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Sample records for caraway

  1. Method for Attaining Caraway Seed Oil Fractions with Different Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwakoti, Santosh; Poudyal, Shital; Saleh, Osama; Astatkie, Tess; Zheljazkov, Valtcho D

    2016-06-01

    Caraway (Carum carvi L.) is a medicinal and aromatic plant; its seeds (fruits) are used as spice and they contain essential oils. We hypothesized that by collecting caraway oil at different time points during the extraction process, we could obtain oil fractions with distinct chemical composition. A hydrodistillation time (HDT) study was conducted to test the hypothesis. The caraway seed oil fractions were collected at eight different HDT (at 0 - 2, 2 - 7, 7 - 15, 15 - 30, 30 - 45, 45 - 75, 75 - 105, and 105 - 135 min). Additionally, a non-stop HD for 135 min was conducted as a control. Most of the oil was eluted early in the HD process. The non-stop HDT treatment yielded 2.76% oil by weight. Of the 24 essential oil constituents, limonene (77 - 19% of the total oil) and carvone (20 - 79%) were the major ones. Other constituents included myrcene (0.72 - 0.16%), trans-carveol (0.07 - 0.39%), and β-caryophyllene (0.07 - 0.24%). Caraway seed oil with higher concentration of limonene can be obtained by sampling oil fractions early in HD process; conversely, oil with high concentration of carvone can be obtained by excluding the fractions eluted early in the HD process. We demonstrated a method of obtaining caraway seed oil fractions with various and unique composition. These novel oil fractions with unique composition are not commercially available and could have much wider potential uses, and also target different markets compared to the typical caraway essential oil.

  2. Microwave-assisted extraction kinetics of terpenes from caraway seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chemat, S.; Ait-Amar, H.; Lagha, A.; Esveld, D.C.

    2005-01-01

    The process conditions during the extraction of carvone and limonene from caraway seed (Carum carvi L.) with microwave-assisted extraction have been studied with respect to microwave power, radiation dose and extraction time in order to obtain the secondary metabolites selectively. Using classical s

  3. Hepatoprotective effects of {gamma}-irradiated caraway essential oils in experimental sepsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fatemi, F. [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box, 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Allameh, A. [Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box, 14115-111, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: allameha@modares.ac.ir; Khalafi, H. [Radiation Application Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafihelan, J. [Department of Pathobiology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Tabriz, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Irradiation is an important method of processing herbal drugs, while our understanding of the effects of {gamma}-irradiation on pharmacological properties of seed products such as caraway essential oils is however still very limited. In this study, caraway seeds were irradiated at dose levels of 0, 10 and 25 kGy. After extracting the essential oils, the effects of fresh and {gamma}-irradiated caraway oils (100 mg/kg b.w) on preventing septic-related oxidative liver injury induced by cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model were investigated by measuring oxidative stress parameters in the liver. CLP operation caused a marked increase in myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity which was readily reversed in rats treated with fresh and irradiated caraway oils. Likewise, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) level in the liver was compensated in rats treated with the fresh and irradiated caraway oils. Moreover, liver GSH which was initially depleted due to CLP was recovered by essential oil treatments. The protective role of oils was further confirmed by showing that liver function tests (ALT/AST) as well as histopathological changes following CLP operation were recovered in rats treated with oils from either fresh or irradiated caraway seeds. These data may suggest that {gamma}-irradiation to caraway seeds at 10 and 25 kGy has no influence on the antioxidative properties of caraway essential oils.

  4. Effect of caraway on gentamicin-induced oxidative stress, inflammation and nephrotoxicity in rats

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    Hoda Erjaee

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Different potentially therapeutic approaches to prevent or attenuate gentamicin (GEM induced nephrotoxicity have been proposed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible protective effects of caraway seed oil against GEM-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. Rats (24 were randomly assigned into four equal groups: i normal control group, ii treated with GEM, iii pretreated with orally caraway seed oil 10 (mg kg−1 plus GEM and iv treated with GEM and caraway seed oil 10 mg kg−1. Biochemical examinations were utilized for evaluation of the oxidative stress and renal nephrotoxicity. Creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN, plasma malondialdehyde (MDA levels, catalase (CAT, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px activities were determined. Administration of gentamicin to rats induced a marked renal failure, characterized by a significant increase in plasma creatinine and BUN concentrations. The animals treated with gentamicin alone showed a significantly higher plasma MDA level andlower SOD, GSH-Px and CAT activities when compared with the control group. Treatment and simultaneous treatment with caraway seed oil produced amelioration in MDA and increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes SOD, GSH-Px and CAT when compared with the gentamicin treated group. In addition, GEM nephrotoxicity increased renal inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6 and IFN-γ. Pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly decreased (P<0.05 in the test groups administered caraway seed oil. These findings suggest that caraway seed oil treatment attenuates renal dysfunction and structural damage through the reduction of oxidative stress and inflammation in rats.

  5. Comparison of conventional and ultrasound-assisted extraction of carvone and limonene from caraway seeds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chemat, S.; Lagha, A.; AitAmar, H.; Bartels, P.V.; Chemat, F.

    2004-01-01

    Extraction experiments with hexane were carried out at atmospheric pressure in Soxhlet, conventional and ultrasound extractions of flaked caraway seeds, and detailed results are given for two major plant extract components, carvone and limonene. The results indicate that carvone yield and plant extr

  6. Water-soluble constituents of caraway: aromatic compound, aromatic compound glucoside and glucides.

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    Matsumura, Tetsuko; Ishikawa, Toru; Kitajima, Junichi

    2002-10-01

    From the water-soluble portion of the methanolic extract of caraway (fruit of Carum carvi L.), an aromatic compound, an aromatic compound glucoside and a glucide were isolated together with 16 known compounds. Their structures were clarified as 2-methoxy-2-(4'-hydroxyphenyl)ethanol, junipediol A 2-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside and L-fucitol, respectively.

  7. Antimicrobial activity of caraway, garlic and oregano extracts against filamentous moulds

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    Tanackov Ilija J.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory effect of caraway, garlic and oregano extracts (0.07, 0.1, 0.5, 1 and 2%, against four moulds species was investigated. The caraway extract had the strongest inhibitory effect by inhibiting the germination of Emericella nidulans, Penicillium commune and P. implicatum at the concentration of 0.1% and Aspergillus tamarii at the concentration of 0.5% during 7 days of incubation at 25ºC. The extract of garlic only partially inhibited the growth of A. tamarii and P. commune. However, it inhibited completely the growth of P. implicatum and E. nidulans at the doses of 0.5 and 1%. Oregano partially inhibited all mould species, significantly reducing the growth of colonies, especially of E. nidulans (93.3%.

  8. Improvement of antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of chitosan film with caraway and oregano essential oils

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    Hromiš Nevena M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, caraway or oregano essential oils were added to the cast chitosan film in an attempt to design a natural, biodegradable, bioactive (antioxidant and antimicrobial packaging film. When the structure of the tested films was analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, no significant differences were found between the chitosan film with and without essential oils of caraway or oregano. The lowest antioxidant activity, based on the scavenging of the stable DPPH• free radical, was detected for the chitosan film without oil addition, going from 11.64%, after 2.5 h to 28.96%, after 24 h. When the caraway essential oil was added to the chitosan film, the antioxidant activity was increased (p<0.05 to 33.47±4.77%, after 2.5 h and to 81.08±0.64%, after 24 h. This increase in the antioxidant activity was even higher in the film with oregano essential oil (p<0.05. After 2.5 h, the value for the antioxidant activity of the chitosan-oregano film was 87.58±1.71%, and after 4 h and 24 h it was above 90%. The obtained results for the antimicrobial activity showed that the chitosan film is an effective antimicrobial agent against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. When caraway essential oil was added in 1% volume concentration to the film, no increase in the antimicrobial action of chitosan film was detected. On the other hand, the addition of oregano essential oil promoted chitosan film antimicrobial activity, which was particularly evident with Escherichia coli. The results showed that the chitosan film can be successfully applied as a matrix carrier for essential oils in the active film system.[ Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31032

  9. Effect of oregano and caraway essential oils on the production and flavor of cow milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejonklev, Johan; Kidmose, U.; Jensen, S.

    2016-01-01

    of essential oils, 0.2 and 1.0 g of oil/kg of dry matter, were added to the feed of lactating cows for 24 d. No effects on feed consumption, milk production, and methane emissions were observed. The amount and composition of volatile terpenes were altered in the produced milk based on the terpene content....... Essential oils from caraway (Carum carvi) seeds and oregano (Origanum vulgare) plants were included in dairy cow diets to study the effects on terpene composition and sensory properties of the produced milk, as well as feed consumption, production levels of milk, and methane emissions. Two levels...

  10. The influence of fertilization on yield of caraway, anise and coriander in organic agriculture

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    Aćimović Milica G.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Many plants of Apiaceae family have long been well known because of flavorful aromatic spice and, because of its healing properties, are often used in folk medicine and in cooking. In our study three plants of this family were included: caraway (Carum carvi L., anise (Pimpinella anisum L. and coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.. Regarding good agro-ecological conditions for growing these plants in Serbia, and a new world trend of increasing organic agricultural production, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of application of various types of fertilizers on yield of studied plant species. The field experiment was carried out during the years of 2011 and 2012, in three localities in Vojvodina Province with the local ecotypes and six different treatments (control, ‘Slavol’, ‘Bactofil B-10’, ‘Royal Ofert’, vermicompost and NPK. The highest caraway yield was obtained by the application of biofertilizer ‘Bactofil B-10’. As regards anise and coriander the highest yield was achieved by the application of chemical fertilizer. The most effective organic fertilizers were the following: vermicompost for anise and specific poultry manure ‘Royal Ofert’ granules for coriander.

  11. Effect of mint (Mentha piperita L. and caraway (Carum carvi L. on the growth of some toxigenic aspergillus species and aflatoxin B1 production

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    Škrinjar Marija M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available An inhibitory effect of various concentrations (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2,0% of mint (Mentha piperita L. and caraway (Carvum carvi L. on the growth of A. fumigatus, A. flavus and A. ochraceus was examined during 10 days of cultivation in YES medium at temperature of 25°C. Mint showed stronger inhibitory effect than caraway. Total dry weight (g/l after 10 days of the growth of A. fumigatus in YES medium with 0.5% of mint decreased by about 95%, A. flavus by 97% and A. ochraceus by about 82%. Addition of higher concentrations of mint (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% reduced the growth of all tested species. It was poor and hardly visible. pH values of the media increased with the increase of mint concentrations. A. fumigatus showed the highest sensitivity towards caraway and A. flavus the lowest. Total dry weight (g/l after 10 days of growth of A. fumigatus in medium with 0.5% of caraway decreased by about 72% in comparison to the control. In media with higher concentrations of caraway, its growth was found to be very poor. Concentration of 1.0% of caraway reduced A. flavus growth by 15% and of 1.5% by 92%, in regard to the control. In medium with 2.0% of caraway the growth of A. flavus was observed as poor and hardly visible. The growth of A. ochraceus in medium with 0.5% of caraway decreased by about 85% comparing with control and further decrease was noticed by the increase of concentrations. In medium with 1.5% of caraway a reduction of about 95% of growth was found and under 2.0% of caraway it was poor. pH of the media also increased with the increase of caraway concentrations. Applied concentrations of mint and caraway inhibited completely the production of AB1 by A. flavus.

  12. Effects of Carum carvi L. (Caraway) extract and essential oil on TNBS-induced colitis in rats.

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    Keshavarz, A; Minaiyan, M; Ghannadi, A; Mahzouni, P

    2013-01-01

    Carum carvi L. (Apiaceae family) or caraway is a common household plant grown around the world including Iran. Caraway fruits are used as flavoring agent in foods and beverages, and have various traditional uses in ethnomedicine. Anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic, antimicrobial, antioxidant, carminative and immunomodulatory properties of caraway suggest that it might exert beneficial effects on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the effects of caraway hydroalcoholic extract (CHE) and its essential oil (CEO) in an immunological model of colitis in rats induced by trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Different doses of CHE (100, 200, 400 mg/kg) and CEO (100, 200, 400 μl/kg) were administered orally (p.o.) and also doses of CHE (100, 400 mg/kg) and CEO (100, 400 μl/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p.) to the separate groups of male Wistar rats (n=6). Administration of the doses started 6 h after induction of colitis and continued daily for 5 consecutive days. Wet colon weight/length ratio was measured and tissue damage scores as well as indices of colitis were evaluated both macroscopically and histopathologically. CHE and CEO at all doses tested were effective in reducing colon tissue lesions and colitis indices and the efficacy was nearly the same when different doses of plant fractions were administered p.o. or i.p. Administration of prednisolone (p.o., 4 mg/kg), Asacol® (mesalazine microgranules, p.o., 100 mg/kg) and hydrocortisone acetate (i.p., 20 mg/kg) as references were effective in reducing colon tissue injures as well. These data suggest that caraway fractions are both effective and possess anti-colitic activity irrespective of the dose and route of administration.

  13. Comparison of Inhibitory Effect of Gripe Mixture and Caraway Mixture on Acetylcholine Induced Spasm in Rat jejunum

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    F. Zeraati

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available In comparison of effects of various drugs with the same indications produced by different companies or comparing drugs manufactured in Iran with their foreign counterparts may result in producing drugs with higher qualities in our country. In this study the spasmolithic effect of two herbal drugs , gripe mixture and caraway mixture , that are prescribed as spasmolithic and carminative in infants were compared. 2 cm of rat jejunum was placed in a organ bath containing tyrode solution (37 C , 100% O2 . The jejunum was contracted because of acetylcholine (1 ml. when the muscle contraction reached the plateau the different volumes of drug were added to the organ bath. The inhibitory effect of drug indicated by physiograph , the intestine was washed two times. When the intestine reached the basal tonicity , the different volumes of second drug were tested. The results were compared using paired t.test The results show that both drugs inhibit the spasm induced by acetylcholine in rat jejunum . This inhibitory effect was dose dependent. The caraway mixture showed a higher effect in comparison with gripe mixture (P<0.05. The caraway mixture has a higher inhibitory effect on acetylcholine induced spasm in rat jejunum . It seems that it has the same effect on human.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of menthol and carvone after administration of an enteric coated formulation containing peppermint oil and caraway oil.

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    Mascher, H; Kikuta, C; Schiel, H

    2001-01-01

    Enteric coating of peppermint oil/caraway oil capsules avoids subjective discomfort to the patient caused by gastroesophageal reflux. In order to confirm bioequivalence of an enteric coated formulation containing peppermint oil and caraway oil (CAS 277309-55-4, Enteroplant) and an immediate release formulation of both oils, the pharmacokinetics of menthol and carvone after oral administration of the two formulations were studied in a randomized, two-period cross-over study in 16 healthy male volunteers. The subjects received 180 mg peppermint oil and 100 mg caraway oil, once as 2 enteric coated capsules of the fixed enteric coated combination preparation containing 90 mg peppermint oil (WS 1340) and 50 mg caraway oil (WS 1520) each (test) and once in the form of 5 capsules of an immediate release formulation (reference) containing 36 mg peppermint (WS 1340) oil and 20 mg caraway oil (WS 1520) each. The capsules were taken with 250 ml water after a 10 h fast. Both substances were determined in plasma by GC/MS after extraction. The limit of quantification was 10 ng/ml for menthol and 0.5 ng/ml for carvone. The mean maximum plasma levels for menthol were 1196 ng/ml after administration of the test medication and 1492 ng/ml after administration of the reference medication. The bioavailability with respect to the AUC was comparable after administration of test and reference preparation, the 90% confidence interval was 97 to 105%. As expected, there were considerable differences for Tmax. After application of the enteric coated form the maximum concentration was reached significantly later (3.0 h vs. 1.7 h) compared to the immediate release capsule. Corresponding data were also calculated for carvone. After application of the test medication the maxima of 14 ng/ml for both formulations were reached later (2.5 h vs. 1.3 h). The 90% confidence interval of the AUC for carvone was 79 to 119% and therefore slightly outside the acceptable range for bioequivalence of 80 to 125

  15. Short communication: Effect of oregano and caraway essential oils on the production and flavor of cow milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejonklev, Johan; Kidmose, Ulla; Jensen, Sidsel

    2016-01-01

    of essential oils, 0.2 and 1.0 g of oil/kg of dry matter, were added to the feed of lactating cows for 24 d. No effects on feed consumption, milk production, and methane emissions were observed. The amount and composition of volatile terpenes were altered in the produced milk based on the terpene content....... Essential oils from caraway (Carum carvi) seeds and oregano (Origanum vulgare) plants were included in dairy cow diets to study the effects on terpene composition and sensory properties of the produced milk, as well as feed consumption, production levels of milk, and methane emissions. Two levels...

  16. Effect of chitosan-caraway coating on color stability and lipid oxidation of traditional dry fermented sausage

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    Hromiš Nevena M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chitosan, the second most abundant polysaccharide in nature, after cellulose, has been tested for numerous applications, among which for edible film and coating. Chitosan-based coating showed positive results for shelf life prolongation of meet products. In this paper, dry fermented sausage (Petrovská klobása was coated with chitosan-caraway film. The effect of coating on the moisture content, color and lipid oxidation was investigated during a fivemonth period of storage. The moisture content decreased rapidly during the storage and the coating did not slow down the loss of moisture. The Lightness (L* of the sausage surface increased by the coating application, while the redness (a* and yellowness (b* did not change. The coated sausages showed a better color stability of the sausage core through the storage time. Also, coated sausage showed a better oxidative stability till the 60th day of storage, while this difference was not detected at the end of the storage period. Apart from slowing down sausage drying during the storage, chitosan-caraway coating was effective in preserving the sausage quality. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR31032

  17. Antioxidant and hepatoprotective potential of essential oils of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and caraway (Carum carvi L.) (Apiaceae).

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    Samojlik, Isidora; Lakić, Neda; Mimica-Dukić, Neda; Daković-Svajcer, Kornelia; Bozin, Biljana

    2010-08-11

    Essential oils of Coriandrum sativum L. and Carum carvi L. fruits were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and assayed for their in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity and hepatoprotective effect against carbon tetrachloride (CCl(4)) damage. The in vitro antioxidant activity was evaluated as a free radical scavenging capacity (RSC), measured as scavenging activity of the essential oils on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH(*)) and OH radicals and effects on lipid peroxidation (LP) in two systems of induction. Some liver biochemical parameters were determined in animals pretreated with essential oils and later intoxicated with CCl(4) to assess in vivo hepatoprotective effect. Tested essential oils were able to reduce the stable DPPH(*) in a dose-dependent manner and to neutralize H(2)O(2), reaching 50% neutralization with IC(50) values of <2.5 microL/mL for Carvi aetheroleum and 4.05 microL/mL for Coriandri aetheroleum . Caraway essential oil strongly inhibited LP in both systems of induction, whereas coriander essential oil exhibited prooxidant activity. In vivo investigation conferred leak of antioxidative capacity of coriander essential oil, whereas the essential oil of caraway appeared promising for safe use in folk medicine and the pharmaceutical and food industries.

  18. Antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation as biomarker for potato tuber stored by two essential oils from Caraway and Clove and its main component carvone and eugenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abd El-Moneim MR Afify; Hossam S El-Beltagi; Amina A Aly; Abeer E El-Ansary

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate two essential oils from Caraway and Clove and its main component carvone and eugenol as sprout inhibitors on germination of potato tubers. Methods: The enzymes activities: catalase, glutathione-S-transferase, peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase and superoxide dismutase, in addition to lipid peroxidation level were tested in potato tubers stored for 3, 6 and 9 weeks. Essential oils; Caraway, Clove, carvone and eugenol with three concentration (100, 200 and 300 ppm) were used to control germination process of potato tubers. Results: The results of enzyme activities varied depending on the function of enzymes involved. As general trend the activities of the enzymes recorded are significantly found on the range of enzyme control or less, which prevent of potato tuber from germination. Glutathione-S-transferase activity was significantly increased after treatment with essential oils and the activity of enzyme reached (23.3±5.15) (100 ppm) for Caraway, (18.8±0.00) (100 ppm) for carvone, (10.4±0.00) (100 ppm) for colve, and (14.1±0.0) (100 ppm) for eugenol respectively compared to control (7.86±3.26). Conclusions:Polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activity increased in its activity and recovered to the level of control after treatment with essential oils which maintain potato tuber for 9 weeks. The pure essential oils especially carvone have more potent as suppressor of potato tuber germination.

  19. The extension of shelf-life of chicken meat after application of caraway and anise essential oils and vacuum packaging

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    Maciej Kluz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK X-NONE X-NONE The effect of caraway (CEO and anise (AEO essential oils as well as vacuum packaging (VP in extending of the shelf life of fresh chicken breast meat stored at 4 °C was investigated. CEO and AEO were used at concentrations 0.2% v/w with and without VP. Microbiological properties of chicken breast meat were monitored over a 16 day period. The microbiological parameters as the anaerobic plate count (AC, Enterobacteraceae, lactic acid bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. counts were detected. The anaerobic plate counts ranged from 2.77 log cfu.g-1 in all tested group on 0 day to 5.45 log cfu.g-1 on 16 day in control group stored in air condition. The number of lactic acid bacteria ranged from 3.20 log cfu.g-1 in all tested group on 0 day to 4.75 log cfu.g-1 on 16 day in control group stored in air condition. Enterobacteriaceae counts ranged from 0.00 to 4.25 log cfu.g-1 on 16 day in control group stored in air condition. The number of Pseudomonas spp. ranged from 0.00 log cfu.g-1 in all tested group on 0 day to 2.65 log cfu.g-1 on 16 day in control group stored in air condition. Statistically significant differences (P≤0.001 were found among tested group in all tested microorganisms. Among the antimicrobial combination treatments were examined in the study, the as application of vacuum packaging, EDTA, and essential oils were the most effective against the growth of lactic acid bacteria and Enterobactericeae and to a less extent on anaerobic plate count. The results of this present study suggest the possibility of using the essential oil of caraway and anise as natural food preservatives and potential source of antimicrobial ingredients for chicken breast meat.

  20. Short communication: Effect of oregano and caraway essential oils on the production and flavor of cow milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejonklev, J; Kidmose, U; Jensen, S; Petersen, M A; Helwing, A L F; Mortensen, G; Weisbjerg, M R; Larsen, M K

    2016-10-01

    Many essential oils and their terpene constituents display antimicrobial properties, which may affect rumen metabolism and influence milk production parameters. Many of these compounds also have distinct flavors and aromas that may make their way into the milk, altering its sensory properties. Essential oils from caraway (Carum carvi) seeds and oregano (Origanum vulgare) plants were included in dairy cow diets to study the effects on terpene composition and sensory properties of the produced milk, as well as feed consumption, production levels of milk, and methane emissions. Two levels of essential oils, 0.2 and 1.0g of oil/kg of dry matter, were added to the feed of lactating cows for 24d. No effects on feed consumption, milk production, and methane emissions were observed. The amount and composition of volatile terpenes were altered in the produced milk based on the terpene content of the essential oils used, with the total amount of terpenes increasing when essential oils were added to the diet. Sensory properties of the produced milk were altered as well, and milk samples from animals receiving essential oil treatment were perceived as having a fresher aroma and lower stored aroma and flavor. The levels of essential oils used in this study mimic realistic levels of essential oils in herbs from feed, but were too low to affect milk production and methane emissions, and their inclusion in the animal diet did not adversely affect milk flavor.

  1. Survey of Anti-Bacterial Effect of Plant Extracts (Fennel-Dill-Caraway-Cinnamon by Flow Cytometry and Disk Diffusion

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    P. Ranjbarian

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available H.pylori has been discovered as an etiologic agent for peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. It is well known that eradicating H.pylori is an essential step in curing ulcer disease. Many regimens are currently available but none of them can achieve 100% eradication rate . In this research, anti-bacterial effect of extracts of:fennel, dill, caraway, cinnamon and antibiotics of: ciprofloxacin, Tetracyclin and amoxycillin were investigated against H.pylori by disk diffusion method and flow cytometry. In this study we used culture and rapid urease Test , catalase, oxidase and also staining to recognize H.pylori in 30 biopsies that has been taken from patients . 14 cases (46.66% were positive for H.pylori infection. Disk diffusion method was used to detremine the sensitivity of H.pylori to some selective antibiotics and plant extracts. In analysis of information it has been used from nonparametric Cochran test and for comparisons between plant extracts of different groups, the Mcnemar and Bonferroni tests was used. In this study, bacterial viability was surveyed after being subjected to plant extracts and antibiotics by flow cytometry . Results showed that all of the bacteria were susceptible to plant extracts and the highest sensitivity was obtained with dill. All bacteria were susceptible to ciprofloxacin , tetracyclin and were resistant to amoxicillin. Flow cytometry showed that ciprofloxacin had bacteriocidal effect, tetra cyclin had bacteriostatic effect and could not kill bacteria whereas plant extracts had bacteriostatic effect .

  2. [Isolation and identification of flavon(ol)-O-glycosides in caraway (Carum carvi L.), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.), anise (Pimpinella anisum L.), and coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), and of flavon-C-glycosides in anise. I. Phenolics of spices (author's transl)].

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    Kunzemann, J; Herrmann, K

    1977-07-29

    The flavonoid constituents of various spices were separated by means of chromatography on cellulose colums, and the following compounds were obtained crystalline: Quercetin 3-glucuronide from caraway, fennel, anise, and coriander; isoquercitrin from caraway and fennel; rutin from fennel and anise; quercetin 3-O-caffeylglucoside and kaempferol 3-glucoside from caraway; quercetin 3-arabinoside from fennel, and luteolin 7-glucoside, isoorientin and isovitexin from anise. Other constitutents which were however not obtained crystalline, but which could be identified by the usual procedures were kaempferol 3-glucuronide and kaempferol 3-arabinoside in fennel, apigenin 7-glucoside and a luteolin glycoside in anise, and isoquercitrin and rutin in coriander. The glycosides contained in the fruit of the four spices also occur in the leaves. Leaves of caraway and fennel in addition contain isorhammetin glycosides in low concentration.

  3. Antimicrobial activity of a pullulan-caraway essential oil coating on reduction of food microorganisms and quality in fresh baby carrot.

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    Gniewosz, Małgorzata; Kraśniewska, Karolina; Woreta, Marcin; Kosakowska, Olga

    2013-08-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of pullulan films containing caraway essential oil (CEO). The films were prepared from a 10% of pullulan, containing from 0.12% to 10.0% of CEO. The composition of the CEO was analyzed with the use of gas chromatography. The antimicrobial activity of the CEO was evaluated with the method of serial microdilutions, and the films containing CEO-with the agar diffusion method against selected Gram-negative, Gram-positive bacteria, and fungi. The structure of the film surface and its cross-section were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Analyses were also carried out to determine the efficacy of a pullulan coating with 10% CEO on baby carrots experimentally inoculated with Salmonella enteritidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or Aspergillus niger and stored at a room temperature for 7 d. At a concentration of 0.12%, CEO inhibited the growth of all the tested microorganisms. Pullulan films containing 8% to 10% of CEO were active against all tested microorganisms. Populations of S. aureus on carrot samples were reduced by approximately 3 log CFU/g, while those of A. niger and S. cerevisiae by, respectively, 5 and 4 log CFU/g, after 7 d of storage. S. enteritidis was the most resistant among the tested species, since it was not significantly reduced after 7 d of storage. At the end of storage, samples treated with pullulan-caraway oil coating maintained better visual acceptability than control samples. Results of this study suggest the feasibility of applying a pullulan film with incorporated CEO to extend the microbiological stability of minimally processed foods.

  4. Antibacterial activity of rosemary, caraway and fennel essential oils

    OpenAIRE

    Kwiatkowski Paweł; Giedrys-Kalemba Stefania; Mizielińska Małgorzata; Bartkowiak Artur

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, interest in essential oils used in natural medicine, has been increasing. Essential oils are still being tested for their potential uses as an alternative remedies for the treatment of many infectious diseases.

  5. Antibacterial activity of rosemary, caraway and fennel essential oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwiatkowski Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recently, interest in essential oils used in natural medicine, has been increasing. Essential oils are still being tested for their potential uses as an alternative remedies for the treatment of many infectious diseases.

  6. 小茴香与藏茴香的鉴别%Identification of Fennel and Caraway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李纳英; 毕焕新

    2008-01-01

    小茴香为伞形科植物茴香Foeniculum vulgate Mill.的干燥成熟果实,为常用中药。始载于《唐本草》,又名茴香、谷茴香。气香,性味辛、温。小茴香果实含挥发油,主要成份含茴香醚、α-茴香酮、茴香醛等。具有散寒止痛,理气和胃之功能.藏茴香为伞形科植物黄蒿Carum carvi L.的种子,又名黄蒿、马缨子、小防风。民族药名有棵虐、亚瓦比迪扬等。性味辛、涩、温。

  7. S-(+)-carvone as starting material in the enantioselective synthesis of natural products.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verstegen-Haaksma, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    In this thesis the applicability of S-(+)-carvone as chiral starting material in the synthesis of biologically active compounds is examined. S-(+)-carvone is the major compound of caraway essential oil. The essential oil content of caraway seed may vary from 2-7% and it contains about 50-60% of S-(+

  8. Anticonvulsant Effect of the Aqueous Extract and Essential Oil of Carum Carvi L. Seeds in a Pentylenetetrazol Model of Seizure in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showraki, Alireza; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh; Oftadegan, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Carum carvi L. (caraway), known as black zeera in Iran, has been indicated for the treatment of epilepsy in Iranian folk medicine. This study evaluated whether the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway seeds have anticonvulsant effects in mice. Methods: The anticonvulsant effects of the aqueous extract (200, 400, 800, 1600, and 3200 mg/kg, i.p.) and essential oil (25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, i.p.) of caraway were assessed using pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; 95 mg/kg i.p.) induced convulsions. Diazepam (3 mg/kg) was used as positive control. The latency time before the onset of myoclonic, clonic, and tonic convulsions and the percentage of mortality were recorded. In addition, the effect of caraway on neuromuscular coordination was evaluated using the rotarod performance test. Results: The extract and essential oil dose-dependently increased the latency time to the onset of myoclonic (ED50, 1257 and 62.2 mg/kg, respectively) and clonic (ED50, 929 and 42.3 mg/kg, respectively) seizures. The extract and essential oil of caraway prevented the animals from tonic seizure with ED50s of 2142.4 and 97.6 mg/kg, respectively. The extract and essential oil of caraway protected 28.6 and 71.4% of the animals from PTZ-induced death, respectively, and had no significant effect on neuromuscular coordination. Conclusion: This study showed that the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway had anticonvulsant properties. However, the essential oil was more potent and effective than was the aqueous extract as an anticonvulsant. Additionally, the anticonvulsant effect of caraway was not due to a muscle relaxant activity. These findings support the acclaimed antiepileptic effect of caraway in folk medicine and propose its potential use in petit mal seizure in humans. PMID:27217604

  9. Anticonvulsant Effect of the Aqueous Extract and Essential Oil of Carum Carvi L. Seeds in a Pentylenetetrazol Model of Seizure in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Showraki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Carum carvi L. (caraway, known as black zeera in Iran, has been indicated for the treatment of epilepsy in Iranian folk medicine. This study evaluated whether the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway seeds have anticonvulsant effects in mice. Methods: The anticonvulsant effects of the aqueous extract (200, 400, 800, 1600, and 3200 mg/kg, i.p. and essential oil (25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg, i.p. of caraway were assessed using pentylenetetrazol (PTZ; 95 mg/kg i.p. induced convulsions. Diazepam (3 mg/kg was used as positive control. The latency time before the onset of myoclonic, clonic, and tonic convulsions and the percentage of mortality were recorded. In addition, the effect of caraway on neuromuscular coordination was evaluated using the rotarod performance test. Results: The extract and essential oil dose-dependently increased the latency time to the onset of myoclonic (ED50, 1257 and 62.2 mg/kg, respectively and clonic (ED50, 929 and 42.3 mg/kg, respectively seizures. The extract and essential oil of caraway prevented the animals from tonic seizure with ED50s of 2142.4 and 97.6 mg/kg, respectively. The extract and essential oil of caraway protected 28.6 and 71.4% of the animals from PTZ-induced death, respectively, and had no significant effect on neuromuscular coordination. Conclusion: This study showed that the aqueous extract and essential oil of caraway had anticonvulsant properties. However, the essential oil was more potent and effective than was the aqueous extract as an anticonvulsant. Additionally, the anticonvulsant effect of caraway was not due to a muscle relaxant activity. These findings support the acclaimed antiepileptic effect of caraway in folk medicine and propose its potential use in petit mal seizure in humans.

  10. Cuminum cyminum and Carum carvi: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johri, R K

    2011-01-01

    Cuminum cyminum and Carum carvi are the sources of cumin and caraway seeds respectively, which have been used since antiquity for the treatment of various indications in traditional healing systems in wide geographical areas. Cumin and caraway seeds are rich sources of essential oils and have been actively researched for their chemical composition and biological activities. In recent times (especially during the last 3 years) considerable progress has been made regarding validation of their acclaimed medicinal attributes by extensive experimental studies. In this attempt many novel bioactivities have been revealed. This review highlights the significance of cumin and caraway as potential source of diverse natural products and their medicinal applications.

  11. Effect of seed mixture composition and management on competitiveness of herbs in temporary grasslands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Tine Bloch; Søegaard, Karen; Eriksen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    (Carum carvi), birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus), chervil (Anthriscus cerefolium), plantain (Plantago lanceolata), lucerne (Medicago sativa), and melilot (Melilotus officinalis). All herb species, except lucerne and caraway, were most competitive in the first harvest year. The proportion of all...

  12. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqil, Farrukh; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Munagala, Radha; Ravoori, Srivani; Vadhanam, Manicka V.; Schultz, David J.; Gupta, Ramesh C.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish) rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M) or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w) of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold) enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα). The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92 days in control

  13. Chemoprevention of Rat Mammary Carcinogenesis by Apiaceae Spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrukh Aqil

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Scientific evidence suggests that many herbs and spices have medicinal properties that alleviate symptoms or prevent disease. In this study, we examined the chemopreventive effects of the Apiaceae spices, anise, caraway, and celery seeds against 17β-estrogen (E2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in an ACI (August-Copenhagen Irish rat model. Female ACI rats were given either control diet (AIN 93M or diet supplemented with 7.5% (w/w of anise, caraway, or celery seed powder. Two weeks later, one half of the animals in each group received subcutaneous silastic implants of E2. Diet intake and body weight were recorded weekly, and animals were euthanized after 3 and 12 weeks. E2-treatment showed significantly (2.1- and 3.4-fold enhanced growth of pituitary gland at 3 and 12 weeks, respectively. All test spices significantly offset the pituitary growth by 12 weeks, except celery which was effective as early as three weeks. Immunohistochemical analysis for proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in mammary tissues showed significant reduction in E2-mediated mammary cell proliferation. Test spices reduced the circulating levels of both E2 and prolactin at three weeks. This protection was more pronounced at 12 weeks, with celery eliciting the highest effect. RT-PCR and western blot analysis were performed to determine the potential molecular targets of the spices. Anise and caraway diets significantly offset estrogen-mediated overexpression of both cyclin D1 and estrogen receptor α (ERα. The effect of anise was modest. Likewise, expression of CYP1B1 and CYP1A1 was inhibited by all test spices. Based on short-term molecular markers, caraway was selected over other spices based on its enhanced effect on estrogen-associated pathway. Therefore, a tumor-end point study in ACI rats was conducted with dietary caraway. Tumor palpation from 12 weeks onwards revealed tumor latency of 29 days in caraway-treated animals compared with first tumor appearance at 92

  14. A surprising method for green extraction of essential oil from dry spices: Microwave dry-diffusion and gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhat, Asma; Fabiano-Tixier, Anne-Sylvie; Visinoni, Franco; Romdhane, Mehrez; Chemat, Farid

    2010-11-19

    Without adding any solvent or water, we proposed a novel and green approach for the extraction of secondary metabolites from dried plant materials. This "solvent, water and vapor free" approach based on a simple principle involves the application of microwave irradiation and earth gravity to extract the essential oil from dried caraway seeds. Microwave dry-diffusion and gravity (MDG) has been compared with a conventional technique, hydrodistillation (HD), for the extraction of essential oil from dried caraway seeds. Essential oils isolated by MDG were quantitatively (yield) and qualitatively (aromatic profile) similar to those obtained by HD, but MDG was better than HD in terms of rapidity (45min versus 300min), energy saving, and cleanliness. The present apparatus permits fast and efficient extraction, reduces waste, avoids water and solvent consumption, and allows substantial energy savings.

  15. Evaluation of Antacid Activity of Microemulsion Formulation of Blend of Essential Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joydeep Mazumder

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are having wide range of biological activity is used to achieve therapeutic effects. These are volatile substances sensitive to oxygen, light, moisture and heat. In the present study microemulsion formulation was prepared using a blend of essential oil contains cardamom, coriander, fennel, caraway, ajowan and peppermint oil, water and non ionic surfactant tween 20 and cosurfactant as ethanol. Each essential oil was extracted from dried seed by steam distillation and characterized by Headspace Gas chromatography use of a marker compound which was linalool for coriander oil, cineol for cardamom oil, anethol for fennel oil, carvone for caraway oil, thymol for ajowan oil and menthol for peppermint oil. The marker compound was characterized using mass spectroscopy. Microemulsion of oil showed higher stability with droplet size in the range of 110-410nm. The product then screened for in vitro antacid properties which showed significant positive response.

  16. Fatty acids and sterols composition, and antioxidant activity of oils extracted from plant seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowska, Mariola; Gruczyńska, Eliza; Ścibisz, Iwona; Rudzińska, Magdalena

    2016-12-15

    This study determined and compared the contents of bioactive components in plant seed oils extracted with n-hexane (Soxhlet method) and chloroform/methanol (Folch method) from coriander, caraway, anise, nutmeg and white mustard seeds. Oleic acid dominated among unsaturated fatty acids in nutmeg and anise seed oils while petroselinic acid was present in coriander and caraway oils. Concerning sterols, β-sitosterol was the main component in seed oils extracted with both methods. The content of total phenolics in nutmeg, white mustard and coriander seed oils extracted with chloroform/methanol was higher than in their counterparts prepared with n-hexane. The seed oil samples extracted according to the Folch method exhibited a higher ability to scavenge DPPH radicals compared to the oil samples prepared with the Soxhlet method. DPPH values of the methanolic extracts derived from oils produced with the Folch method were also higher than in the oils extracted with n-hexane.

  17. Efficacy of activated alginate-based nanocomposite films to control Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage flora in rainbow trout slice

    OpenAIRE

    Alboofetileh, Mehdi; Rezaei, Masoud; Hosseini, Hedayat; Abdollahi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Essential oils of clove, coriander, caraway, marjoram, cinnamon, and cumin were tested for their antilisterial activity by application of agar diffusion assay (experiment 1). Marjoram essential oil (MEO) showed the highest inhibitory effect, followed by clove and cinnamon. Subsequently, these essential oils were incorporated to alginate/clay nanocomposite films and antilisterial effectiveness of the films was studied in a model solid food system during 12 days at 10 °C (experiment 2). The res...

  18. JPRS Report, Near East and South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    exports to Europe," he said. Woolen hand-woven carpets, pistachios, copper bars, copper anodes and cathodes, raisins and caraway seeds Yarjani said...shortage of supply might appear in the late 1990s Copper bars and copper anodes and cathodes were the unless major consuming countries find themselves...devices ( IUDs ) are funnelled out of the country by unscrupulous officials through smugglers to Iran and Official Birthrate Figures Termed False

  19. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G H Naderi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes.

  20. Effect of some high consumption spices on hemoglobin glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, G H; Dinani, Narges J; Asgary, S; Taher, M; Nikkhoo, N; Boshtam, M

    2014-01-01

    Formation of glycation products is major factor responsible in complications of diabetes. Worldwide trend is toward the use of natural additives in reducing the complications of diseases. Therefore, there is a growing interest in natural antiglycation found in plants. Herbs and spices are one of the most important targets to search for natural antiglycation from the point of view of safety. This study investigated the ability of some of the spices to inhibit glycation process in a hemoglobin/glucose model system and compared their potency with each other. For this subject the best concentration and time to incubate glucose with hemoglobin was investigated. Then the glycosylation degree of hemoglobin in the presence of extracts by the three concentrations 0.25, 0.5 and 1 μg/ml was measured colorimetrically at 520 nm. Results represent that some of extracts such as wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper have inhibitory effects on hemoglobin glycation. But some of the extracts such as anise and saffron have not only inhibitory effects but also aggravated this event and have proglycation properties. In accordance with the results obtained we can conclude that wild caraway, turmeric, cardamom and black pepper especially wild caraway extracts are potent antiglycation agents, which can be of great value in the preventive glycation-associated complications in diabetes.

  1. Reasoned opinion on the modification of the existing MRLs for pendimethalin in various crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    European Food Safety Authority

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with Article 6 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, Germany, hereafter referred to as the evaluating Member State (EMS, received an application from BASF to modify the existing MRLs for pendimethalin in various crops. In order to accommodate for the intended uses Germany proposed to raise the existing MRLs to 0.2 mg/kg on salsify, to 0.5 mg/kg for the group of herbal infusions (roots and to 0.3 mg/kg on spices (seeds and on caraway, whereas the intended uses on swedes, turnips, celeriac and celery were not sufficiently supported by data and no amendment of the MRLs was proposed. Germany drafted an evaluation report in accordance with Article 8 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005 which was submitted to the European Commission and forwarded to EFSA. According to EFSA the data are sufficient to propose a MRL of 0.2 mg/kg on salsify, 0.5 mg/kg on herbal infusions (roots and 0.05 mg/kg (LOQ on spices (seeds and on caraway. The intended uses on swedes, turnips, celeriac and celery are not adequately supported by residue data and no MRL proposals can be therefore derived. Analytical enforcement methods are available to control the residues of pendimethalin in the crops under consideration, which are fully validated on salsify matrices; further validation data would be desirable on herbal infusions and spices. Based on the risk assessment results, EFSA concludes that the proposed use of pendimethalin on salsify, herbal infusions (roots, spices (seeds and caraway will not result in a exposure exceeding the toxicological reference value and therefore is unlikely to pose a consumer health risk.

  2. Evaluation of antibacterial activity of selected Iranian essential oils against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli in nutrient broth medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenzadeh, Mohammad

    2007-10-15

    The antibacterial effect of different concentrations (0.01 to 15%) of thyme (Thymus vulgaris), peppermint (Mentha piperita L.) caraway seed (Carum carvi), fennel (Foeniculum vulgar), tarragon (Artmesia dracunculus) and pennyroyal (Mentha pullegium) essential oils on the Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was studied in nutrient broth medium. The MIC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils against Escherichia coli were 0.5 +/- 0.03, 1 +/- 0.03, 0.3 +/- 0.01, 0.7 +/- 0.03 and 0.6 +/- 0.02% and in contrast, for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.4 +/- 0.01, 2 +/- 0.13, 0.1 +/- 0.01, 0.5 +/- 0.02 and 0.5 +/- 0.02%, respectively. The MBC values of peppermint, fennel, thyme, pennyroyal and caraway essential oils for Escherichia coli were 0.7 +/- 0.02, 2 +/- 0.05, 0.5 +/- 0.02, 1 +/- 0.02 and 0.8 +/- 0.02 and for Staphylococcus aureus were 0.5 +/- 0.02, 4 +/- 0.26, 0.3 +/- 0.02, 0.7 +/- 0.02 and 0.6 +/- 0.01, respectively. Statistical evaluation of the results indicated that the essential oils of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) showed the broadest spectrum of action (p Foeniculum vulgar) had moderate effect against tested microorganisms and in contrast, tarragon essential oil were less effective against tested microorganisms. In conclusion, essential oils of edible plants could be a potential source for inhibitory substances for some foodborne pathogens. Natural substances that extracted from plants have applications in controlling pathogens in foods.

  3. Phytotoxic activities of Mediterranean essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; Frei, Fernando; Mancini, Emilia; De Martino, Laura; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2010-06-14

    Twelve essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants were tested for their phytotoxic activity, at different doses, against the germination and the initial radicle growth of seeds of Raphanus sativus, Lactuca sativa and Lepidium sativum. The essential oils were obtained from Hyssopus officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Majorana hortensis, Melissa officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis and Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae), Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae), Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare and Carum carvi (Apiaceae). The germination and radicle growth of tested seeds were affected in different ways by the oils. Thyme, balm, vervain and caraway essential oils were more active against both germination and radicle elongation.

  4. Presence of moulds and mycotoxins in spices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Dragica D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper there are presented the results of mycologic and mycotoxicologic analysis of seven spices which are being used for production of meat products. Using standard mycologic methods, in all the tested samples, we noticed a presence of moulds. By quality and quantity, most represented are genera: Aspergillus and Penicillium. With smaller occurrence there are presented genera: Rhizopus, Mucor, Paecylomyces and Absydia. Mycotoxins - ochratoxin, aflatoxins and zearalenon, are detected in samples of ground white pepper, ginger, cloves and ground caraway.

  5. Preparation of some compounded soup powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Bhatia

    1961-01-01

    Full Text Available Recipes for the preparation of some compounded soup powders from tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, green peas, dried peas, chicken and mutton using components like corn starch, skim milk powder, hydrogenated groundnut oil, common salt, mixed spices (black pepper, caraway and ginger and monosodium glutamate have been developed. Pretreatment and drying conditions for the preparation of pre-cooked dry bases from tomatoes, potatoes, carrots, green peas, dried peas, chicken and mutton have been determined. Except for tomatoes where vacuum drier is necessary, other bases can be easily prepared in a simple cross flow hot air cabinet drier and used subsequently in the preparation of soup powders.

  6. Phytotoxic Activities of Mediterranean Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Rolim de Almeida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Twelve essential oils from Mediterranean aromatic plants were tested for their phytotoxic activity, at different doses, against the germination and the initial radicle growth of seeds of Raphanus sativus, Lactuca sativa and Lepidium sativum. The essential oils were obtained from Hyssopus officinalis, Lavandula angustifolia, Majorana hortensis, Melissa officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Origanum vulgare, Salvia officinalis and Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae, Verbena officinalis (Verbenaceae, Pimpinella anisum, Foeniculum vulgare and Carum carvi (Apiaceae. The germination and radicle growth of tested seeds were affected in different ways by the oils. Thyme, balm, vervain and caraway essential oils were more active against both germination and radicle elongation.

  7. Aromatic plant-derived essential oil: an alternative larvicide for mosquito control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitasawat, B; Champakaew, D; Choochote, W; Jitpakdi, A; Chaithong, U; Kanjanapothi, D; Rattanachanpichai, E; Tippawangkosol, P; Riyong, D; Tuetun, B; Chaiyasit, D

    2007-04-01

    Five aromatic plants, Carum carvi (caraway), Apium graveolens (celery), Foeniculum vulgare (fennel), Zanthoxylum limonella (mullilam) and Curcuma zedoaria (zedoary) were selected for investigating larvicidal potential against mosquito vectors. Two laboratory-reared mosquito species, Anopheles dirus, the major malaria vector in Thailand, and Aedes aegypti, the main vector of dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever in urban areas, were used. All of the volatile oils exerted significant larvicidal activity against the two mosquito species after 24-h exposure. Essential oil from mullilam was the most effective against the larvae of A. aegypti, while A. dirus larvae showed the highest susceptibility to zedoary oil.

  8. IN VITRO ANTIFUNGAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OILS ON GROWTH OF PHYTOPATHOGENIC FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasenka Ćosić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Eleven essential oils (clove, rosemary, cinnamon leaf, sage, scots pine, neroli, peppermint, aniseed, caraway, lavander, common thyme were tested for in vitro antifungal activity on twelve plant pathogenic fungi (Fusarium graminearum, F. verticillioides, F. subglutinans, F. oxysporum, F. avenaceum, Diaporthe helianthi, Diaporthe phaseolorum var. caulivora, Phomopsis longicolla, P. viticola, Helminthosporium sativum, Colletotrichum coccodes, Thanatephorus cucumeris. The results indicated that all oils except scots pine and neroli had antifungal activity against some or all tested fungi. The best antifungal activity had common thyme, cinnamon leaf, clove and aniseed oils. When compared to control, scots pine, neroli and sage oils stimulated mycelium growth of some investigated fungi.

  9. Transfer of terpenes from essential oils into cow milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lejonklev, J.; Løkke, M.M.; Larsen, M.K.;

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transfer of volatile terpenes from caraway seed and oregano plant essential oils into cow's milk through respiratory and gastrointestinal exposure. Essential oils have potential applications as feed additives because of their antimicrobial......, carvone, and carvacrol were most abundant; in oregano, the monoterpenes carvacrol and p-cymene were most abundant For almost all treatments, an immediate effect was detected in milk, whereas little or no effect was detected in milk the following day. This suggests that the transfer into milk...

  10. Up to date review of toxicological data of some point volatiles with antifungal activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonsi, P.; Stammati, A. [eds.] [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Comparata ed Ecotossicologia; De Vincenzi, M. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Rome (Italy). Lab. di Metabolismo e Biochimica Patologica; Zucco, F. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Rome (Italy). Ist. di Tecnologie Biomediche

    1999-07-01

    Toxicological cards of the essential oil caraway and ten volatiles compounds components of essential oils, all with fungicide activity, are presented; carvacrol, D-carvone, cinnamaldehyde, 1,8-cineole, p-cymene, decanal, eugenol, 2-hexenal, linalool and thymol. The cards have been prepared in the context of the European Community project FAIR1-CT95-0722, which has the aim of implementing the use of natural pesticides for plant protection during cultivation and storage. Literature data have been collected from 1980, screening different archives (BIOSIS, CAB, CHEMABS, RTECS, MEDLINE) and Council of Europe classifications. [Italian] Il rapporto contiene le schede tossicologiche di un olio essenziale (caraway oil) e di dieci sostanze volatili, componenti di olii essenziali e tutti con attivita' fungicida: carvacrol, D-carvone, cinnamaldehyde, 1, 8-cineole, p-cymene, decanol, eugenol, 2-hexenal, linaool e thymol. Le schede sono state preparate nell'ambito del progetto europeo FAIR1-CT95-0722, che ha lo scopo di sviluppare l'uso di fungicidi naturali per la protezione delle piante durante la coltivazione e lo stoccaggio. Sono stati raccolti i dati della letteratura dal 1980 ad oggi, consultando diversi archivi (BIOSIS, CAB, CHEMABS, RTECS, MEDLINE) e le classificazioni del Consiglio d'Europa.

  11. Application of EPR Spectroscopy to Examination of the Effect of Sterilization Process on Free Radicals in Different Herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawłowska-Góral, Katarzyna; Ramos, Paweł; Pilawa, Barbara; Kurzeja, Ewa

    2013-03-01

    Free radicals in the original and sterilized caraway, curry, curcuma and cardamom were studied. An X-band (9.3 GHz) electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was the experimental technique. Effect of microwave power in the range of 2.2-70 mW on amplitudes, linewidths, and lineshape parameters of the EPR spectra was tested. Free radicals concentrations in the non- and sterilized herb samples were compared. The aim of this work was to determine properties and concentration of free radicals in steam sterilized caraway, curry, curcuma and cardamom. It was pointed out that free radicals (~10(18) spin/g) exist in both the original and sterilized herbs. Complex free radical system with oxygen and carbon paramagnetic centers characterizes the examined herbs. Homogeneously dipolar broadened EPR spectra were measured for all the tested herbs. Slow spin-lattice relaxation processes exist in the examined samples. Practical usefulness of EPR method in food technology was discussed.

  12. Spectrophotometric analysis of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josimovic, L.; Cudina, I.

    1987-01-01

    Seven different spices (thyme, cinnamon, coriander, caraway, pimento, paprika, black pepper) were treated by gamma radiation at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy, and the effect on chemical quality was determined. The effects of this dose were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis of some water-soluble constituents of spices (carbohydrates; carbonyl compounds) and on the content of water-insoluble steam-volatile oils. The colour of paprika and the content of piperine in pepper held in different packaging materials were measured in unirradiated and irradiated samples as a function of storage time. In all cases irradiation does not bring about any distinct qualitative or quantitative chemical changes based on spectrophotometric analysis of spice extracts.

  13. Study of behavior and determination of customer lifetime value(CLV) using Markov chain model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permana, Dony; Indratno, Sapto Wahyu; Pasaribu, Udjianna S.

    2014-03-01

    Customer Lifetime Value or CLV is a restriction on interactive marketing to help a company in arranging financial for the marketing of new customer acquisition and customer retention. Additionally CLV can be able to segment customers for financial arrangements. Stochastic models for the fairly new CLV used a Markov chain. In this model customer retention probability and new customer acquisition probability play an important role. This model is originally introduced by Pfeifer and Carraway in 2000 [1]. They introduced several CLV models, one of them only involves customer and former customer. In this paper we expand the model by adding the assumption of the transition from former customer to customer. In the proposed model, the CLV value is higher than the CLV value obtained by Pfeifer and Caraway model. But our model still requires a longer convergence time.

  14. Microbiological quality of retail spices in Tehran, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohy-Kamaly-Dehkordy, Paliz; Nikoopour, Houshang; Siavoshi, Farideh; Koushki, Mohammadreza; Abadi, Alireza

    2013-05-01

    The microbiological quality of 351 samples of nine types of spices including black pepper, caraway, cinnamon, cow parsnip, curry powder, garlic powder, red pepper, sumac, and turmeric, collected from retail shops in Tehran during 2007, was determined. The numbers of aerobic mesophilic bacteria, Escherichia coli, and molds exceeded Iran's National Standard limits, at 63.2% (>5 × 10(5) CFU/g), 23.4% (>0.3 MPN/g), and 21.9% (>5 × 10(3) CFU/g) of the studied samples, respectively. Coliform contamination was more than 10(3) MPN/g in 24.8% of samples. High contamination of retail spices is considered an indication of environmental or fecal contamination due to unhygienic practices in their production. Use of spices with high microbial content could increase the chance of food spoilage and transmission of foodborne pathogens. Accordingly, application of food safety measurements to reduce microbial counts in spices is strongly recommended.

  15. The influence of 'time since last blood meal' on the toxicity of essential oils to the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D R; Smith, T J; Sparagano, O A E; Guy, J H

    2008-08-17

    The poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer) is a serious ectoparasitic pest of layer hens that can survive for long periods in the poultry house sub-structure without taking a blood meal from its host. The research undertaken in this study found that 'time since last blood meal' had a notable effect on how toxic a selection of plant essential oils were to D. gallinae under laboratory conditions. In general, the essential oils had a greater toxic effect on D. gallinae if mites had been starved of a blood meal for around 3 weeks, than if they had been more recently fed 3-13 days prior to tests. This result was consistent across the four essential oils used (thyme, palmarosa, caraway and juniper leaf). This suggests that plant essential oils may be of use in management schemes for D. gallinae, particularly if used to sanitise houses between flocks, when mites will have been starved.

  16. Toxicity of plant essential oils to Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Eun-Hee; Choi, Byeoung-Ryeol; Park, Hyung-Man; Ahn, Young-Joon

    2003-10-01

    A total of 53 plant essential oils were tested for their insecticidal activities against eggs, nymphs, and adults of Trialeurodes vaporariorum Westwood, using an impregnated filter paper bioassays without allowing direct contact. Responses varied according to oil type and dose, and developmental stage of the insect. Bay, caraway seed, clove leaf, lemon eucalyptus, lime dis 5 F, pennyroyal, peppermint, rosewood, spearmint, and tea tree oils were highly effective against T. vaporariorum adults, nymphs, and eggs at 0.0023, 0.0093, and 0.0047 microl/ml air, respectively. These results indicate that the mode of delivery of these essential oils was largely a result of action in the vapor phase. Significant correlations among adulticidal, nymphicidal, and ovicidal activities of the test oils were observed. The essential oils described herein merit further study as potential fumigants for T. vaporariorum control.

  17. Determination of pyrrolizidine alkaloids in tea, herbal drugs and honey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodi, Dorina; Ronczka, Stefan; Gottschalk, Christoph; Behr, Nastassja; Skibba, Anne; Wagner, Matthias; Lahrssen-Wiederholt, Monika; Preiss-Weigert, Angelika; These, Anja

    2014-01-01

    Honey was previously considered to be one of the main food sources of human pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) exposure in Europe. However, comprehensive analyses of honey and tea sampled in the Berlin retail market revealed unexpected high PA amounts in teas. This study comprised the analysis of 87 honey as well as 274 tea samples including black, green, rooibos, melissa, peppermint, chamomile, fennel, nettle, and mixed herbal tea or fruit tea. Total PA concentrations in tea ranged from < LOD to 5647 µg kg(-1), while a mean value of about 10 µg kg(-1) was found in honey samples. Additionally, herbal drugs were investigated to identify the source of PA in teas. Results suggest that PA in tea samples are most likely a contamination caused by co-harvesting of PA-producing plants. In some cases such as fennel, anise or caraway, it cannot be excluded that these plants are able to produce PA themselves.

  18. Acaricidal activities of some essential oils and their monoterpenoidal constituents against house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Acari: Pyroglyphidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SAAD El-Zemity; HUSSIEN Rezk; SAHER Farok; AHMED Zaitoon

    2006-01-01

    The acaricidal activities of fourteen essential oils and fourteen of their major monoterpenoids were tested against house dust mites Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. Five concentrations were used over two different time intervals 24 and 48 h under laboratory conditions. In general, it was noticed that the acaricidal effect based on LC50 of either essential oils or monoterpenoids against the mite was time dependant. The LC50 values were decreased by increasing of exposure time. Clove,matrecary, chenopodium, rosemary, eucalyptus and caraway oils were shown to have high activity. As for the monoterpenoids,cinnamaldehyde and chlorothymol were found to be the most effective followed by citronellol. This study suggests the use of the essential oils and their major constituents as ecofriendly biodegradable agents for the control of house dust mite, D. pteronyssinus.

  19. [Influence of spiced feed additives on taste of hen's eggs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Th; Braun, P; Fehlhaber, K

    2002-01-01

    The effect of the spices garlic (Allium sativum), extract from garlic, sage (Salvia officinalis), caraway (Carum carvi), peppermint (Mentha piperita), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), thyme (Thymus vulgaris), paprika (Capsicum annuum), marjoram (Majorana hortensis), cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) and sausage-mix fed to white hybrides on the quality of eggs (n = 705) was tested by 10 qualified persons. Changes in smell or taste were partly significant; a direct improvement is hard to induce. A well seasoned taste was obtained by feeding of garlic, fennel, peppermint and marjoram. They produce an aromatic flavor. A practical application is possible but limited by higher production prices. Further, it is uncertain if there is a need for "taste-manipulated" eggs.

  20. Transfer of terpenes from essential oils into cow milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejonklev, J; Løkke, M M; Larsen, M K; Mortensen, G; Petersen, M A; Weisbjerg, M R

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the transfer of volatile terpenes from caraway seed and oregano plant essential oils into cow's milk through respiratory and gastrointestinal exposure. Essential oils have potential applications as feed additives because of their antimicrobial properties, but very little work exists on the transfer of their volatile compounds into milk. Lactating Danish Holstein cows with duodenum cannula were used. Gastrointestinal exposure was facilitated by infusing the essential oils, mixed with deodorized sesame oil, into the duodenum cannula. Two levels were tested for each essential oil. Respiratory exposure was facilitated by placing the animal in a chamber together with a sponge soaked in the essential oils. All exposures were spread over 9h. Milk samples were collected immediately before and after exposure, as well as the next morning. Twelve monoterpenes and 2 sesquiterpenes were analyzed in essential oils and in milk samples using dynamic headspace sampling and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. In the essential oils, almost all of the terpenes were detected in both essential oils at various levels. For caraway, the monoterpenes limonene, carvone, and carvacrol were most abundant; in oregano, the monoterpenes carvacrol and ρ-cymene were most abundant. For almost all treatments, an immediate effect was detected in milk, whereas little or no effect was detected in milk the following day. This suggests that the transfer into milk of these volatile terpenes is fast, and that the milk will not be influenced when treatment is discontinued. Principal component analysis was used to elucidate the effect of the treatments on the terpene profile of the milk. Terpene content for treatment milk samples was characterized by the same terpenes found in the treatment essential oil used for that animal, regardless of pathway of exposure. The terpenes appear to be transferred unaltered into the milk, regardless of the pathway of exposure

  1. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-12-02

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF₃) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  2. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao; Aparicio, Mario; Saleh, Mahmoud A.

    2016-01-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA) of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens), caraway (Carum carvi), cumin (Cuminum cyminum), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), anise (Pimpinella anisum), carrot (Daucus carota), celery (Apium graveolens), fennel (Foeniculum vulgare), and Khella (Ammi visnaga), all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v) using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs) from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES) using 1% boron trifluoride (BF3) in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF) mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0), palmitoleic (C16:1n-9), stearic (C18:0), petroselinic (C18:1n-12), linoleic (C18:2n-6), linolinic (18:3n-3), and arachidic (C20:0) acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in

  3. PHENOLIC PROFILE, ANTIOXIDANT AND ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITIES FROM THE Apiaceae FAMILY (DRY SEEDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Lubomirova Christova-Bagdassarian

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, a comparative evaluation of the phenolic compounds antioxidant capacity and antibacterial activity to several kinds of seeds from the Apiacea family, to which belong: Foeniculum vulgare (Fennel, Anethum graveolens (Dill, Pimpinella anisum (Anise, Carum carvi (Caraway and Coriandrum sativum (Coriander were carried out. Methods: The total phenolic content of seeds was measured spectrophotometrically by using the Folin-Ciocalteu assay, the total flavonoids was measured spectrophotometrically by using the aluminum chloride colorimetric. Antioxidant capacity was analysed by 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging effect of the seeds and was determined also spectrophotometrically. Antibacterial activity was analysed by ISO standards. Results: The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of the Foeniculum vulgare (Fennel varied between 115.96 mg GAE/100g and 68.10 mg CE/100g .The Coriandrum sativum (Coriander content is lower (from 17.04 mg GAE/100g to 11.10 mg CE/100g, respecively. The highest radical scavanging effect was observed in the Foeniculum vulgare (Fennel with IC50 of 113.19 ml/L. In our study, the methanol extract of seeds didn’t have any antimicrobial activity. Conclusions: An original data for total phenolic and total flavonoid contents are present in this study. They are a basis for assessment of the role of Apiaceae family dry seeds against free radicals effect and antibacterial activity. The results show that methanolic extract has the highest of total phenolic and total flavonoid contents, high potential of antioxidant activity of dry seeds from Apiaceae family, to which belong: Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare, Dill (Anethum graveolens, Anise (Pimpinella anisum, Caraway (Carum carvi and Coriander (Coriandrum sativum. From all results, the solvent extracts of dry seeds are rich in phytochemical contents, which possessed high antioxidant and antimicrobial activities. Therefore the data found in

  4. Accurate Mass GC/LC-Quadrupole Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Fatty Acids and Triacylglycerols of Spicy Fruits from the Apiaceae Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The triacylglycerol (TAG structure and the regio-stereospecific distribution of fatty acids (FA of seed oils from most of the Apiaceae family are not well documented. The TAG structure ultimately determines the final physical properties of the oils and the position of FAs in the TAG molecule affects the digestion; absorption and metabolism; and physical and technological properties of TAGs. Fixed oils from the fruits of dill (Anethum graveolens, caraway (Carum carvi, cumin (Cuminum cyminum, coriander (Coriandrum sativum, anise (Pimpinella anisum, carrot (Daucus carota, celery (Apium graveolens, fennel (Foeniculum vulgare, and Khella (Ammi visnaga, all from the Apiaceae family, were extracted at room temperature in chloroform/methanol (2:1 v/v using percolators. Crude lipids were fractionated by solid phase extraction to separate neutral triacylglycerols (TAGs from other lipids components. Neutral TAGs were subjected to transesterification process to convert them to their corresponding fatty acids methyl esters (FAMES using 1% boron trifluoride (BF3 in methanol. FAMES were analyzed by gas chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (GC-QTOF mass spectrometry. Triglycerides were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time of flight (LC-QTOF mass spectrometry. Petroselinic acid was the major fatty acid in all samples ranging from 57% of the total fatty acids in caraway up to 82% in fennel. All samples contained palmitic (16:0, palmitoleic (C16:1n-9, stearic (C18:0, petroselinic (C18:1n-12, linoleic (C18:2n-6, linolinic (18:3n-3, and arachidic (C20:0 acids. TAG were analyzed using LC-QTOF for accurate mass identification and mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (MS/MS techniques for regiospesific elucidation of the identified TAGs. Five major TAGs were detected in all samples but with different relative concentrations in all of the tested samples. Several other TAGs were detected as minor components and were present in some

  5. Quantitative Scrutinization of Aflatoxins in Different Spices from Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Aiza; Kanwal, Kinza; Khan, Abdul Muqeet; Abbas, Mateen

    2016-01-01

    The current research work aimed to access the contamination level of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in the household spices that are widely consumed in huge amounts. 200 different spice samples, 100 packed and 100 unpacked, were analyzed for the aflatoxins profile by HPLC with an incidence of 61.5% contamination out of which 53.66% samples exceed the EU limit. The results disclosed that the unpacked samples are more contaminated as compared to the packed samples except for white cumin seeds. Among packed and unpacked samples of spices, the maximum value of aflatoxins was detected in fennel, that is, 27.93 μg/kg and 67.04 μg/kg, respectively. The lowest concentration of aflatoxin was detected in cinnamon in packed form (0.79 μg/kg) and in the unpacked samples of white cumin seeds which is 1.75 μg/kg. Caraway seeds and coriander in its unpacked form showed positive results whereas black pepper (packed and unpacked) was found free from aflatoxins. This is the first report on the occurrence of aflatoxins in packed and unpacked samples of spices from Pakistan. To ensure safe consumption of spices, there should be constant monitoring of aflatoxin and more studies need to be executed with the intention of preventing mycotoxin accretion in this commodity. PMID:27781067

  6. [Food allergy: the celery-mugwort-spice syndrome. Association with mango allergy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, B; Hofer, T

    1984-06-22

    Celery allergies are commonly observed in mugwort pollen-allergic patients. This situation is frequently associated with an allergy to spices of the umbelliferous family. Thus a "celery-mugwort-spice syndrome" has been established. In 31 patients (27 females, 4 males) allergy to celery was diagnosed between 1978 and 1982. They were followed up in 1983 and complementary tests (skin and RAST) with various raw vegetables, spices and mugwort pollen were done. For specific diagnosis of allergy to celery skin testing (scratch or prick) with fresh celery bulb was reliable. In contrast, RAST was not sufficiently sensitive, 87% of patients allergic to celery had pollinosis in the form of mugwort pollen sensitisation established by skin testing and RAST. Allergy to carrots was clinically and by testing currently associated in 52%. In contrast, a clinically relevant hypersensitivity to caraway (26%), parsley (16%), fennel (13%), green pepper (10%) and aniseed (3%) was found less frequently although these allergens showed a much larger positivity in skin testing. This signifies group sensitisation within the umbelliferous plants. The association of celery-mugwort allergy with allergy to mango fruit described here for the first time cannot be explained as group sensitisation within a botanic relation, as mango, and pistachio-nut, belong to the family of anacardiaceae.

  7. Antioxidant activity and protecting health effects of common medicinal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrovánková, Soňa; Mišurcová, Ladislava; Machů, Ludmila

    2012-01-01

    Medicinal plants are traditionally used in folk medicine as natural healing remedies with therapeutic effects such as prevention of cardiovascular diseases, inflammation disorders, or reducing the risk of cancer. In addition, pharmacological industry utilizes medicinal plants due to the presence of active chemical substances as agents for drug synthesis. They are valuable also for food and cosmetic industry as additives, due to their preservative effects because of the presence of antioxidants and antimicrobial constituents. To commonly used medicinal plants with antioxidant activity known worldwide belong plants from several families, especially Lamiaceae (rosemary, sage, oregano, marjoram, basil, thyme, mints, balm), Apiaceae (cumin, fennel, caraway), and Zingiberaceae (turmeric, ginger). The antioxidant properties of medicinal plants depend on the plant, its variety, environmental conditions, climatic and seasonal variations, geographical regions of growth, degree of ripeness, growing practices, and many other factors such as postharvest treatment and processing. In addition, composition and concentration of present antioxidants, such as phenolic compounds, are related to antioxidant effect. For appropriate determination of antioxidant capacity, the extraction technique, its conditions, solvent used, and particular assay methodology are important.

  8. Potent Chemopreventive/Antioxidant Activity Detected in Common Spices of the Apiaceae Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Aqil, Farrukh; Soper, Lisa; Schultz, David J; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2015-01-01

    Spices are used worldwide, particularly in the Asian and Middle Eastern countries, and considered protective against degenerative diseases, including cancer. Here, we report the efficacy of aqueous and non-aqueous extracts of 11 Apiaceae spices for free radical-scavenging activity and to inhibit cytochrome P450s in two separate reactions involving: 1) 4-hydroxy-17ß-estradiol (4E2), DNA, and CuCl2 and 2) 17ß-estradiol, rat liver microsomes, cofactors, DNA and CuCl2. Oxidative DNA adducts resulting from redox cycling of 4E2 were analyzed by (32)P-postlabeling. Aqueous (5 mg/ml) and non-aqueous extracts (6 mg/ml) substantially inhibited (83-98%) formation of DNA adducts in the microsomal reaction. However, in nonmicrosomal reaction, only aqueous extracts showed the inhibitory activity (83-96%). Adduct inhibition was also observed at five-fold lower concentrations of aqueous extracts of cumin (60%) and caraway (90%), and 10-fold lower concentrations of carrot seeds (76%) and ajowan (90%). These results suggests the presence of 2 groups of phytochemicals: polar compounds that have free radical-scavenging activity and lipophilic compounds that selectively inhibit P450 activity associated with estrogen metabolism. Because most of these Apiaceae spices are used widely with no known toxicity, the phytochemicals from the Apiaceae spices used in foods may be potentially protective against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.

  9. Forage herbs improve mineral composition of grassland herbage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pirhofer-Walzl, Karin; Søegaard, Karen; Jensen, Henning Høgh;

    2011-01-01

    Provision of an adequate mineral supply in the diets of ruminants fed mainly on grassland herbage can present a challenge if mineral concentrations are suboptimal for animal nutrition. Forage herbs may be included in grassland seed mixtures to improve herbage mineral content, although there is li......Provision of an adequate mineral supply in the diets of ruminants fed mainly on grassland herbage can present a challenge if mineral concentrations are suboptimal for animal nutrition. Forage herbs may be included in grassland seed mixtures to improve herbage mineral content, although...... groups (grasses, legumes and herbs). Herb species included chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.), caraway (Carum carvi L.) and salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor L.). We also investigated the effect of slurry application on the macro- and micromineral concentration of grasses......, legumes and herbs. In general, herbs had greater concentrations of the macrominerals P, Mg, K and S and the microminerals Zn and B than grasses and legumes. Slurry application indirectly decreased Ca, S, Cu and B concentrations of total herbage because of an increase in the proportion of mineral-poor...

  10. Apiaceae seeds as functional food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aćimović Milica G.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review was to point to a great importance of plants from Apiaceae family as a functional food. Caraway (Carum carvi L., anise (Pimpinella anisum L., coriander (Coriandrum sativum L., dill (Anethum graveolens L., fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. and cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. are plants from the above-mentioned family whose seeds are widely used in folk medicine, pharmaceutical industry, as spices, flavoring agents and as dietary supplements. These plants are rich in essential oil, which is a mixture of volatile compounds that give it a characteristic aroma. Their antioxidant and antimicrobial activities have been proven and because of these activities they have great potential to be used as natural food conservatives. These plants also have hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activities as well as anticancer properties. They are used as food supplements in everyday nutrition and as natural health products for the prevention and treatment of many disorders such as inflammations, hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia and others. Apart from this, these plants have real application in foods such as pastries, meat and dairy products, pickles and salads as well as spice blends like curry powder, garam masala and others.

  11. Bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of culinary and medicinal plants against Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rachel O'Mahony; Huda Al-Khtheeri; Deepeka Weerasekera; Neluka Fernando; Dino Vaira; John Holton; Christelle Basset

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the bactericidal and anti-adhesive properties of 25 plants against Helicobacter pylori (H pylori).METHODS: Twenty-five plants were boiled in water to produce aqueous extracts that simulate the effect of cooking. The bactericidal activity of the extracts was assessed by a standard kill-curve with seven strains of H pylori. The anti-adhesive property was assessed by the inhibition of binding of four strains of FITC-labeled H pylori to stomach sections. RESULTS: Of all the plants tested, eight plants, including Bengal quince, nightshade, garlic, dill, black pepper, coriander, fenugreek and black tea, were found to have no bactericidal effect on any of the isolates. Columbo weed, long pepper, parsley, tarragon, nutmeg, yellow-berried nightshade, threadstem carpetweed, sage and cinnamon had bactericidal activities against H pylori, but total inhibition of growth was not achieved in this study. Among the plants that killed H pylori, turmeric was the most efficient, followed by cumin, ginger, chilli, borage, black caraway, oregano and liquorice. Moreover, extracts of turmeric; borage and parsley were able to inhibit the adhesion of H pylori strains to the stomach sections.CONCLUSION: Several plants that were tested in our study had bactericidal and/or anti-adhesive effects on H pylori. Ingestion of the plants with anti-adhesive properties could therefore provide a potent alternative therapy for H pylori infection, which overcomes the problem of resistance associated with current antibiotic treatment.

  12. Quantitative Scrutinization of Aflatoxins in Different Spices from Pakistan

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    Narjis Naz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The current research work aimed to access the contamination level of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 in the household spices that are widely consumed in huge amounts. 200 different spice samples, 100 packed and 100 unpacked, were analyzed for the aflatoxins profile by HPLC with an incidence of 61.5% contamination out of which 53.66% samples exceed the EU limit. The results disclosed that the unpacked samples are more contaminated as compared to the packed samples except for white cumin seeds. Among packed and unpacked samples of spices, the maximum value of aflatoxins was detected in fennel, that is, 27.93 μg/kg and 67.04 μg/kg, respectively. The lowest concentration of aflatoxin was detected in cinnamon in packed form (0.79 μg/kg and in the unpacked samples of white cumin seeds which is 1.75 μg/kg. Caraway seeds and coriander in its unpacked form showed positive results whereas black pepper (packed and unpacked was found free from aflatoxins. This is the first report on the occurrence of aflatoxins in packed and unpacked samples of spices from Pakistan. To ensure safe consumption of spices, there should be constant monitoring of aflatoxin and more studies need to be executed with the intention of preventing mycotoxin accretion in this commodity.

  13. The Impact of γ-Irradiation, Essential Oils and Iodine on Biochemical Components and Metabolism of Potato Tubers During Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El-Moneim M.R. AFIFY

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Several methods have been suggested as effective for inhibition of sprouting of potato tubers during storage. Three methods; γ-irradiation, volatile oils and iodine vapor were used for the inhibition of potato tuber cv. ‘Diamond’. Gamma irradiation, essential oils (caraway, clove, carvone, eugenol and Iodine vapor were used to achieve the purpose. The results proved that γ-irradiation and essential oils maintain potato as well as inhibit sprouting for 9 weeks while iodine vapor maintain potato for six weeks. Alpha amylase activity showed an increase after six weeks and then reduced to lower value compared to control. During the metabolic pathway the concentration of lactate was decreased and reached to the level of control when potato tuber treated even with essential oils, radiation as well as with iodine vapor. The levels of NADP and NADPH+H were decreased during potato storage proving that synthesis of this metabolite were very low. The level of glycoalkaloids was fluctuated during storage depending on the treatments.

  14. Sesamin and sesamolin as unexpected contaminants in various cold-pressed plant oils: NP-HPLC/FLD/DAD and RP-UPLC-ESI/MS(n) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Górnaś, Paweł; Siger, Aleksander; Pugajeva, Iveta; Segliņa, Dalija

    2014-04-01

    Thirteen cold-pressed oils (Japanese quince seed, black caraway, flaxseed, rapeseed, hemp, peanut, sunflower, pumpkin, hazelnut, poppy, walnut, almond and sesame oil) manufactured by the same company over a 2-year period (2011-12) were assessed for lipophilic compounds. The presence of sesamin and sesamolin, two characteristic lignans of sesame oil, were detected in all tested plant oils. Both lignans were identified by NP-HPLC/FLD/DAD and confirmed by a RP-UPLC-ESI/MS(n) method. The lowest amount of sesamin and sesamolin was found for Japanese quince seed oil (0.10 and 0.27 mg/100 g), and the highest, excluding sesame oil, for almond oil (36.21 and 105.42 mg/100 g, respectively). The highly significant correlation between sesamolin and sesamin concentrations was found in all samples tested (r = 0.9999; p < 0.00001). These results indicate contamination of cold-pressed oils from the same source. This investigation highlights the fact that increasing the range of products manufactured by the same company can contribute to a lesser regard for the quality of the final product. Moreover, less attention paid to the quality of final product can be related to the health risks of consumers especially sensitive to allergens. Therefore, proper cleaning of processing equipment is needed to prevent cross-contact of cold-pressed oils.

  15. Repellence of plant essential oils to Dermanyssus gallinae and toxicity to the non-target invertebrate Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D R; Sparagano, O A E; Port, G; Okello, E; Shiel, R S; Guy, J H

    2009-05-26

    With changes in legislation and consumer demand, alternatives to synthetic acaricides to manage the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer) in laying hen flocks are increasingly needed. These mites may cause losses in egg production, anaemia and even death of hens. It may be possible to use plant-derived products as D. gallinae repellents, especially if such products have a minimal impact on non-target organisms. An experiment was conducted with D. gallinae to assess the repellence of a range of plant essential oils, previously found to be of varying toxicity (relatively highly toxic to non-toxic) to this pest. Experiments were also undertaken to assess the toxicity of these products to mealworm beetles (Tenebrio molitor L.), a non-target invertebrate typical of poultry production systems. Results showed that all seven essential oils tested (manuka, thyme, palmarosa, caraway, spearmint, black pepper and juniper leaf) were repellent to D. gallinae at 0.14mg oil/cm(3) (initial concentration) during the first 2 days of study. Thyme essential oil appeared to be the most effective, where repellence lasted until the end of the study period (13 days). At the same concentration toxicity to T. molitor differed, with essential oils of palmarosa and manuka being no more toxic to adult beetles than the control. There was neither a significant association between the rank toxicity and repellence of oils to D. gallinae, nor the toxicity of oils to D. gallinae (as previously determined) and T. molitor.

  16. Interrelations between herbage yield, α-tocopherol, β-carotene, lutein, protein, and fiber in non-leguminous forbs, forage legumes, and a grass-clover mixture as affected by harvest date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgersma, Anjo; Søegaard, Karen; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2015-01-21

    Pastures with diverse botanical composition may enhance animal-derived product quality. A recent study demonstrated high vitamin concentrations and yields in some forb species. The objectives of the present study were to investigate interrelations between herbage yields, vitamin concentrations, protein and fiber contents and analyze the effect of harvest date. We hypothesized that interrelations would be similar across investigated forage species. Four nonleguminous forbs: salad burnet (Sanguisorba minor), caraway (Carum carvi), chicory (Cichorium intybus), and ribwort plantain (Plantago lanceolata), three legumes: yellow sweet clover (Melilotus officinalis), lucerne (Medicago sativa), and birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus) and a perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne)-white clover (Trifolium repens) mixture were sown in a field trial with two replicated and randomized blocks. Forage in 1.5 m × 9 m plots was grown in two consecutive years and cut four times per year (May-October). Analyses of variance were performed. In most herbages, α-tocopherol and β-carotene were positively correlated as were β-carotene and lutein; all vitamins were negatively correlated with fiber content and herbage yield. β-Carotene was positively correlated with protein content. α-Tocopherol and β-carotene contents were generally highest in October and lowest in July. Our results showed similar interrelationships in most investigated species, and we suggest that these species may be mixed when designing novel biodiverse mixtures for particular product quality characteristics.

  17. Simultaneous HPLC determination of 22 components of essential oils; method robustness with experimental design

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    A Porel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was the development and validation of a simple, precise and specific reversed phase HPLC method for the simultaneous determination of 22 components present in different essential oils namely cinnamon bark oil, caraway oil and cardamom fruit oil. The chromatographic separation of all the components was achieved on Wakosil-II C 18 column with mixture of 30 mM ammonium acetate buffer (pH 4.7, methanol and acetonitrile in different ratio as mobile phase in a ternary linear gradient mode. The calibration graphs plotted with five different concentrations of each component were linear with a regression coefficient R 2 >0.999. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation were estimated for all the components. Effect on analytical responses by small and deliberate variation of critical factors was examined by robustness testing with Design of Experiment employing Central Composite Design and established that this method was robust. The method was then validated for linearity, precision, accuracy, specificity and demonstrated to be applicable to the determination of the ingredients in commercial sample of essential oil.

  18. Mycobiota and Natural Incidence of Aflatoxins, Ochratoxin A, and Citrinin in Indian Spices Confirmed by LC-MS/MS

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    Punam Jeswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nine different Indian spices (red chilli, black pepper, turmeric, coriander, cumin, fennel, caraway, fenugreek, and dry ginger commonly cultivated and highly used in India were analysed for natural occurrence of toxigenic mycoflora and aflatoxins (AFs, ochratoxin A (OTA, and citrinin (CTN contamination. Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus niger were the most dominant species isolated from all types of spices. Red chilli samples were highly contaminated with aflatoxins (85.4% followed by dry ginger (77.7%. 56% Aspergillus flavus from red chilli and 45% Aspergillus ochraceus from black pepper were toxigenic and produced aflatoxins and ochratoxin A, respectively. Qualitative detection and quantitative detection of mycotoxins in spices were analyzed by ELISA and further confirmed by LC-MS/MS. Penicillium citrinum produced citrinin in red chilli, black pepper, coriander, cumin, fenugreek, and dry ginger samples. The highest amount of AFs was found in red chilli (219.6 ng/g, OTA was in black pepper (154.1 ng/g, and CTN was in dry ginger samples (85.1 ng/g. The results of this study suggest that the spices are susceptible substrate for growth of mycotoxigenic fungi and further mycotoxin production. This is the first report of natural occurrence of citrinin in black pepper and dry ginger from India.

  19. Herbs in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, Jamile B; Azimi, Somayyeh; Rafieian, Nasrin; Zanjani, Hosein Akhavan

    2011-12-01

    Herbs have been used for centuries to prevent and control disease. Herbal extracts are effective because they interact with specific chemical receptors within the body and are in a pharmacodynamic sense, drugs themselves. By using herbal medicines, patients have averted the many side effects that generally come with traditional medicines, but this does not mean that side effects do not occur. Only knowledgeable practitioners can prescribe the right herb and its proper dosage. Herbal medicines had been considered in every culture, however, pharmaceutical companies overturned this type of thinking. Now, pharmaceuticals are called traditional and herbs are libeled as the 'alternative'. The biggest challenge and problem is lack of information about the effect of herbs in oral tissues, mechanism of effect, and side effects. Several popular conventional drugs on the market are derived from herbs. These include aspirin (from white willow bark), digitalis (from foxglove), and sudafed (modelled after a component in the plant ephedra). Herbal products can vary in their potency. Therefore, care must be taken in selecting herbs, even so, herbal medicines have dramatically fewer side effects and are safer to use than conventional medications. The herbs described in this article are Bloodroot, Caraway, Chamomile, Echinacea, Myrrh, Peppermint, Rosemary, Sage, Thyme, Aloe Vera, Propolis, and a summary of other herbs that are useful in dentistry. Herbs may be good alternatives to current treatments for oral health problems but it is clear that we need more research.

  20. Efficacy of activated alginate-based nanocomposite films to control Listeria monocytogenes and spoilage flora in rainbow trout slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboofetileh, Mehdi; Rezaei, Masoud; Hosseini, Hedayat; Abdollahi, Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Essential oils of clove, coriander, caraway, marjoram, cinnamon, and cumin were tested for their antilisterial activity by application of agar diffusion assay (experiment 1). Marjoram essential oil (MEO) showed the highest inhibitory effect, followed by clove and cinnamon. Subsequently, these essential oils were incorporated to alginate/clay nanocomposite films and antilisterial effectiveness of the films was studied in a model solid food system during 12 days at 10 °C (experiment 2). The results revealed that the films with MEO were more effective against Listeria monocytogenes in the model step. Finally, alginate-clay film incorporating 1 % MEO was applied to inoculated trout slices during refrigerated storage (4 °C) for 15 days (experiment 3). The control and the wrapped fish samples were analyzed periodically for microbiological (L. monocytogenes, total viable count, psychrotrophic count) and chemical (TVB-N) properties. The results demonstrated that alginate-clay films enriched with 1 % MEO significantly delayed the growth of L. monocytogenes during the 15-day storage with final counts reaching 6.23 log CFU/g while the counts in control samples were significantly higher reaching 7.38 log CFU/g (p < 0.05). Furthermore, active films efficiently reduced total viable count and psychrotrophic count as well as TVB-N in the fish slice during refrigerated storage.

  1. Chiral Molecules Revisited by Broadband Microwave Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Melanie

    2014-06-01

    Chiral molecules have fascinated chemists for more than 150 years. While their physical properties are to a very good approximation identical, the two enantiomers of a chiral molecule can have completely different (bio)chemical activities. For example, the right-handed enantiomer of carvone smells of spearmint while the left-handed one smells of caraway. In addition, the active components of many drugs are of one specific handedness, such as in the case of ibuprofen. However, in nature as well as in pharmaceutical applications, chiral molecules often exist in mixtures with other chiral molecules. The analysis of these complex mixtures to identify the molecular components, to determine which enantiomers are present, and to measure the enantiomeric excesses (ee) remains a challenging task for analytical chemistry, despite its importance for modern drug development. We present here a new method of differentiating enantiomers of chiral molecules in the gas phase based on broadband rotational spectroscopy. The phase of the acquired signal bares the signature of the enantiomer, as it depends upon the combined quantity, μ_a μ_b μ_c, which is of opposite sign between enantiomers. It thus also provides information on the absolute configuration of the particular enantiomer. Furthermore, the signal amplitude is proportional to the ee. A significant advantage of our technique is its inherent mixture compatibility due to the fingerprint-like character of rotational spectra. In this contribution, we will introduce the technique and present our latest results on chiral molecule spectroscopy and enantiomer differentiation. D. Patterson, M. Schnell, J.M. Doyle, Nature 497 (2013) 475-477 V.A. Shubert, D. Schmitz, D. Patterson, J.M. Doyle, M. Schnell, Angewandte Chemie International Edition 53 (2014) 1152-1155

  2. Comparative chemical and antimicrobial study of nine essential oils obtained from medicinal plants growing in Egypt

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    Nashwa Tarek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are one of interesting natural products group that are used in different aspects of life due to their various biological activities. This study investigate the antimicrobial activities of 9 herbal essential oils on survival and growth of selected pathogenic and spoilage microorganisms. Essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation method and were analyzed using GC/MS technique. The oils were tested for their antimicrobial activity against 2 Gram +ve, Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus and Listeria innocua (L. innocua, 2 Gram −ve, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa and Salmonella Typhi (S. Typhi as well as 2 Fungi, Aspergillus niger (A. niger and Candida albicans (C. albicans, using agar dilution method. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined. The antibiotic susceptibility test was performed against the test organisms by disc diffusion method. Results showed that Cinnamon oil was found effective against all the tested strains (MIC ≤ 1 μl/ml. Peppermint, lemon grass, caraway, anise, fennel and clove showed activity at (MIC ≤ 1 μl/ml with all the tested organisms except for P. aeruginosa. Lavender oil exhibited antimicrobial activities against 4 strains (S. aureus, L. innocua, A. niger and C. albicans with MIC (≤1 μl/ml while geranium oil was inhibitory at (MIC ≤ 1 μl/ml against S. aureus, S. Typhi, A. niger and C. albicans and with MIC ∼ 2 μl/ml against L. innocua. Although Gram −ve organisms had shown high resistance toward different essential oils, they were found to be susceptible to cinnamon oil even at lower concentration. Cinnamon oil is effective against drug resistant organisms. It can be suggested to use essential oils/constituents as potential natural preservatives and would be helpful in the treatment of various infections.

  3. Suitability of thermoluminescence, chemiluminescence, ESR and viscosity measurements as detection method for the irradiation of medicinal herbs; Eignung von Thermolumineszenz-, Chemilumineszenz-, ESR- und Viskositaetsmessungen zur Identifizierung strahlenbehandelter Arzneidrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuettler, C.; Gebhardt, G.; Stock, A.; Helle, N.; Boegl, K.W.

    1993-12-31

    Chemiluminescence, electron spin resonance, thermoluminescence and viscosity measurements have been investigated for their suitability as detection method for the irradiation of the medicinal herbs anise seeds (anisi fructus), valerian roots (valerianae radix), redberry leaves (uvae ursi folium), birch leaves (betulae folium), greek hay seeds (foenugraeci semen), cayenne pepper (capsici fructus acer), black-aldertee bark (frangulae cortex), fennel fruits (feoniculi fructus), rose hip shells (cynosbati fructus), coltsfoot (farfarae folium), acorus roots (calami rhizoma), chamomile flowers (matricariae flos), caraway (carvi fructus), lavender flowers (lavandulae flos), linseed (lini semen), lime tree flowers (tiliae flos), St. Mary`s thistle fruit (cardui mariae herba), lemon balm (melissae folium), java tea (orthosiphonis folium), peppermint (menthae piperitae folium), sage leaves (salviae folium), scouring rush (equiseti herba), senna leaves (sennae folium), plantain herbs (plantaginis lanceolata herba), thyme herbs (thymi herba), juniper berries (juniperi fructus), hawthorne herbs (crataegi folium), wheat starch (amylum tritici) and wormwood (absinthii herba). Depending on the herbs, the methods used were more or less suitable. Chemiluminescence measurements showed the smallest differences between untreated and irradiated samples whereas thermoluminescence measurements on isolated minerals from the vegetable drugs gave better results. In some herbs radiation-specific radicals could be identified by ESR spectroscopy. Viscosity measurement is suitable for some herbs as fast and inexpensive method for screening. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Eignung von Chemilumineszenz-, ESR-, Thermolumineszenz- und Viskositaetsmessungen als Nachweismethode fuer die Behandlung von Arzneidrogen mit ionisierenden Strahlen wurde an Anis, Baldrianwurzel, Baerentraubenblaettern, Birkenblaettern, Bockshornsamen, Cayennepfeffer, Faulbaumrinde, Fenchel, Hagebuttenschalen, Huflattichblaettern

  4. Management of functional dyspepsia: Unsolved problems and new perspectives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Madisch; Stephan Miehlke; Joachim Labenz

    2005-01-01

    The common characteristic criteria of all functional gastrointestinal(GI)disorders are the persistence and recurrence of variable gastrointestinal symptoms that cannot be explained by any structural or biochemical abnormalities. Functional dyspepsia (FD) represents one of the important GI disorders in Western countries because of its remarkably high prevalence in general population and its impact on quality of life. Due to its dependence on both subjective determinants and diverse country-specific circumstances, the definition and management strategies of FD are still variably stated.Clinical trials with several drug classes (e.g., proton pump inhibitors, H2-blockers, prokinetic drugs) have been performed frequently without validated diseasespecific test instruments for the outcome measurements.Therefore, the interpretation of such trials remains difficult and controversial with respect to comparability and evaluation of drug efficacy, and definite conclusions can be drawn neither for diagnostic management nor for efficacious drug therapy so far. In view of these unsolved problems, guidelines both on the clinical management of FD and on the performance of clinical trials are needed. In recent years, increasing research work has been done in this area. Clinical trials conducted in adequately diagnosed patients that provided validated outcome measurements may result in better insights leading to more effective treatment strategies.Encouraging perspectives have been recently performed by methodologically well-designed treatment studies with herbal drug preparations. Herbal drugs, given their proven efficacy in clinical trials, offer a safe therapeutic alternative in the treatment of FD which is often favored by both patients and physicians. A fixed combination of peppermint oil and caraway oil in patients suffering from FD could be proven effective by well-designed clinical trials.

  5. Anti-plasmodial and insecticidal activities of the essential oils of aromatic plants growing in the Mediterranean area

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    Dell’Agli Mario

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sardinia is a Mediterranean area endemic for malaria up to the last century. During a screening study to evaluate the anti-plasmodial activity of some aromatic plants traditionally used in Sardinia, Myrtus communis (myrtle, Myrtaceae, Satureja thymbra (savory, Lamiaceae, and Thymus herba-barona (caraway thyme, Lamiaceae were collected in three vegetative periods: before, during and after flowering. Methods The essential oils were obtained by steam distillation, fractionated by silica gel column chromatography and analysed by GC-FID-MS. Total oil and three main fractions were tested on D10 and W2 strains of Plasmodium falciparum in vitro. Larvicidal and adulticidal activities were tested on Anopheles gambiae susceptible strains. Results The essential oil of savory, rich in thymol, was the most effective against P. falciparum with an inhibitory activity independent from the time of collection (IC50 17–26 μg/ml on D10 and 9–11 μg/ml on W2. Upon fractionation, fraction 1 was enriched in mono-sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbons; fraction 2 in thymol (73-83%; and fraction 3 contained thymol, carvacrol and terpinen-4-ol, with a different composition depending on the time of collection. Thymol-enriched fractions were the most active on both strains (IC50 20–22 μg/ml on D10 and 8–10 μg/ml on W2 and thymol was confirmed as mainly responsible for this activity (IC50 19.7± 3.0 and 10.6 ± 2.0 μg/ml on D10 and W2, respectively. The essential oil of S. thymbra L. showed also larvicidal and adulticidal activities. The larvicidal activity, expressed as LC50, was 0.15 ± 0.002; 0.21 ± 0.13; and 0.15 ± 0.09 μg/ml (mean ± sd depending on the time of collection: before, during and after flowering, respectively. Conclusions This study provides evidence for the use of essential oils for treating malaria and fighting the vector at both the larval and adult stages. These findings open the possibility for further

  6. Reasoned opinion on the modification of the existing MRLs for fosetyl in potato, kiwi and certain spices

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    European Food Safety Authority

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with Article 6 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, France, hereafter referred to as the evaluating Member State France (EMS France, received an application from Bayer CropScience to modify the existing MRL for fosetyl-Al in kiwi. In order to accommodate the intended use in Italy, the EMS France proposed to raise the MRL in kiwi to 150 mg/kg. Spain (EMS Spain, received an application from Probelte S.A. to modify the existing MRL for fosetyl-Al in potatoes. In order to accommodate the intended use in the SEU and to account for resulting residues in animal commodities, the EMS Spain proposed to raise the MRL in potatoes to 70 mg/kg and in ruminant`s kidney to 0.6 mg/kg. Germany (EMS Germany compiled an application to modify the existing MRL for fosetyl-Al in several spices. The EMS Germany proposed to raise the existing MRL for fosetyl in several seeds of spices and in caraway and cardamom to 300 mg/kg. The EMSs drafted evaluation reports in accordance with Article 8 of Regulation (EC No 396/2005, which were submitted to the European Commission and forwarded to EFSA. According to EFSA the data are sufficient to derive MRL proposals for the crops under consideration in support of the new intended uses for the residue definitions proposed in the Article 12 MRL review. Based on the risk assessment results, EFSA concludes that the proposed use of fosetyl-Al on kiwi and certain spices will not result in a consumer exposure exceeding the toxicological reference values for fosetyl and phosphonic acid and therefore is unlikely to pose a consumer health risk. The intended use on potatoes cannot be supported due to data gaps identified regarding the magnitude of phosphonic acid residues in livestock commodities. A new feeding study in ruminants is required to adequately estimate residues of phosphonic acid in food of animal origin.

  7. Chiroptical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurst, Jerome E.

    1995-09-01

    A brief review of the literature, and Chemical and Engineering News in particular, reveals that the determination and use of optical activity is of increasing importance in today's commercial and research laboratories. The classical technique is to measure [alpha]D using a manual or recording polarimeter to provide a single value, the specific rotation at 589 nm. A spectropolarimeter can be used to determine optical activity through the UV-Visible spectrum (Optical Rotatory Dispersion [ORD]). At wavelengths far removed from electronic absorption bands, optical activity arises from circular birefringence, or the difference in the refractive index for left- and right-circularly polarized light; i.e., nL - nR does not equal zero for chiral materials. If the optical activity is measured through an absorption band, complex behavior is observed (a Cotton Effect curve). At an absorption band, chiral materials exhibit circular dichroism (CD), or a difference in the absorption of left- and right-circularly polarized light; epsilon L minus epsilon R does not equal zero. If the spectropolarimeter is set for the measurement of CD spectra, one observes what appears to be a UV-Vis spectrum except that some absorption bands are positive while others may be negative. Just as enantiomers have specific rotations that are equal and opposite at 589 nm (sodium D line), rotations are equal and opposite at all wavelengths, and CD measurements are equal and opposite at all wavelengths. Figure 1 shows the ORD curves for the enantiomeric carvones while Figure 2 contains the CD curves. The enantiomer of carvone that has the positive [alpha]D is obtained from caraway seeds and is known to have the S-configuration while the R-enantiomer is found in spearmint oil. Figure 1. ORD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones Figure 2. CD of S-(+)- and R-(-)-carvones While little can be done to correlate stereochemistry with [alpha]D values, chiroptical spectroscopy (ORD and/or CD) often can be used to assign

  8. Separate Culture and Morphological Observation of Free Living Amoebae and Ciliates%自生阿米巴和纤毛虫的分离培养与观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    岳爱梅; 刘营; 谭叶; 丛慧; 林佳慧; 张英杰; 张忠广

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the methods of cultivation and morphological observation of free living amoebae and ciliates and observe the growth and species change of parasites in different time and vegetables. Methods Various green vegetable juice were prepared for cultivating the amoebae and ciliates at 37℃ The growth of free living amoebae and ciliates were observed using microscope. Results Rotary motion of ciliates was observed after cultivation for 48 hours.Decreased quantity and activity of ciliates and increased quantity and activity of free living amoebae were observed after cultivation for 72 hours. Decreased quantity of free living amoebae and ciliates were observed even disappeared but the cysts appeared after cultivation for 144 hours. And various green vegetable juice showed differences in culturing the amoebae and ciliates; between 72 h to 120 h ciliates could be found in celery juice, while free living amoebae were found between 96 h to 120 h. Ciliates could be easier to observe in rape flower juice between 72 h to 96h and free living amoebae easier to see in caraway juice between 72 h to 120 h. Conclusion This method is simple and convenient to observe the living amoebae and ciliates. It is useful in the parasitology teaching.%目的 研究建立自生阿米巴和纤毛虫的培养方法,观察不同菜种在不同时间寄生虫的生长情况及种类的变化.方法 制作不同蔬菜叶的悬液,37℃恒温培养,镜下观察不同时间自生阿米巴和纤毛虫的生长情况.结果 培养48 h后,可观察到纤毛虫活跃的旋转运动;72 h后纤毛虫数量减少,活动度降低,自生阿米巴出现,蠕动活跃;144 h后自生阿米巴、纤毛虫数量减少甚至观察不到,包囊出现,不同菜种在不同时间自生阿米巴、纤毛虫数量、种类也相应变化,如芹菜中纤毛虫在72~120 h、阿米巴在96~120 h数量最多,最易观察到,油菜中纤毛虫在72~96 h最易观察到,香菜中阿米巴在72~120 h

  9. GC-MS法高灵敏检测蔬菜中氨基甲酸酯农药残留%Detection of pesticides residues of carbamate in vegetables by GC-MS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王俊; 管有志; 于微; 谭洪兴; 朱李佳; 刘小立

    2013-01-01

    目的 建立使用气质联用法同时检测蔬菜中多种氨基甲酸酯快速灵敏的检测方法.方法 样品经乙腈提取,固相萃取柱净化,并建立一种快速测定蔬菜中6种氨基甲酸酯类农药残留(异丙威、仲丁威、残杀威、抗芽威、速灭威、甲奈威)的气相色谱质谱联用(GC-MS)检测方法.同时对22种蔬菜中的多种氨基甲酸酯类农药进行定性及定量分析. 结果 建立一种快速测定蔬菜中6种氨基甲酸酯类农药残留的GC-MS方法,该方法对6种氨基甲酸酯类农药的相对标准偏差为1.06%~3.73%,回收率为86.5%~112.3%,并具有较好的精密度.在应用该方法检测的22种蔬菜中,一份空心菜检测出残杀威,一份香菜中检测出异丙威. 结论 本文建立的快速测定蔬菜中6中氨基甲酸酯类农药的GC-MS方法准确可靠,灵敏度高,可应用于蔬菜中多种氨基甲酸酯农药的同时测定.%Objective To set up a reliable method for determination of six carbamates in vegetables by using GC-MS.. Methods Samples were extracted with acetonitrile and then purified by solid-phase extraction (SPE). A method on rapid detection of six carbamates (Isoprocarb,BPMC,Propoxur,Pirimicarb,MTMC,Carbaryl)in samples by GC-MS has been established. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of pesticide residues in 22 vegetables from local supermarket have been performed by the proposed method. Results The relative standard deviations of the method were between 1.06% and 3.73%,and the method recoveries were in the range of 86.5-112.3% with good precision. Propoxur in water spinach and Isoprocarb in caraway have positive test results in our experiments. Conclusions The method was highly sensitive with satisfied recovery and it could be applied to detect six carbamates residues in vegetables quickly and accurately.

  10. Examining food additives and spices for their anti-oxidant ability to counteract oxidative damage due to chronic exposure to free radicals from environmental pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Raul A., III

    The main objective of this work was to examine food additives and spices (from the Apiaceae family) to determine their antioxidant properties to counteract oxidative stress (damage) caused by Environmental pollutants. Environmental pollutants generate Reactive Oxygen species and Reactive Nitrogen species. Star anise essential oil showed lower antioxidant activity than extracts using DPPH scavenging. Dill Seed -- Anethum Graveolens -the monoterpene components of dill showed to activate the enzyme glutathione-S-transferase , which helped attach the antioxidant molecule glutathione to oxidized molecules that would otherwise do damage in the body. The antioxidant activity of extracts of dill was comparable with ascorbic acid, alpha-tocopherol, and quercetin in in-vitro systems. Black Cumin -- Nigella Sativa: was evaluated the method 1,1-diphenyl2-picrylhhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity. Positive correlations were found between the total phenolic content in the black cumin extracts and their antioxidant activities. Caraway -- Carum Carvi: The antioxidant activity was evaluated by the scavenging effects of 1,1'-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Caraway showed strong antioxidant activity. Cumin -- Cuminum Cyminum - the major polyphenolic were extracted and separated by HPTLC. The antioxidant activity of the cumin extract was tested on 1,1'-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging. Coriander -- Coriandrum Sativum - the antioxidant and free-radical-scavenging property of the seeds was studied and also investigated whether the administration of seeds curtails oxidative stress. Coriander seed powder not only inhibited the process of Peroxidative damage, but also significantly reactivated the antioxidant enzymes and antioxidant levels. The seeds also showed scavenging activity against superoxides and hydroxyl radicals. The total polyphenolic content of the seeds was found to be 12.2 galic acid equivalents (GAE)/g while the total flavonoid content