained for dentin. In the case of acid etching, there was no difference between the results obtained for enamel and dentin loss. Also the dentin loss obtained after a treatment of 30 applications of 10% carbamide peroxide was the same magnitude of that one application of 37% phosphoric acid. (author)

  1. Effects of 15% carbamide peroxide and 40% hydrogen peroxide on the microhardness and color change of composite resins.

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    Sedighe Sadat Hashemi Kamangar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 40% hydrogen peroxide and 15% carbamide peroxide on microhardness and color change of a silorane-based composite resin in comparison with two methacrylate-based composites.Fifty-four disc-shaped specimens (A3 shade were fabricated of Filtek P90 (P90, Filtek Z350XT Enamel (Z350 and Filtek Z250 (Z250 (3MESPE (n=18. The samples of each composite were randomly divided into three subgroups of 6. The control subgroups were immersed in distilled water; the test groups were exposed to Opalescence Boost (OB once; and Opalescence PF (OP (Ultradent for two weeks. Vickers microhardness testing and a spectrophotometric analysis of the color of samples were performed before and after each intervention.The baseline microhardness of P90 was significantly lower than that of the other two composites (P=0.001, but no difference was found between Z250 and Z350 in this respect (P=0.293. Bleaching treatments significantly decreased the microhardness of Z250 and Z350 (P 0.05. No significant difference was detected between the two types of bleaching (P>0.05. After bleaching with OB, ΔE value was measured to be 3.12(1.97, 3.31(1.84 and 3.7(2.11 for P90, Z250 and Z350, respectively. These values were 5.98(2.42, 4.66(2.85 and 4.90(2.78 after bleaching with OP with no significant difference.Bleaching decreased the microhardness of methacrylate-based but not silorane-based composites. Although no significant differences were found in ΔE of composites, ΔE of all groups did not remain in the clinically acceptable range after bleaching except for P90 after bleaching with 40% H2O2 (ΔE < 3.3.

  2. Spectrophotometric assessment of the effects of 10% carbamide peroxide on enamel translucency

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    Glauco Fioranelli Vieira

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Tooth shade results from the interaction between enamel color, enamel translucency and dentine color. A change in any of these parameters will change a tooth’s color. The objective of this study was to evaluate the changes occurring in enamel translucency during a tooth whitening process. Fourteen human tooth enamel fragments, with a mean thickness of 0.96 mm (± 0.3 mm, were subjected to a bleaching agent (10% carbamide peroxide 8 hours per day for 28 days. The enamel fragment translucency was measured by a computer controlled spectrophotometer before and after the bleaching agent applications in accordance with ANSI Z80.3-1986 - American National Standard for Ophthalmics - nonprescription sunglasses and fashion eyewear-requirements. The measurements were statistically compared by the Mann-Whitney non-parametric test. A decrease was observed in the translucency of all specimens and, consequently, there was a decrease in transmittance values for all samples. It was observed that the bleaching procedure significantly changes the enamel translucency, making it more opaque.

  3. Effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching strip gels on dental restorative materials in vitro: surface microhardness and surface morphology.

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    Duschner, Heinz; Götz, Hermann; White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathleen M; Zoladz, James R

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effects of peroxide tooth bleaching, including Crest Whitestrips hydrogen peroxide gel treatments, on the surface hardness and morphology of common dental restorative treatments. American Dental Association (ADA) recommended dental restorative materials, including amalgam, dental gold, porcelain, glass ionomer, and composites, were prepared according to manufacturers' instructions. A cycling treatment methodology was employed which alternated ex vivo human salivary exposures with bleaching treatments under conditions of controlled temperature and durations of treatment. Bleaching treatments included commercial Crest Whitestrips bleaching gels, which utilize hydrogen peroxide as the in situ bleaching source, and several commercial carbamide peroxide bleaching gels. Control treatments included placebo gels and an untreated group. Crest Whitestrips bleaching included treatment exposures simulating recommended clinical exposures (14 hours), along with excess bleaching simulating exposure to five times suggested Crest Whitestrips use. At the conclusion of treatments, surface microhardness measures and surface morphological assessments with standard and variable pressure (VP-) SEMs were conducted to assess the effects of bleaching exposure on the surface morphology and structural integrity of the restoratives. Surface microhardness and SEM measures revealed no significant deleterious effects on the restoration surfaces from Whitestrips gels. These results confirm that tooth bleaching from the selected commercial hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide bleaching systems does not produce changes in surface morphology or microhardness of common dental restorative materials. These results support the clinical safety of the selected commercial bleaching systems to the oral environment, matching results obtained from long-term use of these ingredients applied in dental offices and available in commercial formulations.

  4. Effect of light energy on peroxide tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Karen; Tam, Laura; Hubert, Manfred

    2004-02-01

    Light-activated bleaching is a method of tooth whitening. The authors conducted a study to compare the whitening effects and tooth temperature changes induced by various combinations of peroxide bleaches and light sources. The authors randomly assigned 250 extracted human teeth halves into experimental groups (n = 10). A placebo gel (control), a 35 percent hydrogen peroxide or a 10 percent carbamide peroxide bleach was placed on the tooth surface and was irradiated with no light (control); a halogen curing light; an infrared, or IR, light; an argon laser; or a carbon dioxide, or CO2, laser. Color changes were evaluated immediately, one day and one week after treatment using a value-oriented shade guide and an electronic dental color analyzer. The outer enamel and inner dentin surface temperatures were monitored before and immediately after each 30-second application of light using a thermocouple thermometer. Color and temperature changes were significantly affected by an interaction of the bleach and light variables. The application of lights significantly improved the whitening efficacy of some bleach materials, but it caused significant temperature increases in the outer and inner tooth surfaces. The IR and CO2 laser lights caused the highest tooth temperature increases. Dentists performing an in-office bleaching technique with the use of an additional light source to accelerate tooth whitening should consider the specific bleaching agent being used, as well as the potential risks of heating teeth. A specific combination of bleach and light that demonstrates good color change and little temperature rise should be selected for in-office tooth bleaching.

  5. Effect of 38% carbamide peroxide on the microleakage of silorane-based versus methacrylate-based composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Sadat Hashemi Kamangar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to assess the effect of 38% carbamide peroxide on the microleakage of class V cavities restored with either a silorane-based composite or two methacrylate-based composites. Materials and Methods A total of 96 class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of extracted human teeth with both enamel and dentin margins and were randomly assigned into three groups of Filtek P90 (3M-ESPE + P90 system adhesive (3M-ESPE(group A, Filtek Z250 (3M-ESPE + Adper Prompt L-Pop (3M-ESPE(group B and Filtek Z350XT (3M-ESPE + Adper Prompt L-Pop (group C. Half of the teeth were randomly underwent bleaching (38% carbamide peroxide, Day White, Discus Dental, applying for 15 min, twice a day for 14 day while the remaining half (control were not bleached. Dye penetration was measured following immersion in basic fuchsine. Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a level of 0.05. Results No significant differences were found between composites in the control groups in enamel (p = 0.171 or dentin (p = 0.094 margins. After bleaching, microleakage of Z250 (in enamel [p = 0.867] or dentin [p = 0.590] margins and Z350 (in enamel [p = 0.445] or dentin [p = 0.591] margins did not change significantly, but the microleakage of P90 significantly increased in both enamel (p = 0.042 and dentin (p = 0.002 margins. Conclusions No significant differences were noted between the bleached and control subgroups of two methacrylate-based composites in enamel or dentin margins. Microleakage of silorane-based composite significantly increased after bleaching.

  6. In vitro evaluation of human dental enamel surface roughness bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide and submitted to abrasive dentifrice brushing Avaliação in vitro da rugosidade superficial do esmalte dental humano clareado com peróxido de carbamida a 35% e submetido à escovação com dentifrícios abrasivos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cia Worschech

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the surface roughness of human enamel bleached with 35% carbamide peroxide at different times and submitted to different superficial cleaning treatments: G1 - not brushed; G2 - brushed with fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G3 - brushed with a non-fluoride abrasive dentifrice; G4 - brushed without dentifrice. Sixty fragments of human molar teeth with 4 x 4 mm were obtained using a diamond disc. The specimens were polished with sandpaper and abrasive pastes. A perfilometer was used to measure roughness average (Ra values of the initial surface roughness and at each 7-day-interval after the beginning of treatment. The bleaching was performed on the surface of the fragments for 1 hour a week, and the surface cleaning treatment for 3 minutes daily. The samples were stored in individual receptacles with artificial saliva. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test revealed significant differences in surface roughness values for G2 and G3, which showed an increase in roughness over time; G1 and G4 showed no significant roughness differences. The bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide did not alter the enamel surface roughness, but when the bleaching treatment was performed combined with brushing with abrasive dentifrices, there was a significant increase in roughness values.O propósito deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar em diferentes tempos a rugosidade superficial do esmalte dental humano clareado com peróxido de carbamida a 35% e submetido a diferentes tratamentos superficiais de limpeza: G1 - não escovado; G2 - escovado com dentifrício fluoretado abrasivo; G3 - escovado com dentifrício não fluoretado abrasivo; G4 - escovado sem dentifrício. Sessenta fragmentos de molares humanos com 4 x 4 mm foram obtidos através do seccionamento com discos diamantados. Os espécimes foram polidos com lixas e pastas abrasivas. Um perfilômetro foi utilizado para determinar os valores da média de dureza Ra ("roughness

  7. Role of fluoridated carbamide peroxide whitening gel in the remineralization of demineralized enamel: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollineni, Swetha; Janga, Ravi Kumar; Venugopal, L; Reddy, Indukuri Ravikishore; Babu, P Ravisekhar; Kumar, Sunil S

    2014-05-01

    The use of self-administered carbamide peroxide bleaching gels has become increasingly popular for whitening of discolored vital teeth. Studies have reported that its use may induce increased levels of sensitivity and surface roughness of the tooth due to demineralization. This study evaluates the effect of fluoride addition to the bleaching agent - its remineralizing capacity and alterations in the whitening properties. Twenty-four extracted lower third molar teeth, with the pretreatment shade determined, were taken up in the study. Each tooth was sectioned into four and labeled as groups A, B, C, and D. The tooth quadrants in group A-C were demineralized; groups A and B were treated with 10% carbamide peroxide gel (group-A without fluoride and group-B with 0.463% fluoride addition) (no further treatment was carried out for group c) group-D remained as the control. The post-treatment shade was determined. The tooth samples were sectioned (approximately 200 μm) for evaluation under a light microscope. The depth of demineralization was analyzed at five different equidistant points. Statistical analysis was carried out with t-tests, accepting ≤0.05 as significant. Addition of fluoride caused remineralization of demineralized enamel. The tooth whitening system showed that the remineralization properties did not affect the whitening properties.

  8. Influence of carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agents on the bond strength of resin-enamel/dentin interfaces Influência de agentes clareadores à base de peróxido de carbamida na resistência de união entre resina-esmalte/dentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Cavalli

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available In this bond strength study, a bleaching agent containing 10% carbamide peroxide was applied over composite-teeth bonded interfaces of two adhesive systems applied to enamel and dentin. Sixteen human third molars were used for bonding procedures. Single Bond (SB and Clearfil SE Bond (CB were applied to enamel and dentin according to the manufacturers' instructions. A resin composite cube-like structure was incrementally built on the bonded surfaces. The restored teeth were sectioned into 0.7 mm thick slices that were trimmed at enamel or dentin bonded interfaces to an hourglass shape with a cross-sectional area of approximately 0.5 mm². Specimens were assigned to 8 groups (n = 10 according to the following factors under study: dental substrate (enamel and dentin; adhesive system (SB and CB and treatment (10% carbamide peroxide and not bleached/control. The bleaching gel (Opalescence was applied at the bonded interfaces for 6 hours during 14 days and after daily treatment specimens were stored in artificial saliva. Unbleached specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. Specimens were tested for tension and the data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p Este estudo avaliou a resistência de união de dois sistemas adesivos ao esmalte e à dentina após a aplicação de agente clareador sobre a união compósito-dente. Dezesseis terceiros molares humanos foram usados nos procedimentos restauradores. Single Bond (SB e Clearfil SE Bond (CB foram aplicados no esmalte e na dentina de acordo com as instruções dos fabricantes. Um bloco de compósito foi construído nas superfícies tratadas com os adesivos. Os dentes restaurados foram seccionados em fatias com espessura de 0,7 mm, que receberam constrição na interface de união num formato de ampulheta, com área de secção transversal de ± 0,5 mm². Os espécimes foram distribuídos em 8 grupos (n = 10 de acordo com os fatores em estudo: substrato dental (esmalte e

  9. Comparison of Radicular Peroxide Leakage from four Commonly used Bleaching agents following Intracoronal Bleaching in Endodontically treated teeth - An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, Ks; Hegde, Swaroop; Mathew, Sylvia; Lata, DA; Bhandi, Shilpa H; N, Shruthi

    2013-08-01

    Non vital bleaching is simple, conservative procedure for esthetic correction of discolored endodontically treated teeth. The aim of this study was to determine and compare the amount of peroxide leakage from four different bleaching agents i.e superoxol, sodium perborate, combination of superoxol & sodium perborate and carbamide peroxide during intracoronal bleaching, as the safe and effective bleaching is the need of the hour. 50 extracted maxillary centrals were selected for the study. Following standardized protocol access, cleaning and shaping by step back technique and obturation was done using guttapercha and AH plus sealer. Access was sealed with Cavit G and outer root surface was coated with wax and nail varnish. The teeth were separated into crown and root and the root portion was placed in plastic tube containing distilled water for 7days.After incubation, 3mm of gutta-percha was removed below CEJ and 2mm glass ionomer cement base was placed. Grouped into five categories based on the bleaching agent placed in pulp chamber as -group1 (control)-distilled water, group 2-sodium perborate with distilled water , group 3- 30% hydrogen peroxide ,group 4-mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide and group 5-10% carbamide peroxide gel. Peroxide leakage was measured after 24hrs using ferrothiocyanate method and optical density using spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis of the data was conducted using ANOVA and multiple comparisons within the groups was done using BONFERRONI method (Post-Hoc tests). The results showed highest peroxide penetration from 30% hydrogen peroxide followed by mixture of sodium perborate with 30% hydrogen peroxide, mixture of sodium perborate with distilled water and least penetration from 10% carbamide peroxide gel. The results were statistically significant. Radicular peroxide leakage in 10% carbamide peroxide was significantly lower than the other tested bleaching agents making it a very safe alternative for intracoronal

  10. Color Recovery Effect of Different Bleaching Systems on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-12-05

    Dec 5, 2017 ... KEYWORDS: Composite resin, discoloration, home bleaching, laser activated bleaching, office ... hexametaphosphate, which protect the teeth surface from .... exposure, saliva and other fluids diluting the staining .... Penetration of the pulp ... dentin permeability of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide.

  11. Investigation of 16% carbamide-peroxide on the structure and properties and effect return enamel staining teeth whitening after their

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matvijenko Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The most tooth whitening is a procedure that removes stains and various discolorations of tooth surface. Discoloration of teeth may be endogenous and exogenous nature. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of bleaching combined with daily use of drinks that cause tooth discoloration. Evaluated the changes in surface structure of enamel, and changes in hardness after bleaching. Were 20 extracted teeth. The teeth are marked with longitudinal lines halves (medial vestibular and distal surfaces. Tretitana mesial half of the 16% carbamide peroxide, a distal was left as control. NDT device HL-400DL, duroskopskom method of enamel hardness was measured before treatment, after treatment and after remineralization. Olympus inverted microscope GX41 enamel structures were observed in the treated and control half of the tooth. After bleaching there is a difference compared to the untreated surface, that surface is bleached a few shades lighter, but after the use of coffee and soft drinks teeth back to the original dark color. Enamel microhardness after the treatment is somewhat small but not significant. With a magnification of 2000x and see the structural changes in enamel. Tooth whitening, but that the remineralization and the abstinence from prebojenih beverages and tobacco.

  12. An in vitro study to evaluate the effect of two ethanol-based and two acetone-based dental bonding agents on the bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepa Basavaraj Benni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Carbamide peroxide bleaching has been implicated in adversely affecting the bond strength of composite to enamel. The objective of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 bond, Kuraray, Adper Single bond 2, 3M ESPE dental products and acetone-based (Prime and Bond NT, Dentsply, One Step, Bisco bonding agents on the shear bond strength of composite to enamel treated with 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 extracted human noncarious permanent incisors were randomly divided into two groups (control and experimental. Experimental group specimens were subjected to a bleaching regimen with a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching system (Opalescence; Ultradent Products Inc, South Jordan, USA. Composite resin cylinders were bonded to the specimens using four bonding agents and shear bond strength was determined with universal testing machine. Results: There was no statistically significant difference in the shear bond strength between control and experimental groups with both ethanol-based (Clearfil S 3 Bond and Adper Single Bond 2 and acetone-based bonding agent (Prime and Bond NT and One Step. Interpretation and Conclusion: The adverse effect of bleaching on bonding composite to enamel can be reduced or eliminated by using either ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent. Clinical Significances: Immediate bonding following bleaching procedure can be done using ethanol- or acetone-based bonding agent without compromising bond strength.

  13. Evaluation of human dental loss caused by carbamide peroxide bleacher compared with phosphoric acid conditioning - radioactive method; Avaliacao da perda dental humana com o uso do clareador peroxido de carbamida comparado ao condicionamento com acido fosforico - metodo radiometrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Eduardo Makoto; Yousseff, Michel Nicolau [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Dentistica; Saiki, Mitiko [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise por Ativacao Neutronica

    2002-07-01

    The radiometric method was applied to the evaluation of dental loss caused by carbamide peroxide when it is applied on the surface layers of enamel and dentin tissues. Also the dental loss caused by the etching with 37% phosphoric acid procedure used in aesthetic restoration was assessed for comparison with those results obtained. The tooth samples irradiated with a P standard in a thermal neutron flux of the nuclear reactor were placed in contact with 10% carbamide peroxide or with 37% phosphoric acid solution. The radioactivity of {sup 32} P transferred from the radioactive teeth to the bleaching gel or to etching acid was measured using a Geiger Muller detector to calculate the mass of P removed in this treatment and losses were calculated after obtaining their P concentrations. Results obtained indicated that enamel and dentin exposed to carbamide peroxide bleaching agent lose phosphorus. The extent of enamel loss was smaller than that obtained for dentin. In the case of acid etching, there was no difference between the results obtained for enamel and dentin loss. Also the dentin loss obtained after a treatment of 30 applications of 10% carbamide peroxide was the same magnitude of that one application of 37% phosphoric acid. (author)

  14. Fracture resistance and failure pattern of teeth submitted to internal bleaching with 37% carbamide peroxide, with application of different restorative procedures Resistência à fratura e padrão de falha de dentes submetidos ao clareamento interno com peróxido de carbamida a 37%, com aplicação de diferentes procedimentos restauradores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Bonfante

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the compressive fracture strength and failure pattern in premolars submitted to endodontic treatment and internal bleaching with 37% carbamide peroxide for 21 days, with application of different restorative procedures. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Six groups were employed (n = 10: 1 non-bleached teeth and pulp chamber sealed with IRM; 2 bleached teeth and pulp chamber sealed with IRM; 3 bleached teeth and pulp chamber filled with light cured composite resin; 4 bleached teeth, root canals prepared at 10mm, filling of the root canal and pulp chamber with IRM; 5 bleached teeth, root canals prepared at 10mm, luting of prefabricated metallic post with zinc phosphate and pulp chamber sealed with composite resin; 6 bleached teeth, root canals prepared at 10mm, luting of glass fiber post with resin cement and pulp chamber sealed with composite resin. After 24-hour storage in distilled water, the specimens were submitted to compressive fracture strength testing in a universal testing machine. RESULTS: The following values were found: Group 1 - 56.23kgf; Group 2 - 48.96kgf; Group 3 - 53.99kgf; Group 4 - 45.72kgf; Group 5 - 54.22kgf; Group 6 - 60.12kgf. The analysis of variance did not reveal statistically significant difference between groups (pOBJETIVO: O objetivo do estudo foi investigar a resistência à fratura sob compressão e padrão de falha de pré-molares tratados endodonticamente e clareados internamente por 21 dias com peróxido de carbamida a 37%, aplicando-se diferentes procedimentos restauradores. MATERIAL E MÉTODOS: O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a resistência à fratura sob compressão e padrão de falha de pré-molares unirradiculares tratados endodonticamente e clareados internamente com peróxido de carbamida a 37%. Foram constituídos 6 grupos (n = 10: 1 dentes sem clareamento e câmara pulpar vedada com IRM; 2 dentes clareados e câmara pulpar vedada com IRM; 3 dentes clareados e câmara pulpar

  15. Effect of carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agents containing fluoride or calcium on tensile strength of human enamel Efeito de agentes clareadores à base de peróxido de carbamida contendo fluoreto e cálcio na resistência à tração do esmalte humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Giannini

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of carbamide peroxide-based bleaching agents (CPG containing fluoride (CF or calcium (CCa on the ultimate tensile strength of enamel (UTS. METHOD: A "cube-like" resin composite structure was built-up on the occlusal surface of twenty-two sound third molars to facilitate specimen preparation for the micro-tensile test. The restored teeth were serially sectioned in buccal-lingual direction in slices with approximate 0.7 mm thickness. Each slice was trimmed with a fine diamond bur to reduce the buccal, internal slope enamel of the cusps to a dumb-bell shape with a cross-sectional area at the "neck" of less than 0.5 mm². The samples were randomly divided into 12 groups (n=11. The control groups were not submitted to the bleaching regimen. Specimens were treated with 10% CPG gel or with 10% CPG formulations containing CF (0.2% and 0.5% or CCa (0.05% and 0.2%. Bleached groups received the application of the 10% CPGs for 6 hours/day at 37º C, during 14 consecutive days and were stored in artificial saliva (AS or 100% relative humidity (RH among each application. After bleaching, specimens were tested with the microtensile method at 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (5%. RESULTS: No significant difference was observed between groups stored in AS or RH. Specimens treated with CF or CCa presented similar UTS as unbleached control groups. CONCLUSION: Either 10% CPG formulations containing CF or CCa can preserve the UTS after bleaching regimen.OBJETIVO: O propósito deste estudo foi avaliar os efeitos de agents clareadores à base de peróxido de carbamida (CPG contendo fluoreto (CF e cálcio (CCa na resistência à tração do esmalte (UTS. MÉTODO: Um bloco de resina composta foi confeccionada na superfície oclusal de vinte e dois terceiros molars hígidos para facilitar a preparação dos espécimes para o teste de micro-tração. Os dentes restaurados foram

  16. The evaluation of hydrogen peroxide bleaching of Gonometa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide bleaching on Gonometa postica silk and the influence that temperature, pH and time duration had on hydrogen peroxide release , colour change, breaking load and stiffness were determined. The best bleaching (81 delta E) of the Gonometa postica silk fabric was obtained with 60 minutes ...

  17. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  18. Carbamide peroxide gel stability under different temperature conditions: is manipulated formulation an option?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Martini Bonesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays the use of gel containing carbamide peroxide (CP prepared in Pharmacy is a normal practice in the population. However, the quality of this product is questionable concerning its stability. The aim of this study is was to synthesize and to analyze this drug alone or associated to Carbopol gel through analytical methodology compatible with the routine of the Pharmacies. The reaction between urea and hydrogen peroxide was carried out at different resting times: 24 hours (CP 24 powder and 48 hours (CP48 powder after the mixture. Both products were associated with Carbopol 940® gel 1.5% (G generating G24 and G48 samples. The stability of powders (CP24 e CP48 and the formulations (G24 and G48 were evaluated as a function of time (15, 40 and 45 days and thermal variation (refrigeration: 8 °C±1; thermal shock 32 °C±1 /8 °C±1; stove: 32 °C±1, using a standard titration method. As a result, only under refrigeration the CP24 and CP48 contents remained stable during the period of 45 days. An interesting finding was that G24 and G48 presented greater stability for at least 45-days under refrigeration and thermal shock conditions, and up to 30 days under stove conditions. The results for the G24 and G48 were slightly higher than those obtained for the control. Therefore, we were able to conclude that association with Carbopol 940® Gel 1.5 % provided greater CP stability and that manipulated formulations containing CP may be viable for use in a period of 45 days under refrigeration conditions. The titration proved to be an effective technique for the analysis of CP with or without Carbopol 940® gel 1.5%.Atualmente, a utilização de gel contendo peróxido de carbamida manipulado em Farmácia é uma prática comum na população. No entanto, a qualidade deste produto é questionada, sobretudo no que se refere à estabilidade deste fármaco. O objetivo deste trabalho consiste na avaliação da viabilidade de sintetizar e analisar

  19. PROCESS OPTIMIZATION OF TETRA ACETYL ETHYLENE DIAMINE ACTIVATED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF POPULUS NIGRA CTMP

    OpenAIRE

    Qiang Zhao; Junwen Pu; Shulei Mao; Guibo Qi

    2010-01-01

    To enhance the bleaching efficiency, the activator of tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED) was used in conventional H2O2 bleaching. The H2O2/TAED bleaching system can accelerate the reaction rate and shorten bleaching time at relative low temperature, which can reduce the production cost. In this research, the process with hydrogen peroxide activated by TAED bleaching of Populus nigra chemi-thermo mechanical pulp was optimized. Suitable bleaching conditions were confirmed as follows: pulp con...

  20. Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (PMo stage)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Marcos Sousa

    2009-01-01

    Optimum conditions to run the P Mo stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 deg C, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H 2 O 2 . The P Mo stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5) and increasing temperature (75-90 deg C), time (2-4 h), and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t) and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t). The implementation of the P Mo stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clovis; Benetti, Ana Raquel

    2005-01-01

    Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning......: 2h); G3- four 2-hour exposures to 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 8h); G4- two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide, which was light-activated with halogen lamp at 700mW/cm² during 7min and remained in contact with enamel for 20min (total exposure: 40min). All bleaching treatments adopted...... analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were...

  2. MOLYBDENUM CATALYZED ACID PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF EUCALYPTUS KRAFT PULP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos S. Rabelo

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Molybdenum catalyzed peroxide bleaching (PMo Stage consists of pulp treatment with hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions in the presence of a molybdenum catalyst. Molybdenum is applied in catalytic doses (50-200 mg/kg pulp and may originate from various sources, including (NH46Mo7O24.4H2O, Na2MoO4.2H2O, siliconmolybdate, etc. This work is aimed at optimizing the PMo stage and evaluating its industrial application in the OAZDP sequence. Optimum PMo stage conditions for bleaching eucalyptus pulp were 90 ºC, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/adt Mo and 5 kg/adt H2O2. The PMo stage was more efficient to remove pulp hexenuronic acids than lignin. Its efficiency decreased with increasing pH in the range of 1.5-5.5, while it increased with increasing temperature and peroxide and molybdenum doses. The application of the PMo stage as replacement for the A-stage of the AZDP sequence significantly decreased chlorine dioxide demand. The PMo stage caused a decrease of 20-30% in the generation of organically bound chlorine. The quality parameters of the pulp produced during the PMo stage mill trial were comparable to those obtained with the reference A-stage.

  3. Therapeutic effectiveness of a new enzymatic bleaching dentifrice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forner, Leopaldo; Amengual, José; Liena, Carmen; Riutord, Pere

    2012-01-01

    Research into bleaching focuses on new products in order to minimize undesirable effects. This study evaluated the bleaching effectiveness of a new enzymatic-activated dentifrice. A total of 20 volunteers were bleached with a dentifrice containing 5% lactoperoxidase and 3% carbamide peroxide applied three times a day for two minutes over 21 days. Color was recorded before and after the treatment using a spectrophotometer. CIELAB differences were calculated before and after treatment using the paired t test (P whitening teeth. Enzymatic dental bleaching is able to increase the efficiency of low concentration peroxides, reducing the potential risk of peroxides on oral tissues.

  4. Bleaching of the discolored traumatized tooth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Jon E.; Kopperud, Siemen E.; Pallesen, Ulla

    2018-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the treatment of discolored traumatized teeth, most of them being non-vital and subsequently, endodontically treated. Tooth bleaching based upon hydrogen peroxide as the active agent, applied directly or produced in a chemical reaction from sodium perborate or carbamide pe...

  5. Specific concentration evaluation of 16% carbamide peroxide compounded at dispensing pharmacies Avaliação da concentração específica do peróxido de carbamida a 16% produzido em farmácias de manipulação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Maria Habith Martin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the concentration of carbamide peroxide compounded at different dispensing pharmacies. Immediate concentration analysis was made of bleaching gels dispensed by specialized pharmacies, and of a commercially available gel (control group (n = 20. The carbamide peroxide concentration was determined by titration and the results were analyzed statistically by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The commercial bleaching agent (control group and one of the gels from the pharmacies presented the best mean concentration values, close to 16%. In conclusion, the concentration of the manipulated and industrialized carbamide peroxide gels presented concentration values differing from 16%.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a concentração do peróxido de carbamida manipulado em diferentes farmácias de manipulação. Foram utilizados géis clareadores manipulados em farmácias especializadas e um industrializado (grupo controle (n = 20 com análise de concentração imediata. A concentração do peróxido de carbamida foi obtida por titulometria e os resultados foram submetidos a análise estatística pelo teste de Kruskal-Wallis. Como resultado, o agente clareador (controle e um dos produtos manipulados em farmácia apresentaram as melhores médias de concentração, próximas a 16%. Pode-se concluir que a concentração do peróxido de carbamida manipulado e dos industrializados apresentaram valores de concentração diferentes de 16%.

  6. Arundo donax L. reed: new perspectives for pulping and bleaching. Part 4. Peroxide bleaching of organosolv pulps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatalov, A A; Pereira, H

    2005-05-01

    A comparative study on TCF (totally chlorine-free) bleachability of organosolv pulps from the annual fibre crop Arundo donax L. (giant reed) was carried out using a simple three-stage peroxide bleaching sequence without oxygen pre-bleaching. ASAM (alkali-sulfite-anthraquinone-methanol), Organocell (alkali-anthraquinone-methanol) and ethanol-soda organosolv pulps were bleached and compared with kraft pulp, as a reference. The final brightness of 76-78% ISO was attained for all tested pulps. The chemical charge required to reach this level of brightness varied for different pulps (despite the equal initial content of the residual lignin) and directly related to starting brightness values. No direct correlation between brightness improvement and lignin removal during bleaching was found, indicating the influence of the specific pulp properties introduced by pulping process on bleaching chemistry. The general higher bleaching response of organosolv pulps from A. donax was noted in comparison with kraft.

  7. Tooth bleaching using peroxide-containing agents: current status of safety issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y

    1998-08-01

    During the last 10 years, at-home tooth bleaching using peroxide-containing agents has quickly become well accepted. It is one of the most popular cosmetic dental procedures for whitening teeth. Although there are few disputes regarding their efficacy, concerns and debates have continued regarding the safety of peroxide-containing tooth bleaching agents. Potential carcinogenicity and genotoxicity of the peroxides used in bleaching agents are the two most persistent and controversial issues. This article reviews and discusses available information on carcinogenicity and genotoxicity of hydrogen peroxide and the potential risks associated with the use of peroxide-containing bleaching agents. Clinical studies reported after the 1996 international symposium on responses of oral tissues to peroxide-containing bleaching agents are also reviewed. Overall evidence supports the conclusion that the proper use of peroxide-containing at-home tooth bleaching agents is safe. However, potential adverse effects may occur in inappropriate applications, abuses, or the use of inappropriate products. At-home tooth bleaching should be monitored by dental professionals to maximize the benefits while minimizing potential risks.

  8. Efficacy and safety of over-the-counter whitening strips as compared to home-whitening with 10 % carbamide peroxide gel--systematic review of RCTs and metanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serraglio, Carla Regina; Zanella, Luana; Dalla-Vecchia, Karine Battestin; Rodrigues-Junior, Sinval Adalberto

    2016-01-01

    The study aims to compare the efficacy and safety of over-the-counter whitestrips with the American Dental Association (ADA)-recommended home-whitening using the 10 % carbamide peroxide gel. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the clinical efficacy and safety of the whitestrips with the 10 % carbamide peroxide (10 % CP) gel applied on tray for tooth whitening in adults were searched at PubMed and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases and selected up to October 2014. Efficacy of the whitening techniques was assessed through ∆E, ∆L, and ∆b parameters, while side effects were analyzed as dichotomous variables. Data was extracted independently by two reviewers. Metanalysis was performed using random- and fixed-effect models (RevMan 5.3). Eight studies were included in the metanalysis. The metanalysis revealed no significant difference between the intervention groups for tooth-whitening efficacy measured as ΔE (mean difference [MD]-0.53; 95 % CI [-1.72;0.66]; Z = 0.88; p = 0.38) and ΔL (MD-0.22; 95 % CI [-0.81;0.36]; z = 0.75; p = 0.45); reduction of yellowing was higher with the whitestrips (MD-0.47; 95 % CI [-0.89; -0.06]; Z = 2.25; p = 0.02). Tooth sensitivity (risk ratio [RR] 1.17; 95 % CI [0.81-1.69]; Z = 0.81; p = 0.42) and gingival sensitivity (RR 0.76; 95 % CI [0.53-1.10]; Z = 1.44; p = 0.15) were similar, regardless of the whitening method used. The observed gingival irritation was higher when the 10 % CP gel was applied on tray (RR 0.43; 95 % CI [0.20-0.93]; Z = 2.14; p = 0.03). The quality of evidence generated was rated very low for all outcomes. There is no sound evidence to support the use of the whitening strips in detriment of the ADA-recommended technique based on the 10 % carbamide peroxide gel applied on tray. To the moment, there is no sound evidence in dental literature to suggest that the ADA-recommended whitening technique based on 10 % carbamide peroxide gel could be substituted by the whitening strips. The

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets to Tooth Enamel After Treatment With Different Tooth Bleaching Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahid Dastjerdi, Elahe; Khaloo, Negar; Mojahedi, Seyed Masoud; Azarsina, Mohadese

    2015-11-01

    Bleaching treatments decrease shear bond strength between orthodontic brackets and teeth; although definite results have not been reported in this regard. This study determined the effects of different bleaching protocols on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets to teeth. This experimental study was performed in Iran. Forty-eight extracted human premolars were randomly assigned into four groups. In the control group, no bleaching treatment was performed. In groups 2 - 4, the bleaching procedures were performed using carbamide peroxide 45%, carbamide peroxide 20% and diode laser, respectively. Two weeks later, brackets were bonded to teeth and thermocycled. The shear bond strengths of the brackets to the teeth were measured. Data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Dunnett post-hoc test. Shear bond strength of the brackets to the teeth were 10.54 ± 1.51, 6.37 ± 0.92, 7.67 ± 1.01 and 7.49 ± 1.19 MPa, in groups 1 - 4, respectively. Significant differences were found between control group and all other groups (P brackets to the teeth. 45% carbamide peroxide had a more significant effect on bond strength compared to 20% carbamide peroxide. The difference in bond strength was not significant between laser group and either carbamide peroxide groups.

  10. Study of the hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent effects on bovine enamel using X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Ruda F.; Calazans, Fernanda S.; Miranda, Mauro S.; Santos, Ramon S.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Assis, Joaquim T.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide's a bleaching agent capable of oxidizing a wide range of colored organic, causing discoloration and hence bleaching of the substrate, but some authors related the occurrence of side effects related to bleaching of the tooth structure, such as changes in morphology superficial. It was used 6 bovine incisors, each tooth was initially evaluated six times in different areas to obtain the count of elements phosphorus and calcium using X-Ray Fluorescence. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups: both groups were submitted to bleaching in office with hydrogen peroxide 38%, once a week during three weeks. Group 1 was stored in distilled water and group 2 in artificial saliva, between the sessions. The measurements were repeated every seven days before the bleaching treatment. Besides that, changes in mineral levels were always assessed in the same area and using the same procedure. It was observed that the bleaching was not able to demineralize the tooth enamel studied. (author)

  11. Effect of various bleaching treatments on shear bond strength of different universal adhesives and application modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the bond strength of 2 universal adhesives used in different application modes to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods Extracted 160 sound human incisors were used for the study. Teeth were divided into 4 treatment groups: No treatment, 35% hydrogen peroxide, 16% carbamid peroxide, 7.5% carbamid peroxide. After bleaching treatments, groups were divided into subgroups according to the adhesive systems used and application modes (n = 10): 1) Single Bond Universal, etch and rinse mode; 2) Single Bond Universal, self-etch mode; 3) Gluma Universal, etch and rinse mode; 4) Gluma Universal, self-etch mode. After adhesive procedures nanohybrid composite resin cylinders were bonded to the enamel surfaces. All specimens were subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) test after thermocycling. Data were analyzed using a 3-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test. Results No significant difference were found among bleaching groups (35% hydrogen peroxide, 16% carbamid peroxide, 7.5% carbamid peroxide, and no treatment groups) in the mean SBS values. There was also no difference in SBS values between Single Bond Universal and Gluma Universal at same application modes, whereas self-etch mode showed significantly lower SBS values than etch and rinse mode (p adhesives was enhanced with the etch and rinse mode application to bleached enamel and non-bleached enamel. PMID:29765900

  12. Sensory and Functionality Differences of Whey Protein Isolate Bleached by Hydrogen or Benzoyl Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tucker J; Foegeding, E Allen; Drake, MaryAnne

    2015-10-01

    Whey protein is a highly functional food ingredient used in a wide variety of applications. A large portion of fluid whey produced in the United States is derived from Cheddar cheese manufacture and contains annatto (norbixin), and therefore must be bleached. The objective of this study was to compare sensory and functionality differences between whey protein isolate (WPI) bleached by benzoyl peroxide (BP) or hydrogen peroxide (HP). HP and BP bleached WPI and unbleached controls were manufactured in triplicate. Descriptive sensory analysis and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were conducted to determine flavor differences between treatments. Functionality differences were evaluated by measurement of foam stability, protein solubility, SDS-PAGE, and effect of NaCl concentration on gelation relative to an unbleached control. HP bleached WPI had higher concentrations of lipid oxidation and sulfur containing volatile compounds than both BP and unbleached WPI (P protein loss at pH 4.6 of WPI decreased by bleaching with either hydrogen peroxide or benzoyl peroxide (P whey with either BP or HP resulted in protein degradation, which likely contributed to functionality differences. These results demonstrate that bleaching has flavor effects as well as effects on many of the functionality characteristics of whey proteins. Whey protein isolate (WPI) is often used for its functional properties, but the effect of oxidative bleaching chemicals on the functional properties of WPI is not known. This study identifies the effects of hydrogen peroxide and benzoyl peroxide on functional and flavor characteristics of WPI bleached by hydrogen and benzoyl peroxide and provides insights for the product applications which may benefit from bleaching. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  13. Enamel susceptibility to red wine staining after 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Bittencourt Berger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been expressed regarding the staining of enamel surface by different beverages after bleaching. This study investigated the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface stained with wine after whitening treatments. Flat and polished bovine enamel surfaces were submitted to two commercially available 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents or kept in 100% humidity, as a control group (n = 10. Specimens of all groups were immersed in red wine for 48 h at 37°C, immediately, 24 h or 1 week after treatments. All specimens were ground into powder and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. Data were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test at 5% significance level. The amount of wine pigments uptake by enamel submitted to bleaching treatments was statistically higher than that of control group, independently of the evaluation time. Results suggested that wine staining susceptibility was increased by bleaching treatments.

  14. ENAMEL SUSCEPTIBILITY TO RED WINE STAINING AFTER 35% HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Coelho, Alessandra Sanchez; Oliveira, Valéria Aparecida Pessatti; Cavalli, Vanessa; Giannini, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    Concern has been expressed regarding the staining of enamel surface by different beverages after bleaching. This study investigated the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface stained with wine after whitening treatments. Flat and polished bovine enamel surfaces were submitted to two commercially available 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents or kept in 100% humidity, as a control group (n = 10). Specimens of all groups were immersed in red wine for 48 h at 37°C, immediately, 24 h or 1 week after treatments. All specimens were ground into powder and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. Data were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test at 5% significance level. The amount of wine pigments uptake by enamel submitted to bleaching treatments was statistically higher than that of control group, independently of the evaluation time. Results suggested that wine staining susceptibility was increased by bleaching treatments. PMID:19089218

  15. An Analysis of Dental Enamel after Bleaching using 35% Hydrogen Peroxide with Energy-dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Asmawati, Dr. drg. Asmawati, M.Kes

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an effective bleaching agent of tooth whitening, but its use causes changes in the chemical composition of the elements that configure tooth enamel. The purpose of this study is to determine whether there are changes in the composition of the elements that configure the tooth enamel after bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide. Background: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an effective bleaching agent of tooth whitening, but its use causes changes in the chemical compo...

  16. Assessing the effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrighetto, Augusto Ricardo; de Leão Withers, Eduardo Henrique; Grando, Karlos Giovani; Ambrosio, Aldrieli Regina; Shimizu, Roberto Hideo; Melo, Ana Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    Tooth bleaching is, today, one of the most widespread cosmetic treatments in dental practice,  so it is important to determine whether it can interfere with orthodontic bonding or not. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Forty-five upper bicuspids were divided into three groups (n = 15). In the control Group (C), the brackets were bonded without previous bleaching treatment. Group 1 (G1) was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent 24 h before bracket bonding. Group 2 was also bleached, and the brackets were bonded after 30 days. The shear bond strength of the brackets was measured using an EMIC machine, and the results were analyzed by ANOVA. There were no statistically significant differences between the three groups (P > 0.05), with Group C showing a mean bond strength of 9.72 ± 2.63 MPa, G1 of 8.09 ± 2.63 MPa, and G2 of 11.15 ± 4.42 MPa. It was possible to conclude that 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent does not affect the shear strength of orthodontic brackets bonded 24 h and 30 days after bleaching.

  17. Depth profile analysis of non-specific fluorescence and color of tooth tissues after peroxide bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klukowska, Malgorzata; Götz, Hermann; White, Donald J; Zoladz, James; Schwarz, Björn-Olaf; Duschner, Heinz

    2013-02-01

    To examine laboratory changes of endogenous non-specific fluorescence and color throughout subsurface of tooth structures prior to and following peroxide bleaching. Extracted human teeth were cross sectioned and mounted on glass slides. Cross sections were examined for internal color (digital camera) and nonspecific fluorescence (microRaman spectroscopy) throughout the tooth structure at specified locations. Surfaces of sections were then saturation bleached for 70 hours with a gel containing 6% hydrogen peroxide. Cross sections were reexamined for color and non-specific fluorescence changes. Unbleached enamel, dentin-enamel junction and dentin exhibit different CIELab color and non-specific fluorescence properties. Bleaching of teeth produced significant changes in color of internal cross sections and substantial reductions of non-specific fluorescence levels within enamel dentin and DEJ. Enamel and dentin non-specific fluorescence were reduced to common values with bleaching with enamel and the DEJ showing larger reductions than dentin.

  18. BLEACHING IN VITAL TEETH: A LITERARY REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Fagundes Soares

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Tooth bleaching technique has presented a significant evolution, promoting higher satisfaction and comfort to the patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to present the bleaching agents and the techniques, discussing advantages and disadvantages of each one, and the effect of these agents in the oral environment. The main agents used in the bleaching technique are the hydrogen peroxide and the carbamide peroxide, promoting the bleaching effect through oxidation of organic compounds. The application of these agents can be made at home or at a doctor office. During treatment, it may occur some adverse effects, such as tooth sensibility, increasing of dental porosity, and some interactions with the restorative material. However, these adverse effects can be eliminated or controlled when the treatment is executed under professional orientation. When the bleaching technique is well indicated and correctly conducted, it is associated with significantly positive results.

  19. Effect of antioxidant agents on bond strength of composite to bleached enamel with 38% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Marcela Guimaraes da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of antioxidant agents on microtensile bond strengths (mTBS of composite to bleached enamel. Fifteen freshly extracted human third molars were selected and randomly assigned to 6 groups (n = 5: (NB enamel not bleached, (B bleached enamel, (BR7 bleached enamel and restored 7 days later, (BSA bleached enamel+sodium ascorbate, (BMC bleached enamel+malvidin chloride, (BPC bleached enamel+pelargonidin chloride. The groups were bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP - Opalescence Xtra Boost and restored with Single Bond+Filtek Z350. The specimens were thermocycled and submitted to a microtensile load at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The data were evaluated by ANOVA and Tukey test at 5% of significance. The mean and standard-deviation for all groups were: NB: 30.95(±11.97a; BSA: 30.34(±8.73a, BPC: 22.81(6.00b, BR7: 21.41(±6.12b, B: 14.10(±4.45c, BMC: 13.25(±6.02c. Sodium ascorbate reversed the bond strengths to enamel immediately after bleaching.

  20. An Effective Ostrich Oil Bleaching Technique Using Peroxide Value as an Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Seng Chiew

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Ostrich oil has been used extensively in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. However, rancidity causes undesirable chemical changes in flavour, colour, odour and nutritional value. Bleaching is an important process in refining ostrich oil. Bleaching refers to the removal of certain minor constituents (colour pigments, free fatty acid, peroxides, odour and non-fatty materials from crude fats and oils to yield purified glycerides. There is a need to optimize the bleaching process of crude ostrich oil prior to its use for therapeutic purposes. The objective of our study was to establish an effective method to bleach ostrich oil using peroxide value as an indicator of refinement. In our study, we showed that natural earth clay was better than bentonite and acid-activated clay to bleach ostrich oil. It was also found that 1 hour incubation at a 150 °C was suitable to lower peroxide value by 90%. In addition, the nitrogen trap technique in the bleaching process was as effective as the continuous nitrogen flow technique and as such would be the recommended technique due to its cost effectiveness.

  1. Investigation of 16% carbamide-peroxide on the structure and properties and effect return enamel staining teeth whitening after their

    OpenAIRE

    Matvijenko Vladimir; Živković M.; Videnović G.; Kostić-Šubarić Lj.; Živković D.; Perić D.; Jovanović R.

    2015-01-01

    The most tooth whitening is a procedure that removes stains and various discolorations of tooth surface. Discoloration of teeth may be endogenous and exogenous nature. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of bleaching combined with daily use of drinks that cause tooth discoloration. Evaluated the changes in surface structure of enamel, and changes in hardness after bleaching. Were 20 extracted teeth. The teeth are marked with longitudinal lines halves (medial vestibular and dis...

  2. Microhardness of demineralized enamel following home bleaching and laser-assisted in office bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Akbari, Majid; Hamzei, Haniye

    2015-01-01

    Background There is little data regarding the effect of tooth whitening on microhardness of white spot lesions. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of home-bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching on microhardness of demineralized enamel. Material and Methods Forty bovine incisors were selected and immersed in a demineralizing solution for 12 weeks to induce white spot lesions. Enamel blocks were prepared and randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each. The first group underwent home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide which was applied for 8 hours a day over a period of 15 days. In the second group, in-office bleaching was performed by 40% hydrogen peroxide and powered by irradiation from an 810 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser (CW, 2W). This process was performed for 3 sessions every seven days, in 15 days. The specimens were stored in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva during the experiment. Surface microhardness was assessed before and after the bleaching therapies in both groups. Results Microhardness decreased significantly following both home bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching (pTooth whitening through home bleaching or laser-assisted in-office bleaching can result in a significant reduction in microhardness of white spot lesions. Therefore, it is suggested to take protective measures on bleached demineralized enamel. Key words:White spot lesion, bleaching, laser, microhardness, demineralized enamel, home bleaching, in-office bleaching. PMID:26330939

  3. Does the Use of a "Walking Bleaching" Technique Increase Bone Resorption Markers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersezio, C; Vildósola, P; Sáez, M; Sánchez, F; Vernal, R; Oliveira, O B; Jorquera, G; Basualdo, J; Loguercio, A; Fernández, E

    This randomized clinical trial evaluated the effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide in comparison with 37% carbamide peroxide in a nonvital bleaching technique of "walking bleaching" (four sessions of treatment) on periodontal markers: nuclear factor kappa B-ligand (RANK-L-process of root resorption marker) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β-inflammatory response marker). Fifty volunteers presenting with discoloration of nonvital teeth and endodontic treatment in good condition participated. Fifty teeth were randomly divided into two study groups according to bleaching gel: HP = 35% hydrogen peroxide (n=25) and 37% carbamide peroxide (n=25). Nonvital bleaching was performed with a walking bleaching technique consisting of four sessions of bleach application. Gingival crevicular fluid samples were taken in order to quantify the RANK-L and IL-1β levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were obtained from six periodontal sites for each bleached tooth: three vestibular and three palatine (mesial, middle, and distal) at seven time periods: baseline, after each of the four sessions of nonvital bleaching, at one week, and at one month after nonvital bleaching. Tooth color variations were analyzed in each session by VITA Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER (ΔSGU). Significant increments in the RANK-L and IL-1β levels were detected in each evaluated time compared with baseline ( pbleaching therapies ( pbleaching induced a significant increment in the RANK-L and IL-1β levels in periodontal tissues around bleached, nonvital teeth.

  4. [Effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphouscalcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatment on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after tooth bleaching].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Ding, Xiao-jun; Yu, Xiao-ping; Gong, Yi-ming

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphouscalcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) treatment on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after tooth bleaching. One hundred extracted human premolars were randomly divided and treated according to 5 groups (n=20) : (1) no treatment; (2) 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching; (3) 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching; (4)10% carbamide peroxide bleaching and CPP-ACP paste; (5)38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching and CPP-ACP paste. In all groups, the brackets were bonded using a conventional acid-etch and bond system (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif). The shear bond strength adhesive remnant index (ARI) of the brackets were determined and the data was analyzed by ANOVA and Bonferroni test using SPSS13.0 software package. The use of 10% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide bleaching significantly decreased the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets when compared with untreated group (P0.05). The ARI did not show any significant difference before and after CPP-ACP treatment. After tooth bleaching, CPP-ACP treatment have little influence on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

  5. Influência do agente clareador peróxido de carbamida a 10% na resistência mecânica da colagem de braquetes ortodônticos Influence of 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgard Norões R. da Matta

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available O propósito deste estudo in vitro foi determinar a influência do agente clareador peróxido de carbamida a 10% na resistência mecânica da colagem de braquetes ortodônticos. Foram estudados três grupos denominados G1 (não submetido ao clareamento, G2 (com clareamento e colagem realizada 1 semana após e G3 (com clareamento e colagem realizada 24h após. O teste de cisalhamento foi conduzido na máquina de ensaios mecânicos Emic, com a velocidade de deformação de 0,5 mm/min.A resitência ao cisalhamento em relação à área de colagem foi calculada para cada dente e expressa em MPa. Os resultados mostraram aumento estatisticamente significante (pThe purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the influence of 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Three group were studied: G1 (without bleaching, G2 (bleaching and bonding after 1 week and G3 (bleaching and bonding after 24h. The shear test was conduced in a Emic testing machine with a crosshead speed of 0,5 mm/min. The shear bond strength was calculated for each tooth and expressed in MPa. The results show enhance statistical significant (p<0,001 on the shear bond strength after bleaching and encreased with the time interval between bleaching and bonding, significantily.

  6. Study of the hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent effects on bovine enamel using X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Ruda F.; Calazans, Fernanda S.; Miranda, Mauro S.; Santos, Ramon S.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Assis, Joaquim T. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide's a bleaching agent capable of oxidizing a wide range of colored organic, causing discoloration and hence bleaching of the substrate, but some authors related the occurrence of side effects related to bleaching of the tooth structure, such as changes in morphology superficial. It was used 6 bovine incisors, each tooth was initially evaluated six times in different areas to obtain the count of elements phosphorus and calcium using X-Ray Fluorescence. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups: both groups were submitted to bleaching in office with hydrogen peroxide 38%, once a week during three weeks. Group 1 was stored in distilled water and group 2 in artificial saliva, between the sessions. The measurements were repeated every seven days before the bleaching treatment. Besides that, changes in mineral levels were always assessed in the same area and using the same procedure. It was observed that the bleaching was not able to demineralize the tooth enamel studied. (author)

  7. Effect of ultrasonic pre-treatment of thermomechanical pulp on hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranger, E.; Charles, A.; Daneault, C.

    2012-12-01

    Ultrasound pre-treatments of softwood TMP had been carried to evaluate its impact on the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. The trials were performed after a factorial design of experiment using frequency, power and time as variables. The experiments were conducted in an ultrasonic bath and then bleached with hydrogen peroxide. Measurements such as brightness, L*A*B* color system coordinate, residual hydrogen peroxide and metal content were evaluated on bleached pulp. The results indicate that the effect of ultrasonic treatment on brightness was dependent on the ultrasound frequency used; the brightness increased slightly at 68 kHz and decreased at 40 and 170 kHz. These results were correlated to the ultrasound effect on the generation of transition metals (copper, iron and manganese) which are responsible for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The influence of metal interference was minimized by using a chelating agent such as diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). With the results obtained in this study we have identified a set of option conditions, e.g. 1000 W, 40 kHz, 1.5 % consistency and 0.2% addition of DTPA prior to the bleaching stage (after ultrasonic pre-treatment) who improve brightness by 2.5 %ISO.

  8. Ecofriendly laccase-hydrogen peroxide/ultrasound-assisted bleaching of linen fabrics and its influence on dyeing efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Okeil, A; El-Shafie, A; El Zawahry, M M

    2010-02-01

    This study evaluates the bleaching efficiency of enzymatically scoured linen fabrics using a combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide bleaching process with and without ultrasonic energy, with the goal of obtaining fabrics with high whiteness levels, well preserved tensile strength and higher dye uptake. The effect of the laccase enzyme and the combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide bleaching process with and without ultrasound has been investigated with regard to whiteness value, tensile strength, dyeing efficiency and dyeing kinetics using both reactive and cationic dyes. The bleached linen fabrics were characterized using X-ray diffraction and by measuring tensile strength and lightness. The dyeing efficiency and kinetics were characterized by measuring dye uptake and colour fastness. The results indicated that ultrasound was an effective technique in the combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide bleaching process of linen fabrics. The whiteness values expressed as lightness of linen fabrics is enhanced by using ultrasonic energy. The measured colour strength values were found to be slightly better for combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide/ultrasound-assisted bleached fabrics than for combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide for both reactive and cationic dyes. The fastness properties of the fabrics dyed with reactive dye were better than those obtained when using cationic dye. The time/dye uptake isotherms were also enhanced when using combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide/ultrasound-assisted bleached fabric, which confirms the efficiency of ultrasound in the combined oxidative bleaching process. The dyeing rate constant, half-time of dyeing and dyeing efficiency have been calculated and discussed.

  9. Effect of Bleaching on Color Change and Surface Topography of Composite Restorations

    OpenAIRE

    Pruthi, Gunjan; Jain, Veena; Kandpal, H. C.; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Shah, Naseem

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on color change and surface topography of different composite veneering materials (Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE), Esthet X (Dentsply India), and Admira (Voco, Germany). Methods. 30 samples were fabricated for evaluation of color change using CIELAB color system and Gonioreflectometer (GK 311/M, ZEISS). 45 disc-shaped specimens were made for evaluation of surface topography after bleaching (Nupro White Gold; Den...

  10. Effect of in-office bleaching agents on physical properties of dental composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourouzis, Petros; Koulaouzidou, Elisabeth A; Helvatjoglu-Antoniades, Maria

    2013-04-01

    The physical properties of dental restorative materials have a crucial effect on the longevity of restorations and moreover on the esthetic demands of patients, but they may be compromised by bleaching treatments. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of in-office bleaching agents on the physical properties of three composite resin restorative materials. The bleaching agents used were hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide at high concentrations. Specimens of each material were prepared, cured, and polished. Measurements of color difference, microhardness, and surface roughness were recorded before and after bleaching and data were examined statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey HSD post-hoc test at P composite resin altered after the bleaching procedure (P composite resins tested (P > .05). The silorane-based composite resin tested showed some color alteration after bleaching procedures. The bleaching procedure did not alter the microhardness and the surface roughness of all composite resins tested.

  11. Improved tooth bleaching combining ozone and hydrogen peroxide--A blinded study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Omiri, Mahmoud K; Abul Hassan, Ra'ed S; AlZarea, Bader K; Lynch, Edward

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of tooth bleaching using ozone after hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in comparison to the use of H2O2 alone. 70 extracted teeth were randomly distributed into two groups. Teeth surfaces in group 1 (n=35) were treated using 38% H2O2 and then were exposed to ozone for 60s and this ozonated peroxide mixture was left on the teeth for 20 min. Meanwhile, teeth in group 2 (n=35) were treated with H2O2 38% for 20 min. The L* a* b* and Vita Classic shade values of teeth were evaluated in both groups at base line, after application of H2O2 and ozone in group 1, and after application of H2O2 and then again after another application of ozone in group 2. The statistically significant changes were set at P ≤ 0.05. Baseline L* a* b* and Vita shade values were comparable between groups (P>0.05). Teeth obtained lighter shades following bleaching with both H2O2 and ozone or with H2O2 alone (P ≤ 0.05). Further bleaching with ozone for teeth already bleached with H2O2 alone showed further improvement of the shades of teeth (Pbleaching in both groups (P ≤ 0.05). More changes were obtained when both ozone and H2O2 were used (P ≤ 0.05). Bleaching with 38% H2O2 and ozone resulted in teeth with lighter shades than bleaching with 38% H2O2 alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of Bleaching Agents on Color and Translucency of Aged Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Maristela; Mozzaquatro, Lisandra R; Rodrigues, Camila; Kaizer, Marina R; Mallmann, André; Jacques, Letícia B

    2017-09-01

    Evaluate the influence of two bleaching agents (16% carbamide peroxide-CP and 35% hydrogen peroxide-HP) on color and translucency of one resin composite (Filtek Z350 XT) in two opacities (enamel and dentin) previously aged in deionized water or red wine. Sixty specimens of each material were divided in two groups (n = 30): aged in water or red wine for 14 days. Then the specimens were divided in three subgroups (n = 10): control/no treatment, treated with 16% carbamide peroxide (Mix Night), treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Mix One). Color readings were performed 24 hours after polishing (baseline); after the 14 days of aging; and after bleaching treatment. Color coordinates CIE L*a*b* were measured using a spectrophotometer (SP60 X-Rite). Color change (CIEDE2000) and translucency parameter were calculated. Data were analyzed with repeated measures two-way ANOVA, and Student-Newman-Keuls tests (5%). Bleaching decreased color change in stained resin composites (aged in red wine), whereas increased it in non-stained enamel resin composites (aged in water). CP had better bleaching results with stained resin composites than HP. Translucency of non-stained dentin resin composite decreased with aging, but did not change with bleaching. For stained resin composites, aging caused reduced translucency, whereas bleaching increased it. Effective bleaching of discolored resin composites aged in an acidic and alcoholic media rich in staining agents was achieved, improving color and translucency. Carbamide peroxide showed better performance than hydrogen peroxide for the bleaching of stained resin composites. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:368-377, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Pulpal inflammation after vital tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardiny Andriani

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-office vital tooth bleaching is a treatment to remove tooth stains. Tooth sensitivity is one of side effect commonly complained by patients receiving this treatment. Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine histological inflammatory cells infiltration of dental pulp after application of 38% H2O2 as a vital tooth bleaching agent. Methods: Under informed consent, a total of 15 premolars from 8 healthy subjects scheduled for orthodontic extraction were used in this study. Thirty eight percent H2O2 was applied on the buccal surface of the treated group. The treated teeth were extracted after 1 hour, 5, 8, and 15 days. All specimens were embedded in paraffin wax, sectioned serially and stained with Hematoxyllin Eosin. Histological specimens were then observed under a light microscope. Results: All treated groups showed a slight disorganization of odontoblasts layer and slight inflammation in the pulp tissue adjacent to the 38% H2O2 application site. The number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN had increased significantly 1 hour after application of 38% H2O2 (p<0.05, while macrophages had significantly increased 5 days after the application (p<0.05. The most intense PMN and macrophages infiltration was found 5 days after the application and gradually decreased 8 days after application of38% H2O2. Conclusion: Application of 38% H2O2 as a vital tooth bleaching agent induces acute inflammation in human dental pulp; however, the inflammation will decrease 8 days after the application.Latar belakang: Perawatan pemutihan gigi vital metode in-office merupakan tindakan untuk menghilangkan pewarnaan pada gigi. Salah satu efek samping yang sering dikeluhkan oleh pasien yang menjalani perawatan ini adalah sensitivitas gigi. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengamati infiltrasi sel inflamasi pada pulpa gigi setelah aplikasi H2O2 38% sebagai bahan pemutih gigi. Metode: Sampel penelitian ini berupa 15 gigi premolar yang berasal dari 8

  14. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis of Set CEM Cement after Application of Different Bleaching Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiei, Mohammad; Janani, Maryam; Vahdati, Amin; Alemzadeh, Yalda; Bahari, Mahmoud

    2017-01-01

    The present study evaluated the element distribution in completely set calcium-enriched mixture (CEM) cement after application of 35% carbamide peroxide, 40% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate as commercial bleaching agents using an energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis (EDX) system. The surface structure was also observed using the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Twenty completely set CEM cement samples, measuring 4×4 mm 2 , were prepared in the present in vitro study and randomly divided into 4 groups based on the preparation technique as follows: the control group; 35% carbamide peroxide group in contact for 30-60 min for 4 times; 40% hydrogen peroxide group with contact time of 15-20 min for 3 times; and sodium perborate group, where the powder and liquid were mixed and placed on CEM cement surface 4 times. Data were analyzed at a significance level of 0.05 through the one Way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests. EDX showed similar element distribution of oxygen, sodium, calcium and carbon in CEM cement with the use of carbamide peroxide and hydroxide peroxide; however, the distribution of silicon was different ( P structure. Sodium perborate was similar to control group due to its weak oxidizing properties. Globular structures and numerous woodpecker holes were observed on the even surface on the carbamide peroxide group. The mean elemental distribution of completely set CEM cement was different when exposed to sodium perborate, carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Sonochemical and hydrodynamic cavitation reactors for laccase/hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Idalina; Martins, Madalena; Loureiro, Ana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Silva, Carla

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to develop a novel and environmental-friendly technology for cotton bleaching with reduced processing costs. This work exploits a combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide process assisted by ultrasound. For this purpose, specific reactors were studied, namely ultrasonic power generator type K8 (850 kHz) and ultrasonic bath equipment Ultrasonic cleaner USC600TH (45 kHz). The optimal operating conditions for bleaching were chosen considering the highest levels of hydroxyl radical production and the lowest energy input. The capacity to produce hydroxyl radicals by hydrodynamic cavitation was also assessed in two homogenizers, EmulsiFlex®-C3 and APV-2000. Laccase nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization using BSA (bovine serum albumin) as emulsifier. The bleaching efficiency of these formulations was tested and the results showed higher whiteness values when compared to free laccase. The combination of laccase-hydrogen peroxide process with ultrasound energy produced higher whiteness levels than those obtained by conventional methods. The amount of hydrogen peroxide was reduced 50% as well as the energy consumption in terms of temperature (reduction of 40 °C) and operating time (reduction of 90 min). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of two in-office and home bleaching gels on microhardness of composite resin

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    Alizadeh Oskoee P.

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Bleaching products as chemical materials can exert side effects on soft and hard tissues and existing restorative materials with oxidizing mechanism. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 15% and 35% carbamide peroxide gels as home and in-office bleaching agents respectively, on microhardness and surface topography of composite resin.Materials and Methods: In this in vitro study, a total of 75 disc shaped specimens were prepared from Z100  composite resin (3M and randomly divided into three groups with following treatment designs: group 1, 370C distilled water, group 2, 15% carbamide peroxide, 6 hours/day for 3 weeks, group 3, 35% carbamide peroxide 30 minutes/week for 3 weeks. The microhardness (Vickers hardness of samples was measured using Shimadzu set on three different points of each sample. 8 samples of each group were selected randomly to be assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM for probable changes in surface topography. Data were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Duncan tests with p<0.05 as the level of significance. Results: 15% carbamide peroxide group had the maximum amount of microhardness (84.59±1.87 and 35% carbamide peroxide group had the minimum (76. 14±1.77. Only the difference between home bleaching and control group was not statistically significant (P=0.24. The SEM assessing revealed no changes in surface topography.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, in-office bleaching may decrease the microhardness of composite resin.

  17. The Use of Mg(OH2 in the Final Peroxide Bleaching Stage of Wheat Straw Pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lan Liu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium-based alkali is an attractive alkaline source for the peroxide bleaching of high-yield pulp. However, little information is available on Mg(OH2 application in the final peroxide bleaching stage of wheat straw pulp. The use of Mg(OH2 was demonstrated as a partial replacement for NaOH in the peroxide bleaching of a chelated oxygen-delignified wheat straw pulp. The yield, viscosity, and strength properties of bleached pulp significantly increased with increasing replacement ratio of Mg(OH2, while the chemical oxygen demand load (COD of filtrate was decreased. For similar brightness of bleached pulp at a 24% replacement ratio of Mg(OH2, the tensile and tear indices were higher, by 2.1 Nm.g-1 and 1.75 mN*m2.g-1, respectively, than that of control pulp bleached with NaOH as the sole alkaline source. When the MgSO4 was eliminated and the dosage of Na2SiO3 was decreased in the bleaching process, the tear and burst indices of the bleached pulp were also enhanced, with the brightness maintained. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM showed that more swelling occurred in the fibers of bleached pulp from the Mg(OH2-based bleaching process. Fiber analysis indicated that peroxide bleaching with Mg(OH2 increased the proportion of fiber lengths between 0.20 to 1.20 mm and 1.20 to 7.60 mm.

  18. The effect of bleaching agents on the microhardness of dental aesthetic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türker, S B; Biskin, T

    2002-07-01

    This study investigated the effects of three home bleaching agents on the microhardness of various dental aesthetic restorative materials. The restorative materials were: feldspatic porcelain, microfilled composite resin and light-cured modified glass-ionomer cement and the bleaching agents Nite-White (16% carbamide peroxide), Opalescence (10% carbamide peroxide and carbapol jel) and Rembrandt (10% carbamide peroxide jel). A total of 90 restorative material samples were prepared 1 cm diameter and 6 mm thick and kept in distilled water for 24 h before commencing bleaching which was carried out for 8 h day-1 for 4 weeks. Microhardness measurements were then made using a Tukon tester. Statistically significant differences with respect to unbleached controls were found only for the feldspatic porcelain and microfilled composite resins (P light cured modified glass-ionomer cement. For the composite resin, whereas Nite-White increased its microhardness, the other bleaching agents decreased it. There were no significant differences between the bleaching agents for any of the restorative materials.

  19. Mechanistic insights into the bleaching of melanin by alkaline hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R A W; Garrett, B; Naqvi, K R; Fülöp, A; Godfrey, S P; Marsh, J M; Chechik, V

    2017-07-01

    This work aims to determine the roles of reactive oxygen species HO∙ and HO 2 - in the bleaching of melanins by alkaline hydrogen peroxide. Experiments using melanosomes isolated from human hair indicated that the HO∙ radical generated in the outside solution does not contribute significantly to bleaching. However, studies using soluble Sepia melanin demonstrated that both HO 2 - and HO∙ will individually bleach melanin. Additionally, when both oxidants are present, bleaching is increased dramatically in both rate and extent. Careful experimental design enabled the separation of the roles and effects of these key reactive species, HO∙ and HO 2 - . Rationalisation of the results presented, and review of previous literature, allowed the postulation of a simplified general scheme whereby the strong oxidant HO∙ is able to pre-oxidise melanin units to o-quinones enabling more facile ring opening by the more nucleophilic HO 2 - . In this manner the efficiency of the roles of both species is maximised. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of several clinical parameters after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide at different concentrations: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Suellen Nogueira Linares; Ribeiro, Izabella Santos; Grisotto, Marcos Augusto; Fernandes, Elizabeth Soares; Hass, Viviane; de Jesus Tavarez, Rudys Rodolfo; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Lima, Darlon Martins; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Bandeca, Matheus Coelho

    2018-01-01

    This randomized double-blind clinical trial compared tooth sensitivity (TS), bleaching efficacy, and cytokine levels after applying in-office bleaching treatments containing 15% and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP15% and HP35%, respectively). Twenty-five volunteers were randomly assigned to receive HP15% or HP35% treatment. The bleaching agent was applied in three 15-min applications per session. Two bleaching sessions were separated by a 1-week interval. The participants scored TS using a visual analog scale and numerical rating scale. Bleaching efficacy was determined by subjective and objective methods. Gingival crevicular fluid was collected from three jaws sites per patient for the analysis of fluid volume. Flow cytometry was used to analyze gingival crevicular fluid levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, tumor necrosis factor, and interferon-gamma. All measurements were obtained before and after bleaching. All data were statistically analyzed (α=0.05). The absolute risk and intensity of TS was higher for HP35% than for HP15% (p>0.002). One month post-bleaching, HP35% produced more bleaching than HP15% (p=0.02). However patient perception (p=0.06) and patient satisfaction (p=0.53) with regard to bleaching were not significantly different. No significant differences existed in the gingival fluid volume (p>0.38) or in any cytokine level (p>0.05) for either HP concentration. Treatment: with HP35% is more effective than HP15%, but generates a greater risk and intensity of TS. No inflammatory changes occurred despite the difference in the HP concentrations. Hydrogen peroxide at a lower concentration (e.g., 15%) should be considered a good treatment alternative for in-office bleaching because the higher concentration for in-office bleaching generates a greater risk and intensity of TS for patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of hydrogen peroxide bleaching strips on tooth surface color, surface microhardness, surface and subsurface ultrastructure, and microchemical (Raman spectroscopic) composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duschner, Heinz; Götz, Hermann; White, Donald J; Kozak, Kathleen M; Zoladz, James R

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effects of hydrogen peroxide tooth bleaching strips on the surface hardness and morphology of enamel and the ultrastructure and chemical composition of enamel and dentin in vitro. Sound human molars were ground and polished to prepare a uniform substrate for bleaching treatments. A cycling treatment methodology was employed which alternated ex vivo human salivary exposures with bleaching treatments under conditions of controlled temperature and durations of treatment. Bleaching treatments included commercial Crest Whitestrips bleaching strips, which utilize hydrogen peroxide in a gel as the in situ bleaching source at 6.0 and 6.5% concentrations of H2O2. Control treatments included an untreated group. Crest Whitestrips bleaching included treatment exposures simulating 2x the recommended clinical exposures (28 hours bleaching). Surface color measurements were taken prior to and following bleaching to ensure tooth bleaching activity. The effects of bleach on physical properties of enamel were assessed with microhardness measures. Ultrastructural effects were classified by surface and subsurface confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. In addition, the effects of bleaching on tooth microchemical composition was studied in different tooth regions by coincident assessment of Raman spectroscopic signature. Color assessments confirmed significant ex vivo tooth bleaching by Whitestrips. Surface microhardness and SEM measures revealed no deleterious effects on the enamel surfaces. CLSM micromorphological assessments supported the safety of hydrogen peroxide bleaching strips both on surface and subsurface enamel, DEJ, and dentin ultrastructure. Raman spectroscopy analysis demonstrated no obvious effects of bleaching treatments on the microchemical composition of enamel and dentin. These results confirm that tooth bleaching with hydrogen peroxide whitening strips does not produce changes in surface

  2. Clinical and Spectrophotometric Evaluation of LED and Laser Activated Teeth Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Giudice, R; Pantaleo, G; Lizio, A; Romeo, U; Castiello, G; Spagnuolo, G; Giudice, G Lo

    2016-01-01

    Auxiliary power sources (LED and laser) are used in in-office teeth bleaching techniques to accelerate the redox reaction of the whitening gel to increase ease of use, to improve comfort and safety, and to decrease the procedure time. The aim this study is to evaluate the efficiency of the teeth whitening procedures performed with hydrogen peroxide and carbamide peroxide, LED or Laser activated. 18 patients, affected by exogenous dyschromia, were treated with a bleaching agent composed by 35% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide. They were divided into two groups: in the first group the bleaching agent was activated by a LED lamp; in the second group it was activated by a Laser diode lamp. Both groups were subjected to 3 bleaching cycle of 15' each. The chromatic evaluations were performed before and after one week from the treatment, using a chromatic scale and a spectrophotometer. The mean value of pre, post bleaching and follow-up were analyzed using a T-test, with results statistically significant for Pbleaching effectiveness. All patients treated with laser activation complained an increase in dental sensitivity. The use of laser-activating systems did not improve the efficacy of bleaching.

  3. Influence of tooth bleaching on dental enamel microhardness: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolla, J; Marques, Abc; da Costa, D C; de Souza, A S; Coutinho, M

    2017-09-01

    Several studies have investigated the effect of bleaching on dental tissues. The evaluation of the effect of home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide is important for assessing alterations in enamel microhardness that may affect dental health in terms of resistance to masticatory forces. This meta-analysis was performed in order to determine scientific evidence regarding the effects of home vital bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide gel on the microhardness of human dental enamel. A systematic electronic literature search was conducted in the PubMed and Web of Science databases using search terms. Two independent researchers evaluated the information and methodological quality of the studies. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were established for article selection; further, only studies published in English were selected. Thirteen studies that met all of the inclusion and exclusion criteria were selected and underwent statistical analysis. The results of this meta-analysis showed no significant changes in enamel microhardness when using the 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching gel over periods of 7, 14 and 21 days. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  4. Effect of a New Bleaching Gel on Tooth Whitening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, T N; Bailey, C W; Ashcraft-Olmscheid, D; Vandewalle, K S

    The purpose of this study was to compare the whitening efficacy of a novel bleaching agent containing a unique tribarrel hydremide-peroxide gel (KöR) with a traditional bleaching system of hydrogen peroxide or carbamide peroxide (Opalescence). Bovine incisors were mounted into a custom resin, arch-shaped mounting device. Four groups of 10 teeth were created using mounting devices containing five teeth each. The in-office and home bleaching gels of KöR and Opalescence were applied to the teeth alone and in trays to simulate a combination of in-office and home bleaching or home bleaching only. Spectrophotometer readings of L* a* b* were performed at baseline, the end of active bleaching (immediate), and three and six months postbleaching. Immediately postbleaching, the use of Opalescence gel resulted in greater change in ΔE* and Δb* (less yellow) for combined and home bleaching techniques compared with KöR. After six months, Opalescence had significantly greater ΔE* and Δb* compared with KöR for home bleaching only. There was no significant difference in ΔL* between Opalescence and KöR at any time period with either technique.

  5. Effects of light irradiation on bleaching by a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suemori, T; Kato, J; Nakazawa, T; Akashi, G; Igarashi, A; Hirai, Y; Kumagai, Y; Kurata, H

    2008-01-01

    A low-concentration hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide as a photocatalyst has attracted attention as a safe office bleaching agent. In this study, the influence of different kinds of light on the bleaching effect of this agent was examined. The bleaching agent was applied to hematoporphyrin-stained paper strips that were then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm 2 ), a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm 2 ), or an LED (835 mW/cm 2 ) for 5 minutes. The color was measured spectrophotometrically before treatment and every 30 seconds thereafter, and the effects of bleaching on the strip were assessed using the CIE 1976 L * a * b * color coordinate system. Of the three different irradiation conditions, 405-nm laser irradiation gave the strongest bleaching effect with 3.5% hydrogen peroxide containing titanium dioxide. The laser provides strong irradiance at 405 nm, which corresponds to the absorption range of the bleaching agent, and consequently the largest effect was obtained

  6. Release time of residual oxygen after dental bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide: effect of a catalase-based neutralizing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guasso, Bárbara; Salomone, Paloma; Nascimento, Paulo Cícero; Pozzobon, Roselaine Terezinha

    2016-01-01

    This article assessed the effect of a catalase-based agent on residual oxygen (O2) release from teeth exposed to 35% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The use of the catalase-based neutralizer agent for 2-3 minutes was able to release residual O2 5 days after exposure to a 35% H2O2-based bleaching gel.

  7. Effect of 10% sodium bicarbonate on bond strength of enamel and dentin after bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Medeiros Darzé

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroductionBy-products of hydrogen peroxide degradation released during dental bleaching influence the polymerization of adhesive systems and composite resins, causing a reduction in shear bond strength to the tooth.Objectivethe aim of this article was to evaluate the effect of 10% sodium bicarbonate (SB, applied for different lengths of time, on the shear bond strength to enamel and dentin after bleaching.Material and methodEnamel and dentin blocks were divided into groups (n=10: (1 control: no bleaching; (2 immediate: bleaching immediately followed by restoration; (3 14-day: bleaching, restoration 14 days later; (4 SB for 10 minutes: bleaching, SB gel for 10 minutes, immediately followed by restoration; (5 SB for 20 minutes: bleaching, SB gel for 20 minutes, immediately followed by restoration. A 38% hydrogen peroxide gel (Opalescence Boost/Ultradent was used. After application of the adhesive system, composite resin cylinders were mounted on the surface of the substrates in order to test shear bond strength. Result: ANOVA and Tukey tests showed significantly higher mean enamel bond strength values for the 14-day follow-up group and without significant differences for control group. Mean bond strength values obtained for the other groups were intermediate. When testing dentin, the Tukey test revealed a significantly higher mean bond strength value for the 14-day follow-up group when compared with application of SB for 20 minutes.ConclusionSB gel applied was unable to reverse the low bond strength to enamel and dentin after bleaching treatment.

  8. Catalase and sodium fluoride mediated rehabilitation of enamel bleached with 37% hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Thakur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bleaching agents bring about a range of unwanted changes in the physical structure of enamel which needs to be restored qualitatively and timely. Catalase being an antioxidant ensures the effective removal of free radicals and improvement in fluoride mediated remineralization from the enamel microstructure which if retained may harm the integrity and affect the hardness of enamel. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted incisors were sectioned to 6 slabs which were divided into 5 groups: Group A, control; Group B, treatment with 37% hydrogen peroxide (HP; Group C, treatment with 37% HP and catalase, Group D, treatment with 37% HP and 5% sodium fluoride application, Group E, treatment with 37% HP followed by catalase and 5% sodium fluoride. Scanning electron microscope and microhardness analysis were done for all slabs. One-way ANOVA test was applied among different groups. Results: Vicker′s microhardness number (VHN of Group B and C was significantly lower. No significant difference between VHN of Group B and C. VHN of Group D was significantly higher than Group A, B, and C; but significantly lower than Group E. VHN of Group E was significantly higher than any other experimental group. One-way ANOVA revealed a highly significant P value (P = 0.0001 and so Tukey′s post-hoc Test for the group comparisons was employed. Conclusion: Subsequent treatment of bleached enamel with catalase and fluoride varnish separately results in repairing and significantly increasing the microhardness.

  9. Penetration of 38% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber in bovine and human teeth submitted to office bleach technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Gasparoto Mancini, Maria Nadir; Menezes, Marcia Maciel

    2007-09-01

    This study evaluated the pulp chamber penetration of peroxide bleaching agent in human and bovine teeth after office bleach technique. All the teeth were sectioned 3 mm apical of the cement-enamel junction and were divided into 2 groups, A (70 third human molars) and B (70 bovine lateral incisors), that were subdivided into A1 and B1 restored by using composite resin, A2 and B2 by using glass ionomer cement, and A3 and B3 by using resin-modified glass ionomer cement; A4, A5, B4, and B5 were not restored. Acetate buffer was placed in the pulp chamber, and the bleaching agent was applied for 40 minutes as follows: A1-A4 and B1-B4, 38% hydrogen peroxide exposure and A5 and B5, immersion into distilled water. The buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube in which leuco crystal violet and horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Dunnett, Kruskal-Wallis, and Tukey tests (5%). A higher level of hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp chamber in resin-modified glass ionomer cements in bovine (0.79 +/- 0.61 microg) and human (2.27 +/- 0.41 microg) groups. The bleaching agent penetration into the pulp chamber was higher in human teeth for any experimental situation. The penetration of the hydrogen peroxide depends on restorative materials, and under the conditions of this study human teeth are more susceptible to penetration of bleaching agent into the pulp chamber than bovine teeth.

  10. Peroxide bleaching agent effects on enamel surface microhardness, roughness and morphology Efeitos de agentes clareadores à base de peróxidos na microdureza, rugosidade e morfologia superficial do esmalte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Franco Pinto

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness, microhardness and morphology of human enamel exposed to six bleaching agents (at baseline and post-treatment. Human dental enamel samples were obtained from human third molars and randomly divided into seven groups (n = 11: control, Whiteness Perfect - 10% carbamide peroxide (10% CP, Colgate Platinum - 10% CP, Day White 2Z - 7.5% hydrogen peroxide (7.5% HP, Whiteness Super - 37% CP, Opalescence Quick - 35% CP and Whiteness HP - 35% HP. Bleaching agents were applied according to manufacturers' instructions. The control group remained not treated and stored in artificial saliva. Microhardness testing was performed with a Knoop indentor and surface roughness was analyzed with a profilometer. Morphologic observations were carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results were statistically analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test (5%, and revealed a significant decrease in microhardness values and a significant increase in surface roughness post-bleaching. Changes in enamel morphology after bleaching were observed under SEM. It was concluded that bleaching agents can alter the microhardness, roughness and morphology of dental enamel surface.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a rugosidade, microdureza e morfologia superficial do esmalte dental humano tratado com seis agentes clareadores (antes e depois do tratamento. Amostras de esmalte dental humano foram obtidas de terceiros molares e aleatoriamente distribuídas em sete grupos (n = 11: controle, Whiteness Perfect - peróxido de carbamida a 10% (PC 10%, Colgate Platinum - PC 10%, Day White 2Z - peróxido de hidrogênio a 7,5% (PH 7,5%, Whiteness Super - PC 37%, Opalescence Quick - PC 35% e Whiteness HP - PH 35%. Os agentes clareadores foram aplicados de acordo com as instruções dos fabricantes. O grupo controle permaneceu sem tratamento e armazenado em saliva artificial. O teste de microdureza foi realizado

  11. Erosion and abrasion on dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarquinio SBC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Flávio Fernando Demarco1, Sônia Saeger Meireles2, Hugo Ramalho Sarmento1, Raquel Venâncio Fernandes Dantas1, Tatiana Botero3, Sandra Beatriz Chaves Tarquinio11Graduate Program in Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil; 2Department of Operative Dentistry, Federal University of Paraíba, Brazil; 3Cariology, Restorative Science, and Endodontics Department, School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, MI, USAAbstract: This review investigates erosion and abrasion in dental structures undergoing at-home bleaching. Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition that may be idiopathic or caused by a known acid source. Some bleaching agents have a pH lower than the critical level, which can cause changes in the enamel mineral content. Investigations have shown that at-home tooth bleaching with low concentrations of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no significant damaging effects on enamel and dentin surface properties. Most studies where erosion was observed were in vitro. Even though the treatment may cause side effects like sensitivity and gingival irritation, these usually disappear at the end of treatment. Considering the literature reviewed, we conclude that tooth bleaching agents based on hydrogen or carbamide peroxide have no clinically significant influence on enamel/dentin mineral loss caused by erosion or abrasion. Furthermore, the treatment is tolerable and safe, and any adverse effects can be easily reversed and controlled.Keywords: peroxide, tooth bleaching, enamel, dentin, erosion, abrasion

  12. Fragmentation of the gastrodermis and detachment of zooxanthellae in symbiotic cnidarians: a role for hydrogen peroxide and Ca2+ in coral bleaching and algal density control

    OpenAIRE

    I. M Sandeman

    2006-01-01

    Coral bleaching involves the detachment of zooxanthellae and the simultaneous fragmentation of the gastrodermis. Results obtained with a cell permeant fluorescent probe for calcium ions (Ca2+) indicates that "thermal" bleaching is the result of a temperature related breakdown of the Ca2+ exclusion system. "Solar" bleaching, which takes place at lower temperatures and is driven by light, is the result of a build-up of photo-synthetically produced hydrogen peroxide in the tissues. Gastrodermal ...

  13. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists' awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P bleaching agents significantly decreased microhardness compared to the control group (P 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide bleaching induces changes in the physical properties of dental restorative materials: Effects of study protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Zhang, Chang-Yuan; Wang, Yi-Ning; Cheng, Hui

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of study protocols on the effects of bleaching on the surface roughness, substance loss, flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), Weibull parameters, and color of 7 restorative materials. The test materials included 4 composite resins, 1 glass-ionomer cement, 1 dental ceramic, and 1 polyacid-modified composite. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups (n = 20) according to different study protocols: a bleaching group at 25°C (group 25B), a bleaching group at 37°C (group 37B), a control group at 25°C (group 25C), and a control group at 37°C (group 37C). The specimens in the bleaching group were treated with 40% hydrogen peroxide for 80 min at the respective environmental temperatures. The surface roughness, substance loss, FS, FM, and color of the specimens were measured before and after treatment. FS data were also subjected to Weibull analysis, which was used to estimate of the Weibull modulus (m) and the characteristic strength (σ 0 ). Surface roughness increased and significant color changes were observed for all tested specimens after bleaching treatment, except for the ceramic. After bleaching at 37°C, the polyacid-modified composite showed significantly reduced FS, FM, m, and σ 0 values in comparison to the control specimens stored at 37°C in whole saliva. Significant differences were also found between the 37B and 25B polyacid-modified composite groups in terms of surface roughness, FS, m, σ 0 , and color changes. Varying effects of bleaching on the physical properties of dental restorative materials were observed, and the influences of the study protocols on bleaching effects were found to be material-dependent. The influence of study protocols on the effects of bleaching on the surface roughness, flexural properties, and color of dental restorative materials are material-dependent and should be considered when evaluating the effects of bleaching on dental restorative

  15. Effect of vital bleaching with solutions containing different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and pineapple extract as an additive on human enamel using reflectance spectrophotometer: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vejai Vekaash, Chitra Janardhanan; Kumar Reddy, Tripuravaram Vinay; Venkatesh, Kondas Vijay

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the color change in human enamel bleached with three different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, containing pineapple extract as an additive in two different timings, using reflectance spectrophotometer. The study aimed to investigate the bleaching efficacy on natural teeth using natural enzymes. Baseline color values of 10 randomly selected artificially stained incisors were obtained. The specimens were divided into three groups of 20 teeth each: Group 1 - 30% hydrogen peroxide, Group II - 20% hydrogen peroxide, and Group III - 10% hydrogen peroxide. One half of the tooth was bleached with hydrogen peroxide, and other was bleached with hydrogen peroxide and pineapple extract for 20 min (Subgroup A) and 10 min (Subgroup B). The results were statistically analyzed using student's t -test. The mean ΔE values of Group IA (31.62 ± 0.9), Group IIA (29.85 ± 1.2), and Group IIIA (28.65 ± 1.2) showed statistically significant higher values when compared to the mean Δ E values of Group 1A (25.02 ± 1.2), Group IIA (22.86 ± 1.1), and Group IIIA (16.56 ± 1.1). Identical results were obtained in Subgroup B. The addition of pineapple extract to hydrogen peroxide resulted in effective bleaching.

  16. In vitro evaluation of the chemical and morphological changes of the enamel surface using different bleaching techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattos, Alessandra de Siervi

    2003-01-01

    'In vitro' evaluation through MEV and EDS of the morphological and chemical changes, respectively, of the bovine enamel, submitted to different bleaching techniques. For the MEV evaluation eighteen apical thirds were pigmented and divided into two parts. One half of each sample was the control and the other half was bleached according to the protocol of each test group (n= 6). Group I - home bleaching with a 10% carbamide peroxide; group II bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and LED; group III - bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with diode laser bleaching. The same procedure was done with the eighteen samples which were analyzed through EDS and which had their buccal surface grinded and polished before the bleaching procedure in order to obtain more precise values of the fraction of calcium and phosphorus. The results showed no morphological changes among the analyzed control halves and the bleached halves. There was not a statistical significant difference about Ca and P values, among the control halves and the bleached halves regarding the chemical components (p< 0,05). (author)

  17. The effect of light-activation sources on tooth bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroudi, Kusai; Hassan, Nadia Aly

    2014-01-01

    Vital bleaching is one of the most requested cosmetic dental procedures asked by patients who seek a more pleasing smile. This procedure consists of carbamide or hydrogen peroxide gel applications that can be applied in-office or by the patient (at-home/overnight bleaching system). Some in-office treatments utilise whitening light with the objective of speeding up the whitening process. The objective of this article is to review and summarise the current literature with regard to the effect of light-activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. A literature search was conducted using Medline, accessed via the National Library of Medicine Pub Med from 2003 to 2013 searching for articles relating to effectiveness of light activation sources on in-office tooth bleaching. This study found conflicting evidence on whether light truly improve tooth whitening. Other factors such as, type of stain, initial tooth colour and subject age which can influence tooth bleaching outcome were discussed. Conclusions: The use of light activator sources with in-office bleaching treatment of vital teeth did not increase the efficacy of bleaching or accelerate the bleaching. PMID:25298598

  18. The corrosion of titanium and some other construction materials during hydrogen peroxide bleaching according to the field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyoekyvirta, O.; Pohjanne, P.; Heinaevaara, A. [Oy METSA-BOTNIA Ab, Kaskinen' s mill, 64260 Kaskinen (Finland); Hirvonen, J. [VTT Automation, Industrial Automation, P.O. Box 1301, FIN-02044 (Finland); Lewenstam, A. [Center for Process Analytical Chemistry and Sensor Technology ' ProSens' Abo Akademi University, 20500 Abo (Finland)

    1999-07-01

    In a Finnish pulp mill, the field measurements of different materials were performed in different stages of peroxide bleaching: P{sub 1} and P{sub 2}. The field measurements were performed with three different sensors. The sensors were designed in co-operation with Valmet Automation Kajaani Oy. Each sensor measured the corrosion potential, the redox potential and the weight losses of three different materials. Simultaneously, the data of the most important parameters of bleaching, i.e. temperature, pH, peroxide flow rate and concentration, mass flow, consistency, residuals, flow rate and concentration of alkaline, were collected in the data logger by a dedicated program. The results proved that the corrosion of different materials (stainless steel S31654, nickel-based alloy N10276 and titanium Gr. 5) could be estimated with field experiments. The uniform corrosion of titanium occurred in a certain bleaching situation. The field measurements gave a good estimation of whether the material dissolved during process operation or process disorders. Our results clearly show that the mixing of the chemicals can be reliably estimated, and thus advantageous for a pulp mill. The materials studied withstood the bleaching significantly better if the chemicals were mixed directly with a pulp. Usually the chemicals are mixed with alkaline and then added to the pulp. The field measurements could also be applied in ozone and in the peracetic acid bleaching stage. The sensors can be utilized as tools during process monitoring or diagnostics. With the aid of monitoring it is possible to clarify how the different process operation models affect the corrosion of materials. (author)

  19. The corrosion of titanium and some other construction materials during hydrogen peroxide bleaching according to the field measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyoekyvirta, O.; Pohjanne, P.; Heinaevaara, A.; Hirvonen, J.; Lewenstam, A.

    1999-01-01

    In a Finnish pulp mill, the field measurements of different materials were performed in different stages of peroxide bleaching: P 1 and P 2 . The field measurements were performed with three different sensors. The sensors were designed in co-operation with Valmet Automation Kajaani Oy. Each sensor measured the corrosion potential, the redox potential and the weight losses of three different materials. Simultaneously, the data of the most important parameters of bleaching, i.e. temperature, pH, peroxide flow rate and concentration, mass flow, consistency, residuals, flow rate and concentration of alkaline, were collected in the data logger by a dedicated program. The results proved that the corrosion of different materials (stainless steel S31654, nickel-based alloy N10276 and titanium Gr. 5) could be estimated with field experiments. The uniform corrosion of titanium occurred in a certain bleaching situation. The field measurements gave a good estimation of whether the material dissolved during process operation or process disorders. Our results clearly show that the mixing of the chemicals can be reliably estimated, and thus advantageous for a pulp mill. The materials studied withstood the bleaching significantly better if the chemicals were mixed directly with a pulp. Usually the chemicals are mixed with alkaline and then added to the pulp. The field measurements could also be applied in ozone and in the peracetic acid bleaching stage. The sensors can be utilized as tools during process monitoring or diagnostics. With the aid of monitoring it is possible to clarify how the different process operation models affect the corrosion of materials. (author)

  20. Susceptibility of Enamel Treated with Bleaching Agents to Mineral Loss after Cariogenic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Tezel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Controversial reports exist whether bleaching agents cause a susceptibility to demineralization. The aim of this study was to compare the calcium loss of enamel treated with different bleaching agents and activation methods. Method and Materials. The specimens obtained from human premolars were treated in accordance with manufacturer protocols; 10% carbamide peroxide, 38% hydrogen peroxide light-activated, 38% hydrogen peroxide laser-activated, and no treatment (control. After cariogenic challenge calcium concentrations were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Results. No differences were found between the calcium loss of the laser-activated group and 10% carbamide peroxide group (>0.05. However, the differences between laser-activated and control groups were statistically significant (0.05. On the other hand, the light-activated group showed a significantly higher calcium loss compared with the other groups (<0.05. Conclusions. The results show that bleaching agents may cause calcium loss but it seems to be a negligible quantity for clinical aspects.

  1. The Influence of Post Bleaching Treatments in Stain Absorption and Microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Horieh; Darvishzadeh, Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of post bleaching treatments to prevent restaining and the change of enamel surface microhardness after dental bleaching in vitro. Sixty intact human incisor teeth were stained in tea solution and randomly assigned into four groups (n=15). Then samples were bleached for two weeks (8 hours daily) by 15% carbamide peroxide. Tooth color was determined both with a spectrophotometer and visually before bleaching (T1) and immediately after bleaching (T2). Next, it was applied in group 1 fluoride (Naf 2%) gel for 2 minutes, and in group 2 a fractional CO2 laser (10 mJ, 200 Hz, 10 s), and in group 3, nanohydroxyapatite gel for 2 minutes. The bleached teeth in group 4 remained untreated (control group). Then teeth placed in tea solution again. Color examinations were repeated after various post bleaching treatments (T3) and restaining with tea (T4) and color change values recorded. The microhardness was measured at the enamel surface of samples. Data was analyzed using ANOVA, Tukey HSD test and Dunnett T3 (α = 0.05). Directly after bleaching (ΔE T3-T2), the treatment with nanohydroxyapatite showed significantly the least color lapse in colorimetric evaluation. In experimental groups, the color change between T3 and T4 stages (ΔE T4-T3) was significantly lower than control group (P bleaching treatments are suggested for prevention of stain absorption and increasing the hardening of bleached enamel.

  2. Influence of bleaching agents on surface roughness of sound or eroded dental enamel specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrak, Birgül; Callaway, Angelika; Kurth, Petra; Willershausen, Brita

    2010-12-01

    The aim of the present in vitro study was to assess the effect of bleaching agents on eroded and sound enamel specimens. Enamel specimens prepared from human permanent anterior teeth were incubated with different bleaching agents containing active ingredients as 7.5 or 13.5% hydrogen peroxide or 35% carbamide peroxide, ranging in pH from 4.9 to 10.8. The effect of the tooth whitening agents on surface roughness was tested for sound enamel surfaces as well as for eroded enamel specimens. To provoke erosive damage, the enamel specimens were incubated for 10 hours with apple juice (pH = 3.4). Afterwards, pretreated and untreated dental slices were incubated with one of the bleaching agents for 10 hours. The surface roughness (R(a)) of all enamel specimens (N = 80) was measured using an optical profilometric device. A descriptive statistical analysis of the R(a) values was performed. The study demonstrated that exposure to an acidic bleaching agent (pH = 4.9) resulted in a higher surface roughness (p = 0.043) than treatment with a high peroxide concentration (pH = 6.15). If the enamel surface was previously exposed to erosive beverages, subsequent bleaching may enhance damage to the dental hard tissue. Bleaching agents with a high concentration of peroxide or an acidic pH can influence the surface roughness of sound or eroded enamel. © 2010, COPYRIGHT THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010, WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. Bleaching augments lipid peroxidation products in pistachio oil and its cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistachio consumption is associated with reductions in serum cholesterol and oxidative stress due to their constituents of unsaturated fats, phytosterols, fiber, and antioxidants. Bleaching has been applied to whiten nut shells for antifungal and cosmetic purposes. However, the impact of bleaching o...

  4. Evaluation of the Efficacy and Color Stability of Two Different At-Home Bleaching Systems on Teeth of Different Shades: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aka, Betül; Celik, Esra Uzer

    2017-09-01

    This randomized controlled clinical trial compared the bleaching efficacy of two different at-home bleaching systems on teeth of different shades and their color stability after a 6-month follow-up. Ninety-two patients (777 teeth) were randomly divided into three groups: (a) negative control, (b) patients treated with a custom-made tray containing 10% carbamide peroxide (10% CP/PF) (Opalescence PF), and (c) patients treated with a pre-loaded tray containing 6% hydrogen peroxide (6% HP/Go) (Opalescence Go). Teeth in all groups were divided into three sub-groups according to the VITA Classic Shade Guide: light (A1-C1), medium dark (C2-B3), and dark (A3.5-C4). Bleaching systems were performed in accordance with manufacturers' instructions for 14 days. The color values were measured at the baseline, 10 days and 14 days of bleaching, 2 weeks, and 6 months after bleaching. Three-way ANOVA and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). Irrespective of original shade, both bleaching groups showed significantly higher ΔE* values than the control groups, and the ΔE* values were significantly higher in the 10% CP/PF groups than those in the 6% HP/Go groups (p bleaching systems, the dark teeth showed higher ΔE* values than the light teeth (p bleaching agents produced a bleaching effect, but 10% CP/PF was more effective. A pre-loaded tray system may be used for dental bleaching, but it is still less effective than conventional a 10% carbamide peroxide system, irrespective of the initial shade. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:325-338, 2017). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Analysis of shade, temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration during dental bleaching: in vitro study with the KTP and diode lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaini, C; Lagori, G; Merigo, E; Meleti, M; Manfredi, M; Guidotti, R; Serraj, A; Vescovi, P

    2013-01-01

    Many dental bleaching techniques are now available, several of them using a laser source. However, the literature on the exact role of coherent light in the biochemical reaction of the whitening process is very discordant. The aims of this in vitro study were: (1) to compare two different laser sources, a KTP laser with a wavelength of 532 nm and a diode laser with a wavelength of 808 nm, during dental bleaching, and (2) to investigate the relationships among changes in gel temperature, tooth shade and hydrogen peroxide (HP) concentration during laser irradiation. Altogether, 116 bovine teeth were bleached using a 30% HP gel, some of them with gel only and others with gel plus one of the two lasers (532 or 808 nm) at two different powers (2 and 4 W). The KTP laser produced a significant shade variation with a minimal temperature increase. The diode laser led to a higher temperature increase with a greater reduction in HP concentration, but the change in shade was only statistically significant with a power of 4 W. At a power of 2 W, the KTP laser caused a greater change in shade than the diode laser. No significant correlations were found among temperature, HP concentration and shade variation. The KTP laser appears to provide better results with less dangerous thermal increases than the diode laser. This might call into question most of the literature affirming that the action of laser bleaching is by increasing the gel temperature and, consequently, the speed of the redox reaction. Further study is required to investigate the correlations between the parameters investigated and efficacy of the bleaching process.

  6. Evaluation of enamel by scanning electron microscopy green LED associated to hydrogen peroxide 35% for dental bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Juliana S. C.; de Oliveira, Susana C. P. S.; Zanin, Fátima A. A.; Santos, Gustavo M. P.; Sampaio, Fernando J. P.; Gomes Júnior, Rafael Araújo; Gesteira, Maria F. M.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Pinheiro, Antônio Luiz B.

    2014-02-01

    Dental bleaching is a frequently requested procedure in clinical dental practice. The literature is contradictory regarding the effects of bleaching agents on both morphology and demineralization of enamel after bleaching. The aim of this study was to analyze by SEM the effect of 35% neutral hydrogen peroxide cured by green LED. Buccal surfaces of 15 pre-molars were sectioned and marked with a central groove to allow experimental and control groups on the same specimen. For SEM, 75 electron micrographs were evaluated by tree observers at 43X, 220X and 1000X. Quantitative analysis for the determination of the surface elemental composition of the samples through X-ray microanalysis by SEM was also performed. The protocol tested neither showed significant changes in mineral composition of the samples nor to dental enamel structure when compared to controls. SEM analysis allowed inferring that there were marked morphological differences between the enamel samples highlighting the need for the use of the same tooth in comparative morphological studies. The tested protocol did not cause morphological damage the enamel surface when compared to their respective controls.

  7. Effects of the concentration and composition of in-office bleaching gels on hydrogen peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena-Serrano, A P; Parreiras, S O; do Nascimento, E M S; Borges, C P F; Berger, S B; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A

    2015-01-01

    In tooth whitening, the hydrogen peroxide (HP) diffuses in the enamel and dentin, reaching the pulp. This in vitro study aimed to quantify the penetration of HP in the pulp chamber in teeth submitted to bleaching agents of different concentrations of HP without calcium (HP 20% [20CF], HP 35% [35CF]) and with calcium (HP 20% [20CC], HP 35% [35CC]). Fifty human premolars were sectioned 3 mm from the cemento-enamel junction and the pulp tissue was removed. The teeth were divided into five groups according to treatment and with a control group (n=10). An acetate buffer solution was placed in the pulp chamber of all teeth. The control group was exposed only to distilled water, while the other groups were treated with a bleaching procedure, according to the manufacturer's recommendations. After treatment, the acetate buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube in which leuco-crystal violet and peroxidase solutions were added, resulting in a blue solution. The optical density of this blue solution was determined spectrophotometrically and converted into micrograms equivalent to the HP. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The HP concentration did not affect the HP inside the pulp chamber, but the presence of calcium significantly reduced it (p<0.0001). The amount of HP that reaches the pulp chamber depends on the bleaching protocol and the product employed, and it seems to be less affected by HP concentration.

  8. The effect of long-term use of tooth bleaching products on the human enamel surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polydorou, Olga; Scheitza, Sophia; Spraul, Mathias; Vach, Kirstin; Hellwig, Elmar

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the long-term effect of bleaching on human enamel. Four groups of enamel specimens were prepared (n = 20): group 1: bleaching with Opalescence Boost [40% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), 3 × 20 min/week]; group 2: control group (the specimens were stored in human saliva); group 3: beaching with Vivastyle Paint on Plus (6% H 2 O 2 , 2 × 10 min/day), and group 4: bleaching with Opalescence PF 16% [16% carbamide peroxide (CP), 6 h/day]. After each bleaching session the specimens were stored in human saliva. Knoop microhardness and surface roughness were measured: before bleaching, after 2-week and after 8-week bleaching. After 2-week treatment, surface roughness was significantly increased in all experimental groups (p  0.05). The roughness changes exerted after 8-week bleaching were not significantly higher than the ones after 2 weeks (p > 0.05). After 8-week treatment, the increase in roughness caused by 16% CP was significantly higher (p bleaching on enamel was not shown to be dependent on the method or the H 2 O 2 concentration. Bleaching with CP 16% resulted in higher roughness than bleaching with H 2 O 2 , while 40% H 2 O 2 caused the higher microhardness increase. The present study showed that in-office bleaching with 40% H 2 O 2 seems to be at least as safe as home bleaching as far as their effects on human enamel are concerned.

  9. Spectrophotometric evaluation of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket in enamel and dentin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correr, Americo-Bortolazzo; Rastelli, Alessandra-Nara-Souza; Lima, Débora-Alves-Nunes-Leite; Consani, Rafael-Leonardo-Xediek

    2014-01-01

    Aware of the diffusion capacity of bleaching in the dental tissues, many orthodontists are subjecting their patients to dental bleaching during orthodontic treatment for esthetic purposes or to anticipate the exchange of esthetic restorations after the orthodontic treatment. For this purpose specific products have been developed in pre-loaded whitening trays designed to fit over and around brackets and wires, with clinical efficacy proven. Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate, through spectrophotometric reflectance, the effectiveness of dental bleaching under orthodontic bracket. Material and Methods: Thirty-two bovine incisors crown blocks of 8 mm x 8 mm height lengths were used. Staining of tooth blocks with black tea was performed for six days. They were distributed randomly into 4 groups (1-home bleaching with bracket, 2- home bleaching without bracket, 3- office bleaching with bracket, 4 office bleaching without bracket). The color evaluation was performed (CIE L * a * b *) using color reflectance spectrophotometer. Metal brackets were bonded in groups 1 and 3. The groups 1 and 2 samples were subjected to the carbamide peroxide at 15%, 4 hours daily for 21 days. Groups 3 and 4 were subjected to 3 in-office bleaching treatment sessions, hydrogen peroxide 38%. After removal of the brackets, the second color evaluation was performed in tooth block, difference between the area under the bracket and around it, and after 7 days to verified color stability. Data analysis was performed using the paired t-test and two-way variance analysis and Tukey’s. Results: The home bleaching technique proved to be more effective compared to the office bleaching. There was a significant difference between the margin and center color values of the specimens that were subjected to bracket bonding. Conclusions: The bracket bond presence affected the effectiveness of both the home and office bleaching treatments. Key words:Tooth bleaching, spectrophotometry

  10. Dental bleaching on teeth submitted to enamel microabrasion 30 years ago-a case report of patients' compliance during bleaching treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Daniel; Pavani, Caio Cesar; Schott, Timm Cornelius; Machado, Lucas Silveira; Pini, Núbia Inocêncya Pavesi; Bertoz, André Pinheiro de Magalhães; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2018-04-20

    The present dental bleaching case report describes a new method that precisely quantifies the daily wearing-times of the bleaching product by inserting a microsensor in the acetate custom tray. The bleaching efficacy was also discussed since the patient was previously submitted to enamel microabrasion. The patient was submitted to enamel microabrasion in 1987, and bleaching treatment was performed in 2005. In 2017, re-bleaching was executed using 10% peroxide carbamide. The electronic microsensor, TheraMon (TheraMon® microelectronic system; Sales Agency Gschladt, Hargelsberg, Austria), was embedded in the labial region of the upper and lower acetate trays to evaluate the wearing-times of the acetate trays/bleaching product. The patient was instructed to wear the tray for 6 to 8 h/day while sleeping. After 24 days of bleaching treatment, the data obtained from the TheraMon electronic devices was collected and interpreted. The patient did not entirely follow the bleaching treatment as recommended, as there was no evidence of use of the upper and lower trays for some days; additionally, the bleaching product was used for shorter and longer periods than was instructed. The TheraMon microeletronic device precisely measured the wearing-times of the acetate tray/bleaching product during the bleaching treatment. Teeth submitted to enamel microabrasion presented with a healthy clinical appearance after 30 years. Measuring the length and frequency of use of an acetate tray/bleaching product can be important to clinicians and patients for obtaining a controlled and adequate bleaching treatment.

  11. In vitro Assessment of Influence of Various Bleaching Protocols on the Strength of Ceramic Orthodontic Brackets bonded to Bleached Tooth Surface: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iska, Divya; Devanna, Raghu; Singh, Madhvi; Chitumalla, Rajkiran; Balasubramanian, Sai C Bala; Goutam, Manish

    2017-12-01

    Esthetics is one of the common issues because of which patients consult dental orthodontic treatment. Two ways of tooth bleaching are available these days, which includes in-office bleach and home bleach. Various bleaching protocols are available these days for treating the tooth surfaces. Hence, we planned the present study for investigating the impact of various intracoronal bleaching protocols on shear bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to tooth surface after bleaching. The present study included assessment of 100 extracted maxillary central incisors with the integrated buccal surface. A resin block was made and individual teeth were embedded in each block. Root canal therapy procedure was performed in all the teeth, after which 2 mm short of tooth apex up to the level of cementoenamel junction, removal of the root canal filling was done. All the samples were broadly divided into four study groups with 25 samples in each group. Bleaching procedure was carried in all the samples intracoronally followed by testing of shear bond strength using universal force testing machine. Following the modified adhesive remnant index (AI), assessment of remaining adhesive on the brackets was done. All the results were compiled and analyzed by Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software version 17.0. In the control group, mean shear bond strength was found to be 17.9 MPa. While comparing the carbamide peroxide (CP) group with sodium perborate study group, we observed a statistically significant difference. Nonsignificant results were obtained while comparing the shear bond strength in between sodium perborate group and hydrogen peroxide (HP) group. Intracoronal bleaching does affect the shear bond strength of ceramic brackets. Sodium perborate bleaching influences shear bond strength more strongly than other bleaching agents such as CP and HP. In patients undergoing orthodontic treatment, HP is a preferred agent where bleaching has to be followed by

  12. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Baptista PAULA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed.Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals.Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa.Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group.Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized.

  13. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching--an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Anabela Baptista; Dias, Maria Isabel; Ferreira, Manuel Marques; Carrilho, Teresa; Marto, Carlos Miguel; Casalta, João; Cabrita, António Silvério; Carrilho, Eunice

    2015-10-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized.

  14. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAULA, Anabela Baptista; DIAS, Maria Isabel; FERREIRA, Manuel Marques; CARRILHO, Teresa; MARTO, Carlos Miguel; CASALTA, João; CABRITA, António Silvério; CARRILHO, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed. Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals. Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days) at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa. Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group. Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized. PMID:26537721

  15. Clinical Comparison of At-Home and In-Office Dental Bleaching Procedures: A Randomized Trial of a Split-Mouth Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Lucas Silveira; Anchieta, Rodolfo Bruniera; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Briso, André Luiz; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo Guilherme; Sundfeld, Renato Herman

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this split-mouth clinical study was to compare a combination of in-office and at-home dental bleaching with at-home bleaching alone. Two applications of in-office bleaching were performed, with one appointment per week, using 38% hydrogen peroxide. At-home bleaching was performed with or without in-office bleaching using 10% carbamide peroxide in a custom-made tray every night for 2 weeks. The factor studied was the bleaching technique on two levels: Technique 1 (in-office bleaching combined with home bleaching) and Technique 2 (home bleaching only). The response variables were color change, dental sensitivity, morphology, and surface roughness. The maxillary right and left hemiarches of the participants were submitted to in-office placebo treatment and in-office bleaching, respectively (Phase 1), and at-home bleaching (Phase 2) treatment was performed on both hemiarches, characterizing a split-mouth design. Enamel surface changes and roughness were analyzed with scanning electron microscopy and optical interferometry using epoxy replicas. No statistically significant differences were observed between the bleaching techniques for either the visual or the digital analyses. There was a significant difference in dental sensitivity when both dental bleaching techniques were used, with in-office bleaching producing the highest levels of dental sensitivity after the baseline. Microscopic analysis of the morphology and roughness of the enamel surface showed no significant changes between the bleaching techniques. The two techniques produced similar results in color change, and the combination technique produced the highest levels of sensitivity. Neither technique promoted changes in morphology or surface roughness of enamel.

  16. Association Between In-Office And At-Home Tooth Bleaching: A Single Blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Lima; Rocha, Patrícia Souza; Pardim, Silvia Letícia de Souza; Machado, Ana Cláudia Vieira; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Seraidarian, Paulo Isaías

    2018-01-01

    This controlled randomized clinical trial evaluated the effect of associating at-home and in-office bleaching procedures on tooth sensitivity (TS) and bleaching effectiveness. Forty patients subjected to on session of in-office bleaching with 38% peroxide hydrogen. Subsequently, the patients were randomly allocated to receive a second session of in-office bleaching or to use a tray containing 10% carbamide peroxide delivered during 7 consecutive days. The worst TS score reported during or after each bleaching procedure was recorded using a verbal rating scale and TS risk (score different from 0) was calculated. Color changes were measured 7 days after each in-office session (for patients receiving in-office procedures only) or after the end of at-home bleaching (for the combined protocol), and 6 months after the last procedure for both bleaching protocols. Color was assessed by a spectrophotometer and by color match with the Vita Classical and Bleach guide scales. Statistical analyses were carried out to assess possible differences between the protocols regarding the outcomes and to analyze the effect of time of assessment on color changes. The bleaching protocol did not affect the risk for and the maximum level of TS reported, irrespective of the time of assessment. In the color evaluation, the bleaching protocol also did not affect the ultimate tooth color. In conclusion, after one in-office bleaching session, there was no difference in bleaching effectiveness and TS between performing a second in-office session and associating it with 1-week at-home bleaching.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide and caustic soda: Dancing with a dragon while bleaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter W. Hart; Carl Houtman; Kolby Hirth

    2013-01-01

    When hydrogen peroxide is mixed with caustic soda, an auto-accelerating reaction can lead to generation of significant amounts of heat and oxygen. On the basis of experiments using typical pulp mill process concentration and temperatures, a relatively simple kinetic model has been developed. Evaluation of these model results reveals that hydrogen peroxide-caustic soda...

  18. In vitro evaluation of the chemical and morphological changes of the enamel surface using different bleaching techniques; Avaliacao in vitro das alteracoes quimica e morfologica da superficie do esmalte utilizando diferentes tecnicas de clareamento dental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Alessandra de Siervi

    2003-07-01

    'In vitro' evaluation through MEV and EDS of the morphological and chemical changes, respectively, of the bovine enamel, submitted to different bleaching techniques. For the MEV evaluation eighteen apical thirds were pigmented and divided into two parts. One half of each sample was the control and the other half was bleached according to the protocol of each test group (n= 6). Group I - home bleaching with a 10% carbamide peroxide; group II bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and LED; group III - bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with diode laser bleaching. The same procedure was done with the eighteen samples which were analyzed through EDS and which had their buccal surface grinded and polished before the bleaching procedure in order to obtain more precise values of the fraction of calcium and phosphorus. The results showed no morphological changes among the analyzed control halves and the bleached halves. There was not a statistical significant difference about Ca and P values, among the control halves and the bleached halves regarding the chemical components (p< 0,05). (author)

  19. In vitro evaluation of the chemical and morphological changes of the enamel surface using different bleaching techniques; Avaliacao in vitro das alteracoes quimica e morfologica da superficie do esmalte utilizando diferentes tecnicas de clareamento dental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattos, Alessandra de Siervi

    2003-07-01

    'In vitro' evaluation through MEV and EDS of the morphological and chemical changes, respectively, of the bovine enamel, submitted to different bleaching techniques. For the MEV evaluation eighteen apical thirds were pigmented and divided into two parts. One half of each sample was the control and the other half was bleached according to the protocol of each test group (n= 6). Group I - home bleaching with a 10% carbamide peroxide; group II bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and LED; group III - bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with diode laser bleaching. The same procedure was done with the eighteen samples which were analyzed through EDS and which had their buccal surface grinded and polished before the bleaching procedure in order to obtain more precise values of the fraction of calcium and phosphorus. The results showed no morphological changes among the analyzed control halves and the bleached halves. There was not a statistical significant difference about Ca and P values, among the control halves and the bleached halves regarding the chemical components (p< 0,05). (author)

  20. Molecular analysis of tooth enamel by Raman spectroscopy after treatment with bleaching agents at different concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran Sedo, Randall; Obando Rosabal, Sofia; Saenz Bonilla, Paola; Soto Aguilar, Calendy; Vasquez Rodriguez, Amaya

    2014-01-01

    The changes in the concentration of the v1 phosphate molecule of the surface of dentin enamel are treated and researched with bleaching agents of chemical activation to basis of hydrogen peroxide than 9,5% and 14% and carbamide peroxide than 38%, for a period of 28 days. Raman spectroscopy was used and 30 dental pieces extracted, of which, were to be free of blemishes and pigmentations, without possessing fractures of the enamel, decay nor any other type of defect. The Raman spectrum was obtained of each dental piece prior to the application of bleaching agents. The specimens were separated into three experimental groups according to the concentration of whitening. The concentration of the v1 phosphate molecule was measured in the tooth enamel to the second and fourth week of treatment. In addition, ANOVA was performed for respective measurements (p≤0.05). A reduction of the v1 phosphate molecule were observed during and after the bleaching process in the experimental groups that have used of hydrogen peroxide to 14% and carbamide peroxide 38%. In the group of hydrogen peroxide to 9,5% has remained unproven a significant reduction. Within the limitations of this study is concluded that the bleaching agent causes a loss of v1 phosphate. This loss has been greater in the whitening of higher concentration. In spite, that the possible effect remineralizing of the saliva on a teeth whitening process has been unevaluated, it is recommended using during and after the treatment, toothpastes, mouthwashes, chewing gums, dental floss, among others, that contain ACP to help to cushion the potential loss of phosphate from tooth enamel. (author) [es

  1. Alkaline peroxide treatment of ECF bleached softwood kraft pulps: part 2. effect of increased fiber charge on refining, wet-end application, and hornification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng Dang; Thomas Elder; Jeffery S. Hsieh; Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2007-01-01

    The effect of increased fiber charge on refining, cationic starch adsorption, and hornification was examined. Two pulps were investigated: (1) a softwood (SW) kraft pulp (KP) which was bleached elementally chlorine-free (ECF) and sewed as control; and (2) a control pulp treated with alkaline peroxide, which had a higher fiber charge. It was shown that increased fiber...

  2. The effect of enamel bleaching on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztaş, E; Bağdelen, G; Kiliçoğlu, H; Ulukapi, H; Aydin, I

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching and delayed bonding on the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded with light and chemically cure composite resin to human enamel. One hundred and twenty extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into three groups of 40 each. The first two groups were bleached with 20 per cent carbamide peroxide (CP) at-home bleaching agent. No bleaching procedures were applied to the third group and served as control. The first two and control groups were divided into equal subgroups according to different adhesive-bracket combinations. Specimens in group 1 (n = 40) were bonded 24 hours after bleaching process was completed while the specimens in group 2 (n = 40) were bonded 14 days after. The specimens in all groups were debonded with a Universal testing machine while the modified adhesive remnant index was used to evaluate fracture properties. No statistically significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of metal and ceramic brackets bonded to bleached enamel after 24 hours, 14 days, and unbleached enamel with light or chemical cure adhesives (P > 0.05). The mode of failure was mostly at the bracket/adhesive interface and cohesive failures within the resin were also observed. Our findings indicated that at-home bleaching agents that contain 20 per cent CP did not significantly affect the shear bond strength of metal and ceramic orthodontic brackets to enamel when bonding is performed 24 hours or 14 days after bleaching.

  3. Shear bond strength of self-etching adhesive systems with different pH values to bleached and/or CPP-ACP-treated enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskoee, Siavash Savadi; Bahari, Mahmoud; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Navimipour, Elmira Jafari; Firouzmandi, Maryam

    2012-08-01

    To compare shear bond strengths of three different self-etching adhesive systems of different pH values to enamel bleached with carbamide peroxide, treated with casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), or treated with CPP-ACP subsequent to bleaching with carbamide peroxide. Thirty-six human third molars were cut into 4 sections and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 36): group I: no treatment; group II: bleaching; group III: CPP-ACP; group IV: bleaching and CPP-ACP. After surface treatments, the samples of each group were further divided into three subgroups (n = 12) based on the adhesive used. The adhesives Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), AdhesE (ADE), and Adper SE Plus (ADP) were applied, and resin composite cylinders with a diameter of 2 mm and a height of 4 mm were bonded to the enamel. Then the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. Two-way ANOVA and a post-hoc Tukey's test were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). There were significant differences between the adhesive systems (p system showed the highest bond strength, and the bleaching procedure reduced bond strengths (p = 0.001). Furthermore, there were no significant differences in shear bond strength values between the control and CPP groups. However, the differences between other groups were statistically significant (p material dependent.

  4. Dentin bond strength and nanoleakage of the adhesive interface after intracoronal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalli, Vanessa; Sebold, Maicon; Shinohara, Mirela Sanae; Pereira, Patrícia Nóbrega Rodrigues; Giannini, Marcelo

    2018-04-01

    This study evaluated dentin bond strength (BS) and nanoleakage of non- and pre-etched dentin immediately (T 0 ,), 7 days (T 7 ), and 14 days (T 14 ) after bleaching. Bovine incisors (150) were selected and half of them submitted to intrapulpal dentin etching (e). Non- and pre-etched dentin were subjected to the following (n = 15): no bleaching/control (C); 35% carbamide peroxide (CP); 35% hydrogen peroxide (35% HP); 25% hydrogen peroxide (25% HP); and sodium perborate (SP). Bleaching agents were applied to the pulp chamber four times within a 72-h interval. Afterwards, pulp chamber dentin was prepared for the BS test at different evaluation times (n = 5): T 0 , T 7 , and T 14 . Composite blocks were built on pulp chamber and sectioned in slices. Slices were reduced to an hour-glass shape with a cross-sectional area of 0.8 mm 2 and submitted to microtensile BS test. Two additional specimens for each group were prepared for nanoleakage evaluation by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Results were analyzed by ANOVA (two-way) and Dunnett's test (p bleaching for both sound and pre-etched dentin (p bleached dentin increased for all groups, whereas the pre-etched SPe group presented BS similar to the Ce. Nanoleakage within the hybrid layer was perceptible immediately after bleaching, although a decrease in nanoleakage was observed for all groups at T 14 . Adhesive restorations should be performed 7-14 days after bleaching, according to the bleaching agent used. Intracoronal bleaching should be performed preferably with sodium perborate if previous dentin etching is applied. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance ( p ≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration ( p ≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups ( p ≤0,05). In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words: Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate.

  6. Titanium dioxide in dental enamel as a trace element and its variation with bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Durán-Sedó, Randall; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2018-06-01

    Titanium is a less studied trace element in dental enamel. Literature relates an increased Titanium concentration with a decreased enamel crystal domain size, which in turn is related to a higher color value. The aim of our study was to analyze the effect of tooth bleaching agents on its concentration in dental enamel by means of confocal Raman spectroscopy. Human teeth were randomly distributed in six experimental groups (n=10) and submitted to different bleaching protocols according to the manufacturer´s instructions. Confocal Raman spectroscopy was carried out in order to identify and quantify the presence of titanium dioxide molecules in enamel prior to and during whitening. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance ( p ≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Titanium dioxide concentration was negatively affected by the longer bleaching protocols (at-home bleaching gels). All in-office whitening products increased significantly the studied molecule ( p ≤0,05). All dental specimens depicted the presence of titanium dioxide as a trace element in dental enamel. Bleaching gels that have to be applied at higher concentrations but for shorter periods of time increase the concentration of titanium dioxide, whilst at-home whitening gels used for longer periods of time despite the lower concentration caused a loss in titanium. Key words: Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, titanium dioxide.

  7. A new non-vital tooth bleaching method using titanium dioxide and 3.5% hydrogen peroxide with a 405-nm diode laser or a halogen lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suemori, T; Kato, J; Nakazawa, T; Akashi, G; Hirai, Y

    2008-01-01

    To establish a safer and more effective bleaching method for discolored pulpless teeth, we examined bleaching from the pulpal dentin side using a 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide. The twenty bovine blood-stained discolored enamel-dentin plates of 1.0 mm enamel thickness and 2.0 mm dentin thickness were used. The bleaching agent was applied to the dentin side that was then irradiated with a 405-nm diode laser (800 mW/cm 2 ) or a halogen lamp (720 mW/cm 2 ) for 15 minutes. The bleaching effect was assessed by spectrophotometric measurement of the color of the specimens from the dentin and enamel side for every 5 minutes, and then dentin or enamel surface was examined with a scanning electron microscope. The 3.5% hydrogen peroxide solution containing titanium dioxide proved to have a strong bleaching effect. The color difference after laser irradiation was higher than that after halogen lamp irradiation, however, there was no significant difference between them. No changes in the enamel surface morphology were found and open dentinal tubules with no smear layer were clearly observed at the pulpal dentin surface in both groups

  8. A randomized CIE L*a*b* evaluation of external bleaching therapy effects on fluorotic enamel stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Attin, Rengin; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of external bleaching on the color and luminosity of fluorotic stains and adjacent, normally mineralized enamel areas by means of CIE L*a*b* colorimetry. Eighteen adolescents with mild to moderate fluorotic stains were randomly assigned to either bleaching group A (n = 9) or control group B. Eligibility criteria were fluorotic stained maxillary incisors or canines and the informed consent of the participants and their guardians. Using a colorimeter, CIE L*a*b* values of maxillary incisors and canines were assessed at baseline (T1) in the center of the fluorotic stained area (F1) and at adjacent, normally mineralized enamel areas (F2). Then, external bleaching with Illumine office (30% hydrogen peroxide, Dentsply DeTrey) was performed for 60 minutes, followed by color reassessment (T2). After 14 days (T3), a 2-week home bleaching period with a daily bleaching time of 1 hour with Illumine home (15% carbamide peroxide, Dentsply DeTrey) was conducted with subsequent color determination (T4). After completion of bleaching therapy, 96.0% of all fluorotic areas (F1) and 100% of normal enamel areas (F2) showed a significant change within group A, compared to 29.4% in control group B. Comparing the collective DeltaE (L*, a*, b*) of F1 and F2, 60.0% of all areas showed significant differences after completion of bleaching therapy, compared to 88.0% initially. Of group B sites, 82.4% showed color differences in the beginning (T1) and 88.2% at the end (T4). Whereas a single 1-hour session of in-office bleaching with 30% hydrogen peroxide does not significantly affect the color and luminosity of fluorotic teeth, a 14-day period of home bleaching leads to an assimilation of the color of the fluorotic stain with the color of surrounding enamel areas due to different responses of sound and fluorotic enamel to the bleaching regime.

  9. Effects of at-home and in-office bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets to enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahul, M; Kumar, P Anil; Nair, Amal S; Mathew, Shino; Amaladas, Antony Shijoy; Ommen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of at-home and in-office bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS) of metal, ceramic, and composite orthodontic brackets and to compare their SBSs. A total of 96 human lower premolar teeth were used for this study. Six teeth were used for scanning electron microscopic study while the remaining ninety were divided into three equal groups. Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups with ten samples each. Three protocols were used. In the at-home bleaching group (n = 30), opalescence non-PF (potassium nitrate and fluoride) bleaching agent (10% carbamide peroxide) was applied onto the teeth daily for 14 days and left for 8 h each day. Teeth in the in-office group (n = 30) were treated twice in consecutive days with Opalescence boost PF (40% hydrogen peroxide). After bleaching, the specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 day before bonding. SBS testing was performed on all teeth using Instron universal testing machine. Analysis of variance indicated a significant difference (P brackets in control group (Ib) and minimum was shown by composite brackets of in-office bleached group (IIIc). The results showed that at-home bleaching did not affect the SBS significantly whereas in-office bleaching reduced SBS of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets significantly. It is preferable to use metal or ceramic brackets than composite brackets for bonding 24 h after bleaching.

  10. Effect of newer antioxidants on the bond strength of composite on bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Manoharan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study aims to evaluate the effect of the application of two antioxidants on the bond strength of composite resin to bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Eighty enamel surfaces were obtained from forty human extracted premolars. Specimens were randomly divided into four groups (n = 20. Group 1: No bleaching (control; Group 2a: Bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide gel; Group 2b: Bleaching, followed by application of 10% sodium ascorbate gel; Group 2c: Bleaching, followed by application of 5% proanthocyanidin agent. Surfaces were etched followed by application of total etch bonding system, and composite resin cylinders were bonded. Specimens were tested for shear bond strength. Statistical Analysis Used: One-way analysis of variance was used for multiple group comparison and post hoc Tukey′s test for individual group-wise comparison. Results: Significantly higher shear bond strength values were observed in Group 2c and 2b as compared with Group 1 and 2a (P < 0.05. Among the antioxidants, Group 2c showed significantly higher shear bond strength values than Group 2b (P < 0.05. Conclusion: It can be concluded that the use of antioxidant before bonding procedures on bleached enamel completely neutralizes the deleterious effects of bleaching and increases the bond strength significantly.

  11. Kraft pulp bleaching with molybdenum activated acid peroxide (P{sub Mo} stage); Branqueamento de polpa celulosica kraft de eucalipto com peroxido acido ativado por molibdenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Marcos Sousa [Servico Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial (SENAI), Lauro de Freitas, BA (Brazil). Dept. Regional da Bahia; Silva, Vanessa Lopes; Barros, Denise Pires de; Colodette, Jorge Luiz [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Florestal; Sacon, Vera Maria; Silva, Marcelo Rodrigues da [Votorantim Celulose e Papel, Jacarei, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Optimum conditions to run the P{sub Mo} stage for bleaching eucalyptus kraft pulp were 90 deg C, pH 3.5, 2 h, 0.1 kg/t Mo and 5 kg/t H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The P{sub Mo} stage efficiency increased with decreasing pH (1.5-5.5) and increasing temperature (75-90 deg C), time (2-4 h), and hydrogen peroxide (3-10 kg/t) and molybdenum concentration (0.1-0.4 kg/t). The implementation of the P{sub Mo} stage, as replacement for the A stage, decreased total active chlorine demand of the OAZDP sequence by 6 kg/t to reach 90% ISO, both in laboratory and mill scale. Such practice resulted in decreased bleaching chemical costs to produce fully bleached pulp of 90% ISO. (author)

  12. Influence of Enamel Thickness on Bleaching Efficacy: An In-Depth Color Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Públio, Juliana do Carmo; D'Arce, Maria Beatriz Freitas; Catelan, Anderson; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lovadino, José Roberto; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of different enamel thicknesses and bleaching agents on treatment efficacy in-depth by spectrophotometry color analysis. Eighty bovine dental fragments were previously stained in black tea solution and randomly assigned into eight groups (n=10), 1.75mm dentin thickness and different enamel thicknesses as follows: 0.5mm, 1.0mm planned, 1.0mm unplanned (aprismatic enamel), and absence of enamel. The 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface following the manufacturer's recommendations. Color of underlying dentin was evaluated at four times: after staining with tea (baseline) and after each one of the three weeks of bleaching treatment, by CIE L*a*b* system using reflectance spectrophotometer (CM 700d, Konica Minolta). The ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb values were recorded and subjected to repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). The results showed an increase on lightness (L*), with decreased redness (a*) and yellowness (b*). At first and second week, bleaching with CP showed higher whitening effectiveness compared to bleaching with HP and the presence of aprismatic enamel significantly reduced ΔE for bleaching with CP. After three weeks of bleaching, few differences were observed between CP and HP groups, and outer enamel layer caused no influence on bleaching effectiveness. Overall, both at-home and in-office bleaching treatments were effective and the presence of aprismatic enamel did not interfere on the whitening efficacy.

  13. Effect of dental bleaching after bracket bonding and debonding using three different adhesive systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucianna de Oliveira Gomes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the influence of bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets on dental in-home bleaching, taking into account three different adhesive systems. METHODS: Forty-four bovine incisors were divided into four groups according to the primer system used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Following the debonding of orthodontic brackets, the teeth were stored in staining solution for 96 hours. Then, teeth were whitened using 10% carbamide peroxide for two weeks at a 6-hour-a-day regime. Standardized digital photographs were taken at the following intervals: T0 (initial; T1 (after debonding; T2 (after pigmentation; T3, T4 and T5 representing 1, 7, and 14 days of bleaching. Repeatability and stability tests were carried out to check the method accuracy. Images were analyzed using Adobe Photoshop 7.0 software considering (L*a*b*color coordinate values and a modified color difference total (Δ;E'. RESULTS: The results of this study (ANOVA and Tukey; p < 0.01 demonstrated that after 7 days of bleaching, experimental groups showed significantly less teeth whitening compared to the control group. However, there were no significant color differences between the groups after 14 days, according to values of lightness (L*. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the adhesive primer system applied, bonding and debonding of orthodontic brackets alters the outcome of tooth whitening in the first 7 days of bleaching, however it has no influence on the whitening of the dental structure after 14 days of in-home dental bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide.

  14. Effects of bleaching agents on human enamel light reflectance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovic, Ljubisa; Fotouhi, Kasra; Lorenz, Heribert; Jordan, Rainer A; Gaengler, Peter; Zimmer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Tooth whitening has been associated with splitting-up chromogenic molecules by hydrogen peroxides. Though micromorphological alterations are well documented, little is known about optical changes as a function of shifting in wavelengths. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to measure reflectance changes after bleaching in vitro by using a spectrometer. Forty-eight enamel slabs (diameter = 5 mm) were prepared from the sound enamel of extracted human teeth that were: 1) fully impacted, 2) from juveniles ages 10 to 16 years, 3) from adults 35 to 45 years of age and 4) from seniors older than age 65. In all specimens, the baseline total reflectance measurement was performed with a computer-assisted spectrometer (Ocean Optics, Dunedin, FL, USA) within wavelengths (wl) from 430 nm to 800 nm. Four enamel samples of each age group were exposed to either 10% or 15% carbamide peroxide (Illuminé Home, Dentsply, Konstanz, Germany) or 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office, SDI Limited, Victoria, Australia). After surface treatment, all slabs underwent total reflectance measurement again. Statistical analysis was calculated at wl 450, 500 and 750 nm using the Student's paired t-test and one-way variance analysis. Total reflectance significantly increased after bleaching at all enamel maturation stages, irrespective of the bleaching agent concentration, for wl 450 nm (blue) and 500 nm (green) with penamel from adults and seniors (pwhitening of the dental enamel works at different maturation stages, even in impacted teeth. This effect is irrespective of the bleaching protocol used and the bleaching agent concentration.

  15. Effectiveness of and Dental Sensitivity to At-home Bleaching With 4% and 10% Hydrogen Peroxide: A Randomized, Triple-blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemin, K; Rezende, M; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A; Kossatz, S

    To evaluate the risk for and intensity of tooth sensitivity and color change of at-home dental bleaching with 4% and 10% hydrogen peroxide (HP). For this study, 78 patients were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria and randomized into two groups: HP 4 (White Class 4%, FGM) and HP 10 (White Class 10%, FGM). In both groups, the at-home bleaching was performed for a period of 30 minutes twice a day for two weeks. The color was assessed by Vita Classical, Vita Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER and spectrophotometer Vita Easyshade (Vita Zahnfabrik) at baseline, during bleaching (first and second weeks) and after bleaching (one month). Patients recorded their tooth sensitivity using a numeric rating scale (0-4) and visual analog scale (0-10). Data from color change (DeltaE data) was submitted to two-way analysis of variance. The color change data in Delta SGU from the two shade guide units were compared with the Mann Whitney test. The risk of tooth sensitivity was evaluated by χ 2 test and the intensity of tooth sensitivity from both scales was evaluated by a Mann-Whitney test (α=0.05). The absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity was higher in the group that used HP 10 than the one that used HP 4. Data from change in the number of shade guide units and color variation after one month of bleaching for both groups showed significant whitening, with no difference between groups. At-home bleaching is effective with 4% and 10% HP concentrations, but 10% HP increased the absolute risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity during at-home bleaching.

  16. Does the hybrid light source (LED/laser) influence temperature variation on the enamel surface during 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching? A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Patricia Moreira; Menezes, Andressa Nery; da Mota, Ana Carolina Costa; Simões, Alyne; Mendes, Fausto Medeiros; Lago, Andrea Dias Neves; Ferreira, Leila Soares; Ramos-Oliveira, Thayanne Monteiro

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated how a hybrid light source (LED/laser) influences temperature variation on the enamel surfaces during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching. Effects on the whitening effectiveness and tooth sensitivity were analyzed. Twenty-two volunteers were randomly assigned to two different treatments in a split-mouth experimental model: group 1 (control), 35% HP; group 2 (experimental), 35% HP + LED/laser. Color evaluation was performed before treatment, and 7 and 14 days after completion of bleaching, using a color shade scale. Tooth sensitivity was assessed using a visual analog scale (VAS; before, immediately, and 24 hours after bleaching). During the bleaching treatment, thermocouple channels positioned on the tooth surfaces recorded the temperature. Data on color and temperature changes were subjected to statistical analysis (α = 5%). Tooth sensitivity data were evaluated descriptively. Groups 1 and 2 showed mean temperatures (± standard deviation) of 30.7 ± 1.2 °C and 34.1 ± 1.3 °C, respectively. It was found that there were statistically significant differences between the groups, with group 2 showing higher mean variation (P enamel surface. The color change results showed no differences in bleaching between the two treatment groups (P = .177). The variation of the average temperature during the treatments was not statistically associated with color variation (P = .079). Immediately after bleaching, it was found that 36.4% of the subjects in group 2 had mild to moderate sensitivity. In group 1, 45.5% showed moderate sensitivity. In both groups, the sensitivity ceased within 24 hours. Hybrid light source (LED/ laser) influences temperature variation on the enamel surface during 35% HP bleaching and is not related to greater tooth sensitivity.

  17. Effect of bleaching agent extracts on murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Aletéia M M; Vilela, Polyana G F; Valera, Marcia C; Bolay, Carola; Hiller, Karl Anton; Schweikl, Helmut; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity and the influence of bleaching agents on immunologically cell surface antigens of murine macrophages in vitro. RAW 264.7 cells were exposed to bleaching gel extracts (40% hydrogen peroxide or 20% carbamide peroxide) and different H 2 O 2 concentrations after 1 and 24-h exposure periods and 1-h exposure and 23-h recovery. Tests were performed with and without N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The expression of surface markers CD14, CD40, and CD54 with and without LPS stimulation was detected by flow cytometry, while the production of TNF-α was measured by ELISA. Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test (α = 0.05). Extracts of bleaching agents were cytotoxic for cells after a 1-h exposure; cells could not recover after 24 h. This effect can be mitigated by the antioxidant NAC and increased by BSO, an inhibitor of glutathione (GSH) synthesis. LPS stimulated expression of all surface markers and TNF-α production. Exposure to bleaching agent extracts and H 2 O 2 leads to a reduction of TNF-α, CD14, and CD40 expression, while the expression of CD54 was upregulated at non-cytotoxic concentrations. Whereas NAC reduced this effect, it was increased in the presence of BSO. Extracts of bleaching agents were irreversibly cytotoxic to macrophages after a 1-h exposure. Only the expression of CD54 was upregulated. The reactions are mediated by the non-enzymatic antioxidant GSH. The addition of an antioxidant can downregulate unfavorable effects of dental bleaching.

  18. Effect of tooth bleaching agents on protein content and mechanical properties of dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Bertassoni, Luiz E; Charadram, Nattida; Rathsam, Catherine; Swain, Michael V

    2015-07-01

    This study investigated the effect of two bleaching agents, 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) and 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), on the mechanical properties and protein content of human enamel from freshly extracted teeth. The protein components of control and treated enamel were extracted and examined on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Marked reduction of the protein matrix and random fragmentation of the enamel proteins after bleaching treatments was found. The mechanical properties were analyzed with Vickers indentations to characterize fracture toughness, and nanoindentation to establish enamel hardness, elastic modulus and creep deformation. Results indicate that the hardness and elastic modulus of enamel were significantly reduced after treatment with CP and HP. After bleaching, the creep deformation at maximum load increased and the recovery upon unloading reduced. Crack lengths of CP and HP treated enamel were increased, while fracture toughness decreased. Additionally, the microstructures of fractured and indented samples were examined with field emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM) showing distinct differences in the fracture surface morphology between pre- and post-bleached enamel. In conclusion, tooth bleaching agents can produce detrimental effects on the mechanical properties of enamel, possibly as a consequence of damaging or denaturing of its protein components. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Tooth sensitivity with a desensitizing-containing at-home bleaching gel-a randomized triple-blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maran, Bianca Medeiros; Vochikovski, Laína; de Andrade Hortkoff, Diego Rafael; Stanislawczuk, Rodrigo; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-05-01

    Desensitizing agents are usually included in the composition of bleaching agents to reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity (TS). This randomized clinical trial (RCT) evaluated the risk and intensity of TS and color change after at-home bleaching with a desensitizing-containing (3% potassium nitrate and 0.2% sodium fluoride) and desensitizing-free 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel (Whiteness Perfect, FGM). A triple-blind, within-person RCT was conducted on 60 caries-free adult patients. Each participant used the gel in a bleaching tray for 3 h daily for 21 days in both the upper and lower dental arches. The absolute risk and intensity of TS were assessed daily through the 0-10 VAS and NRS scale for 21 days. Color change was recorded using shade guides (Vita Classical and Vita Bleachedguide) and the Easyshade spectrophotometer at baseline, weekly and 30 days after the end of the bleaching. The risk and intensity of TS were evaluated by the McNemar and Wilcoxon Signed Rank tests, respectively. Color change (ΔSGU and ΔE) were evaluated by the Mann-Whitney test and a paired t-test, respectively (α = 0.05). No difference in the TS and color change was observed (p > 0.05). The incorporation of potassium nitrate and sodium fluoride in 10% carbamide peroxide at-home bleaching gel tested in this study did not reduce the TS and did not affect color change (RBR-4M6YR2). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro colorimetric evaluation of the efficacy of home bleaching and over-the-counter bleaching products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietschi, Didier; Benbachir, Nacer; Krejci, Ivo

    2010-06-01

    Various bleaching modalities are now offered to patients, either monitored by the dental office or self-directed, for which relative efficiency is unknown. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the ability of bleaching products and protocols to lighten enamel and dentin. Bovine tooth specimens of standardized thickness (2.5 +/- 0.025 mm with similar dentin and enamel thickness) were prepared and stained with whole blood and hemolysate before being submitted to seven supervised or self-directed bleaching regimens: tray-based bleaching using 10% (Opalescence, Ultradent; Nite White, Discus Dental) or light-activated 30% (Metatray, Metatray) carbamide peroxide (CP); 6% (Zoom, Discus Dental) or 9% (TresWhite, Ultradent) hydrogen peroxide (HP); strips (Whitening Strips, Oral B-Rembrandt); and paint-on gel (Paint on Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent) containing 8.1% and 6% HP, respectively. Colorimetric measurements were performed on each specimen side, according to the CIE L*a*b* system, before and after staining, as well as after 5, 10, and the recommended number of bleaching applications. Color change after recommended number of applications (DEr) varied from 15.72 (Metatray) to 29.67 (Nite White) at enamel and 14.91 (Paint on Plus) to 41.43 (Nite White) at dentin side; Nite White (10% CP) and TresWhite (9% HP) were more effective than Metatray (30% CP) and Paint on Plus (6% HP) after 5 or the recommended number of applications. In this in vitro study based on bovine teeth, tray-based systems produced the faster and better bleaching effect, regardless of the product and concentration used, at both enamel and dentin sides.

  1. Fracture resistance of teeth submitted to several internal bleaching protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo, Renato de Toledo; Kuga, Milton Carlos; Guiotti, Flávia Angélica; Andolfatto, Carolina; Faria-Júnior, Norberto Batista de; Campos, Edson Alves de; Keine, Kátia Cristina; Dantas, Andrea Abi Rached

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to several internal bleaching protocols using 35% hydrogen peroxide (35HP), 37% carbamide peroxide (37CP), 15% hydrogen peroxide with titanium dioxide nanoparticles (15HPTiO2) photoactivated by LED-laser or sodium perborate (SP). After endodontic treatment, fifty bovine extracted teeth were divided into five groups (n = 10): G1-unbleached; G2-35HP; G3-37CP; G4-15HPTiO2 photoactivated by LED-laser and G5-SP. In the G2 and G4, the bleaching protocol was applied in 4 sessions, with 7 days intervals between each session. In the G3 and G5, the materials were kept in the pulp teeth for 21 days, but replaced every 7 days. After 21 days, the teeth were subjected to compressive load at a cross head speed of 0.5 mm/min, applied at 135° to the long axis of the root using an eletromechanical testing machine, until teeth fracture. The data were submitted to ANOVA and Tukey tests (α = 5%). The 35HP, 37CP, 15HPTiO2 and SP showed similar fracture resistance teeth reduction (p > 0.05). All bleaching treatments reduced the fracture resistance compared to unbleached teeth (p endodontically-treated teeth, but there were no differences between each other. There are several internal bleaching protocols using hydrogen peroxide in different concentrations and activation methods. This study evaluated its effects on fracture resistance in endodontically-treated teeth.

  2. In-Vitro Comparative Study of In-office and Home Bleaching Agents on Surface Micro-morphology of Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nazish

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent with 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on surface micro-morphology of enamel. An experimental study. The discs were prepared at Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, and surface morphology was analyzed at Centralized Science Laboratory of Karachi University, Pakistan. Duration of study was one year from January to December 2012. Forty five sound human third molar crowns, extracted for periodontal reason, were included in the study. Longitudinal sections were made using diamond disks (0.2 mm) under water lubrication to obtain enamel slabs measuring (3 mm x 3 mm). The slabs were embedded in polystyrene resin by using 2.0 cm diameter PVC molds, leaving the outer enamel surface uncovered by the resin. Ninety dental enamel slabs were prepared. The slabs were then randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained thirty specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator (Memart, Germany) during whole experiment. Group 2 was treated with power whitening gel (White Smile 2011, Germany). Group 3 was treated with tooth whitening pen (White Smile 2011, Germany). The most central region or the region that was most representative of the entire surface area was used. The SEM (Jeol-Japan-JSM6380A, JAPAN) micrographs were examined to determine the type of surface presented. The enamel changes were classified as no or mild alteration, moderate alteration and severe altered surface. Regarding micro-morphology, the enamel surface of control groups showed smooth surface in general with some scattered clear scratches due to the polishing procedure. The specimens bleached in group 2 and group 3, represented areas of mild erosion. Bleaching with 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) and 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) resulted in mild changes in surface micro-morphology of enamel.

  3. Influence of bleaching agents on the microhardness of nanoparticle resin composite

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    Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of bleaching agents on the microhardness of nanoparticle resin composite. Methods: Twenty-eight cylindrical test specimens (8x1mm of FiltekTM Supreme XT resin (3M/ESPE were prepared and divided into 5 groups. The initial Vickers microhardness was measured (load of 50 grams force for 30 seconds on the top surface of the test specimens. The groupswere treated and divided as follows: G1 – artificial saliva (21 days - control; G2 - 7% hydrogen peroxide gel applied for 4h/day, for 14 days; G3 - 10% carbamide peroxide for 4h/day, for 14 days: G4 – 35% hydrogen peroxide gel applied in three sessions of 30 minutes each, with an interval of one week (21 days between the sessions; G5 - 35% carbamide peroxide, three sessions of 30 minutes each, with an interval of one week (21 days between the sessions. The top surfaces of the test specimens received treatment and were submitted to the Vickers microhardness test. Results: The results obtained were submitted to the Analysis of Variance at a fixed criterion, at a level of significance of p=0.05. No significant differences were observed among the treatments tested (p=0.42 when compared with G1. Significant differences (Tukey test were found when the initial microhardness values were compared with the values after experimental treatments (p<0.01. Conclusion: The application of bleaching agents did not alter the microhardness of resin composites. Therefore, there is no need to change restorations after bleaching.

  4. Longevity, Esthetic Perception, and Psychosocial Impact of Teeth Bleaching by Low (6%) Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration for In-office Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, E; Bersezio, C; Bottner, J; Avalos, F; Godoy, I; Inda, D; Vildósola, P; Saad, Jrc; Oliveira, O B; Martín, J

    The aim was to evaluate the color longevity after nine months of in-office bleaching with gel (6% hydrogen peroxide), to compare this to a control concentration of 35% in a split-mouth study model, and to assess the dental confidence and psychosocial impact on patients. Twenty-seven patients were assessed at the nine-month recall. The bleaching procedure with 6% or 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was performed randomly in the upper hemi-arch of each patient. The color was measured at baseline and at one week, one month, and nine months after the procedure, using the Vita Easyshade spectrophotometer, the Vita classical shade guide organized by value, and Vita Bleach Guide 3DMaster. Moreover, two surveys, OHIP-Esthetics and PIDAQ, were used to assess the esthetic self-perception and psychosocial impact of the bleaching procedure. During the nine-month recall, the color was assessed before and after dental prophylaxis. Twenty-seven patients participated in the nine-month recall. There was a significant difference in ΔE between the two groups at all times assessed (p0.20). There was no significant difference in ΔSGU at all times (p>0.05). There was a significant difference in OHIP-Esthetics and PIDAQ sums compared with baseline scores (p<0.03). The two compounds remained effective at nine months, with a slight rebound of color, and maintained their objective color difference but not the subjective color difference. Patients were satisfied with the bleaching procedure, and this had a positive impact on esthetic perception and a positive psychosocial impact at the nine-month recall.

  5. Effect of Home Bleaching on Microleakage of Fiber-reinforced and Particle-filled Composite Resins

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    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching may exert some negative effects on existing composite resin restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of home bleaching on microleakage of fiber-reinforced and particle-filled composite resins. Materials and methods. Ninety class V cavities (1.5×2×3 mm were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 90 bovine teeth. The teeth were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=15 and restored as follows: Groups 1 and 2 with Z100, groups 3 and 4 with Z250, and groups 5 and 6 with Nulite F composite resins. All the specimens were thermocycled. Groups 1, 3 and 5 were selected as control groups (without bleaching and the experimental groups 2, 4 and 6 were bleached with 22% carbamide peroxide gel. All the samples were immersed in 2% basic fuchsin dye for 24 hours and then sectioned longitudinally. Dye penetration was evaluated under a stereomicroscope (×25, at both the gingival and incisal margins. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (α=0.05. Results. Statistical analyses revealed that bleaching gel increased microleakage only at gingival margins with Z250 (P=0.007. Moreover, the control groups showed a statistically significant difference in microleakage at their gingival margins. Nulite F had the maximum microleakage while Z250 showed the minimum (P=0.006. Conclusion. Microleakage of home-bleached restorations might be related to the type of composite resin used.

  6. High-performance liquid chromatography method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching kits and hair cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Pascal; Bousquet, Claudine; Lassu, Nelly; Maggio, Annie-Françoise; Civade, Corinne; Brenier, Charlotte; Lempereur, Laurent

    2015-03-25

    This manuscript presents an HPLC/UV method for the determination of hydrogen peroxide present or released in teeth bleaching products and hair products. The method is based on an oxidation of triphenylphosphine into triphenylphosphine oxide by hydrogen peroxide. Triphenylphosphine oxide formed is quantified by HPLC/UV. Validation data were obtained using the ISO 12787 standard approach, particularly adapted when it is not possible to make reconstituted sample matrices. For comparative purpose, hydrogen peroxide was also determined using ceric sulfate titrimetry for both types of products. For hair products, a cross validation of both ceric titrimetric method and HPLC/UV method using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive (official iodometric titration method) was performed. Results obtained for 6 commercialized teeth whitening products and 5 hair products point out similar hydrogen peroxide contain using either the HPLC/UV method or ceric sulfate titrimetric method. For hair products, results were similar to the hydrogen peroxide content using the cosmetic 82/434/EEC directive method and for the HPLC/UV method, mean recoveries obtained on spiked samples, using the ISO 12787 standard, ranges from 100% to 110% with a RSDhydrogen peroxide contents higher than the regulated limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of Different Anti-Oxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resins to Bleached Human Enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladi, Hari Krishna; Bollu, Indira Priyadarshini; Burla, Devipriya; Ballullaya, Srinidhi Vishnu; Devalla, Srihari; Maroli, Sohani; Jayaprakash, Thumu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The bond strength of the composite to the bleached enamel plays a very important role in the success and longevity of an aesthetic restoration. Aim The aim of this study was to compare and evaluate the effect of Aloe Vera with 10% Sodium Ascorbate on the Shear bond strength of composite resin to bleached human enamel. Materials and Methods Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into 5 groups. Group I and V are unbleached and bleached controls groups respectively. Group II, III, IV served as experimental groups. The labial surfaces of groups II, III, IV, V were treated with 35% Carbamide Peroxide for 30mins. Group II specimens were subjected to delayed composite bonding. Group III and IV specimens were subjected to application of 10% Sodium Ascorbate and leaf extract of Aloe Vera following the Carbamide Peroxide bleaching respectively. Specimens were subjected to shear bond strength using universal testing machine and the results were statistically analysed using ANOVA test. Tukey (HSD) Honest Significant Difference test was used to comparatively analyse statistical differences between the groups. A p-value <0.05 is taken as statistically significant. Results The mean shear bond strength values of Group V showed significantly lower bond strengths than Groups I, II, III, IV (p-value <0.05). There was no statistically significant difference between the shear bond strength values of groups I, II, III, IV. Conclusion Treatment of the bleached enamel surface with Aloe Vera and 10% Sodium Ascorbate provided consistently better bond strength. Aloe Vera may be used as an alternative to 10% Sodium Ascorbate. PMID:26674656

  8. In Vitro Comparative Study of Two Different Bleaching Agents on Micro-hardness Dental Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nazish; Ali Abidi, Syed Yawar; Meo, Ashraf Ali

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent containing 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on enamel micro-hardness. An in vitroexperimental study. Department of Operative Dentistry and Science of Dental Materials at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences and Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from July to December 2014. Atotal of 90 enamel slabs from 45 sound human 3rd molar were randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained 30 specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator during the whole experiment. However, Groups 2 and 3 were treated with power whitening gel and tooth whitening pen respectively. After bleaching session, specimens were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water again for 10 seconds and then stored in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator. Artificial saliva was changed after every 2 days. The Vickers hardness tester (Wolpert 402 MVD, Germany) was adjusted to a load of 0.1 kg (100 gm) and dwell time of 5 seconds. Three Vickers were performed on each specimen using a hardness tester according to the ISO 6507-3:1998 specification. Micro-hardness measurements were performed before and after bleaching at day 1, 7 and 14. In the control group, the baseline micro-hardness was 181.1 ±9.3 which was reduced after the storage on day 1, 7 and 14 (p = 0.104). In Group 2, baseline micro-hardness was 180.4 ±10.1 which was reduced to 179.79 ±10.0 units after day 1. Whereas, on day 7 and 14, the values of micro-hardness were 179.8 ±10 and 179.7 ±10.29, respectively (p=0.091). Furthermore, the baseline micro-hardness in Group 3 was 174.0 ±22.9 units which was reduced to 173 ±23 on day 1, 170 ±30 on day 7 and 173 ±23 on day 14 (p = 0.256). The statistically insignificant difference was found among micro-hardness values of different bleaching

  9. In Vitro Comparative Study of Two Different Bleaching Agents on Micro-hardness Dental Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, N.; Abidi, S. Y. A.; Meo, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16 percentage Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent containing 38 percentage Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on enamel micro-hardness. Study Design: An in vitro experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Operative Dentistry and Science of Dental Materials at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences and Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from July to December 2014. Methodology: A total of 90 enamel slabs from 45 sound human 3rd molar were randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained 30 specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37 Degree C in incubator during the whole experiment. However, Groups 2 and 3 were treated with power whitening gel and tooth whitening pen respectively. After bleaching session, specimens were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water again for 10 seconds and then stored in artificial saliva at 37 Degree C in incubator. Artificial saliva was changed after every 2 days. The Vickers hardness tester (Wolpert 402 MVD, Germany) was adjusted to a load of 0.1 kg (100 gm) and dwell time of 5 seconds. Three Vickers were performed on each specimen using a hardness tester according to the ISO 6507-3:1998 specification. Micro-hardness measurements were performed before and after bleaching at day 1, 7 and 14. Results: In the control group, the baseline micro-hardness was 181.1 ± 9.3 which was reduced after the storage on day 1, 7 and 14 (p = 0.104). In Group 2, baseline micro-hardness was 180.4 ±10.1 which was reduced to 179.79 ± 10.0 units after day 1. Whereas, on day 7 and 14, the values of micro-hardness were 179.8 ±10 and 179.7 ±10.29, respectively (p=0.091). Furthermore, the baseline micro-hardness in Group 3 was 174.0 ±22.9 units which was reduced to 173 ± 23 on day 1, 170 ±30 on day 7 and 173 ± 23 on day 14 (p = 0

  10. Effect of sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of silorane and methacrylate composites after vital bleaching

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    Eda Guler

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effect of sodium ascorbate (SA on the microtensile bond strengths (MTBSs of different composites to bovine enamel after vital bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (HP or carbamide peroxide (CP. Thirty bovine incisors were randomly divided into five groups and treated with no bleaching application (control, 35% HP alone, 35% HP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (HP + SA, 16% CP alone, or 16% CP + 10% SA for 10 minutes (CP + SA. Specimens were restored with Silorane adhesive and Filtek Silorane composite (designated as S / group or with Clearfil SE bond and Filtek Supreme XT (designated as F / group. Composite build-up was created on the enamel. Sectioned specimens (n = 10 per group; 1 mm2; cross-sectional area were created and stressed in a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. The application of 10% SA immediately after bleaching with 16% CP or 35% HP increased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used. The resulting MTBS values were similar to those of the control groups. Use of 16% CP and 35% HP alone decreased the enamel MTBS, regardless of the adhesive / composite resin used, with F / CP + SA = F / HP + SA = F / CP = S / CP + SA = S / HP + SA = S / C > S / CP = S / HP = F / CP = F / HP (p < 0.05. We concluded that the application of SA for 10 minutes immediately after vital bleaching increases the enamel BS for dimethacrylate- and silorane-based composites

  11. Acid demineralization susceptibility of dental enamel submitted to different bleaching techniques and fluoridation regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomão, Dlf; Santos, Dm; Nogueira, Rd; Palma-Dibb, Rg; Geraldo-Martins, Vr

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to assess the acid demineralization susceptibility of bleached dental enamel submitted to different fluoride regimens. One hundred bovine enamel blocks (6×6×3 mm) were randomly divided into 10 groups (n=10). Groups 1 and 2 received no bleaching. Groups 3 to 6 were submitted to an at-home bleaching technique using 6% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3 and G4) or 10% carbamide peroxide (CP; G5 and G6). Groups 7 to 10 were submitted to an in-office bleaching technique using 35% HP (G7 and G8) or 35% CP (G9 and G10). During bleaching, a daily fluoridation regimen of 0.05% sodium fluoride (NaF) solution was performed on groups 3, 5, 7, and 9, while weekly fluoridation with a 2% NaF gel was performed on groups 4, 6, 8, and 10. The samples in groups 2 to 10 were pH cycled for 14 consecutive days. The samples from all groups were then assessed by cross-sectional Knoop microhardness at different depths from the outer enamel surface. The average Knoop hardness numbers (KHNs) were compared using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey tests (α=0.05). The comparison between groups 1 and 2 showed that the demineralization method was effective. The comparison among groups 2 to 6 showed the same susceptibility to acid demineralization, regardless of the fluoridation method used. However, the samples from groups 8 and 10 showed more susceptibility to acid demineralization when compared with group 2 (penamel to acid demineralization. However, the use of 35% HP and 35% CP must be associated with a daily fluoridation regimen, otherwise the in-office bleaching makes the bleached enamel more susceptible to acid demineralization.

  12. Effect of bleaching on mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzyme activities: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Filiz Yalcin; Ergin, Esra; Gurgan, Sevil; Sabuncuoglu, Suna; Arpa, Cigdem Sahin; Tokgoz, İlknur; Ozgunes, Hilal; Kiremitci, Arlin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot clinical study was to determine the mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzyme activities (Superoxide Dismutase [SOD] and Catalase[CAT] ) in body fluids after exposure to two different vital tooth bleaching systems. Twenty eight subjects with an average age of 25.6 years (18-41) having at least two but not more than four Class II amalgam fillings on each quadrant arch in the mouth participated in the study. Baseline concentrations of mercury levels in whole blood, urine, and saliva were measured by a Vapor Generation Accessory connected to an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Erythrocyte enzymes, SOD, and CAT activities in blood were determined kinetically. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of 14 volunteers. Group 1 was treated with an at-home bleaching system (Opalescence PF 35% Carbamide Peroxide, Ultradent), and Group 2 was treated with a chemically activated office bleaching system (Opalescence Xtra Boost 38% Hydrogen Peroxide, Ultradent) according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Twenty-four hours after bleaching treatments, concentrations of mercury and enzymes were remeasured. There were no significant differences on mercury levels in blood, urine, and saliva before and after bleaching treatments (p > 0.05). No differences were also found in the level of antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD and CAT) before and after treatments (p > 0.05). Mercury release did not affect the enzyme activities (p > 0.05). Bleaching treatments either office or home did not affect the amount of mercury released from amalgam fillings in blood, urine, and saliva and the antioxidant-enzyme activities in blood. Bleaching treatments with the systems tested in this pilot study have no deleterious effect on the mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzymes in body fluids. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A review of the effect of vital teeth bleaching on the mechanical properties of tooth enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfallah, Hunida M; Swain, Michael V

    2013-09-01

    Tooth whitening is considered the easiest and most cost-effective procedure for treating tooth discoloration. Contemporary bleaching agents contain hydrogen peroxide as the active ingredient. It is either applied directly or produced from its precursor, carbamide peroxide. A review of the published literature was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effects of whitening products on dental enamel, with a focus on its mechanical properties and the influence of various parameters on study outcomes. There appear to be considerable differences in opinion as to whether changes in mechanical properties occur as a result of tooth whitening. However, the mechanical property findings of those studies appear to be related to the load applied during the indentation tests. Most studies which used loads higher than 500mN to determine enamel hardness showed no effect of bleaching, whereas those using lower loads were able to detect hardness reduction in the surface layer of enamel. In conclusion, bleaching reduces the hardness of the enamel surface of enamel, and that is more readily detected with instrumented low load testing systems. This hardness reduction may arise due to degradation or denaturation of enamel matrix proteins by the peroxide oxidation.

  14. Effect of Home Bleaching on the Translucency of CAD/CAM Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karci, Muhammet; Demir, Necla

    2017-11-10

    To evaluate the effect of a home bleaching agent (Opalescence PF) on the translucency of CAD/CAM ceramic systems. The 28 sintered ceramic specimens (IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD; 15 mm long, 10 mm wide, 1 mm thick) were divided into two subgroups as control and bleaching groups (n = 7). Carbamide peroxide (CP), 16%, home bleaching agent was applied onto the surface of each specimen for 6 hours per day for 7 days. A spectrophotometer (VITA Easyshade Advance) was used to measure the CIE L * a * b * coordinates and the reflectance value (Y) of the specimens on white and black backgrounds. The translucency parameter (TP), contrast ratio (CR), and opalescence parameter (OP) of the specimens were calculated. The data were statistically analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's test, and Pearson's correlation. Statistically significant differences in the TP values after 16% CP bleaching treatment were observed (p ˂ 0.05); however, no significant differences were found in the OP and CR values after the surface treatment (p ˃ 0.05). According to our study, patients who have all-ceramic restorations in their mouths should be careful when using home bleaching agents, because whitening agents can affect the translucency of all-ceramic restorations such as e.max CAD and Empress CAD. © 2017 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  15. Enamel Mineral Content Changes After Bleaching With High and Low Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrations: Colorimetric Spectrophotometry and Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Avd; Bridi, E C; Amaral, Flb; França, Fmg; Turssi, C P; Pérez, C A; Martinez, E F; Flório, F M; Basting, R T

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the calcium (Ca) and phosphorous (P) content in enamel bleached with high and low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) using Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TXRF) and colorimetric spectrophotometry (SPEC). Forty-eight sound human third molars were used. Their roots were embedded in polystyrene resin and immersed for seven days in an artificial saliva solution. Then they were distributed into six groups to receive the bleaching treatments. The agents of high HP concentration (for in-office use) evaluated were Whiteness HP Maxx/FGM (35% HP), Whiteness HP Blue/FGM (35% HP, 2% calcium gluconate), Pola Office+/SDI (37.5% HP, 5% potassium nitrate), and Opalescence Boost/Ultradent (38% HP, 1.1% ion fluoride, 3% potassium nitrate); these agents were applied to enamel in three sessions. The agents of low HP concentration (for home use) evaluated were Pola Day/SDI (9.5% HP) and White Class 10%/FGM (10% HP, potassium nitrate, calcium, fluoride), and these agents were applied for 14 days. Enamel microbiopsies were evaluated by TXRF and SPEC analysis before the bleaching treatment (baseline), during the treatment, and 14 days after the end of the treatment. For TXRF, the Kruskal-Wallis test showed that Ca and P were not influenced by agent (p>0.05). For SPEC, Pola Office+, Opalescence Boost, Pola Day, and White Class 10% caused a decrease of Ca over time; there was a significant decrease of P over time to Pola Office+ and White Class 10%. The Spearman test showed no correlation between the Ca (p=0.987; r 2 =-0.020) and P (p=0.728, r 2 =0.038) obtained by SPEC and TXRF. For TXRF and SPEC, changes in Ca and P during bleaching occurred independently of the HP concentration used.

  16. In-office tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide promotes moderate/severe pulp inflammation and production of ll-1β, TNF-β, GPX, FGF-2 and osteocalcin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Costa, Renata Suellen Galvão da; Ribeiro, Andressa Eveline de Lima; Assunção, Isauremi Vieira de; Araújo Júnior, Raimundo Fernandes de; Araújo, Aurigena Antunes de; Guerra, Gerlane Coelho Bernardo; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra

    2018-06-11

    To study the intensity of inflammatory infiltrate and production of interleukin-1β (ll-1β), tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF-β), fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and osteocalcin in response to in-office tooth bleaching in rats. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n=5) according to the received treatment (tooth bleaching or no treatment - control) and the period of euthanasia after treatment (24 h or 10 days). We performed tooth bleaching using a 38% hydrogen peroxide gel on maxillary and mandibular incisors. After euthanasia, incisors (20 per group) were processed for histological analysis, immunohistochemistry staining of ll-1β, TNF-β, FGF-2 and GPX and osteocalcin by immunofluorescence. We analyzed data using the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn tests (p<0.05). The bleached groups presented statistically significant differences regarding the pulp inflammation stage compared with the control groups. Bleached teeth showed moderate/severe inflammatory infiltrate and control groups presented absent inflammatory cells or a negligible number of mononuclear cells (p<0.001) at two times (24 h and 10 days). There was strong staining for ll-1β, TNF-β, and GPX in bleached groups at 24 h and strong staining for ll-1β, TNF-β, GPX and FGF-2 at 10 days. After 10 days of tooth bleaching, the bleached group showed a statistically superior amount of osteocalcin than the other groups (p<0.01). Tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide causes severe pulp inflammation, but characteristics of tissue repair after 10 days.

  17. In-office tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide promotes moderate/severe pulp inflammation and production of ll-1β, TNF-β, GPX, FGF-2 and osteocalcin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Suellen Galvão da Silva-Costa

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To study the intensity of inflammatory infiltrate and production of interleukin-1β (ll-1β, tumor necrosis factor-β (TNF-β, fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2, glutathione peroxidase (GPX, and osteocalcin in response to in-office tooth bleaching in rats. Material and Methods: Twenty male Wistar rats were randomized into four groups (n=5 according to the received treatment (tooth bleaching or no treatment - control and the period of euthanasia after treatment (24 h or 10 days. We performed tooth bleaching using a 38% hydrogen peroxide gel on maxillary and mandibular incisors. After euthanasia, incisors (20 per group were processed for histological analysis, immunohistochemistry staining of ll-1β, TNF-β, FGF-2 and GPX and osteocalcin by immunofluorescence. We analyzed data using the Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn tests (p<0.05. Results: The bleached groups presented statistically significant differences regarding the pulp inflammation stage compared with the control groups. Bleached teeth showed moderate/severe inflammatory infiltrate and control groups presented absent inflammatory cells or a negligible number of mononuclear cells (p<0.001 at two times (24 h and 10 days. There was strong staining for ll-1β, TNF-β, and GPX in bleached groups at 24 h and strong staining for ll-1β, TNF-β, GPX and FGF-2 at 10 days. After 10 days of tooth bleaching, the bleached group showed a statistically superior amount of osteocalcin than the other groups (p<0.01. Conclusions: Tooth bleaching with 38% hydrogen peroxide causes severe pulp inflammation, but characteristics of tissue repair after 10 days.

  18. Comparative clinical study of the effectiveness of different dental bleaching methods - two year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Francisco Lia Mondelli

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated color change, stability, and tooth sensitivity in patients submitted to different bleaching techniques. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In this study, 48 patients were divided into five groups. A half-mouth design was conducted to compare two in-office bleaching techniques (with and without light activation: G1: 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP (Lase Peroxide - DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil + hybrid light (HL (LED/Diode Laser, Whitening Lase II DMC Equipments, São Carlos, SP, Brazil; G2: 35% HP; G3: 38% HP (X-traBoost - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA + HL; G4: 38% HP; and G5: 15% carbamide peroxide (CP (Opalescence PF - Ultradent, South Jordan UT, USA. For G1 and G3, HP was applied on the enamel surface for 3 consecutive applications activated by HL. Each application included 3x3' HL activations with 1' between each interval; for G2 and G4, HP was applied 3x15' with 15' between intervals; and for G5, 15% CP was applied for 120'/10 days at home. A spectrophotometer was used to measure color change before the treatment and after 24 h, 1 week, 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months. A VAS questionnaire was used to evaluate tooth sensitivity before the treatment, immediately following treatment, 24 h after and finally 1 week after. RESULTS: Statistical analysis did not reveal any significant differences between in-office bleaching with or without HL activation related to effectiveness; nevertheless the time required was less with HL. Statistical differences were observed between the results after 24 h, 1 week and 1, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months (intergroup. Immediately, in-office bleaching increased tooth sensitivity. The groups activated with HL required less application time with gel. CONCLUSION: All techniques and bleaching agents used were effective and demonstrated similar behaviors.

  19. Effect of two different bleaching regimens on the gloss of tooth colored restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Filiz; Gürgan, Sevil

    2005-05-01

    Vital tooth bleaching with peroxide is one of the most common cosmetic procedures in dentistry and can be accomplished using a variety of methods or regimens. Recently, new generation of tooth color restorative materials were introduced to market. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the gloss changes of three different tooth color restorative materials: Flowable composite (Filtek Flow/3M), packable composite (Filtek P60/3M) and ormocer (Definite/DEGUSSA) after two different bleaching regimens (Vivastyle/VIVADENT) and (Crest Professional Whitestrips/PROCTER and GAMBLE). 16 specimens 30 x 30 x 2 mm size were fabricated from each restorative material. After gloss values were measured with gloss meter, at two different angles of illumination (20 and 60 degrees ), 10% carbamide peroxide (Vivastyle) was applied for 2 h per day for fourteen days to the half of the specimens while 6.5% hydrogen peroxide strip bands (Crest Professional Whitestrips) were applied to the remaining eight of the specimens for 30 min twice daily for 14 days. During the test period the specimens were stored in 37 degrees C and 100% relative humidity. At the end of bleaching regimen the gloss measurements were repeated and the data were subjected to statistical analysis. The Wilcoxon Signed Rank Test analysis revealed that the gloss values were affected by both bleaching regimens (P=0.012). Whitestrips decreased the gloss values of Filtek P60 (at 20 and 60 degrees , Pgloss values of Definite did not show any significant change between Vivastyle and Whitestrips application (at 20 degrees P=0.279; at 60 degrees , P=0.279, Mann-Whitney U Test). The gloss values of materials were significantly different before (at 20 degrees Pgloss of tooth colored restorative materials could be affected by bleaching regimens, it is necessary to consider the type of the material before starting the treatment.

  20. Surface discoloration of composite resins: Effects of staining and bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Beltrami, Riccardo; Scribante, Andrea; Colombo, Marco; Chiesa, Marco

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate surface discoloration of three microhybrid composite resins (Esthet•X HD, Clearfil AP-X, Gradia Direct) and five nanohybrid composite resins (Ceram•X, GC Kalore, G-aenial, Grandio, GrandioSO), after staining and bleaching procedures. The composite resins were polymerized with a curing light (Celalux II, Voco, Cuxhaven, Germany) into 160 silicon molds (6,4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) to obtain identical specimens. Twenty samples for each composite resin were prepared. The specimens were polished using an automated polishing machine with the sequence of 600-, 800-, 1000-grit abrasive paper under water irrigation. The specimens were immersed in tea and distilled water: the specimens were dipped for 20 min, once a day (every 24 h), for 14 days into the drinks. The specimens were then bleached with carbamide peroxide at 17% (Perfect Bleach-Voco). The color of specimens was measured with a spectrophotometer according to the CIE L(*)a(*)b(*) system after light-polymerization of composite resin specimens, after 7 days, after 14 days, and after bleaching. The color difference h index (DEab(*)) between each measurement was calculated. Statistical analysis was made using analysis of variance (ANOVA). All specimens showed a significant increase in staining with a similar trend and no significant differences between microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins. After whitening procedures, materials tested showed both significant and unsignificant differences of the h index. Microhybrid and nanohybrid composite resins had similar in vitro surface discoloration in tea. After bleaching, discoloration was removed from some composite resins tested.

  1. Bleaching agent action on color stability, surface roughness and microhardness of composites submitted to accelerated artificial aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattacaso, Raphael Mendes Bezerra; da Fonseca Roberti Garcia, Lucas; Aguilar, Fabiano Gamero; Consani, Simonides; de Carvalho Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bleaching agent action on color stability, surface roughness and microhardness of composites (Charisma, Filtek Supreme and Heliomolar - A2) submitted to accelerated artificial aging (AAA). A Teflon matrix (12 x 2 mm) was used to fabricate 18 specimens (n=6) which, after polishing (Sof-Lex), were submitted to initial color reading (ΔE), Knoop microhardness (KHN) (50 g/15 s load) and roughness (R(a)) (cut-off 0.25 mm) tests. Afterwards, the samples were submitted to AAA for 384 hours and new color, microhardness and roughness readings were performed. After this, the samples were submitted to daily application (4 weeks) of 16% Carbamide Peroxide (NiteWhite ACP) for 8 hours and kept in artificial saliva for 16 hours. New color, microhardness and roughness readings were made at the end of the cycle, and 15 days after bleaching. Comparison of the ΔE means (2-way ANOVA, Bonferroni, P<.05) indicated clinically unacceptable color alteration for all composites after AAA, but without significant difference. Statistically significant increase in the KHN values after AAA was observed, but without significant alterations 15 days after bleaching. For R(a) there was no statistically significant difference after AAA and 15 days after bleaching. The alterations promoted by the bleaching agent and AAA are material dependent.

  2. Effect of bleaching on color change and surface topography of composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Gunjan; Jain, Veena; Kandpal, H C; Mathur, Vijay Prakash; Shah, Naseem

    2010-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on color change and surface topography of different composite veneering materials (Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE), Esthet X (Dentsply India), and Admira (Voco, Germany). Methods. 30 samples were fabricated for evaluation of color change using CIELAB color system and Gonioreflectometer (GK 311/M, ZEISS). 45 disc-shaped specimens were made for evaluation of surface topography after bleaching (Nupro White Gold; Dentsply) using SEM. Statistical analysis. One way ANOVA and Multiple comparison tests were used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was declared if the P value was .05 or less. Results and conclusion. All the specimens showed significant discoloration (ΔE > 3.3) after their immersion in solutions representing food and beverages. The total color change after bleaching as compared to baseline color was significant in Filtek Z350 (P = .000) and Esthet X (P = .002), while it was insignificant for Admira (P = .18). Esthet X showed maximum surface roughness followed by Admira and Filtek Z350. Bleaching was effective in reducing the discoloration to a clinically acceptable value in all the three groups (ΔE < 3.3).

  3. Effect of Bleaching on Color Change and Surface Topography of Composite Restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunjan Pruthi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to determine the effect of 15% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on color change and surface topography of different composite veneering materials (Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, Esthet X (Dentsply India, and Admira (Voco, Germany. Methods. 30 samples were fabricated for evaluation of color change using CIELAB color system and Gonioreflectometer (GK 311/M, ZEISS. 45 disc-shaped specimens were made for evaluation of surface topography after bleaching (Nupro White Gold; Dentsply using SEM. Statistical analysis. One way ANOVA and Multiple comparison tests were used to analyze the data. Statistical significance was declared if the P value was .05 or less. Results and conclusion. All the specimens showed significant discoloration (ΔE>3.3 after their immersion in solutions representing food and beverages. The total color change after bleaching as compared to baseline color was significant in Filtek Z350 (P=.000 and Esthet X (P=.002, while it was insignificant for Admira (P=.18. Esthet X showed maximum surface roughness followed by Admira and Filtek Z350. Bleaching was effective in reducing the discoloration to a clinically acceptable value in all the three groups (ΔE<3.3.

  4. Systems of erbium chloride- carbamide- water and erbium nitrate- carbamide- water at 30 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajtimbetov, K.; Sulajmankulov, K.S.; Batyuk, A.G.; Ismailov, M.

    1975-01-01

    The systems erbium chloride - carbamide - water and erbium nitrate - carbamide - water were studied by solubility method at 30 deg C. In the system erbium chloride - carbamide - water three compounds were detected: ErClsub(3).6CO(NHsub(2))sub(2), ErClsub(3).4CO(NHsub(2))sub(2), ErClsub(3).2CO(NHsub(2))sub2.6Hsub(2)O. In the system erbium nitrate -carbamide - water two new compounds were found: Er(NOsub(3))sub(3).4CO(NHsub(2))sub2, Er(NOsub(3) )sub(3)

  5. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    OpenAIRE

    PAULA,Anabela Baptista; DIAS,Maria Isabel; FERREIRA,Manuel Marques; CARRILHO,Teresa; MARTO,Carlos Miguel; CASALTA,João; CABRITA,António Silvério; CARRILHO,Eunice

    2015-01-01

    The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect...

  6. Effects of at-home and in-office bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets to enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Rahul

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effects of at-home and in-office bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS of metal, ceramic, and composite orthodontic brackets and to compare their SBSs. Subjects and Methods: A total of 96 human lower premolar teeth were used for this study. Six teeth were used for scanning electron microscopic study while the remaining ninety were divided into three equal groups. Each group was further subdivided into three subgroups with ten samples each. Three protocols were used. In the at-home bleaching group (n = 30, opalescence non-PF (potassium nitrate and fluoride bleaching agent (10% carbamide peroxide was applied onto the teeth daily for 14 days and left for 8 h each day. Teeth in the in-office group (n = 30 were treated twice in consecutive days with Opalescence boost PF (40% hydrogen peroxide. After bleaching, the specimens were stored in distilled water for 1 day before bonding. SBS testing was performed on all teeth using Instron universal testing machine. Results: Analysis of variance indicated a significant difference (P < 0.005 among the groups. Maximum SBS was shown by ceramic brackets in control group (Ib and minimum was shown by composite brackets of in-office bleached group (IIIc. Conclusions: The results showed that at-home bleaching did not affect the SBS significantly whereas in-office bleaching reduced SBS of metal, ceramic, and composite brackets significantly. It is preferable to use metal or ceramic brackets than composite brackets for bonding 24 h after bleaching.

  7. In vitro Evaluation of Effect of Dental Bleaching on the Shear Bond Strength of Sapphire Orthodontics Brackets Bonded with Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainab M Kadhom

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to assess the effect of various types of bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of sapphire brackets bonded to human maxillary premolar teeth using resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC and to determine the site of bond failure. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted maxillary human premolars were selected and assigned into three equal groups, ten teeth in each. The first group was the control (unbleached group; the second group comprised teeth bleached with hydrogen peroxide group (HP 37.5% (in-office bleaching while the third group included teeth bleached with carbamide peroxide group (CP 16% (at-home bleaching. The teeth in the experimental groups were bleached and stored in water one day then bonded with sapphire brackets using RMGIC with the control group and left another day. De-bonding was performed using Instron universal testing machine. To determine the site of bond failure, both the enamel surface and bracket base of each tooth were examined under magnifying lens (20X of a stereomicroscope. Results: Results showed statistically highly significant difference in the shear bond strengths between control group and both of bleaching groups being low in the control group. Score III was the predominant site of bond failure in all groups. Conclusions: RMGIC provides adequate bond strength when bonding the sapphire brackets to bleached enamel; this bonding was strong enough to resist both the mechanical and masticatory forces. Most of the adhesive remained on the brackets, so it reduced the time required for removal of the bonding material’s remnants during enamel finishing and polishing.

  8. Effect of Different Bleaching Techniques on Microleakage under orthodontic Brackets: In Vitro Study

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    Salehi P

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of problem: Numerous studies report significant changes in tooth color that occur during orthodontic treatment. The adverse effects of bleaching procedures during orthodontic treatments have not been studied comprehensively. Objectives: This study investigated the effects of two methods of dental bleaching on the degree of microleakage beneath orthodontic brackets. Materials and Methods: We selected 45 extracted premolar teeth and bonded them to orthodontic brackets. These teeth were stored in normal saline for 24 hours and thermocycled. We randomly divided the samples into 3 groups of 15 teeth per group. The first group (control received no bleach treatment; the second group (office bleaching was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Whiteness HP Maxx; and the third group (home bleaching was treated with 22% carbamide peroxide (Whiteness Perfect. The apices were sealed with sticky wax, rinsed in tap water, and air-dried. We applied nail varnish to the entire surface of each tooth, except for an area approximately 1 mm away from the brackets. The samples were immersed in basic fuchsine and cleaned after 24 hours. Microleakage was determined by direct measurement using a stereomicroscope. Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn post-hoc statistical tests, and SPSS software were used for statistical analysis. The significance level was set at P≤0.05. Results: The office bleaching group had significantly more microleakage scores under the brackets at both the occlusal (P=0.04 and gingival (P =0.040 margins of the brackets compared to the home bleaching group. The home bleaching group showed statistically more significant microleakage scores than the control group in both the gingival (P=0.006 and occlusal (P=0.014 margins of the brackets. All three groups had statistically more significant microleakage at the gingival margins of the brackets than the occlusal margins. Conclusions: Office bleaching caused the most microleakage under the brackets and home

  9. Concentrations of and application protocols for hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels: effects on pulp cell viability and whitening efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2014-02-01

    To assess the whitening effectiveness and the trans-enamel/trans-dentinal toxicity of experimental tooth-bleaching protocols on pulp cells. Enamel/dentine discs individually adapted to trans-well devices were placed on cultured odontoblast-like cells (MDPC-23) or human dental pulp cells (HDPCs). The following groups were formed: G1 - no treatment (control); G2 to G4 - 35% H2O2, 3 × 15, 1 × 15, and 1 × 5 min, respectively; and G5 to G7 - 17.5% H2O2, 3 × 15, 1 × 15, and 1 × 5 min, respectively. Cell viability and morphology were evaluated immediately after bleaching (T1) and 72 h thereafter (T2). Oxidative stress and cell membrane damage were also assessed (T1). The amount of H2O2 in culture medium was quantified (Mann-Whitney; α=5%) and colour change (ΔE) of enamel was analysed after 3 sessions (Tukey's test; α=5%). Cell viability reduction, H2O2 diffusion, cell morphology alteration, oxidative stress, and cell membrane damage occurred in a concentration-/time-dependent fashion. The cell viability reduction was significant in all groups for HDPCs and only for G2, G3, and G5 in MDPC-23 cells compared with G1. Significant cell viability and morphology recovery were observed in all groups at T2, except for G2 in HDPCs. The highest ΔE value was found in G2. However, all groups presented significant ΔE increases compared with G1. Shortening the contact time of a 35%-H2O2 gel for 5 min, or reducing its concentration to 17.5% and applying it for 45, 15, or 5 min produce gradual tooth colour change associated with reduced trans-enamel and trans-dentinal cytotoxicity to pulp cells. The experimental protocols tested in the present study provided significant tooth-bleaching improvement associated with decreased toxicity to pulp cells, which may be an interesting alternative to be tested in clinical situations intended to reduce tooth sensitivity and pulp damage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Smile restoration through use of enamel microabrasion associated with tooth bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Rahal, Vanessa; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Enamel microabrasion can eliminate enamel irregularities and discoloration defects, improving the appearance of teeth. This article presents the latest treatment protocol of enamel microabrasion to remove stains on the enamel surface. It has been verified that teeth submitted to microabrasion acquire a yellowish color because of the thinness of the remaining enamel, revealing the color of dentinal tissue to a greater degree. In these clinical conditions, correction of the color pattern of these teeth can be obtained with a considerable margin of clinical success using products containing carbamide peroxide in custom trays. Thus, patients can benefit from combined enamel microabrasion/tooth bleaching therapy, which yields attractive cosmetic results. Esthetics plays an important role in contemporary dentistry, especially because the media emphasizes beauty and health. Currently, in many countries, a smile is considered beautiful if it imitates a natural appearance, with clear, well-aligned teeth and defined anatomical shapes. Enamel microabrasion is one technique that can be used to correct discolored enamel. This technique has been elucidated and strongly advocated by Croll and Cavanaugh since 1986, and by other investigators who suggested mechanical removal of enamel stains using acidic substances in conjunction with abrasive agents. Enamel microabrasion is indicated to remove intrinsic stains of any color and of hard texture, and is contraindicated for extrinsic stains, dentinal stains, for patients with deficient labial seals, and in cases where there is no possibility to place a rubber dam adequately during the microabrasion procedure. It should be emphasized that enamel microabrasion causes a microreduction on the enamel surface, and, in some cases, teeth submitted to microabrasion may appear a darker or yellowish color because the thin remaining enamel surface can reveal some of the dentinal tissue color. In these situations, according to Haywood and Heymann

  11. In-Vitro Comparative Study of In-office and Home Bleaching Agents on Surface Micro-morphology of Enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fatima, N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16 percent Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent with 38 percentage Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on surface micro-morphology of enamel. Study Design: An experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: The discs were prepared at Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, and surface morphology was analyzed at Centralized Science Laboratory of Karachi University, Pakistan. Duration of study was one year from January to December 2012. Methodology: Forty five sound human third molar crowns, extracted for periodontal reason, were included in the study. Longitudinal sections were made using diamond disks (0.2 mm) under water lubrication to obtain enamel slabs measuring (3 mm x 3 mm). The slabs were embedded in polystyrene resin by using 2.0 cm diameter PVC molds, leaving the outer enamel surface uncovered by the resin. Ninety dental enamel slabs were prepared. The slabs were then randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained thirty specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37 degree C in incubator (Memart, Germany) during whole experiment. Group 2 was treated with power whitening gel (White Smile 2011, Germany). Group 3 was treated with tooth whitening pen (White Smile 2011, Germany). The most central region or the region that was most representative of the entire surface area was used. The SEM (Jeol-Japan-JSM6380A, JAPAN) micrographs were examined to determine the type of surface presented. The enamel changes were classified as no or mild alteration, moderate alteration and severe altered surface. Results: Regarding micro-morphology, the enamel surface of control groups showed smooth surface in general with some scattered clear scratches due to the polishing procedure. The specimens bleached in group 2 and group 3, represented areas of mild erosion. Conclusion: Bleaching with 38 percentage Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) and

  12. Effect of Delayed Bonding and Antioxidant Application on the Bond Strength to Enamel after Internal Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılınç, Halil İbrahim; Aslan, Tuğrul; Kılıç, Kerem; Er, Özgür; Kurt, Gökmen

    2016-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of delayed bonding and antioxidant application (AA, 10% sodium ascorbate) after internal bleaching (35% carbamide peroxide) on the shear bond strength of an adhesive cement to enamel. Eighty-four human maxillary central incisors were endodontically treated. The control group remained unbleached with no AA. Experimental groups were all internally bleached. The buccal enamel was finished and polished with metallographic paper to a refinement of #600, in order to obtain a 5-mm(2) flat bonding area. An adhesive cement (Clearfil Esthetic) was placed into a plastic tube with internal diameter of 3 mm and a 3-mm height and cured on the enamel. Bonding occurred either immediately after bleaching (group Im), a 7-day delay (group 7), or a 14-day delay (group 14), and half the specimens were treated with antioxidant application (groups Im-AA, 7-AA, and 14-AA). Shear bond strength testing was performed on a universal testing machine, and data were analyzed with ANOVA and Fisher test (5%). Delaying of bonding is a useful factor for enhancing shear bond strength (p adhesive cementation to enamel is recommended only when delayed 14 days, or delayed 7 days with sodium ascorbate application. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Exogenous bleaching evaluation on dentin using chemical activated technique compared with diode laser technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Breno Carnevalli Franco de

    2003-01-01

    This in vitro study compared the results of different exogenous bleaching proceedings on dentin after treatment of enamel surface. Thirty human canine were hewn preserving the vestibular half of the crown and 3 mm of root, showing a vestibular-lingual thickness average of 3,5 mm, measuring in the third middle of the crown. Ali teeth were maintained in wet chamber during the experiment. Digital photographs were taken of the dentin surface at 3 experimental times (LI: initial record, L0: immediate pos-bleaching record and L 15: 15 days after bleaching). The teeth were divided into 3 experimental groups of 10 teeth in each. The Control Group did not receive any kind of treatment. The Laser Group received 2 session of laser bleaching, with 3 applications each, using 35% hydrogen peroxide, activated by diode laser during 30 seconds, by scanning the enamel surface from incisal edge to the top of the crown, from mesial to distal portion of the crown and circularly, each movement during 10 seconds. The following parameters being adopted: wavelength of 808 nm, power of 1,5 W and optic fiber with 600 μm (core). The Peroxide Group received 28 daily applications, during 4 hours each application, using 16% carbamide peroxide. The bleaching records were analysed using a computer, through RGBK (red, green , blue and black). The K averages (K=100% for black and K=0% for white) of the records for Control Group were: LI=50,1 %, L0=50,3% and L 15=50,6%. For Laser Group the K averages were LI=48,5%, L0=50,0% and L 15=47,7%. And for the Peroxide Group were LI=50,5%, L0=35,9% and L 15=37,3%. The statistical analysis showed no significant difference of the K between the Control Group and the Laser Group, as to LI, L0 and L 15. Only Peroxide Group showed significant statistical difference between LI with L0 and L 15 (0,1%), and L0 in comparison with L 15 did not show any difference. (author)

  14. Effect of bleaching agents and soft drink on titanium surface topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faverani, Leonardo P; Barão, Valentim A R; Ramalho-Ferreira, Gabriel; Ferreira, Mayara B; Garcia-Júnior, Idelmo R; Assunção, Wirley G

    2014-01-01

    The effects of carbamide peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and cola soft drink on the topographic modifications of commercially-pure titanium (CP-Ti) and Ti-6Al-4V were investigated. Ti discs were divided into 18 groups (n = 4) based on the solution treatment and Ti type. Specimens were immersed in 3 mL of each solution for 4 h per day (for the remaining 20 h, discs were left dry or immersed in artificial saliva) for 15 days. For control, specimens were immersed in only artificial saliva. Ti surfaces were examined using scanning electron (SEM) and atomic force (AFM) microscopes and their surface roughness (in µm) and surface chemical modifications were investigated. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Groups immersed in 35% hydrogen peroxide showed the highest roughness (Ra) (171.65 ± 4.04 for CP-Ti and 145.91 ± 14.71 for Ti-6Al-4V) (p  0.05). SEM and AFM revealed dramatic changes in the specimens surfaces immersed in the 35% hydrogen peroxide, mainly for CP-Ti. No detectable chemical modifications on the Ti surface were observed. Bleaching agents promoted significant changes in Ti topography, which could affect the longevity of implants treatments. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Influence of intracanal irrigants on coronal fracture resistance of endodontically treated and bleached teeth: An In vitro Study

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    Maryam Khoroushi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Irrigation has a key role in the success of endodontic treatment. Intracanal irrigant solutions have adverse effects on the physical properties of dentin. Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of different irrigation protocols on coronal fracture resistance of endodontically treated teeth undergoing bleaching treatment. Design and Materials and Methods: Access cavities were prepared in 120 maxillary premolars which were divided into two groups (n = 60 – Group A: nonbleached, Group B: bleached (B. Each group was subdivided into five subgroups based on irrigation protocol (n = 12; G1: normal saline (NS, G2: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, G3: 10% citric acid (CA, G4: 17% ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid, and G5: NaOCl plus CA. In Group B, the teeth were bleached using 38% hydrogen peroxide and 20% carbamide peroxide gels as in-office and at-home bleaching techniques for 3 weeks. All the teeth were restored with composite resin, thermocycled, and incubated for 24 h. The specimens underwent fracture resistance tests. Data were analyzed with ANOVA, Tukey honestly significant difference test, t-test, and Chi-squared test (α =0.05. Results: T-test showed significant differences between each two corresponding subgroups (P < 0.0001. In Group A, NS demonstrated significantly higher fracture resistance compared to others; however, minimum fracture resistance recorded in G2. In Group B, the maximum fracture resistance was recorded in G1, with the minimum being recorded in G5. Samples irrigated with NaOCl and NaOCl plus CA exhibited significantly lower fracture resistance compared to NS subgroup (P < 0.05. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the irrigation protocol used during endodontic treatment with/without bleaching can affect the coronal fracture resistance.

  16. Neurosensory analysis of tooth sensitivity during at-home dental bleaching: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Rahal, Vanessa; de Azevedo, Fernanda Almeida; Gallinari, Marjorie de Oliveira; Gonçalves, Rafael Simões; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate dental sensitivity using visual analogue scale, a Computerized Visual Analogue Scale (CoVAS) and a neurosensory analyzer (TSA II) during at-home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide, with and without potassium oxalate. Materials and Methods Power Bleaching 10% containing potassium oxalate was used on one maxillary hemi-arch of the 25 volunteers, and Opalescence 10% was used on the opposite hemi-arch. Bleaching agents were used daily for 3 weeks. Analysis was performed before treatment, 24 hours later, 7, 14, and 21 days after the start of the treatment, and 7 days after its conclusion. The spontaneous tooth sensitivity was evaluated using the visual analogue scale and the sensitivity caused by a continuous 0°C stimulus was analyzed using CoVAS. The cold sensation threshold was also analyzed using the TSA II. The temperatures obtained were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%). Results The data obtained with the other methods were also analyzed. 24 hours, 7 and 14 days before the beginning of the treatment, over 20% of the teeth presented spontaneous sensitivity, the normal condition was restored after the end of the treatment. Regarding the cold sensation temperatures, both products sensitized the teeth (p0.05). In addition, when they were compared using CoVAS, Power Bleaching caused the highest levels of sensitivity in all study periods, with the exception of the 14th day of treatment. Conclusion We concluded that the bleaching treatment sensitized the teeth and the product with potassium oxalate was not able to modulate tooth sensitivity. PMID:29742258

  17. 3D Surface Profile and Color Stability of Tooth Colored Filling Materials after Bleaching

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    Bryant Anthony Irawan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to evaluate the effects of vital tooth bleaching with carbamide peroxide home bleaching and in-office bleaching on the color stability and 3D surface profile of dental restorative filling materials. Thirty discs (n=30 measure 6 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick for each of three restorative materials. These are nanofilled composite Filtek Z350 XT, the submicron composite Estelite Σ Quick, and nanofilled glass ionomer Ketac N100 nanoionomer and were fabricated in shade A2. Each group was further divided into three subgroups (n=10: subgroup A (Opalescence PF, subgroup B (Opalescence Boost in-office bleaching, and subgroup C (distilled water serving as control. Samples were bleached according to the manufacturer’s instructions for a period of two weeks. The Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage (CIE L*, a*, b* system was chosen for image processing, while 3D surface profile was tested with atomic force microscopy (AFM. Statistical analyses were performed with the Mann-Whitney tests and Krusal-Wallis with a P value of ≤0.05. The three restorative materials showed significant color changes (ΔE; P≤0.05. In diminishing order, the mean color changes recorded were Estelite Σ (3.82 ± 1.6 > Ketac Nano (2.97 ± 1.2 > Filtek Z350 XT (2.25 ± 1.0. However, none of the tested materials showed statistically significant changes in surface roughness; P>0.05.

  18. Effect of Green Tea Extract as Antioxidant on Shear Bond Strength of Resin Composite to in-Office and Home-Bleached Enamel

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    Sharafeddin F

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Shear bond strength (SBS of home and office bleached enamel will be compromised by immediate application of composite restoration. Antioxidant agent may overcome this problem. Objectives: This in vitro study assessed the effect of green tea extract on shear bond strength of resin composite to in-office and home-bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 extracted intact human incisors were embedded in cylindrical acrylic resin blocks (2.5 ×1.5 cm, with the coronal portion above the cemento enamel junction out of the block. Then, after bleaching labial enamel surfaces of 20 teeth with 15% carbamide peroxide 6 hours a day for 5 days, they were randomly divided into two groups: A1 and A2 (n = 10, depending upon whether or not they are treated with antioxidant. Labial enamel surfaces of the remaining 20 teeth were bleached with 38% hydrogen peroxide before being randomly divided into groups B1 and B2 (n = 10, again depending on whether or not the antioxidant was used in their treatment . The experimental groups (A2,B2 were treated with 5% solution of green tea extract before resin composite restoration was done by a cylindrical Teflon mould (5×2 mm. Shear bond strength of the specimens was tested under a universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020. The SBS data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p < 0.05. Results: There were no statistically significant differences between shear bond strength of the control group (A1 and treated group (A2 but there were statistically significant differences between the groups B1 and B2 (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Application of antioxidant did not increase the shear bond strength of home-bleached enamel to resin composite but its application increased the shear bond strength of in-office bleached enamel to resin composite.

  19. Fragmentation of the gastrodermis and detachment of zooxanthellae in symbiotic cnidarians: a role for hydrogen peroxide and Ca2+ in coral bleaching and algal density control

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    I. M Sandeman

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching involves the detachment of zooxanthellae and the simultaneous fragmentation of the gastrodermis. Results obtained with a cell permeant fluorescent probe for calcium ions (Ca2+ indicates that "thermal" bleaching is the result of a temperature related breakdown of the Ca2+ exclusion system. "Solar" bleaching, which takes place at lower temperatures and is driven by light, is the result of a build-up of photo-synthetically produced hydrogen peroxide in the tissues. Gastrodermal tissue with its symbionts, scraped from between septa of corals, was observed under controlled conditions of high light and temperature. Pieces of gastrodermis round off, zooxanthellae move to the surface, protrude from the surface and after a delay, detach, surrounded by a thin layer of host cytoplasm, inclusions and plasma membrane. The higher the temperature and light level the shorter the delay and higher the rate of algal detachment. Fragmentation by the ballooning-out and detachment of small spheres of cytoplasm (bleb formation takes place simultaneously. This is likely to be due to oxidation, by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, of -SH groups on the cytoskeleton and its attachment to the plasma membrane. Ground, polished and stained thin acrylic resin sections reveal similar processes taking place in artificially bleached corals. Isolated zooxanthellae and whole corals are shown to release H2O2 in the light. This process of algal detachment and fragmentation that takes place at normal sea temperatures may underlie the mechanism limiting algal populations in the gastrodermis and may be localized to areas with a concentration of algae near the membrane. At above-normal temperatures under the synergistic effect of light and temperature, the rate of production of H2O2 exceeds the rate at which can it be lost by diffusion or destroyed and H2O2 accumulates. This results in damage to the calcium exclusion system, detachment of zooxanthellae into the coelenteron and

  20. A comparative study of different bleaching agents on the morphology of human enamel: an in vitro SEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uthappa, Roshan; Suprith, M L; Bhandary, Shreetha; Dash, Sumit

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare two different commercial bleaching agents, Opalescence with Colgate Platinum, and 30% phosphoric acid used as aggressive agent on the morphology of human enamel. Ten freshly extracted, noncarious, human maxillary central incisors extracted for periodontal reasons were used in this study. The labial surface of the disinfected teeth were polished using a polishing paste with the help of rubber cup and a slow speed handpiece. Each tooth was sectioned at cement-enamel junction and the crown was separated into four specimens, all taken from labial surface. Group 1 was treated with Colgate Platinum for 7 hours, group 2 with Opalescence for 7 hours, group 3 was treated with 30% phosphoric acid for 30 seconds and group 4 was untreated and used as control. After the treatment period, the specimens were washed with normal saline and stored in sterile bottle and sealed. Photomicrographs obtained from the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after surface treatments were examined for no alteration, slight alteration, moderate alteration and severe alterations. The specimens treated with commercial bleaching agents revealed no enamel surface morphologic alterations compared to control group. The specimen treated with phosphoric acid showed severe alterations. Ten percent carbamide peroxide evaluated in this study does not etch tooth enamel or alter enamel surface morphology as do conventional etching techniques. Carbamine peroxide is a safe and effective tooth whitening agent even when used for extended period of time. The enamel surface remains smooth which reduces caries due to plaque collection.

  1. Crown discoloration promoted by materials used in regenerative endodontic procedures and effect of dental bleaching: spectrophotometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luciane Geanini Pena Dos; Felippe, Wilson Tadeu; Souza, Beatriz Dulcineia Mendes de; Konrath, Andrea Cristina; Cordeiro, Mabel Mariela Rodríguez; Felippe, Mara Cristina Santos

    2017-01-01

    To assess tooth crown's color after intracanal treatment with triple antibiotic paste (TAP) or calcium hydroxide (CH); cervical sealing with glass ionomer cement (GIC) or mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA); and bleaching with carbamide peroxide. After pulp removal and color spectrophotometer measurement, 50 bovine incisors were divided into 4 experimental groups and one control (untreated). Experiments were performed in phases (Ph). Ph1: TAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, minocycline), TAPM (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole, amoxicillin), DAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole), or CH treatment groups. After 1 and 3 days (d); 1, 2, 3 weeks (w); and 1, 2, 3 and 4 months (m), color was measured and medications were removed. Ph2: GIC or MTA cervical sealing, each using half of the specimens from each group. Color was assessed after 1d, 3d; 1w, 2w, 3w; 1m and 2m. Ph3: Two bleaching sessions, each followed by color measurement. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and post-hoc Holm-Sidak method. Ph1: Specimens of TAP group presented higher color alteration (ΔE) mean than those of TAPM group. No significant difference was found among TAP or TAPM and CH, DAP or Control groups. Ph2: cervical sealing materials showed no influence on color alteration. Ph3: Different ΔE means (from different groups), prior to bleaching, became equivalent after one bleaching session. TAP induces higher color alteration than TAPM; color alteration increases over time; cervical sealing material has no influence on color alteration; and, dental bleaching was able to recover, at least partially, the tooth crown's color.

  2. Effects of drying agents on bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to enamel immediately after bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niat, Alireza Boruzi; Yazdi, Fatmeh Maleknejad; Koohestanian, Niloufar

    2012-12-01

    To determine the effect of drying agents and adhesive solvents on the bond strength of resin composite to enamel immediately after bleaching. Sixty healthy human premolars were bleached using 15% carbamide peroxide gel and randomly divided into three groups according to the immersing solutions applied immediately after bleaching: 70% alcohol, acetone, and distilled water. Each group was randomly divided into two subgroups according to the adhesives that were applied: an alcohol-based adhesive (Single Bond) and an acetone-based adhesive (One Step). By using rubber washers, composite Z100 was placed onto the enamel and shear bond strength was evaluated in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. The type of failure was also assessed using a stereomicroscope. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). Fisher's Exact test was used to evaluate differences in the failure modes. Statistical analysis showed that the bond strength of the distilled water groups was significantly lower than that of the other groups, but the bond strengths of the two groups where a drying agent was applied were similar to that of the unbleached group. The acetone-based adhesive (One Step) provided higher bond strength than did the alcohol-based adhesive (Single Bond) (p 0.05). Fisher's Exact test showed there was no significant difference in the failure mode of all the experimental groups (p > 0.05). The application of drying agents improves the bond strength of resin composite to bleached enamel. Furthermore, the acetone-based adhesive used in the study had a higher bond strength to bleached enamel than did the alcohol-based adhesive used.

  3. BLEACHING EUCALYPTUS PULPS WITH SHORT SEQUENCES

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    Flaviana Reis Milagres

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp, due to its high content of hexenuronic acids, is quite easy to bleach. Therefore, investigations have been made attempting to decrease the number of stages in the bleaching process in order to minimize capital costs. This study focused on the evaluation of short ECF (Elemental Chlorine Free and TCF (Totally Chlorine Free sequences for bleaching oxygen delignified Eucalyptus spp kraft pulp to 90% ISO brightness: PMoDP (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoD/P (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, without washing PMoD(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, chlorine dioxide and pressurized peroxide, D(EPODP (chlorine dioxide, extraction oxidative with oxygen and peroxide, chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, PMoQ(PO (Molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide, and XPMoQ(PO (Enzyme, molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide, DTPA and pressurized peroxide. Uncommon pulp treatments, such as molybdenum catalyzed acid peroxide (PMo and xylanase (X bleaching stages, were used. Among the ECF alternatives, the two-stage PMoD/P sequence proved highly cost-effective without affecting pulp quality in relation to the traditional D(EPODP sequence and produced better quality effluent in relation to the reference. However, a four stage sequence, XPMoQ(PO, was required to achieve full brightness using the TCF technology. This sequence was highly cost-effective although it only produced pulp of acceptable quality.

  4. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

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    Muhammet Karadas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n=10: AS: no whitening (negative control, with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwash; SC: Scope White mouthwash; and OP group: 10% CP Opalescence PF (positive control. Color measurements were carried out with a spectrophotometer before staining, after staining, and on the 7th, 28th, and 56th day of the whitening period. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance followed by a Tukey post hoc test. The color change (ΔE was significantly greater in all the groups compared to that of the AS group. After 56 days, no significant differences were found among the mouthwash products with respect to color change (P>0.05. The whiteness of the teeth treated with the mouthwashes increased significantly over time. Nevertheless, the color change achieved with the mouthwashes was significantly lower than that achieved with the 10% CP at-home bleaching gel.

  5. Effects of in-office bleaching on human enamel and dentin. Morphological and mineral changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llena, Carmen; Esteve, Irene; Forner, Leopoldo

    2018-05-01

    The effects of HP-based products upon dental enamel and dentin are inconclusive. To evaluate changes in micromorphology and composition of calcium (Ca) and phosphate (P) in enamel and dentin after the application of 37.5% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and 35% carbamide peroxide (CP) METHODS: Crowns of 20 human teeth were divided in two halves. One half was used as control specimen and the other as experimental specimen. The control specimens were kept in artificial saliva, and the experimental specimens were divided into four groups (n=5 each): group 1 (enamel HP for 45min); group 2 (dentin HP for 45min); group 3 (enamel CP for 90min); and group 4 (dentin CP for 90min). The morphological changes were evaluated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), while the changes in the composition of Ca and P were assessed using environmental scanning electron microscopy combined with a microanalysis system (ESEM+EDX). The results within each group and between groups were compared using the Wilcoxon test and Mann-Whitney U-test, respectively (p0.05). When bleaching products with a neutral pH are used in clinical practice, both, the concentration and the application time should be taken into account in order to avoid possible structural and mineral changes in enamel and dentin. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of home bleaching agents on the surface roughness of five different composite resins: A SEM evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Esra; Kurtulmus-Yilmaz, Sevcan; Ulusoy, Nuran; Deniz, Sule Tugba; Yuksel-Devrim, Ece

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP) on the surface roughness of five different composite resins using profilometer and scanning electron microscope (SEM). Thirty-six specimens (1 mm thick, 10 mm in diameter) of five composite resins were fabricated. Each composite group was equally divided into three subgroups as control, CP and HP. In control group, specimens were stored in daily refreshed distilled water during the 14-day testing period. In other groups, 10% HP (Opalescence Treswhite) and 10% CP (Opalescence PF) were applied and surface roughness values (Ra) of each specimen were measured with a profilometer at the end of 14 days. Additionally, SEM analysis was performed to evaluate the surface deformations of composite resins. Data were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Ra values of composite groups exposed to bleaching agents were statistically higher than control group (p composite group while SEM micrographs showed higher surface alterations at HP group compared to CP. Among the composite resins tested, Ceram-X Mono revealed the lowest Ra values after CP and HP applications as seen at SEM images. Home bleaching agents increased the surface roughness of all composites. Except CP applied Ceram-X mono specimens, Ra values of all composite resins evaluated in this study exceeded the critical limit of 0.2 μm. Ceram-X mono was the least affected composite material after bleaching application. SCANNING 38:277-283, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF CARBAMIDE AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

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    E. V. Avramenko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. The paper presents the results of measurements of refractometric properties (refractive index n, its temperature factor dn/dt and the ultraviolet spectral absorption in carbonic acid diamide aqueous solutions (carbamide depending on solid residue mass fraction md = 0-50 % and on temperaturet = 10-70 °C.Method of Research. Laboratory methods ofliquid-phase medium refractometry and ultraviolet spectrophotometry were applied for the research. We carried out computational modeling of electronic states spectrum for the carbonic acid diamide molecule and theoretical calculation of the fundamental electronic absorption of the molecule in the ultraviolet wavelenght region.Main Results. We have established that the solution concentration md has a nonlinear character and may be represented by the quadratic polynomial with the error Δn= ± 0,0005. We have shown the refractive indexdependence on temperature n(t changes in linear fashion att = 10-70 °C.At that, the inclination of lines n(t increases at the increase of md; so, the temperature factor dn/dt may be approximated by the quadratic polynomial. Transmission spectra of solutions in the spectral region λ= 225-760 nm have no special features except for the sharp edge in the short-wavelength region; the fundamental electronic absorptionis responsible for it. We have established that dispersion dependences of the refraction index n(λ;md in aqueous solutions of carbamide at λ= 360-760 nm and at md = 0-50 % may be calculated with the satisfactory error without additional adjustable parameters from the ultraviolet absorption data in terms of the one-dimentional oscillator Lorentz model.PracticalRelevance. Representedmeasurements of carbonic acid diamide aqueous solutions optical properties may be applied for the adjustment and calibration of commercial refractometers at processing lines of the AdBlue reagent manufacture for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR of motor transport

  8. Microtensile bond strength of enamel after bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Andrea Dias Neves; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to the bovine enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide. It was used an etching-and-rinse adhesive system employed immediately, 7 and 14 days after the bleaching. Twenty bovine teeth were randomly distributed into 4 groups (n = 5), 3 experimental and 1 control. G1: Unbleached + restoration 14 days after storage in artificial saliva (control); G2: Bleached + restoration immediately after bleaching; G3: Bleached + restoration 7 days after bleaching; G4: Bleached + restoration 14 days after bleaching. Their buccal enamel surfaces were flattened, and a 25 mm² (5 × 5 mm) area from each one of these regions was outlined so as to standardize the experimental region. Universal hybrid composite resin Filtek™Z350 was inserted into four layers of 1 mm each and photo-activated. The bond strength was quantitatively evaluated by a microtensile test (1.0 mm/min) 24 h after the restorative procedures. The failure mode was assessed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM). There was a significant reduction in the bond strength of the restored teeth immediately after the bleaching (G2). There were no significant differences in enamel bond strength between groups G1, G3, and G4. There was a predominance of adhesive and mixed (cohesive + adhesive) failure in all groups. The 7-day-period after the end of the bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was enough to achieve the appropriate values of bond strength to the enamel.

  9. Comparison of the effect of hydrogel and solution forms of sodium ascorbate on orthodontic bracket-enamel shear bond strength immediately after bleaching: An in vitro study

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    Kimyai Soodabeh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study compared the effects of hydrogel and solution forms of sodium ascorbate (SA with two different application times on bracket bond strength subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: A total of 72 sound premolars were randomly divided into six groups (n = 12: An unbleached control group (group one and five experimental groups of carbamide peroxide. Specimens in group two were bonded immediately after bleaching; specimens in groups three and four were bleached, then treated with SA solution for ten minutes and three hours, respectively, and then bonded. In groups five and six, SA hydrogel was used and the specimens were prepared similar to groups three and four, respectively. Following debonding, bond strengths were recorded in MPa. To evaluate the amount of resin left on the enamel surfaces, adhesive remnant index (ARI scores were used. Statistical Analysis: The bond strength data were analyzed with ANOVA and pairwise comparisons were made by Tukey test. The ARI data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis test and two-by-two comparisons were made by the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: There were significant differences in bond strengths between the groups ( P < 0.0005. However, the differences between groups three, four, five and six were not significant. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between group one and groups four and six, whereas the differences between the other groups were significant ( P < 0.05. Regarding ARI, there were significant differences among the groups ( P = 0.004. Conclusion: Bleaching significantly decreased the bracket bond strength. Compromised bonding was reversed with a three-hour application of both forms of SA.

  10. Peroxy bleaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carson, P.A. [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight Laboratory (United States) and Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States)]. E-mail: pcarson2005@aol.com; Fairclough, C.S. [Unilever Research, Port Sunlight Laboratory (United States); Mauduit, C. [Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States); Colsell, M. [Chemistry Department, University of Manchester, Institute of Science and Technology (United States)

    2006-08-25

    Fabric laundering is now a sophisticated chemical process involving a variety of operations including bleaching. The chemistry of peroxy bleaches is described including the use of novel organic compounds to provide effective bleaching at the lower temperatures of modern wash cycles. The instability of peroxy compounds is illustrated using cameo case histories to relate theory and practice. Techniques available for determining their thermochemistry are summarised. A model is provided for hazard and risk assessment of development projects in general (particularly those involving new molecules, processes or formulations) from ideas phase through exploratory laboratory investigations to pilot plant scale-up and eventual manufacture and commercial exploitation. This paper is a prelude to Part 2, which describes the determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of peroxy bleaches and discusses the implication of the results in terms of precautions for their safe storage and incorporation into detergent formulations during processing.

  11. Peroxy bleaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, P.A.; Fairclough, C.S.; Mauduit, C.; Colsell, M.

    2006-01-01

    Fabric laundering is now a sophisticated chemical process involving a variety of operations including bleaching. The chemistry of peroxy bleaches is described including the use of novel organic compounds to provide effective bleaching at the lower temperatures of modern wash cycles. The instability of peroxy compounds is illustrated using cameo case histories to relate theory and practice. Techniques available for determining their thermochemistry are summarised. A model is provided for hazard and risk assessment of development projects in general (particularly those involving new molecules, processes or formulations) from ideas phase through exploratory laboratory investigations to pilot plant scale-up and eventual manufacture and commercial exploitation. This paper is a prelude to Part 2, which describes the determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of peroxy bleaches and discusses the implication of the results in terms of precautions for their safe storage and incorporation into detergent formulations during processing

  12. Effect of at-home bleaching with different thickeners and aging on physical properties of a nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Thayla Hellen Nunes; Públio, Juliana do Carmo; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi; Paulillo, Luís Alexandre Maffei Sartini; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of 16% carbamide peroxide (CP) containing different thickeners on the physical characteristics of a nanocomposite resin submitted or not to accelerated artificial aging (AAA). One hundred samples were randomly distributed into two groups (n = 50) according to AAA. Each group was divided into 5 subgroups (n = 10) depending on the bleaching/thickener treatment: CP + carbopol, CP + natrosol, carbopol, natrosol, and no treatment (control). The physical properties tested were color (ΔE), gloss (GU), mean roughness (Ra), and Knoop microhardness (KHN). The resin surface was performed with atomic force microscopy (AFM). The color (variable Δ E) was assessed with two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and additionally with Tukey's and Dunnett's tests, the roughness values were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn's, and Mann-Whitney's tests. Data on gloss and KHN were submitted to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Among the physical properties evaluated, CP + carbopol promoted a reduction in composite microhardness only, thus differing statistically from the controls. As for CP + natrosol, such a change was not observed. The aging process reduced all the physical properties, thus differing statistically from the nonaging group. CP + carbopol increased the roughness and decreased the gloss of aged resins, whereas natrosol reduced gloss only, which differed statistically from the controls. AFM showed evidence of the loss of organic matrix and exposure to load particles in the aged samples. Therefore, the replacement of carbopol with natrosol provided maintenance of the composite microhardness following bleaching. The aging process reduced the physical properties evaluated, and some changes were enhanced by the application of bleaching.

  13. Effect of bleaching on microhardness of esthetic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkondu, Özlem; Yurdagüven, Haktan; Say, Esra Can; Kazazoğlu, Ender; Soyman, Mübin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a high-concentration carbamide peroxide–containing home bleaching system (Opalescence PF) and a hydrogen peroxide–containing over-the-counter bleaching system (Treswhite Supreme) on the microhardness of two nanocomposites (Filtek Supreme XT and Premise) and leucite-reinforced glass ceramic (Empress Esthetic), glass ceramic (Empress 2 layering), and feldspathic porcelain (Matchmaker MC). A total of 100 specimens, 20 of each kind of the restorative materials, 2 mm in thickness and 10 mm in diameter, were fabricated. Then the specimens were polished with SiC paper and 1 μm alumina polishing paste. After polishing, porcelain specimens were glazed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Each type of restorative material was then randomly divided into two groups (n=10), and the specimens were treated with either Opalescence PF or Treswhite Supreme. The microhardness of the specimens before bleaching (baseline) and after bleaching was determined using a digital microhardness tester. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Wilcoxon test. Opalescence PF significantly influenced the hardness of all the restorative materials. Statistically significant decreases with respect to before bleaching were found for Premise (p=0.005), Empress Esthetic (p=0.003), Empress 2 layering (p=0.005), and Matchmaker-MC (p=0.003), whereas a statistically significant increase was observed in Filtek Supreme XT (p=0.028). The difference in the microhardness values between before and after bleaching using Treswhite Supreme was statistically significant only for Premise (p=0.022). High-concentration carbamide peroxide–containing home bleaching may affect the microhardness of restorative materials.

  14. Estimation of effect of inorganic salts on state of melts and carbamide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymnikov, N.S.; Yakunin, N.A.; Baranov, A.V.; Moryganov, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    The character of coordination in the systems carbamide-LiCl and carbamide-CaCl 2 has been shown on the basis of IR spectroscopy data. Interrelation between complexing in the melt carbamide-inorganic salt and thermal resistance of amide compound has been ascertained. 3 refs.; 3 figs

  15. Nightguard vital bleaching: side effects and patient satisfaction 10 to 17 years post-treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boushell, Lee W; Ritter, André V; Garland, Glenn E; Tiwana, Karen K; Smith, Lynn R; Broome, Angela; Leonard, Ralph H

    2012-06-01

      The long-term patient satisfaction and safety of nightguard vital bleaching (NGVB) requires further evaluation.   The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients' satisfaction and identify side effects of NGVB up to 17 years post-treatment.   Thirty-one participants who had completed previous NGVB studies using 10% carbamide peroxide were contacted at least 10 years post-treatment (range 10-17 years, average 12.3 years). Participants reported shade satisfaction (very satisfied [VS], partially satisfied [PS], or not satisfied [NS]) as well as potential complications. Participants had teeth # 6 to 11 examined for tooth vitality, gingival inflammation (Löe's Gingival Index [GI]), and radiographically for external cervical resorption (ECR).   All of the participants had successful lightening of their teeth. Sixty-one percent (19) had not retreated their teeth. Of those who had not retreated their teeth and who responded to the question of whitening satisfaction, 31% (4/13) were VS, 54% (7/13) were PS, and 15% (2/13) were NS with their current shade. Of those who had retreated their teeth, all were VS or PS. Ninety-one percent of the examined teeth had GI = 0 (normal), 7% had GI = 1 (mild inflammation), and 2% had GI = 2 (moderate inflammation). Sixty-nine percent of teeth tested responded to a cold stimulus. Radiographs did not detect ECR or apical lesions. No participant reported having a gingival biopsy post-treatment, and 87% would whiten again.   Patient satisfaction with NGVB may last as long as 12.3 years in average (range 10-17 years) post-treatment. GI and ECR findings were considered within the normal expectations for the sample studied, suggesting minimal clinical post-NGVB side effects up to 17 years. Nightguard vital bleaching provides patient satisfaction with minimal side effects up to 17 years post-treatment. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Short communication: The influence of solids concentration and bleaching agent on bleaching efficacy and flavor of sweet whey powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jervis, M G; Smith, T J; Drake, M A

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the effect of bleaching conditions and bleaching agent on flavor and functional properties of whey protein ingredients. Solids concentration at bleaching significantly affected bleaching efficacy and flavor effects of different bleaching agents. It is not known if these parameters influence quality of sweet whey powder (SWP). The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of solids concentration and bleaching agent on the flavor and bleaching efficacy of SWP. Colored cheddar whey was manufactured, fat separated, and pasteurized. Subsequently, the whey (6.7% solids) was bleached, concentrated using reverse osmosis (RO) to 14% solids, and then spray dried, or whey was concentrated before bleaching and then spray dried. Bleaching treatments included a control (no bleaching, 50 °C, 60 min), hydrogen peroxide (HP; 250 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), benzoyl peroxide (50 mg/kg, 50 °C, 60 min), lactoperoxidase (20 mg/kg of HP, 50 °C, 30 min), and external peroxidase (MaxiBright, DSM Food Specialties, Delft, the Netherlands; 2 dairy bleaching units/mL, 50 °C, 30 min). The experiment was repeated in triplicate. Sensory properties and volatile compounds of SWP were evaluated by a trained panel and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. Bleaching efficacy (norbixin destruction) and benzoic acid were measured by HPLC. Differences in bleaching efficacy, sensory and volatile compound profiles, and benzoic acid were observed with different bleaching agents, consistent with previous studies. Solids concentration affected bleaching efficacy of HP, but not other bleaching agents. The SWP from whey bleached with HP or lactoperoxidase following RO had increased cardboard and fatty flavors and higher concentrations of lipid oxidation compounds compared with SWP from whey bleached before RO. The SWP bleached with benzoyl peroxide after RO contained less benzoic acid than SWP from whey bleached before RO. These results indicate that

  17. High level extracellular production of a recombinant alkaline catalase in E. coli BL21 under ethanol stress and its application in hydrogen peroxide removal after cotton fabrics bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenxiao; Zheng, Hongchen; Zhao, Xingya; Li, Shufang; Xu, Jianyong; Song, Hui

    2016-08-01

    The effects of induction parameters, osmolytes and ethanol stress on the productivity of the recombinant alkaline catalase (KatA) in Escherichia coli BL21 (pET26b-KatA) were investigated. The yield of soluble KatA was significantly enhanced by 2% ethanol stress. And a certain amount of Triton X-100 supplementation could markedly improved extracellular ratio of KatA. A total soluble catalase activity of 78,762U/mL with the extracellular ratio of 92.5% was achieved by fed-batch fermentation in a 10L fermentor, which was the highest yield so far. The purified KatA showed high stability at 50°C and pH 6-10. Application of KatA for elimination of H2O2 after cotton fabrics bleaching led to less consumption of water, steam and electric power by 25%, 12% and 16.7% respectively without productivity and quality losing of cotton fabrics. Thus, the recombinant KatA is a promising candidate for industrial production and applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The gadolinium nitrate-carbamide-water and the ytterbium nitrate-carbamide-water systems at 30 deg C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khudajbergenova, N.; Sulajmankulov, K.

    1980-01-01

    Gadolinium nitrate-carbamide-water(1) and ytterbium nitrate-carbamide-water(2) systems are studied at 30 deg C by the solubility method. Two new compounds are formed in the system(1). One of them is incongruent Gd(NO 3 ) 3 x3CON 2 H 4 and Gd(NO 3 ) 3 x4CON 2 H 4 is congruently soluble. Incongruent compound of Yb(NO 3 ) 3 xCON 2 H 4 composition and congruently soluble Yb(NO 3 ) 3 x4CON 2 H 4 are also formed in the system(2). Presented are solubility isotherms of the systems [ru

  19. Bleaching and enamel surface interactions resulting from the use of highly-concentrated bleaching gels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazioli, Guillermo; Valente, Lisia Lorea; Isolan, Cristina Pereira; Pinheiro, Helena Alves; Duarte, Camila Gonçalves; Münchow, Eliseu Aldrighi

    2018-03-01

    Tooth bleaching is considered a non-invasive treatment, although the use of highly-concentrated products may provoke increased surface roughness and enamel demineralization, as well as postoperative sensitivity. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate whether hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) concentration would affect tooth bleaching effectiveness and the enamel surface properties. Enamel/dentin bovine specimens (6 × 4 mm) were immersed in coffee solution for 7 days and evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Easyshade; baseline), using the CIEL * a * b * color parameters. Hardness was measured using a hardness tester. The specimens were randomly assigned into four groups: one negative control, in which the specimens were not bleached, but they were irradiated with a laser-light source (Whitening Lase II, DMC Equipments); and three groups using distinct H 2 O 2 concentration, namely LP15% (15% Lase Peroxide Lite), LP25% (25% Lase Peroxide Sensy), and LP35% (35% Lase Peroxide Sensy), all products from DMC. The bleached specimens were also irradiated with the laser-light source. After bleaching, all specimens were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). pH kinetics and rate was monitored during bleaching. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p bleaching gels produced similar color change (p > 0.05). Concerning hardness, only the LP25% and LP35% significantly reduced hardness after bleaching; also, there was a progressive tendency for a greater percentage reduction in hardness with increased H 2 O 2 concentration of the gel (R 2  = 0.9973, p bleaching effectiveness, and may increase the possibility for alteration of enamel hardness, surface morphology, and acidity of the medium. When using H 2 O 2 -based bleaching agents, dental practitioners should choose for less concentrated gels, e.g., around the 15% level. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimization of Dithionite Bleaching of High Yield Bagasse Pulp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, E.

    2005-01-01

    High yield bagasse pulp was prepared by soaking bagasse in 10 % cold sodium hydroxide for 24 hours and then refluxing for two hours at 95 degree C. Optimization of dithionite bleaching was attained by investigation of different parameters as consistency, temperature, time and ph. Effect of additives as chelating agent (EDTA) or stabilizing of bleaching solution (Zn compound and hexamethylene tetramine) was considered. The effect of air content was also studied. One and two stages bleaching of the pulp were investigated by using sodium dithionite (D) as a sole bleaching agent or after application of one stage bleaching by hydrogen peroxide to attain high brightness for high yield pulp

  1. Effect of acetamide, carbamide and thiocarbamide on sodium tetraborate solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadetdinov, Sh V

    1985-07-01

    By the methods of solubility and refractometry it is ascertained that sodium tetraborate-acetamide (carbamide, thiocarbamide)-water systems are of a simple eutonic type. Amides reduce salt solubility. Lyotropic effect on conversion to mole concentrations grows from acetamide to thiocarbamide by the absolute value.

  2. Effect of acetamide, carbamide and thiocarbamide on sodium tetraborate solubility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadetdinov, Sh.V.

    1985-01-01

    By the methods of solubility and refractometry it is ascertained that sodium tetraborate-acetamide (carbamide, thiocarbamide)-water systems are of a simple eutonic type. Amides reduce salt solubility. Lyotropic effect on conversion to mole concentrations grows from acetamide to thiocarbamide by the absolute value

  3. Efficacy and persistence of tooth bleaching using a diode laser with three different treatment regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Quran, Firas A M; Mansour, Yasar; Al-Hyari, Sabaa; Al Wahadni, Ahed; Mair, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Studies have measured the effectiveness of tooth bleaching, however there are very few studies that have measured the persistence in color change after a 6-month follow-up. This study assessed the efficacy of the laser bleaching process using different regimens, and the persistence of color change over a 6-month period. Sixty patients divided into three equal groups were subjected to bleaching using a diode laser with 34% hydrogen peroxide. Group 1: patients subjected to one session of laser bleaching. Group 2: patients subjected to two sessions of laser bleaching with a 1-week interval. Group 3: the same as Group 2 but followed by home bleaching once a month for 3 months. The color was assessed four times: before bleaching, directly after bleaching, 3 months after bleaching, and 6 months after bleaching. All teeth had a significant color change at 6 months, but all teeth had regressed from the maximum value. There was significantly less regression in color for Group 3, followed by Groups 2 and 1, respectively. The combined technique of in-office laser bleaching for two sessions with a 1-week interval, followed by home bleaching once a month for 3 months gave more persistence in color change. In-office power bleaching using a laser assisted hydrogen peroxide system repeated after a week, combined with home bleaching once a month for 3 months, is an effective bleaching regimen with less color regression after 6 months compared to a regimen of in-office bleaching alone.

  4. Efficacy of Mouthwashes Containing Hydrogen Peroxide on Tooth Whitening

    OpenAIRE

    Karadas, Muhammet; Hatipoglu, Omer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the efficacy of mouthwashes containing hydrogen peroxide compared with 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) gel. Fifty enamel-dentin samples were obtained from bovine incisors and then stained in a tea solution. The stained samples were randomly divided into five groups according to the whitening product applied (n = 10): AS: no whitening (negative control), with the samples stored in artificial saliva; CR: Crest 3D White mouthwash; LS: Listerine Whitening mouthwas...

  5. Effect of thickener agents on dental enamel microhardness submitted to at-home bleaching Efeito de agentes espessantes na microdureza do esmalte submetido ao clareamento dental caseiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Rodrigues

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental bleaching occurs due to an oxidation reaction between the bleaching agents and the macromolecules of pigments in the teeth. This reaction is unspecific and the peroxides can also affect the dental matrix causing mineral loss. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested that the thickener agent carbopol can also cause mineral loss. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of at-home dental bleaching on dental enamel microhardness after the use of bleaching agents with and without carbopol as a thickener agent. Bovine dental slabs with 3 x 3 x 3 mm were obtained, sequentially polished, and randomly divided into 4 groups according to the experimental treatment: G1: 2% carbopol; G2: 10% carbamide peroxide with carbopol; G3: carbowax; G4: 10% carbamide peroxide with poloxamer. Bleaching was performed daily for 4 weeks, immersed in artificial saliva. Enamel microhardness values were obtained before the treatment (T0 and 7 (T1, 14 (T2, 21 (T3, 28 (T4, and 42 (T5 days after the beginning of the treatment. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed statistically significant differences only for the factor Time (F = 5.48; p O clareamento dental ocorre devido a uma reação de oxidação entre o agente clareador e as macromoléculas de pigmentos presentes nos dentes. Esta reação é inespecífica e o peróxido pode agir na matriz dental causando perdas de mineral. Por outro lado, estudos recentes sugerem que o agente espessante carbopol também pode causar perda mineral. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar in vitro o efeito do clareamento caseiro sobre a microdureza do esmalte após o uso de agentes clareadores com e sem carbopol como espessante. Fragmentos de esmalte bovino de 3 x 3 x 3 mm foram obtidos, polidos seqüencialmente e aleatoriamente divididos em 4 grupos de acordo com o tratamento experimental: G1: carbopol a 2%; G2: peróxido de carbamida a 10% com carbopol; G3: carbowax; G4: peróxido de carbamida a

  6. Microtensile bond strength of enamel after bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa Dias Neves Lago

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the bond strength of a composite resin to the bovine enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide. It was used an etching-and-rinse adhesive system employed immediately, 7 and 14 days after the bleaching. Materials and Methods: Twenty bovine teeth were randomly distributed into 4 groups (n = 5, 3 experimental and 1 control. G1: Unbleached + restoration 14 days after storage in artificial saliva (control; G2: Bleached + restoration immediately after bleaching; G3: Bleached + restoration 7 days after bleaching; G4: Bleached + restoration 14 days after bleaching. Their buccal enamel surfaces were flattened, and a 25 mm² (5 × 5 mm area from each one of these regions was outlined so as to standardize the experimental region. Universal hybrid composite resin Filtek™Z350 was inserted into four layers of 1 mm each and photo-activated. The bond strength was quantitatively evaluated by a microtensile test (1.0 mm/min 24 h after the restorative procedures. The failure mode was assessed through scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results: There was a significant reduction in the bond strength of the restored teeth immediately after the bleaching (G2. There were no significant differences in enamel bond strength between groups G1, G3, and G4. There was a predominance of adhesive and mixed (cohesive + adhesive failure in all groups. Conclusion: The 7-day-period after the end of the bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide was enough to achieve the appropriate values of bond strength to the enamel.

  7. Evaluation of the bleached human enamel by Scanning Electron Microscopy Avaliação do esmalte dental humano submetido ao tratamento clareador por meio de Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baptista Miranda

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Since bleaching has become a popular procedure, the effect of peroxides on dental hard tissues is of great interest in research. Purpose: The aim of this in vitro study was to perform a qualitative analysis of the human enamel after the application of in-office bleaching agents, using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. Materials and Methods: Twenty intact human third molars extracted for orthodontic reasons were randomly divided into four groups (n=5 treated as follows: G1- storage in artificial saliva (control group; G2- four 30-minute applications of 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 2h; G3- four 2-hour exposures to 35% carbamide peroxide (total exposure: 8h; G4- two applications of 35% hydrogen peroxide, which was light-activated with halogen lamp at 700mW/cm² during 7min and remained in contact with enamel for 20min (total exposure: 40min. All bleaching treatments adopted in this study followed the application protocols advised by manufacturers. Evaluation of groups submitted to 35% carbamide peroxide was carried out after two time intervals (30 minutes and 2 hours per session, following the extreme situations recommended by the manufacturer. Specimens were prepared for SEM analysis performing gold sputter coating under vacuum and were examined using 15kV at 500x and 2000x magnification. Results: Morphological alterations on the enamel surface were similarly detected after bleaching with either 35% carbamide peroxide or 35% hydrogen peroxide. Surface porosities were characteristic of an erosive process that took place on human enamel. Depression areas, including the formation of craters, and exposure of enamel rods could also be detected. Conclusion: Bleaching effects on enamel morphology were randomly distributed throughout enamel surface and various degrees of enamel damage could be noticed. Clinical significance: In-office bleaching materials may adversely affect enamel morphology and therefore should be used with caution.Desde o

  8. Influence of post-bleaching time intervals on dentin bond strength Influência de tempos de espera pós-clareamento na resistência adesiva da dentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Cappelletto Nogueira Teixeira

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported that bond strength of resin to tooth structure can be reduced when the bonding procedure is carried out immediately after the bleaching treatment. This study evaluated the effect of bleaching of non-vital teeth bleaching on the shear bond strength (SBS of composite resin/bovine dentin interface and the influence of delaying the bonding procedures for different time intervals following internal bleaching. According to a randomized block design, composite resin cylinders (Z100/Single bond - 3M were bonded to the flattened dentin surface of two hundred and fifty-six teeth which had previously been subjected to four different treatments: SPH - sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide; SPW - sodium perborate + distilled water; CP - 37% carbamide peroxide; and CON - distilled water (control, each one followed by storage in artificial saliva for 0 (baseline, 7, 14, and 21 days after bleaching (n = 16. The bleaching agents in the pulp chambers were replaced every 7 days, over 4 weeks. The SBS test of the blocks was done using a universal testing machine. The ANOVA showed that there was no significant interaction between time and bleaching agents, and that the factor time was not statistically significant (p > 0.05. For the factor bleaching treatment, the Student's t-test showed that [CON = CP] > [SPW = SPH]. The bleaching of non-vital teeth affected the resin/dentin SBS values when sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide or water was used, independently of the elapsed time following the bleaching treatment.Tem-se sugerido que a qualidade da adesão resina composta-dentina pode ser prejudicada quando restaurações são confeccionadas imediatamente após o tratamento clareador. Este estudo avaliou o efeito da postergação do procedimento adesivo após o clareamento interno realizado com diferentes agentes na resistência ao cisalhamento da interface compósito/dentina. De acordo com um delineamento aleatório em blocos

  9. Peroxy bleaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carson, P.A.; Fairclough, C.S.; Mauduit, C.; Colsell, M.

    2006-01-01

    The thermodynamic and kinetic properties of a series of inorganic and organic peroxy bleaches were determined using adiabatic rate calorimetry and isothermal microcalorimetry. Results are compared to calculated oxygen balance values. The decomposition of the majority of the compounds is complex. Data indicate the need for cooling during the storage and transport for some materials evaluated. Although no overall structure/activity relationship could be established because of the diversity of molecular architectures studied, a combination of decomposition and activation energy data provides a means for hazard and risk classification

  10. Molecular analysis of tooth enamel by Raman spectroscopy after treatment with bleaching agents at different concentrations; Analisis molecular del esmalte dental por medio de espectroscopia Raman despues del tratamiento con agentes blanqueadores a diferentes concentraciones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran Sedo, Randall; Obando Rosabal, Sofia; Saenz Bonilla, Paola; Soto Aguilar, Calendy; Vasquez Rodriguez, Amaya

    2014-07-01

    The changes in the concentration of the v1 phosphate molecule of the surface of dentin enamel are treated and researched with bleaching agents of chemical activation to basis of hydrogen peroxide than 9,5% and 14% and carbamide peroxide than 38%, for a period of 28 days. Raman spectroscopy was used and 30 dental pieces extracted, of which, were to be free of blemishes and pigmentations, without possessing fractures of the enamel, decay nor any other type of defect. The Raman spectrum was obtained of each dental piece prior to the application of bleaching agents. The specimens were separated into three experimental groups according to the concentration of whitening. The concentration of the v1 phosphate molecule was measured in the tooth enamel to the second and fourth week of treatment. In addition, ANOVA was performed for respective measurements (p≤0.05). A reduction of the v1 phosphate molecule were observed during and after the bleaching process in the experimental groups that have used of hydrogen peroxide to 14% and carbamide peroxide 38%. In the group of hydrogen peroxide to 9,5% has remained unproven a significant reduction. Within the limitations of this study is concluded that the bleaching agent causes a loss of v1 phosphate. This loss has been greater in the whitening of higher concentration. In spite, that the possible effect remineralizing of the saliva on a teeth whitening process has been unevaluated, it is recommended using during and after the treatment, toothpastes, mouthwashes, chewing gums, dental floss, among others, that contain ACP to help to cushion the potential loss of phosphate from tooth enamel. (author) [Spanish] Los cambios en la concentracion de la molecula de fosfato v1 de la superficie del esmalte dental son tratados e investigados con agentes blanqueadores de activacion quimica a base de peroxido de hidrogeno al 9,5% y 14% y peroxido de carbamida al 38%, por un periodo de 28 dias. Espectroscopia Raman fue utilizada y 30 piezas

  11. INFLUENCE OF BLEACHING WITH OZONE AND PEROXIDO OF HYDROGEN IN THE YIELD AND QUALITY OF SECONDARY FIBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Ventorim

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Total Chlorine Free (TCF bleaching processes were evaluated for bleaching a secondary fiber of different origens. The samples were bleached to a target brightness of 78 % ISO. The results were interpreted on the basis of chemical cost to reach the target brightness, bleaching yield and bleached pulp quality as measured by viscosity, fluorescence and b* color coordinate. The ozone stage was responsible for improve TCF bleaching performance. The pulp bleached by sequences contained a ozone stage followed by chelation, without interstage washing (ZQ, and a final hydrogen peroxide stage unpressurized (P or pressurized with oxygen (PO, designed as (ZQ(PO showed good results. These sequences decreased pulp b* coordinate significantly and fluorescence slightly. For  all three bleaching processes, it was determined that process yield is negatively affected by hot alkaline stages such as oxygen, O, peroxide, P, and peroxide pressurized with oxygen, (PO and also for the origin of the pulps of secondary fibers.

  12. Influence of remineralizing gels on bleached enamel microhardness in different time intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Alessandra Bühler; Yui, Karen Cristina Kazue; D'Avila, Thaís Corrêa; Takahashi, Camila Lurie; Torres, Carlos Rocha Gomes; Borges, Alexandre Luis Souto

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of bleaching gel pH, the effect of applying remineralizing gels after bleaching and the effect of artificial saliva on enamel microhardness. Seventy bovine incisors were divided into three groups: Group 1 (n=10) received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide neutral gel (n=30) and Group 3 was bleached with a 35% hydrogen peroxide acid gel (n=30). Each experimental group was subdivided into three groups (n=10) according to the post-bleaching treatment: storage in artificial saliva, application of a fluoride gel and application of a combination of calcium and fluoride gel. The specimens were stored in artificial saliva for 7, 15 and 30 days and enamel microhardness was evaluated. The Vickers microhardness data were analyzed by three-way RM ANOVA, which revealed a significant difference only for treatment factor. The Tukey's test showed that the groups bleached followed by no additional treatment exhibited microhardness means significantly lower than the bleached groups treated with remineralizing gels. The Dunnet's test showed a significant difference only for the group bleached with acid gel without remineralizing treatment compared to the control group measured immediately after bleaching. It was concluded that acid bleaching gel significantly reduced enamel microhardness and that use of remineralizing gels after bleaching can significantly enhance the microhardness of bleached enamel.

  13. Clinical and patient reported outcomes of bleaching effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaric Sever, Eva; Budimir, Zrinka; Cerovac, Matea; Stambuk, Mario; Par, Matej; Negovetic Vranic, Dubravka; Tarle, Zrinka

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate clinical and patient reported outcomes of different bleaching products. Thirty participants were randomly divided into three bleaching groups (n = 10). Bleaching was performed with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) - Boost (40%) and Dash (30%), and with prefabricated splints Bite&White (6% HP). Tooth colour was measured before, immediately after, and 1 and 6 months after the bleaching by using classical shade guide and spectrophotometer. Tooth hypersensitivity was self-rated by patients on the Wong-Baker's face scale. Patient satisfaction was evaluated on a 7-point Likert-type scales that measured perceived performance and importance of different characteristics of bleaching treatment. All products were effective in teeth colour change (ΔE > 3.3), which was significantly higher for Boost (p = .016) and Dash (p = .024) than Bite&White treatment. Perception of hypersensitivity was the highest in Boost group, followed by Dash and Bite&White treatment. Most of the patients were satisfied with final tooth colour, length and comfort during treatment, but were dissatisfied with the stability of bleached tooth colour. Materials with the higher concentrations of bleaching agent demonstrated greater bleaching effectiveness than at-home bleaching product, but also a greater hypersensitivity. Lengthening the treatment process, but achieving a more stable tooth colour may improve the perceived value of a bleaching service.

  14. Influence of bleaching on flavor of 34% whey protein concentrate and residual benzoic acid concentration in dried whey products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  15. Influence of Bleaching on Flavor of 34% Whey Protein Concentrate and Residual Benzoic Acid Concentration in Dried Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous studies have shown that bleaching negatively affects the flavor of 70% whey protein concentrate (WPC70), but bleaching effects on lower-protein products have not been established. Benzoyl peroxide (BP), a whey bleaching agent, degrades to benzoic acid (BA) and may elevate BA concentrations...

  16. Application of TAED/H2O2 system for low temperature bleaching of crude cellulose extracted from jute fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Zuoqiang; Zou, Linbo; Wang, Weiming

    2018-03-01

    Tetraacetylethylenediamine (TAED) activated hydrogen peroxide system had been applied for bleaching of crude cellulose extracted from jute fiber. Comparing with conventional hydrogen peroxide bleaching system, those results showed that bleaching temperature and time could be effectively reduced, and a preferable whiteness could be produced under faint alkaline condition. And the optimum conditions for activated bleaching system could be summarized as molar ratio of H2O2/TAED 1:0.7, pH 8, pure hydrogen peroxide 0.09 mol/L, temperature 70 °C and time 60min.

  17. The effect of two bleaching agents on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy: An ex vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokkalingam Mothilal Venkatesan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The aim of this ex vivo study was to evaluate the effect of in-office bleaching agents,-35% and 38% hydrogen peroxide containing bleaching agents, on the phosphate concentration of the enamel evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. Materials and Methods : Forty noncarious, craze-free human maxillary incisors, extracted for periodontal reasons, were used in this study. Baseline Raman spectra from each specimen were obtained before the application of the bleaching agent to assess the phosphate content present in the teeth. The teeth were divided into two groups: Group A - bleached with pola office bleach (35% hydrogen peroxide, potassium nitrate (light activated. Group B - bleached with opalescence Xtra bleach (38% hydrogen peroxide potassium nitrate and fluoride (chemical activated. After the bleaching procedure, the treated specimens were taken to obtain Raman spectra to assess the phosphate loss after bleaching treatment. Results : The results showed that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed less phosphate loss when compared with the light activated bleaching agent. Conclusion : Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that the chemically activated bleaching agent showed minimal phosphate loss when compared to light activated bleaching agent. The chemically activated bleaching agent was better than the light activated bleaching agent when values were evaluated statistically.

  18. The combination of sodium perborate and water as intracoronal teeth bleaching agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ananta Tantri Budi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The color change on post-endodontic treated teeth can be overcome by intracoronal tooth bleaching using walking bleach. Some agents used in walking bleach are combination of sodium peroxide and hydrogen peroxide, and combination of sodium perborate and water. Purpose: The objective of this review is to provide information and consideration of using safe and effective bleaching agents in the field of dentistry. Reviews: On one side, the use of sodium perborate and water combination does not cause the reduction of dentin hardness, enamel decay, and root resorbtion. On the other side, the use of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide combination indicates that it takes longer time in yielding the proper color of teeth. Conclusion: The use of sodium perborate and water combination as bleaching agents is effective and safe.

  19. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J.; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations.\\ud \\ud The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence® Boost and Mirawhite® Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 ...

  20. Bleaching Dengan Teknologi Laser

    OpenAIRE

    Eliwaty

    2008-01-01

    Penulisan tentang bleaching dengan laser dimaksudkan untuk menambah wawasan serta pengetahuan dari pembaca di bidang kedokteran gigi. Macam-macam laser yang dipergunakan dalam bleaching yaitu argon, CO2 serta dioda laser. Contoh merek produk laser yaitu Blulaze, Dentcure untuk argonlaser, Novapulse untuk C02 serta Opus 5 untuk dioda laser. Laser bleaching hasilnya dapat dicapai dalam satu kunjungan saja, cepat, efisien namun biayanya relatif mahal, dapat menimbulkan burn, sensitivitas se...

  1. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet as an Accelerator of Tooth Bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran Šantak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of atmospheric pressure plasma (APP jet as a potential accelerator of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide in bleaching gels which could lead to better and faster bleaching. Material and Methods: 25 pastilles of hydroxylapatite were colored in green tea for 8 hours and were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5. The bleaching process was performed with 30% and 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel alone and in conjunction with helium APP jet. During the bleaching treatment, optical emission spectroscopy and non-contact surface temperature measurement using pyrometer were performed. Color of the pastilles was determined by a red– green–blue (RGB colorimeter. PH values of bleaching gels were measured before and after the plasma treatment on additional 10 pastilles using a pH meter with contact pH electrode. Results: The color measurements of pastilles before and after the treatment showed that treatment with APP jet improved the bleaching effect by 32% and 15% in the case of 30 % and 40% HP gel. Better results were obtained approximately six times faster than with a procedure suggested by the bleaching gel manufacturer. Optical emission spectroscopy proved that plasma has a chemically active role on the gel. After the APP treatment, pH values of bleaching gels dropped to about 50–75% of their initial value while the surface temperature increased by 8–10˚C above baseline. Conclusion: The use of plasma jet provides more effective bleaching results in a shorter period of time without a significant temperature increase which may cause damage of the surrounding tissue.

  2. In-Office Bleaching During Orthodontic Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Dutra, Hélio; Morais, Alexandre; Sgura, Ricardo; Devito-Moraes, André Guaraci

    2017-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to pursue teeth whitening treatment protocols during orthodontic treatment with no esthetic loss. Many patients undergoing orthodontic treatment desire to have a straight and well aligned dentition, but also whiter teeth. For many years, it was believed that carrying out a whitening treatment with positioned orthodontic brackets in place would result in localized spots on the enamel labial surfaces of teeth. However, a deeper understanding of the bleaching process suggests that the oxidation caused by products, which results from hydrogen peroxide decomposition, are able to diffuse peripherally into the tooth structure and reach even that under the cemented brackets. Two in-office-bleaching treatments were performed in patients using orthodontic fixed braces in two or three 40-minute sessions using a 35% hydrogen peroxide. In-office bleaching is possible and effective, even with orthodontic brackets in position. The teeth were successfully bleached despite the presence of brackets. All biological criteria have been fulfilled satisfying patients' expectations of aligned and whitened teeth in less time than if treatments had been performed separately, with satisfactory results and no esthetic loss. The whitening of teeth is possible during orthodontic treatment with fixed braces without any esthetic loss. The in-office bleaching treatment with brackets in position also may act as a motivation factor, preventing patient withdrawal or treatment interruption. Therefore, at the end of the orthodontic treatment, the patient is able to display an aligned, functional and whitened smile. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:83-92, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Effects of green tea on the shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets after in-office vital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Lopes, Murilo Baena; Oltramari-Navarro, Paula Vanessa; Fernandes, Thais Maria; Schwertner, Renata de Castro Alves; Ursi, Wagner José Silva

    2016-01-01

    The application of bleaching agents before placement of resin-bonded fixed appliances significantly, but temporarily, reduces bond strength to tooth structure. Antioxidants have been studied as a means to remove residual oxygen that compromises bonding to bleached enamel. This in vitro study evaluated whether green tea (GT) could restore the shear bond strength between bonded orthodontic brackets and bleached enamel. Six experimental groups were compared: group 1, no bleaching plus bracket bonding (positive control); group 2, bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus bracket bonding (negative control); group 3, 35% HP plus 10% sodium ascorbate (SA) plus bracket bonding; group 4, 35% HP plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding; group 5, no bleaching plus 10% SA plus bracket bonding; group 6, no bleaching plus 10% GT plus bracket bonding. Results suggested that GT, like SA, may be beneficial for bracket bonding immediately after bleaching.

  4. Opalescence of bleached teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Max; Maia, Hamilton Pires; Baratieri, Luiz Narciso

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the influence of tooth bleaching on the opalescence properties of enamel. Color of 38 specimens was determined by colorimetric analysis before and after bleaching in the reflectance and transmittance modes. The results were described as CIELab color coordinates. The Opalescent Parameter (OP) was calculated as the difference in yellow-blue color coordinate (CIE Δb*) and red-green color coordinate (CIE Δa*) between the reflected and transmitted colors. Mean OP value of the specimens was 18.9 (±1.6) before bleaching and 16.1 (±1.0) after bleaching. Bleaching decreases the OP of the specimens (p>0.001). OP decrease was correlated with differences in b* color coordinate in the transmittance mode. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Catalytic bleaching of cotton: molecular and macroscopic aspects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Topalovic, T.

    2007-01-01

    The scope of this thesis was to investigate the possibility of low-temperature cotton bleaching employing dinuclear tri- -oxo bridged manganese(IV) complex of the ligand 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (MnTACN) as the catalyst in the system with hydrogen peroxide. With this objective in

  6. Evaluation of peanut hulls as an alternative to bleaching clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassanein, M. M.; El-Shami, S. M.; Taha, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Peanut hulls (PNH) were carbonized at different temperatures, times, and evaluated at different concentrations as an alternative to bleaching clays. Evaluation of bleached crude soybean oil with PNH was based on their delta free fatty acids, reduction in peroxide value (PV), reduction in phospholipids (PL) and bleachability. The performance of several commercially used bleaching clays was evaluated, for comparison. Mixtures were formulated including: PNH and Tonsil -N (TN), PNH and Fuller's earth (FE) and PNH and O-passive (OP) and examined. The oxidative stability of oils was determined. Results for the investigated commercial bleaching clays revealed: TN > FE > F > TF > OP. Highest reduction in PV and PL, and highest bleachability were achieved for soybean oil bleached with 2% PNH carbonized at 500 degree centigrade for 30 min (PNH). Mixtures of PNH with the three chosen bleaching clays indicated that 1PNH : 2TN gave the highest bleachability. CSO was miscella bleached in hexane using PNH and resulted in an appreciable improvement in all oil characteristics, especially in bleachability. Oxidative stability of oils was in the following order: TN > control > FE > PNH with Induction period values of 23.1 > 6.43 > 5.73 > 2.85 h, respectively. (Author) 20 refs.

  7. Clinical Evaluation of Genotoxicity of In-office Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, M; De Geus, J L; Loguercio, A D; Reis, A; Kossatz, D

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide in epithelial cells from the gingival and lip tissues. Thirty volunteers with central incisors shade A1 or darker were selected for this study. The gingival tissue of the teeth to be bleached was isolated with a light-polymerized resin dam, and the 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was administered during three 15-minute applications over the course of the 45-minute application period. Two bleaching sessions with a one-week interval in between were performed. Exfoliated oral mucosa gingival epithelial cells and upper lip lining were collected at baseline and one month after the in-office dental bleaching. The scraped cells were placed on clean glass slides and smears were prepared. After staining with Giemsa solution, two blinded examiners performed cell and micronuclei counts under a 100× optical microscope. Tooth sensitivity was evaluated using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Shade evaluation was recorded before and one month after the bleaching treatment with the value-oriented shade guide Vita Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER and the spectrophotometer Vita Easyshade. Data from the shade guide units and the micronuclei (MN) frequency were subjected to a Mann-Whitney test (α=0.05). The overall difference between before and one month after the bleaching treatment (ΔE and ΔSGU), absolute risk, and intensity of tooth sensitivity (TS) were calculated, as was the 95% confidence interval (CI). The frequency of MN was not increased after bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide in both study groups (p>0.05). The absolute risk of TS of the participants was 93% (95% CI, 79%-98%), with a mean VAS intensity of 5.7 ± 2.9 (95% CI, 4.6-6.8). Meaningful whitening was observed after bleaching. The change in shade guide units in the Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER was 2.3 ± 1.4. In terms of ΔE, the change in color was 7.7 ± 3.5. The in-office bleaching did not induce DNA damage to the gingival

  8. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  9. Enamel alteration following tooth bleaching and remineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coceska, Emilija; Gjorgievska, Elizabeta; Coleman, Nichola J; Gabric, Dragana; Slipper, Ian J; Stevanovic, Marija; Nicholson, John W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of professional tooth whitening agents containing highly concentrated hydrogen peroxide (with and without laser activation), on the enamel surface; and the potential of four different toothpastes to remineralize any alterations. The study was performed on 50 human molars, divided in two groups: treated with Opalescence(®) Boost and Mirawhite(®) Laser Bleaching. Furthermore, each group was divided into five subgroups, a control one and 4 subgroups remineralized with: Mirasensitive(®) hap+, Mirawhite(®) Gelleѐ, GC Tooth Mousse™ and Mirafluor(®) C. The samples were analysed by SEM/3D-SEM-micrographs, SEM/EDX-qualitative analysis and SEM/EDX-semiquantitative analysis. The microphotographs show that both types of bleaching cause alterations: emphasized perikymata, erosions, loss of interprizmatic substance; the laser treatment is more aggressive and loss of integrity of the enamel is determined by shearing off the enamel rods. In all samples undergoing remineralization deposits were observed, those of toothpastes based on calcium phosphate technologies seem to merge with each other and cover almost the entire surface of the enamel. Loss of integrity and minerals were detected only in the line-scans of the sample remineralized with GC Tooth Mousse™. The semiquantitative EDX analysis of individual elements in the surface layer of the enamel indicates that during tooth-bleaching with HP statistically significant loss of Na and Mg occurs, whereas the bleaching in combination with a laser leads to statistically significant loss of Ca and P. The results undoubtedly confirm that teeth whitening procedures lead to enamel alterations. In this context, it must be noted that laser bleaching is more aggressive for dental substances. However, these changes are reversible and can be repaired by application of remineralization toothpastes. © 2015 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2015 Royal Microscopical Society.

  10. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina; Cardoso Espejo, Luciana; Brossi Botta, Sergio; Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de; Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A.; Garone-Netto, Narciso; Bona Matos, Adriana; Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 μm x 15 μm area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  11. AFM analysis of bleaching effects on dental enamel microtopography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedreira de Freitas, Ana Carolina, E-mail: anacarolfreitas@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cardoso Espejo, Luciana, E-mail: luespejo@hotmail.com [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Brossi Botta, Sergio, E-mail: sbbotta@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Sa Teixeira, Fernanda de, E-mail: nandast@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Cerqueira, Luz Maria Aparecida A., E-mail: maacluz@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Garone-Netto, Narciso, E-mail: ngarone@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Bona Matos, Adriana, E-mail: bona@usp.br [Departamento de Dentistica, Faculdade de Odontologia da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2227 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05508-000, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Barbosa da Silveira Salvadori, Maria Cecilia, E-mail: mcsalva@if.usp.br [Laboratorio de Filmes Finos, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao, Travessa R, 187 - Cidade Universitaria, CEP 05314-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to test a new methodology to evaluate the effects of 35% hydrogen peroxide agent on the microtopography of sound enamel using an atomic force microscope (AFM). The buccal sound surfaces of three extracted human lower incisors were used, without polishing the surfaces to maintain them with natural morphology. These unpolished surfaces were subjected to bleaching procedure with 35% hydrogen peroxide that consisted of 4 applications of the bleaching agent on enamel surfaces for 10 min each application. Surface images were obtained in a 15 {mu}m x 15 {mu}m area using an AFM. The roughness (Ra and RMS) and the power spectral density (PSD) were obtained before and after the bleaching treatment. As results we could inquire that the PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces, while the Ra and RMS parameters were insufficient to represent the morphological alterations promoted by bleaching procedure on enamel. The morphological wavelength in the range of visible light spectrum (380-750 nm) was analyzed, showing a considerable increase of the PSD with the bleaching treatment.

  12. Effect of various factors on the quality of products of deparaffinization with crystalline carbamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorodnova, V.S.; Martynenko, A.G.; Matrirosov, R.A.; Tarelkin, L.P.

    1981-01-01

    The refining of Stavropol and Romashkin crude into liquid paraffin and diesel fuel was studied at a commercial carbamide deparaffinization installation. From a solidification temp. of 35/sup 0/ and below, the product of diesel fuel from Romashkin crude is ensured by introducing carbamide 80 at the complex formation stage and 1% MeOH in the crude. Here the solid phase in the suspension makes up 21%, while the capacity of paraffin in the complex is 0.135g/g. The temp. of the separated paraffin is about 25/sup 0/ during its selection from a potential up to 65%. Increasing the amount of MeOH to 2.0% while decreasing the carbamide consumption to 60% in the crude leads to an increased paraffin capacity in the complex of 0.215 g/g, which makes possible the production of diesel fuel from a solidification temp. of 44/sup 0/. For the production of diesel fuel from Stavropol crude from solidification temps. of 35/sup 0/ and below with a 1% MeOH consumption, it is necessary to add twice as much carbamide (150%) at the complex formation stage as compared with Romashkin crude. The solid phase content in the suspension is 34%. Analogous results were obtained for 2.0% MeOH consumption.

  13. Study of factors that influence complex-formation of n-alkanes with crystal carbamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorodnova, V.S.; Korzhov, Yu.A.; Martynenko, A.G.

    1982-01-01

    Studies effect of temperature, solid phase content in the suspension and amount of MeOH on extent of n-alkane extraction during carbamide deparaffinization. A most thorough extraction of n-alkanes is achieved with a graduated temperature regimen of complex-formation.

  14. Influence of bleaching regimen and time elapsed on microtensile bond strength of resin composite to enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulya Toksoy Topcu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of time elapsed since bleaching and different bleaching regimens on the microtensile bond strength of resin composite to enamel. Methodology: Forty flattened buccal enamel surfaces were divided into four groups: An unbleached (control group and three bleaching groups. Control group specimens were not subjected to a bleaching regimen (Group 1, while those in the bleaching groups were bleached as follows: opalescence 10% (Group 2, whiteness perfect 16% (Group 3, and whiteness hydrogen peroxide 35% (Group 4. Thereafter, the bleached specimens were divided into three subgroups (n = 4 teeth each for restoration according to predetermined posttreatment time intervals (immediately, 1 week, and 2 weeks. Bonded specimens were then sectioned and subjected to μTBS testing. The data were analyzed using Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests at α = 0.05. Results: There was a significant difference in the μTBS of the resin composite to enamel in groups that were bonded immediately after bleaching and in the control group (P 0.05. Conclusions: Adhesive restorative procedures could not be performed immediately or after 1 week irrespective of the type or concentration of bleaching system used. Composite restorations on bleached enamel surfaces should be performed after an interval of at least 2 weeks.

  15. Influence of bleach activators on the fabric made from cotton (gossypium hamster l.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asif, H.M.; Iftikhar, M.; Shahbaz, B.

    2013-01-01

    Raw cotton contains various type of trash and most of the impurities are removed during the spinning process but still the cotton fabric coming from the weaving or knitting process always contains some impurities. Some time cotton fabric gets the oil, stains and coloured materials which affect the quality of dyed fabric. Bleaching is a process that eliminates unwanted coloured matters from the fibres, yarn and fabrics. A bleaching agent is a material that lightens or whitens a substrate through chemical action. Hydrogen peroxide is by far the most commonly used oxidative bleaching agent for cotton and its blends, accounting for more than 90 percent of all the bleaching agents. The use of activators to enhance the bleaching performance of hydrogen peroxide for cellulosic materials has gained popularity now a day. In this context the main objectives of this paper are to study the influence of different bleaching activators on cotton fabric and to give implications for textile extension.The results indicate that the activators with different concentrations, along with different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2) have significant influence on the bleaching performance of cotton fabric. (author)

  16. A comparative analysis of bleached and sound enamel structure through scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saleem, A.; Kaleem, M.; Anwar, R.

    2015-01-01

    To analyze the effects of bleaching agent on enamel structure and to characterize the morphological and chemical changes in enamel due to bleaching. Study Design: Experimental study. Place and Duration of Study: School of Chemical and Material Engineering (SCME), NUST Islamabad from Feb to May 2013. Materials and Methods: Ten recently extracted pre molars between the 12-22 years age group were randomly assigned into two groups. Group one was a non-bleached control group with sound enamel. Group two was bleached with Everbrite In office tooth whitening system after specimen preparation, surface morphology was observed under SEM (scanned electron microscope) and AFM (Atomic force microscope). Results: The detrimental effects of hydrogen per-oxide on enamel were evident in bleached specimens under SEM, and AFM analysis. Conclusion: There were significant surface alterations found in the bleached specimens as compared to control group. However salivary buffering potentials could overcome the demineralizing effect of bleaching gel. (author)

  17. Tooth Whitening And Temperature Rise With Two Bleaching Activation Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abu-ElMagd, D. M.; El-Sayad, I. I.; Abd El-Gawad, L. M.

    2009-01-01

    To measure the tooth whitening and the surface and Intrapulpal temperature increase in vitro on freshly extracted upper human central incisors after chemical, Zoom AP light and diode laser activated bleaching. Thirty caries-free upper human incisors were selected. Teeth were divided into three equal groups according to the methods of activation of the bleaching agent (n = 10). A whitening gel containing hydrogen peroxide was applied to the buccal surface of all teeth. Group I was bleached using chemically activated hydrogen peroxide gel, for three applications of 15 min each. Group II was bleached with high intensity advanced power Zoom activation light (Zoom AP), for three applications of 15 min each. Group III was bleached with diode laser activation technique, where the teeth were irradiated with 2 Watt diode laser for three applications of 30 sec each. The whitening degree was assessed using an image analysis system, while temperature rise was recorded using a thermocouple on the external tooth surface and Intrapulpal. The degree of whitening increased significantly in all groups. However, the percentage of whitening was not statistically significantly different between the three groups. In addition, group II showed statistically significant higher mean rise in both surface and pulp temperatures than group I and group III. Chemical bleaching produces the same whitening effect as Zoom AP light and laser, with no surface or pulpal temperature rise. Laser application is faster and produces less surface and pulp temperature increase than Zoom AP light. Diode laser used to activate bleaching gels is not considered dangerous to the vitality of dental pulp using power settings of 2 W.

  18. Influence of bleaching and desensitizing gel on bond strength of orthodontic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Alves Rodrigues Britto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to assess, in vitro, the influence of bleaching gel and the use of desensitizing agent over bond strength of ceramic brackets bonded to bovine enamel. METHODS: One hundred bovine incisors were selected and randomly divided into five groups (n = 20: Group 1, control group (without bleaching; Group 2, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; Group 3, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (three applications, 15 minutes each and desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes; Group 4, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes; Group 5, bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for 40 minutes with desensitizing agent applied for 10 minutes. Brackets were bonded 7 days after bleaching and submitted to shear bond strength test after 24 hours at a compression rate of 1 mm/minute. After fracture, the adhesive remnant index (ARI was assessed under stereoscopic at 40 x magnification. Shear strength data (MPa were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test with significance level set at 5%. RESULTS: Group 5 (29.33 MPa showed significantly higher bond strength than Group 1 (19.19 MPa, Group 2 (20.59 MPa and Group 4 (23.25 MPa, but with no difference in comparison to Group 3. There was no significant difference among the other groups. The adhesive remnant index showed predominance of score 3, that is, all resin remained adhered to enamel for all groups. CONCLUSION: Bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium associated with desensitizing agent application produced higher bond strength values of brackets bonded to bovine enamel.

  19. Influence of pH, bleaching agents, and acid etching on surface wear of bovine enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Ana Flávia; Bombonatti, Juliana Fraga Soares; Alencar, Marina Studart; Consolmagno, Elaine Cristina; Honório, Heitor Marques; Mondelli, Rafael Francisco Lia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Development of new materials for tooth bleaching justifies the need for studies to evaluate the changes in the enamel surface caused by different bleaching protocols. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bovine dental enamel wear in function of different bleaching gel protocols, acid etching and pH variation. Material and Methods Sixty fragments of bovine teeth were cut, obtaining a control and test areas. In the test area, one half received etching followed by a bleaching gel application, and the other half, only the bleaching gel. The fragments were randomly divided into six groups (n=10), each one received one bleaching session with five hydrogen peroxide gel applications of 8 min, activated with hybrid light, diode laser/blue LED (HL) or diode laser/violet LED (VHL) (experimental): Control (C); 35% Total Blanc Office (TBO35HL); 35% Lase Peroxide Sensy (LPS35HL); 25% Lase Peroxide Sensy II (LPS25HL); 15% Lase Peroxide Lite (LPL15HL); and 10% hydrogen peroxide (experimental) (EXP10VHL). pH values were determined by a pHmeter at the initial and final time periods. Specimens were stored, subjected to simulated brushing cycles, and the superficial wear was determined (μm). ANOVA and Tukey´s tests were applied (α=0.05). Results The pH showed a slight decrease, except for Group LPL15HL. Group LPS25HL showed the highest degree of wear, with and without etching. Conclusion There was a decrease from the initial to the final pH. Different bleaching gels were able to increase the surface wear values after simulated brushing. Acid etching before bleaching increased surface wear values in all groups. PMID:27008254

  20. Fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth: effect of combination bleaching and an antioxidant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Feiz, Atieh; Khodamoradi, Roghayeh

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study assessed the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth undergoing combination bleaching with 38% and 9.5% hydrogen peroxide gels as in-office and at-home bleaching techniques, respectively. In addition, the effect of an antioxidizing agent, sodium ascorbate, was investigated. Sixty maxillary premolars were endodontically-treated, received a glass ionomer barrier as a mechanical seal and were embedded in acrylic resin up to the cemento-enamel junction. The specimens were divided into four groups (n = 15) as follows: G I: no bleaching, access cavity restored with resin composite (negative control); G II: bleached for three weeks daily using 9.5% hydrogen peroxide for two hours and three sessions of in-office bleaching using 38% hydrogen peroxide every seven days, then restored (positive control); G III: bleached similar to G II and restored after one week; G IV: bleached similar to G II, along with the use of an antioxidizing agent for 24 hours, then restored. In each in-office and at-home bleaching session, the whitening gels were applied to the buccal surface of the tooth and placed inside the pulp chamber (inside/outside bleaching technique). Finally, the specimens underwent fracture resistance testing; the data were analyzed using ANOVA and Scheffé's test (alpha = 0.05). Significant differences were observed among the study groups (p 0.05). Within the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the fracture resistance of endodontically-treated teeth decreases after combination bleaching. The use of sodium ascorbate can reverse decreased fracture resistance.

  1. In situ Effect of Nanohydroxyapatite Paste in Enamel Teeth Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Yasmin Sb de Lima; Alexandrino, Larissa D; Alencar, Cristiane de M; Alves, Eliane B; Faial, Kelson Cf; Silva, Cecy M

    2017-11-01

    Evaluate in situ the effect of nanohydroxyapatite paste (nano-HAP) before bleaching with hydrogen peroxide 35% (HP35%) by ion chromatography (IC) Knoop hardness number (KHN) and tristimulus colorimetry (TC). A total of 60 fragments were obtained from third molars included (3 mm × 3 mm × 3 mm) and the specimens were divided into three groups (n = 20): Gas chromatography (CG) (negative control group) = no bleaching; HP35% (positive control group) = HP35% whitening (whiteness HP35%); nano-HAP = application for 10 minutes before bleaching treatment + HP35%. The specimens were fixed to the volunteers' molars. The KHN and TC were measured before and after bleaching. For IC, the dentin layer was removed, leaving the enamel that was crushed, and autoclaved for chemical quantification (calcium, fluorine, and phosphorus). The results of KHN and TC were analyzed statistically by analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by Tukey test (p bleaching treatment. Nano-HA is a biomaterial that has shown positive results in the prevention of deleterious effects on the enamel by the action of the office bleaching treatment.

  2. Patterns of coral bleaching: Modeling the adaptive bleaching hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, J.R.; Fautin, D.G.; Buddemeier, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    Bleaching - the loss of symbiotic dinoflagellates (zooxanthellae) from animals normally possessing them - can be induced by a variety of stresses, of which temperature has received the most attention. Bleaching is generally considered detrimental, but Buddemeier and Fautin have proposed that bleaching is also adaptive, providing an opportunity for recombining hosts with alternative algal types to form symbioses that might be better adapted to altered circumstances. Our mathematical model of this "adaptive bleaching hypothesis" provides insight into how animal-algae symbioses might react under various circumstances. It emulates many aspects of the coral bleaching phenomenon including: corals bleaching in response to a temperature only slightly greater than their average local maximum temperature; background bleaching; bleaching events being followed by bleaching of lesser magnitude in the subsequent one to several years; higher thermal tolerance of corals subject to environmental variability compared with those living under more constant conditions; patchiness in bleaching; and bleaching at temperatures that had not previously resulted in bleaching. ?? 1996 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Two-minute Application of 35% Sodium Ascorbate on Composite Bond Strength following Bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Eman H; Kilinc, Evren; Hardigan, Patrick C; Rothrock, James K; Thompson, Jeffrey Y; Garcia-Godoy, Cristina

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the effect of 35% sodium ascorbate on microtensile bond strength of dentin immediately after bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide. A total of 25 sound human 3 rd molars were collected. Teeth were randomly divided into five groups for different treatments: Group I [bleaching + immediate bonding (i.e., restoration)], group II (bleaching + delayed bonding), group III (bleaching + sodium ascorbate + immediate bonding), group IV (bleaching + sodium ascorbate + delayed bonding), and group V (bonding only). After bleaching, but before bonding, groups II and IV were stored for 1 week in deionized water at 37°C. All samples were bonded using OptiBoned FL (Kerr) and Filtek Supreme (3M/ESPE). Teeth were sectioned into 1 × 1 mm 2 bars, and microtensile bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine (Instron 8841) at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Microtensile bond strength differed significantly across the five groups, with a significant reduction in microtensile bond strength observed for samples in group I relative to samples in any of the other treatment groups (p bleaching on composite bonding strength to dentin. The negative effects of bleaching on composite bonding can be neutralized by the application of the reversing agent sodium ascorbate thus, increasing the efficiency of clinic chair time. This is clinically relevant for those patients requiring restorative treatment immediately after in-office bleaching.

  4. Toothpaste use protocol with dental bleaching for a conservative treatment: Case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemir F. Vieira-Junior

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In-office bleaching is a treatment based on products that contain hydrogen peroxide (HP while demonstrating whitening effectiveness. HP could promote alterations to surface morphologies and properties of dental tissues. The objective was describe a toothpaste protocol associated to bleaching therapy to promote a safer approach. Patient 1 (male and Patient 2 (female were attended, and toothbrushing (twice a day with a dentifrice containing bioactive glass (BG (NovaMin™ and fluoride was indicated before and during the treatment. Three bleaching sessions were made in cases, at intervals of 7 days. The gels used were 35% HP (Patient 1 and 35% HP supplied with calcium (Patient 2. The effectiveness of bleaching treatment was observed in both cases (Vita scale, with an esthetic self-acceptance. Sensitivity associated with the procedure was not reported. The indication of BG-based toothpaste is relevant in relation to enamel properties and did not affect the whitening effectiveness of dental bleaching.

  5. Bleaching of Wool with Sodium Borohydride

    OpenAIRE

    Duygu Yilmazer, MSc.; Mehmet Kanik, Ph.D.

    2009-01-01

    An untreated wool fabric was bleached both with sodium borohydride (SBH) in the presence of sodium bisulphite (SBS) solution and with a commercial H2O2 bleaching method. The concentration effects of SBH and SBS, bleaching time, pH and temperature on SBH bleaching process were investigated. Whiteness, yellowness and alkali solubility results were assessed for both bleaching methods. The results showed that whiteness degrees obtained with SBH bleaching was comparable with that of H2O2 bleaching...

  6. Efficacy and cytotoxicity of a bleaching gel after short application times on dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Diana Gabriela; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; da Silveira Vargas, Fernanda; Hebling, Josimeri; de Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2013-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate and correlate the efficacy and cytotoxicity of a 35 % hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching gel after different application times on dental enamel. Enamel/dentin disks in artificial pulp chambers were placed in wells containing culture medium. The following groups were formed: G1, control (no bleaching); G2 and G3, three or one 15-min bleaching applications, respectively; and G4 and G5, three or one 5-min bleaching applications, respectively. Extracts (culture medium with bleaching gel components) were applied for 60 min on cultured odontoblast-like MDPC-23 cells. Cell metabolism (methyl tetrazolium assay) (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5 %) and cell morphology (scanning electron microscopy) were analyzed immediately after the bleaching procedures and the trans-enamel and trans-dentinal HP diffusion quantified (one-way analysis of variance/Tukey's test; α = 5 %). The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity was evaluated 24 h after the contact time of the extracts with the cells (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 5 %). Tooth color was analyzed before and 24 h after bleaching using a spectrophotometer according to the Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage L*a*b* system (Kruskal-Wallis/Mann-Whitney; α = 0.05). Significant difference (p 0.05). The lowest amount of HP diffusion was observed in G5 (p 0.05). HP diffusion through dental tissues and its cytotoxic effects were proportional to the contact time of the bleaching gel with enamel. However, shorter bleaching times reduced bleaching efficacy. Shortening the in-office tooth bleaching time could be an alternative to minimize the cytotoxic effects of this clinical procedure to pulp tissue. However, the reduced time of bleaching agent application on enamel may not provide adequate esthetic outcome.

  7. The role of bound chlorine in the brightness reversion of bleached hardwood kraft pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kátia Maria Morais Eiras

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Our previous paper showed fragmentary evidence that pulp brightness reversion may be negatively affected by its organically bound chlorine (OX content. A thorough investigation on eucalyptus kraft pulp led to the conclusion that OX increases reversion of certain pulps but this trend is not universal. Alkaline bleaching stages decrease reversion regardless of pulp OX content. Pulps bleached with high temperature chlorine dioxide revert less than those bleached with conventional chlorine dioxide in sequences ending with a chlorine dioxide stage but similarly in sequences ending with a final peroxide stage. The use of secondary condensate for pulp washing decreases reversion.

  8. BLEACHING NEPTUNE BALLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONET Maria Angeles

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Posidonia Oceanic is a seaweed from Mediterranean Sea and it is more concentrated at the Balerian SEA. This implies the Valencian Community also. It forms vaste underwater meadows in the sea and are part of the Mediterranean ecosystem. It is a sea-grass specie with fruits and flowers. Leaves are ribbon-like and they grow in winter and at the end of summer some of them are separated and arrive to some sea line. Fuit is separated and can floate, it is known as “the olive of the sea” mainly in Italy, or as the Neptune Balls. As it can be used in different fields, it is is being studied in order ro have the precitice tests. Some authors have reported the manufacturing of fully bio-based comites with a gluten matrix by hot-press molding. And it has been considered as an effective insulator for building industry or even though to determine the presence of mercure in the Mediterranean sea some years ago. As many applications can be designed from that fibers, it has been considered to be bleached in order to used them in fashionable products. Consequently, its original brown color is not the most suitable one and it should be bleached as many other cellulosic fibers. The aim of this paper is to bleache neptune balls however, the inner fibers were not accessible at all and it implied not to bleach the inner fibers in the neptune ball. Further studiesd will consider bleaching the individualized fibers.

  9. Effect of enamel sealants on tooth bleaching and on the color stability of the result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcodel, N; Hassel, A J; Sen, S; Saure, D; Rammelsberg, P; Lux, C J; Zingler, S

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of enamel sealants on bleaching of natural teeth by use of 40 % hydrogen peroxide in a dental surgery. The color stability of the results from bleaching was, furthermore, determined 10 months after the bleaching procedure. In a standardized setting, four sealants (Pro Seal ® , Light Bond™ Sealant, Protecto ® , and Clinpro™ XT Varnish) were applied to and removed from human teeth in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Natural teeth served as medium; half of the teeth were sealed and the others served as controls. Hydrogen peroxide gel (40 %; Opalescence Boost; Ultradent Products, South Jordan, UT, USA) was used as bleaching agent. Color measurement was performed with a spectroradiometer (Photoresearch PR670) before the bleaching process (T1) and 24 h (T2) and 10 months (T3) after bleaching. The spectroradiometer results were expressed by use of the Commission Internationale de l'Éclairage (CIE) L*a*b* color notation. The L*, a*, and b* values of the sealed and the unsealed surfaces were not significantly different at any time during the study (p > 0.05), irrespective of the sealant used. Ten months after the bleaching process, mean L*, a*, and b* values were lower than at 1-day post-bleaching; the mean value of ΔE between 1-day post-bleaching and 10 months post-bleaching was 2.46 (±3.1). The results of the study suggest that the effectiveness of professional tooth whitening is not appreciably affected by the application of the four sealants tested.

  10. Assessment of acute phase proteins and oxidative stress status of Nigerians using bleaching agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akibinu, M.O.; Arinola, O.G.; Afolabi, K.A.

    2010-01-01

    The disruption of primary innate immune function of the epidermal layer of the skin accounts for the susceptibility of individuals using bleaching agents to localized or systemic infections. This subverted innate immunity in these people may lead to other pathological conditions. The resultant effects of skin bleaching and phagocytes activation in response to infections have not been studied in Nigerians using bleaching agents. The present study therefore assessed the levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), albumin, total antioxidant potential (TAP), total plasma peroxides (TPP), oxidative stress index (OSI) and malonaldehyde (MDA) in the users bleaching agents. Thirty (30) people who had used bleaching agents for average of 4.9 + 1.2 years participated in this study. They were recruited from various schools and markets within the city of Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria. Thirty apparently healthy staffs of University College Hospital Ibadan, Ibaadan, Nigeria, who had never used bleaching agents served as controls. All the subjects used for this study had no metabolic abnormality and tested negative to both HIV and hepatitis B infections. The mean value of TAP (p 0.20) when compared with the controls. Oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are possible consequences of skin bleaching. The users of skin bleaching agents may need antioxidant therapies to avert the risks of oxidative stress. (author)

  11. Effects of the bleaching sequence on the optical brighteners action in eucalyptus kraft pulp

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    Mauro Manfredi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available During the bleaching process the pulp is treated with chemical reagents that can be retained in the pulp and interfere in the action of the optical brighteners. Different bleaching sequences can produce pulps at the same brightness but with different potential to whiteness increase when treated with optical brighteners. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of the bleaching sequence on the efficiency of disulphonated and tetrasulphonated optical brighteners. Eucalyptus kraft pulp was bleached using four different bleaching sequences. For each pulp three brightness targets were aimeds. For each bleaching sequence mathematical model was generated for predicting the final pulp whiteness according to the initial brightness and the optical brightener charge applied. The presence of organochlorine residues in the pulp reduced the effectiveness of the optical brighteners. Therefore, bleaching sequences that use low chlorine dioxide charge favors for greater gains in whiteness with the application of optical brighteners. The replacement of the final chlorine dioxide bleaching stage with a hydrogen peroxide one in the sequence increased the efficiency of the optical brightening agents.

  12. [Effect of bleaching agents on the color of indirect and direct composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Wenzhong; Jiang, Tao; Chen, Xiaodong; Wang, Yining

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the effect of bleaching agents on the color of indirect and direct composite resins. Five resin composite materials were tested in this in vitro study. The five composites were as follow: two indirect composite resins (Adoro SR, Ceramage) and three direct composite resins (Filtek Z350, Clearfil Majesty Esthetic, and Gradia Direct Anterior). For each material, twenty disk-shaped specimens were prepared and randomly divided into five groups according to the color parameters of specimens before bleaching treatment. The composite resin specimens were treated by one of five sample solutions which were at-home bleaching agents (10% and 15% carbarmide peroxide), in- office bleaching agents (38% H(2)O(2) and 35%H(2)O(2)) and deionized water (control group). The color parameters of specimens were measured by spectrophotometer at baseline and after bleaching treatments. The color differences (ΔE values) between baseline and post-treatments were calculated. The data of color differences were evaluated statistically using two-way analysis with a significance level of 0.05. The color changes of the resin composites were less than 2.0 after bleaching agent treatment, therefore were not perceptible. Slight increase of L(*) values and decrease of C(*)ab values in color parameters of specimens were observed. There were statistically significant differences in ΔE values for different bleaching treatments and resin materials (P = 0.001). The bleaching agents did not affect the color of indirect and direct composite resins tested.

  13. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35% hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Deng, Meng; Wen, Hai-Lin; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Feng; Xu, Xin; Li, Hong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups: distilled deionized ...

  14. Effect of laser-assisted bleaching with Nd:YAG and diode lasers on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirhashemi, Amirhossein; Emadian Razavi, Elham Sadat; Behboodi, Sara; Chiniforush, Nasim

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of laser-assisted bleaching with neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG) and diode lasers on shear bond strength (SBS) of orthodontic brackets. One hundred and four extracted human premolars were randomly divided into four groups: group 1: No bleaching applied (control group); group 2: Teeth bleached with 40 % hydrogen peroxide; group 3: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 2.5 W, 25 Hz, pulse duration of 100 μs, 6 mm distance); and group 4: Teeth treated with 30 % hydrogen peroxide activated with diode laser (810 nm, 1 W, CW, 6 mm distance). Equal numbers of teeth in groups 2, 3, and 4 were bonded at start, 1 h, 24 h, and 1 week after bleaching. A universal testing machine measured the SBS of the samples 24 h after bonding. After bracket debonding, the amount of residual adhesive on the enamel surface was observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. The SBS in the unbleached group was significantly higher than that in the bleached groups bonded immediately and 1 h after laser-assisted bleaching (P laser-assisted bleaching, the SBS was found to be significantly lower than that in the control group. Significant differences in the ARI scores existed among groups as well. The SBS of brackets seems to increase quickly within an hour after laser-assisted bleaching and 24 h after conventional bleaching. Thus, this protocol can be recommended if it is necessary to bond the brackets on the same day of bleaching.

  15. Effects of the bleaching procedures on enamel micro-hardness: Plasma Arc and diode laser comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematianaraki, Saeid; Fekrazad, Reza; Naghibi, Nasim; Kalhori, Katayoun Am; Junior, Aldo Brugnera

    2015-10-02

    One of the major side effects of vital bleaching is the reduction of enamel micro-hardness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of two different bleaching systems, Plasma Arc and GaAlAs laser, on the enamel micro-hardness. 15 freshly extracted human third molars were sectioned to prepare 30 enamel blocks (5×5 mm). These samples were then randomly divided into 2 groups of 15 each (n=15): a plasma arc bleaching group (: 350-700 nm) + 35% Hydrogen Peroxide whitening gel and a laser bleaching group (GaAlAs laser, λ: 810 nm, P: 10 W, CW, Special Tip) + 35% Hydrogen Peroxide whitening gel. Samples were subjected to the Vickers micro-hardness test (VHN) at a load of 50 g for 15s before and after treatment. Data were statistically analyzed by a Mann-Whitney test (p≤0.05). In the GaAlAs laser group, the enamel micro-hardness was 618.2 before and was reduced to 544.6 after bleaching procedures. In the plasma arc group, the enamel micro-hardness was 644.8 before and 498.9 after bleaching. Although both techniques significantly reduced VHN, plasma arc bleaching resulted in a 22.62% reduction in VHN for enamel micro-hardness, whereas an 11.89% reduction in VHN was observed for laser bleaching; this difference is statistically significant (plaser than with the plasma arc. Therefore GaAlAs laser bleaching has fewer harmful effects than plasma arc in respect to enamel micro-hardness reduction.

  16. Thermographic and spectrophotometric analysis of the extrinsic tooth bleaching using a diode laser and a LED system. In vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micheli, Paola Racy de

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra-pulpal temperature change, as well as to compare the bleaching power of a 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Xtra Boost- Ultradent. Inc), when activated with a diode laser, with a LED system and without activation, in the extrinsic tooth bleaching in vitro. Ten mandibular human incisors, a thermocouple, 45 bovine incisors and a spectrophotometer (Shade Eye- Shofu) for the color analysis. The samples were divided into 3 groups: 38% hydrogen peroxide activated by a diode laser (ZAP lasers, wavelength 808 nm ± 5, power of 1,4 W); 38% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED (Bright LEC-Mmoptics, wavelength 470 nm ± 25, power of 380 mW); 38% hydrogen peroxide without activation. After the artificial pigmentation, the bleaching agent acted for the same time in the 3 groups, differing only by the type of activation. The results of temperature showed that the LED activation was safer than the diode laser, which, in some measures exceeded the limit of 5.6 deg C. The luminosity of the samples did not show significantly statistics differences in none of the groups and moments of this study. The diode laser and LED activation did not influenced at the bleaching power of the peroxide, which showed effective for removing stains, with great capacity of bleaching bovine tooth artificially darkened. (author)

  17. Influence of whitening gel on pulp chamber temperature rise by in-office bleaching technique

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    Sandro Cordeiro Loretto

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Dental bleaching is a conservative method for the aesthetic restoration of stained teeth. However, whitening treatments are likely to cause adverse effects when not well planned and executed. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the influence of whitening gel on temperature rise in the pulp chamber, using the in-office photoactivated dental bleaching technique. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The root portion of an upper central human incisor was sectioned 3mm below the cemento-enamel junction. The root canal was enlarged to permit the insertion of the K-type thermocouple sensor (MT-401 into the pulp chamber, which was filled with thermal paste to facilitate the transfer of heat during bleaching. Three photosensitive whitening agents (35% hydrogen peroxide were used: Whiteness HP (FGM, Whiteness HP Maxx (FGM and Lase Peroxide Sensy (DMC. An LED photocuring light (Flash Lite - Discus Dental was used to activate the whitening gels. Six bleaching cycles were performed on each group tested. The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and LSD t-test (α<0.05. RESULT: The lowest mean temperature variation (ºC was detected for Lase Peroxide Sensy (0.20, while the highest was recorded for Whiteness HP (1.50. CONCLUSION: The Whiteness HP and Whiteness HP Maxx whitening gels significantly affected the temperature rise in the pulp chamber during bleaching, and this variation was dependent on the type of whitening gel used.

  18. Effect of coffe and a cola-based soft drink on the color stability of bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching

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    Rodrigo PIROLO

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus about the waiting time necessary for the patient to start consuming beverages containing colorants again after bleaching. Objective: To evaluate the influence of beverages with coloring agents on bleached bovine incisors considering the time elapsed after bleaching. Materials and methods: Sixty bovine incisors were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide for in-office use (Whiteness HP Max and divided into 10 groups. The color was evaluated with a spectrophotometer (Spectro Shade MICRO before and after bleaching, employing the CIE-Lab system. After bleaching, the teeth were exposed for 5 min to coffee or cola-based soft drink (CBSD at different periods after bleaching: 10 min, 1 h, 24 h, 48 h, and 72 h. Color (∆E and lightness (∆L variations were obtained from the CIE-Lab coordinates. Data were subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD tests (p<0.05. Results: Significant differences were observed between groups for both the ∆L and ∆E values (p<0.001. All specimens presented a decrease in brightness (negative ∆L. The highest ∆E values were observed for teeth stained with a CBSD at 10 min and 1 h (4.12 and 4.16, respectively. Teeth pigmented with coffee presented ∆E values below 3.3 units for all evaluation times. Conclusion: The exposure to coffee after bleaching causes less color changes than the exposure to a CBSD regardless of the time after bleaching.

  19. Spectrophotometric analysis of discoloration and internal bleaching after use of different antibiotic pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundaoğlu Küçükekenci, Funda; Çakici, Fatih; Küçükekenci, Ahmet Serkan

    2018-04-14

    To investigate teeth's antibiotic-induced color differences after bleaching using two different techniques. One hundred twenty extracted maxillar human incisors were examined. The specimens were randomly divided into six groups, each receiving one of six antibiotic paste fillings: (1) triple antibiotic paste (TAP) with minocycline, (2) double antibiotic paste (DAP), (3) TAP with amoxicillin, (4) TAP with cefaclor, (5) TAP with doxycycline, and (6) no filling (control group). Spectrophotometric measurements were obtained at baseline and then during the first, second, and third weeks after paste placement. The specimens discolored by antibiotics pastes were randomly divided into two subgroups: (1) internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2) and (2) internal bleaching with H 2 O 2 plus Nd-YAG laser irradiation. The ∆E value was calculated and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance and post-hoc Tukey's test (α = 0.05). The ∆E for all groups showed color differences exceeding the perceptibility threshold (∆E ˃ 3.7) at all time points except in the control and DAP groups. Minocycline-induced TAP showed the most severe coronal discoloration (32.42). When the ∆E was examined, thermo/photo bleaching (22.01 ± 8.23) caused more bleaching than walking bleaching (19.73 ± 5.73) at every time point (P = 0.19). No group returned to the original color after bleaching (P bleaching with Nd-YAG laser can be useful for bleaching/removing this discoloration. For clinically successful final appearances, understanding the effects of bleaching procedures on antibiotic paste discoloration is important.

  20. Influence of dental bleaching on marginal leakage of Class V restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Cristina Ramos Dorini

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Evaluate the in vitro effect of bleaching performed in the dental office and waiting time on the degree of microleakage in class V cavities with margins in enamel, restored with resin composite. Methods: Forty-five human third molars were used, in which the vestibular faces were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide activated with LED and the palatine faces were not bleached (control. The teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups with 15 teeth in each: Group 1, restored immediately after bleaching; Group 2, seven days after bleaching; and Group 3, fourteen days after bleaching. After cavity preparation, 35% phosphoric acid, Adper Single Bond 2 adhesive (3M ESPE, St. Paul, Mn, USA, and resin composite Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA were applied. The teeth were thermal cycled and sealed with red nail polish on the bleached faces and blue on the non bleached faces, except for 1mm around the restored region. The samples were classified according to the following scores: 0 = no leakage, 1 = minimum leakage (less than 1 / 3 the length of the wall, 2 = moderate leakage (1/3 to 2/3 of the wall and 3 = extensive leakage (over 2/3 of the wall. The data were submitted to the Kruskal-Wallis test at a level of significance of 5%. Results: The restorative procedure immediately after bleaching resulted in statistically higher microleakage values (p 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results, it is advisable to wait at least 7 days after bleaching to make the definitive restoration.

  1. Effects of the Ratio between Pigment and Bleaching Gel on the Fracture Resistance and Dentin Microhardness of endodontically treated Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloza, Marina Og; Jordão-Basso, Keren Cf; Bandeca, Matheus C; Costa, Samuel O; Borges, Alvaro H; Tonetto, Mateus R; Tirintan, Fabio C; Keine, Kátia C; Kuga, Milton C

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of bleaching gel using 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), associated with red carmine pigment (RC), in the 3:1 or 1:1 ratio, on fracture resistance and dentin microhardness of endodontically treated teeth. A total of 40 lower incisors were endodontically treated and divided into four groups (n = 10), according to the bleaching protocol: G1 (HP3), 35% HP + RC (3:1); G2 (HP1), 35% HP + RC (1:1); G3 (positive), 38% HP; and G4 (negative), unbleached. Four dental bleaching sessions were performed. The dental crowns were restored after the last session and submitted to the fracture resistance test. Totally, 60 specimens from the endodontically treated lower incisor crowns were prepared to evaluate the effects on dentin microhardness. The analysis was measured (in Knoop) prior to and after the last dental bleaching session using similar bleaching protocols. G2 presented the lowest fracture resistance (p 0.05). No difference was observed in the reduction of dentin microhardness among the groups (p > 0.05). A 1:1 ratio (bleaching gel:pigment) caused a significant fracture resistance reduction in relation to the other protocols. No effect on the dentin microhardness reduction was observed. The pigment addition to the bleaching agent accelerates the bleaching chemical reaction. However, no studies have evaluated the ideal proportion to optimize tooth bleaching.

  2. Bleaching in vital deciduous teeth – a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Pettorossi Imparato

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available There has been growing concern and search for esthetic beauty and harmony over the last few years. This concern does not form part ofadults’ lives only, but also of children’s. Among the substances used for bleaching dental structures, the most outstanding are those whoseactive principle is hydrogen peroxide-based . The present study reports a clinical case of a 4-year-old girl that suffered trauma of tooth 61 with consequent color alteration, but with no alteration in pulp vitality. The main complaint by the patient and her guardians concerned esthetics, therefore external dental bleaching was performed, using Opalescence Xtra® (Ultradent, in two sessions with an interval of one month between them. External in office bleaching was the treatment of choice, due to the tooth vitality, patient’s age and presence of only one darkened tooth. After the bleaching treatments an improvement in the darkening was observed, and both the child and her guardians were satisfied with the esthetic result.

  3. High-performance supercapacitors using flexible and freestanding MnOx/carbamide carbon nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Edmund; Jo, Hong Seok; Joshi, Bhavana; Park, Hyun Goo; Kim, Yong Il; An, Seongpil; Swihart, Mark T.; Yun, Je Moon; Kim, Kwang Ho; Yoon, Sam S.

    2017-11-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a MnOx/carbamide carbon nanofiber (CCNF) composite consisting of MnO particles embedded in CCNFs as a highly flexible and freestanding electrode material for supercapacitors. A sacrificial polymer component, polymethylmethacrylate, included in the precursor solution, pyrolyzes during heating, resulting in pores in the fibers, some of which are filled by the MnO nanocrystals. Carbamide is added to control the size of the MnOx particles as well as to increase the carbon content of the composite and hence its conductivity. The X-ray diffraction and Raman spectra of the composite show that the MnO particles formed have low crystallinity. Transmission electron microscopy confirms that the MnO particles are distributed very uniformly over the CCNFs. Symmetric supercapacitors constructed using electrodes of this composite exhibit specific capacitances of 498 F•g-1 at a scan rate of 10 mV•s-1 and 271 F•g-1 at a current density of 1 A•g-1. They also exhibit excellent long-term cycling performance, retaining 93% of their initial capacity after 5000 cycles of galvanostatic charging/discharging.

  4. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of new uranyl malonate and oxalate complexes with carbamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkina, L. B.; Grigor’ev, M. S.; Serezhkin, V. N.

    2016-01-01

    Two new malonate-containing uranyl complexes with carbamide of the formulas [UO 2 (C 3 H 2 O 4 )(Urea) 2 ] (I) and [UO 2 (C 3 H 2 O 4 )(Urea) 3 ] (II), where Urea is carbamide, and one uranyl oxalate complex of the formula [UO 2 (C 2 O 4 )(Urea) 3 ] (III) were synthesized, and their crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction. The main structural units in crystals I are the electroneutral chains [UO 2 (C 3 H 2 O 4 )(Urea) 2 ] ∞ belonging to the crystal-chemical group AT 11 M 2 1 (A = UO 2 2+ , T 11 = C 3 H 2 O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea) of uranyl complexes. Crystals II and III are composed of the molecular complexes [UO 2 (L)(Urea) 3 ], where L = C 3 H 2 O 4 2- or C 2 O 4 2- , belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB 01 M 3 1 (A = UO 2 2+ , B 01 = C 3 H 2 O 4 2- or C 2 O 4 2- , M 1 = Urea). The characteristic features of the packing of the uranium-containing complexes are discussed in terms of molecular Voronoi–Dirichlet polyhedra. The effect of the Urea: U ratio on the structure of uranium-containing structural units is considered.

  5. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on the surface roughness of bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The ever-increasing demand for enhanced esthetic appearance has resulted in significant developments in bleaching products. However, the enamel surface roughness (SR might be negatively affected by bleaching agents. This in vitro study was undertaken to compare the effects of three nanobiomaterials on the enamel SR subsequent to bleaching. Materials and Methods: The crowns of six extracted intact nonerupted human third molars were sectioned. Five dental blocks measuring 2 mm × 3 mm × 4 mm were prepared from each tooth and placed in colorless translucent acrylic resin. The enamel areas from all the specimens were divided into five groups (n = 6: Group 1 did not undergo any bleaching procedures; Group 2 was bleached with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by bioactive glass (BAG, amorphous calcium phosphate, and hydroxyapatite, respectively. The enamel SR was evaluated before and after treatment by atomic force microscopy. The data were analyzed by Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests. Results: SR increased significantly in the HP group. SR decreased significantly in the HP gel modified by BAG group as compared to other groups. Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, incorporation of each one of the three test biomaterials proved effective in decreasing enamel SR subsequent to in-office bleaching technique.

  6. Coral reef bleaching: ecological perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glynn, P. W.

    1993-03-01

    Coral reef bleaching, the whitening of diverse invertebrate taxa, results from the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or a reduction in photosynthetic pigment concentrations in zooxanthellae residing within the gastrodermal tissues of host animals. Of particular concern are the consequences of bleaching of large numbers of reef-building scleractinian corals and hydrocorals. Published records of coral reef bleaching events from 1870 to the present suggest that the frequency (60 major events from 1979 to 1990), scale (co-occurrence in many coral reef regions and often over the bathymetric depth range of corals) and severity (>95% mortality in some areas) of recent bleaching disturbances are unprecedented in the scientific literature. The causes of small scale, isolated bleaching events can often be explained by particular stressors (e.g., temperature, salinity, light, sedimentation, aerial exposure and pollutants), but attempts to explain large scale bleaching events in terms of possible global change (e.g., greenhouse warming, increased UV radiation flux, deteriorating ecosystem health, or some combination of the above) have not been convincing. Attempts to relate the severity and extent of large scale coral reef bleaching events to particular causes have been hampered by a lack of (a) standardized methods to assess bleaching and (b) continuous, long-term data bases of environmental conditions over the periods of interest. An effort must be made to understand the impact of bleaching on the remainder of the reef community and the long-term effects on competition, predation, symbioses, bioerosion and substrate condition, all factors that can influence coral recruitment and reef recovery. If projected rates of sea warming are realized by mid to late AD 2000, i.e. a 2°C increase in high latitude coral seas, the upper thermal tolerance limits of many reef-building corals could be exceeded. Present evidence suggests that many corals would be unable to adapt

  7. Reuse of discarded deactivated bleaching earth in the bleaching of oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girgis, Adel Y.

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Discarded bleaching earth was used after its reactivation for the bleaching of sunflower, soybean and corn oils. The efficiency of reactivated bleaching earth was compared to the efficiency of virgin activated bleaching earth. Acid reactivated earth (pH 2.5-3 had a slightly higher content in silicone than virgin activated or neutralized reactivated earths. The best results in the color of sunflower and corn oils were obtained when neutralized earth (pH 6–7 was used at 1 and 2 % levels. Acid reactivated earth used at 2 % achieved a higher reduction in soybean oil color than virgin earth (pH 3 at the same dosage. Both reactivated earths reduced peroxide value, iron, conjugated dienes and soap, while they increased acidity and conjugated trienes. Furthermore, these reactivated earths determined higher decrements in the oil induction period than virgin earth. Reactivated earth could be used for 5 cycles for the bleaching of soybean or corn oils and for more than 6 cycles for sunflower oil.Tierra decolorante desechada, fue empleada, tras su reactivación para decolorar aceites de girasol, soja y maíz. La eficiencia de la tierra decolorante reactivada fue comparada con la de la virgen activada. La tierra reactivada ácida (pH 2,5–3 tuvo ligeramente mayor contenido en silicona que la tierra virgen o la reactivada neutra. Los mejores resultados en el color de los aceites de girasol y maíz fueron obtenidos cuando se emplearon niveles del 1 y 2 % de tierra reactivada neutra (pH 6-7. La tierra ácida reactivada, usada al 2 % consiguió una mayor reducción del color del aceite de soja, que una misma dosis de tierra virgen (pH 3. Ambas tierras reactivadas redujeron el índice de peróxidos, hierro, dienos conjugados y jabón de los aceites, mientras que hicieron aumentar la acidez y los trienos conjugados. Además, estas tierras reactivadas determinaron mayores descensos en los periodos de inducción del aceite que la tierra virgen. Las tierras

  8. Utilisation of the energy-independent underground gasification-uvea process for carbamide production; Einsatz des energieautarken Untertagevergasungs-Urea-Prozesses zur Carbamid-Herstellung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaten, Natalie; Kempka, Thomas [Helmholtz Zentrum Potsdam, Deutsches GeoForschungszentrum (GFZ) Potsdam (Germany); Schlueter, Ralph [DMT GmbH und Co. KG, Essen (Germany). Abt. Geologie und Bohrlochvermessungen; Hamann, Joerg [EPC Industrial Engineering Deutschland GmbH, Alzenau (Germany); Islam, Rafiqul [Dhaka Univ. (Bangladesh). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Azzam, Rafig [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Ingenieur- und Hydrogeologie

    2011-08-15

    The worldwide coal resources have an energy supply potential of several hundred years. However, great depths, thin seams and tectonic faults may greatly restrict the utilisation of the coal seams by means of conventional conveyor technologies. With the aim of production of a conveyable synthesis gas underground coal gasification (UCG) offers an environmentally friendly and economically viable possibility of utilisation of previously inaccessible coal deposits. The high-calorific UCG synthesis gas can be used, for example, for the generation of electricity in an integrated gas and steam turbine process (GaS) as well as the production of chemical starting materials. One possibility of product recovery from the UCG synthesis gas is the production of the fertiliser carbamide (CH{sub 6}N{sub 2}O{sub 2}). The aim of this study is the development of a utilisation concept for coal deposits on the basis of a combined and energy-independent UCG-GaS-urea process. To check the utilisation concept based on an independent electricity supply an economic feasibility study for a selected investigation area in the north of Bangladesh was carried out with consideration of the economic viability and potential of the UCG-GaS-urea process. (orig.)

  9. The number of bleaching sessions influences pulp tissue damage in rat teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Benetti, Francine; da Silva Facundo, Aguinaldo Cândido; Ferreira, Luciana Louzada; Gomes-Filho, João Eduardo; Ervolino, Edilson; Rahal, Vanessa; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2013-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide tooth bleaching is claimed to cause alterations in dental tissue structures. This study investigated the influence of the number of bleaching sessions on pulp tissue in rats. Male Wistar rats were studied in 5 groups (groups 1S-5S) of 10 each, which differed by the number (1-5) of bleaching sessions. In each session, the animals were anesthetized, and 35% hydrogen peroxide gel was applied to 3 upper right molars. Two days after the experimental period, the animals were killed, and their jaws were processed for light microscope evaluation. Pulp tissue reactions were scored as follows: 1, no or few inflammatory cells and no reaction; 2, session, necrotic tissue in the pulp horns and underlying inflammatory changes were observed. The extent and intensity of these changes increased with the number of bleaching sessions. After 5 sessions, the changes included necrotic areas in the pulp tissue involving the second third of the radicular pulp and intense inflammation in the apical third. The number of bleaching sessions directly influenced the extent of pulp damage. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Optimization Of Bleaching Parameters By Whiteness Index And Bursting Strength Of Knitted Cotton Fabric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu Naser Md. Ahsanul Haque

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The study comprises the effect of different bleaching parameters on scoured single jersey cotton fabrics. Three different concentrations 1.8 gL 2.0 gL and 2.2 gL taken from 5 stock solution of hydrogen peroxide were considered for the experiment. In each concentration bleaching was performed in four individual temperatures 78C 88C 98C and 108C. In each of the temperatures bleaching were continued for four individual time period 20 30 40 and 50 minutes. The weight of sample fabric was 12.5 grams and 110 liquor ratio was maintained in each operation. The bleached samples were tested in a reflectance spectrophotometer datacolor 650 and also their bursting strengths were found from an Autoburst instrument following ISO 13038-1 method. The results show that bursting strength and whiteness index have an inverse relation between themselves. For the nominated concentrations of peroxide 88C to 98C temperature with 30 to 40 minutes time duration is suggested as the optimum bleaching parameter for knitted cotton fabric.

  11. Bleaching Gels Containing Calcium and Fluoride: Effect on Enamel Erosion Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra B. Borges

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study evaluated the effect of 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP bleaching gel modified or not by the addition of calcium and fluoride on enamel susceptibility to erosion. Bovine enamel samples (3 mm in diameter were divided into four groups (n=15 according to the bleaching agent: control—without bleaching (C; 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP; 35% HP with the addition of 2% calcium gluconate (HP + Ca; 35% HP with the addition of 0.6% sodium fluoride (HP + F. The bleaching gels were applied on the enamel surface for 40 min, and the specimens were subjected to erosive challenge with Sprite Zero and remineralization with artificial saliva for 5 days. Enamel wear was assessed using profilometry. The data were analyzed by ANOVA/ Tukey’s test (P<0.05. There were significant differences among the groups (P=0.009. The most enamel wear was seen for C (3.37±0.80 μm, followed by HP (2.89 ± 0.98 μm and HP + F (2.72 ± 0.64 μm. HP + Ca (2.31 ± 0.92 μm was the only group able to significantly reduce enamel erosion compared to C. The application of HP bleaching agent did not increase the enamel susceptibility to erosion. However, the addition of calcium gluconate to the HP gel resulted in reduced susceptibility of the enamel to erosion.

  12. In-office bleaching efficacy on stain removal from CAD/CAM and direct resin composite materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Amal; Ardu, Stefano; Bortolotto, Tissiana; Krejci, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of in-office bleaching on stain removal from stained resin composite and ceramic computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM) blocks and direct resin composites. Forty disk-shaped samples were fabricated from each of nine materials: six CAD/CAM (VITABLOCS Mark II, Paradigm MZ100, Exp Vita Hybrid Ceramic, VITA ENAMIC, Exp Kerr, and LAVA Ultimate) and three direct resin composites (Filtek Supreme, Venus Diamond, and Filtek Silorane). Samples were randomly divided into five groups (n = 8), each stained with a particular staining solution. Using a calibrated spectrophotometer and a black background, L*a*b* values were assessed before and after 120 days of staining. Samples were subjected to in-office bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide gel for one hour. At subsequent assessment, color change (ΔE) was calculated as the difference between L*a*b* values. Both ANOVA and the Duncan test were used to identify differences between groups (α = 0.05). Bleaching resulted in significant differences in ΔE values for all materials (P Bleaching efficacy was highly influenced by material composition and staining solution. Residual color values after bleaching for ceramic and hybrid ceramics ranged from -0.49 to 2.35, within the clinically acceptable maximum of 3.3. Values after bleaching for resin-based CAD/CAM ranged from -0.7 to 7.08 while direct resin composites values ranged from -1.47 to 25.13. Coffee left the greatest residual color on all materials. Based on material nature, 40% hydrogen peroxide bleaching can remove staining. The new resin-based CAD/CAM blocks showed promising results in terms of color stability. Bleaching using 40% hydrogen peroxide can be an effective method to remove stains from dental restorations. In this way, restoration replacement as a result of discoloration may no longer be necessary. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. A bleaching earth from egyptian local deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Kinawy, Omayma S.

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation deals with the bleaching of vegetable oils using activated clays collected from some deposits in Egypt as compared to Tonsil FF currently used by local oil industry. The comparison was made; not only on the basis of the decolourising power of the earth, but also on the basis of its effects on the oil acidity, formation of the oil peroxides and the decomposition rate of the formed peroxides to aldehydes and ketones during the bleaching process. The activation of the collected earth samples was made using 4N HCl, 6N HCl and 30 % H2SO4. The bleaching tests of the activated samples were performed using the major four oil types processed in Egypt being cottonseed, sunflower, soybean and palm oils. In addition to the laboratory-evaluation tests, the performance of the activated samples, which showed promise on the lab-scale have been also tested on an industrial scale. The industrial application has proved that the activated local earth's can be successfully used as bleaching earth of local oils. Thus it can be used as a substitute of the varieties currently imported and used by the local oil sector.La presente investigación trata de la decoloración de aceites vegetales usando tierras activadas obtenidas de yacimientos egipcios, comparándola con el Tonsil FF usado normalmente en la industria oleícola local. La comparación se realizó, no sólo sobre la base del poder decolorante de la tierra, sino también sobre la base de sus efectos en la acidez del aceite, la formación de peróxidos y la velocidad de descomposición de los peróxidos formados en aldehidos y cetonas durante el proceso de decoloración. La activación de las muestras de tierras recogidas se hizo utilizando ClH 4N, ClH 6N y H2SO4 30 %. Los tests de decoloración de las muestras activadas se llevaron a cabo usando los cuatro tipos mayoritarios de aceites procesados en Egipto: aceite de semilla de algodón, de girasol, de soja y de palma. Además de los

  14. Synthesis and X-ray diffraction study of new uranyl malonate and oxalate complexes with carbamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedkov, Ya. A.; Serezhkina, L. B., E-mail: Lserezh@samsu.ru [Samara State University (Russian Federation); Grigor’ev, M. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry (Russian Federation); Serezhkin, V. N. [Samara State University (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-15

    Two new malonate-containing uranyl complexes with carbamide of the formulas [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Urea){sub 2}] (I) and [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Urea){sub 3}] (II), where Urea is carbamide, and one uranyl oxalate complex of the formula [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Urea){sub 3}] (III) were synthesized, and their crystals were studied by X-ray diffraction. The main structural units in crystals I are the electroneutral chains [UO{sub 2}(C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4})(Urea){sub 2}]{sub ∞} belonging to the crystal-chemical group AT{sup 11}M{sub 2}{sup 1} (A = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, T{sup 11} = C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-}, M{sup 1} = Urea) of uranyl complexes. Crystals II and III are composed of the molecular complexes [UO{sub 2}(L)(Urea){sub 3}], where L = C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-} or C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-}, belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB{sup 01}M{sub 3}{sup 1} (A = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = C{sub 3}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-} or C{sub 2}O{sub 4}{sup 2-}, M{sup 1} = Urea). The characteristic features of the packing of the uranium-containing complexes are discussed in terms of molecular Voronoi–Dirichlet polyhedra. The effect of the Urea: U ratio on the structure of uranium-containing structural units is considered.

  15. Preemptive use of etodolac on tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaez, Savil Costa; Faria-E-Silva, André Luís; Loguércio, Alessandro Dourado; Fernandes, Micaelle Tenório Guedes; Nahsan, Flávia Pardo Salata

    2018-02-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of the preemptive administration of etodolac on risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity and the bleaching effect caused by in-office bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide. Fifty patients were selected for this tripleblind, randomized, crossover, and placebo-controlled clinical trial. Etodolac (400 mg) or placebo was administrated in a single-dose 1 hour prior to the bleaching procedure. The whitening treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide was carried out in two sessions with a 7-day interval. Tooth sensitivity was assessed before, during, and 24 hours after the procedure using the analog visual scale and the verbal rating scale. Color alteration was assessed by a bleach guide scale, 7 days after each session. Relative risk of sensitivity was calculated and adjusted by session, while overall risk was compared by the McNemar's test. Data on the sensitivity level of both scales and color shade were subjected to Friedman, Wilcoxon, and Mann-Whitney tests, respectively (α=0.05). The preemptive administration of etodolac did not affect the risk of tooth sensitivity and the level of sensitivity reported, regardless of the time of evaluation and scale used. The sequence of treatment allocation did not affect bleaching effectiveness, while the second session resulted in additional color modification. The preemptive administration of etodolac in a single dose 1 hour prior to in-office tooth bleaching did not alter tooth color, and the risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity reported by patients. A single-dose preemptive administration of 400 mg of etodolac did not affect either risk of tooth sensitivity or level of sensitivity reported by patients, during or after the in-office tooth bleaching procedure.

  16. Effectiveness of bleaching agent on composite resin discoloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galih Sampoerno

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The discoloration of teeth, especially anterior teeth, is one of aesthetic problems. The use of tooth bleaching agents for discolored natural teeth is becoming increasingly popular. Many dentists, however, get many problems when they conduct bleaching process since there is much composite filling on patient’s anterior teeth. Although many research have focused on the discoloration of composite resin after bleaching process, the problem still becomes debatable. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the difference of the discoloration between hybrid composite and nano composite before and after the application of tooth bleaching agent, 38% hydrogen peroxide. Methods: Eighteen disk-shaped specimens (5 mm of each of two composite resins, hybrid and nano filler, were prepared. The each group was treated 3 times and the specimens were divided into two groups consisted of 9 specimens for each, and then immersed in black tea solutions for 72 hours. Next, after having staining and bleaching processes, the color of the specimens was measured with a optic spectrophotometer by using photo with type BPY-47 and digital microvolt. The differences of the light intensity among three measurements were then calculated. Afterwards, GLM MANOVA Repeated Measure and parametric analysis (Independent t-test and Paired t-test were then used to analyze the data. Results: After staining process, it is then known that the nano composite had more discoloration and more affected by the black tea solution than the hybrid one. Conclusion: After bleaching, the discoloration was finally removed completely from both hybride and nano filler composite resins and became brighter from the baseline color.Latar belakang: Salah satu problem estetik adalah adanya perubahan warna pada gigi anterior. Peningkatan pemakaian bahan bleaching semakin popular. Banyak dokter gigi mempunyai problem ketika mereka akan melakukan proses bleaching dan ditemukan banyak

  17. The effect of dental bleaching on pulpal tissue response in a diabetic animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintra, L T A; Ferreira, L L; Benetti, F; Gastélum, A A; Gomes-Filho, J E; Ervolino, E; Briso, A L F

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate pulpal tissue response after dental bleaching in normal and alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Twenty-eight rats were divided into two groups of normoglycaemic and diabetic rats (n = 14). Diabetes mellitus (DM) was induced with alloxan. After DM confirmation, all rats were anaesthetized and dental bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) on the right maxillary molars for 30 min. Left molars were used as controls. Bleaching resulted in four hemimaxillae groups: normoglycaemic (N), N-bleached (NBle), diabetic (D) and D-bleached (DBle). After 2 or 30 days, the animals were euthanized and the hemimaxillae were removed, processed for histopathological analysis and stained with haematoxylin-eosin (HE), Masson's trichrome (MT) and picrosirius red (PSR). Results obtained within animals (normoglycaemic or diabetic rats) were submitted to Wilcoxon or paired t-tests, and between animal (normoglycaemic and diabetic rats), to Mann-Whitney test or t-tests. At 2 days, the NBle group had a mild inflammatory infiltration in the pulpal tissue, whilst the DBle had severe inflammation or necrosis (P bleaching was greater in diabetic rats. Additionally, the increase in reactionary dentine deposition and mature collagen fibres observed in diabetic rats needs further evaluation to confirm the present results. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Influence of skin cold sensation threshold in the occurrence of dental sensitivity during dental bleaching: a placebo controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Rahal; Marjorie de Oliveira Gallinari; Juliana Stuginski Barbosa; Reynaldo Leite Martins-Junior; Paulo Henrique dos Santos; Luciano Tavares Angelo Cintra; André Luiz Fraga Briso

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study verified the occurrence of dental sensitivity in patients submitted to a 35% hydrogen peroxide based product (Whiteness HP Maxx 35% – FGM), skin cold sensation threshold (SCST) and its influence on dental sensitivity. Material and Methods Sixty volunteers were divided into 4 groups (n = 15), according to SCST (low: GI and GIII, and high: GII and IV) and bleaching treatment (hydrogen peroxide: GI and GII, and placebo: GIII and GIV). SCST was determined in the in...

  19. High levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas: effects on enamel and pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, George; Zaidel, Lynette; Lin, Nora; Stranick, Michael; Bagley, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Limited data are available to assess the safety of high levels of hydrogen peroxide in overnight tooth-whitening formulas. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of hydrogen peroxide on enamel microhardness, pulp penetration, and enamel morphology. Colgate Platinum Professional Overnight Whitening System (Colgate Oral Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Canton, MA, USA) (10% carbamide peroxide, equivalent to 3.5% hydrogen peroxide) was compared with two prototype formulations containing either 7.0% or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide. In the pulp chamber studies, human extracted teeth were exposed to 3.5%, 7.0%, or 12.0% hydrogen peroxide for 30 minutes, 4 hours, or 7 hours. Microhardness, electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis, and atomic force microscopy evaluations were made from enamel blocks cut from human extracted molars. The enamel blocks were evaluated following 14 7-hour treatments (98 h total). At 7 hours' post-treatment, hydrogen peroxide penetrated the pulp chamber at 23.12 +/- 10.09, 24.58 +/- 6.90, and 26.39 +/- 5.43 microg for 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% hydrogen peroxide, respectively. With regard to enamel morphology, pulp penetration, microhardness, and elemental composition, no statistically significant differences were observed between treatment groups following 98 hours of treatment. Hydrogen peroxide does not adversely affect enamel morphology or microhardness. The levels recovered in pulp indicate that hydrogen peroxide is not expected to inhibit pulpal enzymes. Overnight tray products containing levels of hydrogen peroxide of 3.5%, 7.0%, and 12.0% are not expected to adversely affect the enamel or pulpal enzymes. Additional safety studies are needed to assess the potential for tooth sensitivity and gingival irritation.

  20. Fracture resistance of bleached teeth restored with different procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Coelho Bandéca

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fracture resistance of teeth submitted to internal bleaching and restored with different non-metallic post. Eighty mandibular incisors were endodontically treated and randomly divided in 10 groups (n = 8: G1- restored with composite resin (CR, G2- CR + fiber-reinforced composite post (FRC, Everstick post, Sticktech cemented with resin cement self-etch adhesive (RCS, Panavia F 2.0, Kuraray, G3- CR + FRC + self-adhesive resin cement (SRC, Breeze, Pentral Clinical, G4- CR+ glass fiber post (GF, Exacto Post, Angelus + RCS, G5- CR + GF + SRC. The G6 to G10 were bleached with hydrogen peroxide (HP and restored with the same restorative procedures used for G1 to G5, respectively. After 7 days storage in artificial saliva, the specimens were submitted to the compressive strength test (N at 0.5 mm/min cross-head speed and the failure pattern was identified as either reparable (failure showed until 2 mm below the cement-enamel junction or irreparable (the failure showed <2 mm or more below the cement-enamel. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey test (α = 0.05. No significant difference (p < 0.05 was found among G1 to G10. The results suggest that intracoronal bleaching did not significantly weaken the teeth and the failure patterns were predominately reparable for all groups. The non-metallic posts in these teeth did not improve fracture resistance.

  1. Lycopene control of benzophenone-sensitized lipid peroxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetković, Dragan; Marković, Dejan

    2012-05-01

    Lycopene antioxidant activity in the presence of two different mixtures of phospholipids in hexane solution, under continuous regime of UV-irradiation from three different ranges (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C) has been evaluated in this work. Lycopene expected role was to control lipid peroxidation, by scavenging free radicals generated by UV-irradiation, in the presence and in the absence of selected photosensitizer, benzophenone. This work shows that lycopene undergoes to UV-induced destruction (bleaching), highly dependent on the incident photons energy input, more expressed in the presence than in the absence of benzophenone. The further increase ("excess") of its bleaching is undoubtedly related to the further increase of its antioxidant activity in the presence of benzophenone, having the same cause: increase of (phospholipids peroxidation) chain-breaking activities.

  2. Nitrophenylboronic acids as highly chemoselective probes to detect hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Ping; Lin, Chieh-Ti; Chang, Ching-Ming; Wu, Shih-Hsiung; Lo, Lee-Chiang

    2011-11-09

    Hydrogen peroxide is commonly used in the food processing industry as a chlorine-free bleaching and sterilizing agent, but excessive amounts of residual hydrogen peroxide have led to cases of food poisoning. Here we describe the development of a novel nonenzymatic colorimetric method for the determination of residual hydrogen peroxide in foods and agricultural products. Nitrophenylboronic acids chemoselectively react with hydrogen peroxide under alkaline conditions to produce yellow nitrophenolates. Of the three nitrophenylboronic acid isomers tested, the p-isomer displayed the highest sensitivity for hydrogen peroxide and the fastest reaction kinetics. The reaction product, p-nitrophenolate, has an absorption maximum at 405 nm and a good linear correlation between the hydrogen peroxide concentration and the A(405) values was obtained. We successfully applied this convenient and rapid method for hydrogen peroxide determination to samples of dried bean curds and disposable chopsticks, thereby demonstrating its potential in foods and agricultural industries.

  3. The Influence of Chemical Surface Modification of Kenaf Fiber using Hydrogen Peroxide on the Mechanical Properties of Biodegradable Kenaf Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Inani Abdul Razak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching treatment of kenaf fiber was performed in alkaline medium containing hydrogen peroxide solution maintained at pH 11 and 80 °C for 60 min. The bleached kenaf fiber was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and X-ray Diffraction (XRD analysis. The bleached kenaf fiber was then compounded with poly-(lactic acid (PLA via a melt blending method. The mechanical (tensile, flexural and impact performance of the product was tested. The fiber treatment improved the mechanical properties of PLA/bleached kenaf fiber composites. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM morphological analysis showed improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  4. Conservative reconstruction of the smile by orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundfeld, Renato Herman; Machado, Lucas Silveira; de Oliveira, Fernanda Garcia; Santos, Eduardo Almada; Lugato, Isabel Cristina Prado Torres; Sundfeld Neto, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The following is a clinical case report of a patient whose chief complaint was the presence of generalized spacing in the maxillary anterior segment following orthodontic treatment. After meticulous clinical analyses and discussions of the clinical procedures to be adopted, dental bleaching was performed in both arches with 10% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Trèswhite Supreme 10% Hydrogen Peroxide - Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) after the conclusion and stabilization of orthodontic treatment. Then, the orthodontic appliance was removed and the diastemas in the maxillary anterior teeth were closed with Amelogen Plus (Ultradent Products, Inc., South Jordan, USA) resin composite. It was observed that the association of orthodontic, bleaching, and restorative procedures was capable of restoring dental shape, function, and esthetics, allowing the patient to smile without hesitation. PMID:22229015

  5. Study on Bleaching Technology of Cotton Fabric with Sodium Percarbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Li Zhi; Wang Yanling; Wang Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Bleach cotton fabric with sodium percarbonate solution. Analyse of the effect of the concentration of sodium percarbonate solution, bleaching time, bleaching temperature and the light radiation on the bleaching effect of fabric.The result shows that increasing concentrations of percarbonate,increasing the bleaching time , raising the bleaching temperature and the UV irradiation may whiten the cotton fabric.The most suitable conditions for the bleaching process is concentration of sodium perca...

  6. Titrimetric and photometric methods for determination of hypochlorite in commercial bleaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnalagadda, Sreekanth B; Gengan, Prabhashini

    2010-01-01

    Two methods, simple titration and photometric methods for determination of hypochlorite are developed, based its reaction with hydrogen peroxide and titration of the residual peroxide by acidic permanganate. In the titration method, the residual hydrogen peroxide is estimated by titration with standard permanganate solution to estimate the hypochlorite concentration. The photometric method is devised to measure the concentration of remaining permanganate, after the reaction with residual hydrogen peroxide. It employs 4 ranges of calibration curves to enable the determination of hypochlorite accurately. The new photometric method measures hypochlorite in the range 1.90 x 10(-3) to 1.90 x 10(-2) M, with high accuracy and with low variance. The concentrations of hypochlorite in diverse commercial bleach samples and in seawater which is enriched with hypochlorite were estimated using the proposed method and compared with the arsenite method. The statistical analysis validates the superiority of the proposed method.

  7. The Effect of Fiber Bleaching Treatment on the Properties of Poly(lactic acid/Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwah Rayung

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid (PLA and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of the composite. The study was extended by blending the composites with commercially available masterbatch colorant.

  8. The effect of fiber bleaching treatment on the properties of poly(lactic acid)/oil palm empty fruit bunch fiber composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayung, Marwah; Ibrahim, Nor Azowa; Zainuddin, Norhazlin; Saad, Wan Zuhainis; Razak, Nur Inani Abdul; Chieng, Buong Woei

    2014-08-22

    In this work, biodegradable composites from poly(lactic acid) (PLA) and oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFB) fiber were prepared by melt blending method. Prior to mixing, the fiber was modified through bleaching treatment using hydrogen peroxide. Bleached fiber composite showed an improvement in mechanical properties as compared to untreated fiber composite due to the enhanced fiber/matrix interfacial adhesion. Interestingly, fiber bleaching treatment also improved the physical appearance of the composite. The study was extended by blending the composites with commercially available masterbatch colorant.

  9. Obtaining low-congealing oils and paraffins by carbamide deparaffinization method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalambet, I A; Dorodnova, V S

    1982-07-01

    Ethane cooling is required to obtain oils with congealing points lower than 15-20/sup 0/C. Thus a process of carbamide deparaffinization that would be relatively simple and would not require special cooling equipment was deemed desirable. Filtrates were selected from an oil separating device after basic solid paraffins had been removed. They were subjected to hydropurification with an alumimum-cobalt-molybdenum catalyst at 4 MPa pressure, 320/sup 0/C, feed of 1.5c/sup -1/ and hydrogen-containing gas compressed to 500 m/sup 3//m/sup 3/. Results showed that the initial mixed hydrocarbon filtrate was deparaffinized under these conditions to produce an oil that congealed on the average at temperatures 2-3/sup 0/ lower than controls. A benzine fraction at 80-120/sup 0/C was used as the solvent and methanol served as the activator. Using distillates from Stavropol crude oil, it was possible to obtain oils.

  10. Laser Teeth Bleaching: Evaluation of Eventual Side Effects on Enamel and the Pulp and the Efficiency In Vitro and In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Moor, Roeland Jozef Gentil; Meire, Maarten August; De Coster, Peter Jozef

    2015-01-01

    Light and heat increase the reactivity of hydrogen peroxide. There is no evidence that light activation (power bleaching with high-intensity light) results in a more effective bleaching with a longer lasting effect with high concentrated hydrogen peroxide bleaching gels. Laser light differs from conventional light as it requires a laser-target interaction. The interaction takes place in the first instance in the bleaching gel. The second interaction has to be induced in the tooth, more specifically in the dentine. There is evidence that interaction exists with the bleaching gel: photothermal, photocatalytical, and photochemical interactions are described. The reactivity of the gel is increased by adding photocatalyst of photosensitizers. Direct and effective photobleaching, that is, a direct interaction with the colour molecules in the dentine, however, is only possible with the argon (488 and 415 nm) and KTP laser (532 nm). A number of risks have been described such as heat generation. Nd:YAG and especially high power diode lasers present a risk with intrapulpal temperature elevation up to 22°C. Hypersensitivity is regularly encountered, being it of temporary occurrence except for a number of diode wavelengths and the Nd:YAG. The tooth surface remains intact after laser bleaching. At present, KTP laser is the most efficient dental bleaching wavelength. PMID:25874258

  11. A colourimetric evaluation of the effect of bacterial contamination on teeth stained with blood in vitro: Evaluation of the efficacy of two different bleaching regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Cathro, P; Heithersay, G; Briggs, N; Ratnayake, J; Zilm, P

    2018-02-27

    Tooth discolouration could occur due to bacterial contamination in traumatized teeth. Hydrogen peroxide is the commonly used bleaching agent. However, due to concerns over safety, alternative bleaching regimes such as sodium perborate (S) and thiourea-hydrogen peroxide (T) have been investigated. Apices resected and pulp extirpated 99 premolars were divided into two groups. Group 1 and 2 was injected with blood and blood/bacteria, stored anaerobically for 35 days. The two groups were treated by bleaching with water, S or T. Teeth were rebleached after 7 days. Colourimetric evaluation was assessed using digital imaging, CasMatch standardization and CIE L*a*b colour system preoperatively, 35 days of staining and 7 and 14 of bleaching. A linear mixed model with fixed effects of time, group and bleach was used to examine colour difference. Blood-stained teeth were significantly redder and darker on day 35 compared with blood/bacteria-stained teeth. After bleaching, blood-stained teeth retained significant redness compared with blood/bacteria-stained teeth using either S or T. T produced a significantly whiter shade in both the groups after 14 days. Blood-stained teeth were significantly darker and red compared with blood/bacteria-stained teeth. T bleaching regime was more effective than S. © 2018 Australian Dental Association.

  12. Effect of 10% Strontium Chloride and 5% Potassium Nitrate with Fluoride on Bleached Bovine Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alencar, Cristiane de Melo; Pedrinha, Victor Feliz; Araújo, Jesuína Lamartine Nogueira; Esteves, Renata Antunes; Silva da Silveira, Ana Daniela; Silva, Cecy Martins

    2017-01-01

    Dental whitening has been increasingly sought out to improve dental aesthetics, but may cause chemical and morphological changes in dental enamel surfaces. This study evaluated in vitro the effect of 10% strontium chloride and 5% potassium nitrate with fluoride on bovine enamel, through tristimulus colorimetry, Knoop microhardness (KHN), and roughness after bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). The specimens were divided into three groups (n=15): GControl received bleaching treatment with 35% HP; GNitrate received bleaching with 35% HP followed by the application of 5% potassium nitrate with 2% sodium fluoride; and GStrontium received bleaching with 35% HP followed by the application of 10% strontium chloride on the enamel. Next, five specimens of each experimental group were subjected to KHN and tristimulus colorimetry tests, and 10 specimens were subjected to surface roughness (SR) tests. The values obtained for the different groups were compared through analysis of variance (ANOVA) followed by a post-hoc Tukey-Kramer test in addition to Student's T-test for paired data. In the intergroup comparison, KHN final differed statistically ( p 0.05). 10% strontium chloride and 5% potassium nitrate combined with 2% fluoride downplayed morphological changes to the enamel, without interfering with the effectiveness of the bleaching process.

  13. A novel approach for the reuse of the textile bleaching wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, I.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the efficiency of used hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) bleach bath was assessed for the elimination of hydrolyzed unfixed reactive dyes from cellulosic fabrics. The aim of this study was to reuse textile wastewater and develop a new textile dyeing and wash-off method with small quantities of water and chemicals, without compromising quality of dyeing. For this purpose, spent bleach bath having H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ was collected from a textile industry and used in wash-off step of fabric after dyeing with reactive dyes to determine colour fastness properties and shade strength of selected reactive dyes. Five dyeings were carried out, using C. I. Reactive Yellow 138, C. I. Reactive Orange 122, C. I. Reactive Red 195, C. I. Reactive Blue 221, and C. I. Reactive Black 5 and dyed samples were passed through both conventional wash-off and new wash-off method containing spent bleach bath. Washing fastness, rubbing fastness, change of colour, and magnitude of total colour difference ( E*) values of both washed-off fabrics were compared. The colourfastness properties and final shade of fabrics washed-off with spent bleach were found to be comparable to those washed-off conventionally. This study concludes that spent bleach bath containing H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is a potential nominee for the removal of hydrolyzed reactive dyes from cotton fabrics. (author)

  14. Influence of microhybrid resin and etching times on bleached enamel for the bonding of ceramic brackets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leily Macedo Firoozmand

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS of polycrystalline ceramic brackets (PCB bonded after bleaching treatment using different composite resins and enamel etching times. A total of 144 bovine incisors were randomly divided into two study groups (n = 72, each as follows: G1, enamel bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide, and G2 (control group, enamel unbleached. After the bleaching treatment, the samples were stored in artificial saliva for 14 days. These groups were further divided into two subgroups (n = 36, each as follows: GA, brackets bonded with Transbond XT (3M and GB, brackets bonded with Filtek Z250 (3M. For each resin used, three different etching times with 37% phosphoric acid (15, 30 and 60 seconds were tested. SBS tests were performed using a universal testing machine (EMIC, and the adhesive remnant index (ARI score was verified. Significant differences among the three experimental conditions and interactions between the groups were observed. The type of composite resin accounted for 24% of the influence on the bond strength, whereas the etching time and bleaching treatment accounted for 14.5% and 10% of the influence on bond strength, respectively. The ARI revealed that the most common area of adhesion failure was at the composite resin-bracket interface. The type of composite resin, etching time and external bleaching significantly influenced the SBS of PCB on enamel, even after 14 days of saliva storage.

  15. Effect of Toothpaste Application Prior to Dental Bleaching on Whitening Effectiveness and Enamel Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira-Junior, W F; Lima, D A N L; Tabchoury, C P M; Ambrosano, G M B; Aguiar, F H B; Lovadino, J R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on the enamel properties and effectiveness of bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) when applying toothpastes with different active agents prior to dental bleaching. Seventy enamel blocks (4 × 4 × 2 mm) were submitted to in vitro treatment protocols in a tooth-brushing machine (n=10): with distilled water and exposure to placebo gel (negative control [NC]) or HP bleaching (positive control [PC]); and brushing with differing toothpastes prior to HP bleaching, including potassium nitrate toothpaste (PN) containing NaF, conventional sodium monofluorophosphate toothpaste (FT), arginine-based toothpastes (PA and SAN), or a toothpaste containing bioactive glass (NM). Color changes were determined using the CIE L*a*b* system (ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb), and a roughness (Ra) analysis was performed before and after treatments. Surface microhardness (SMH) and cross-sectional microhardness (CSMH) were analyzed after treatment. Data were analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA for Ra, one-way ANOVA (SMH, ΔE, ΔL, Δa, and Δb), split-plot ANOVA (CSMH), and Tukey post hoc test (α PA = SAN > all other groups) or decreased HP effects (CSMH). Ra increased in all bleached groups, with the exception of NM, which did not differ from the NC. The variation in the color variables (ΔL, Δa, and Δb) explained 21% of the variation in the physical surface variables (Ra and SMH). The application of toothpaste prior to dental bleaching did not interfere with the effectiveness of treatment. The bioactive glass based toothpaste protected the enamel against the deleterious effects of dental bleaching.

  16. Spectrophotometric Evaluation of the Pulpal Peroxide Levels in Intact and Restored Teeth - An Invitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patri, Gaurav; Acharya, Gourismita; Agrawal, Pratik; Panda, Vijeta

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (30%) is a commonly used "in office" bleaching agent. Deleterious effects of hydrogen peroxide on the pulp have been observed. The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the penetration of 30% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber through intact teeth and through the surface of teeth, restored with either hybrid composite or Resin Modified Glass Ionomer Cement (RMGIC). Sixty extracted human maxillary central incisors were selected and divided into six groups. Two groups were restored with hybrid composite resin and two with RMGIC, while two groups were left intact. The teeth with acetate buffer solution in their pulp cavity were then immersed in either 30% hydrogen peroxide or distilled water depending upon the group, for 60 minutes at 37°C. Then horseradish peroxidase and leucocrystal violet were added to the acetate buffer solution present in the pulp chamber after it was transferred to a test tube and the optical density of the resultant blue solution obtained was measured spectrophotometrically. The data obtained were analyzed using one way ANOVA and Student's t-test. The data obtained established that hydrogen peroxide penetrated into the pulp from the bleaching agent used. Hydrogen peroxide (30%) showed the highest pulpal peroxide level in teeth restored with RMGIC followed by teeth restored with hybrid composite resin and the least amount of penetration was observed in intact teeth. The amount of peroxide penetration into the tooth is more through restored tooth than intact tooth and is also dependant on the type of restorative materials used.

  17. Body image disturbance and skin bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christopher A D; McLean, Shua-Kym

    2017-11-01

    This study looks at body image disturbance among Jamaicans who bleach their skin. The hypothesis states that there is a positive relationship between skin bleaching and body image disturbance. The study used a convenience sample of 160 participants with a skin bleaching group (n = 80) and a non-bleaching comparison group (n = 80). The instrument included demographic questions, the body image disturbance questionnaire (BIDQ), and questions about skin bleaching. The results of a t-test revealed that the skin bleaching group (M = 1.5255, SD = 0.42169) was not significantly different from the non-bleaching group (M = 1.4938, SD = 0.74217) in terms of body image disturbance, t(158) = 0.333, p = .740. The participants who bleached did not suffer from body image disturbance. Self-reports revealed that they bleached to acquire beauty, attract a partner, elude the police, and market skin bleaching products. The practice was fashionable and popular and it made some participants feel good, while others were fans of a popular musical artiste who bleached his skin. The majority of participants bleached because of the perceived personal, social, and entrepreneurial benefits of the practice and not because they suffered emotional distress, anxiety, and functional impairment because of their skin colour. However, there was some level of BID among the minority of participants who argued that they bleached because they wanted to be pretty so they were emotionally distressed about there body image and experienced functional impairment. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  18. Influence of skin cold sensation threshold in the occurrence of dental sensitivity during dental bleaching: a placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahal, Vanessa; Gallinari, Marjorie de Oliveira; Barbosa, Juliana Stuginski; Martins-Junior, Reynaldo Leite; Santos, Paulo Henrique Dos; Cintra, Luciano Tavares Angelo; Briso, André Luiz Fraga

    2018-01-18

    This study verified the occurrence of dental sensitivity in patients submitted to a 35% hydrogen peroxide based product (Whiteness HP Maxx 35% - FGM), skin cold sensation threshold (SCST) and its influence on dental sensitivity. Sixty volunteers were divided into 4 groups (n = 15), according to SCST (low: GI and GIII, and high: GII and IV) and bleaching treatment (hydrogen peroxide: GI and GII, and placebo: GIII and GIV). SCST was determined in the inner forearm for 6 different times using a neurosensory analyzer, the TSA II (Medoc Advanced Medical Systems, Ramat Yishai, Northern District, Israel). Dental sensitivity measurements were performed 10 different times using a thermal stimulus and an intraoral device attached to TSA II, positioned in the buccal surface of the upper right central incisor. Spontaneous dental sensitivity was also determined using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Data were submitted to Student's t-test and Pearson's Correlation Test (α=0.05). SCST remained the same during bleaching treatment. Distinct responses of dental sensitivity were found in patients with low and high SCST during the first and third bleaching session (p≤0.05). The teeth submitted to the bleaching treatment became more sensitive to cold than those treated with placebo. Moreover, data obtained with TSA and VAS presented moderate correlation. Bleaching treatment increased dental sensitivity and skin cold sensation threshold might represent a determining factor in this occurrence, since low and high SCST patients had different responses to the thermal stimulus in the teeth.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conner, W.V.

    1993-01-01

    A literature survey was conducted to review the safety issues involved in handling hydrogen peroxide solutions. Most of the information found in the literature is not directly applicable to conditions at the Rocky Flats Plant, but one report describes experimental work conducted previously at Rocky Flats to determine decomposition reaction-rate constants for hydrogen peroxide solutions. Data from this report were used to calculate decomposition half-life times for hydrogen peroxide in solutions containing several decomposition catalysts. The information developed from this survey indicates that hydrogen peroxide will undergo both homogeneous and heterogeneous decomposition. The rate of decomposition is affected by temperature and the presence of catalytic agents. Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is catalyzed by alkalies, strong acids, platinum group and transition metals, and dissolved salts of transition metals. Depending upon conditions, the consequence of a hydrogen peroxide decomposition can range from slow evolution of oxygen gas to a vapor, phase detonation of hydrogen peroxide vapors

  20. Non-bleached colonies of massive Porites may attract fishes for selective grazing during mass bleaching events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Ikeuchi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the variation in grazing scar densities between bleached and non-bleached colonies of massive Porites species in Sekisei Lagoon (Okinawa, southwestern Japan during a mass bleaching event in 2016. The grazing scar densities and bleaching susceptibility varied among neighboring colonies of massive Porites spp. However, non-bleached colonies had significantly more surface scars than bleached colonies. One explanation for these variations is that corallivorous fishes may selectively graze on non-bleached, thermally tolerant colonies. This is the first report of a relationship between grazing scars and the bleaching status of massive Porites spp. colonies during a mass bleaching event.

  1. Study of the composition of impurities in paraffins, which have been removed at different stages of the carbamide deparaffinization process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorodnova, V.S.; Martirosov, R.A.; Martynenko, A.G.; Pereverzev, A.N.

    1980-01-01

    Results of the study on the composition of impurities in paraffin raw material, which has been removed from different stages of a deparaffinization unit are presented. It is shown that by using the method of chromatographic partitioning of paraffins during rinsing of the system basically monocyclic aromatics are removed, and the content of polycyclic aromatics and resins shows practically no change. A separation temperature of the system of 93-95/sup 0/ is recommended as optimum for existing G-64 commercial units. The content of residual paraffin in this case in the carbamide is about 1%.

  2. Production of uranium peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caropreso, F.E.; Kreuz, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A process is claimed of recovering uranium values as uranium peroxide from an aqueous uranyl solution containing dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities by treating the uranyl solution with hydrogen peroxide in an amount sufficient to have an excess of at least 0.5 parts H 2 O 2 per part of vanadium (V 2 O 5 ) above the stoichiometric amount required to form the uranium peroxide, the hydrogen peroxide treatment is carried out in three sequential phases consisting of I, a precipitation phase in which the hydrogen peroxide is added to the uranyl solution to precipitate the uranium peroxide and the pH of the reaction medium maintained in the range of 2.5 to 5.5 for a period of from about 1 to 60 minutes after the hydrogen peroxide addition; II, a digestion phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 3.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 5 to 180 minutes and III, a final phase in which the pH of the reaction medium is maintained in the range of 4.0 to 7.0 for a period of about 1 to 60 minutes during which time the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction solution containing the dissolved vanadium and sodium impurities. The excess hydrogen peroxide is maintained during the entire treatment up until the uranium peroxide is separated from the reaction medium

  3. Efficacy of cold light bleaching using different bleaching times and their effects on human enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Li, Jiajia; Liao, Susan; Ai, Hongjun

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of cold light bleaching using different bleaching times and the effects thereof on tooth enamel. Before and after bleaching, stained tooth specimens were subjected to visual and instrumental colorimetric assessments using Vita Shade Guide and spectrophotometric shade matching. Enamel surface alterations were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to analyze surface morphology, surface microhardness (SMH) measurement to determine changes in mechanical properties, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize post-bleaching enamel composition. Cold light bleaching successfully improved tooth color, with optimal efficacy when bleaching time was beyond 10 min. Significant differences in surface morphology were observed among the different bleaching times, but no significant differences were observed for enamel composition and surface microhardness among the different bleaching times. Results of this study revealed an association between the bleaching time of cold light bleaching and its whitening efficacy. Together with the results on enamel surface changes, this study provided positive evidence to support cold light bleaching as an in-office bleaching treatment.

  4. Radiation coloration and bleaching of glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treadaway, M.J.; Passenheim, B.C.; Kitterer, B.D.; Schall, P.

    1976-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the bleaching of radiation-induced darkening in ten Schott optical glasses is presented. Measurements were made at several temperatures from 160K to 340K for times from 5 msec to 500 hours after exposure. The theory of processes distributed in activation energies has been used to formulate a model which explains the time and temperature dependence of the bleaching. Analysis of the bleaching results in terms of this model has yielded the activation energy distributions and ''frequency factors'' which govern the bleaching for each material

  5. Determination of nicotine content in teeth submitted to prophylaxis and in-office bleaching by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, Juliana L; Beltrame, Flávio L; Wang, Mei; Avula, Bharathi; Khan, Ikhlas A; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Kossatz, Stella; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-02-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the dental color exposed to acute cigarette smoke treatment and quantify the amount of nicotine in samples exposed to cigarette smoke, after dental prophylaxis and after in-office bleaching. Sixty-nine healthy human molars were subjected to cigarette smoke in a cigarette machine. The teeth were divided into three groups: positive control, prophylaxis, and bleaching. Forty cycles of smoke exposition with duration of 15 min each were performed using 10 cigarettes (positive control). Dental prophylaxis was performed with a rotating brush and prophylaxis paste; in-office bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide, in two sessions of three 15-min applications, with a 1-week interval between sessions. The color was evaluated at the baseline, after exposure to cigarette smoke, after dental prophylaxis, and after in-office bleaching. Teeth from each group were powdered and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in order to measure the amount of nicotine present in each group. Data from quantification of nicotine and color change were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Data for subjective and objective color evaluation, a perceptible dental darkening occurred in teeth after exposure to cigarette smoke. Dental prophylaxis was able to recover the original color of teeth however, only after bleaching teeth became whiter than at the baseline (p bleaching group (0.8 ± 0.3 μg/g) (p bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide can partially remove the nicotine from tobacco smoke. However, when in-office bleaching was applied, a more significant nicotine removal was achieved. Dental prophylaxis could remove most of the external nicotine-staining on the tooth surfaces while bleaching could further reduce the external and internal nicotine-staining of teeth.

  6. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Saneie, Tahere; Samimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG)/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA)/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP), to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT) and vickers hardness number (VHN) of bovine enamel. The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C) were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP) mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal-Wallis test (α = 0.05). A significant difference in young's modulus (YM), VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching.

  7. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP, to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT and vickers hardness number (VHN of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05. Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM, VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching.

  8. Fracture toughness of bleached enamel: Effect of applying three different nanobiomaterials by nanoindentation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mazaheri, Hamid; Saneie, Tahere; Samimi, Pouran

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the absence of dispute about the efficacy of bleaching agents, a prime concern is about their compromising effect on the enamel structure. This in vitro study investigated whether the addition of three different biomaterials, including nano-bioactive glass (n-BG)/nano-hydroxy apetite (n-HA)/nano-amorphous calcium phosphate (n-ACP), to bleaching agents can affect the fracture toughness (FT) and vickers hardness number (VHN) of bovine enamel. Materials and Methods: The crowns of the newly extracted permanent bovine incisors teeth were separated from the root and sectioned along their central line; one half serving as the control specimen and the other half as the test specimen. After mounting and polishing procedure, all the control specimens (C) were subjected to nano-indentation test to obtain the baseline values of FT. Then, the control specimens were exposed to a 38% hydrogen peroxide for four times, each time for 10 min. The test specimens were divided into three groups and treated as follows, with the same protocol used for the control specimens: Group 1; ACP + hydrogen peroxide (HP) mixed gel; Group 2 BG + HP mixed gel; and Group 3 HA + HP mixed gel. FT measurements with nano-indentation were carried out subsequent to bleaching experiments. Data were analyzed using SPSS and Kruskal–Wallis test (α = 0.05). Results: A significant difference in young's modulus (YM), VHN, and FT at baseline and subsequent to bleaching in control group was observed. However, no significant differences were found in YM, VHN, and FT between the test groups, compared to the respective baseline values. Conclusion: Under the limitations of the current study, it can be concluded that the n-HA, n-ACP, and n-BG could be potential biomaterials used to reduce the adverse effects of tooth bleaching. PMID:27307669

  9. Biochemical methane potential of kraft bleaching effluent and codigestion with other in-mill streams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fitamo, Temesgen Mathewos; Dahl, Olli; Master, Emma

    2016-01-01

    and in combination: total bleaching effluent, alkaline bleaching effluent, kraft evaporator condensate, and chemithermomechanical pulping effluent. The total bleaching effluent, consisting of the chlorine dioxide bleaching and alkaline bleaching effluents, exhibited the highest potential for organic matter...

  10. Thermographic and spectrophotometric analysis of the extrinsic tooth bleaching using a diode laser and a LED system. In vitro; Analise termografica e espectrofotometrica do clareamento dental extrinsico utilizando laser de diodo e sistema de LED. Estudio In vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micheli, Paola Racy de

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the intra-pulpal temperature change, as well as to compare the bleaching power of a 38% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Xtra Boost- Ultradent. Inc), when activated with a diode laser, with a LED system and without activation, in the extrinsic tooth bleaching in vitro. Ten mandibular human incisors, a thermocouple, 45 bovine incisors and a spectrophotometer (Shade Eye- Shofu) for the color analysis. The samples were divided into 3 groups: 38% hydrogen peroxide activated by a diode laser (ZAP lasers, wavelength 808 nm {+-} 5, power of 1,4 W); 38% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED (Bright LEC-Mmoptics, wavelength 470 nm {+-} 25, power of 380 mW); 38% hydrogen peroxide without activation. After the artificial pigmentation, the bleaching agent acted for the same time in the 3 groups, differing only by the type of activation. The results of temperature showed that the LED activation was safer than the diode laser, which, in some measures exceeded the limit of 5.6 deg C. The luminosity of the samples did not show significantly statistics differences in none of the groups and moments of this study. The diode laser and LED activation did not influenced at the bleaching power of the peroxide, which showed effective for removing stains, with great capacity of bleaching bovine tooth artificially darkened. (author)

  11. In vitro penetration of bleaching agents into the pulp chamber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benetti, Ana Raquel; Valera, M C; Mancini, M N G

    2004-01-01

    To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures.......To investigate pulp chamber penetration of bleaching agents in teeth following restorative procedures....

  12. The effect of bleaching agents on the degradation of vitamins and carotenoids in spray-dried whey protein concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stout, M A; Park, C W; Drake, M A

    2017-10-01

    Previous research has shown that bleaching affects flavor and functionality of whey proteins. The role of different bleaching agents on vitamin and carotenoid degradation is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of bleaching whey with traditional annatto (norbixin) by hydrogen peroxide (HP), benzoyl peroxide (BP), or native lactoperoxidase (LP) on vitamin and carotenoid degradation in spray-dried whey protein concentrate 80% protein (WPC80). An alternative colorant was also evaluated. Cheddar whey colored with annatto (15 mL/454 L of milk) was manufactured, pasteurized, and fat separated and then assigned to bleaching treatments of 250 mg/kg HP, 50 mg/kg BP, or 20 mg/kg HP (LP system) at 50°C for 1 h. In addition to a control (whey with norbixin, whey from cheese milk with an alternative colorant (AltC) was evaluated. The control and AltC wheys were also heated to 50°C for 1 h. Wheys were concentrated to 80% protein by ultrafiltration and spray dried. The experiment was replicated in triplicate. Samples were taken after initial milk pasteurization, initial whey formation, after fat separation, after whey pasteurization, after bleaching, and after spray drying for vitamin and carotenoid analyses. Concentrations of retinol, a-tocopherol, water-soluble vitamins, norbixin, and other carotenoids were determined by HPLC, and volatile compounds were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sensory attributes of the rehydrated WPC80 were documented by a trained panel. After chemical or enzymatic bleaching, WPC80 displayed 7.0 to 33.3% reductions in retinol, β-carotene, ascorbic acid, thiamin, α-carotene, and α-tocopherol. The WPC80 bleached with BP contained significantly less of these compounds than the HP- or LP-bleached WPC80. Riboflavin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, nicotinic acid, and cobalamin concentrations in fluid whey were not affected by bleaching. Fat-soluble vitamins were reduced in all wheys by more than 90

  13. Removing polysaccharides-and saccharides-related coloring impurities in alkyl polyglycosides by bleaching with the H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanmei, Liu; Jinliang, Tao; Jiao, Sun; Wenyi, Chen

    2014-11-04

    The effect of H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system, namely NaHCO3 as alkaline agent with the (tetra acetyl ethylene diamine (TAED)) TAED-activated peroxide system, bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution was studied by spectrophotometry. The results showed that the optimal bleaching conditions about H2O2/TAED/NaHCO3 system bleaching of alkyl polyglycosides solution were as follows: molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 was 0.06, addition of H2O2 was 8.6%, addition of NaHCO3 was 3.2%, bleaching temperature of 50-65 °C, addition of MgO was 0.13%, and bleaching time was 8h. If too much amount of NaHCO3 was added to the system and maintained alkaline pH, the bleaching effect would be greatly reduced. Fixing molar ratio of TAED to H2O2 and increasing the amount of H2O2 were beneficial to improve the whiteness of alkyl polyglycosides, but adding too much amount of H2O2 would reduce the transparency. In the TAED-activated peroxide system, NaHCO3 as alkaline agent and buffer agent, could overcome the disadvantage of producing black precipitates when NaOH as alkaline agent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of fluoride or nanohydroxiapatite on roughness and gloss of bleached teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedreira De Freitas, Ana Carolina; Botta, Sérgio Brossi; Teixeira, Fernanda De Sá; Salvadori, Maria Cecília Barbosa Silveira; Garone-Netto, Narciso

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe roughness and gloss alterations of enamel after treatment with 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) and after polishing with 2% neutral sodium fluoride (SF) or a dental tooth paste containing nanohydroxiapatite particles (nHA) using power spectral density (PSD) description, roughness parameters (Ra, RMS, and Z range) and gloss analysis. An atomic force microscope (AFM) and a spectrophotometer were used to analyze eighteen specimens of upper incisors. After initial analyses, all specimens were bleached with 38% HP for 135 min. The specimens were analyzed after bleaching. Nine specimens were polished with SF (Group Fluor) and the other nine specimens were polished with nHA (Group nHA), then all specimens were analyzed after polishing. Roughness and gloss were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey's t-test. No statistical difference was found for Ra and RMS among initial, after bleaching and after polishing in both groups. For Z range, Group nHA showed a significant decrease after polishing. Bleaching with 38% HP did not increase the PSD in the spatial frequency of the visible light spectrum range in both groups. After polishing, nHA group showed a decrease in PSD for all morphological wavelengths. Gloss did not show statistical difference after bleaching in both groups. Gloss showed significant increase after polishing with nHA. bleaching treatment with 38% HP didn't alter enamel surface roughness or gloss. PSD analyses were very suitable to identifying the morphological changes on the surfaces. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials: Test methods and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauter, Paula [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tucker, Mark D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tezak, Matthew S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Boucher, Raymond [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  16. THE BLEACHING SYNDROME: MANIFESTATION OF A POST ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    universal and extends to the Americas and elsewhere impacted by colonial influences. Without exception .... "They say we should stop bleaching because of skin cancer and skin disease. ... Kenya, activists moved to have a ban put on the sale of skin bleaching creams. In agreement .... socioeconomic standing. Furthermore ...

  17. Reef corals bleach to resist stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obura, David O

    2009-02-01

    A rationale is presented here for a primary role of bleaching in regulation of the coral-zooxanthellae symbiosis under conditions of stress. Corals and zooxanthellae have fundamentally different metabolic rates, requiring active homeostasis to limit zooxanthellae production and manage translocated products to maintain the symbiosis. The control processes for homeostasis are compromised by environmental stress, resulting in metabolic imbalance between the symbionts. For the coral-zooxanthella symbiosis the most direct way to minimize metabolic imbalance under stress is to reduce photosynthetic production by zooxanthellae. Two mechanisms have been demonstrated that do this: reduction of the chlorophyll concentration in individual zooxanthellae and reduction of the relative biomass of zooxanthellae. Both mechanisms result in visual whitening of the coral, termed bleaching. Arguments are presented here that bleaching provides the final control to minimize physiological damage from stress as an adversity response to metabolic imbalance. As such, bleaching meets the requirements of a stress response syndrome/general adaptive mechanism that is sensitive to internal states rather than external parameters. Variation in bleaching responses among holobionts reflects genotypic and phenotypic differentiation, allowing evolutionary change by natural selection. Thus, reef corals bleach to resist stress, and thereby have some capacity to adapt to and survive change. The extreme thermal anomalies causing mass coral bleaching worldwide lie outside the reaction norms for most coral-zooxanthellae holobionts, revealing the limitations of bleaching as a control mechanism.

  18. Side effects of external tooth bleaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruzell, E.M.; Pallesen, Ulla; Thoresen, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The study was performed to assess the risk of at-home and in-office bleaching procedures, and to recognise potential predictors for side effects. Design Multi-centre, questionnaire-based prospective study with follow-ups at around 14 days and around one year post-treatment. Setting...... General practices and university clinics during the years 2007‑2009 in Scandinavia. Subjects Patients with tooth bleaching as part of the treatment plan. Results The prevalence of experienced tooth sensitivity at first follow-up was independent of bleaching procedure (at-home = 50.3% [n = 143]; in...... attributed to the bleaching treatment in the at-home and in-office groups, respectively. Predictors for side effects were tooth sensitivity, surface loss and gingivitis when observed at inclusion. Treatment-related predictors were bleaching concentration and contact between tray and gingiva. Conclusions...

  19. Colour Change of Enamel after Application of Averrhoa bilimbi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cut Fauziah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Teeth discoloration is mainly treated with dental bleaching. Use of chemical bleaching has side effects, so it is important to find an alternative natural dental bleaching agent. Averrhoa bilimbi contains peroxide and oxalate acid that possess tooth whitening properties. Objective: To determine the change in color of dental enamel after the application of Averrhoa bilimbi and 10% carbamide peroxide. Methods: Samples were 20 post-extracted of the two tested materials premolars (10 specimens each for Averrhoa bilimbi and carbamide peroxide application. After the application, the specimens were incubated at 37ºC for 2 hours, washed and soaked in aquadest before further incubated for another 14 days. The colour changed was observed by 5 independent observers using shade guide. Results: Quantitative and qualitative analyzes were performed. Qualitatively, A3 color has changed into C1, A2, D2, B2 and B1 in the Averrhoa bilimbi group. A more significant color change in the 10% carbamide peroxide group (p=0.005 compared to Averrhoa bilimbi group (p=0.005 were observed. The difference of resulted enamel colour change was statistically significant (p=0.002. Conclusion: Averrhoa bilimbi had a good prospect as dental bleaching agent since its application effectively resulted in a slight enamel colour change although its whitening properties was still lower than 10% carbamide peroxide.DOI: 10.14693/jdi.v19i3.134

  20. The Effects of Short Wave UV Irradiation (254-366nm on Color Values of Recycled and Bleached ONP/OMP Pulps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Peşman

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT As it is known, mechanical pulp papers include significant amount of lignin and carbohydrates as well as cellulose. Thus, when these lignin reach papers irradiated with short wave UV light they could not protect their color. In this study, bleaching of ONP/OMG recycled pulps with hydrogen peroxide, sodium percarbonate, sodium dithyonite, sodium borohydride and formamidin sulfunic acid were performed. Then the test papers of these pulps were irradiated with 254-366nm UV light and changes in the ISO Brightness, CIE L*a*b*, yellowness (YI and whiteness (WI values were observed. At the result of study, all bleaching agents were determined as insufficient in the respect of color stability. But if they compared with each other, the two stages sodium percarbonate-sodium borohydride bleaching sequence was gave the best results against to color reversion. Keywords: Old news/old magazine papers (ONP/OMG, Bleaching, Color Stability, UV Irradiation

  1. 'In vitro' assessment to instrumented indentation hardness tests in enamel of bovine teeth, before and after dental bleaching by laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britto Junior, Francisco Meira

    2004-01-01

    The laser enamel bleaching is a common used procedure due to its satisfactory esthetic results. The possible changes on the dental structures caused by the bleaching technique are of great importance. The enamel superficial microhardness changes through instrumented indentation hardness on bovine teeth were analyzed in this present study. The samples were divided in two halves, one being the control and the other irradiated with a diode laser (808 nm) or with a Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) to activate the Whiteness HP bleaching gel (hydrogen peroxide at 35%). It was possible to conclude that there was a statistical significant increase on the enamel superficial microhardness (Group I, sample 1 and Group II, sample 1) despite this increase did not seem to indicate a concern regarding the enamel surface resistance change. There was not a significant statistical change on the enamel microhardness on the other samples. The final conclusion is that there was no superficial enamel morphological change after these treatments. (author)

  2. Application of TCF bleaching in mixtures of chemical and mechanics fibers recycled: alternative for the paper industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes L, Jhonattan; Uribe R, Gabriel H

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study the technical feasibility of using mixtures composed by mechanical and chemical fibers recycled in the production of tissue paper, using TCF bleaching sequences that improve the optical properties of this raw material. At present, chemical fibers recycled are used, but their limited availability and high cost,stimulate the search for raw materials which replace them partially. Bleaching stages were carried out at atmospheric pressure, with the oxidative process made with hydrogen peroxide at 80 celsius degrade in 1.5 hours and the reductive stage with FAS, VBrite, Thiourea Dioxide in situ or Chromaclear at 60 celsius degrade for 1 hour. The obtained results allow to deduce that the addition of mechanical recycled fiber significantly affects the optical properties of mixtures. However, some of the bleaching sequences applied manage to compensate, at least partly, the effect of adding this raw material of lower quality and cost.

  3. Corrosion Study of Stainless Steels in Peracetic Acid Bleach Media With and Without Chloride and Chelant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohtash

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper industries are adopting non-chlorine containing chemicals e.g. peroxide, ozone, peracids etc. as alternate of chlorine based bleach chemicals e.g. chlorine and chlorine dioxide etc. with the aim of eco-friend atmospheres. Changeover to the new chemicals in the bleaching process is likely to affect the metallurgy of the existing bleach plants due to change in the corrosivity of the media. Accordingly, corrosion investigations were performed in a peracid namely peracetic acid to test the suitability of austenitic stainless steels 654SMO, 265SMO, 2205, 317L and 316L. The performance of above stainless steels was evaluated through long term immersion tests and Electrochemical polarization measurements in peracetic acid (PAA bleach media at pH value 4 maintaining concentration 0.2 % as active oxygen along with three chloride levels 0, 500 and 1000 ppm in pulp-free laboratory. To study the effect of corrosion inhibitors with extending limit of chloride in liquors, measurements were also made with two types of chelants- EDTA & MgSO4. The results showed that corrosivity of PAA reduced by addition of chelant while increased with concentration of Cl¯. The results also exhibited that EDTA is better inhibitor than MgSO4.

  4. Effect of Sodium Ascorbate and Delayed Bonding on the Bond Strength of Silorane and Two-step Self-etch Adhesive Systems in Bleached Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Abed Kahnemooyi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Studies have shown decreased bond strength of composite resin to human and bovine bleached enamel. This study evaluated the effect of sodium ascorbate and delayed bonding on the bond strength of two adhesive systems to bleached enamel. Materials and methods. The labial surfaces of 150 sound bovine incisor teeth were abraded with abrasive paper. The teeth were randomly divided into 8 groups: A: control; B: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide; C: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + sodium ascorbate gel; and D: bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide + delayed bonding. In groups A‒D, silorane adhesive system and Filtek silorane composite resin were used. In groups E‒H, the same preparation methods of groups A‒D were used. Two-step self-etch Clearfil SE Bond adhesive systems and AP-X composite resin were administered. Shear bond strength of each group was measured. Two samples were prepared for each surface preparation for ultrastructural evaluation. Two-way ANOVA and Tukey test were used for data analysis at P<0.05. Results. The interaction between the adhesive system type and surface preparation protocol was significant (P=0.014, with significant differences in shear bond strengths in terms of the adhesive systems (P<0.01. There were significant differences in shear bond strength in terms of surface preparation techniques irrespective of the adhesive system (P<0.01. Conclusion. The results showed that bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide decreased the shear bond strength values with both adhesive systems, and a one-week delay in bonding and 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes restored the bond strength in both adhesive systems.

  5. 40 CFR 63.445 - Standards for the bleaching system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for the bleaching system. 63... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants from the Pulp and Paper Industry § 63.445 Standards for the bleaching system. (a) Each bleaching system that does not use any chlorine or chlorinated compounds for bleaching...

  6. Mouthwashes with hydrogen peroxide are carcinogenic, but are freely indicated on the internet: warn your patients!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It all began in Ancient Egypt where people used to bleach their teeth with antiseptic mouthwashes made of urea from human urine. Teeth harmony is promoted by expression of feelings, communication, a real window of the brain and its content! Tooth bleaching products are medicines, not cosmetics! Mouth washing with hydrogen peroxide is an illogical and dangerous procedure! Hydrogen peroxide must be used in one's mouth only when employed by a dentist who has been properly instructed to protect the mucosa, preventing it from receiving these products. How and for how long these products are going to be used require caution in order to avoid or decrease any adverse effects on the tissues. Many websites instruct people on how to purchase and prepare hydrogen peroxide so that it is used as an antiseptic mouthwash and tooth bleaching agent. Some websites even refer to dentists as "exploiters", accusing them of not instructing patients properly. In this article, we aim at providing evidence and information upon which dentists and assistants may base their thinking as well as their opinion and procedures regarding "the indiscriminate and free use of hydrogen peroxide in the mouth, on teeth and oral mucosa". Those websites, blogs and social network profiles trespass the limits of public trust and should be immediately sued by the government for committing a crime against public health.

  7. Mouthwashes with hydrogen peroxide are carcinogenic, but are freely indicated on the Internet: warn your patients!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    It all began in Ancient Egypt where people used to bleach their teeth with antiseptic mouthwashes made of urea from human urine. Teeth harmony is promoted by expression of feelings, communication, a real window of the brain and its content! Tooth bleaching products are medicines, not cosmetics! Mouth washing with hydrogen peroxide is an illogical and dangerous procedure! Hydrogen peroxide must be used in one's mouth only when employed by a dentist who has been properly instructed to protect the mucosa, preventing it from receiving these products. How and for how long these products are going to be used require caution in order to avoid or decrease any adverse effects on the tissues. Many websites instruct people on how to purchase and prepare hydrogen peroxide so that it is used as an antiseptic mouthwash and tooth bleaching agent. Some websites even refer to dentists as "exploiters", accusing them of not instructing patients properly. In this article, we aim at providing evidence and information upon which dentists and assistants may base their thinking as well as their opinion and procedures regarding "the indiscriminate and free use of hydrogen peroxide in the mouth, on teeth and oral mucosa". Those websites, blogs and social network profiles trespass the limits of public trust and should be immediately sued by the government for committing a crime against public health.

  8. Microleakage comparison of glass-ionomer and white mineral trioxide aggregate used as a coronal barrier in nonvital bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosoughhosseini, Sepideh; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Shahmoradi, Kaveh; Saghiri, Mohammad-Ali; Zand, Vahid; Mehdipour, Masoumeh; Ranjkesh, Bahram; Mokhtari, Hadi; Salemmilani, Amin; Doosti, Sirvan

    2011-11-01

    There is some evidence that the pH at the root surface is reduced by intracoronal placement of bleaching pastes, which is known to enhance osteoclastic activity. Therefore, it is recommended that a protective barrier be used over the canal filling to prevent leakage of bleaching agents. Glass-ionomer (GI) is commonly used as a coronal barrier before nonvital bleaching. Because mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) creates high alkalinity after mixing with water, using MTA as a protective barrier over the canal filling may not only prevent leakage of bleaching agents and microorganisms, but may prevent cervical resorption. The aim of this study was to evaluate sealing ability of white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) as a coronal barrier before nonvital bleaching. Root canals of one hundred thirty human maxillary incisors were instrumented and filled with gutta-percha without sealer. Gutta-percha was removed up to 3 mm below the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). The teeth were randomly divided into six experimental groups of 20 teeth each and two control groups of 5. In three experimental groups, WMTA was packed into the canal to the level of CEJ. In the remaining experimental groups, glass-ionomer (GI) was used as a coronal barrier. After a 24-hour incubation period, one of the following three bleaching agents was placed in the access cavity of each of the WMTA or GI groups. These three bleaching agents were 30% hydrogen peroxide, sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide, and sodium perborate mixed with distilled water. The bleaching agents were replaced every 3 days for three times. In the positive controls, no coronal barrier was used. In the negative controls, all the tooth surfaces were covered by two layers of nail varnish. Microleakage was evaluated using protein leakage test. Statistical analyses were performed with the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. The experimental groups showed minimum leakage which was not significantly more than tha in the

  9. Clinical study of the safety and effectiveness of a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghalili, K Michael; Khawaled, Kamal; Rozen, Doran; Afsahi, Veda

    2014-01-01

    We investigated color change, gingival irritation, and tooth sensitivity in patients undergoing at-home vital tooth bleaching with a novel over-the-counter bleaching tray system. Tooth color shade in anterior teeth, supragingival plaque and gingivitis in Ramfjord teeth, as well as visual assessment of teeth gingival tissues and mucosa were evaluated in-office prior to treatment, after two consecutive applications of the 9% hydrogen peroxide bleaching product, after eight applications (10 minutes/day for 3 days at home), and after ten applications (50 minutes exposure over 5 days). Color stability was evaluated at 3 months after completing the treatment regimen. Over-the-counter bleaching products can be used by the patient at home without dentist supervision, but are frequently associated with gingival irritation and tooth sensitivity despite low concentrations of peroxide agents. Our investigations showed that the treatment is tolerable and safe with a low incidence of adverse effects. Any adverse effects associated with use of the whitening gel and tray are temporary, easily controlled, and often disappear within minutes of treatment. Statistical analysis revealed significant improvement in teeth whitening following treatment (mean color change of seven shades) and at three months after treatment. PMID:24591847

  10. [Assessment of tooth bleaching efficacy with spectrophotometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenhao; Liu, Chang; Pan, Jie

    2014-06-01

    To analyze the changes in CIE L*, a*, and b* at cervical, body, and incisal sites after tooth bleaching by using a spectrophotometer. Sixty-seven intact and healthy maxillary central incisors were in-vestigated. These incisors were darker than A3 according to the Vita Classical shade guide. The CIE tooth shade parameters L*, a*, and b* were simultaneously recorded at three tooth areas (cervical, body, and incisal) with a spectrophotometer before and after tooth bleaching (35%H2O2 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating). The shade dif-ferential (DeltaE) was calculated. ANOVA, paired t-test, and Pearson correlation analysis were used for data analysis. The efficacy rates of tooth bleaching were satisfactory, with 86.6%, 86.6%, and 85.1% in the cervical, body, and incisal sites, respectively. The average values of DeltaE were 5.09, 4.44, and 4.40 in the cervical, body, and incisal sites. Tooth bleaching significantly increased L* and significantly decreased a* and b* in all tooth areas (P spectrophotometer could objectively evaluate the whitening effect of tooth bleaching at the different tooth sites. The tooth bleaching system (35%H202 coordinating with Beyond whitening accelerator irradiating) exerts powerful bleaching actions in most of the tooth areas investigated. The order of tooth bleaching effectiveness is cervicalbody>incisal. Yellow coloration is decreased mainly at the cervical site, and brightness was increased mostly at theincisal site. The effectiveness of tooth bleaching increases as the baseline b* value increases.

  11. Coral bleaching independent of photosynthetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolleter, Dimitri; Seneca, François O; DeNofrio, Jan C; Krediet, Cory J; Palumbi, Stephen R; Pringle, John R; Grossman, Arthur R

    2013-09-23

    The global decline of reef-building corals is due in part to the loss of algal symbionts, or "bleaching," during the increasingly frequent periods of high seawater temperatures. During bleaching, endosymbiotic dinoflagellate algae (Symbiodinium spp.) either are lost from the animal tissue or lose their photosynthetic pigments, resulting in host mortality if the Symbiodinium populations fail to recover. The >1,000 studies of the causes of heat-induced bleaching have focused overwhelmingly on the consequences of damage to algal photosynthetic processes, and the prevailing model for bleaching invokes a light-dependent generation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) by heat-damaged chloroplasts as the primary trigger. However, the precise mechanisms of bleaching remain unknown, and there is evidence for involvement of multiple cellular processes. In this study, we asked the simple question of whether bleaching can be triggered by heat in the dark, in the absence of photosynthetically derived ROS. We used both the sea anemone model system Aiptasia and several species of reef-building corals to demonstrate that symbiont loss can occur rapidly during heat stress in complete darkness. Furthermore, we observed damage to the photosynthetic apparatus under these conditions in both Aiptasia endosymbionts and cultured Symbiodinium. These results do not directly contradict the view that light-stimulated ROS production is important in bleaching, but they do show that there must be another pathway leading to bleaching. Elucidation of this pathway should help to clarify bleaching mechanisms under the more usual conditions of heat stress in the light. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simultaneous production of bio-ethanol and bleached pulp from red algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Min Ho; Lee, Yoon Woo; Lee, Chun Han; Seo, Yung Bum

    2012-12-01

    The red algae, Gelidium corneum, was used to produce bleached pulp for papermaking and ethanol. Aqueous extracts obtained at 100-140 °C were subjected to saccharification, purification, fermentation, and distillation to produce ethanol. The solid remnants were bleached with chlorine dioxide and peroxide to make pulp. In the extraction process, sulfuric acid and sodium thiosulfate were added to increase the extract yield and to improve de-polymerization of the extracts, as well as to generate high-quality pulp. An extraction process incorporating 5% sodium thiosulfate by dry weight of the algae provided optimal production conditions for the production of both strong pulp and a high ethanol yield. These results suggest that it might be possible to utilize algae instead of trees and starch for pulp and ethanol production, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mill Designed Bio bleaching Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Institute of Paper Science Technology

    2004-01-30

    A key finding of this research program was that Laccase Mediator Systems (LMS) treatments on high-kappa kraft could be successfully accomplished providing substantial delignification (i.e., > 50%) without detrimental impact on viscosity and significantly improved yield properties. The efficiency of the LMS was evident since most of the lignin from the pulp was removed in less than one hour at 45 degrees C. Of the mediators investigated, violuric acid was the most effective vis-a-vis delignification. A comparative study between oxygen delignification and violuric acid revealed that under relatively mild conditions, a single or a double LMS{sub VA} treatment is comparable to a single or a double O stage. Of great notability was the retention of end viscosity of LMS{sub VA} treated pulps with respect to the end viscosity of oxygen treated pulps. These pulps could then be bleached to full brightness values employing conventional ECF bleaching technologies and the final pulp physical properties were equal and/or better than those bleached in a conventional ECF manner employing an aggressively O or OO stage initially. Spectral analyses of residual lignins isolated after LMS treated high-kappa kraft pulps revealed that similar to HBT, VA and NHA preferentially attack phenolic lignin moieties. In addition, a substantial decrease in aliphatic hydroxyl groups was also noted, suggesting side chain oxidation. In all cases, an increase in carboxylic acid was observed. Of notable importance was the different selectivity of NHA, VA and HBT towards lignin functional groups, despite the common N-OH moiety. C-5 condensed phenolic lignin groups were overall resistant to an LMS{sub NHA, HBT} treatments but to a lesser extent to an LMS{sub VA}. The inactiveness of these condensed lignin moieties was not observed when low-kappa kraft pulps were biobleached, suggesting that the LMS chemistry is influenced by the extent of delignification. We have also demonstrated that the current

  14. JMBR - SEPTEMBER 2013.cdr

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    FinePrint

    treating discoloured non-vital teeth as a majority of the population may be unable to afford the alternative treatments like ceramic veneers and crowns. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy and safety of 35% carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate as intracoronal bleaching agents; with a view to encouraging ...

  15. Pre- and postoperative dexamethasone does not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity: A randomized, triple-masked clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Márcia; Bonafé, Elize; Vochikovski, Laína; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Reis, Alessandra; Kossatz, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Tooth sensitivity (TS) is the most common side effect of dental bleaching therapies. Dexamethasone has been used with tooth bleaching to reduce TS. The efficacy of dexamethasone for this purpose has not been well studied. The authors conducted a triple-masked, randomized, clinical trial with a parallel design involving 63 healthy participants who received either a placebo or dexamethasone. The placebo or dexamethasone (8 milligrams) was administered 1 hour before the in-office bleaching (35% hydrogen peroxide) and extra doses of 4 mg were administered every 6 hours for a total of 48 hours. TS was recorded on 2 scales: visual analog scale (0-10) and numeric rating scale (0-4) in different periods. The color evaluations were performed before and 1 month after dental bleaching with visual shade guides VITA Classical (VITA Zahnfabrik) and VITA Bleachedguide 3D-MASTER (VITA Zahnfabrik), and for a shade guide evaluation, the authors used a digital spectrophotometer, VITA Easyshade (VITA Zahnfabrik). The absolute risk of TS was evaluated by a Fisher exact test. Data of TS intensity using the NRS scale for the 2 groups were compared with Mann-Whitney and Friedman tests, whereas data from the visual analog scale were evaluated by 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance. The color changes between groups were compared using a t test (α = .05). In both groups, the authors detected a high risk of TS, which was approximately 90%. No significant difference was observed in terms of TS intensity. A whitening of approximately 3 shade guide units of the VITA Classical was detected in both groups, which were statistically similar. The use of dexamethasone before bleaching did not reduce the risk and intensity of bleaching-induced TS. The use of the steroidal anti-inflammatory agent dexamethasone was not capable of preventing TS arising from in-office dental bleaching. Copyright © 2016 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In-Vitro Evaluation of the Effect of Herbal Antioxidants on Shear Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Bleached Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Khamverdi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: A reduction in bond strength of composite to bleached enamel has been reported immediately after bleaching treatment. Application of some antioxidant agents may decrease the adverse effects of whitening agents on bond strength and enhance composite bond to enamel. This study aimed to assess the effect of green tea, sodium ascorbate, sage and grape seed extract on bond strength of composite to bleached enamel.Materials and Methods: In this in-vitro study, 90 human enamel surfaces were randomly divided into six groups as follows (n=15: G1, no bleaching; G2, bleaching with 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP; G3, HP+1000 μmol epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG for 10 minutes; G4, HP+10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes; G5, HP+10% sage for 10 minutes and G6, HP+5% grape seed extract for 10 minutes. The specimens were bonded to composite in all groups. The shear bond strength of specimens was measured in Megapascals (MPa. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s HSD test (α=0.05.Results: The highest and the lowest mean shear bond strength values were observed in group 1 (22.61±3.29MPa and group 2 (5.87±1.80MPa, respectively. The reduction in bond strength in group 2 was greater than that in other groups (P<0.001. No significant difference was found among groups 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6 (P>0.05. Conclusions: All the herbal antioxidants used in this study equally compensated for the reduced bond strength of composite to bleached enamel.Keywords: Antioxidants; Tooth Bleaching; Composite Resins; Shear Strength 

  17. Don't bleach chaotic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theiler, J.; Eubank, S.

    1993-01-01

    A common first step in time series signal analysis involves digitally filtering the data to remove linear correlations. The residual data is spectrally white (it is ''bleached''), but in principle retains the nonlinear structure of the original time series. It is well known that simple linear autocorrelation can give rise to spurious results in algorithms for estimating nonlinear invariants, such as fractal dimension and Lyapunov exponents. In theory, bleached data avoids these pitfalls. But in practice, bleaching obscures the underlying deterministic structure of a low-dimensional chaotic process. This appears to be a property of the chaos itself, since nonchaotic data are not similarly affected. The adverse effects of bleaching are demonstrated in a series of numerical experiments on known chaotic data. Some theoretical aspects are also discussed

  18. Effect of low-level laser therapy on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Horieh; Arjmand, Nooshin; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Zakeri, Majid; Maleknejad, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on tooth sensitivity induced by in-office bleaching. Sixty-six patients enrolled in this randomized clinical trial. Following the in-office procedure with 40% hydrogen peroxide, the participants were randomly divided into three groups. The patients in group 1 received irradiation from a low-level red laser (LLRL; 660 nm, 200 mW, 15 s, 12 J/cm(2)), whereas participants in group 2 were subjected to a low-level infrared laser (LLIL; 810 nm) under similar conditions as in group 1. In group 3 (placebo), the laser treatment was the same as that in groups 1 and 2, but without energy output. The degree of tooth sensitivity was recorded at 1, 24, and 48 h after bleaching using a visual analog scale (VAS). The change in tooth shade was measured 30 days after tooth whitening. The intensity of tooth sensitivity was not significantly different between groups at 1 h after bleaching (p > 0.05). At 24 h after therapy, pain level was significantly lower in the LLIL group compared to the LLRL and placebo groups (p bleaching, VAS scores in the LLIL and LLRL groups were comparable to each other (p > 0.05) and both were significantly lower than that of the placebo group (p  0.05). LLLT with an infrared diode laser could be recommended as a suitable strategy to reduce the intensity of tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching.

  19. Impact of toothbrushing with a dentifrice containing calcium peroxide on enamel color and roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feitosa, Diala Aretha de Sousa; Borges, Boniek Castillo Dutra; Pinheiro, Fabio Henrique de Sa Leitao; Duarte, Rosangela Marques; Araujo, Renato Evangelista de; Braz, Rodivan; Santos, Maria Carmo Moreira da Silva; Montes, Marcos Antonio Japiassu Resende

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study sought to evaluate both the bleaching potential and changes to average surface roughness (Ra) of enamel after brushing with a dentifrice. Fifty-four enamel specimens (4 x 4 x 2 mm) were divided into 3 groups (n = 18) and treated with 1 of 3 dentifrices: 1 with calcium peroxide, and 2 without. The samples were submitted to 20,000 brushing cycles. Color and Ra were measured before and after brushing. Although the Ra increased in all groups after brushing, only the dentifrice containing calcium peroxide resulted in an increase in reflectance.

  20. The influence of the Nd:YAG laser bleaching on physical and mechanical properties of the dental enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcondes, Maurem; Paranhos, Maria Paula Gandolfi; Spohr, Ana Maria; Mota, Eduardo Gonçalves; da Silva, Isaac Newton Lima; Souto, André Arigony; Burnett, Luiz Henrique

    2009-07-01

    The Nd:YAG laser can be used in Dentistry to remove soft tissue, disinfect canals in endodontic procedures and prevent caries. However, there is no protocol for Nd:YAG laser application in dental bleaching. The aims of this in vitro study were: (a) to observe the tooth shade alteration when hydrogen peroxide whitening procedures are associated with dyes with different wavelengths and irradiated with Nd:YAG laser or halogen light; (b) to measure the Vickers (VHN) enamel microhardness before and after the whitening procedure; (c) to evaluate the tensile bond strength of two types of adhesive systems applied on bleached enamel; (d) to observe the failure pattern after bond strength testing; (e) to evaluate the pulpal temperature during the bleaching procedures with halogen light or laser; (f) to measure the kinetic reaction of hydrogen peroxide. Extracted sound human molar crowns were sectioned in the mesiodistal direction to obtain 150 fragments that were divided into five groups for each adhesive system: WL (H(2)O(2) + thickener and Nd:YAG), WH (H(2)O(2) + thickener and halogen light), QL (H(2)O(2) + carbopol + Q-switch and Nd:YAG), QH (H(2)O(2) + carbopol + Q-switch and halogen light), and C (Control, without whitening agent). Shade assessment was made with a shade guide and the microhardness tests were performed before and after the bleaching procedures. Immediately afterwards, the groups were restored with the adhesive systems Adper Single Bond 2 or Solobond M plus composite resin, and the tensile bond strength test was performed. The temperature was measured by thermocouples placed on the enamel surface and intrapulpal chamber. The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide was observed by ultraviolet analysis. The shade changed seven levels for Nd:YAG laser groups and eight levels for halogen light. According to the student's t-test, there was no statistical difference between the VHN before and after the whitening protocols (p > 0.05). The tensile bond strength showed no

  1. Assessment of bleaching of K-feldspar grains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jiafu; Li Shenghua; Tso, M-Y.W.

    2001-01-01

    Based on the difference in the bleaching rate between IRSL and TL signals, a new method of assessing the bleaching of sedimentary feldspar is proposed. All measurements for De and the bleaching factor (normalized ratio of IRSL to TL) are carried out on the same grain. K-feldspar grains from two sediments, a marine and an alluvium, from Hong Kong were tested. Their bleaching factors indicate that bleaching of the marine sediment was not uniform, whereas the latter was relatively homogeneous. Furthermore, the relatively well-bleached grains in each sample were identified

  2. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... to the residues targeted and their spatial location. Modification can result in increased side-chain hydrophilicity, side-chain and backbone fragmentation, aggregation via covalent cross-linking or hydrophobic interactions, protein unfolding and altered conformation, altered interactions with biological partners...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...

  3. Temperament and perception of tooth bleaching results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Mehr

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background . The neurophysiological process of perceiving the results of tooth bleaching requires the correct interaction between the central nervous system and the organs of sight. Exaggerated beliefs concerning defective facial features may enhance inner attitudes about one’s own color of dentition, as well as a feeling of dissatisfaction with the degree of leaching. Objectives. The study aimed to assess the degree of the patient satisfaction with the results of tooth bleaching in relation to their temperament. Material and methods. There were 68 generally healthy volunteers, aged 28–38 years, with external discolorations of the teeth. They had never undergone dental bleaching and their frontal teeth did not have any fillings. After clinical evaluation and the completion of formalities, the patients were asked to fill in Strelau’s temperament questionnaire. Questionnaires and visual status were assessed three times by three doctors: before bleaching, and then 24 hours and two weeks after the home-bleaching operation, which was done with the use of Opalescence (Ultradent in uniform sequence. Results . There were practically no adverse side results, except a periodic dentin hypersensitivity that occurred periodically in 44 patients. The results of the visual assessment performed by the physicians did not differ. The questionnaire data showed that women were more critical of the results in relation to the expectations. Among elancholics, full satisfaction was declared by 41%, whereas among sanguine people, full satisfaction was obtained by 85%. Satisfaction with the aesthetic results was associated with bleaching by at least 4 degrees. Conclusions . Patients’ temperament affects their subjective evaluation of the effectiveness of tooth bleaching, which should be taken into consideration in the patient’s individual dental treatment plan.

  4. Influence of skin cold sensation threshold in the occurrence of dental sensitivity during dental bleaching: a placebo controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Rahal

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective This study verified the occurrence of dental sensitivity in patients submitted to a 35% hydrogen peroxide based product (Whiteness HP Maxx 35% – FGM, skin cold sensation threshold (SCST and its influence on dental sensitivity. Material and Methods Sixty volunteers were divided into 4 groups (n = 15, according to SCST (low: GI and GIII, and high: GII and IV and bleaching treatment (hydrogen peroxide: GI and GII, and placebo: GIII and GIV. SCST was determined in the inner forearm for 6 different times using a neurosensory analyzer, the TSA II (Medoc Advanced Medical Systems, Ramat Yishai, Northern District, Israel. Dental sensitivity measurements were performed 10 different times using a thermal stimulus and an intraoral device attached to TSA II, positioned in the buccal surface of the upper right central incisor. Spontaneous dental sensitivity was also determined using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS. Data were submitted to Student's t-test and Pearson's Correlation Test (α=0.05. SCST remained the same during bleaching treatment. Results Distinct responses of dental sensitivity were found in patients with low and high SCST during the first and third bleaching session (p≤0.05. The teeth submitted to the bleaching treatment became more sensitive to cold than those treated with placebo. Moreover, data obtained with TSA and VAS presented moderate correlation. Conclusions Bleaching treatment increased dental sensitivity and skin cold sensation threshold might represent a determining factor in this occurrence, since low and high SCST patients had different responses to the thermal stimulus in the teeth.

  5. Assessment of micro-leakage for light-cure glass ionomer and pro-root mineral trioxide aggregate as coronal barriers in intracoronal bleaching of endodontically treated teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Zare Jahromi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cervical root resorption is one of the most important complications of intra coronal bleaching. A way of preventing this type of resorption is using a coronal barrier under the bleaching materials. The aim of this study was to compare the sealing ability of glass ionomer cement and Pro Root Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA as a coronal barrier in intra coronal bleaching. Materials &Methods: In this study, 40 single-root maxillary anterior teeth were endodontically prepared and divided into two experimental groups (n= 15 and two positive and negative control groups (n=5. In the experimental groups, gutta percha was removed up to 3 mm below the cemento enamel junction (CEJ.RMGI and MTA were placed over gutta percha up to the level of CEJ. After a 24-hour incubation period, the bleaching agent (a mixture of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide was placed in the access cavities. The bleaching agents were replaced every 3 days over 9 days. Then, the access cavity was filled with 2% methylene blue for 48 hours. All samples were longitudinally sectioned and the dye penetration range was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Data were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests (α=0.05. Results: Leakage mean indicated that there was a significant difference between these two groups and leakage was less in ProRoot than glass ionomer. Conclusion: It seems that the MTA can provide a better coronal seal during the bleaching.

  6. Bleaching of cotton fabric with tetraacetylhydrazine as bleach activator for H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Xuan; Yan, Kelu

    2018-05-15

    Tetraacetylhydrazine (TH) as bleach activator for H 2 O 2 cotton bleaching was synthesized and characterized by 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR and MS spectra. TH has better solubility than that of TAED. The CIE whiteness index (WI), H 2 O 2 decomposition rate and bursting strength were employed to investigate the performance of H 2 O 2 /TH bleaching system. By addition of TH, WI and H 2 O 2 decomposition rate increased significantly at 70 °C. Bleaching temperature, NaHCO 3 concentration and bleaching time were also discussed in detail and the loss of bursting strength is not clear. By using benzenepentacarboxylic acid (BA) as a fluorescent probe for hydroxyl radical detection, the bleaching process of H 2 O 2 /TH system was investigated. Acetylhydrazine and diacetylhydrazine were also utilized to further confirm the process. In addition, bimolecular decomposition was investigated by using 9,10-dimethylanthracene (DMA) as fluorescent probe of 1 O 2 . Based on these experimental results, the bleaching mechanism of H 2 O 2 /TH system was proposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Effect of acidity of in-office bleaching gels on tooth sensitivity and whitening: a two-center double-blind randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguercio, A D; Servat, F; Stanislawczuk, R; Mena-Serrano, A; Rezende, M; Prieto, M V; Cereño, V; Rojas, M F; Ortega, K; Fernandez, E; Reis, A

    2017-12-01

    The study aimed to compare the tooth sensitivity (TS) and bleaching efficacy of two hydrogen peroxide gels with different pHs (acid pH [Pola Office, SDI] and the neutral pH [Pola Office+, SDI]) used for in-office bleaching. Fifty-four patients from Brazil and Chile, with right superior incisor darker than A2, were selected for this double-blind, split-mouth randomized trial. Teeth were bleached in two sessions, with 1-week interval. Each session had three applications of 8 min each, according to the manufacturer's instructions. The color changes were evaluated by subjective (Vita Classical and Vita Bleachedguide) and objective (Easy shade spectrophotometer) methods. Participants recorded TS with 0-10 visual analog scale. Color change in shade guide units (SGU) and ΔE was analyzed by Student's t test (α = 0.05). The absolute risk and intensity of TS were evaluated by McNemar's test and Wilcoxon-paired test, respectively (α = 0.05). All groups achieved the same level of whitening after 30 days of clinical evaluation. The use of a neutral in-office bleaching gel significantly decreases the absolute risk of TS (28%, 95% CI 18-41) and intensity of TS when compared to the acid bleaching gel (absolute risk of 50%, 95% CI 37-63). The use of a neutral in-office bleaching agent gel produced the same whitening degree than an acid bleaching gel but with reduced risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity. Clinicians should opt to use in-office bleaching with a neutral gel than an acid product because the former causes a significant lower risk and intensity of tooth sensitivity.

  8. Effect of topical application of dipyrone on dental sensitivity reduction after in-office dental bleaching: A randomized, triple-blind multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Márcia; Chemin, Kaprice; Vaez, Savil Costa; Peixoto, Aline Carvalho; Rabelo, Jéssica de Freitas; Braga, Stella Sueli Lourenço; Faria-E-Silva, André Luis; Silva, Gisele Rodrigues da; Soares, Carlos José; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-05-01

    Tooth sensitivity commonly occurs during and immediately after dental bleaching. The authors conducted a trial to compare tooth sensitivity after in-office bleaching after the use of either a topical dipyrone or placebo gel. A split-mouth, triple-blind, randomized, multicenter clinical trial was conducted among 120 healthy adults having teeth that were shade A2 or darker. The facial tooth surfaces of the right or left sides of the maxillary arch of each patient were randomly assigned to receive either topical dipyrone or placebo gel before 2 in-office bleaching sessions (35% hydrogen peroxide) separated by 2 weeks. Visual analog and numerical rating scales were used to record tooth sensitivity during and up to 48 hours after bleaching. Tooth color change from baseline to 1 month after bleaching was measured with shade guide and spectrophotometer measures. The primary outcome variable was absolute risk of tooth sensitivity. An intention-to-treat analysis was used to analyze data from all patients who were randomly assigned to receive the dipyrone and placebo gels. No statically significant difference was found in the absolute risk of tooth sensitivity between the dipyrone and placebo gels (83% and 90%, respectively, P = .09; relative risk, 0.92; 95% confidence interval, 0.8 to 1.0). A whitening effect was observed in both groups with no statistically significant difference (P > .05) between them. No adverse effects were observed. Topical use of dipyrone gel before tooth bleaching, at the levels used in this study, did not reduce the risk or intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. Topical application of dipyrone gel does not reduce bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. Copyright © 2018 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Coronal microleakage with five different temporary restorative materials following walking bleach technique: An ex-vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. P. V Srikumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Walking bleach technique uses 30% hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate, and this paste mixture causes loosening of the coronal temporary restorative materials and thus decreasing its clinical effectiveness and causing irritation to the patients oral tissues. In the present study, sealing ability of hygroscopic coronal temporary restorative materials were compared with the other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Aim: To evaluate the effects of walking bleach material on the marginal sealing ability and coronal microleakage of the hydrophilic temporary restorative materials with that of the other commonly used temporary restorative materials in endodontic practice. Materials and Methods: Seventy-five extracted human maxillary central incisor teeth were prepared chemo-mechanically and obturated with gutta-percha in lateral condensation technique. Surface of each tooth was double coated with cyanoacrylate glue. All the teeth were randomly divided in to five groups. Out of 15 teeth in each group, 10 teeth served as experimental specimens, in which bleaching agent was placed in the pulp chamber and 5 teeth served as control, in which no bleaching agent was placed. The access cavities were restored with temporary restorative materials being tested per each group respectively. The specimens were then immersed in 1% India ink dye and subjected to thermo cycling for 7 days. All the teeth were longitudinally sectioned and observed with stereomicroscope and were graded according to the depth of linear dye penetration. Statistical Analysis Used: Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: Hydrophilic temporary restorative materials Cavit G and Coltosol F have shown minimal coronal dye leakage with better sealing ability when exposed to walking bleach paste mixture in the dye penetration tests compared to other commonly used temporary restorative materials. Conclusion: Marginal sealing ability of Cavit G and Coltosol F were

  10. Local stressors reduce coral resilience to bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carilli, Jessica E; Norris, Richard D; Black, Bryan A; Walsh, Sheila M; McField, Melanie

    2009-07-22

    Coral bleaching, during which corals lose their symbiotic dinoflagellates, typically corresponds with periods of intense heat stress, and appears to be increasing in frequency and geographic extent as the climate warms. A fundamental question in coral reef ecology is whether chronic local stress reduces coral resistance and resilience from episodic stress such as bleaching, or alternatively promotes acclimatization, potentially increasing resistance and resilience. Here we show that following a major bleaching event, Montastraea faveolata coral growth rates at sites with higher local anthropogenic stressors remained suppressed for at least 8 years, while coral growth rates at sites with lower stress recovered in 2-3 years. Instead of promoting acclimatization, our data indicate that background stress reduces coral fitness and resilience to episodic events. We also suggest that reducing chronic stress through local coral reef management efforts may increase coral resilience to global climate change.

  11. On luminescence bleaching of tidal channel sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fruergaard, Mikkel; Pejrup, Morten; Murray, Andrew S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the processes responsible for bleaching of the quartz OSL signal from tidal channel sediment. Tidal dynamics are expected to play an important role for complete bleaching of tidal sediments. However, no studies have examined the amount of reworking occurring in tidal channels...... and on tidal flats due to the mixing caused by currents and waves. We apply bed level data to evaluate the amount of vertical sediment reworking in modern tidal channels and at a tidal flat. Cycles of deposition and erosion are measured with a bed level sensor, and the results show that gross sedimentation...... was several times higher than net sedimentation. We propose that tidal channel sediment is bleached either on the tidal flat before it is transported to the tidal channels and incorporated in channel-fill successions or, alternatively, on the shallow intertidal part of the channel banks. Based...

  12. In-office dental bleaching with light vs. without light: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maran, Bianca Medeiros; Burey, Adrieli; de Paris Matos, Thalita; Loguercio, Alessandro D; Reis, Alessandra

    2018-03-01

    A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed to answer the following research question: Does light-activated in-office vital bleaching have a greater whitening efficacy and higher tooth sensitivity (TS) in comparison with in-office vital bleaching without light when used in adults? Only randomized clinical trials (RCTs) involving adults who had in-office bleaching with and without light activation were included. Controlled vocabulary and keywords were used in a comprehensive search for titles and abstracts in PubMed, and this search was adapted for Scopus, Web of Science, LILACS, BBO, Cochrane Library, and SIGLE without restrictions in May 2016 and was updated in August 2017. IADR abstracts (1990-2016), unpublished- and ongoing-trial registries, dissertations, and theses were also searched. The risk-of-bias tool of the Cochrane Collaboration was used for quality assessment. The quality of the evidence was rated using the Grading of Recommendations: Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Through the use of the random effects model, a meta-analysis with a subgroup analysis (low and high hydrogen peroxide concentration) was conducted for color change (ΔE*, ΔSGU) as well as the risk and intensity of TS. We retrieved 6663 articles, but after removing duplicates and non-relevant articles, only 21 RCTs remained. No significant difference in ΔE*, ΔSGU, and risk and intensity of TS was observed (p > .05). For ΔE and risk of TS, the quality of the evidence was graded as moderate whereas the evidence for ΔSGU and intensity of TS was graded as very low and low, respectively. Without considering variations in the protocols, the activation of in-office bleaching gel with light does not seem to improve color change or affect tooth sensitivity, regardless of the hydrogen peroxide concentration. (PROSPERO - CRD42016037630). Although it is commercially claimed that in-office bleaching associated with light improves and accelerates color change, this

  13. Coral Bleaching and Associated Mortality at Mayotte, Western Indian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mamoudzou 97600, Mayotte. Keywords: coral, bleaching, mortality, Mayotte, Western Indian Ocean. Abstract—Bleaching and associated coral mortality were assessed on fringing and barrier reefs on the north and east coasts of Mayotte from 1-24 May 2010. Major bleaching was encountered; nearly 80% of the corals were ...

  14. Mass coral bleaching in the northern Persian Gulf, 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javid Kavousi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Coral bleaching events due to elevated temperatures are increasing in both frequency and magnitude worldwide. Mass bleaching was recorded at five sites in the northern Persian Gulf during August and September 2012. Based on available seawater temperature data from field, satellite and previous studies, we suggest that the coral bleaching threshold temperature in the northern Persian Gulf is between 33.5 and 34°C, which is about 1.5 to 2.5°C lower than that in the southern part. To assess the bleaching effects, coral genera counted during 60-minute dives were categorized into four groups including healthy, slightly bleached ( 50% bleached tissue and fully bleached colonies. The anomalously high sea surface temperature resulted in massive coral bleaching (~84% coral colonies affected. Acropora spp. colonies, which are known as the most vulnerable corals to thermal stress, were less affected by the bleaching than massive corals, such as Porites, which are among the most thermo-tolerant corals. Turbid waters, suggested as coral refugia against global warming, did not protect corals in this study since most affected corals were found in the most turbid waters. The 2012 bleaching in the northern Persian Gulf was relatively strong from the viewpoint of coral bleaching severity. Long-term monitoring is needed to understand the actual consequences of the bleaching event on the coral reefs and communities.

  15. 21 CFR 872.6475 - Heat source for bleaching teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Heat source for bleaching teeth. 872.6475 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6475 Heat source for bleaching teeth. (a) Identification. A heat source for bleaching teeth is an AC-powered device that consists of a...

  16. Bleaching and diffusion dynamics in optofluidic dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersborg-Hansen, Morten; Balslev, Søren; Mortensen, Asger

    2007-01-01

    The authors have investigated the bleaching dynamics that occur in optofluidic dye lasers where the liquid laser dye in a microfluidic channel is locally bleached due to optical pumping. They find that for microfluidic devices, the dye bleaching may be compensated through diffusion of dye molecules...

  17. Tooth Bleaching: Current Concepts of the Procedure in Cosmetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Less caustic agents more recently introduced, in the late 1900s, have revived the interest of the dental profession in the art of tooth bleaching. These agents are now being packaged as bleaching kits, which may be used for in-office bleaching by the dentist or used at home by the patient under the supervision of the dentist.

  18. Color Recovery Effect of Different Bleaching Systems on a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Composite samples were immersed in coffee and turnip juice for 1 week in each. One laser activated bleaching (LB) (Biolase Laserwhite*20) and three conventional bleaching systems (Ultradent Opalescence Boost 40% (OB), Ultradent Opalescence PF 15% home bleaching (HB), Crest 3D White [Whitening Mouthwash]) ...

  19. Efektivitas Desensitizing Agent dengan dan tanpa Fluor pada Metode in Office Bleaching terhadap Kandungan Mineral Gigi (Kajian In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulita Kristanti

    2015-12-01

    -office bleaching was performed is usually overcome by using desensitizing agent with or without fluor. So far, desensitizing method applied only reduces tooth sensitivity but it had not overcome demineralization problem yet. This study was aimed to determine the influence of an application process and fluoride containing desensitizing agent in tooth mineral lossEight teeth were divided into four parts. Six specimens were smoothened using agate mortar. One mg of powder was inserted into the sample holder and mounted on goniometer heads to examine mineral content before treatment using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. Twenty-four specimens were classified into four groups. In group I, 0,1 ml desensitizing agent without fluoride (CPP-ACP was applied for 30 minutes after an in-office bleaching using 40% Hydrogen Peroxide was performed, while in group II, CPP-ACP was applied before and after an in-office bleaching was performed. In group III 0,1 ml fluoride containing desensitizing agent (CPP-ACFP was applied for 30 minutes after in-office bleaching using 40% Hydrogen Peroxide was performed, while in group IV fluoride containing desensitizing agent was applied before and after an in-office bleaching was performed. Finally, all of the specimens were measured in their after-treatment mineral contain. Mann Whitney test showed that the lowest mineral lost was detected in group IV (4500. Fluoride containing desensitizing agent applied before and after an in-office bleaching effectively reduced mineral loss.

  20. Identifying well-bleached quartz using the different bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, A.S.; Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Masuda, N.

    2012-01-01

    When dating older sedimentary deposits using quartz, there are no unambiguous methods for identifying the presence of incomplete bleaching. Current statistical analysis of dose distributions depends entirely on the assumption that incomplete bleaching and mixing are the main causes of any excess...... dispersion in the distribution; the only existing way to test this assumption is using independent age control. Here we suggest a new approach to this question, based on the differential bleaching rates of quartz and feldspar luminescence signals. We first present data that confirm the differences...... in relative bleaching rates of quartz optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 50 °C by infrared light (IR50) and feldspar luminescence stimulated at 290 °C by infrared light after a stimulation at 50 °C (pIRIR290), and use recently deposited samples to determine...

  1. Transenamel and transdentinal penetration of hydrogen peroxide applied to cracked or microabrasioned enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briso, A L F; Lima, A P B; Gonçalves, R S; Gallinari, M O; dos Santos, P H

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated transenamel and transdentinal penetration of hydrogen peroxide during tooth whitening recognized in altered enamel by the presence of cracks or microabrasion. We used 72 experimental units (n=20) obtained from bovine incisors: GI-sound enamel; GII-teeth showing visible enamel cracks (4 mm to 5.7 mm in length); and GIII-microabrasioned enamel. The 12 remaining specimens were used to analyze the enamel surface morphology using scanning electron microscopy. The specimens were cylindrical and 5.7 mm in diameter and 3.5 mm thick. A product based on 35% hydrogen peroxide was used for bleaching, following the manufacturer's recommendations for use. To quantify the H2O2 penetration, the specimens were placed in artificial pulp chambers containing an acetate buffer solution. After bleaching, the solution was collected and adequately proportioned with leucocrystal violet, peroxidase enzyme, and deionized water. The resulting solution was evaluated using ultraviolet visible reflectance spectrophotometer equipment. The data were analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's PLSD at a significance level of 0.05, and significant differences in the penetration of peroxide in different substrate conditions were observed (penamel was microabraded showed intermediate values when compared to the control group. Microabrasion and the presence of cracks in the enamel make this substrate more susceptible to penetration of hydrogen peroxide during in-office whitening.

  2. Peroxide organometallic compounds and their transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Razuvaev, G.A.; Brilkina, T.G.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given experimental works on synthesis and reactions of peroxide organometallic compounds. Reactions have been considered of organometallic compounds with oxygen and organic peroxides which result in formation of both peroxide and non-peroxide products. Possible routes and mechanisms of chemical transformations of peroxide organometallic compounds have been discussed. Reactions of organometallic compounds with oxygen and peroxides have been considered

  3. Photo-oxidation of histidine peptides yields high concentrations of unstable peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Policarpio, V.V.; Hawkins, C.L.; Davies, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Oxidation of proteins by UV, and visible light in the presence of sensitizers, results in side chain modification as well as aggregation and fragmentation. In particular, singlet oxygen has been reported to oxidize Met, Trp, Tyr, Cys and His side chains in a selective manner. In this study the oxidation of histidine and its derivatives, and His-containing peptides is examined using a range of sensitizers, to determine whether peroxides are major intermediates, and the mechanism of formation of these species. Visible light-sensitised oxidation of Gly-His-Gly in the presence of oxygen and rose bengal gives unstable substrate-derived peroxides with the peroxide yield increasing with increasing photolysis time. Similar behaviour was detected with other photosensitizers, though the peroxide yields varied with the sensitizer at identical concentrations with rose bengal > aluminium phthalocyanine > hematoporphyrin IX > zinc phthalocyanine > tetrakisporphine. The peroxide yield was decreased in the presence of azide and enhanced when deuterium oxide was employed as the solvent, consistent with peroxide formation being singlet oxygen mediated. Experiments using anoxic conditions gave low yields of peroxides confirming the oxygen-dependence of these reactions. HPLC analysis showed rapid loss of the parent peptide, with subsequent formation of both stable and unstable products; these are currently being characterized by MS and NMR. Similar behavior has been observed with other His derivatives. The yield of singlet oxygen formed in these reactions has been estimated using a bleaching assay (N, N-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline). Quantification of singlet oxygen formation and Gly-His-Gly derived peroxide during rose bengal-mediated photooxidation indicated a conversion efficiency of the initial singlet oxygen into substrate-derived peroxides of ca. 75% indicating that peroxide formation is a highly efficient and major reaction pathway

  4. The safety of peroxide-containing at-home tooth whiteners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiming

    2003-04-01

    Scientific data from research conducted during the past decade have demonstrated the safety of the dentist-dispensed at-home whiteners containing 10% carbamide peroxide. There has been no evidence of systemic adverse effects associated with the proper use of these whitening systems. Most commonly observed local adverse effects are mild-to-moderate tooth sensitivity and/or gingival irritation, which usually do not prevent the patient from completing the whitening treatment. The sensitivity and irritation are transient in most cases, and they dissipate when the patient discontinues the use of the whitener. There is no evidence of any long-term consequences that have resulted from tooth sensitivity and/or gingival irritation. However, potential adverse effects may occur from inappropriate applications, abuses, or the use of inappropriate products. The risks of using at-home whiteners without a dentist's involvement, or using formulations with a higher peroxide content than recommended, are yet to be determined. To maximize benefits while minimizing potential risks, the author advises using at-home tooth whiteners under the supervision of a dental professional.

  5. Enzymes improve ECF bleaching of pulp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lachenal, D.

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The delignification efficiency of different laccase enzymes was examined on the eucalyptus Kraft pulp. The laccase enzyme from Trametes versicolor showing the highest delignification efficiency was selected and used in the elemental chlorine-free bleaching sequence for improving the pulp bleachability. An appreciable reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was also obtained. Further reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was obtained when the same laccase treated pulp was subjected to an acid treatment after the extraction stage followed by the DEPD sequence. Elemental-chlorine free bleaching was also performed using the xylanase-laccase treated pulp. Xylanase treatment was incorporated to the laccase mediator system in the elemental-chlorine free bleaching both sequentially and simultaneously. The bleaching sequence DEPD followed and in both the cases, the reduction in chlorine dioxide consumption was greater in comparison to the control. The chlorine dioxide consumption was reduced further when xylanase-laccase treated pulp was given an additional acid treatment. The final pulp properties of the treated pulps were comparable to the control pulp.

  6. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Terry P.; Kerry, James T.; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G.; Anderson, Kristen D.; Baird, Andrew H.; Babcock, Russell C.; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R.; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C.; Butler, Ian R.; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E.; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R.; Cumming, Graeme S.; Dalton, Steven J.; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C. Mark; Figueira, Will F.; Gilmour, James P.; Harrison, Hugo B.; Heron, Scott F.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A.; Hoogenboom, Mia O.; Kennedy, Emma V.; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M.; Lowe, Ryan J.; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T.; Malcolm, Hamish A.; McWilliam, Michael J.; Pandolfi, John M.; Pears, Rachel J.; Pratchett, Morgan S.; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J.; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R.; Willis, Bette L.; Wilson, Shaun K.

    2017-03-01

    During 2015-2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  7. Global warming and recurrent mass bleaching of corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Terry P; Kerry, James T; Álvarez-Noriega, Mariana; Álvarez-Romero, Jorge G; Anderson, Kristen D; Baird, Andrew H; Babcock, Russell C; Beger, Maria; Bellwood, David R; Berkelmans, Ray; Bridge, Tom C; Butler, Ian R; Byrne, Maria; Cantin, Neal E; Comeau, Steeve; Connolly, Sean R; Cumming, Graeme S; Dalton, Steven J; Diaz-Pulido, Guillermo; Eakin, C Mark; Figueira, Will F; Gilmour, James P; Harrison, Hugo B; Heron, Scott F; Hoey, Andrew S; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Hoogenboom, Mia O; Kennedy, Emma V; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Lough, Janice M; Lowe, Ryan J; Liu, Gang; McCulloch, Malcolm T; Malcolm, Hamish A; McWilliam, Michael J; Pandolfi, John M; Pears, Rachel J; Pratchett, Morgan S; Schoepf, Verena; Simpson, Tristan; Skirving, William J; Sommer, Brigitte; Torda, Gergely; Wachenfeld, David R; Willis, Bette L; Wilson, Shaun K

    2017-03-15

    During 2015-2016, record temperatures triggered a pan-tropical episode of coral bleaching, the third global-scale event since mass bleaching was first documented in the 1980s. Here we examine how and why the severity of recurrent major bleaching events has varied at multiple scales, using aerial and underwater surveys of Australian reefs combined with satellite-derived sea surface temperatures. The distinctive geographic footprints of recurrent bleaching on the Great Barrier Reef in 1998, 2002 and 2016 were determined by the spatial pattern of sea temperatures in each year. Water quality and fishing pressure had minimal effect on the unprecedented bleaching in 2016, suggesting that local protection of reefs affords little or no resistance to extreme heat. Similarly, past exposure to bleaching in 1998 and 2002 did not lessen the severity of bleaching in 2016. Consequently, immediate global action to curb future warming is essential to secure a future for coral reefs.

  8. Perbandingan intensitas warna CPO dengan menggunakan Bleaching Earth (BE) dan Spent Bleaching Earth (SBE) di PT. SMART Tbk.

    OpenAIRE

    Aritonang, Dwi Christina

    2016-01-01

    Comparative studies have been conducted on the effect of bleaching earth quality bleachibility power on CPO (crude palm oil). by using the tool Lovibond Tintometer model of F in PT Smart Tbk Medan – Belawan.From experiments obtained initial color with the CPO 20R - 20Y after addition Bleaching Earth and spent bleaching earth with the CPO each - each 10,2R - 20Y and 17.3R - 20Y . The results showed that purification using Bleaching Earth better than the purification of Spent Bleaching Earh ...

  9. Oxidation of lignin-carbohydrate complex from bamboo with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by Co(salen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xue-Fei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of salen complexes toward hydrogen peroxide has been long recognized. Co(salen was tested as catalyst for the aqueous oxidation of a refractory lignin-carbohydrate complex (LCC isolated from sweet bamboo (Dendrocalamushamiltonii in the presence of hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Co(salen catalyzed the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with LCC. From the spectra analyses, lignin units in LCC were undergoing ring-opening, side chain oxidation, demethoxylation, β-O-4 cleavage with Co(salen catalytic oxidation. The degradation was also observed in the carbohydrate of LCC. The investigation on the refractory LCC degradation catalyzed by Co(salen may be an important aspect for environmentally-oriented biomimetic bleaching in pulp and paper industry.

  10. In vitro effect of low intensity laser on the cytotoxicity produced by substances released by bleaching gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Maria Gomes Dantas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This in vitro study aimed to analyze the effect of different parameters of phototherapy with low intensity laser on the viability of human dental pulp fibroblasts under the effect of substances released by bleaching gel. Cells were seeded into 96 wells plates (1 x 10³ cells/well and placed in contact with culture medium conditioned by a 35 % hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel for 40 minutes, simulating the clinical condition of the in-office bleaching treatment. Cells cultured in ideal growth conditions served as positive control group (PC, and the cells grown in conditioned medium and non-irradiated served as negative control group (NC. Cells grown in conditioned medium were submitted to a single irradiation with a diode laser (40 mW, 0.04 cm² emitting at visible red (660 nm; RL or near infrared (780 nm; NIR using punctual technique, in contact mode and energy densities of 4, 6 or 10 J/cm². The cell viability was analyzed through the MTT reduction assay immediately and 24 hours after the irradiation. The data was compared by ANOVA followed by the Tukey's test (p < 0.05. The cell viability increased significantly in 24 hours within each group. The PC presented cell viability significantly higher than NC in both experimental times. Only the NIR/10 J/cm² group presented cell viability similar to that of PC in 24 hours. The phototherapy with low intensity laser in defined parameters is able to compensate the cytotoxic effects of substances released by 35 % hydrogen peroxide bleaching gel.

  11. Changes in bleaching susceptibility among corals subject to ocean warming and recurrent bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchett, Morgan S; McCowan, Dominique; Maynard, Jeffrey A; Heron, Scott F

    2013-01-01

    Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites), during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98%) than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species) is producing a coral assemblage that is more resistant to sustained and ongoing ocean warming.

  12. Changes in Bleaching Susceptibility among Corals Subject to Ocean Warming and Recurrent Bleaching in Moorea, French Polynesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratchett, Morgan S.; McCowan, Dominique; Maynard, Jeffrey A.; Heron, Scott F.

    2013-01-01

    Background Climate-induced coral bleaching poses a major threat to coral reef ecosystems, mostly because of the sensitivities of key habitat-forming corals to increasing temperature. However, susceptibility to bleaching varies greatly among coral genera and there are likely to be major changes in the relative abundance of different corals, even if the wholesale loss of corals does not occur for several decades. Here we document variation in bleaching susceptibility among key genera of reef-building corals in Moorea, French Polynesia, and compare bleaching incidence during mass-bleaching events documented in 1991, 1994, 2002 and 2007. Methodology/Principal Findings This study compared the proportion of colonies that bleached for four major genera of reef-building corals (Acropora, Montipora, Pocillopora and Porites), during each of four well-documented bleaching events from 1991 to 2007. Acropora and Montipora consistently bleached in far greater proportions (up to 98%) than Pocillopora and Porites. However, there was an apparent and sustained decline in the proportion of colonies that bleached during successive bleaching events, especially for Acropora and Montipora. In 2007, only 77% of Acropora colonies bleached compared with 98% in 1991. Temporal variation in the proportion of coral colonies bleached may be attributable to differences in environmental conditions among years. Alternately, the sustained declines in bleaching incidence among highly susceptible corals may be indicative of acclimation or adaptation. Conclusions/Significance Coral genera that are highly susceptible to coral bleaching, and especially Acropora and Montipora, exhibit temporal declines in their susceptibility to thermal anomalies at Moorea, French Polynesia. One possible explanation for these findings is that gradual removal of highly susceptible genotypes (through selective mortality of individuals, populations, and/or species) is producing a coral assemblage that is more resistant to

  13. Preventive Use of a Resin-based Desensitizer Containing Glutaraldehyde on Tooth Sensitivity Caused by In-office Bleaching: A Randomized, Single-blind Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Acs; Lima, Snl; Tavarez, RRdJ; Borges, A H; Pinto, Scs; Tonetto, M R; Loguercio, A D; Bandéca, M C

    2018-03-23

    To evaluate the risk and intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity (TS) after in-office bleaching following topical application of a resin-based glutaraldehyde desensitizer. Thirty-three patients were randomly assigned to the experimental (Gluma Desensitizer Liquid, Heraeus Kulzer, Hanau, Germany) and placebo groups. The placebo or Gluma Desensitizer Liquid was applied for one minute prior to application of an in-office bleaching gel. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel (three applications × 15 minutes each) over two sessions, one week apart. The color of the anterior teeth was evaluated before and 21 days after treatment using the VITA Classical shade guide, Bleachedguide 3D, and Easyshade spectrophotometer. TS during and after the bleaching was recorded according to the visual analog (VAS) and numerical rating (NRS) scales. All data were submitted to statistical analysis (α=0.05). There was no significant difference in absolute risk or intensity of TS between the two groups (risk and VAS, p=0.93 and 0.31, respectively; NRS, p≥0.45). At the end of the bleaching protocol, tooth whitening was observed in both groups, as evident from color change in shade guide units (ΔSGU, 4.1-7.1; both guides) and overall color change (ΔE, 7.4-9.3 units); however, there were no significant differences in whitening between the two groups ( p>0.11). Gluma Desensitizer Liquid was not able to reduce the risk or intensity of TS. Bleaching efficacy was not affected by application of the desensitizer.

  14. Immune defenses of healthy, bleached and diseased Montastraea faveolata during a natural bleaching event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlarz, Laura D; Couch, Courtney S; Weil, Ernesto; Smith, Garriet; Harvell, C Drew

    2009-11-16

    One prominent hypothesis regarding climate change and scleractinian corals is that thermal stress compromises immune competence. To test this hypothesis we tracked how the immune defenses of bleached, apparently healthy and yellow band disease (YBD) diseased Montastraea faveolata colonies varied with natural thermal stress in southwestern Puerto Rico. Colonies were monitored for 21 mo from the peak of the bleaching event in October 2005 to August 2007. Since sea surface temperature was significantly higher in summer and fall 2005 than 2006, year of collection was used as a proxy for temperature stress, and colony fragments collected in 2005 were compared with those collected in 2006. Mortality rate was high (43% overall) and all colonies (except one) either died or became infected with YBD by August 2007. YBD-infected tissue did not bleach (i.e. expel zooxanthellae) during the 2005 bleaching event, even when healthy tissue of these colonies bleached. Immune activity was assayed by measuring prophenoloxidase (PPO), peroxidase (POX), lysozyme-like (LYS) and antibacterial (AB) activity. Immune activity was variable between all coral samples, but there was a significant elevation of PPO activity in bleached colonies collected in 2005 relative to apparently healthy and YBD-diseased corals in 2006. In YBD-diseased colonies, LYS and AB activity were elevated in both healthy and infected tissue, indicating a systemic response; activity levels in these colonies were higher compared to those that appeared healthy. In both these immune parameters, there was a trend for suppression of activity in corals that were bleached in 2005. These data, while complicated by between-genet variability, illustrate the complex interaction between disease and temperature stress on immune function.

  15. Coral bleaching response index: a new tool to standardize and compare susceptibility to thermal bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Timothy D; Vega-Perkins, Jesse B; Oestreich, William K; Triebold, Conrad; DuBois, Emily; Henss, Jillian; Baird, Andrew; Siple, Margaret; Backman, Vadim; Marcelino, Luisa

    2016-07-01

    As coral bleaching events become more frequent and intense, our ability to predict and mitigate future events depends upon our capacity to interpret patterns within previous episodes. Responses to thermal stress vary among coral species; however the diversity of coral assemblages, environmental conditions, assessment protocols, and severity criteria applied in the global effort to document bleaching patterns creates challenges for the development of a systemic metric of taxon-specific response. Here, we describe and validate a novel framework to standardize bleaching response records and estimate their measurement uncertainties. Taxon-specific bleaching and mortality records (2036) of 374 coral taxa (during 1982-2006) at 316 sites were standardized to average percent tissue area affected and a taxon-specific bleaching response index (taxon-BRI) was calculated by averaging taxon-specific response over all sites where a taxon was present. Differential bleaching among corals was widely variable (mean taxon-BRI = 25.06 ± 18.44%, ±SE). Coral response may differ because holobionts are biologically different (intrinsic factors), they were exposed to different environmental conditions (extrinsic factors), or inconsistencies in reporting (measurement uncertainty). We found that both extrinsic and intrinsic factors have comparable influence within a given site and event (60% and 40% of bleaching response variance of all records explained, respectively). However, when responses of individual taxa are averaged across sites to obtain taxon-BRI, differential response was primarily driven by intrinsic differences among taxa (65% of taxon-BRI variance explained), not conditions across sites (6% explained), nor measurement uncertainty (29% explained). Thus, taxon-BRI is a robust metric of intrinsic susceptibility of coral taxa. Taxon-BRI provides a broadly applicable framework for standardization and error estimation for disparate historical records and collection of novel

  16. Micro-structural integrity of dental enamel subjected to two tooth whitening regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Reina; Shibata, Yo; Manabe, Atsufumi; Miyazaki, Takashi

    2010-04-01

    Colour modification of tooth enamel has proven successful, but it is unclear how various bleaching applications affect micro-structural integrity of the whitened enamel. To investigate the internal structural integrity of human intact tooth enamel with the application of two commonly used whitening regimes (in-office power bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide and home bleaching with 10% carbamide peroxide), evaluations were performed on teeth of identical colour classification. After the bleaching applications, the enamel mineral density was quantified and visualised with micro-computed tomography. The micro-structural differences between the whitened tooth enamel samples were distinctive, though the colour parameter changes within the samples were equivalent. Home bleaching achieved colour modification by demineralisation, whereas in-office bleaching depended on redistribution of the minerals after treatment and subsequent enhanced mineralisation.

  17. Spatial consequences of bleaching adaptation in cat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, A B; Enroth-Cugell, C

    1981-01-01

    1. Experiments were conducted to study the effects of localized bleaching on the centre responses of rod-driven cat retinal ganglion cells. 2. Stimulation as far as 2 degrees from the bleaching site yielded responses which were reduced nearly as much as those generated at the bleaching site. Bleaching in the receptive field middle reduced responsiveness at a site 1 degrees peripheral more than bleaching at that peripheral site itself. 3. The effectiveness of a bleach in reducing centre responsiveness is related to the sensitivity of the region in which the bleach is applied. 4. Response reduction after a 0.2 degree bleach followed the same temporal pattern for concentric test spots of from 0.2 to 1.8 degrees in diameter, implying a substantially uniform spread of adaptation within these bounds. 5. A linear trade-off between fraction of rhodopsin and area bleached over a range of 8:1 yields the same pattern of response reduction, implying that the non-linear nature of bleaching adaptation is a property of the adaptation pool rather than independent photoreceptors. PMID:7320894

  18. Incorporating adaptive responses into future projections of coral bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Cheryl A; Dunne, John P; Eakin, C Mark; Donner, Simon D

    2014-01-01

    Climate warming threatens to increase mass coral bleaching events, and several studies have projected the demise of tropical coral reefs this century. However, recent evidence indicates corals may be able to respond to thermal stress though adaptive processes (e.g., genetic adaptation, acclimatization, and symbiont shuffling). How these mechanisms might influence warming-induced bleaching remains largely unknown. This study compared how different adaptive processes could affect coral bleaching projections. We used the latest bias-corrected global sea surface temperature (SST) output from the NOAA/GFDL Earth System Model 2 (ESM2M) for the preindustrial period through 2100 to project coral bleaching trajectories. Initial results showed that, in the absence of adaptive processes, application of a preindustrial climatology to the NOAA Coral Reef Watch bleaching prediction method overpredicts the present-day bleaching frequency. This suggests that corals may have already responded adaptively to some warming over the industrial period. We then modified the prediction method so that the bleaching threshold either permanently increased in response to thermal history (e.g., simulating directional genetic selection) or temporarily increased for 2-10 years in response to a bleaching event (e.g., simulating symbiont shuffling). A bleaching threshold that changes relative to the preceding 60 years of thermal history reduced the frequency of mass bleaching events by 20-80% compared with the 'no adaptive response' prediction model by 2100, depending on the emissions scenario. When both types of adaptive responses were applied, up to 14% more reef cells avoided high-frequency bleaching by 2100. However, temporary increases in bleaching thresholds alone only delayed the occurrence of high-frequency bleaching by ca. 10 years in all but the lowest emissions scenario. Future research should test the rate and limit of different adaptive responses for coral species across latitudes and

  19. The effect of hydrogen peroxide concentration on metal ion release from dental casting alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Salehi, S K; Hatton, P V; Johnson, A; Cox, A G; McLeod, C

    2008-04-01

    There are concerns that tooth bleaching agents may adversely affect dental materials. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) are more effective than water at increasing metal ion release from two typical dental casting alloys during bleaching. Discs (n = 28 for each alloy) were prepared by casting and heat treated to simulate a typical porcelain-firing cycle. Discs (n = 7) of each alloy were immersed in either 0%, 3%, 10% or 30% (w/v) HP solutions for 24 h at 37 degrees C. Samples were taken for metal ion release determination using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and the data analysed using a two-way anova followed by a one-way anova. The surface roughness of each disc was measured using a Talysurf contact profilometer before and after bleaching and the data analysed using a paired t-test. With the exception of gold, the differences in metal ion concentration after treatment with 0% (control) and each of 3%, 10% and 30% HP (w/v) were statistically significant (P alloys increased with increasing HP concentrations (over 3000% increase in Ni and 1400% increase in Pd ions were recorded when HP concentration increased from 0% to 30%). Surface roughness values of the samples before and after bleaching were not significantly different (P > 0.05) Exposure of the two dental casting alloys to HP solutions increased metal ion release of all the elements except gold.

  20. Micro-CT and FE-SEM enamel analyses of calcium-based agent application after bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Mauricio Neves; Rodrigues, Flávia Pires; Silikas, Nick; Francci, Carlos Eduardo

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effects of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on bleached enamel. A bleaching agent (35% hydrogen peroxide) was applied, 4 × 8 min on premolar teeth (n = 8). A CPP-ACP paste was applied for 7 days. Prior and post-treatment, microtomography images were obtained and 3D regions of interest (ROIs) were selected, from outer enamel, extending to 110.2-μm depth. CT parameters of structure: thickness (St.Th), separation (St.Sp), and fragmentation index (Fr.I.) were calculated for each (ROI). Data was submitted to paired t tests at a 95% confidence level. The samples were evaluated at 3000 to 100,000 magnification. Quantitative analysis of enamel mineral content was also determined by SEM EDX. There was a significant increase in structure thickness and calcium content. The phosphorus content increased after bleaching. There was also a decreased separation and fragmentation index on the outer enamel to a depth of 56.2 μm (p spaces between the hydroxyapatite crystals appeared around the enamel prisms, 7 days after the CPP-ACP application. The application of a CPP-ACP provides a compact structure on the enamel's outer surface, for 7 days, due to calcium deposition. CT parameters seem to be a useful tool for mineralizing and remineralizing future studies. CPP-ACP neutralizes any adverse effects on enamel surface when applied during a week after bleaching and minimizes any side effects of the bleaching treatment due to a more compact structure.

  1. Influences of Light-emitting Diode Illumination Bleaching Technique on Nanohardness of Computer-aided Design and Computer-aided Manufacturing Ceramic Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntavee, Niwut; Juntavee, Apa; Saensutthawijit, Phuwiwat

    2018-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of light-emitting diode (LED) illumination bleaching technique on the surface nanohardness of various computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramic materials. Twenty disk-shaped samples (width, length, and thickness = 10, 15, and 2 mm) were prepared from each of the ceramic materials for CAD/CAM, including Lava™ Ultimate (L V ), Vita Enamic® (E n ) IPS e.max® CAD (M e ), inCoris® TZI (I C ), and Prettau® zirconia (P r ). The samples from each type of ceramic were randomly divided into two groups based on the different bleaching techniques to be used on them, using 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without LED illumination. The ceramic disk samples were bleached according to the manufacturer's instruction. Surface hardness test was performed before and after bleaching using nanohardness tester with a Berkovich diamond indenter. The respective Vickers hardness number upon no bleaching and bleaching without or with LED illumination [mean ± standard deviation (SD)] for each type of ceramic were as follows: 102.52 ± 2.09, 101.04 ± 1.18, and 98.17 ± 1.15 for L V groups; 274.96 ± 5.41, 271.29 ± 5.94, and 268.20 ± 7.02 for E n groups; 640.74 ± 31.02, 631.70 ± 22.38, and 582.32 ± 33.88 for M e groups; 1,442.09 ± 35.07, 1,431.32 ± 28.80, and 1,336.51 ± 34.03 for I C groups; and 1,383.82 ± 33.87, 1,343.51 ± 38.75, and 1,295.96 ± 31.29 for P r groups. The results indicated surface hardness reduction following the bleaching procedure of varying degrees for different ceramic materials. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a significant reduction in surface hardness due to the effect of bleaching technique, ceramic material, and the interaction between bleaching technique and ceramic material (p LED illumination exhibited more reduction in surface hardness of dental ceramic than what was observed without LED illumination. Clinicians should consider protection of the existing restoration while bleaching.

  2. [Complications of cosmetic skin bleaching in Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morand, J J; Ly, F; Lightburn, E; Mahé, A

    2007-12-01

    Use of cosmetic products to bleach or lighten the skin is common among dark-skinned women in some sub-Saharan African countries. Long-term use of some pharmacologic compounds (e.g. hydroquinone, glucocorticoids and mercury) can cause adverse effects including dermatologic disorders such as dyschromia, exogenous ochronosis, acne and hypertrichosis, prominent striae, tinea corporis, pyoderma, erysipelas, scabies, and contact dermatitis and systemic complications such as hypertension, hypercorticism or surrenal deficiency, and mercurial nephropathy.

  3. Sodium Hydroxide and Calcium Hydroxide Hybrid Oxygen Bleaching with System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doelle, K.; Bajrami, B.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the replacement of sodium hydroxide in the oxygen bleaching stage using a hybrid system consisting of sodium hydroxide calcium hydroxide. Commercial Kraft pulping was studied using yellow pine Kraft pulp obtained from a company in the US. The impact of sodium hydroxide, calcium hydroxide hybrid system in regard to concentration, reaction time and temperature for Kraft pulp was evaluated. The sodium hydroxide and calcium hydroxide dosage was varied between 0% and 15% based on oven dry fiber content. The bleaching reaction time was varied between 0 and 180 minutes whereas the bleaching temperature ranged between 70 °C and 110 °C. The ability to bleach pulp was measured by determining the Kappa number. Optimum bleaching results for the hybrid system were achieved with 4% sodium hydroxide and 2% calcium hydroxide content. Beyond this, the ability to bleach pulp decreased.

  4. Thermoluminescence emission spectra and optical bleaching of oligoclase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bos, A.J.J.; Piters, T.M.; Ypma, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoluminescence (TL) spectra of oligoclase samples have been recorded in the temperature range from 300 to 700 K and the wavelength range from 300 to 850 nm. Like other feldspars, oligoclase produces blue (peaking at 460 nm) and red (peaking at 765 nm) emission bands. The maximum of the red emission occurs 20 K lower than that of the blue band. Optical bleaching was performed at wavelengths varying from 360 to 800 nm. Bleaching of artificially irradiated oligoclase causes a decrease of the TL signal. The bleaching efficiency increases with decreasing wavelength. Bleaching does not only influence the height of the glow curve but also the shape. An interesting observation is that the ratio of the blue and red band intensities is not affected by a bleaching procedure. No evidence has been found that bleaching influences the shape of the emission spectra. The correlation between the blue and red bands is discussed. (Author)

  5. 21 CFR 172.802 - Acetone peroxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Acetone peroxides. 172.802 Section 172.802 Food and... Multipurpose Additives § 172.802 Acetone peroxides. The food additive acetone peroxides may be safely used in... acetone peroxide, with minor proportions of higher polymers, manufactured by reaction of hydrogen peroxide...

  6. A global protocol for monitoring of coral bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver, J.; Setiasih, N.; Marshall, P.; Hansen, L.

    2004-01-01

    Coral bleaching and subsequent mortality represent a major threat to the future health and productivity of coral reefs. However a lack of reliable data on occurrence, severity and other characteristics of bleaching events hampers research on the causes and consequences of this important phenomenon. This article describes a global protocol for monitoring coral bleaching events, which addresses this problem and can be used by people with different levels of expertise and resources.

  7. Mass Coral Bleaching in 2010 in the Southern Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision mak...

  8. Coral mass bleaching and reef temperatures at Navassa Island, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. W.; Piniak, G. A.; Williams, D. E.

    2011-01-01

    Bleaching and associated mortality is an extreme threat to the persistence of coral populations in the projected warming regime of the next few decades. Recent evidence indicates that thermal bleaching thresholds may be affected by water quality gradients. The unexpected encounter of a coral mass bleaching event at a remote, uninhabited Caribbean island (Navassa) during a routine reef assessment cruise in November 2006 provided the opportunity to characterize bleaching responses and thermal exposure in an oceanic area with negligible continental influence or human impact on water quality. The coral taxa most susceptible to bleaching were Agaricia spp. and Montastraea faveolata. Siderastraea siderea, Diploria spp. and Porites porites were intermediately affected, while Porites astreoides and Montastraea cavernosa were minimally affected and negligible bleaching was observed in Acropora palmata. Bleaching prevalence (colonies > 4 cm diameter) ranged from 0.16 to 0.63 among sites. Deeper sites (between 18 and 37 m) had significantly higher prevalence of bleaching than shallow sites (<10 m). This general pattern of more bleaching in deeper sites also occurred within species. Though exposure to high-temperature stress was not greater at deeper sites, water motion, which may bolster bleaching resistance, was likely less. In situ loggers indicated temperatures over 30 °C initiated at shallow sites in mid-August, at deeper sites in early September, and were persistent at all sites until mid-October. Long term (1983-2007) climatologies constructed from AVHRR SSTs suggest that the mass bleaching event observed at Navassa in 2006 corresponded with greater intensity and duration of warm temperature anomalies than occurred in 2005, for which no in situ observations (bleaching nor temperature) are available.

  9. Comparative study of the action of two different types of bleaching agents activated by two different types of irradiation fonts: xenon plasma arc lamp and 960 nm diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walverde, Debora Ayala

    2001-01-01

    This in vitro study compares two different types of tooth bleaching agents stimulated with two different irradiation fonts. These fonts accelerate the action of the bleaching agents upon the enamel surface by heating up the materials. We used the xenon plasma arc lamp and a 960 nm fiber-coupled diode laser to irradiate the two materials containing 35% of hydrogen peroxide (Opus White and Opalescence extra). The color of the teeth was measured with a spectrophotometer using the CIELAB color system that gives the numeric values of L * a * b * . (author)

  10. Mass coral bleaching in 2010 in the southern Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching.

  11. Coral bleaching at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hooidonk, Ruben J.; Manzello, Derek P.; Moye, Jessica; Brandt, Marilyn E.; Hendee, James C.; McCoy, Croy; Manfrino, Carrie

    2012-06-01

    The global rise in sea temperature through anthropogenic climate change is affecting coral reef ecosystems through a phenomenon known as coral bleaching; that is, the whitening of corals due to the loss of the symbiotic zooxanthellae which impart corals with their characteristic vivid coloration. We describe aspects of the most prevalent episode of coral bleaching ever recorded at Little Cayman, Cayman Islands, during the fall of 2009. The most susceptible corals were found to be, in order, Siderastrea siderea, Montastraea annularis, and Montastraea faveolata, while Diplora strigosa and Agaricia spp. were less so, yet still showed considerable bleaching prevalence and severity. Those found to be least susceptible were Porites porites, Porites astreoides, and Montastraea cavernosa. These observations and other reported observations of coral bleaching, together with 29 years (1982-2010) of satellite-derived sea surface temperatures, were used to optimize bleaching predictions at this location. To do this a Degree Heating Weeks (DHW) and Peirce Skill Score (PSS) analysis was employed to calculate a local bleaching threshold above which bleaching was expected to occur. A threshold of 4.2 DHW had the highest skill, with a PSS of 0.70. The method outlined here could be applied to other regions to find the optimal bleaching threshold and improve bleaching predictions.

  12. Regeneration of irradiated optical fibres by photo-bleaching?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henschel, H.; Koehn, O.

    1999-01-01

    It is known that a light power between 0,1 and 20 μW caused bleaching of colour centres, which implies a reduction of induced loss. Older fibres especially those with a core made of undoped, low OH silica, experience tremendous photo-bleaching. Light of shorter wavelengths has a higher bleaching efficiency than that of longer wavelengths and same light intensity. The investigations have demonstrated that the injection of photo-bleaching light of shorter wavelength and higher intensity can distinctly decrease the radiation-induced loss of Ge-doped fibres, especially at low temperatures. Another possibility to apply photo-bleaching by short wavelength is to regenerate fibres that are permanently installed in radiation environments. Modern undoped multi-mode (MM) step index (Si), Ge-doped MM graded index (Gi) and Ge-doped single-mode (SM) fibres that had been irradiated were submitted to bleaching light. In this article it is shown how loss reduction and necessary bleaching time depend on wavelength and intensity of the bleaching light, on fibre length (bleaching time) and on radiation dose. These results are promising for the regeneration of optical fibres in facilities where the fibres cannot be replaced easily by new ones. (A.C.)

  13. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  14. Mass Coral Bleaching in 2010 in the Southern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu I, Jahson Berhane; Clement, Ysharda

    2014-01-01

    Ocean temperatures are increasing globally and the Caribbean is no exception. An extreme ocean warming event in 2010 placed Tobago's coral reefs under severe stress resulting in widespread coral bleaching and threatening the livelihoods that rely on them. The bleaching response of four reef building taxa was monitored over a six month period across three major reefs systems in Tobago. By identifying taxa resilient to bleaching we propose to assist local coral reef managers in the decision making process to cope with mass bleaching events. The bleaching signal (length of exposure to high ocean temperatures) varied widely between the Atlantic and Caribbean reefs, but regardless of this variation most taxa bleached. Colpophyllia natans, Montastraea faveolata and Siderastrea siderea were considered the most bleaching vulnerable taxa. Interestingly, reefs with the highest coral cover showed the greatest decline reef building taxa, and conversely, reefs with the lowest coral cover showed the most bleaching but lowest change in coral cover with little algal overgrowth post-bleaching. PMID:24400078

  15. Surface roughness comparison of methacrylate and silorane-based composite resins after 40% hydrogen peroxide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rori Sasmita

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The change of the tooth colour could be restored with bleaching. The tooth bleaching will affects the surface roughness of the composite resins. Recently, the material basis for composite resins has developed, among others are methacrylate-based and silorane based composite resins. The objective of this study was to distinguish the surface roughness value of methacrylate-based composite resin and silorane based composite resins. This research was quasi-experimental. The sample used in this study were methacrylate and silorane based composite resins in discs form, with the size of 6 mm and the thickness of 3 mm, manufactured into 20 specimens and divided into 2 groups. The control group was immersed in the artificial saliva, and the treatment group was applied with 40% hydrogen peroxide. The result of the experiment analyzed using unpaired sample t-test showed significant differences in the average value of the surface roughness after the application of 40% hydrogen peroxide. The average value of methacrylate and silorane based composite resins were 2.744 μm and 3.417 μm, respectively. There was a difference in the surface roughness of methacrylate and silorane based composite resin compounds after the application of 40% hydrogen peroxide. The surface roughness value of the silorane-based composite resin was higher than the methacrylate-based.

  16. Murine T cell activation is regulated by surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warford, Jordan, E-mail: jordan.warford@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Doucette, Carolyn D., E-mail: carolyn.doucette@dal.ca [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Hoskin, David W., E-mail: d.w.hoskin@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Easton, Alexander S., E-mail: alexander.easton@dal.ca [Department of Pathology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada); Department of Surgery (Neurosurgery), Dalhousie University, Tupper Building, 5850 College Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 4R2 (Canada)

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Surfen is the first inhibitor of glycosaminoglycan function to be studied in murine T cells. •Surfen reduces T cell proliferation stimulated in vitro and in vivo. •Surfen reduces CD25 expression in T cells activated in vivo but not in vitro. •Surfen increases T cell proliferation when T cell receptor activation is bypassed. •Surfen’s effects are blocked by co-administration of heparin sulfate. -- Abstract: Surfen (bis-2-methyl-4-amino-quinolyl-6-carbamide) binds to glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and has been shown to influence their function, and the function of proteoglycans (complexes of GAGs linked to a core protein). T cells synthesize, secrete and express GAGs and proteoglycans which are involved in several aspects of T cell function. However, there are as yet no studies on the effect of GAG-binding agents such as surfen on T cell function. In this study, surfen was found to influence murine T cell activation. Doses between 2.5 and 20 μM produced a graduated reduction in the proliferation of T cells activated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibody-coated T cell expander beads. Surfen (20 mg/kg) was also administered to mice treated with anti-CD3 antibody to activate T cells in vivo. Lymphocytes from surfen-treated mice also showed reduced proliferation and lymph node cell counts were reduced. Surfen reduced labeling with a cell viability marker (7-ADD) but to a much lower extent than its effect on proliferation. Surfen also reduced CD25 (the α-subunit of the interleukin (IL)-2 receptor) expression with no effect on CD69 expression in T cells treated in vivo but not in vitro. When receptor activation was bypassed by treating T cells in vitro with phorbyl myristate acetate (10 ng/ml) and ionomycin (100 ng/ml), surfen treatment either increased proliferation (10 μM) or had no effect (2.5, 5 and 20 μM). In vitro treatment of T cells with surfen had no effect on IL-2 or interferon-γ synthesis and did not alter proliferation of the IL-2 dependent cell

  17. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    OpenAIRE

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, Ingo; Kaczmarek, Karina; Bijma, Jelle; Gruber, D.F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been ex...

  18. Penetration of 35% hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber in bovine teeth after LED or Nd:YAG laser activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Samira Esteves Afonso; Cardoso, Paula Elaine; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; de Araújo, Maria Amélia Máximo; Kojima, Alberto Noriyuki

    2009-01-01

    This aim of the present study was to evaluate the pulp chamber penetration of 35% hydrogen peroxide activated by LED (light-emitting diode) or Nd:YAG laser in bovine teeth, after an in-office bleaching technique. Forty-eight bovine lateral incisors were divided into four groups, acetate buffer was placed into the pulp chamber and bleaching agent was applied as follows: for group A (n = 12), activation was performed by LED; for group B (n = 12), activation was performed by Nd:YAG laser (60 mJ, 20 Hz); group C (n = 12) received no light or laser activation; and the control group (n = 12) received no bleaching gel application or light or laser activation. The acetate buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube and Leuco Crystal Violet and horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of this solution was determined spectrophotometrically and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. The results were analysed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). It was verified that the effect of activation was significant, as groups activated by LED or laser presented greater hydrogen peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber (0.499 +/- 0.622 microg) compared with groups that were not (0.198 +/- 0.218 microg). There was no statistically significant difference in the penetration of hydrogen peroxide into the pulp chamber between the two types of activation (LED or laser). The results suggest that activation by laser or LED caused an increase in hydrogen peroxide penetration into the pulp chamber.

  19. A new, high-resolution global mass coral bleaching database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon D Donner

    Full Text Available Episodes of mass coral bleaching have been reported in recent decades and have raised concerns about the future of coral reefs on a warming planet. Despite the efforts to enhance and coordinate coral reef monitoring within and across countries, our knowledge of the geographic extent of mass coral bleaching over the past few decades is incomplete. Existing databases, like ReefBase, are limited by the voluntary nature of contributions, geographical biases in data collection, and the variations in the spatial scale of bleaching reports. In this study, we have developed the first-ever gridded, global-scale historical coral bleaching database. First, we conducted a targeted search for bleaching reports not included in ReefBase by personally contacting scientists and divers conducting monitoring in under-reported locations and by extracting data from the literature. This search increased the number of observed bleaching reports by 79%, from 4146 to 7429. Second, we employed spatial interpolation techniques to develop annual 0.04° × 0.04° latitude-longitude global maps of the probability that bleaching occurred for 1985 through 2010. Initial results indicate that the area of coral reefs with a more likely than not (>50% or likely (>66% probability of bleaching was eight times higher in the second half of the assessed time period, after the 1997/1998 El Niño. The results also indicate that annual maximum Degree Heating Weeks, a measure of thermal stress, for coral reefs with a high probability of bleaching increased over time. The database will help the scientific community more accurately assess the change in the frequency of mass coral bleaching events, validate methods of predicting mass coral bleaching, and test whether coral reefs are adjusting to rising ocean temperatures.

  20. A new, high-resolution global mass coral bleaching database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donner, Simon D; Rickbeil, Gregory J M; Heron, Scott F

    2017-01-01

    Episodes of mass coral bleaching have been reported in recent decades and have raised concerns about the future of coral reefs on a warming planet. Despite the efforts to enhance and coordinate coral reef monitoring within and across countries, our knowledge of the geographic extent of mass coral bleaching over the past few decades is incomplete. Existing databases, like ReefBase, are limited by the voluntary nature of contributions, geographical biases in data collection, and the variations in the spatial scale of bleaching reports. In this study, we have developed the first-ever gridded, global-scale historical coral bleaching database. First, we conducted a targeted search for bleaching reports not included in ReefBase by personally contacting scientists and divers conducting monitoring in under-reported locations and by extracting data from the literature. This search increased the number of observed bleaching reports by 79%, from 4146 to 7429. Second, we employed spatial interpolation techniques to develop annual 0.04° × 0.04° latitude-longitude global maps of the probability that bleaching occurred for 1985 through 2010. Initial results indicate that the area of coral reefs with a more likely than not (>50%) or likely (>66%) probability of bleaching was eight times higher in the second half of the assessed time period, after the 1997/1998 El Niño. The results also indicate that annual maximum Degree Heating Weeks, a measure of thermal stress, for coral reefs with a high probability of bleaching increased over time. The database will help the scientific community more accurately assess the change in the frequency of mass coral bleaching events, validate methods of predicting mass coral bleaching, and test whether coral reefs are adjusting to rising ocean temperatures.

  1. Recovery of cat retinal ganglion cell sensitivity following pigment bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonds, A B; Enroth-Cugell, C

    1979-01-01

    1. The threshold illuminance for small spot stimulation of on-centre cat retinal ganglion cells was plotted vs. time after exposure to adapting light sufficiently strong to bleach significant amounts of rhodopsin. 2. When the entire receptive field of an X- or Y-type ganglion cell is bleached by at most 40%, recovery of the cell's rod-system proceeds in two phases: an early relatively fast one during which the response appears transient, and a late, slower one during which responses become more sustained. Log threshold during the later phase is well fit by an exponential in time (tau = 11.5-38 min). 3. After bleaches of 90% of the underlying pigment, threshold is cone-determined for as long as 40 min. Rod threshold continues to decrease for at least 85 min after the bleach. 4. The rate of recovery is slower after strong than after weak bleaches; 10 and 90% bleaches yield time constants for the later phase of 11.5 and 38 min, respectively. This contrasts with an approximate time constant of 11 min for rhodopsin regeneration following any bleach. 5. The relationship between the initial elevation of log rod threshold extrapolated from the fitted exponential curves and the initial amount of pigment bleached is monotonic, but nonlinear. 6. After a bleaching exposure, the maintained discharge is initially very regular. The firing rate first rises, then falls to the pre-bleach level, with more extended time courses of change in firing rate after stronger exposures. The discharge rate is restored before threshold has recovered fully. 7. The change in the response vs. log stimulus relationship after bleaching is described as a shift of the curve to the right, paired with a decrease in slope of the linear segment of the curve. PMID:521963

  2. Pre-operative use of dexamethasone does not reduce incidence or intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. A triple-blind, parallel-design, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Poubel, Luiz Augusto; de Gouvea, Cresus Vinicius Deppes; Calazans, Fernanda Signorelli; Dip, Etyene Castro; Alves, Wesley Veltri; Marins, Stella Soares; Barcelos, Roberta; Barceleiro, Marcos Oliveira

    2018-04-25

    This study evaluated the effect of the administration of pre-operative dexamethasone on tooth sensitivity stemming from in-office bleaching. A triple-blind, parallel-design, randomized clinical trial was conducted on 70 volunteers who received dexamethasone or placebo capsules. The drugs were administered in a protocol of three daily 8-mg doses of the drug, starting 48 h before the in-office bleaching treatment. Two bleaching sessions with 37.5% hydrogen peroxide gel were performed with a 1-week interval. Tooth sensitivity (TS) was recorded on visual analog scales (VAS) and numeric rating scales (NRS) in different periods up to 48 h after bleaching. The color evaluations were also performed. The absolute risk of TS and its intensity were evaluated by using Fisher's exact test. Comparisons of the TS intensity (NRS and VAS data) were performed by using the Mann-Whitney U test and a two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test, respectively. In both groups, a high risk of TS (Dexa 80% x Placebo 94%) was detected. No significant difference was observed in terms of TS intensity. A whitening of approximately 3 shade guide units of the VITA Classical was detected in both groups, which were statistically similar. It was concluded that the administration pre-operatively of dexamethasone, in the proposed protocol, does not reduce the incidence or intensity of bleaching-induced tooth sensitivity. The use of dexamethasone drug before in-office bleaching treatment does not reduce incidence or intensity of tooth sensitivity. NCT02956070.

  3. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  4. The effects of habitat on coral bleaching responses in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsditch, Gabriel; Mwaura, Jelvas M; Kilonzo, Joseph; Amiyo, Nassir

    2010-06-01

    This study examines the bleaching responses of scleractinian corals at four sites in Kenya (Kanamai, Vipingo, Mombasa and Nyali) representing two distinct lagoon habitats (relatively shallow and relatively deep). Bleaching incidence was monitored for the whole coral community, while zooxanthellae densities and chlorophyll levels were monitored for target species (Pocillopora damicornis, Porites lutea, and Porites cylindrica) during a non-bleaching year (2006) and a year of mild-bleaching (2007). Differences in bleaching responses between habitats were observed, with shallower sites Kanamai and Vipingo exhibiting lower bleaching incidence than deeper sites Nyali and Mombasa. These shallower lagoons display more fluctuating thermal and light environments than the deeper sites, suggesting that corals in the shallower lagoons have acclimatized and/or adapted to the fluctuating environmental conditions they endure on a daily basis and have become more resistant to bleaching stress. In deeper sites that did exhibit higher bleaching (Mombasa and Nyali), it was found that coral recovery occurred more quickly in the protected area than in the non-protected area.

  5. Investigating Motivations for Women's Skin Bleaching in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kelly M.; Robkin, Navit; Gaska, Karie; Njoki, Lillian Carol

    2011-01-01

    Why do many African women continue to use damaging skin-bleaching cosmetics that contain dangerous chemicals (e.g., mercury) that may increase their rates of infertility, skin cancer, and serious skin/brain/kidney disease? To address this question, our study investigated motivations driving the preservation of skin-bleaching practices in Tanzania.…

  6. The Bleaching Syndrome: The Role of Educational Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ronald E.

    2016-01-01

    Per the Bleaching Syndrome, people of color, including African, Asian, and Latino Americans, are both victims and perpetrators of color discrimination. The Bleaching Syndrome encompasses perceptual, psychological, and behavioral sectors that affect students' schooling experiences. Education professionals, including teachers, administrators, and…

  7. Effects of a New Bleaching Gel on Tooth Whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-17

    that claims "wow’’ results and permanent whiteness unaffected by consumption of coffee, tea, or red wine with low to no sensitivity. KOR has also...bleaching to result in greater lightness {delta L *)than Home bleaching, suggesting no overall benefit from either technique. Two recent clinical

  8. Effect of a New Bleaching Gel on Tooth Whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-12

    that claims “wow” results and permanent whiteness unaffected by consumption of coffee, tea, or red wine with low to no sensitivity. KöR has also...tendency for Combined bleaching to result in greater lightness (delta L*) than Home bleaching, suggesting no overall benefit from either technique

  9. The bleaching syndrome: manifestation of a post-colonial pathology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The post-colonial root of African problems is directly related to skin color. Under the cloak of personal preference, light skin among African women has replaced dark skin as the native ideal. The aftermath is manifestation of the Bleaching Syndrome. Social Work professionals have overlooked the Bleaching Syndrome as ...

  10. Does deposition depth control the OSL bleaching of fluvial sediment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cunningham, A. C.; Wallinga, J.; Hobo, N.; Versendaal, A. J.; Makaske, B.; Middelkoop, H.

    2014-01-01

    The Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) signal from fluvial sediment often contains a remnant from the previous deposition cycle, leading to a partially bleached equivalent-dose distribution. Although identification of the burial dose is of primary concern, the degree of bleaching could

  11. Coral bleaching pathways under the control of regional temperature variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, C. E.; Lenton, A.; Heron, S. F.; Evenhuis, C.; Sen Gupta, A.; Brown, J. N.; Kuchinke, M.

    2017-11-01

    Increasing sea surface temperatures (SSTs) are predicted to adversely impact coral populations worldwide through increasing thermal bleaching events. Future bleaching is unlikely to be spatially uniform. Therefore, understanding what determines regional differences will be critical for adaptation management. Here, using a cumulative heat stress metric, we show that characteristics of regional SST determine the future bleaching risk patterns. Incorporating observed information on SST variability, in assessing future bleaching risk, provides novel options for management strategies. As a consequence, the known biases in climate model variability and the uncertainties in regional warming rate across climate models are less detrimental than previously thought. We also show that the thresholds used to indicate reef viability can strongly influence a decision on what constitutes a potential refugia. Observing and understanding the drivers of regional variability, and the viability limits of coral reefs, is therefore critical for making meaningful projections of coral bleaching risk.

  12. Release of hydrogen peroxide and antioxidants by the coral Stylophora pistillata to its external milieu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armoza-Zvuloni, R.; Shaked, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a common reactive oxygen species, plays multiple roles in coral health and disease. Elevated H2O2 production by the symbiotic algae during stress may result in symbiosis breakdown and bleaching of the coral. We have recently reported that various Red Sea corals release H2O2 and antioxidants to their external milieu, and can influence the H2O2 dynamics in the reef. Here, we present a laboratory characterization of H2O2 and antioxidant activity release kinetics by intact, non-stressed Stylophora pistillata. Experimenting with bleached and non-bleached corals and different stirring speeds, we explored the sources and modes of H2O2 and antioxidant release. Since H2O2 is produced and degraded simultaneously, we developed a methodology for resolving the actual H2O2 concentrations released by the corals. H2O2 and antioxidant activity steadily increased in the water surrounding the coral over short periods of 1-2 h. Over longer periods of 5-7 h, the antioxidant activity kept increasing with time, while H2O2 concentrations were stabilized at ~ 1 μM by 1-3 h, and then gradually declined. Solving for H2O2 release, corals were found to release H2O2 at increasing rates over 2-4 h, and then to slow down and stop by 5-7 h. Stirring was shown to induce the release of H2O2, possibly since the flow reduces the thickness of the diffusive boundary layer of the coral, and thus increases H2O2 mass flux. Antioxidant activity was released at similar rates by bleached and non-bleached corals, suggesting that the antioxidants did not originate from the symbiotic algae. H2O2, however, was not released from bleached corals, implying that the symbiotic algae are the source of the released H2O2. The observed flow-induced H2O2 release may aid corals in removing some of the internal H2O2 produced by their symbiotic algae, and may possibly assist in preventing coral bleaching under conditions of elevated temperature and irradiance.

  13. Bleaching of reef coelenterates in the San Blas Islands, Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasker, Howard R.; Peters, Esther C.; Coffroth, Mary Alice

    1984-12-01

    Starting in June 1983, 25 species of hermatypic corals, gorgonians, hydrocorals, anemones and zoanthids in the San Blas Islands, Panama, began showing signs of a loss of colour leading in some cases to a white “bleached” appearance. Histologic examination of six coral species indicated that bleaching was associated with drastic reductions in the density of zooxanthellae and with the atrophy and necrosis of the animal tissue. The severity of the bleaching varied among species and many species were unaffected. The species most extensively affected were: Agaricia spp., which became completely bleached and frequently died; Montastraea annularis which bleached and continued to survive; and Millepora spp. which bleached white but quickly regained their colouration. Shallow reefs dominated by Agaricia spp. suffered the most extensive bleaching. At one site, Pico Feo, 99% of the Agaricia (32% of the living cover) was bleached. On fore reers, which were dominated by Agaricia spp. and M. annularis, the proportion of M. annularis bleached ranged from 18 to 100% and that of Agaricia spp. from 30 to 53%. Transects at Sail Rock and House Reef were surveyed in August 1983 and January 1984. At those sites, 53% of the Agaricia cover died between August and January. The remaining living cover of Agaricia and of all other species exhibited normal colouration in January. Salinity and temperature were monitored every second day at 4 m depth between May 10 and August 28, 1983 at one of the localities. Bleaching was first observed within two weeks of a 2 °C rise in temperature which occurred in late May 1983. Temperatures remained at or above 31.5 °C for the following 3 weeks and were at or above 30 °C for an additional 4 weeks. The bleaching of corals in the San Blas was most likely due to those elevanted temperatures.

  14. Competition between excitation and bleaching of thermoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, R.; Hornyak, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    The bleaching of thermoluminescence (TL) yield to a residual value by light is explained, at least in some cases, to be due to an equilibrium between excitation and de-excitation by the illuminating light. Kinetic differential equations are given governing the process for the simple case of a single trapping state for electrons and a single variety of hole recombination centre. The equations are solved numerically for chosen sets of the relevant parameters starting either from empty traps and centres or from highly populated ones. In agreement with experimental results, the numerical computation predicts that after a long enough illumination the process of filling of the traps converges to the same equilibrium value as that produced by bleaching. It is also found that the equilibrium value is independent of the intensity, though, of course, this is approached faster with more intense light. The computed dependencies of the filling of trapping states as a function of illumination time are shown. The final equilibrium value for the filling of trapping states can also be evaluated analytically for any set of given parameters; these compare very favourably with the calculated results. The change of the results with the variation of the relevant parameters is discussed. (author)

  15. Influence of enamel/dentin thickness on the toxic and esthetic effects of experimental in-office bleaching protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Duque, C C; Soares, D G; Basso, F G; Hebling, J; de Souza Costa, C A

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to assess the whitening effectiveness and toxicity of tooth-bleaching protocols applied to enamel/dentin disks simulating mandibular incisors (ICs) and premolars (PMs). A 10% hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) gel was applied for 3 × 15, 1 × 15, or 1 × 5 min to enamel/dentin disks simulating mandibular ICs and PMs, and the trans-enamel and trans-dentinal diffusion products were applied to human dental pulp cells (1 h). Professional therapy (35% H 2 O 2 -3 × 15 min) was used as positive control, and non-bleached samples were used as negative control. Cell viability and morphology, oxidative stress generation, and odontoblastic marker expression were assessed. The H 2 O 2 diffusion and enamel color change (ΔE) were also analyzed. The 10% H 2 O 2 gel induced significant cell viability reduction only when applied 3 × 15 min, with the intensity of oxidative stress and down-regulation of odontoblastic markers being higher in the IC group. The other experimental bleaching protocols caused slight alterations regarding the cell parameters evaluated, with intensity being related to enamel/dentin thickness. These effects were also correlated with higher H 2 O 2 diffusion in the IC group. ΔE values similar as positive control were found for the 10% 3 × 15 and 1 × 15 protocols on IC group, after 4 and 6 sessions. Application of a 10% H 2 O 2 bleaching gel for 15 or 45 min to thin dental substrate significantly minimizes cell toxicity in comparison with highly concentrated gels associated with similar esthetic outcomes by increasing the number of bleaching sessions. Bleaching gels with 10% H 2 O 2 applied in small teeth for short periods may be an interesting alternative to obtain whitening effectiveness without causing toxicity to pulp cells, which may be able to reduce the tooth hypersensitivity claimed by patients.

  16. Effect of different storage conditions on the physical properties of bleached enamel: An in vitro vs. in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeczkowski, Marília; Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi; Aguiar, Flávio Henrique Baggio; Lima, Débora Alves Nunes Leite

    2015-09-01

    Evaluate the effect of different storage conditions on bleached enamel using Knoop microhardness (KHN) and colour variation. Forty-eight tooth blocks were divided into four groups (n=12), based on storage media (SM): purified water (PW), artificial saliva (AS), natural saliva (NS), in situ (IS). Three whitening sessions were carried out using 35% hydrogen peroxide, with a week interval. Colour and KHN measurements were taken before the samples were placed in the SM (t1), after 24h in the SM (t2), and after 24h at the end of the bleaching treatment (t3). Two extra samples from each group were analysed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). KHN results were analysed by PROC-MIXED and Tukey-Kramer test (α=0.05), and colour changes were evaluated using ΔL, Δa, Δb, ΔE between the different times Δ1(t1-t2), Δ2(t2-t3) using the Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's test (α=0.05). Significant statistical difference was noted in KHN at t3, with the lowest values found for PW. As for colour analysis in ΔE2 and Δb2, IS showed values that were statistically lower when compared to AS. Likewise, there were differences between PW and AS in relation to IS when evaluating ΔL2. In addition, NS showed similar values to IS. The storage conditions had different effects on the physical properties of bleached enamel. NS was the only SM that showed similar behaviour to IS. NS proved an effective SM in the protection and recovery of damage caused by bleaching and is a viable SM for in vitro studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of two in-office whitening agents on the enamel surface in vivo: a morphological and non-contact profilometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadenaro, Milena; Breschi, Lorenzo; Nucci, Cesare; Antoniolli, Francesca; Visintini, Erika; Prati, Carlo; Matis, Bruce A; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the morphological effects produced in vivo by two in-office bleaching agents on enamel surface roughness using a noncontact profilometric analysis of epoxy replicas. The null hypothesis tested was that there would be no difference in the micromorphology of the enamel surface during or after bleaching with two different bleaching agents. Eighteen subjects were selected and randomly assigned to two treatment groups (n=9). The tooth whitening materials tested were 38% hydrogen peroxide (HP) (Opalescence Xtra Boost) and 35% carbamide peroxide (CP) (Rembrandt Quik Start). The bleaching agents were applied in accordance with manufacturer protocols. The treatments were repeated four times at one-week intervals. High precision impressions of the upper right incisor were taken at baseline as the control (CTRL) and after each bleaching treatment (T0: first application, T1: second application at one week, T2: third application at two weeks and T3: fourth application at three weeks). Epoxy resin replicas were poured from impressions, and the surface roughness was analyzed by means of a non-contact profilometer (Talysurf CLI 1000). Epoxy replicas were then observed using SEM. All data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and differences were determined with a t-test. No significant differences in surface roughness were found on enamel replicas using either 38% hydrogen peroxide or 35% carbamide peroxide in vivo. This in vivo study supports the null hypothesis that two in-office bleaching agents, with either a high concentration of hydrogen or carbamide peroxide, do not alter enamel surface roughness, even after multiple applications.

  18. Effects of 45S5 bioglass on surface properties of dental enamel subjected to 35% hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Meng; Wen, Hai-Lin; Dong, Xiao-Li; Li, Feng; Xu, Xin; Li, Hong; Li, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Tooth bleaching agents may weaken the tooth structure. Therefore, it is important to minimize any risks of tooth hard tissue damage caused by bleaching agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of applying 45S5 bioglass (BG) before, after, and during 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) bleaching on whitening efficacy, physicochemical properties and microstructures of bovine enamel. Seventy-two bovine enamel blocks were prepared and randomly divided into six groups: distilled deionized water (DDW), BG, HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. Colorimetric and microhardness tests were performed before and after the treatment procedure. Representative specimens from each group were selected for morphology investigation after the final tests. A significant color change was observed in group HP, BG before HP, BG after HP and BG during HP. The microhardness loss was in the following order: group HP>BG before HP, BG after HP>BG during HP>DDW, BG. The most obvious morphological alteration of was observed on enamel surfaces in group HP, and a slight morphological alteration was also detected in group BG before HP and BG after HP. Our findings suggest that the combination use of BG and HP could not impede the tooth whitening efficacy. Using BG during HP brought better protective effect than pre/post-bleaching use of BG, as it could more effectively reduce the mineral loss as well as retain the surface integrity of enamel. BG may serve as a promising biomimetic adjunct for bleaching therapy to prevent/restore the enamel damage induced by bleaching agents.

  19. A novel approach for in-office tooth bleaching with 6% H2O2/TiO_N and LED/laser system-a controlled, triple-blinded, randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolatto, Janaina Freitas; Trevisan, Tamara Carolina; Bernardi, Priscila Sadalla Ismael; Fernandez, Eduardo; Dovigo, Livia Nordi; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Batista de Oliveira Junior, Osmir; Pretel, Hermes

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this randomized, parallel, triple-blinded clinical trial was to compare efficacy and tooth sensitivity (TS) after use of an in-office bleaching agent of 6% hydrogen peroxide containing nanoparticles of nitrogen-doped titanium oxide (HP6) vs. 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP35). Forty-eight volunteers were randomly divided either a HP6 or HP35. Two clinical sessions were performed with an interval of 7 days between them for each group. In each session, two consecutive applications of each bleaching agent were performed and activated by a hybrid LED/laser light. Efficacy was determined by color alteration (ΔE), recorded with reflectance spectroscopy. It was assessed at baseline and after the first and second bleaching session. TS was characterized according to occurrence, intensity, duration, and type. Efficacy was analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Bonferroni test, and TS was analyzed by means of chi(2) test (α = 0.05). For HP35, highest and significant values of ΔE were found after bleaching when compared to HP6 (p = 0.002). However, HP35 showed a significantly higher occurrence of TS than HP6 (p = 0.008). Also, intensity and duration were higher in HP35. The majority of volunteers classified the type experienced in their sensitivity in the form of a "shock." The use of HP6 despite reducing efficacy when compared to an in-office bleaching in higher concentration (35%) produced less tooth sensitivity. In terms of tooth sensitivity, the use of lower concentrations of in-office bleaching should be the first choice, suggesting greater biocompatibility and safety compared to a conventional HP35.

  20. Bleaching and recovery of a phototrophic bioeroding sponge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlow, Joseph; Davy, Simon K.; Shaffer, Megan; Haris, Abdul; Bell, James J.

    2018-06-01

    In the Wakatobi region of Indonesia, a prolonged period of elevated water temperature in 2016 caused extensive coral bleaching and mortality. Unusually, bleaching was also observed in the bioeroding sponge Cliona aff. viridis, with affected sponges expelling 99% of their Symbiodinium. Bleaching surveys of C. aff. viridis were conducted 6 weeks apart, coinciding with a 0.8 °C drop in water temperature. Over this period, bleaching prevalence dropped from 73.9% (± 9.9 SE) to 25.7% (± 5.8 SE), and bleaching severity dropped from 25.95% (± 4.5 SE) to 11.54% (± 1.9 SE) of sponge tissue. Over the same period, monitored bleached sponges showed an 81% drop in bleaching severity, but also a 13% reduction in overall sponge size. Our results show that while the clionaid- Symbiodinium relationship is susceptible to break down under thermal stress, rapid recovery can occur, although incurring some partial host mortality.

  1. Bleaching of F-type centres in alkali halides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandratillake, M.R.; Newton, G.W.A.; Robinson, V.J.

    1984-01-01

    Bleaching of the F band in KCl occurs on pulsing with 532 nm laser light. The bleaching is accompanied by the appearance of an absorption on the red side of the F band. Both bleaching and absorption are transient phenomena, and no permanent bleaching or absorption is observed. The same exponential lifetime of about 5μS was obtained for both bleaching and absorption, and all the features were found to be independent of both temperature (between 200 and 300 K) and the intensity of the analysing light. This eliminates the possibility of a trapped species, such as F - , being responsible. The phenomena are qualitatively different from the bleaching observed at low light intensity, where bleaching of the F band is accompanied by formation of F - , which is thermally stable below 250 K. The most likely explanation of the results is that the high concentration of conduction band electrons following the laser pulse allows formation of free or quasi-free electron pairs, e 2 - , which decay back into F centres on a time scale which is long compared with that for individual electrons. (author)

  2. Determination of burial dose in incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Kristina Jørkov; Murray, A.S.; Bøtter-Jensen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    We determine the burial dose in three known-age incompletely bleached fluvial samples using single grains of quartz. Estimation of burial dose in incompletely bleached samples requires that the characteristics of the well-bleached part of the distribution are known in order to distinguish between...... well-bleached and poorly bleached grains. It is especially important to investigate if the uncertainties assigned to individual estimates of dose adequately describe the observed variability in well-bleached dose distributions. We investigate this by quantifying the overdispersion in laboratory-bleached...

  3. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct.

  4. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. PMID:26048979

  5. Salt, chloride, bleach, and innate host defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoshun; Nauseef, William M

    2015-08-01

    Salt provides 2 life-essential elements: sodium and chlorine. Chloride, the ionic form of chlorine, derived exclusively from dietary absorption and constituting the most abundant anion in the human body, plays critical roles in many vital physiologic functions, from fluid retention and secretion to osmotic maintenance and pH balance. However, an often overlooked role of chloride is its function in innate host defense against infection. Chloride serves as a substrate for the generation of the potent microbicide chlorine bleach by stimulated neutrophils and also contributes to regulation of ionic homeostasis for optimal antimicrobial activity within phagosomes. An inadequate supply of chloride to phagocytes and their phagosomes, such as in CF disease and other chloride channel disorders, severely compromises host defense against infection. We provide an overview of the roles that chloride plays in normal innate immunity, highlighting specific links between defective chloride channel function and failures in host defense. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  6. Improvement in rice straw pulp bleaching effluent quality by incorporating oxygen delignification stage prior to elemental chlorine-free bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Daljeet; Bhardwaj, Nishi K; Lohchab, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Environmental degradation by industrial and other developmental activities is alarming for imperative environmental management by process advancements of production. Pulp and paper mills are now focusing on using nonwood-based raw materials to protect forest resources. In present study, rice straw was utilized for pulp production as it is easily and abundantly available as well as rich in carbohydrates (cellulose and hemicelluloses). Soda-anthraquinone method was used for pulp production as it is widely accepted for agro residues. Bleaching process during paper production is the chief source of wastewater generation. The chlorophenolic compounds generated during bleaching are highly toxic, mutagenic, and bioaccumulative in nature. The objectives of study were to use oxygen delignification (ODL) stage prior to elemental chlorine-free (ECF) bleaching to reduce wastewater load and to study its impact on bleached pulp characteristics. ODL stage prior to ECF bleaching improved the optical properties of pulp in comparison to only ECF bleaching. When ODL stage was incorporated prior to bleaching, the tensile index and folding endurance of the pulp were found to be 56.6 ± 1.5 Nm/g and 140, respectively, very high in comparison to ECF alone. A potential reduction of 51, 57, 43, and 53% in BOD 3 , COD, color, and AOX, respectively was observed on adding the ODL stage compared to ECF only. Generation of chlorophenolic compounds was reduced significantly. Incorporation of ODL stage prior to bleaching was found to be highly promising for reducing the toxicity of bleaching effluents and may lead to better management of nearby water resources. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  7. Comparison of Intracoronal Bleaching Methods on Teeth Discolored ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... Germany) for 48 h. Standard access ... Bad Säckingen, Germany) on the buccal surfaces of the crown ..... via visual assessment (e.g., digital image analysis) and .... Sulieman M. An overview of bleaching techniques: I. History,.

  8. Through bleaching and tsunami: Coral reef recovery in the Maldives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morri, Carla; Montefalcone, Monica; Lasagna, Roberta; Gatti, Giulia; Rovere, Alessio; Parravicini, Valeriano; Baldelli, Giuseppe; Colantoni, Paolo; Bianchi, Carlo Nike

    2015-09-15

    Coral reefs are degrading worldwide, but little information exists on their previous conditions for most regions of the world. Since 1989, we have been studying the Maldives, collecting data before, during and after the bleaching and mass mortality event of 1998. As early as 1999, many newly settled colonies were recorded. Recruits shifted from a dominance of massive and encrusting corals in the early stages of recolonisation towards a dominance of Acropora and Pocillopora by 2009. Coral cover, which dropped to less than 10% after the bleaching, returned to pre-bleaching values of around 50% by 2013. The 2004 tsunami had comparatively little effect. In 2014, the coral community was similar to that existing before the bleaching. According to descriptors and metrics adopted, recovery of Maldivian coral reefs took between 6 and 15years, or may even be considered unachieved, as there are species that had not come back yet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Natural sunlight bleaching of the aluminum center in quartz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Min; Yin Gongming; Han Kongyan; Bao Jifei; Liu Jingwei; Jia Li

    2007-01-01

    The effect of sunlight bleaching on ESR signals from the aluminum center in quartz is reported for two samples of sand-sized quartz, one from a granite and one from a beach sand. The grains were exposed to direct sunlight for periods of time up to 500 h, with bleaching carried out in four different cities in China that are from 50 to 3600 m above sea level. Each sample bleached to the same residual level, ∼55% for the granite and 80% for the beach sand of the initial value after a 200 Gy dose had been given. After 200 h, the bleaching level reached was independent of the height above sea level

  10. Dating implications from solar bleaching of thermoluminescence of ancient marble

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liritzis, I.; Galloway, R.B.

    1999-01-01

    Measurements of Thermoluminescence (TL) from Greek marble quarried at Paros, Naxos, Pendeli, Hymitos, Thassos, which have been known since ancient time are presented. The results concern i) the solar bleaching of TL, ii) the solar transmission through marble thicknesses up to 16 mm, and iii) the implications for potential dating of ancient carbed marble monuments/objects. The bleaching rate for marbles is very fast during the first hour of exposure. The solar penetration is at least 35 mm for long exposures. Beyond the 2 mm marble slab for exposure times 90-120 hours of sunshine, the residual bleached TL level is not reached. The bleached TL reaches a plateau which serves as the 'zero time' upon which the archaeological TL dose subsequently builds up and gives the age of a marble monument. (author)

  11. Bleaching of hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabrics without scouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    This work investigated whether a hydroentangled greige cotton nonwoven fabric made at a relatively high hydroentangling water pressure, say, 135-bar, could be successfully bleached to attain the desired whiteness, absorbency and other properties without traditional scouring. Accordingly, the scoured...

  12. Guest–host interactions in the alkaline bleaching of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    cyclodextrin on the bleaching rates of triphenylmethane dyes crystal violet (CV), malachite green (MG) and rosaniline. (RA) have been investigated in alkaline medium with a view to understand the guest–host interaction in these system. 2.

  13. Sludge disinfection by combined treatment of bleaching powder and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsoyo

    1987-01-01

    Sludge disinfection by combined treatment of bleaching powder and irradiation. Disinfection of sludge by combined treatment of bleaching powder and irradiation has been investigated. Sludge were obtained from water and waste sanitation department (Dinas Kebersihan) DKI located at Kebon Nanas, Jakarta. Sludge were mixed with bleaching powder at the concentration of 0, 10 and 20 mg/l and then irradiated in multipurpose panoramic batch irradiator (PANBIT) with doses of 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 kGy and a dose rate 9 kGy/h. The reducing colony form unit caused by the combined treatment depend on type bacteria observed in sludge. Pathogenic bacteria as Clostridium still survive at a dose of 10 kGy on sludge containing 20 mg/l bleaching powder, but Salmonella, Shigella, and Vibrio were not detected in this experiment, neither in the control nor in the irradiated samples. (author). 14 refs.; 4 figs

  14. Thermal refugia against coral bleaching throughout the northern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Eslam O.

    2017-10-17

    Tropical reefs have been impacted by thermal anomalies caused by global warming that induced coral bleaching and mortality events globally. However, there have only been very few recordings of bleaching within the Red Sea despite covering a latitudinal range of 15° and consequently it has been considered a region that is less sensitive to thermal anomalies. We therefore examined historical patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) and associated anomalies (1982–2012) and compared warming trends with a unique compilation of corresponding coral bleaching records from throughout the region. These data indicated that the northern Red Sea has not experienced mass bleaching despite intensive Degree Heating Weeks (DHW) of >15°C-weeks. Severe bleaching was restricted to the central and southern Red Sea where DHWs have been more frequent, but far less intense (DHWs <4°C-weeks). A similar pattern was observed during the 2015–2016 El Niño event during which time corals in the northern Red Sea did not bleach despite high thermal stress (i.e. DHWs >8°C-weeks), and bleaching was restricted to the central and southern Red Sea despite the lower thermal stress (DHWs < 8°C-weeks). Heat stress assays carried out in the northern (Hurghada) and central (Thuwal) Red Sea on four key reef-building species confirmed different regional thermal susceptibility, and that central Red Sea corals are more sensitive to thermal anomalies as compared to those from the north. Together, our data demonstrate that corals in the northern Red Sea have a much higher heat tolerance than their prevailing temperature regime would suggest. In contrast, corals from the central Red Sea are close to their thermal limits, which closely match the maximum annual water temperatures. The northern Red Sea harbours reef-building corals that live well below their bleaching thresholds and thus we propose that the region represents a thermal refuge of global importance.

  15. Thermal refugia against coral bleaching throughout the northern Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Osman, Eslam O.; Smith, David J.; Ziegler, Maren; Kü rten, Benjamin; Conrad, Constanze; El-Haddad, Khaled M.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Suggett, David J.

    2017-01-01

    Tropical reefs have been impacted by thermal anomalies caused by global warming that induced coral bleaching and mortality events globally. However, there have only been very few recordings of bleaching within the Red Sea despite covering a latitudinal range of 15° and consequently it has been considered a region that is less sensitive to thermal anomalies. We therefore examined historical patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) and associated anomalies (1982–2012) and compared warming trends with a unique compilation of corresponding coral bleaching records from throughout the region. These data indicated that the northern Red Sea has not experienced mass bleaching despite intensive Degree Heating Weeks (DHW) of >15°C-weeks. Severe bleaching was restricted to the central and southern Red Sea where DHWs have been more frequent, but far less intense (DHWs <4°C-weeks). A similar pattern was observed during the 2015–2016 El Niño event during which time corals in the northern Red Sea did not bleach despite high thermal stress (i.e. DHWs >8°C-weeks), and bleaching was restricted to the central and southern Red Sea despite the lower thermal stress (DHWs < 8°C-weeks). Heat stress assays carried out in the northern (Hurghada) and central (Thuwal) Red Sea on four key reef-building species confirmed different regional thermal susceptibility, and that central Red Sea corals are more sensitive to thermal anomalies as compared to those from the north. Together, our data demonstrate that corals in the northern Red Sea have a much higher heat tolerance than their prevailing temperature regime would suggest. In contrast, corals from the central Red Sea are close to their thermal limits, which closely match the maximum annual water temperatures. The northern Red Sea harbours reef-building corals that live well below their bleaching thresholds and thus we propose that the region represents a thermal refuge of global importance.

  16. Comparative evaluation of esthetic changes in nonpitted fluorosis stains when treated with resin infiltration, in-office bleaching, and combination therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugnani, Neeraj; Pandit, I K; Gupta, Monika; Gugnani, Shalini; Soni, Sugandhi; Goyal, Virender

    2017-09-01

    Dental fluorosis leads to esthetic deviation and varies from nonpitted white opacities, dark brown stains to pitting or structural breakdown of enamel surface. Treatment for fluorosis depends on the severity of condition and includes both noninvasive methods and invasive methods. Recently resin infiltration has been proposed as an alternative treatment for nonpitted fluorosis. This study was done to evaluate the esthetic changes in nonpitted fluorosis stains when treated with resin infiltration, in-office bleaching and combination therapies. The present study is a randomized, single blinded controlled trial with four parallel arms with 1:1 allocation ratio. The intervention arms included bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide, resin infiltration, resin infiltration with increased infiltration time and a combination approach of bleaching and infiltration. Immediate esthetic changes were evaluated for two parameters including, 'Change in esthetics' and 'Improvement in opacities/stains' using a VAS scale by two independent observers. Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U-test were done for intergroup comparisons. Best results for both the parameters were observed among patients treated with resin infiltration with increased infiltration time. Mann-Whitney U test revealed significantly better results for resin infiltration groups (alone or combination with bleaching) as compared to bleaching alone (P esthetics and improvement in stains. White and brown opacities due to fluorosis have always been a concern for esthetics. In our study, resin infiltration technique with tailored etching times and increased infiltration time exhibited best immediate esthetic improvement for nonpitted fluorotic opacities and stains. These esthetic outcomes reaffirm the applicability of RI technique for nonpitted fluorosis, which was originally advocated only for white spot lesions due to early caries. This will in turn help the dentists to plan the esthetic management of nonpitted fluorosis

  17. Effect of Ascorbic Acid on Shear Bond Strength of Orthodontic Brackets Bonded with Resin-modified Glass-ionomer Cement to Bleached Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnam Khosravanifard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Bleaching can considerably reduce shear bond strength (SBS of orthodontic brackets bonded with composite adhesives. Application of antioxidants is a method to reverse the negative effect of bleaching on compositeto-enamel bond. However, the efficacy of antioxidants in increasing the SBS of brackets bonded using resin-modified glassionomer cement (RMGIC has not been studied, which was the aim of this study. Materials and methods. Fifty freshly extracted human maxillary first premolars were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Pola Office Bleaching, SDI. Sodium ascorbate 10% was applied to the experimental specimens (n=25. All the specimens were etched with 37% phosphoric acid (Ivoclar/Vivadent and bonded using RMGIC (Fuji Ortho LC, GC. The specimens were subjected to incubation (37°C, 24h and thermocycling (1000 cycles, 5-55°C, dwell time = 1 min. The SBS was measured at 0.5 mm/min debonding crosshead speed. The adhesive remnant index (ARI was scored under ×10 magnification. Data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U test, one- and independent-samples t-test, and Fisher’s exact test (α=0.05. Results. The mean SBS of experimental and control groups were 11.97 ± 4.49 and 7.7 ± 3.19 MPa, respectively. The difference was statistically significant (P=0.000 by t-test. SBS of both control (P=0.014 and experimental (P=0.000 groups were significantly higher than the minimum acceptable SBS of 6 MPa, according to one-sample t-test. Conclusion. Application of ascorbic acid can guarantee a strong bond when RMGIC is to be used. However, RMGIC might tolerate the negative effect of bleaching with minimum SA treatments (or perhaps without treatments, which deserves further studies.

  18. 21 CFR 184.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... agent. Wine vinegar Amount sufficient for the purpose Remove sulfur dioxide from wine prior to fermentation to produce vinegar. Emulsifiers containing fatty acid esters 1.25 Bleaching agent. (d) Residual...

  19. The 2014 summer coral bleaching event in subtropical Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, James Y; Lau, Dickey C C; Kei, Keith; Yu, Vriko P F; Chow, Wing-Kuen; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2017-11-30

    We reported a coral bleaching event that occurred in August-September 2014 in Hong Kong waters based on video transect surveys conducted at eight sites. The bleaching affected eight species of corals with different growth forms. Bleaching at seven of the eight study sites was minor, affecting only 0.4-5.2% colonies and 0.8-10.0% coral-covered area. Sharp Island East, however, suffered from a moderate level of bleaching, with 13.1% colonies and 30.1% coral-covered area affected. Examination of the government's environmental monitoring data indicated abnormal water quality conditions preceding and during the bleaching event. Follow-up field surveys of tagged colonies showed that 76% of them had fully recovered, 12% partially recovered, and 12% suffered from mortality. These results indicate that the subtropical corals of Hong Kong are not immune to bleaching, and there is a need to study their responses under climate change scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bleaching of the thermoluminescence of feldspars by sunlight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, G.B.; Prescott, J.R.; Hutton, J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Feldspars are an important component of materials used for thermoluminescence (TL) and photoluminescence (PL) dating of sediments; and successful dating implies a knowledge of the degree of re-setting by exposure to sunlight of the stored luminescence energy. We have studied the bleaching by full sunlight of the TL of six alkali feldspars of representative composition and of one oligoclase. The high potassium and high sodium feldspars are the brightest, and are also the least easily bleached, whereas those of intermediate (K-Na) composition bleach quickly. On a time scale of upwards of 16 h, all samples would have bleached enough for them to be useful for TL dating. A search was made for individual glow curve peaks that bleach particularly quickly (and are thus similar to the well-known 325 o C peak used in the TL dating of quartz). In the samples studied, there was only one glow curve peak that was selectively susceptible to bleaching: the 280 o C peak in oligoclase. (author)

  1. [High school student and skin bleaching in Cameroon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayoughouo Mouliom, Adeline; Wamba, André

    2017-04-27

    Introduction: Skin bleaching is a common practice in Africa, particularly in Cameroon. Studies show that it represents a danger for health, in terms of a demonstrated increased risk of dermatological diseases. However, increasing numbers of people are using skin bleaching in African cities, despite the fact that they are sometimes aware of the risk. This study proposed to transform the knowledge and perceptions of skin bleaching practices into educational strategies that can be used both by health professionals and educators. These strategies can also be used as preventive measures against skin bleaching among young schoolgirls. Methods: Data collection was based on a qualitative approach, in the form of a focus group discussion attended by 40 girls aged between 14 and 20 years, selected by convenient random sampling. Results: The results indicated that girls have an approximate knowledge about the consequences of skin bleaching on their health. On the contrary, they have a good knowledge about prevention, which can be used to develop a prevention strategy in order to reduce or eradicate skin bleaching, by educational awareness campaigns Conclusion: These elements can be used as a basis for better prevention and health promotion in schools; so that students adopt healthy behaviours and to prevent those students at risk.

  2. Uranium precipitation with hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    Although hydrogen peroxide precipitation of uranium continues to be used primarily as means of producing a high purity yellowcake, it has also become an important process due to its superior physical properties. Processing costs such as filtering, drying and/or calcining and drumming, can be reduced. 5 refs

  3. Hydrogen peroxide: importance and determination

    OpenAIRE

    Mattos, Ivanildo Luiz de; Shiraishi, Karina Antonelli; Braz, Alexandre Delphini; Fernandes, João Roberto

    2003-01-01

    A brief discussion about the hydrogen peroxide importance and its determination is presented. It was emphasized some consideration of the H2O2 as reagent (separated or combined), uses and methods of analysis (techniques, detection limits, linear response intervals, sensor specifications). Moreover, it was presented several applications, such as in environmental, pharmaceutical, medicine and food samples.

  4. Validation of degree heating weeks as a coral bleaching index in the northwestern Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayanne, Hajime

    2017-03-01

    Mass bleaching is the most significant threat to coral reefs. The United States National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration monitors world sea surface temperature (SST) and releases warnings for bleaching based on degree heating weeks (DHW), which is the accumulation of temperature anomalies exceeding the monthly maximum mean SST for a given region. DHW values >4.0 °C-weeks are thought to induce bleaching, and those >8.0 °C-weeks are thought to result in widespread bleaching and some mortality. This study validates the effectiveness of DHW as a mass bleaching index by on-site historical observation at eight sites in the northwestern Pacific Ocean. The mass bleaching events occurred during different years at different sites. The recorded years of the bleaching events matched well with DHW values >8 °C-weeks, and the logistically projected probability of bleaching against DHW showed a positive relationship. DHW provides a reasonable threshold for bleaching.

  5. Quantifying bleaching for zero-age fluvial sediment: A Bayesian approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, Alastair C.; Evans, Mary; Knight, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Luminescence dating of sediment requires the sand grains to have been exposed to sunlight prior to their most recent burial. Under fluvial transport, the amount of sunlight exposure may not always be sufficient to reset the luminescence signal, a phenomenon known as ‘partial bleaching'. The extent of bleaching is dependent on a combination of geomorphic, sedimentological and fluvial processes. If bleaching can be quantified, and the relationship with these processes understood, it could potentially be used as a new environmental proxy for changes in the dynamics of river systems. Here, we use a recently developed statistical model to evaluate the extent of bleaching, by inferring the proportion of well-bleached grains in the small-aliquot population. We sampled low-flow and flood deposits at a single site on the River Sabie, South Africa. We show that the low-flow sediment is almost perfectly bleached (>80% of grains well bleached), while sediment at flood elevations is partially bleached (20–70 % of grains well bleached). The degree of bleaching may show a relationship with flood magnitude as defined by elevation above normal river level, and we speculate on the causes of variability in bleaching between flood samples. - Highlights: • We sampled modern river sediment from low-flow and flood elevations. • The unbleached OSL dose was measured. • Bayesian methods can estimate the proportion of well-bleached grains. • Low-flow sediments are well bleached; flood deposits are poorly bleached.

  6. Effect of bleaching and repolishing procedures on coffee and tea stain removal from three anterior composite veneering materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkün, L Sebnem; Türkün, Murat

    2004-01-01

    Discolored teeth can be treated with resin veneers, but their color changes when confronted with staining solutions. Polishing procedures can provide a remedy for highly stained composites, but they tend to remove some materials as well. However, bleaching procedures are an effective, nondestructive method for solving the problem. The aim of this study was to compare the color change of three veneer composites exposed to staining solutions and to evaluate the effectiveness of a 15% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent and three polishing systems to remove the stain. Forty-five disks (12 x 2 mm) each of Clearfil ST (Kuraray Co. Ltd., Osaka, Japan), Esthet-X (Dentsply/Caulk, Milford DE, USA), and Filtek A110 (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) were prepared. The specimens were polished with Sof-Lex (3M ESPE), Enhance (Dentsply/Caulk), or PoGo (Dentsply/Caulk). Five specimens for each material-polishing system combination were immersed in coffee (Nescafe Classic, Nestle SA, Vevey, Switzerland) or tea (Earl Grey, Lipton, Blackfriars-London, England) for 7 days. The remaining disks were stored in water. Color measurements were made with a spectrophotometer (X-Rite Seroice SP78, Loaner, Köln, Germany) at baseline; after 1, 3, 5, and 7 days; and after bleaching and repolishing. After 1 week, one side of the specimens was bleached with Illuminé-office (Dentsply De Trey GmbH, Konstanz, Germany) for 1 hour, and the other side was repolished for 30 seconds. All comparisons of color change for the polishing systems, times, and staining solutions were subjected to repeated measurements of analysis of variance. Paired t-test was used to examine whether significant color differences (deltaE*) occurred during immersion at the specified time intervals (p < or = .05). Filtek A110 was the least stained resin composite. Its color remained under a deltaE* value of 2 during the study. Clearfil ST exhibited the most color change after 1 week. All specimens polished with Enhance showed less

  7. Apeksifikasi dengan mineral trioxide aggregate dan perawatan intracoronal bleaching pada gigi insisivus sentralis kiri maksila non vital diskolorasi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Inajati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Affecification with mineral trioxide aggregate and care of intracoronal bleaching on the non vital discoloration maxillary left central incisor. Maxillary anterior teeth in children and adults often experience trauma. This later makes the dental pulp roots that are not completely formed face the necrosis and apical closure stop later causing the apex wide and open. The opened apex can be coped with the care of affecification. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA is the best material of affecification used for the formation of apical barrier. The purpose of this case report was to report the achievement of the apical sealing using MTA in the non-vital permanent maxillary left central incisor with the opened apical due to the trauma. The complaints of male patients aged 20 years was about the broken and discoloured left upper front teeth and becomes a traumatic event since the age of 10 years due to a fall and hit the cement floor. A clinical examination of non-vital teeth used the fracture Ellis IV class with wide open apex and discoloration. The radiographic image showed a widely opened apex with large root canal and there was a periapical radiolucency. The treatment given was affecification with MTA followed obturation with gutta-percha and sealer AH 26. In the following week it was continued with intracoronal bleaching with the application of sodium perborate and 30% hydrogen peroxide. Before treatment, the teeth were brownish (C4 and after treatment it turned into yellowish white (B2. A week after the bleaching treatment was completed and the installation of fibre post was done, followed by giving the composite resin restorations class IV cavity. The 2-week control later showed no abnormalities. In conclusion, the affecification treatment with MTA can accelerate treatment with the formation of apical barrier that stimulates the healing and may be followed by obturation with guttap percha followed by doing intracoronal bleaching and final

  8. The efficacy of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home bleaching on sound and demineralized enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Majid; Mohammadpour, Sakineh

    2015-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the effectiveness of laser-assisted in-office bleaching and home-bleaching in sound and demineralized enamel. Materials and Methods: The sample consisted of 120 freshly-extracted bovine incisors. Half of the specimens were stored in a demineralizing solution to induce white spot lesions. Following exposure to a tea solution for 7.5 days, the specimens were randomly assigned to 4 groups of 30 according to the type of enamel and the bleaching procedure employed. Groups 1 and 2 consisted of demineralized teeth subjected to in-office bleaching and home bleaching, whereas in groups 3 and 4, sound teeth were subjected to in-office and home bleaching, respectively. A diode laser (810 nm, 2 W, continuous wave, four times for 15 seconds each) was employed for assisting the in-office process. The color of the specimens was measured before (T1) and after (T2) staining and during (T3) and after (T4) the bleaching procedures using a spectrophotometer. The color change (ΔE) between different treatments stages was compared among the groups. Results: There were significant differences in the color change between T2 and T3 (ΔE T2–T3) and T2 and T4 (ΔE T2–T4) stages among the study groups (pbleaching (group 1) as compared to the other groups (Pbleaching could provide faster and greater whitening effect than home bleaching on stained demineralized enamel, but both procedures produced comparable results on sound teeth. PMID:26877590

  9. Spectrophotometric and computerized evaluation of tooth bleaching employing 10 different home-bleaching procedures: In-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskersoy, Cem; Tetik, Ayhan; Ozturk, Veli Ozgen; Gokay, Necmi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this in-vitro study was to evaluate the efficacy of bleaching products, determine the applicability and validation of the measurement methods. Materials and Methods: Freshly extracted 110 human incisor teeth were stained with whole blood and hemolysate solution prior to the application of 10 different home-bleaching products. Spectrophotometric measurements of the tooth shades were performed for each specimen before and after bleaching at the 1st, 3rd, 7th, and 14 days. Differences in lightness (Δl), chroma (Δc), hue (Δh) values and shade changes were measured to evaluate process. Computerized digital imaging analyses to determine the color changes were performed with Photoshop CS4 software (Adobe, San Jose, CA, USA). Statistical analyses were performed with analysis of variance, Scheffe and Tukey tests. Results: In all of the test groups regardless of the material used, a significant increase in lightness and hue, and decrease of chroma were observed, as compared to the control group. After recommended bleaching applications, Δl and Δh values respectively increased in group Zaris White and Brite (ZWB) and group Pola Night and Δc values showed significant decrease in groups ZWB and Rembrandt REM3 (P bleaching systems showed slower but almost permanent bleaching effect likewise office-based methods. Both software and spectrophotometric analyses have advantages such as evaluating the results objectively and numerically, also treatment outcomes could be preserved. PMID:25512738

  10. Coral bleaching--capacity for acclimatization and adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, S L; Brown, Barbara E

    2003-01-01

    Coral bleaching, i.e., loss of most of the symbiotic zooxanthellae normally found within coral tissue, has occurred with increasing frequency on coral reefs throughout the world in the last 20 years, mostly during periods of El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Experiments and observations indicate that coral bleaching results primarily from elevated seawater temperatures under high light conditions, which increases rates of biochemical reactions associated with zooxanthellar photosynthesis, producing toxic forms of oxygen that interfere with cellular processes. Published projections of a baseline of increasing ocean temperature resulting from global warming have suggested that annual temperature maxima within 30 years may be at levels that will cause frequent coral bleaching and widespread mortality leading to decline of corals as dominant organisms on reefs. However, these projections have not considered the high variability in bleaching response that occurs among corals both within and among species. There is information that corals and their symbionts may be capable of acclimatization and selective adaptation to elevated temperatures that have already resulted in bleaching resistant coral populations, both locally and regionally, in various areas of the world. There are possible mechanisms that might provide resistance and protection to increased temperature and light. These include inducible heat shock proteins that act in refolding denatured cellular and structural proteins, production of oxidative enzymes that inactivate harmful oxygen radicals, fluorescent coral pigments that both reflect and dissipate light energy, and phenotypic adaptations of zooxanthellae and adaptive shifts in their populations at higher temperatures. Such mechanisms, when considered in conjunction with experimental and observational evidence for coral recovery in areas that have undergone coral bleaching, suggest an as yet undefined capacity in corals and zooxanthellae to adapt to

  11. Bleaching and recovery patterns of corals in Palk Bay, India: An indication of bleaching resilient reef

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Manikandan, B.; Ravindran, J.; Vidya, P.J.; ManiMurali, R.

    was calculated corresponding to our observation eight days interval in-situ observations and plotted. PAR is defined as the integration of the solar flux reaching the ocean surface and denoted as Em-2d-1. In this study, PAR data at the ocean surface....11>0.05). Mean SST and PAR was ≤ 30 °C (Mean ± SE) and ≥ 50 Em-2d-1 respectively, during March 2013 (Fig. 2). Coral colonies appeared normal without any signs of bleaching during the first two weeks of March 2013. Favites and Leptastrea colonies were...

  12. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS CERTAIN OTHER DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 529.1150 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen peroxide...

  13. Anaerobic biodegradability and toxicity of wastewaters from chlorine and total chlorine-free bleaching of eucalyptus kraft pulps.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vidal, G.; Soto, M.; Field, J.; Mendez-Pampin, R.; Lema, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Chlorine bleaching effluents are problematic for anaerobic wastewater treatment due to their high methanogenic toxicity and low biodegradability. Presently, alternative bleaching processes are being introduced, such as elemental chlorine-free (ECF) and total chlorine-free (TCF) bleaching. The

  14. Comparative study of the action of two different types of bleaching agents activated by two different types of irradiation fonts: xenon plasma arc lamp and 960 nm diode laser; Avaliacao da cor e estudo comparativo da acao de dois tipos diferentes de agentes clareadores ativados pelo laser de diodo e lampada xenonio plasmatica, na superficie do esmalte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walverde, Debora Ayala

    2001-07-01

    This in vitro study compares two different types of tooth bleaching agents stimulated with two different irradiation fonts. These fonts accelerate the action of the bleaching agents upon the enamel surface by heating up the materials. We used the xenon plasma arc lamp and a 960 nm fiber-coupled diode laser to irradiate the two materials containing 35% of hydrogen peroxide (Opus White and Opalescence extra). The color of the teeth was measured with a spectrophotometer using the CIELAB color system that gives the numeric values of L{sup *}a{sup *}b{sup *}. (author)

  15. Evaluation of the hydrogen peroxide and special colorant effects under irradiation by argon and diode laser on tooth-whitening in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, Jose Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine if there is any interaction between special colorant found on bleaching agents that have 35 % of hydrogen peroxide on its composition, and argon or diode laser. The first part of the study was to characterize the extrinsic stain obtained through a staining solution containing products present on the day by day diet of the general population. Thirty-two inferior human extracted incisors, free of caries and without filling material were selected for the study. The laser devices employed were Argon laser (AccuCure 3000 TM - Lasermed), wave length 488 nm, with a 200 mW/cm 2 for 30 seconds in continuos mode; and diode laser (