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Sample records for carabid coleoptera community

  1. Significantly higher Carabid beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) catch in conventionally than in organically managed Christmas tree plantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Søren; Lund, Malthe; Rønn, Regin;

    2012-01-01

    Carabid beetles play an important role as consumers of pest organisms in forestry and agriculture. Application of pesticides may negatively affect abundance and activity of carabid beetles, thus reducing their potential beneficial effect. We investigated how abundance and diversity of pitfall...... managed sites. Carabid beetle abundance and richness did not decline more between two sampling periods at sites with pesticide application than at unamended sites. Apparently, the amount of bare ground, which dominated in the conventionally managed, herbicide treated sites, correlated closely with the...

  2. Significantly Higher Carabid Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) Catch in Conventionally than in Organically Managed Christmas Tree Plantations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Soren; Lund, Malthe; Ronn, Regin;

    2012-01-01

    Carabid beetles play an important role as consumers of pest organisms in forestry and agriculture. Application of pesticides may negatively affect abundance and activity of carabid beetles, thus reducing their potential beneficial effect. We investigated how abundance and diversity of pitfall...... managed sites. Carabid beetle abundance and richness did not decline more between two sampling periods at sites with pesticide application than at unamended sites. Apparently, the amount of bare ground, which dominated in the conventionally managed, herbicide treated sites, correlated closely with the...

  3. Seasonal Variation of Carabid Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae Abundance and Diversity in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar

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    Johanna Rainio

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal variation in arthropod abundances is observed in many tropical forests all over the world. This study examines seasonal occurrence of carabid beetles in Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar, where little research has been done concerning seasonality of arthropods. Carabid beetles were collected from secondary and primary montane rainforests throughout a one year. In total, 1205 individuals of 50 species were collected. During the year there was a considerable variation in the abundances of carabids. The highest number of individuals was collected in February, which is a warm and rainy month while the lowest numbers were obtained in May, which is in the beginning of drier months. Species composition varied considerably during the year, 28 % of the species were found only in one month, and only one species was collected in every sampling month. For total species inventory at least one year of collecting is then recommended.

  4. Carabid communities in forests of ENEA centre of Brasimone, Bologna (Italy)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) forest property may be regarded as an open laboratory; interdisciplinary studies on ecology of aquatic and terrestrial mountain ecosystems are feasible. Six sites in tosco-emiliano Apennine (Brasimone area, Italy) were sampled by pitfall traps to assess the forest dwellers ground beetle coenoses. In spite of different wood species, vegetation cover and physionomy, Carabid communities are quite similar in species assemblages, ecological characterization and chronological spectra

  5. DIVERSITY OF CARABIDS (COLEOPTERA) ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOWER LURIN RIVER, LIMA, PERU

    OpenAIRE

    ARMANDO VÉLEZ-AZAÑERO; Alfonso Lizárraga-Travaglini

    2013-01-01

    Quarterly samples of beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) were taken associated with the lower basin of the Lurín River (Lima-Peru) during the period August 2009 - February 2011, in six sampling points between 5 and 51 masl. Pitfall traps were used and obtained a total of 59 specimens distributed among three tribes, three genera, and four morphospecies. We report the presence of Megacephala, Scarites genus, and Pterostichus with the latter being the predominant genus.

  6. Структура комплексов жужелиц (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae) плантационных посадок брусники в условиях Беларуси в первые годы после закладки

    OpenAIRE

    Буга, С. В.; О.Р. Александрович; Морозов, О. В.

    2013-01-01

    Species composition and ecological structure of carabid beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae) community at cowberry plantations were studied in SW Belarus in the first years after planting. Terrestrial invertebrates were sampled by pitfall traps. A total of 3028 imagines of 45 carabid species have been collected. Activity density of carabid beetles was the highest from late May to early June. Poecilus versicolor (Sturm, 1824) was the most abundant (87,39 %). Species richness of predator and...

  7. Структура комплексов жужелиц (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae) плантационных посадок голубики высокорослой в условиях Беларуси в первые годы после закладки

    OpenAIRE

    Буга, С. В.; О.Р. Александрович

    2013-01-01

    Species composition and ecological structure of carabid beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae) communities at highbush blueberry plantations were studied in SW Belarus in the first years after planting. Terrestrial invertebrates were sampled by pitfall traps. A total of 623 imagines of 51 carabid species have been collected. Field and meadow mesophilous and mesokserophilous species are formed main part of whole carabid complex. Poecilus versicolor (Sturm, 1824) and Agonum sexpunctatum (...

  8. Functional species traits of carabid beetles living in two riparian alder forests of the Sila plateau subject to different disturbance factors (Coleoptera: Carabidae

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    Antonio Mazzei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied carabid beetle assemblages found in riparian black alder forests in the Sila plateau (Southern Apennines. These carabid assemblages are characterized by a high incidence of endemic small-sized, low dispersal, highly stenotopic (hygrophilic, and trophycally specialized species. To evaluate the influence of anthropogenic disturbance on these insects, we compared carabid assemblage of an old undisturbed forest (65-170y, wilderness landscape with that of a younger, partly grazed stand (40-60y, cropland landscape. The carabid assemblage of the disturbed stand was characterized by a higher number of species, but showed a lower incidence of zoophagous specialists and brachypterous beetles, with many species probably coming from an adjacent cropland. However, the disturbed stand maintains almost 80% of the core species found in the older forest, which suggests that these insects are not particularly sensitive to disturbance factors represented by periodic wood harvesting and extensive cattle grazing.

  9. Assemblages of carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) in humid forest habitats of different stages of succession in the Puszcza Knyszyńska Forest (northeastern Poland)

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Kwiatkowski

    2011-01-01

    Abstract During a period of three years (2006–2008) the carabid fauna in wet and humid forest habitats of different stages of succession was studied at the Puszcza Knyszynska (north-east part of Poland). The aim of this study was to determine how the assemblages of the carabid fauna change in relation to the ongoing process of succession. Using pitfall traps, 24 plots were sampled. The plots were located in stands of different age, from two year old plantations to more than 100 year old fores...

  10. Effects of ecological flooding on the temporal and spatial dynamics of carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae and springtails (Collembola in a polder habitat

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    Tanja Lessel

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the scope of the Integrated Rhine Program an ecological flood gate and channel was inserted into the polder “Ingelheim” to enhance animal and plant diversity. In 2008, carabid beetles and springtails were collected, using pitfall traps, to measure the effects of ecological flooding and a strong precipitation event at a flood-disturbed and a dry location in this area. At both localities, xerophilic and mesophilic carabid beetle species were dominant throughout the study period. The total number of individuals of hygrophilic species was comparatively constant, while species number increased, partly due to the changed moisture conditions caused by ecological flooding and strong precipitation. Carabid beetle diversity and evenness decreased marginally when ecological flooding was absent. Springtails represent a less mobile arthropod order, and as such the impact of ecological flooding was stronger. An increase in both numbers of species and individuals of hygrophilic and hygrotolerant species occurred in the flood-disturbed location after ecological flooding. After the sites at both locations had dried, the number of individuals belonging to these species declined rapidly. In contrast to carabid species, the strong precipitation event showed no influence on hygrophilic springtail species. Thus, collembolan diversity and evenness decreased markedly in the absence of flooding. We showed that ecological flooding has an influence on the spatial and temporal dynamics of different arthropod groups that inhabit the polder “Ingelheim”. These findings demonstrate the importance of using different arthropod groups as bioindicators in determining the ecological value of a particular polder design.

  11. Cenoses and species phenology of Carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in three stages of vegetational succession in upper Pivka karst (SW Slovenia):

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    Polak, Slavko

    2004-01-01

    The Carabid beetle cenoses in three stages of vegetational succession in selected karst area were studied. Year-round phenology of all species present is presented. Species richness of the habitats, total number of individuals trapped and the nature conservation aspects of the vegetational succession of the karst grasslands are discussed.

  12. Assemblages of carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae in humid forest habitats of different stages of succession in the Puszcza Knyszyńska Forest (northeastern Poland

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    Adam Kwiatkowski

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available During a period of three years (2006–2008 the carabid fauna in wet and humid forest habitats of different stages of succession was studied at the Puszcza Knyszynska (north-east part of Poland. The aim of this study was to determine how the assemblages of the carabid fauna change in relation to the ongoing process of succession. Using pitfall traps, 24 plots were sampled. The plots were located in stands of different age, from two year old plantations to more than 100 year old forests. Additionally, the stands were ordered in three moisture classes (wet, humid and very humid and two classes of soil richness. As indicators for change in the carabid fauna in relation to age of the stands Mean Individual Biomass (MIB, species diversity and share of forest species were used. By applying multivariate statistics the relation of the different habitat characteristics to changes in the carabid fauna was examined. During the study 8903 individuals belonging to 57 species were collected. Pterostichus niger represented 28% of the total catches and therefore the most common species. Another common species, Pterostichus melanarius, contributed to 13% of the total catch. This species was caught at every plot, even in the old forests. In contrast to the results obtained by Szyszko (1990 for fresh and dry pine stands, in this study the relation of MIB with the age of forest was not significant. Although the number of species was rather constant, the number of individuals belonging to the group of forest species significantly increased with the ageing of the forest. The multivariate analysis showed a relationship with ageing of the stands and soil richness rather than with moisture and size of the forest. According to the present paper, clear cuttings in wet and humid habitats do not cause a strong degradation of the carabid fauna.

  13. Assemblages of carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) in humid forest habitats of different stages of succession in the Puszcza Knyszyńska Forest (northeastern Poland).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Adam

    2011-01-01

    During a period of three years (2006-2008) the carabid fauna in wet and humid forest habitats of different stages of succession was studied at the Puszcza Knyszynska (north-east part of Poland). The aim of this study was to determine how the assemblages of the carabid fauna change in relation to the ongoing process of succession. Using pitfall traps, 24 plots were sampled. The plots were located in stands of different age, from two year old plantations to more than 100 year old forests. Additionally, the stands were ordered in three moisture classes (wet, humid and very humid) and two classes of soil richness. As indicators for change in the carabid fauna in relation to age of the stands Mean Individual Biomass (MIB), species diversity and share of forest species were used. By applying multivariate statistics the relation of the different habitat characteristics to changes in the carabid fauna was examined. During the study 8903 individuals belonging to 57 species were collected. Pterostichus niger represented 28% of the total catches and therefore the most common species. Another common species, Pterostichus melanarius, contributed to 13% of the total catch. This species was caught at every plot, even in the old forests. In contrast to the results obtained by Szyszko (1990) for fresh and dry pine stands, in this study the relation of MIB with the age of forest was not significant. Although the number of species was rather constant, the number of individuals belonging to the group of forest species significantly increased with the ageing of the forest. The multivariate analysis showed a relationship with ageing of the stands and soil richness rather than with moisture and size of the forest. According to the present paper, clear cuttings in wet and humid habitats do not cause a strong degradation of the carabid fauna. PMID:21738426

  14. Changes in carabid beetle assemblages across an urban-rural gradient in Japan

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    Ishitani, M.; Kotze, D.J.; NiemelÀ, J.

    2003-01-01

    As part of the international Globenet project, carabid beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae) were collected using pitfall traps from four urban, four suburban and four rural sites in Hiroshima City, Japan, during the 2001 summer season. In agreement with expectation, carabid abundance and species richness decreased significantly from rural to urban sites. Furthermore, no large, and only few individuals of medium-sized specialist species were collected from the urban environment, whil...

  15. Diversity and survival of carabid communities in the area affected by the barrage system Gabcikovo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The changes in representation of individual ecological groups of Carabidae in the within-dike area of the Danube during the period 1989-1994 show that the drainage process has started in this area, and resulted in initial stages of community succession tending to rise of ecologically less valuable heterogeneous ecotonal communities. This succession started as early before the diversion of the Danube main flow as a result of long-term continuous decrease of average ground water level, climatic fluctuations and various human activities in the past. In 1992-1994, after the Danube diversion it was considerably accelerated. The further development of the Carabidae communities has three alternatives characterised briefly as: 1) increase of the dominance of mesohygrophilous species and the dominance or extinction of polyhygrophilous species, 2) the vanishing hygrophilous species may be partially substituted by some tolerant species, 3) preservation of more or less a species spectrum characteristic for floodplain forest, with lower alpha-diversity. (author). 3 tabs., 6 refs

  16. Edge effect on carabid assemblages along forest-grass transects

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    T. Magura

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available During 1997 and 1998, we have tested the edge-effect for carabids along oak-hornbeam forest-grass transects using pitfall traps in Hungary. Our hypothesis was that the diversity of carabids will be higher in the forest edge than in the forest interior. We also focused on the characteristic species of the habitats along the transects and the relationships between their distribution and the biotic and abiotic factors.

    Our results proved that there was a significant edge effect on the studied carabid communities: the Shannon diversity increased significantly along the transects from the forest towards the grass. The diversity of the carabids were significantly higher in the forest edge and in the grass than in the forest interior. The carabids of the forest, the forest edge and the grass are separated from each other by principal coordinates analysis and by indicator species analysis (IndVal, suggesting that each of the three habitats has a distinct species assemblages. There were 5 distinctive groups of carabids: 1 habitat generalists, 2 forest generalists, 3 species of the open area, 4 forest edge species, and 5 forest specialists. It was demonstrated by multiple regression analyses, that the relative air moisture, temperature of the ground, the cover of leaf litter, herbs, shrubs and canopy cover, abundance of the carabids’ preys are the most important factors determining the diversity and spatial pattern of carabids along the studied transects.

  17. Carabid communities in forests of ENEA centre of Brasimone, Bologna (Italy); I coleotteri carabidi nei boschi del centro ENEA del Brasimone, Bologna: effetti della gestione forestale sulla carabidocenosi di alcune formazioni boschive dell`Appennino tosco-emiliano

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Mei, M.; Collina, M. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Dipt. Ambiente; De Felici, S.; Vigna Taglianti, A. [Rome Univ. (Italy). Dipt. Biologia Animale dell`uomo

    1995-08-01

    The ENEA (Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment) forest property may be regarded as an open laboratory; interdisciplinary studies on ecology of aquatic and terrestrial mountain ecosystems are feasible. Six sites in tosco-emiliano Apennine (Brasimone area, Italy) were sampled by pitfall traps to assess the forest dwellers ground beetle coenoses. In spite of different wood species, vegetation cover and physionomy, Carabid communities are quite similar in species assemblages, ecological characterization and chronological spectra.

  18. Do landscape factors affect brownfield carabid assemblages?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carabid fauna of 28 derelict sites in the West Midlands (England) were sampled over the course of one growing season (April-October, 1999). The study aimed to investigate the relationship between carabid assemblages and five measures of landscape structure pertinent to derelict habitat. At each site measurements of landscape features pertinent to derelict habitat were made: (i) the proximity of habitat corridors; (ii) the density of surrounding derelict land; (iii) the distance between the site and the rural fringe; and (iv) the size of the site. Concurrent surveys of the soil characteristics, vegetation type, and land use history were conducted. The data were analysed using a combination of ordination (DCA, RDA), variance partitioning (using pRDA) and binary linear regression. The results suggest that:1.There is very little evidence that the carabid assemblages of derelict sites were affected by landscape structure, with assemblages instead being principally related to within-site habitat variables, such as site age (since last disturbance), substrate type and vegetation community. 2.No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that sites away from railway corridors are more impoverished in their carabid fauna than sites on corridors. 3.There are some suggestions from this study that rarer and non-flying specialist species may be affected by isolation, taking longer to reach sites. We infer from this that older sites with retarded succession, and sites in higher densities of surrounding derelict land may eventually become more species rich and that these sites may be important for maintaining populations of rarer and flightless species. 4.Conservation efforts to maintain populations of these species should focus principally on habitat quality issues, such as maintaining early successional habitats that have a diversity of seed producing annuals and perennial plants and enhancing substrate variability rather than landscape issues

  19. Quantification of motility of carabid beetles in farmland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allema, A B; van der Werf, W; Groot, J C J; Hemerik, L; Gort, G; Rossing, W A H; van Lenteren, J C

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of the movement of insects at field and landscape levels helps us to understand their ecology and ecological functions. We conducted a meta-analysis on movement of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae), to identify key factors affecting movement and population redistribution. We characterize the rate of redistribution using motility μ (L2 T-1), which is a measure for diffusion of a population in space and time that is consistent with ecological diffusion theory and which can be used for upscaling short-term data to longer time frames. Formulas are provided to calculate motility from literature data on movement distances. A field experiment was conducted to measure the redistribution of mass-released carabid, Pterostichus melanarius in a crop field, and derive motility by fitting a Fokker-Planck diffusion model using inverse modelling. Bias in estimates of motility from literature data is elucidated using the data from the field experiment as a case study. The meta-analysis showed that motility is 5.6 times as high in farmland as in woody habitat. Species associated with forested habitats had greater motility than species associated with open field habitats, both in arable land and woody habitat. The meta-analysis did not identify consistent differences in motility at the species level, or between clusters of larger and smaller beetles. The results presented here provide a basis for calculating time-varying distribution patterns of carabids in farmland and woody habitat. The formulas for calculating motility can be used for other taxa. PMID:25673121

  20. Time-consistent rearrangement of carabid beetle assemblages by an urbanisation gradient in Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magura, Tibor; Lövei, Gábor L.; Tóthmérész, Béla

    2008-09-01

    To examine the impact of urbanisation on arthropod biodiversity, carabid (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages were studied over 2 years along a rural-urban gradient representing increasing levels of human disturbance. Carabids were collected by pitfall trapping during their whole activity period in lowland oak forest patches in and near the city of Debrecen, Eastern Hungary, over two seasons (2001-2002). Carabid activity density was significantly higher in the rural than in the two other areas, but there was no significant difference in species richness (measured as mean number of species caught/trap). The proportion of forest specialists significantly decreased from the rural towards the urban area, and the proportion of forest specialist species was significantly higher in the rural and suburban areas than in the urban one. In contrast, the relative activity density of generalist species significantly increased along the rural-urban gradient. Both the relative number of open-habitat species and their activity density were significantly higher in the urban forest fragments than in the suburban and rural ones. The patterns found were consistent between the 2 years. Multidimensional scaling indicated pronounced changes in species composition along the gradient; the assemblages in urban forest fragments were more variable than in the other areas. A large proportion of the variation in overall activity density, species richness and the proportion of carabids with different habitat affinities could be explained by structural habitat variables (percentage cover by canopy, leaf litter, herbs and decaying wood), and prey availability.

  1. Prioridades de conservación aplicando información filogenética y endemicidad: un ejemplo basado en Carabidae (Coleoptera de América del Sur austral Conservation priorities using phylogenetic information and endemicity: an example based on Carabid beetles from Southern South America

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    Sergio Roig-Juñent

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Sobre la base de la información distribucional de las especies de Carabidae (Coleoptera de América del Sur austral, se reconocieron 17 áreas de endemismo. Para cada una de ellas se estimó la diversidad gamma, el porcentaje de endemismo, el valor filogenético y la complementariedad, exceptuando Juan Fernández del cual no se pudo obtener ningún valor filogenético. El cálculo del valor filogenético se realizó a través del uso de cuatro índices, el valor filogenético sin ninguna modificación (W, considerando la endemicidad (We, y sus respectivas estandarizaciones (Ws y Wes. Los resultados muestran que la estandarización del valor filogenético (Ws produce un sesgo cuando los cladogramas difieren en tamaño y que el complemento entre áreas es una herramienta secundaria de gran utilidad. Sin embargo, los resultados muestran que para determinar la importancia de las áreas, el complemento debe ser usado en conjunto con la diversidad específica y la endemicidad. Las comparaciones de los resultados obtenidos usando W, We y análisis de complementariedad estrictos y modificados muestran que el valor filogenético que admite endemicidad (We puede ser aplicado como único valor para determinar la importancia de cada área. Aplicando We, las seis primeras áreas seleccionadas acumulan el 72 % del valor filogenético y el 74 % de la diversidad gamma de los carábidos de América del Sur austral, mientras que ninguno de los otros parámetros usados acumula el 70 % de las especies antes de sumar la séptima área. Las seis áreas seleccionadas son la Selva valdiviana, las Sierras pampeanas, Coquimbo, Patagonia occidental, Chile central y La Araucanía. Es de hacer notar que las Sierras pampeanas y la Patagonia occidental son ambientes de pastizales, Coquimbo y Chile central son ambientes áridos y semiáridos, y solo la Selva valdiviana y Araucanía son típicos bosques australesBased on information of the Southern South American carabid

  2. Large carabid beetle declines in a United Kingdom monitoring network increases evidence for a widespread loss in insect biodiversity

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, David R; Bater, John E.; Clark, Suzanne J.; Monteith, Don T.; Andrews, Christopher; Corbett, Stuart J.; Beaumont, Deborah A.; Chapman, Jason W.

    2012-01-01

    1. Carabid beetles are important functional components of many terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we describe the first long-term, wide-scale and quantitative assessment of temporal changes in UK carabid communities, to inform nationwide management aimed at their conservation. 2. Multivariate and mixed models were used to assess temporal trends over a 15-year period,across eleven sites in the UK Environmental Change Network. Sites covered pasture, field margins, chalk downland, woodland and hed...

  3. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D., James L. Hanula, and Scott Horn

    2005-01-01

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  4. Using malaise traps to sample ground beetles (Coleoptera. Carabidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael D. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Hanula, James L. [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States); Horn, Scott [USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC (United States)

    2012-04-02

    Pitfall traps provide an easy and inexpensive way to sample ground-dwelling arthropods (Spence and Niemela 1994; Spence et al. 1997; Abildsnes and Tommeras 2000) and have been used exclusively in many studies of the abundance and diversity of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae). Despite the popularity of this trapping technique, pitfall traps have many disadvantages. For example, they often fail to collect both small (Spence and Niemela 1994) and trap-shy species (Benest 1989), eventually deplete the local carabid population (Digweed et al. 1995), require a species to be ground-dwelling in order to be captured (Liebherr and Mahar 1979), and produce different results depending on trap diameter and material, type of preservative used, and trap placement (Greenslade 1964; Luff 1975; Work et al. 2002). Further complications arise from seasonal patterns of movement among the beetles themselves (Maelfait and Desender 1990), as well as numerous climatic factors, differences in plant cover, and variable surface conditions (Adis 1979). Because of these limitations, pitfall trap data give an incomplete picture of the carabid community and should be interpreted carefully. Additional methods, such as use of Berlese funnels and litter washing (Spence and Niemela 1994), collection from lights (Usis and MacLean 1998), and deployment of flight intercept devices (Liebherr and Mahar 1979; Paarmann and Stork 1987), should be incorporated in surveys to better ascertain the species composition and relative numbers of ground beetles. Flight intercept devices, like pitfall traps, have the advantage of being easy to use and replicate, but their value to carabid surveys is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate the effectiveness of Malaise traps for sampling ground beetles in a bottomland hardwood forest.

  5. Weed seed predation by granivorous carabids as influenced by carnivorous carabids

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    de Mol, Friederike

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Weed seed predation is influenced for both biological and abiotic factors. Knowledge about these factors is necessary to optimize seed predation as a biological weed control measure. Here, we asked whether carnivorous carabid beetles can affect the seed predation. Additionally, the effect of weather on seed predation rate was investigated. For this purpose, 12, 1m² enclosures were installed in a field (block design with four treatments and three replications in northeastern Germany over a period of 23 days. Treatments in the enclosures were 1 without carabids, 2 with a natural density and species composition of carabids, 3 with granivorous carabid beetles (Pseudoophonus rufipes, Harpulus affinis, and 4 as 3 but additionally with carnivorous carabids (Pterostichus melanarius, Poecilus cupreus Seed predation rate was determined daily using seed cards with Poa annua and Stellaria media seeds. Temperature, relative air humidity and daily precipitation were measured as covariables. In the treatment with granivorous carabids seed predation rate was 54.3 (P. annua resp. 14.3 (S. media seeds per enclosure and day. In the treatment with granivorous and carnivorous carabids, seed predation rate was significantly lower for P. annua (46.6 seeds per enclosure and day, paired Wilcoxon-Test, p = 0.04 and equally high for S. media (14.4 seeds per enclosure and day. In enclosures containing non-manipulated carabid densities 9.1 seeds of P. annua and 7.2 seeds of S. media were lost per enclosure and per day, which is significantly higher than from enclosures that were void of carabids. The minimum night temperature was the only weather variable that significantly influenced seed predation rate. This work contributes to a better understanding of the factors influencing seed predation rates in the field.

  6. Species radiation of carabid beetles (broscini: mecodema in new zealand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Goldberg

    Full Text Available New Zealand biodiversity has often been viewed as Gondwanan in origin and age, but it is increasingly apparent from molecular studies that diversification, and in many cases origination of lineages, postdate the break-up of Gondwanaland. Relatively few studies of New Zealand animal species radiations have as yet been reported, and here we consider the species-rich genus of carabid beetles, Mecodema. Constrained stratigraphic information (emergence of the Chatham Islands and a substitution rate for Coleoptera were separately used to calibrate Bayesian relaxed molecular clock date estimates for diversification of Mecodema. The inferred timings indicate radiation of these beetles no earlier than the mid-Miocene with most divergences being younger, dating to the Plio-Pleistocene. A shallow age for the radiation along with a complex spatial distribution of these taxa involving many instances of sympatry implicates recent ecological speciation rather than a simplistic allopatric model. This emphasises the youthful and dynamic nature of New Zealand evolution that will be further elucidated with detailed ecological and population genetic analyses.

  7. The response of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) to selection cutting in a South Carolina bottomland hardwood forest.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyshen, Michael, D.; Hanula, James L.; Horn, Scott; Kilgo, John, C.; Moorman, Christopher, E.

    2005-04-01

    We compared the response of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) to the creation of canopy gaps of different size (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha) and age (1 and 7 years) in a bottomland hardwood forest (South Carolina, USA). Samples were collected four times in 2001 by malaise and pitfall traps placed at the center and edge of each gap, and 50 m into the surrounding forest. Species richness was higher at the center of young gaps than in old gaps or in the forest, but there was no statistical difference in species richness between old gaps and the forests surrounding them. Carabid abundance followed the same trend, but only with the exclusion of Semiardistomis viridis (Say), a very abundant species that differed in its response to gap age compared to most other species. The carabid assemblage at the gap edge was very similar to that of the forest, and there appeared to be no distinct edge community. Species known to occur in open or disturbed habitats were more abundant at the center of young gaps than at any other location. Generalist species were relatively unaffected by the disturbance, but one species (Dicaelus dilatatus Say) was significantly less abundant at the centers of young gaps. Forest inhabiting species were less abundant at the centers of old gaps than in the forest, but not in the centers of young gaps. Comparison of community similarity at various trapping locations showed that communities at the centers of old and young gaps had the lowest similarity (46.5%). The community similarity between young gap centers and nearby forest (49.1%) and old gap centers and nearby forest (50.0%) was similarly low. These results show that while the abundance and richness of carabids in old gaps was similar to that of the surrounding forest, the species composition between the two sites differed greatly.

  8. Ground Beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidea) Community Structure as an Indication of Disturbance in Stoney Creek, Burnaby, BC

    OpenAIRE

    Romhanyi, Alia; Skidmore, Angie

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the impact of constructing an off-channel pond in Stoney Creek, Burnaby, BC to ground dwelling arthropods, carabid beetles were sampled at three sites: the pond site, the adjacent site, and the upstream site. The pond site was the area in which the artificial pond was constructed to create spawning habitat for salmon, and it was the most disturbed site. The other two sites were relatively undisturbed and were used as a comparison. Species observed in all sites were forest gener...

  9. Oil pipeline corridor through an intact forest alters ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in southeastern Ohio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Bareena; Horn, David J; Purrington, Foster F; Gandhi, Kamal J K

    2008-06-01

    Litter-dwelling ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages were monitored 1 yr after the construction of a corridor for installation of an oil pipeline along a xeric ridge-top forest in southeastern Ohio. After the creation of the corridor, three distinct habitats were evident in these sites: open corridor, ecotone areas around the corridor, and undisturbed forest interior. Carabidae were collected using directional pitfall traps that were placed parallel and perpendicular to the corridor in each of the three habitats. Results indicate that more carabids were present in the ecotone than in the other two habitats. Carabid diversity as estimated by rarefaction was highest in the corridor followed by ecotone and forest interior. Generalist and forest specialists such as Synuchus impunctatus (Say), Carabus goryi Dejean, and Pterostichus trinarius (Casey) were present in greater numbers in the forest interior and ecotone assemblages. In contrast, open-habitat specialists such as Harpalus pensylvanicus (DeGeer) and Selenophorus opalinus (LeConte) were present in greater numbers in the corridor assemblages. Carabid assemblages of the corridor were distinct from those of the ecotone and forest interior, whereas the latter two habitats had very similar assemblages. The successional pathway of the corridor carabid assemblage will therefore be likely different from that of the forest interior and ecotone. Overall, results indicate that construction of the oil pipeline corridor had significant short-term effects on the carabid numbers, diversity, and species composition because of ensuing habitat changes and fragmentation of the forest. PMID:18559178

  10. Edge effect on carabid assemblages along forest-grass transects

    OpenAIRE

    T. Magura; B. Tóthmérész; Molnár, T

    2001-01-01

    During 1997 and 1998, we have tested the edge-effect for carabids along oak-hornbeam forest-grass transects using pitfall traps in Hungary. Our hypothesis was that the diversity of carabids will be higher in the forest edge than in the forest interior. We also focused on the characteristic species of the habitats along the transects and the relationships between their distribution and the biotic and abiotic factors.

    Our results proved that there was a significant edge eff...

  11. Studies on the Dung-inhabiting Beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera Community of Western Anatolia, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinan Anlaş

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In Bozdağlar Mountain of western Turkey, the diversity and composition of the dung-inhabiting beetles in two locations situated in different altitudes (600 m and 900 m in 2004 and 2006 assemblages were sampled. A total of 5.709 individuals from 88 species belonging to the families Scarabaeidae, Aphodiidae, Geotrupidae, Carabidae, Hydrophilidae, Histeridae and Ptilidae of the order Coleoptera are recorded.

  12. CARABID BEATLES AS INDICATORS REFLECTING RIVERINE ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS IN DIFFERENT TYPES OF RIVER REGULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Kędzior

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to estimate factors responsible for sustaining riverine communities in stream sections with various bank regulation systems. The research were conducted on Porebianka stream in the Polish Western Carpathians, where 10 different types of river regulations were chosen for the analysis (strong incision without alluvial deposits, redeposition with sand and gravel banks, concrete revetment walls along the banks, channel with banks lined with rip-rap and reference unmanaged cross- section. We conclude that the carabid beetles assemblages of the studied river sections respond mainly to hydraulic parameters of the stream. Elimination of frequent natural bank inundation (due to the regulations of the banks is the main factor responsible for the impoverishment and extinction of riverine communities.

  13. Predaceous water beetles (Coleoptera, Hydradephaga) of the Lake St Lucia system, South Africa: biodiversity, community ecology and conservation implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Bird, Matthew S; Bilton, David T

    2016-01-01

    Water beetles are one of the dominant macroinvertebrate groups in inland waters and are excellent ecological indicators, reflecting both the diversity and composition of the wider aquatic community. The predaceous water beetles (Hydradephaga) make up around one-third of known aquatic Coleoptera and, as predators, are a key group in the functioning of many aquatic habitats. Despite being relatively well-known taxonomically, ecological studies of these insects in tropical and subtropical systems remain rare. A dedicated survey of the hydradephagan beetles of the Lake St Lucia wetlands (South Africa) was undertaken between 2013 and 2015, providing the first biodiversity census for this important aquatic group in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site within the Maputaland biodiversity hotspot. A total of 32 sites covering the entire spectrum of waterbody types were sampled over the course of three collecting trips. The Lake St Lucia wetlands support at least 68 species of Hydradephaga, a very high level of diversity comparing favourably with other hotspots on the African continent and elsewhere in the world and a number of taxa are reported for South Africa for the first time. This beetle assemblage is dominated by relatively widespread Afrotropical taxa, with few locally endemic species, supporting earlier observations that hotspots of species richness and centres of endemism are not always coincident. Although there was no significant difference in the number of species supported by the various waterbody types sampled, sites with the highest species richness were mostly temporary depression wetlands. This contrasts markedly with the distribution of other taxa in the same system, such as molluscs and dragonflies, which are most diverse in permanent waters. Our study is the first to highlight the importance of temporary depression wetlands and emphasises the need to maintain a variety of wetland habitats for aquatic conservation in this biodiverse

  14. Predaceous water beetles (Coleoptera, Hydradephaga) of the Lake St Lucia system, South Africa: biodiversity, community ecology and conservation implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perissinotto, Renzo; Bird, Matthew S.; Bilton, David T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Water beetles are one of the dominant macroinvertebrate groups in inland waters and are excellent ecological indicators, reflecting both the diversity and composition of the wider aquatic community. The predaceous water beetles (Hydradephaga) make up around one-third of known aquatic Coleoptera and, as predators, are a key group in the functioning of many aquatic habitats. Despite being relatively well-known taxonomically, ecological studies of these insects in tropical and subtropical systems remain rare. A dedicated survey of the hydradephagan beetles of the Lake St Lucia wetlands (South Africa) was undertaken between 2013 and 2015, providing the first biodiversity census for this important aquatic group in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site within the Maputaland biodiversity hotspot. A total of 32 sites covering the entire spectrum of waterbody types were sampled over the course of three collecting trips. The Lake St Lucia wetlands support at least 68 species of Hydradephaga, a very high level of diversity comparing favourably with other hotspots on the African continent and elsewhere in the world and a number of taxa are reported for South Africa for the first time. This beetle assemblage is dominated by relatively widespread Afrotropical taxa, with few locally endemic species, supporting earlier observations that hotspots of species richness and centres of endemism are not always coincident. Although there was no significant difference in the number of species supported by the various waterbody types sampled, sites with the highest species richness were mostly temporary depression wetlands. This contrasts markedly with the distribution of other taxa in the same system, such as molluscs and dragonflies, which are most diverse in permanent waters. Our study is the first to highlight the importance of temporary depression wetlands and emphasises the need to maintain a variety of wetland habitats for aquatic conservation in this

  15. Hypogean carabid beetles as indicators of global warming?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change has been shown to impact the geographical and altitudinal distribution of animals and plants, and to especially affect range-restricted polar and mountaintop species. However, little is known about the impact on the relict lineages of cave animals. Ground beetles (carabids) show a wide variety of evolutionary pathways, from soil-surface (epigean) predatory habits to life in caves and in other subterranean (hypogean) compartments. We reconstructed an unprecedented set of species/time accumulation curves of the largest carabid genera in Europe, selected by their degree of ‘underground’ adaptation, from true epigean predators to eyeless highly specialized hypogean beetles. The data show that in recent periods an unexpectedly large number of new cave species were found lying in well established European hotspots; the first peak of new species, especially in the most evolved underground taxa, occurred in the 1920–30s and a second burst after the 70s. Temperature data show large warming rates in both periods, suggesting that the temperature increase in the past century might have induced cave species to expand their habitats into large well-aired cavities and superficial underground compartments, where they can be easily sampled. An alternative hypothesis, based on increased sampling intensity, is less supported by available datasets. (letter)

  16. Hypogean carabid beetles as indicators of global warming?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmayr, Pietro; Giorgi, Filippo; Casale, Achille; Colombetta, Giorgio; Mariotti, Laura; Vigna Taglianti, Augusto; Weber, Friedrich; Pizzolotto, Roberto

    2013-12-01

    Climate change has been shown to impact the geographical and altitudinal distribution of animals and plants, and to especially affect range-restricted polar and mountaintop species. However, little is known about the impact on the relict lineages of cave animals. Ground beetles (carabids) show a wide variety of evolutionary pathways, from soil-surface (epigean) predatory habits to life in caves and in other subterranean (hypogean) compartments. We reconstructed an unprecedented set of species/time accumulation curves of the largest carabid genera in Europe, selected by their degree of ‘underground’ adaptation, from true epigean predators to eyeless highly specialized hypogean beetles. The data show that in recent periods an unexpectedly large number of new cave species were found lying in well established European hotspots; the first peak of new species, especially in the most evolved underground taxa, occurred in the 1920-30s and a second burst after the 70s. Temperature data show large warming rates in both periods, suggesting that the temperature increase in the past century might have induced cave species to expand their habitats into large well-aired cavities and superficial underground compartments, where they can be easily sampled. An alternative hypothesis, based on increased sampling intensity, is less supported by available datasets.

  17. Phylogeny of minute carabid beetles and their relatives based upon DNA sequence data (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechitae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Maddison

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The phylogeny of ground beetles of supertribe Trechitae is inferred using DNA sequences of genes that code for 28S ribosomal RNA, 18S ribosomal RNA, and wingless. Within the outgroups, austral psydrines are inferred to be monophyletic, and separate from the three genera of true Psydrina (Psydrus, Nomius, Laccocenus; the austral psydrines are formally removed from Psydrini and are treated herein as their own tribe, Moriomorphini Sloane. All three genes place Gehringia with Psydrina. Trechitae is inferred to be monophyletic, and sister to Patrobini.Within trechites, evidence is presented that Tasmanitachoides is not a tachyine, but is instead a member of Trechini. Perileptus is a member of subtribe Trechodina. Against Erwin’s hypothesis of anillines as a polyphyletic lineage derived from the tachyine genus Paratachys, the anillines sampled are monophyletic, and not related to Paratachys. Zolini, Pogonini, Tachyina, and Xystosomina are all monophyletic, with the latter two being sister groups. The relationships of the subtribe Bembidiina were studied in greater detail. Phrypeus is only distantly related to Bembidion, and there is no evidence from sequence data that it belongs within Bembidiina. Three groups that have been recently considered to be outside of the large genus Bembidion are shown to be derived members of Bembidion, related to subgroups: Cillenus is related to the Ocydromus complex of Bembidion, Zecillenus is related to the New Zealand subgenus Zeplataphus, and Hydrium is close to subgenus Metallina. The relationships among major lineages of Trechitae are not, however, resolved with these data.

  18. Coleoptera Associated with Decaying Wood in a Tropical Deciduous Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-López, N Z; Andrés-Hernández, A R; Carrillo-Ruiz, H; Rivas-Arancibia, S P

    2016-08-01

    Coleoptera is the largest and diverse group of organisms, but few studies are dedicated to determine the diversity and feeding guilds of saproxylic Coleoptera. We demonstrate the diversity, abundance, feeding guilds, and succession process of Coleoptera associated with decaying wood in a tropical deciduous forest in the Mixteca Poblana, Mexico. Decaying wood was sampled and classified into four stages of decay, and the associated Coleoptera. The wood was identified according to their anatomy. Diversity was estimated using the Simpson index, while abundance was estimated using a Kruskal-Wallis test; the association of Coleoptera with wood species and decay was assessed using canonical correspondence analysis. Decay wood stage I is the most abundant (51%), followed by stage III (21%). We collected 93 Coleoptera belonging to 14 families, 41 genera, and 44 species. The family Cerambycidae was the most abundant, with 29% of individuals, followed by Tenebrionidae with 27% and Carabidae with 13%. We recognized six feeding guilds. The greatest diversity of Coleoptera was recorded in decaying Acacia farnesiana and Bursera linanoe. Kruskal-Wallis analysis indicated that the abundance of Coleoptera varied according to the species and stage of decay of the wood. The canonical analysis showed that the species and stage of decay of wood determined the composition and community structure of Coleoptera. PMID:26911160

  19. Diversity and community structure of dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae across a habitat disturbance gradient in Lore Lindu National Park, Central Sulawesi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAHABUDDIN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Shahabuddin (2010 Diversity and community structure of dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae across habitat disturbance gradient in Lore Lindu National Park, Central Sulawesi. Biodiversitas 11: 29-33. Dung beetles are important component of most terrestrial ecosystems and used to assess the effects of habitat disturbance and deforestation. This study aimed at comparing dung beetle assemblages among several habitat types ranging from natural tropical forest and agroforestry systems to open cultivated areas at the margin of Lore Lindu National Park (LLNP, Central Sulawesi (one of Indonesia’s biodiversity hotspots. Therefore, 10 pitfall traps baited with cattle dung were exposed at each habitat type (n = 4 replicate sites per habitat type to collect the dung beetles. The results showed that species richness of dung beetles declined significantly from natural forest to open area. However cacao agroforestry systems seemed to be capable of maintaining a high portion of dung beetle species inhabiting at forest sites. The closer relationship between dung beetle assemblages recorded at forest and agroforestry sites reflects the high similarity of some measured habitat parameters (e.g. vegetation structure and microclimate between both habitat types, while species assemblages at open areas differed significantly from both other habitat groups. These results indicated that habitat type has importance effect on determining the species richness and community structure of dung beetles at the margin of LLNP.

  20. Effects of Timing of Grazing on Arthropod Communities in Semi-Natural Grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Lenoir, Lisette; Lennartsson, Tommy

    2010-01-01

    Arthropod communities were investigated in two Swedish semi-natural grasslands, each subject to two types of grazing regime: conventional grazing from May to September (continuous grazing) and traditional late management from mid-July (late grazing). Pitfall traps were used to investigate abundance of carabids, spiders, and ants over the grazing season. Ant abundance was also measured by mapping nest density during three successive years. Small spiders, carabids and ants (Myrmica spp.) were m...

  1. Elevated copper levels during larval development cause altered locomotor behavior in the adult carabid beetle Pterostichus cupreus L. (Coleoptera: Carbidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayley, M; Baatrup, E; Heimbach, U;

    1995-01-01

    effect the emergence weights of adults of either sex. This toxic effect on the larvae was preserved through pupation to the surviving adults, which were normal in size and appearance, but displayed a dramatically depressed locomotor behavior. Copper analysis of these adults revealed that copper levels...

  2. Microbial Community Structure in Midgut and Hindgut of the Humus-Feeding Larva of Pachnoda ephippiata (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Egert, Markus; Wagner, Bianca; Lemke, Thorsten; Brune, Andreas; Friedrich, Michael W.

    2003-01-01

    The guts of soil-feeding macroinvertebrates contain a complex microbial community that is involved in the transformation of ingested soil organic matter. In a companion paper (T. Lemke, U. Stingl, M. Egert, M. W. Friedrich, and A. Brune, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:6650-6658, 2003), we show that the gut of our model organism, the humivorous larva of the cetoniid beetle Pachnoda ephippiata, is characterized by strong midgut alkalinity, high concentrations of microbial fermentation products, a...

  3. Acetylcholinesterase inhibition and altered locomotor behavior in the carabid beetle pterostichus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Charlotte S.; Krause-Jensen, Lone; Baatrup, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The establishment of cause–effect relationships is fundamental for the interpretation and the predictive value of biomarker responses measured at all levels of biological complexity. In the present study, the biochemical exposure biomarker acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition was related to...... locomotor behavior, representing a general effect biomarker at the organismal level. Both sexes of the carabid beetle Pterostichus cupreus were intoxicated with three doses of the organophosphorous insecticide dimethoate. Five elements of their locomotor behavior were measured for 4 h employing computer......-aided video tracking, whereupon the whole body AChE activity was measured in the individual beetle. AChE inhibition was strongly correlated with dimethoate dose in both sexes. Alterations in the locomotor behavior were directly correlated with AChE inhibition in male beetles, which responded by reducing the...

  4. Even the smallest non-crop habitat islands could be beneficial: distribution of carabid beetles and spiders in agricultural landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Knapp

    Full Text Available Carabid beetles and ground-dwelling spiders inhabiting agroecosystems are beneficial organisms with a potential to control pest species. Intensification of agricultural management and reduction of areas covered by non-crop vegetation during recent decades in some areas has led to many potentially serious environmental problems including a decline in the diversity and abundance of beneficial arthropods in agricultural landscapes. This study investigated carabid beetle and spider assemblages in non-crop habitat islands of various sizes (50 to 18,000 square metres within one large field, as well as the arable land within the field, using pitfall traps in two consecutive sampling periods (spring to early summer and peak summer. The non-crop habitat islands situated inside arable land hosted many unique ground-dwelling arthropod species that were not present within the surrounding arable land. Even the smallest non-crop habitat islands with areas of tens of square metres were inhabited by assemblages substantially different from these inhabiting arable land and thus enhanced the biodiversity of agricultural landscapes. The non-crop habitat area substantially affected the activity density, recorded species richness and recorded species composition of carabid and ground-dwelling spider assemblages; however, the effects were weakened when species specialised to non-crop habitats species were analysed separately. Interestingly, recorded species richness of spiders increased with non-crop habitat area, whereas recorded species richness of carabid beetles exhibited an opposite trend. There was substantial temporal variation in the spatial distribution of ground-dwelling arthropods, and contrasting patterns were observed for particular taxa (carabid beetles and spiders. In general, local environmental conditions (i.e., non-crop habitat island tree cover, shrub cover, grass cover and litter depth were better determinants of arthropod assemblages than non

  5. Even the smallest non-crop habitat islands could be beneficial: distribution of carabid beetles and spiders in agricultural landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michal; Řezáč, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Carabid beetles and ground-dwelling spiders inhabiting agroecosystems are beneficial organisms with a potential to control pest species. Intensification of agricultural management and reduction of areas covered by non-crop vegetation during recent decades in some areas has led to many potentially serious environmental problems including a decline in the diversity and abundance of beneficial arthropods in agricultural landscapes. This study investigated carabid beetle and spider assemblages in non-crop habitat islands of various sizes (50 to 18,000 square metres) within one large field, as well as the arable land within the field, using pitfall traps in two consecutive sampling periods (spring to early summer and peak summer). The non-crop habitat islands situated inside arable land hosted many unique ground-dwelling arthropod species that were not present within the surrounding arable land. Even the smallest non-crop habitat islands with areas of tens of square metres were inhabited by assemblages substantially different from these inhabiting arable land and thus enhanced the biodiversity of agricultural landscapes. The non-crop habitat area substantially affected the activity density, recorded species richness and recorded species composition of carabid and ground-dwelling spider assemblages; however, the effects were weakened when species specialised to non-crop habitats species were analysed separately. Interestingly, recorded species richness of spiders increased with non-crop habitat area, whereas recorded species richness of carabid beetles exhibited an opposite trend. There was substantial temporal variation in the spatial distribution of ground-dwelling arthropods, and contrasting patterns were observed for particular taxa (carabid beetles and spiders). In general, local environmental conditions (i.e., non-crop habitat island tree cover, shrub cover, grass cover and litter depth) were better determinants of arthropod assemblages than non-crop habitat island

  6. Quantitative genetic analysis of subspecific differences in body shape in the snail-feeding carabid beetle Damaster blaptoides

    OpenAIRE

    Konuma, J; Sota, T; Chiba, S.

    2012-01-01

    A dimorphic pattern of macrocephalic (wide, short) and stenocephalic (narrow, long) body shapes is observed in snail-feeding carabid beetles globally. The former exhibits high performance in crushing snail shells with powerful jaws, whereas the latter specializes in eating snails' soft body directly by inserting the head into the shell. In the snail-feeding species Damaster blaptoides, the subspecies D. b. capito has a wide, short forebody, and D. b. fortunei has a narrow, long forebody. They...

  7. Adult Diapause in Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo Hodek

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies dealing with adult (reproductive diapause in the Coleoptera are reviewed, as a kind of supplement to the classic compendia. In the first two sections, the general characteristics of adult diapause are described and principal terms explained. Original articles dealing with 19 species from nine coleopteran families (Coccinellidae, Chrysomelidae, Bruchidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae, Silphidae, Scolytidae, Scarabaeidae, and Endomychidae are reviewed. Finally attempts are made at generalisations from the papers reviewed, and hypotheses on diapause evolution are inferred. A polyphenic character of diapause is a prominent feature in C. septempunctata and L. decemlineata, but has been found also in other Coleoptera and in insects generally and often generates voltinism heterogeneity within populations.

  8. Comunidad de escarabajos copronecrófagos (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae en dos bosques del Chaco Oriental Húmedo, Argentina Copro-necrophagous beetle community (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae in two forests from Eastern Humid Chaco, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miryam P. Damborsky

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se investigó y comparó la estructura de la comunidad de Scarabaeinae en dos ambientes con distinto grado de conservación. Se efectuaron muestreos en un bosque nativo del Parque Provincial Pampa del Indio y en un fragmento de bosque del establecimiento ganadero Los Alisos. Los ejemplares se capturaron con coprotrampas y necrotrampas que permanecieron activas durante 72 horas, en los meses de octubre, noviembre y diciembre de 2006. Se colectaron 769 individuos adultos pertenecientes a seis tribus, 11 géneros y 26 especies. En Los Alisos Ontherus sulcatus Fabricius y Onthophagus hirculus Mannerheim resultaron dominantes. Trichillum sp., Canthon podagricus Harold, Malagoniella sp., Gromphas lacordairei Brullé, y dos especies de Dichotomius Hope fueron exclusivas de este establecimiento. Canthon septemmaculatus Latreille y Coprophanaeus jasius Olivier sólo se colectaron en Pampa del Indio. El número de individuos y la diversidad alcanzaron valores significativamente superiores en Pampa del Indio. En Los Alisos, se constató igual proporción de coprófagos y necrófagos, y una mayoría de especies con hábitos endocópridos y paracópridos. En Pampa del Indio, se encontraron más especies de hábitos necrófagos y rodadores. La presente contribución constituye el primer estudio sobre la biodiversidad de Scarabaeinae en el ambiente de bosque de la provincia del Chaco.Scarabaeinae community structure was compared in two habitats with different degrees of conservation: a native forest at Pampa del Indio Provincial Park, and a forest fragment at Los Alisos cattle farm. Pitfall traps baited with carrion and cattle dung were left open for 72-hour periods in October, November and December 2006. 769 adults belonging to six tribes, 11 genera and 26 species were captured in all. At Los Alisos, Ontherus sulcatus Fabricius and Onthophagus hirculus Mannerheim were the dominant species. Trichillum sp., Canthon podagricus Harold, Malagoniella sp., Gromphas

  9. Comunidade de escarabeíneos (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae copro-necrófagos da região de Brejo Novo, Caruaru, Pernambuco, Brasil Copro-necrophagous scarab community (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae of the Brejo Novo region, Caruaru, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Augusto Barbosa Silva

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo objetivou levantar preliminarmente os escarabeíneos copro-necrófagos da região de Brejo Novo, Caruaru, Pernambuco, e verificar aspectos da estrutura da comunidade como sazonalidade, diversidade, equitabilidade, riqueza e abundância das espécies. Foram realizadas 10 coletas, com intervalos de 30 dias e duração de 48 horas, de setembro de 2003 a julho de 2004. Utilizaramse 24 armadilhas de queda, com dois tipos de isca, fezes humanas e carne bovina em estado de putrefação. Foram coletados 1.540 indivíduos pertencentes a seis tribos, 12 gêneros e 28 espécies. As espécies Canthon af. carbonarius, Canthon chalybaeus, Dichotomius nisus, D. semisquamosus, Digitonthophagus gazella e Eurysternus hirtellus aparentemente são as mais adaptadas ao ambiente estudado. Foram coletados 826 indivíduos em armadilhas iscadas com fezes humanas e 714 em carne bovina apodrecida. Ocorreu um número maior de espécies consideradas "raras" (15, sendo três destas "singletons", duas "doubletons" e 10 com abundância entre três e 10 indivíduos, 13 espécies foram consideradas "comuns". Das espécies analisadas, sete apresentaram hábitos alimentares generalistas, quatro são estritamente coprófagas e uma estritamente necrófaga. Foram verificadas correlações positivas entre a precipitação mensal e a abundância e a riqueza de espécies. O levantamento preliminar das espécies de Scarabaeinae da região de Brejo Novo contribuiu para aumentar o número de espécies registradas para o estado de Pernambuco e região Nordeste do Brasil.This paper reports the results of the preliminary survey of copro-necrophagous dung beetles of Brejo Novo region, Caruaru, Pernambuco, as well as some aspects of the community structure such as seasonality, diversity, equitability, richness and abundance of species. Ten samplings with intervals of 30 days and duration of 48 hours, fortnightly were done between September 2003 to July 2004. Scarab beetles were

  10. Un nuevo Trechus (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechini hipogeo de la Sierra de Parapanda (Andalucía, España: taxonomía, sistemática y biología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ortuño, V. M.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new hypogean Trechus (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Trechini from Sierra de Parapanda (Andalucía, España: taxonomy, systematics and biology Sampling of arthropod fauna by pitfall traps in the cavern ‘Sima de San Rafael’ in Íllora (Granada, Spain has revealed a new carabid beetle species, Trechus parapandus n. sp., with remarkable troglobiomorphic characteristics: eyes visible only as scars, depigmentation, and elongation of antennae and legs. In consonance with these characteristics, this new species, Trechus parapandus n. sp. is absent in the upper region of the cave. The species belongs to the Trechus fulvus species group (that has five species in Andalusia according to the characteristics of both male and female genitalia. Study of the fauna in the cave suggests that Collembola might be the prey of this new species since they are the most abundant group and have a coincidental phenology. A key for the 11 Trechus species present in Andalusia is provided.

  11. [Population dynamics of ground carabid beetles and spiders in a wheat field along the wheat-alfalfa interface and their response to alfalfa mowing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Hui; Hu, Yi-Jun; Hu, Wen-Chao; Hong, Bo; Guan, Xiao-Qing; Ma, Shi-Yu; He, Da-Han

    2014-09-01

    Taking the wheat-alfalfa and wheat-wheat interfaces as model systems, sampling points were set by the method of pitfall trapping in the wheat field at the distances of 3 m, 6 m, 9 m, 12 m, 15 m, 18 m, 21 m, 24 m, and 27 m from the interface. The species composition and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders captured in pitfalls were investigated. The results showed that, to some extent there was an edge effect on species diversity and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders along the two interfaces. A marked edge effect was observed between 15 m and 18 m along the alfalfa-wheat interface, while no edge effect was found at a distance over 20 m. The edge effect along the wheat-wheat interface was weaker in comparison to the alfalfa-wheat interface. Alfalfa mowing resulted in the migration of a large number of ground carabid beetles and spiders to the adjacent wheat filed. During ten days since mowing, both species and abundance of ground carabid beetles and spiders increased in wheat filed within the distance of 20 m along the alfalfa-wheat interface. The spatial distribution of species diversity of ground beetles and spiders, together with the population abundance of the dominant Chlaenius pallipes and Pardosa astrigera, were depicted, which could directly indicate the migrating process of natural enemy from alfalfa to wheat field. PMID:25757322

  12. Changes in salt-marsh carabid assemblages after an invasion by the native grass Elymus athericus (Link Kerguélen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Georges

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available As a result of an invasion by the native grass Elymus athericus (Link Kerguélen (Poaceae in the last 10 years, a major change in vegetation cover has occurred in salt marshes of the Mont Saint-Michel bay, Western France. The impact of such an invasion on carabid assemblages, a dominant group of terrestrial arthropods in these habitats and containing several stenotopic species, is investigated here. In our study site, carabid data are available from 1983 and 1984, allowing a comparison of species distribution ranges in salt marshes before (1983–1984 and after (2002 the E. athericus invasion. A total of 16,867 adults belonging to 40 species were caught. By considering the presence-absence of species shared between studies, we show that the invasion by E. athericus promoted the progression of non-coastal species (mainly Pterostichus s.l. spp.. This did however not interfere with resident species distributions, finally resulting in higher carabid species richness in the entire area. The species composition and abundances of carabid assemblages were also compared between natural and invaded stations in 2002. The main result is that abundances of some halophilic species decreased in one invaded plot (in case of Pogonus chalceus (Marsham 1802 whereas the opposite pattern was observed for other species (e.g., Bembidion minimum (Fabricius 1792. Invaded habitats were characterized by lower percentages of halophilic species and higher total species richness.

  13. Spatial distribution of ground beetles (Coleoptera : Carabidae) and moths (Lepidoptera) in the Mrtvy luh bog, Sumava Mts (Central Europe): A test of habitat island community

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezděk, Aleš; Jaroš, Josef; Spitzer, Karel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2006), s. 395-409. ISSN 0960-3115 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA600070501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Carabidae * central Europe * community ecology Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.423, year: 2006

  14. Ensamble peridomiciliario de carábidos (Coleoptera: Carabidae en un talar del sudeste bonaerense, Argentina Peridomestic ground beetle assemblage (Coleoptera: Carabidae in a Celtis tala forest from southeastern Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela V. Castro

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Nuestro objetivo fue conocer la diversidad de carábidos en un área peridomiciliaria del talar de Laguna Nahuel Rucá, Mar Chiquita. Realizamos un inventario de las especies, comparamos la variación estacional en la diversidad alfa acumulada, la estructura del ensamble y los grupos funcionales. En el año de muestreo (marzo 2008-marzo 2009, capturamos 2.588 individuos distribuidos en 63 especies, que representaron el 84-93% de la riqueza estimada. La riqueza específica fue mayor en primavera y verano, en relación a otoño e invierno (pOur purpose was to perform a research on the peridomestic carabid diversity in a Celtis tala Guillies ex Planch forest, at Laguna Nahuel Rucá, Mar Chiquita district. A species inventory and the comparison of the seasonal variation of cumulative species richness, as well as community structure and functional groups were carried out. During one year (March 2008-March 2009, 2588 carabids belonging to 63 species were collected, representing the 84%-93% of the estimated richness. Cumulative species richness during spring and summer was higher than in autumn and winter (p<0.05. Two species, Argutoridius bonariensis (Dejean and Pachymorphus striatulus (Fabricius, represented a total of 47% of captures and were dominant in all seasons. Concerning trophic guilds, zoophagous represented more than 50% of the assemblage in all seasons, while phytophagous and omnivorous remained at low percentages in autumn-winter (<10%; the former reached a peak in spring (20%, and the latter in summer (34%. Regarding humidity affinities, mesophilous species conformed more than 70% of the assemblage and hygrophilous and xerophilous reached less than 20%. We discuss the probable causes of such higher carabid diversity wandering through the talar stand and their simplified surroundings, as well as the influence that these factors exert on composition and structure of the ground beetle assemblage.

  15. Diversity and community structure of dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae associated with semi-urban fragmented agricultural land in the Malabar coast in southern India

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    K.S. Venugopal

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available An evaluation of the diversity and community structure of dung beetles associated with semiurban agricultural land in the Malabar coast of southern India revealed that urbanization has led to decreased diversity compared to regional forests, and has affected the community status of dung beetles. However, contrary to expectations, species richness was observed to be equivalent to rural agricultural fields in the region. Low abundance of prominent agricultural habitat species indicates that the study area has changed as a result of habitat modification/urbanization, and the prevailing conditions are not ideal for the establishment of the most common species in agriculture belts. Prominence of two less common species, Tiniocellus spinipes and Caccobius vulcanus, indicates these generalist urban adaptable (synanthropic species have become increasingly widespread and locally abundant. The low abundance of tunnelers and rollers is attributed to fragmentation of the urban agricultural belt, low mammalian diversity and dung availability, and the hard nature of the laterite soil in the Malabar coast region.

  16. Effects of timing of grazing on arthropod communities in semi-natural grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenoir, Lisette; Lennartsson, Tommy

    2010-01-01

    Arthropod communities were investigated in two Swedish semi-natural grasslands, each subject to two types of grazing regime: conventional grazing from May to September (continuous grazing) and traditional late management from mid-July (late grazing). Pitfall traps were used to investigate abundance of carabids, spiders, and ants over the grazing season. Ant abundance was also measured by mapping nest density during three successive years. Small spiders, carabids and ants (Myrmica spp.) were more abundant in continuous grazing than in late grazing while larger spiders, carabids, and ants (Formica spp.) were more abundant in late grazing. The overall abundance of carabids was higher in continuous grazing in the early summer but higher in late grazing in the late summer. The switch of preference from continuous to late grazing coincided with the time for larvae hibernating species replacing adult hibernating. We discuss possible explanations for the observed responses in terms of effects of grazing season on a number of habitat variables for example temperature, food resources, structure of vegetation, litter layer, competition, and disturbance. PMID:20569138

  17. Useful model organisms, indicators, or both? Ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae reflecting environmental conditions

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    Matti Koivula

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Classic studies have successfully linked single-species abundances, life-history traits, assemblage structures and biomass of carabid beetles to past and present, human-caused environmental impacts and variation in ‘natural’ conditions. This evidence has led many to suggest carabids to function as ‘indicators’ − a term that bears multiple meanings. Here, a conservation-oriented definition for an indicator is used, carabid indicator potential from seven views is evaluated, and ways to proceed in indicator research are discussed. (1 Carabid species richness poorly indicates the richness and abundance of other taxa, which underlines the importance of using multiple taxa in environmental assessments. The ability of assemblage indices and specialist or functional-group abundances to reflect rare species and habitats should be examined in detail. (2 Experimental evidence suggests that carabids may potentially serve as keystone indicators. (3 Carabids are sensitive to human-altered abiotic conditions, such as pesticide use in agro-ecosystems and heavy metal contamination of soils. Carabids might thus reflect ecological sustainability and ‘ecosystem health’. (4 Carabid assemblages host abundant species characteristic of particular habitat types or successional stages, which makes them promising dominance indicators. (5 Carabids reflect variation in ‘natural’ conditions, but vegetation and structural features are more commonly adopted as condition indicators. Carabids nevertheless provide yet another, equally accurate, view on the structure of the environment. (6 Carabids may function as early-warning signalers, as suggested by recent studies linking climate and carabid distributions. (7 Carabids reflect natural and human-caused disturbances and management, but the usefulness of these responses for conservation purposes requires further research. In summary, European carabids appear useful model organisms and possibly indicators because

  18. Forty years of carabid beetle research in Europe – from taxonomy, biology, ecology and population studies to bioindication, habitat assessment and conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Johan Kotze

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Carabidologists do it all’ (Niemelä 1996a is a phrase with which most European carabidologists are familiar. Indeed, during the last half a century, professional and amateur entomologists have contributed enormously to our understanding of the basic biology of carabid beetles. The success of the field is in no small part due to regular European Carabidologists’ Meetings, which started in 1969 in Wijster, the Netherlands, with the 14th meeting again held in the Netherlands in 2009, celebrating the 40th anniversary of the first meeting and 50 years of long-term research in the Dwingelderveld. This paper offers a subjective summary of some of the major developments in carabidology since the 1960s. Taxonomy of the family Carabidae is now reasonably established, and the application of modern taxonomic tools has brought up several surprises like elsewhere in the animal kingdom. Progress has been made on the ultimate and proximate factors of seasonality and timing of reproduction, which only exceptionally show non-seasonality. Triggers can be linked to evolutionary events and plausibly explained by the “taxon cycle” theory. Fairly little is still known about certain feeding preferences, including granivory and ants, as well as unique life history strategies, such as ectoparasitism and predation on higher taxa. The study of carabids has been instrumental in developing metapopulation theory (even if it was termed differently. Dispersal is one of the areas intensively studied, and results show an intricate interaction between walking and flying as the major mechanisms. The ecological study of carabids is still hampered by some unresolved questions about sampling and data evaluation. It is recognised that knowledge is uneven, especially concerning larvae and species in tropical areas. By their abundance and wide distribution, carabid beetles can be useful in population studies, bioindication, conservation biology and landscape ecology. Indeed

  19. Terrestrial model food chain and environmental chemicals. I. Transfer of sodium [14C]pentachlorophenate between springtails and carabids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model soil food chain of a ruderal ecosystem has been constructed in order to study the uptake, transfer, and accumulation of [14C]pentachlorophenate (PCP-Na). The model was based on three food levels, viz. baker's yeast, collembola, and carabid beetles, and the contaminant chemical introduced was via initial food. Continuous exposure of the organisms to the test chemical resulted in a significant uptake and transfer of radiocarbon into the food chain elements. Bioaccumulation of radiocarbon in the body tissues of the organisms was low, as large amounts taken up were quickly eliminated through the excrements. The radiocarbon level of prey animals was about 100 times higher than that of their predators, but there was only small difference in concentration between collembolas and yeast. This was probably because of a faster excretion of the chemical by the beetles than by the collembolas. During the test period no conversion of [14C]PCP-Na took place in the yeast, but the collembolas and beetles metabolized 50 and 59%, respectively. Criteria are proposed for successful implementation of food chain models

  20. Expression of the Bacillus thuringiensis toxin from maize does not affect epigeic communities of carabid beetles and spiders

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Spitzer, L.; Růžička, Vlastimil; Hussein, Hany; Habuštová, Oxana; Sehnal, František

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2004), s. 110-112. ISSN 1335-258X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB6007304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5007907 Keywords : GMO * Bt maize * agroecosystems Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  1. Tanyproctini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) of Socotra Island

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Král, D.; Sehnal, R.; Bezděk, Aleš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 52, suppl. 2 (2012), s. 153-182. ISSN 0374-1036 Grant ostatní: Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports (CZ) LA10036/MSMT Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera * Scarabaeidae * Melolonthinae Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 0.963, year: 2012 http://www.aemnp.eu/PDF/52_s2/52_S2_153.pdf

  2. Egg laying site preferences in Pterostichus melanarius Illiger (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Trefas, H.; Lenteren, van, J.C.

    2004-01-01

    In the case of ground beetles, the number of studies investigating the effects plant-related structure and microclimate on the selection of egg laying sites is very limited. The egg laying site preference of Pterostichus melanarius, an important carabid beetle in agricultural fields, was studied under laboratory conditions. The effects of wet/dry substrate, light/shadow and structured/unstructured environment on the number of eggs laid were investigated, as well as the influence of the presen...

  3. Host plant preference in Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field and laboratory-choice tests were conducted to better understand host plant preference by the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), in Virginia. In laboratory olfactometer studies, L. decemlineata preferred potato over both tomato and eggplant foli...

  4. Spatial distribution of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and moths (Lepidoptera) in the Mrtvý luh bog, Šumava Mts (Central Europe): a test of habitat islands community

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bezděk, Aleš; Jaroš, Josef; Spitzer, Karel

    Dordrecht : Springer, 2006 - (Hawksworth, D.; Bull, A.), s. 381-395 ISBN 1-4020-5203-0 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600070501 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : Carabidae * Central Europe * community ecology Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  5. Carabidae diversity along an altitudinal gradient in a Peruvian cloud forest (Coleoptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah Maveety; Robert Browne; Terry Erwin

    2011-01-01

    Carabid beetles were sampled at five sites, ranging from 1500 m to 3400 m, along a 15 km transect in the cloud forest of Manu National Park, Perú. Seasonal collections during a one year period yielded 77 morphospecies, of which 60% are projected to be undescribed species. There was a significant negative correlation between species richness and altitude, with the number of carabid species declining at the rate of one species for each 100 m increase in altitude. The majority of species ...

  6. What do we know about winter active ground beetles (Coleoptera, Carabidae in Central and Northern Europe?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radomir Jaskula

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the current knowledge on winter active Carabidae in Central and Northern Europe. In total 73 winter active species are listed, based on literature and own observations. Ground beetles are among the three most numerous Coleoptera families active during the autumn to spring period. The winter community of Carabidae is composed both of larvae (mainly autumn breeding species and adults, as well as of epigeic species and those inhabiting tree trunks. Supranivean fauna is characterized by lower species diversity than the subnivean fauna. The activity of ground beetles decreases in late autumn, is lowest during mid-winter and increases in early spring. Carabidae are noted as an important food source in the diet of insectivorous mammals. They are also predators, hunting small winter active invertebrates.

  7. Molecular markers detect cryptic predation on coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by silvanid and laemophloeid flat bark beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei(Coleoptera: Curculionidae)(Ferrari), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and has been recently introduced in Hawai’i, first detected in the state in 2010. Adult silvanid flat bark beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and adult laemoph...

  8. Changing distributions of Cantharidae and Buprestidae within Great Britain (Coleoptera)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, K.

    2003-01-01

    Changing distributions of Cantharidae and Buprestidae within Great Britain (Coleoptera) Data are presented on the distribution of selected species from two coleopteran families chosen to represent a random slice of the British fauna. The species have been chosen as exhibiting extremes of range chang

  9. Noteworthy records of Hispines from Belize (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Naczi, Robert F. C.; Charles L. Staines

    2011-01-01

    Cephaloleia consanguinea Baly, Cephaloleia fulvolimbata Baly, Cephaloleia ruficollis Baly, Chalepus amabilis Baly, Chalepus brevicornis (Baly), Chalepus pici Descarpentries and Villiers, Microrhopala erebus (Newman), Octhispa bimaculata Uhmann, Octotoma championi Baly, Pseudispa tuberculata Staines, Sceloenopla erudita (Baly), Stenispa guatemalensis Uhmann, Sumitrosis gestroi (Weise), and Sumitrosis terminatus (Baly) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae) are new country records of hispine c...

  10. A coffee berry borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae) bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    One hundred years ago, one of the most significant biological invasions of an agricultural insect pest in the Americas was initiated. Endemic to Africa, the coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was accidentally introduced to Brazil in 1913 and years later invaded coffe...

  11. The Peritelini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Entiminae of the Vitale collection

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    Cosimo Baviera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The collection of Peritelini (Coleoptera Curculionidae Entiminae currently stored in the Vitale collection of Messina University is an element of great importance for studies of taxonomy and biogeography of these rarely collected weevils. All species are commented in relation to the contributions to this taxonomic group, published on several occasions by the authors.

  12. Predation by Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae and Laemophloeidae) on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Hawaii coffee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffee berry borer(CBB), Hypothenemus hampei, is a serious pest of coffee worldwide and a new invasive pest in Hawaii. Adult flat bark beetles, mainly Leptophloeus sp.(75%) and Cathartus quadricollis(21%) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae and Silvanidae, respectively), were found feeding in CBB-infested c...

  13. Het voorkomen van de glanskevers van het genus Caprophilus in Nederland (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude, de J.

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of nitidulid beetles of the genus Carpophilus in the Netherlands (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) Some species of the genus Carpophilus (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) may act as pests of stored products like cocoabeans, peanuts, dried fruits like figs and dates, imported from tropical or subtropi

  14. Pitfall Traps and Mini-Winkler Extractor as Complementary Methods to Sample Soil Coleoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, A C; Batistella, D A; Battirola, L D; Marques, M I

    2016-02-01

    We compared abundance, species richness, and capture efficiency with pitfall traps and mini-Winkler extractors to examine their use as complementary methods for sampling soil Coleoptera during dry (2010) and high water seasons (2011) in three areas, including inundated and non-inundated regions, in the Pantanal of Poconé, Mato Grosso, Brazil. We paired treatments with two 10 × 10 m plots in inundated and non-inundated locations that were repeated three times in each location for a total of 18 plots. In each plot, we used nine pitfall traps and collected 2 m(2) of leaf litter and surface soil samples with mini-Winkler extractors. We collected a total of 4260 adult beetles comprising 36 families, 113 genera, and 505 species. Most were caught in pitfalls (69%) and the remainder in the mini-Winkler extractors (31%). Each method provided distinct information about the beetle community: 252 species were captured only in pitfall traps, 147 using only the mini-Winkler extractors, and these methods shared another 106 species. Pitfall and mini-Winkler contribute in different ways for the sampling of the soil beetle community, and so they should be considered complementary for a more thorough assessment of community diversity. PMID:26493175

  15. Carabidae diversity along an altitudinal gradient in a Peruvian cloud forest (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Maveety

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Carabid beetles were sampled at five sites, ranging from 1500 m to 3400 m, along a 15 km transect in the cloud forest of Manu National Park, Perú. Seasonal collections during a one year period yielded 77 morphospecies, of which 60% are projected to be undescribed species. There was a significant negative correlation between species richness and altitude, with the number of carabid species declining at the rate of one species for each 100 m increase in altitude. The majority of species (70.1 % were restricted to only one altitudinal site and no species was found at more than three of the five altitudinal sites. Only one genus, Pelmatellus (Tribe Harpalini, was found at all five sites. Active (hand collections yielded approximately twice as many species per individuals collected than passive (pitfall trap collections. This study is the first systematic sampling of carabid beetles of a high altitude gradient in the cloud forests of southeastern Perú and supports the need to conserve the zone of extremely high biodiversity present on the eastern slopes of the Peruvian Andes.

  16. Large carrion beetles (Coleoptera, Silphidae) in Western Europe: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Dekeirsschieter, Jessica; Verheggen, François; Lognay, Georges; Haubruge, Eric

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on carrion beetles (Coleoptera, Silphidae) of the Western Palearctic and their potential use in forensic entomology as bioindicators. Few studies have looked at Silphidae in forensic context and investigations. However, some Silphidae present the desirable characteristics of some Diptera used in postmortem estimates and thus may extend the minimum postmortem interval (PMImin). We review here the taxonomy and distribution of Western Palearctic Silphidae. The anatomical and...

  17. Large carrion beetles (Coleoptera, Silphidae) in Western Europe: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Dekeirsschieter, J.; Verheggen, F.; Lognay, G.; Haubruge, E.

    2011-01-01

    This review focuses on carrion beetles (Coleoptera, Silphidae) of the Western Palearctic and their potential use in forensic entomology as bioindicators. Few studies have looked at Silphidae in forensic context and investigations. However, some Silphidae present the desirable characteristics of some Diptera used in postmortem estimates and thus may extend the minimum postmortem interval (PMImin). We review here the taxonomy and distribution of Western Palearctic Silphidae. The anatomical and ...

  18. Nocturnal Migration of Coleoptera: Carabidae in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Vertical-looking radar (VLR) has allowed long-term automatic monitoring of the altitudinal and temporal dynamics of high-flying insect populations. To investigate whether ground beetle, insect of Coleoptera, was capable of migrating and its migration pattern by taking advantages of capability of the VLR for long-term real-time automatic monitoring, the migration of Coleoptera ground beetle was investigated by setting up radar observation points, making long-term observation using the VLR and related supplementary equipment, and analyzing low altitude air current and large area circulating current in combination with the meteorological data. Information obtained in 2005 and 2006 showed that the seasonal activities of ground beetles traps of trap lamps were mainly from late June to late August, peak period was mainly in August, seasonal traps of high-altitude lamps and ground lamps were featured by sudden increase and sudden decrease; in peak period, the height of radar echo point could be as high as 600 m, while it was mainly below the height of 450 m; night activities mainly occurred from 20:00 to 22:00, in very few nights, radar echo could last until about 04:00, changes in numbers of ground beetles within the searchlights were consistent with radar echo intensity; ground beetle images were successfully trapped in the sweep nets carried by captive balloons at the height of 200 m. Some species of Carabidaes had some degrees of migration, thus providing the foundation for investigating the migration of Coleoptera insects.

  19. Estados inmaduros de Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini Immature stages of Ancognatha ustulata (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhon César Neita-Moreno

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se describen y se ilustran por primera vez la larva de tercer estadio y la pupa de Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini. Se aportan datos sobre la biología de la especie y su distribución en Colombia. Se proporciona una clave para la identificación de las larvas de tercer estadio conocidas de las especies del género Ancognatha Erichson.The third instar larva and pupa of Ancognatha ustulata Burmeister, 1847 (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae: Dynastinae: Cyclocephalini are described and illustrated for the first time. New data on larval biology and distribution of the species in Colombia are included. A key to the known third stage larvae of Ancognatha Erichson is provided.

  20. Body size distribution in ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) as a possible monitoring method of environmental impacts of transgenic maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grumo, Davide di; Lövei, Gabor L.

    2015-01-01

    informative Lorenz asymmetry coefficients. A total of 6339 carabids belonging to 38 species were captured and indentified. The analysis detected a shift in size distribution between months but no important differences in the assemblages in Bt vs. non-Bt maize plots were found. We concluded that an increasing...

  1. Displacement of Tetropium cinnamopterum (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) by Its Invasive Congener Tetropium fuscum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dearborn, Kenneth W; Heard, Stephen B; Sweeney, Jon; Pureswaran, Deepa S

    2016-08-01

    We examined the native community of insects interacting with an invasive species, Tetropium fuscum (F.) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), in its new range to explore reasons for the invader's relatively slow spread. Tetropium fuscum is a European spruce borer established in Nova Scotia since at least 1990, but it has spread only about 125 km from its site of introduction. We compared the densities of Tetropium spp., their known parasitoids, and the community of wood-boring insects at sites located within the invasion zone in Nova Scotia versus well outside this zone, in New Brunswick, Canada. Using red spruce trees stressed by girdling or felling, we tested whether: 1) T. fuscum had altered the native wood-boring community; 2) T. fuscum displaced a native congener, Tetropium cinnamopterum (Kirby); and 3) parasitism rates of Tetropium spp. differed between the invaded and noninvaded zones. Both Tetropium spp. and their parasitoid wasps emerged exclusively from felled trees as opposed to girdled trees. We found no difference in community diversity inside versus outside the invasion zone. The combined densities of both Tetropium spp. and their overall parasitism rates also did not differ between zones, but T. cinnamopterum density was significantly greater outside the invasion zone, suggesting T. fuscum may displace the native congener where they are sympatric. Our results suggest that the native and invasive Tetropium spp. act as a single functional species in the invasion zone. We speculate that natural control agents (predators, parasitoids, and competitors) might be limiting the rate of spread of T. fuscum. PMID:27247305

  2. Family-Group Names In Coleoptera (Insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Bouchard

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available We synthesize data on all known extant and fossil Coleoptera family-group names for the first time. A catalogue of 4887 family-group names (124 fossil, 4763 extant based on 4707 distinct genera in Coleoptera is given. A total of 4492 names are available, 183 of which are permanently invalid because they are based on a preoccupied or a suppressed type genus. Names are listed in a classification framework. We recognize as valid 24 superfamilies, 211 families, 541 subfamilies, 1663 tribes and 740 subtribes. For each name, the original spelling, author, year of publication, page number, correct stem and type genus are included. The original spelling and availability of each name were checked from primary literature. A list of necessary changes due to Priority and Homonymy problems, and actions taken, is given. Current usage of names was conserved, whenever possible, to promote stability of the classification. New synonymies (family-group names followed by genus-group names: Agronomina Gistel, 1848 syn. n. of Amarina Zimmermann, 1832 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalioini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Melandryini Leach, 1815 (Melandryidae, Polycystophoridae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Malachiinae Fleming, 1821 (Melyridae, Sclerasteinae Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Ptilininae Shuckard, 1839 (Ptinidae, Phloeonomini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Omaliini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Sepedophilini Ádám, 2001 syn. n. of Tachyporini MacLeay, 1825 (Staphylinidae, Phibalini Gistel, 1856 syn. n. of Cteniopodini Solier, 1835 (Tenebrionidae; Agronoma Gistel 1848 (type species Carabus familiaris Duftschmid, 1812, designated herein syn. n. of Amara Bonelli, 1810 (Carabidae, Hylepnigalio Gistel, 1856 (type species Chrysomela caraboides Linnaeus, 1760, by monotypy syn. n. of Melandrya Fabricius, 1801 (Melandryidae, Polycystophorus Gistel, 1856 (type species Cantharis aeneus Linnaeus, 1758, designated herein syn. n. of Malachius Fabricius, 1775 (Melyridae, Sclerastes Gistel, 1856 (type species

  3. Comparative Analysis of the Composition of Intestinal Bacterial Communities in Dastarcus helophoroides Fed Different Diets

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Wei-Wei; He, Cai; Cui, Jun; Wang, Hai-dong; Li, Meng-Lou

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of the intestinal bacterial communities in Dastarcus helophoroides (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Bothrideridae) larvae and adults was assayed by PCR-DGGE to determine whether different artificial diets could influence these bacterial communities. Two diets were used for feeding the larvae and four for the adults. Escherichia, Desemzia, Staphylococcus, Asticcacaulis, Cellvibrio, Aurantimonas, and Planomicrobium were isolated from the gut of the adults, with Escherichia and Staphylococ...

  4. Primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae and Disteniidae) of the Smithsonian Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    The primary types of longhorned woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Disteniidae) of the National Museum of Natural History (Smithsonian Institution) are catalogued and figured, current through 2012 (but also including some 2013 holotypes). Data on the original combination, current combina...

  5. New records of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera:Dytiscidae) in Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobar, L.R.; Gibbs, K.E.; Longcore, J.R.; Perillo, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    Locations, habitat descriptions, and collection dates are listed for new records of 4 genera and 12 species of predaceous diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in Maine. Previously, 17 genera and 53 species of the aquatic beetle were reported from Maine.

  6. First record of Molorchus minor minor (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molorchus minor minor (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae is recorded for the first time in Brazil (Bahia. It was originally described from Europe and is currently widely distributed in that continent and Asia.

  7. Methods for assessing infestations of sunflower stem weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in sunflower stems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The sunflower stem weevil, Cylindrocopturus adspersus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), reduces sunflower, Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), yields by spreading pathogens, damaging vascular tissues, and promoting lodging of sunflower plants. To assess weevil populations for host plant resistanc...

  8. A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) from Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Seunghyun; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    A new species of the genus Falsoibidion Pic, 1922 (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae, Callidiopini) from Korea is described. Habitus and genitalia of male and female of the new species are illustrated.

  9. A diversidade inventarial de Coleoptera (Insecta em uma paisagem antropizada do Bioma Araucária The inventory diversity of Coleoptera (Insecta of an anthropized landscape in the Biome Araucaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma G. Ganho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Como parte do Projeto PROVIVE, foram analisadas a riqueza de espécies, a composição taxonômica, a proporção de espécies raras e a constância taxonômica ao nível de família relacionada à riqueza de espécies, em comunidades de Coleoptera, em Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná. Os dados foram obtidos a partir de coletas através de armadilha malaise no estrato do sub-bosque de cinco áreas com diferentes graus de intervenção antrópica, de setembro de 1999 a agosto de 2000. As 52 semanas de amostragem nas cinco áreas resultaram na coleta de 10.822 indivíduos de 1659 espécies. Todas as áreas apresentaram alta riqueza de espécies e diversidade, como indicado por vários índices. A área em estágio mais avançado de sucessão vegetal foi menos rica do que aquelas em estágio inicial/intermediária. De acordo com diferentes estimadores de riqueza de espécies, o número de espécies coletadas poderia aumentar de 22-123% com o aumento do esforço de coleta. As áreas menos conservadas foram mais ricas em espécies raras ("singletons", "doubletons" e únicas do que as mais conservadas. Nas cinco áreas houve uma constância taxonômica entre as famílias mais ricas (Curculionidae, Chrysomelidae, Cerambycidae, Staphylinidae, Mordelidae, Elateridae, Scarabaeidae, Coccinellidae e Tenebrionidae envolvendo 60% do total de espécies, como observado para a abundância de indivíduos. A existência de um padrão de constância taxonômica de famílias, quando considerados 60% da riqueza de espécies e/ou de abundância de indivíduos por local, poderá tornar mais fácil e rápido o estudo de comunidades de Coleoptera, habilitando a ordem a ser um táxon indicador de condições ambientais de áreas florestadas.The species richness, taxonomic composition, rare species, and taxonomic constancy at family level were studied in communities of Coleoptera in Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, as part of PROVIVE project. The data were gathered

  10. Biologi Hama Kumbang Penggerek Pucuk Kelapa Sawit (Oryctes rhinoceros L.) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Di Rumah Kassa

    OpenAIRE

    Sejahtra, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    Ahmad Sejahtra, "BIOLOGY SHOOT BORERS BEETLE PEST OF COCONUT PALM (Oryctes rhinoceros L.) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) AT KASSA HOUSE", Under supervised by Ms Marheni and Ms Fatima Zahara. This study aims to determine biological pest of oil palm bud weevil (Oryctes rhinoceros L.) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) at home kassa. The experiment was conducted on people's plantations in PERUMNAS Simalingkar starting from September 2010 until April 2011. Research using observational methods for this resear...

  11. Exploring the Leaf Beetle Fauna (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae of an Ecuadorian Mountain Forest Using DNA Barcoding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birthe Thormann

    Full Text Available Tropical mountain forests are hotspots of biodiversity hosting a huge but little known diversity of insects that is endangered by habitat destruction and climate change. Therefore, rapid assessment approaches of insect diversity are urgently needed to complement slower traditional taxonomic approaches. We empirically compare different DNA-based species delimitation approaches for a rapid biodiversity assessment of hyperdiverse leaf beetle assemblages along an elevational gradient in southern Ecuador and explore their effect on species richness estimates.Based on a COI barcode data set of 674 leaf beetle specimens (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae of 266 morphospecies from three sample sites in the Podocarpus National Park, we employed statistical parsimony analysis, distance-based clustering, GMYC- and PTP-modelling to delimit species-like units and compared them to morphology-based (parataxonomic species identifications. The four different approaches for DNA-based species delimitation revealed highly similar numbers of molecular operational taxonomic units (MOTUs (n = 284-289. Estimated total species richness was considerably higher than the sampled amount, 414 for morphospecies (Chao2 and 469-481 for the different MOTU types. Assemblages at different elevational levels (1000 vs. 2000 m had similar species numbers but a very distinct species composition for all delimitation methods. Most species were found only at one elevation while this turnover pattern was even more pronounced for DNA-based delimitation.Given the high congruence of DNA-based delimitation results, probably due to the sampling structure, our study suggests that when applied to species communities on a regionally limited level with high amount of rare species (i.e. ~50% singletons, the choice of species delimitation method can be of minor relevance for assessing species numbers and turnover in tropical insect communities. Therefore, DNA-based species delimitation is confirmed as a

  12. Papel dos besouros (Insecta, Coleoptera) na Entomologia Forense

    OpenAIRE

    Wellington Emanuel dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Esse trabalho apresenta uma revisão do papel que os besouros (Insecta, Coleoptera) desempenham na Entomologia Forense. Discussões sobre ocorrência em cadáveres humanos e carcaças animais, estimativas de Intervalo Pós-Morte (IPM), estudos realizados no Brasil e em outros países, principais famílias de importância forense e aspectos biológicos, ecológicos e biogeográficos das espécies são apresentadas.

  13. Fossil history of Mesozoic weevils (Coleoptera:Curculionoidea)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrei A.Legalov

    2012-01-01

    The first synopsis of Mesozoic weevils (Curculionoidea: Coleoptera) is presented.Changes of family,genera and species abundance during the Mesozoic revealed three distributional patterns.The Jurassic (Karatau) fauna was dominated by the Nemonychidae.During the Early Cretaceous (beginning at the Jurassic/Cretaceous border),the Ithyceridae was the prevalent group with a significant role played by the Nemonychidae.In the Late Cretaceous (Cenomanian and Turonian),the major groups were the Curculionidae and Brentidae.Obviously,the change of weevil fauna during this period was due to the expansion of the angiosperms,which provided multiple niches in their vegetative and reproductive organs for weevil development.

  14. An annotated catalogue of the Buprestidae of Iran (Coleoptera: Buprestoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahari, Hassan; Volkovitsh, Mark G; Bellamy, Charles L

    2015-01-01

    An annotated taxonomic catalogue of the jewel beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) of Iran is given. Original descriptions and recent revisionary or catalogue data are included along with the distribution, both within and outside of Iran, ecological data and host plant associations, junior synonyms, and comments. A complete bibliography completes the catalogue. In total 428 species and 52 subspecies of jewel beetles belonging to 6 subfamilies (Julodinae, Polycestinae, Galbellinae, Chrysochroinae, Buprestinae, and Agrilinae), 20 tribes, and 38 genera are known from Iran including doubtful records and 4 nomina nuda. It is likely that the number of jewel beetle species from Iran will be between 460-480 and possibly even more species. PMID:26250020

  15. Elucidating the Common Generalist Predators of Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in an Organic Apple Orchard Using Molecular Gut-Content Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jason M; Szendrei, Zsofia; Grieshop, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Conotrachelus nenuphar (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), plum curculio, is a serious direct pest of North American tree fruit including, apples, cherries, peaches and plums. Historically, organophosphate insecticides were used for control, but this tool is no longer registered for use in tree fruit. In addition, few organically approved insecticides are available for organic pest control and none have proven efficacy as this time. Therefore, promoting biological control in these systems is the next step, however, little is known about the biological control pathways in this system and how these are influenced by current mechanical and cultural practices required in organic systems. We used molecular gut-content analysis for testing field caught predators for feeding on plum curculio. During the study we monitored populations of plum curculio and the predator community in a production organic apple orchard. Predator populations varied over the season and contained a diverse assemblage of spiders and beetles. A total of 8% of all predators (eight Araneae, two Hemiptera, and six Coleoptera species) assayed for plum curculio predation were observed positive for the presence of plum curculio DNA in their guts, indicating that these species fed on plum curculio prior to collection Results indicate a number of biological control agents exist for this pest and this requires further study in relation to cultural practices. PMID:27348005

  16. Seasonality in the Dung Beetle Community in a Brazilian Tropical Dry Forest: Do Small Changes Make a Difference?

    OpenAIRE

    Medina, Anderson Matos; Lopes, Priscila Paixão

    2014-01-01

    Dung beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Scarabaeinae) activity is influenced by rainfall seasonality. We hypothesized that rainfall might also play a major role in regulating the community structure of this group. In this study, we describe seasonal changes in the richness, composition, and structure of the Scarabaeinae community in a Brazilian tropical dry forest. A fragment of arboreal Caatinga was sampled using baited pitfall traps during the early dry season (EDS), late dry season (LDS), ...

  17. The complete mitochondrial genome of Cryptolestes ferrugineus (Stephens) (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tian Yi; Li, Lei; Xin, Tianrong; Wang, Yayu; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    We determined the complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) sequence of Cryptolestes ferrugineus (GenBank accession number KT182067) by the long PCR and primer walking method. The mitochondrial genome is a typical circular DNA molecule of 15 511 bp in length, and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a A + T-rich region (D-loop). The order of 37 genes was typical of insect mitochondrial DNA sequences described to date. The base composition of the genome is A (39.17%), T (37.24%), C (14.22%), and G (9.37%) with an A + T-rich hallmark as that of other invertebrate mitochondrial genomes. All protein-coding genes start with ATN codon and terminate with the stop codon T (AA) or TAG. The A + T-rich region is located between 12S rRNA and tRNA(Ile). In this study, the phylogenetic relationships of Coleoptera species were constructed based on the nucleotides sequences of 13 PCGs of mitogenomes. The molecular-based phylogeny supported the traditional morphological classification on relationships within Coleoptera species. PMID:26330111

  18. Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana S. Vieira

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rove beetles of medical importance in Brazil (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae, Paederinae. The rove beetles of the genus Paederus Fabricius, 1775 are the most important group within Coleoptera causing dermatitis around the world. The medical importance of Paederus depends on its toxic hemolymph released when these beetles are crushed on human skin. The effects are mainly dermatitis linearis and some sporadic cases of conjunctivitis. In Brazil seven species of Paederus are known to cause dermatitis: P. amazonicus Sharp, 1876, P. brasiliensis Erichson, 1840, P. columbinus Laporte, 1835, P. ferus Erichson, 1840, P. mutans Sharp, 1876, P. protensus Sharp, 1876 stat. rev., and Paederus rutilicornis Erichson, 1840. Paederus mutans and P. protensus are for the first time recorded as of medical importance, whereas the record of P. rutilicornis in Brazil is doubtful. All seven species are redescribed and a dichotomous key is provided. The geographic distributions of all species are documented. The results provided here include the most recent and relevant taxonomic revision of Paederus of the Neotropical region, the first identification key for Brazilian species and the increase of recorded species of medical importance in the world.

  19. Complete mitochondrial genome of Cryptolestes pusillus (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Guanghua; Sun, Tanyi; Xin, Tianrong; Li, Meiyun; Zou, Zhiwen; Xia, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the complete mitochondrial genome of Cryptolestes pusillus (GenBank accession number KT070713) was sequenced by long PCR and primer walking methods. The total length of mitochondrial DNA is 15 502 bp and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two ribosomal RNA genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, and a A + T-rich region. The base composition of the genome is A (39.04%), T (37.07%), C (23.4%), and G (14.6%). Except for COI and ATP8 with TCC and ATC as start codon, respectively, the remaining protein-coding genes initiated with the three orthodox start codons. Two complete stop codons (TAA and TAG) and two incomplete stop codons (COIII stop with T and ND5 stop with TA) were used in the protein-coding genes. The A + T-rich region is located between 12s rRNA and tRNA(Ile) with the length of 859 bp. The phylogenetic relationships of Coleoptera species were constructed based on the nucleotide sequences of 13 protein-coding genes of mitogenome using the neighbor-joining method. The molecular-based phylogenetic analysis supported the traditional morphological classification on relationships within Coleoptera species. PMID:26329895

  20. Sensitivity and tolerance of Riparian arthropod communities to altered water resources along a drying river.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin E McCluney

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Rivers around the world are drying with increasing frequency, but little is known about effects on terrestrial animal communities. Previous research along the San Pedro River in southeastern AZ, USA, suggests that changes in the availability of water resources associated with river drying lead to changes in predator abundance, community composition, diversity, and abundance of particular taxa of arthropods, but these observations have not yet been tested manipulatively. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this study, we constructed artificial pools in the stream bed adjacent to a drying section of the San Pedro River and maintained them as the river dried. We compared pitfall trapped arthropods near artificial pools to adjacent control sites where surface waters temporarily dried. Assemblage composition changed differentially at multiple taxonomic levels, resulting in different assemblages at pools than at control sites, with multiple taxa and richness of carabid beetle genera increasing at pools but not at controls that dried. On the other hand, predator biomass, particularly wolf spiders, and diversity of orders and families were consistently higher at control sites that dried. These results suggest an important role for colonization dynamics of pools, as well as the ability of certain taxa, particularly burrowing wolf spiders, to withstand periods of temporary drying. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, we found some agreement between this manipulative study of water resources and a previous analysis of river drying that showed shifts in composition, changes in diversity, and declines in abundance of certain taxa (e.g. carabid beetles. However, colonization dynamics of pools, as well as compensatory strategies of predatory wolf spiders seem to have led to patterns that do not match previous research, with control sites maintaining high diversity, despite drying. Tolerance of river drying by some species may allow persistence of substantial diversity in the

  1. Chewing insect predation on artificial caterpillars is related to activity density of ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferrante, M.; Lövei, G. L.

    2015-01-01

    In cultivated landscapes, predatory arthropods play an important role for pest control. Traditionally, monitoring their effect on pests was done using indirect measures (e.g. characterising predator activity by the numbers of predators caught). However, the contribution of predators to predation is...... traps in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum). Forty-six percent (n=756/1637) of the artificial sentinel prey were attacked after 24 h, mostly by chewing insects (88%, n=665/756), and 1102 carabids with a size of ≥15mm were collected. Ground beetles were also the most common predatory group, followed by...

  2. Phylogenetic Relationships of Tribes Within Harpalinae (Coleoptera: Carabidae) as Inferred from 28S Ribosomal DNA and the Wingless Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Ober, Karen A; Maddison, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Harpalinae is a large, monophyletic subfamily of carabid ground beetles containing more than 19,000 species in approximately 40 tribes. The higher level phylogenetic relationships within harpalines were investigated based on nucleotide data from two nuclear genes, wingless and 28S rDNA. Phylogenetic analyses of combined data indicate that many harpaline tribes are monophyletic, however the reconstructed trees showed little support for deeper nodes. In addition, our results suggest that the Le...

  3. Chaves para a identificação dos principais Coleoptera (Insecta) associados com produtos armazenados Keys for the identification of Coleoptera (Insecta) associated with stored products

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto Valle da Silva Pereira; Lúcia Massutti de Almeida

    2001-01-01

    An illustrated key to identify nine families of Coleoptera commonly found in stored products is presented. Keys for the identification of Anobiidae [Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792), Stegobium paniceum (Linnaeus, 1761)], Bruchidae [Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say, 1831), Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman, 1833)], Curculionidae [Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus, 1763), S. zeamais Motschulsky, 1885], Silvanidae [Ahasverus advena (Waltl, 1832), Cathartus quadricollis (Guérin, 1892), Oryzaephilus me...

  4. Carabidae diversity along an altitudinal gradient in a Peruvian cloud forest (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maveety, Sarah A; Browne, Robert A; Erwin, Terry L

    2011-01-01

    Carabid beetles were sampled at five sites, ranging from 1500 m to 3400 m, along a 15 km transect in the cloud forest of Manu National Park, Perú. Seasonal collections during a one year period yielded 77 morphospecies, of which 60% are projected to be undescribed species. There was a significant negative correlation between species richness and altitude, with the number of carabid species declining at the rate of one species for each 100 m increase in altitude. The majority of species (70.1 %) were restricted to only one altitudinal site and no species was found at more than three of the five altitudinal sites. Only one genus, Pelmatellus (Tribe Harpalini), was found at all five sites. Active (hand) collections yielded approximately twice as many species per individuals collected than passive (pitfall trap) collections. This study is the first systematic sampling ofcarabid beetles of a high altitude gradient in the cloud forests of southeastern Perú and supports the need to conserve the zone of extremely high biodiversity present on the eastern slopes of the Peruvian Andes. PMID:22371680

  5. Biology and Management of Billbugs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in Turfgrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuy, Madeleine M.; Ramirez, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Billbugs (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Sphenophorus spp.) are a complex of weevil pests affecting turfgrass throughout the United States. Billbug larvae cause damage by feeding in stems, on roots, and on the crowns of turf, causing severe discoloration and eventual plant death. Monitoring efforts have focused on nondestructive pitfall sampling of ground-active billbug adults and on destructive sampling using soil cores for larval stages in the soil. Given the cryptic nature of the susceptible larval stages, billbugs are typically managed by preventive applications of long-residual, systemic insecticides, including neonicotinoids and anthranilic diamides. Despite knowledge of effective management practices including pest-resistant turf varieties, irrigation management, and microbial controls that contribute to an IPM approach, billbug management continues to rely heavily on prophylactic synthetic insecticides. This review will summarize the identification and biology of billbugs and strategies for their management. PMID:27065080

  6. BESOUROS COPRÓFAGOS (COLEOPTERA; SCARABAEIDAE COLETADOS EM PIRACICABA, SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RODRIGUES S.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Através do uso de armadilhas "pitfall" iscadas com massa fecal fresca de bovinos, realizou-se a coleta de besouros coprófagos (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae, durante o período de 15 de abril de 1995 a 17 de fevereiro de 1996, em área de pastagem ao lado de confinamento de bovinos, em Piracicaba, SP. Coletou-se um total de 11 espécies distribuidas nos gêneros Aphodius, Ataenius, Trichillum, Eurysternus, Dichotomius e Canthon. Os besouros coprófagos de comportamento endocoprídeo representaram 72,73% das espécies coletadas, sendo estes os de maior ocorrência e a espécie Aphodius lividus parece ser a mais bem adaptada na área estudada.

  7. Walking stability of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius, 1792) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, E M; Nogueira, R M; Pina, D S; Manica, C L M; Faroni, L R A; Moreira, P S A

    2016-04-19

    Results obtained in studies can contribute to the advancement of science and innovative methods and techniques for developing practical activities. Reporting conditions that may restrict the implementation of research is critical to ensure the optimal development of further technical studies. The objective of this study was to assess the walking stability of R. dominica on a flat and smooth surface. The study was based on the determination of mortality, morphology and walking stability of the insect outside the grain mass, on a flat and smooth surface. Mortality of adults of this Coleoptera in conditions with and without food was similar, which explains the difficulty that this insect had for accessing the food source on the flat and smooth surface. The measurements of body length (BOL), width (BOW) and height (BOH) of R. dominica were compared with those of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), which showed good ability to walk in these conditions. This study indicated that the former presents lower BOL and BOW, and greater BOH than the second, and all these variables showed differences when analyzed simultaneously by means of the construction of multivariate morphometric indices (Width × Height, Length × Height and Height × Length × Width). These morphometric variables, together with the definition of the geometry most similar to the body shape, resulted in determination of the center of gravity (CG) and static rollover threshold (SRTgeom) for both species. Rhyzopertha dominica and T. castaneum presented CGs considered high and low, respectively, and together with the values obtained for SRTgeom, may justify that R. dominica can be considered a less stable species during movement, and presents greater risk of rollover on flat and smooth surfaces. PMID:27097085

  8. Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Romo

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Track analysis of the Neotropical Entimini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Distributional patterns of the species belonging to the tribe Entimini from the Neotropical region were analyzed. Based on a track analysis of 22 species of Entimus, Rhigus, and Phaedropus, for which distributional data were available, two generalized tracks were found. One is located in northern Brazil, corresponding to the Amazonian subregion, and is determined by Phaedropus candidus and Rhigus speciosus. The other is located in southern Brazil, corresponding to the Parana subregion, and is determined by Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus, and R. tribuloides. The development of the Chacoan subregion is hypothesized to have been the dynamic vicariant event that fragmented the former Amazonian-Parana forest.Análisis de trazos de Entimini Neotropical (Coleoptera, Curculionidae, Entiminae. Se analizaron los patrones de distribución de la tribu Entimini en la región Neotropical. Con base en un análisis de los trazos de 22 especies de Entimus, Rhigus y Phaedropus, para los cuales se contaba con datos de distribución, se hallaron dos trazos generalizados. Uno se localiza en el norte de Brasil, en la subregión Amazónica, y está sustentado por Phaedropus candidus y Rhigus speciosus. El otro se localiza en el sur de Brasil, en la subregión Paranaense, y está sustentado por Entimus imperialis, E. excelsus, Phaedropus togatus, Rhigus dejeanii, R. faldermanni, R. horridus, R. lateritus, R. nigrosparsus y R. tribuloides. Se hipotetiza que el desarrollo de la subregión Chaqueña constituyó el evento de vicarianza dinámica que fragmentó el antiguo bosque Amazónico-Paranaense.

  9. Dung beetle assemblages (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae in Atlantic forest fragments in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Campos

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dung beetle assemblages (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae in Atlantic forest fragments in southern Brazil. The beetles of the subfamily Scarabaeinae are important organisms that participate in the cycle of decomposition, especially in tropical ecosystems. Most species feed on feces (dung or carcasses (carrion and are associated with animals that produce their food resources. Dung beetles are divided into three functional groups: rollers, tunnelers and dwellers. This present work aims to study the diversity of dung beetle communities inhabiting fragments of the Atlantic Forest, with the purpose of describing the ecology of the species in southern Brazil. This study was conducted in the region of Campos Novos, in Santa Catarina, where twenty sites of Atlantic forest fragments were sampled. Samplings of dung beetles were conducted using 200 pitfall traps, of which 100 were baited with human feces and another 100 with carrion. Size and environmental complexity were also measured for each forest fragment. A total of 1,502 dung beetles, belonging to six tribes, 12 genera and 33 species, were collected. Results of the Levin's index of niche breadth indicated that 11 species were categorized as being coprophagous, ten as generalists, and two as necrophagous. Most species are tunnelers (19, nine of rollers and four of dwellers. The great diversity of Scarabaeinae in the region of Campos Novos, including several rare species, adds important data to the Scarabaeinae fauna in the central-western region of Santa Catarina. It may also help choosing priority areas for conservation in the region, where human impact, with large areas of monoculture, increasingly threatens the fragments of Mixed Ombrophilous Forest.

  10. Bio-edafology of the Coleoptera order, in three Colombia Natural Regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterization of Coleoptera families is showed to three different Colombian Natural Regions. This is given in relation with biological and environmental factors, different vegetation covers and soil uses. In addition to it, susceptible Coleoptera taxa are determined when natural conditions are disturbed. Methodically, a literature subject research was made, and Barber and Berlesse traps were used to organism extractions from superficial and under superficial soil. Horizons diversity, riches and constancy index were determined to each family. Results show different diversity, riches and constancy values to each family, as much in each natural region, such as to each soil use

  11. Novos táxons sul-americanos de Compsocerini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Dilma Solange Napp; Ubirajara Ribeiro Martins

    2006-01-01

    Novos táxons sul-americanos de Compsocerini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae). Um novo gênero e quatro novas espécies, todos provenientes da Bolívia, são descritos em Compsocerini: Ecoporanga gen. nov., espécie-tipo E. achira sp. nov., Dilocerus brunneus sp. nov., Rierguscha florida sp. nov., procedentes de Santa Cruz e Ethemon iuba sp. nov. proveniente de Cochabamba.New South American taxa of Compsocerini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae). The following new genus and species, all from Bolivia, are describ...

  12. Influence of growing location and cultivar on Rhyzopertha dominica (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) infestation of rough rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FRANK H. ARTHUR; RUSTY C. BAUTISTA; TERRENCE J. SIEBENMORGEN

    2007-01-01

    Long-grain rice cultivars Cocodrie, Wells, and XP 723 grown in three locations (Hazen, MO; Essex and Newport, AR, USA), and medium-grain rice cultivars Bengal and XP 713 grown in two locations (Jonesboro and Lodge Corner, AR, USA), were harvested and assayed for susceptibility to Rhyzopertha dominica (F.) (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), the lesser grain borer, and Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the rice weevil, on rice held at 27℃ 57% and 75% relative humidity (RH).Separate samples from the same harvest lots were also analyzed for the physical characteristics of brown rice yield, percentage whole kernels and kernel thickness. Progeny production and feeding damage of R. dominica were significantly different among long-grain cultivars within two of the three locations (P < 0.05), but not for location or RH (P ≥ 0.05), while progeny production of S. oryzae was different among cultivars, location, and RH (P < 0.05). On medium-grain rice, both cultivar and location were significant for progeny production of R. dominica, but not RH, while cultivar and RH were significant for progeny production of S. oryzae, but not location. On both rice types, feeding damage of R. dominica followed the same trends and was always strongly positively correlated with progeny production (P < 0.05), but for S. oryzae there were several instances in which progeny production was not correlated with feeding damage (P ≥ 0.05). Physical characteristics of both rice types were statistically significant (P < 0.01) but actual numerical differences were extremely small, and were generally not correlated with progeny production of either species. Results indicate that the location in which a particular rice cultivar is grown, along with its characteristics, could affect susceptibility of the rice to R. dominica and S. oryzae.

  13. Catalogue of Geadephaga (Coleoptera: Adephaga of America, north of Mexico

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    Yves Bousquet

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available All scientific names of Trachypachidae, Rhysodidae, and Carabidae (including cicindelines recorded from America north of Mexico are catalogued. Available species-group names are listed in their original combinations with the author(s, year of publication, page citation, type locality, location of the name-bearing type, and etymology for many patronymic names. In addition, the reference in which a given species-group name is first synonymized is recorded for invalid taxa. Genus-group names are listed with the author(s, year of publication, page citation, type species with way of fixation, and etymology for most. The reference in which a given genus-group name is first synonymized is recorded for many invalid taxa. Family-group names are listed with the author(s, year of publication, page citation, and type genus. The geographical distribution of all species-group taxa is briefly summarized and their state and province records are indicated.One new genus-group taxon, Randallius new subgenus (type species: Chlaenius purpuricollis Randall, 1838, one new replacement name, Pterostichus amadeus new name for Pterostichus vexatus Bousquet, 1985, and three changes in precedence, Ellipsoptera rubicunda (Harris, 1911 for Ellipsoptera marutha (Dow, 1911, Badister micans LeConte, 1844 for Badister ocularis Casey, 1920, and Agonum deplanatum Ménétriés, 1843 for Agonum fallianum (Leng, 1919, are proposed. Five new genus-group synonymies and 65 new species-group synonymies, one new species-group status, and 12 new combinations (see Appendix 5 are established.The work also includes a discussion of the notable private North American carabid collections, a synopsis of all extant world geadephagan tribes and subfamilies, a brief faunistic assessment of the fauna, a list of valid species-group taxa, a list of North American fossil Geadephaga (Appendix 1, a list of North American Geadephaga larvae described or illustrated (Appendix 2, a list of Geadephaga species

  14. Osmoderma eremita (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Cetoniinae in Europe

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    Ranius, T.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Research, monitoring and development of preservation strategies for threatened species are often limited by national borders even though a global perspective would be more appropriate. In this study, we collected data on the occurrence of a threatened beetle, Osmoderma eremita, associated with tree hollows in 2,142 localities from 33 countries in Europe where it is or has been present. The larvae develop in tree hollows and very few observations of larvae have been observed in dead logs on the ground. As long as there is a suitable tree hollow, it appears that O. eremita may use any tree species. Oaks (Quercus spp. are the trees mainly used by O. eremita, followed by lime (Tilia spp., willow (Salix spp., beech (Fagus sylvatica and fruit trees (Prunus spp., Pyrus spp., Malus domestica. O. eremita is still found in some remnants of natural forest, but is mainly observed on land that has long been used by man, such as pasture woodlands, hunting parks, avenues, city parks and trees around agricultural fields and along streams. The occurrence of O. eremita seems to have decreased in all European countries. Relatively high densities of O. eremita localities occur in Central Europe (northern Italy, Austria, Czechia, southern Poland and eastern Germany, some parts of Northern Europe (south-eastern Sweden, Latvia and France. In some regions in north-western Europe, the species is extinct or may occur at some single sites (Norway, Danish mainland, The Netherlands, Belgium, north-eastern France. There are few data from south-eastern Europe. Many local extinctions of O. eremita are to be expected in the near future, especially in regions with recent habitat loss and fragmentation. O. eremita is useful as an indicator and umbrella species for the preservation of the entire invertebrate community associated with hollow trees in Europe. A preservation plan for O. eremita should include three aspects that are of general importance in nature conservation in

  15. Utility of morphological and molecular techniques for determination of paternity in two subspecies of Diabrotica undecimpunctata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    An experiment was conducted to determine the paternity of F1 progeny using morphological and molecular methods in Diabrotica (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) subspecies: Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi Barber, also known as spotted cucumber beetle and D. undecimpunctata undecimpunctata Mannerheim, als...

  16. Parasitylenchus sp. (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) parasitizing field populations of Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harding, Susanne; Poinar, George O. Jr.; Dimitrova, Desislava V.; Steenberg, Tove

    2011-01-01

    Adults of the invasive harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), were found to be parasitized by nematodes (Tylenchomorpha: Allantonematidae) in Denmark. The nematodes were identified as Parasitylenchus sp. Major morphological characters of the nematodes did not differ si...

  17. Oxycheila binotata Gray (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae), information on a little known taxon from Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Kippenhan, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Two specimens of Oxycheila binotata Gray (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae) in the Field Museum of Natural History offer additional information on the morphology and distribution of this rare species. One of the specimens, a female, is considered to be the first known specimen of this species.

  18. Study on the genus Daptus ground-beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae from Korea

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    Ik Je Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A genus Daptus Fischer von Waldheim, 1823 of the tribe Harpalini Bonelli, 1810 (Coleoptera: Carabidae is reported for the first time from Korea, based on the Daptus vittatus Fischer von Waldheim from Incheon, Korea. Redescription of the species and illustrations of diagnostic characteristics, including genitalia characteristics of both sexes, are provided.

  19. Patterns of tree species usage by long-horned beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Fiji

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Waqa-Sakiti, H.; Stewart, A.; Čížek, Lukáš; Hodge, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 1 (2014), s. 57-64. ISSN 0030-8870 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/1952 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.924, year: 2014 http://www.bioone.org/doi/pdf/10.2984/68.1.5

  20. An illustrated checklist of dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae from the Periyar Tiger Reserve, Kerala, India

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    Nithya Sathiandran

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An illustrated checklist of 36 species of dung beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae from the Periyar Tiger Reserve in the southern Western Ghats is presented.  Records of eight species endemic to the Western Ghats and a rare primitive old world dung beetle group, Ochicanthon nitidus (Paulian, from the forests of Periyar Tiger Reserve are provided. 

  1. Study on the genus Daptus ground-beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) from Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Ik Je Choi; Jongok Lim; Jinyoung Park; Ji Hwan Park; Jong Kyun Park

    2016-01-01

    A genus Daptus Fischer von Waldheim, 1823 of the tribe Harpalini Bonelli, 1810 (Coleoptera: Carabidae) is reported for the first time from Korea, based on the Daptus vittatus Fischer von Waldheim from Incheon, Korea. Redescription of the species and illustrations of diagnostic characteristics, including genitalia characteristics of both sexes, are provided.

  2. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in the Conservation Reserve Program crop rotation systems in Interior Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adult ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) abundance and diversity were documented on Conservation Research Program (CRP) agricultural lands in Delta Junction, Alaska (64ºN, 145º W). Twenty species were documented based on a total sample of 6,116 specimens collected during 2006 and 2007. Two speci...

  3. ESPECIES DE DRYOPHTHORINAE (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE ASOCIADAS A PLÁTANO Y BANANO (Musaspp. EN COLOMBIA Dryophthorinae Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Associted to Platain and Banana crops (Musaspp. in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAULA A SEPÚLVEDA-CANO

    Full Text Available Se presenta una sinopsis de los escarabajos de la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociados a cultivos de plátano y banano en Colombia. Adicionalmente se ofrecen claves ilustradas para las especies del país. Se registran seis especies asociadas a dichos cultivos: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.This synopsis is about beetle&#’;s subfamily Dryophthorinae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated to plantain and banana crops. Additionally keys illustrated for the species of the country are offered. Six species associated to these cultures are registered: Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar, 1824, Metamasius hemipterus (Linnaeus, 1758, Metamasius hebetatus (Gyllenhal, 1838, Metamasius submaculatus Champion, 1910, Rhyncophorus palmarum (Linnaeus, 1758 y Polytus mellerborgii (Boheman, 1838.

  4. Chaves para a identificação dos principais Coleoptera (Insecta associados com produtos armazenados Keys for the identification of Coleoptera (Insecta associated with stored products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Valle da Silva Pereira

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available An illustrated key to identify nine families of Coleoptera commonly found in stored products is presented. Keys for the identification of Anobiidae [Lasioderma serricorne (Fabricius, 1792, Stegobium paniceum (Linnaeus, 1761], Bruchidae [Acanthoscelides obtectus (Say, 1831, Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman, 1833], Curculionidae [Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus, 1763, S. zeamais Motschulsky, 1885], Silvanidae [Ahasverus advena (Waltl, 1832, Cathartus quadricollis (Guérin, 1892, Oryzaephilus mercator (Fauvel, 1889, O. surinamensis (Linnaeus, 1758] and Tenebrionidae [Gnathocerus cornutus (Fabricius, 1798, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797, T. confusum du Val, 1868] are also provided. These keys cover the most frequent Coleoptera found in stored products, specially grains, and are to the adult stage only. Illustrations of external morphology and general characteristics are provided for each species reported.

  5. Multistate characters and diet shifts: evolution of Erotylidae (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leschen, Richard A B; Buckley, Thomas R

    2007-02-01

    The dominance of angiosperms has played a direct role in the diversification of insects, especially Coleoptera. The shift to angiosperm feeding from other diets is likely to have increased the rate of speciation in Phytophaga. However, Phytophaga is only one of many hyperdiverse lineages of beetles and studies of host-shift proliferation have been somewhat limited to groups that primitively feed on plants. We have studied the diet-diverse beetle family Erotylidae (Cucujoidea) to determine if diet is correlated with high diversification rates and morphological evolution by first reconstructing ancestral diets and then testing for associations between diet and species number and diet and ovipositor type. A Bayesian phylogenetic analysis of morphological data that was previously published in Leschen (2003, Pages 1-108 in Fauna of New Zealand, 47; 53 terminal taxa and 1 outgroup, 120 adult characters and 1 diet character) yielded results that are similar to the parsimony analyses of Leschen (2003). Ancestral state reconstructions based on Bayesian and parsimony inference were largely congruent and both reconstructed microfungal feeding (the diet of the outgroup Biphyllidae) at the root of the Erotylidae tree. Shifts among microfungal, saprophagous, and phytophagous diets were most frequent. The largest numbers of species are contained in lineages that are macrofungal feeders (subfamily Erotylinae) and phytophagous (derived Languriinae), although the Bayesian posterior predictive tests of character state correlation were unable to detect any significant associations. Ovipositor morphology correlated with diet (i.e., acute forms were associated with phytophagy and unspecialized forms were associated with a mixture of diets). Although there is a general trend to increased species number associated with the shift from microfungal feeding to phytophagy (based on character mapping and mainly restricted to shifts in Languriinae), there is a large radiation of taxa feeding on

  6. Biomassa de Dynastinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae fototácticos: um ensaio biogeográfico / Biomass of phototactic Dynastinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae: a biogeographical assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Jorge Riehs

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available São apresentados e analisados valores da biomassa de Dynastinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae fototácticos coletados em seis localidades do Leste e Centro-Oeste do Paraná, sul do Brasil, demonstrando-se as diferenças entre as diversas comunidades. Os dados obtidos no Paraná são correlacionados com os de Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul.

  7. Molecular Markers Detect Cryptic Predation on Coffee Berry Borer (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by Silvanid and Laemophloeid Flat Bark Beetles (Coleoptera: Silvanidae, Laemophloeidae) in Coffee Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Sheina B; Yoneishi, Nicole M; Brill, Eva; Geib, Scott M; Follett, Peter A

    2016-02-01

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a serious pest of coffee worldwide. It was first detected in Hawai'i in 2010. Two predatory beetles, Cathartus quadricollis (Coleoptera: Silvanidae) and Leptophloeus sp. (Coleoptera: Laemophloeidae), have been observed in H. hampei-infested coffee. Under laboratory conditions, colony-reared C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. prey upon all life stages of H. hampei. However, the H. hampei life cycle occurs almost exclusively within a coffee bean obscured from direct observation. Thus, it is unknown if C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. consume H. hampei as prey in the wild. To demonstrate predation of H. hampei by C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp., a molecular assay was developed utilizing species-specific primers targeting short regions of the mitochondrial COI gene to determine species presence. Using these primers, wild C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. were collected and screened for the presence of H. hampei DNA using PCR. Analysis of collections from five coffee farms revealed predation of C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. on H. hampei. Further laboratory testing showed that H. hampei DNA could be detected in predators for as long as 48 h after feeding, indicating the farm-caught predators had preyed on H. hampei within 2 d of sampling. This study demonstrates the utility of molecular markers for the study of the ecology of predators and prey with cryptic behavior, and suggests C. quadricollis and Leptophloeus sp. might be useful biocontrol agents against H. hampei. PMID:26487745

  8. Os grupos tróficos em Coleoptera The trophic groups in Coleoptera

    OpenAIRE

    Renato C. Marinoni

    2001-01-01

    The beetles are a useful group for studies on trophic structure of communities, mainly in forested areas. These kind of studies are based on food habits of species groups. The different terms applied to nomminated these groups (trophic category, ecologic group, trophic group, guild, trophic guild) are discussed. The term trophic group, a natural unity, is proposed to form a group of species with the same food habits, not considering the trophic level. The guild, an artificial unity, is recogn...

  9. New morphological aspects and phylogenetic considerations of Cicindis Bruch (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roig-Juñent, S; Sallenave, S; Agrain, F A

    2011-01-01

    Cicindis Bruch is a monospecific genus of carabid beetles endemic to Argentina. In this contribution, Cicindis horni Bruch is re-described, with addition of new morphological features of male internal sac, female genital tract and elytral closure. New information on the species' habitat and distribution is also provided. The phylogenetic placement and relationships of Cicindis within the family Carabidae are discussed on the basis of a cladistic analysis. Terminal taxa included representatives of all subfamilies of Carabidae and supertribes of Carabinae, with a major sampling of those taxa considered to be closely related to Cicindini by previous authors. The phylogenetic analysis shows the basal position of Cicindis in a clade that includes Ozaeninae, Omophronini, Scaritinae and Conjuncta. A close relationship of Cicindis with Ozaenini + Metriini is supported by the particular closure of the procoxa and the ventral position of the oviduct with respect to the spermatheca. PMID:21710030

  10. Pygidial secretions ofPasimachus subsulcatus (Coleoptera: Carabidae) deter predation byEumeces inexpectatus (Squamata: Scincidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witz, B W; Mushinsky, H R

    1989-03-01

    The carabid beetlePasimachus subsulcatus is an abundant ground-dwelling insect in west central Florida that exudes a powerful mucous membrane irritant when disturbed. This secretion can be sprayed over 10 cm from the abdominal tip. The southeastern five-lined skink,Eumeces inexpectatus, is an abundant insectivorous lizard sympatric withPasimachus. We assessed the availability ofPasimachus toEumeces and found it to be within the foraging microenvironment of the lizard. Analysis ofEumeces gut contents and field feeding trials indicate thatPasimachus are not ingested by the lizard, yet arthropods of comparable size and exoskeletal thickness are ingested. The movement response ofEumeces to isolatedPasimachus secretion constituents, conducted in a modified Y-maze laboratory experiment, was used to assess the repellent capabilities of the secretion.Eumeces are consistently repelled byPasimachus secretion constituents, indicating that the beetle is protected chemically from the lizard. PMID:24271904

  11. Suscetibilidade de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae ao enxofre Susceptibility of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae to sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Gonçalves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available As criações de Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae são freqüentemente infestadas pelo ácaro Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross e Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar doses de enxofre, acaricida eficaz contra A. lacunatus, não-prejudiciais ao desenvolvimento de R. dominica. As unidades experimentais foram constituídas de placas de Petri contendo 30 g de grãos de trigo infestados com 30 adultos de R. dominica. Os tratamentos consistiram na utilização de doses de enxofre sobre os grãos, correspondentes a 0,0; 0,6; 0,9; 1,2; 1,5; 3,0; 6,0; 12,0; 24,0 e 48,0mg i a g-1, em dez repetições. As unidades experimentais foram armazenadas por 60 dias a 30±1°C, 60±5% UR e escotofase de 24h. O desenvolvimento de R. dominica foi afetado pela utilização de doses de enxofre maiores que 3,0mg i a g-1.The laboratory rearing of Rhyzopertha dominica (Fabricius (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae is frequently infested by the parasite mite Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross and Krantz (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae. This study was aimed at evaluating the sulfur doses, an effective acaricide against A. lacunatus, not harmful to the development of with R. dominica. The experimental units were Petri dishes containing 30g of whole wheat grains powdered with the different doses of the sulfur (0.0, 0.6, 0.9, 1.2, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0, 12.0, 24.0 and 48.0mg a i g-1 infested with 30 adults of R. dominica, in ten replicates. All treatments were maintained under controlled conditions (30±1°C, 60±5% r h and 24h scotophase for 60 days after the insect infestation. Sulfur doses higher than 3.0mg a i g-1 negatively affected R. dominica development.

  12. Habitat connectivity shapes urban arthropod communities: the key role of green roofs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaker, S; Ghazoul, J; Obrist, M K; Moretti, M

    2014-04-01

    The installation of green roofs, defined here as rooftops with a shallow soil cover and extensive vegetation, has been proposed as a possible measure to mitigate the loss of green space caused by the steady growth of cities. However, the effectiveness of green roofs in supporting arthropod communities, and the extent to which they facilitate connectivity of these communities within the urban environment is currently largely unknown. We investigated the variation of species community composition (beta diversity) of four arthropod groups with contrasting mobility (Carabidae, Araneae, Curculionidae, and Apidae) on 40 green roofs and 40 extensively managed green sites on the ground in the city of Zurich, Switzerland. With redundancy analysis and variation partitioning, we (1) disentangled the relative importance of local environmental conditions, the surrounding land cover composition, and habitat connectivity on species community composition, (2) searched for specific spatial scales of habitat connectivity for the different arthropod groups, and (3) discussed the ecological and functional value of green roofs in cities. Our study revealed that on green roofs community composition of high-mobility arthropod groups (bees and weevils) were mainly shaped by habitat connectivity, while low-mobility arthropod groups (carabids and spiders) were more influenced by local environmental conditions. A similar but less pronounced pattern was found for ground communities. The high importance of habitat connectivity in shaping high-mobility species community composition indicates that these green roof communities are substantially connected by the frequent exchange of individuals among surrounding green roofs. On the other hand, low-mobility species communities on green roofs are more likely connected to ground sites than to other green roofs. The integration of green roofs in urban spatial planning strategies has great potential to enable higher connectivity among green spaces, so

  13. The complete mitogenome of Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Harold) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Xiaoning; Wei, Cong; He, Hong

    2016-05-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome of Eucryptorrhynchus brandti (Harold) (Insecta: Coleoptera: Curculionidae) were reconstructed from whole-genome Illumina Hiseq 2000 sequencing data with an average coverage of 1406.7X. The circular genome is 15,122 bp in length, consisting of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 21 transfer RNAs (tRNAs), two ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and one D-loop or control region. The tRNA-Ile gene was not found in the mitochondrial genome, as is identical to two other curculionidae species, i.e. Sphenophorus sp. (GU176342) and Naupactus xanthographus (GU176345). All PCGs initiated with ATN codons, except for the ND1 started with TTG. Two PCGs (COI and ND4) have an incomplete stop codon T. Two PCGs (ND4L and ND1) harbor the stop codon TAG, while all other PCGs terminated with the TAA codon. The nucleotide composition is highly asymmetric (38.7% A, 14.4% C, 9.2% G and 37.8% T) with an overall AT content of 76.5%. PMID:25427809

  14. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpierre, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xyp and XYp clearly prevailing (79.0%), but with the XO well represented too (19.75%). The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2%) although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6%) and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%). Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74) has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry. PMID:22303104

  15. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petitpierre, Eduard

    2011-01-01

    Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xy(p) and XY(p) clearly prevailing (79.0%), but with the XO well represented too (19.75%). The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2%) although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6%) and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%). Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74) has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry. PMID:22303104

  16. Cytogenetics, cytotaxonomy and chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae revisited (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Petitpierre

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 260 taxa and chromosomal races of subfamily Chrysomelinae have been chromosomally analyzed showing a wide range of diploid numbers from 2n = 12 to 2n = 50, and four types of male sex-chromosome systems. with the parachute-like ones Xyp and XYp clearly prevailing (79.0%, but with the XO well represented too (19.75%. The modal haploid number for chrysomelines is n = 12 (34.2% although it is not probably the presumed most plesiomorph for the whole subfamily, because in tribe Timarchini the modal number is n = 10 (53.6% and in subtribe Chrysomelina n = 17 (65.7%. Some well sampled genera, such as Timarcha, Chrysolina and Cyrtonus, are variable in diploid numbers, whereas others, like Chrysomela, Paropsisterna, Oreina and Leptinotarsa, are conservative and these differences are discussed. The main shifts in the chromosomal evolution of Chrysomelinae seems to be centric fissions and pericentric inversions but other changes as centric fusions are also clearly demonstrated. The biarmed chromosome shape is the prevalent condition, as found in most Coleoptera, although a fair number of species hold a few uniarmed chromosomes at least. A significant negative correlation between the haploid numbers and the asymmetry in size of karyotypes (r = -0.74 has been found from a large sample of 63 checked species of ten different genera. Therefore, the increases in haploid number are generally associated with a higher karyotype symmetry.

  17. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Marcio Dionizio; Picanco, Marcelo Coutinho; Guedes, Raul Narciso Carvalho; Campos, Mateus Ribeiro de; Silva, Gerson Adriano; Martins, Julio Claudio [Universidade Federal de Vicosa (UFV), MG (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia Animal]. E-mail: marcio.dionizio@gmail.com; picanco@ufv.br; guedes@ufv.br; mateusc3@yahoo.com.br; agronomiasilva@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-15

    The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae), Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae). The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth.), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L.) R.Br.), jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.), baleeira herb (Cordia verbenacea L.), mint (Mentha piperita L.), wild balsam apple (Mormodica charantia L.), and billy goat weed or mentrasto (Ageratum conyzoides L.). The insecticide activity of hexane and ethanol extracts from those plants on R. dominica was evaluated. Among them, only hexane extract of A. conyzoides showed insecticide activity; the hexane extract of this species was successively fractionated by silica gel column chromatography, for isolation and purification of the active compounds. Compounds 5,6,7,8,3',4',5'-heptamethoxyflavone; 5,6,7,8,3'-pentamethoxy-4',5'-methilenedioxyflavone and coumarin were identified. However, only coumarin showed insecticide activity against three insect pests (LD{sub 50} from 2.72 to 39.71 mg g{sup -1} a.i.). The increasing order of insects susceptibility to coumarin was R. dominica, S. zeamais and O. surinamensis. (author)

  18. Economic analysis of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) management options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, A R; Hauer, R H; Schuettpelz, N M

    2012-02-01

    Emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire) (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), plays a significant role in the health and extent of management of native North American ash species in urban forests. An economic analysis of management options was performed to aid decision makers in preparing for likely future infestations. Separate ash tree population valuations were derived from the i-Tree Streets program and the Council of Tree and Landscape Appraisers (CTLA) methodology. A relative economic analysis was used to compare a control option (do-nothing approach, only removing ash trees as they die) to three distinct management options: 1) preemptive removal of all ash trees over a 5 yr period, 2) preemptive removal of all ash trees and replacement with comparable nonash trees, or 3) treating the entire population of ash trees with insecticides to minimize mortality. For each valuation and management option, an annual analysis was performed for both the remaining ash tree population and those lost to emerald ash borer. Retention of ash trees using insecticide treatments typically retained greater urban forest value, followed by doing nothing (control), which was better than preemptive removal and replacement. Preemptive removal without tree replacement, which was the least expensive management option, also provided the lowest net urban forest value over the 20-yr simulation. A "no emerald ash borer" scenario was modeled to further serve as a benchmark for each management option and provide a level of economic justification for regulatory programs aimed at slowing the movement of emerald ash borer. PMID:22420272

  19. Diversity of insect communities with different development phases in natural Populus euphratica forests in Xinjiang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Hai-li; LUO You-qing; TIAN Chengming; SUN Jian-hua; FENG Xiaofeng

    2008-01-01

    An investigation method with sample plots was used to study insect communities in four different growth phases of natural Populus euphratica forests, which are juvenile, middle aged, over-mature and degraded forests, in Tarim, Xinjiang in July, 2005 and April, 2006. In our studies, 5,116 insect specimens, belonging to 12 orders, 61 families and 141 species, were collected. Lepidoptera and Coleoptera were the dominant orders. In middle-aged forests, species, individual numbers and diversity indices of insect communities were higher than those in other woodlands. The species richness and diversity indices were lowest in degraded forests because of extremely scarce vegetation.

  20. Egg-laying-site preferences of Pterostichus melanarius in mono- and intercrops

    OpenAIRE

    Tréfás, H.; Lenteren, van, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Increased vegetational diversity influences the behaviour of carabid beetles by changing plant-related abiotic factors. These abiotic factors (light, humidity and habitat structure) affect the selection of oviposition sites and egg survival of carabid beetles. In a field experiment, more larvae of Pterostichus melanarius (Illiger) (Coleoptera Carabidae) were caught in Brussels sprout intercropped with barley than in Brussels sprout alone. The influence of the presence of living barley and Bru...

  1. Macrozoobenthic community structure and dynamics in Cerna River (western Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosmina-Simona Răescu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to determine water quality in Cerna River, researchers carried out analyses into thestructure and dynamics of benthic macroinvertebrates communities as well as into the physical-chemicalfactors. 12 Groups of macroinvertebrates were identified. Density, abundance and frequency values recordedfor benthic communities varied according to the physical-chemical conditions specific to each samplecollecting station. Researchers noticed a direct influence of Băile Herculane town and dam upon thecommunity submitted to study, the maximum density and percentage numerical abundance beingestablished for Oligochaeta and Diptera, benthic groups tolerant to changes in aquatic ecosystemsqualitative parameters. The community of organisms including Ephemeroptera, Trichoptera, Plecoptera,Odonata and Coleoptera was characterized by a decrease in density and abundance values upstream -downstream as water quality is more and more degraded. This deterioration is also emphasized by the bioticindex EPT/Ch values.

  2. CEPF Western Ghats Special Series: Metazoan community composition in tree hole aquatic habitats of Silent Valley National Park and New Amarambalam Reserve Forest of the Western Ghats, India

    OpenAIRE

    Nishadh, K. A.; K.S.A. Das

    2012-01-01

    In a study of the metazoan community composition in tree hole aquatic habitat of a tropical rainforest, Silent Valley National Park, and the adjacent moist deciduous forest, New Amarambalam Reserve Forest, of the Western Ghats, 28 different species were recorded from 150 tree hole aquatic habitats with an average of 3-5 species per tree hole. Most of the recorded organisms (96.8%) belong to Odonata (dragonflies and damselflies), Heteroptera (bugs), Diptera (flies), Coleoptera (beetles) and T...

  3. Biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Soares Gomes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae. Coleopterans of the family Melolonthidae comprise a large group of species that feed on different food sources, including plant roots, stems, and leaves, in addition to plant materials at different decomposition stages. Several species are found in the genus Leucothyreus, occurring in different regions of Brazil, including the various biomes in the country. Information on the biology of species of the genus Leucothyreus is scarce, therefore, we conducted studies on the biological aspects of Leucothyreus ambrosius Blanchard, 1850. The period of adult occurrence was determined with a light trap installed between a cropped and pasture area in the municipality of Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul State, Brazil. Adults collected in the field were used to form insect pairs and the studies were initiated in the entomology laboratory as the adults began ovipositing. Adults were observed flying in the field from October to December. Eggs were obtained as pairs were formed and a colony was established, the embryonic period lasting 14.6 days on average. The larval period in the 1st instar lasted 21.6 days, in the 2nd instar 19.6 days, and in the 3rd instar, 85.6 days. The head capsule width was 1.48 mm in the 1st instar, 2.44 mm in the 2nd, and 3.83 mm in 3rd larval instar. The pupal stage had an average duration of 35.5 days. The egg to adult period lasted 173.3 days. Morphometric information for the larval and adult stages is presented in this study.

  4. Contributions to the knowledge of Atlantic Canadian Histeridae (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Majka

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available New records of Histeridae from Atlantic Canada are reported. Three species are newly recorded from Prince Edward Island and two from New Brunswick, one of which, the introduced Palearctic Atholus bimaculatus (Linnaeus, is newly recorded from Atlantic Canada as a whole. These new records increase the known histerid fauna of the region to 37 species, 30 native and 7 introduced ones. The regional zoogeography of the Histeridae is examined focusing on differences between the faunal composition of the various provinces and the possible reasons responsible for these. The island faunas of Cape Breton, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland are examined. All have reduced faunas in comparison with the mainland perhaps as a result of island-associated diminutions, an area effect, a paucity of collecting, or a combination of these factors. Those of Cape Breton and Prince Edward Island are proportionately similar to those of other families of Coleoptera, whereas that of Newfoundland (only 10% of the mainland fauna is significantly less, a circumstance which deserves further investigation. Seven species of introduced histerids have been recorded in the region. The average dates of first detection of these species are much later than the earliest records of these species in North America and comparatively later than is the case with other suites of introduced species in the Staphylinidae and Carabidae, perhaps as a result of the sparse attention the Histeridae have historically received by coleopterists in the region. Most of the introduced histerids are known to be synanthropic and may have been introduced to the region association with the importation of livestock and materials related to animal husbandry. The Histeridae of the region largely fall into one of several trophic guilds: coastal species and those associated with beach-drift material; species associated with bird nests; species associated with mammal nests; myrmecophilus species; saproxylic

  5. Biocontrol of larval mosquitoes by Acilius sulcatus (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banerjee Siddhartha S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problems associated with resistant mosquitoes and the effects on non-target species by chemicals, evoke a reason to find alternative methods to control mosquitoes, like the use of natural predators. In this regard, aquatic coleopterans have been explored less compared to other insect predators. In the present study, an evaluation of the role of the larvae of Acilius sulcatus Linnaeus 1758 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae as predator of mosquito immatures was made in the laboratory. Its efficacy under field condition was also determined to emphasize its potential as bio-control agent of mosquitoes. Methods In the laboratory, the predation potential of the larvae of A. sulcatus was assessed using the larvae of Culex quinquefasciatus Say 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae as prey at varying predator and prey densities and available space. Under field conditions, the effectiveness of the larvae of A. sulcatus was evaluated through augmentative release in ten cemented tanks hosting immatures of different mosquito species at varying density. The dip density changes in the mosquito immatures were used as indicator for the effectiveness of A. sulcatus larvae. Results A single larva of A. sulcatus consumed on an average 34 IV instar larvae of Cx. quinquefasciatus in a 24 h period. It was observed that feeding rate of A. sulcatus did not differ between the light-on (6 a.m. – 6 p.m., and dark (6 p.m. – 6 a.m. phases, but decreased with the volume of water i.e., space availability. The prey consumption of the larvae of A. sulcatus differed significantly (P A. sulcatus larvae, while with the withdrawal, a significant increase (p A. sulcatus in regulating mosquito immatures. In the control tanks, mean larval density did not differ (p > 0.05 throughout the study period. Conclusion the larvae of the dytiscid beetle A. sulcatus proved to be an efficient predator of mosquito immatures and may be useful in biocontrol of medically important mosquitoes.

  6. Initial Study of the Ground Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and Other Invertebrates from “Leshnitsa” Nature Reserve(Central Stara Planina Mountains, Bulgaria)

    OpenAIRE

    Teodora M. Teofilova

    2016-01-01

    The invertebrate fauna of the “Leshnitsa” nature reserve was studied, with particular consideration to the ground beetles. During the study altogether 394 specimens of carabid beetlesbelonging to 32 species and subspecies were captured, as well as 23 other invertebrate species,some of which are with a conservation significance (protected, Bulgarian and Balkan endemics).Ground beetles were characterized and classified according to their zoogeographical belonging,degree of endemism and the life...

  7. Phylogenetic community ecology of soil biodiversity using mitochondrial metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andújar, Carmelo; Arribas, Paula; Ruzicka, Filip; Crampton-Platt, Alex; Timmermans, Martijn J T N; Vogler, Alfried P

    2015-07-01

    High-throughput DNA methods hold great promise for the study of taxonomically intractable mesofauna of the soil. Here, we assess species diversity and community structure in a phylogenetic framework, by sequencing total DNA from bulk specimen samples and assembly of mitochondrial genomes. The combination of mitochondrial metagenomics and DNA barcode sequencing of 1494 specimens in 69 soil samples from three geographic regions in southern Iberia revealed >300 species of soil Coleoptera (beetles) from a broad spectrum of phylogenetic lineages. A set of 214 mitochondrial sequences longer than 3000 bp was generated and used to estimate a well-supported phylogenetic tree of the order Coleoptera. Shorter sequences, including cox1 barcodes, were placed on this mitogenomic tree. Raw Illumina reads were mapped against all available sequences to test for species present in local samples. This approach simultaneously established the species richness, phylogenetic composition and community turnover at species and phylogenetic levels. We find a strong signature of vertical structuring in soil fauna that shows high local community differentiation between deep soil and superficial horizons at phylogenetic levels. Within the two vertical layers, turnover among regions was primarily at the tip (species) level and was stronger in the deep soil than leaf litter communities, pointing to layer-mediated drivers determining species diversification, spatial structure and evolutionary assembly of soil communities. This integrated phylogenetic framework opens the application of phylogenetic community ecology to the mesofauna of the soil, among the most diverse and least well-understood ecosystems, and will propel both theoretical and applied soil science. PMID:25865150

  8. Novos táxons sul-americanos de Compsocerini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilma Solange Napp

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Novos táxons sul-americanos de Compsocerini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. Um novo gênero e quatro novas espécies, todos provenientes da Bolívia, são descritos em Compsocerini: Ecoporanga gen. nov., espécie-tipo E. achira sp. nov., Dilocerus brunneus sp. nov., Rierguscha florida sp. nov., procedentes de Santa Cruz e Ethemon iuba sp. nov. proveniente de Cochabamba.New South American taxa of Compsocerini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. The following new genus and species, all from Bolivia, are described in Compsocerini: Ecoporanga gen. nov., type species E. achira sp. nov., Dilocerus brunneus sp. nov., Rierguscha florida sp. nov., from Santa Cruz, and Ethemon iuba sp. nov. from Cochabamba.

  9. Una especie nueva de Trechisibus de la Argentina (Coleoptera: Carabidae A new species of Trechisibus from Argentina (Coleoptera: Carabidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Roig-Juñent

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN. Las Trechini constituyen una tribu de Carabidae distribuida ampliamente en la región Andino Patagónica. A pesar de que existen varias revisiones parciales de esta tribu para la Argentina y Chile, es muy común hallar especies nuevas, debido sobre todo a la prospección de áreas no exploradas. En este aporte se describe una especie nueva del género Trechisibus Jeannel del Cerro Nevado (Mendoza, Argentina. Por sus características morfológicas pertenece al grupo de especies depressus. Se describe e ilustra el adulto de esta especie nueva, se provee una clave para la identificación de las especies del grupo depressus y se discuten algunos aspectos de la distribución de estas especies.ABSTRACT. Trechini is a tribe of Carabidae (Coleoptera widely distributed in the Andean Patagonian region in South America. In spite of several partial revisions of the tribe for Argentina and Chile, it is very common to find new species due to the research of unexplored areas. In the present paper, a new species of the genus Trechisibus Jeannel from the Cerro Nevado (Mendoza, Argentina is described. Based on its morphological features the new species is considered as a member of the depressus group. The adult of the new species is described and illustrated, a key for the identification of the species of the depressus group is provided, and some aspects of the distribution of the group are discussed.

  10. Dung beetle assemblages (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae) in Atlantic forest fragments in southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Renata C. Campos; Malva I. Medina Hernández

    2013-01-01

    Dung beetle assemblages (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae) in Atlantic forest fragments in southern Brazil. The beetles of the subfamily Scarabaeinae are important organisms that participate in the cycle of decomposition, especially in tropical ecosystems. Most species feed on feces (dung) or carcasses (carrion) and are associated with animals that produce their food resources. Dung beetles are divided into three functional groups: rollers, tunnelers and dwellers. This present work aims to study the ...

  11. Species of beetles (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae associated to banana (Musa spp. in Ceballos, Ciego de Avila, Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Sisne Luis

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A white light trap was placed in bananas plantations, according to Sisne, 2009 and MINAG, 1985, in the Citric enterprise of Ciego de Ávila during the period between May and July of 2010 with the objective of determining the composition of genus and species of the order Coleoptera family Scarabaeidae associated to the agroecosystem. The species Cyclocephala cubana Chapin, Phyllophaga puberula Duval, and Phyllophaga patruelis Chev. are associated to bananas crops in these areas.

  12. Ecological impact of entomopathogenic nematodes used to control the large pine weevil, Hylobius abietis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, Christopher D.

    2010-01-01

    The large pine weevil (Hylobius abietis; Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is one of the most economically damaging pests in forestry across Northern Europe. Its larvae develop in coniferous tree stumps on clearfell sites and adult weevils feed on seedlings that are replanted on these sites, causing substantial mortality. As the drive towards achieving the sustainable management of natural resources increases, biological control agents are being considered as an alternative to chemical ...

  13. Otiorhynchus spp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) as pests in horticulture: genetics and management options with entomopathogenic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Jacqueline

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, weevils of the genus Otiorhynchus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) cause damage with detrimental economic effects to many horticultural crops due to the root feeding of their larvae as well as foliage feeding of their adults. Aside from the black vine weevil Otiorhynchus sulcatus, which is the best-known pest within this genus, numerous other Otiorhynchus species have been increasingly recognized as pests in recent years. Nocturnal adult weevils and soil-inhibiting larvae are in princip...

  14. Shared Ancestry of Symbionts? Sagrinae and Donaciinae (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) Harbor Similar Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitra Synefiaridou; Gregor Kölsch

    2012-01-01

    When symbioses between insects and bacteria are discussed, the origin of a given association is regularly of interest. We examined the evolution of the symbiosis between reed beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Donaciinae) and intracellular symbionts belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae. We analyzed the partial sequence of the 16S rRNA to assess the phylogenetic relationships with bacteria we found in other beetle groups (Cerambycidae, Anobiidae, other Chrysomelidae). We discuss the ecology of...

  15. Laboratory Rearing of Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae): A Predator of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Salom, S. M.; L. T. Kok; Lamb, A B; Jubb, C

    2012-01-01

    Coleopteran species are biological control agents of numerous invasive pests. Laricobius nigrinus (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), a predaceous, univoltine species, spends the summer aestivating but is active for the rest of the year. Laricobius nigrinus possesses many essential attributes for effective biological control of the hemlock woolly adelgid (Hemiptera: Adelgidae). The predator must be reared in large numbers for field releases. We describe some of the studies that led to the successful ...

  16. Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Andréa Roveré Franz; Neiva Knaak; Lidia Mariana Fiuza

    2011-01-01

    Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera, Curculionidae). Stored grains are subject to losses in quality nutritional value and in sanitation from the time they are stored to the time they are consumed. Botanical insecticides may offer an alternative solution for pest control. The objective was to test the insecticidal properties of the essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus (leaf), Zingiber officinale (root) and Mentha sp. (leaf). The efficacy of ...

  17. New species and records of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae: Macrodactylini) from Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Pérez, Roberto; Morón, Miguel Ángel

    2014-01-01

    Two new species of Macrodactylus Dejean (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) from Bolivia are described and illustrated: M. megaphyllus new species (from Comarapa, Santa Cruz and Sehuenca, Cochabamba) and M. yunganus new species (from Mairana and Comarapa, Santa Cruz). In addition, the species Macrodactylus bolivianus Moser, M. gracilis Moser, and M. nobilis Frey are redescribed and illustrated to help facilitate identification of these species. A key to the 10 species of Macrodactylus presently known from Bolivia is provided.  PMID:25283110

  18. Wireworms’ Management: An Overview of the Existing Methods, with Particular Regards to Agriotes spp. (Coleoptera: Elateridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Barsics

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireworms (Coleoptera: Elateridae are important soil dwelling pests worldwide causing yield losses in many crops. The progressive restrictions in the matter of efficient synthetic chemicals for health and environmental care brought out the need for alternative management techniques. This paper summarizes the main potential tools that have been studied up to now and that could be applied together in integrated pest management systems and suggests guidelines for future research.

  19. Lectotype designations and nomenclatural changes in Xylographus Mellié (Coleoptera, Ciidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval-Gómez,Vivian E.; Cristiano Lopes-Andrade; John Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    We designate lectotypes and propose nomenclatural changes in Xylographus Mellié (Coleoptera, Ciidae) based on type specimens deposited in the Museum of Comparative Zoology (USA), Museum für Naturkunde Berlin (Germany), the Natural History Museum (UK), Muséum d’Histoire Naturelle de la Ville de Genève (Switzerland), Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle (France), Naturhistoriska Riksmuseet (Sweden) and Naturhistorisches Museum Wien (Austria). We desi...

  20. The Leaf-Beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) Feed On Some Weeds In Tokat Province

    OpenAIRE

    Çam, Halit; ATAY, Turgut

    2004-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the leaf-beetles (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae) which causes extensive damage on weeds in the vicinity of Tokat, Turkey. Total 9 taxa including 4 species of Chrysomelinae, 1 species of Clytrinae, 1 species of Criocerinae, 2 species of Alticinae and 1 species of Cassidinae were found to be destructive on different weed species. These species were; Entomoscelis adonidis (Pall.) on Sinapis arvensis L., Gastrophysa polygoni (L.) on Polygonum convolvulus L. an...

  1. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Characterization of white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera in salak plantation based on morphology and protein banding pattern. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. This research aims to find out the white grub (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera variability based on the morphological characteristic and protein banding pattern found in ”salak pondoh” farm in Regencies of Sleman, Yogyakarta and Magelang, Central Java. Each area has five sampling points. Morphological analysis on white grub was conducted using descriptive method and analysis on protein banding pattern was conducted using qualitative analysis based on the presence or absent of band pattern on the gel, and qualitatively based on the relative mobility value (Rf of protein. The result indicated that the white grub in Sleman and Magelang, based on morphology characteristic is only one species, namely Holothricia sp. Based on the protein banding pattern, the white grub sample have differences of protein band number and protein molecular weight. Key words: Salacca zalacca, white grub, morphology, protein banding pattern.Abstrak. Maryati KT, Sugiyarto. 2010. Karakterisasi lundi putih (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera pada pertanaman salak berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein. Nusantara Bioscience 1: 72-77. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui keanekaragaman lundi putih (Melolonthidae; Coleoptera berdasarkan ciri morfologi dan pola pita protein yang ditemukan di lahan pertanaman salak pondoh di Kabupaten Sleman, Yogyakarta dan Kabupaten Magelang, Jawa Tengah. Pada masing-masing wilayah diambil lima titik sampling. Analisis morfologi lundi putih digunakan metode deskriptif, dan analisis pola pita protein digunakan analisis kualitatif berdasarkan muncul tidaknya pola pita pada gel, dan secara kuantitatif berdasarkan nilai mobilitas relatif protein (RF. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa sampel lundi putih di Kabupaten Sleman dan Magelang, berdasar karakter

  2. A new genus and four new species of false click beetles (Coleoptera: Eucnemidae) from Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    A new genus and four new species of false click beetle (Coleoptera: Eucnemidae) are described. Bermilloides new genus is described from Bornean Malaysia. New species are: Calyptocerus iridis new species (Philippines), Bermilloides lumawigi new species (Malaysia), Spinifornax elongatus new species (Malaysia) and Ceratus antennatus new species (Thailand). Dorsal and ventral habitus, as possible, for each species are illustrated. Male aedeagi are illustrated for Calyptocerus iridis and Ceratu...

  3. Life History of the Tamarind Weevil, Sitophilus linearis (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), on Tamarind Seed

    OpenAIRE

    James Adebayo Ojo; Adebayo Amos Omoloye

    2015-01-01

    The tamarind weevil, Sitophilus linearis Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is an important pest of tamarind and other Caesalpinioideae. Investigating its life history is important in the implementation of management strategy. Its life history was monitored daily to understand its developmental biology on tamarind seed following standard procedures under laboratory conditions of 24–30°C temperature, 60–70% relative humidity, and 12L : 12D photoperiod. The egg incubation period lasted 3.17 ± ...

  4. Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Andreia Mauruto Chernaki-Leffer; Daniel Ricardo Sosa-Gómez; Almeida, Lúcia M.; Ivani de Oliveira Negrão Lopes

    2011-01-01

    Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae) to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil. The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer), is an important insect pest in poultry houses in Brazil. Susceptibility of the lesser mealworm collected from eight poultry houses in Paraná state, southern Brazil, was evaluated for cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron. Adult A. diaperinus were tested in bioassays with cypermethrin and dichlorvo...

  5. Novas espécies de Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae da Bolívia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas da Bolívia, Santa Cruz: Trachysomus apipunga sp. nov., Hesychotypa aotinga sp. nov., Cacostola apyraiuba sp. nov. and Glypthaga nearnsi sp. nov.New species of Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae from Bolivia. New species described from Santa Cruz: Trachysomus apipunga sp. nov., Hesychotypa aotinga sp. nov., Cacostola apyraiuba sp. nov. and Glypthaga nearnsi sp. nov.

  6. Penggunaan Beberapa Serbuk Rimpang Terhadap Mortalitas Hama Callosobruchus chinensis L. (Coleoptera; Bruchidae) Pada Kacang Hijau

    OpenAIRE

    Hayati, Anni

    2012-01-01

    Anni Hayati, "Use of Some Powdered Rhizome Mortality Against Pests Callosobruchus chinensis L. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) On the Green Bean ". It was under supervised by Yuswani Pangestiningsih and Fatimah Zahara. C.chinensis L. are pests on green beans in storage which causes considerable yield loss, one of effective control is the use of botanical insecticides. Use of some powdered rhizome on mortality C.chinensis L. in a green bean plant pests carried in the laboratory of t...

  7. Ernährungsphysiologische Aspekte xylophager Bockkäferlarven (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Grünwald, Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Mittels Fluoreszenz-in-situ-Hybridisierung und PCR-basierter rRNA-Sequenzierung wurde die Darm- und Myzetomflora xylophager Insektenlarven (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) untersucht. Die Myzetome enthalten hefeartige Symbionten in Form von Candida rhagii und Candida shehatae. Das Darmlumen der Tiere beherbergt eine hoch variable Gemeinschaft von Bakterien und Pilzen, die zum Teil der Nahrung entstammt. Die Larven des Hausbockkäfers nehmen eine Sonderstellung ein: Ihnen fehlen sowohl Myzetome als a...

  8. Defensive Glands of the Darkling Beetle Mesomorphus villiger Blanchard (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Seena, C. M.; Sabu K. Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Massive home invasion by the darkling beetle Mesomorphus villiger Blanchard 1853 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) during monsoon season make it a nuisance pest in many regions of south India. Morphology of defensive glands and mode of release and dispersal of the defensive secretion were analysed. Defensive glands were separated from the abdominal sternites by cutting along the posterior margin of the seventh sternite. Glands are evaginations of intersegmental membrane between the seventh and eigh...

  9. New national and state records of Neotropical Staphylinidae (Insecta: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiain, Julieta; Márquez, Juan; Irmler, Urlich

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen new national records of nine species of Osoriinae (Staphylinidae) are added for 10 Neotropical countries. Additionally, 17 species of three subfamilies are first recorded from ten States of México. The distributional patterns of the studied species are commented and the congruence with species of different families of Coleoptera and Odonata previously analyzed is discussed. Finally, we conclude that some of these patterns can be proposed as hypothesis of primary biogeographic homology. PMID:26249885

  10. Incorporating a Sorghum Habitat for Enhancing Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Cotton

    OpenAIRE

    P. G. Tillman; Cottrell, T. E.

    2012-01-01

    Lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) prey on insect pests in cotton. The objective of this 2 yr on-farm study was to document the impact of a grain sorghum trap crop on the density of Coccinellidae on nearby cotton. Scymnus spp., Coccinella septempunctata (L.), Hippodamia convergens Guérin-Méneville, Harmonia axyridis (Pallas), Coleomegilla maculata (De Geer), Cycloneda munda (Say), and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant) were found in sorghum over both years. Lady beetle compositions in sorghum and ...

  11. A checklist of the genus Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae of the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mahendiran

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An annotated checklist of Blosyrus Schoenherr (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Entiminae comprising 101 species with their updated nomenclature, synonyms and distribution is given. The distribution pattern indicates that the genus is diversified mostly in the Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia regions. Out of 101 species, 92 occur in Sub-Saharan Africa. From India, eight species were recorded. In India, the distribution is mainly in West Bengal, Assam, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka and Tamil Nadu.

  12. Biological activities of Allium sativum essential oil against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Chaubey Mukesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Essential oil from Allium sativum was isolated and investigated for its repellent, insecticidal, ovipositional and egg hatching inhibition activities against pulse beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). A. sativum essential oil repelled bruchid adults at a very low concentration in choice oviposition assay. A. sativum essential oil caused both fumigant and contact toxicity in C. chinensis adults in a concentration dependent manner. Oviposition potency of C. chinensis adults...

  13. Insecticidal Efficacy of Some Lamiaceae Plant Extracts Against Callosobruchus chinensis Linn. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    OpenAIRE

    M.M. Kiradoo; Meera Srivastava

    2011-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to screen some plants belonging to family Lamiaceae against Callosobruchus chinensis Linn.. Among fourteen important insect pests of stored grains, the pulse beetle C. chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) is one such pest causing considerable damage to stored pulses. The eggs are laid on the host grains; the larvae bore inside and after feeding and pupating emerge out as adults leaving behind damaged hollow seed-grains. Looking into the hazards of chemical insect...

  14. Distributional patterns in an insect community inhabiting a sandy beach of Uruguay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourglia, Virginia; González-Vainer, Patricia; Defeo, Omar

    2015-12-01

    Most studies of sandy beach macrofauna have been restricted to semiterrestrial species and do not include insects when providing species richness and abundance estimates. Particularly, spatio-temporal patterns of community structure of the entomofauna inhabiting these ecosystems have been scarcely documented. This study assessed spatio-temporal distributional patterns of the night active entomofauna on a beach-dune system of Uruguay, including variations in species richness, abundance and diversity, and their relationship with environmental factors. A deconstructive taxonomic analysis was also performed, considering richness and abundance patterns separately for the most abundant insect Orders (Hymenoptera and Coleoptera) to better understand the factors which drive their patterns. We found clear temporal and across-shore patterns in the insect community inhabiting a land-ocean interface, which matched spatiotemporal variations in the environment. Abundance and species richness were highest in spring and summer, concurrently with high temperatures and low values of sediment moisture and compaction. Multivariate ordinations showed two well-defined species groups, which separated summer, autumn and spring samples from winter ones. Generalized Linear Models allowed us to describe a clear segregation in space of the most important orders of the insect community, with specific preferences for the terrestrial (Hymenoptera) and beach (Coleoptera) fringes. Hymenoptera preferred the dune zone, characterized by high elevation and low sand moisture and compaction levels, whereas Coleoptera preferred gentle slopes and fine and humid sands of the beach. Our results suggest that beach and dune ecosystems operate as two separate components in regard to their physical and biological features. The high values of species richness and abundance of insects reveal that this group has a more significant ecological role than that originally considered so far in sandy beach ecology.

  15. Especies mexicanas de Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae Mexican species of Curculionidae (Insecta: Coleoptera associated to agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Romo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Se estudiaron las especies de picudos o gorgojos (Coleoptera: Curculionidae asociadas con agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae en México. Se registraron 5 especies asociadas con especies de Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes y Yucca; de éstas, 4 pertenecen a la subfamilia Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis y Cactophagus spinolae y 1 a la Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Se presentan diagnosis, ilustraciones y una clave para la identificación de las 5 especies de curculiónidos asociados con agaves. Se establecen las siguientes sinonimias: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; y Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891 y Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae associated with agaves (Asparagaceae: Agavoideae from Mexico are analyzed. Five species were recorded associated with species of Agave, Furcraea, Hesperoyucca, Polianthes, and Yucca. Four of these species belong to the subfamily Dryophthorinae (Scyphophorus acupunctatus, S. yuccae, Rhinostomus frontalis, and Cactophagus spinolae and 1 belongs to the subfamily Baridinae (Peltophorus polymitus. Diagnoses, illustrations and a key are presented for identifying the 5 species of weevils found on agaves. The following synonymies are established: Sphenophorus validus LeConte, 1858 = Cactophagus spinolae (Gyllenhal, 1838; and Zygops polymitus seminiveus LeConte, 1884, Z. p. leopardinus Desbrochers, 1891, and Z. p. suffusus Casey, 1892 = Peltophorus polymitus Boheman, 1845.

  16. Diversity and habitat preferences of Carabidae and Staphylinidae (Coleoptera in two agroecosystems Diversidade e preferência de habitat de Carabidae e Staphylinidae (Coleoptera em dois agroecossistemas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Carlos Fernandes Martins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study had as objective determine the diversity and abundance of adults Carabidae and Staphylinidae in two areas, constituted by forest fragment and soybean/corn crops under conventional tillage and no-tillage systems and to analyze the distribution and preference of those beetles for the habitat. The beetles were sampled with 48 pitfall traps. In both experimental areas, two parallel transects of pitfall traps were installed. Each transect had 100 m in the crop and 100 m in the forest fragment. Four traps were close to each other (1 m in the edge between the crop and the forest fragment, the other traps were installed each 10 m. The obtained data were submitted to the faunistic analysis and the preference of the species by habitat was obtained by cluster analysis. The results demonstrated that the type of crop system (conventional tillage or no-tillage might have influenced the diversity of species of Carabidae and Staphylinidae. The cluster analysis evidenced that the carabids may prefer a specific habitat. In the present study, the distribution of carabids and staphylinids in the three habitats showed that these beetles have potential to be dispersed at great distances inside the crop.Este estudo teve como objetivo determinar a diversidade e abundância de adultos de Carabidae e Staphylinidae em duas áreas, constituídas por fragmentos florestais e culturas de soja/milho sob sistemas de plantio convencional e direto, e analisar a distribuição e a preferência desses insetos para o habitat. Os besouros foram amostrados com o uso de 48 armadilhas de solo do tipo Pitfall. Em ambas as áreas experimentais, foram instalados dois transectos paralelos de armadilhas; cada transecto teve 100 m na culturas e 100 m no fragmento florestal. Na borda entre a cultura e o fragmento de floresta foram instaladas quatro armadilhas, que ficaram distantes entre si por 1 m e as outras armadilhas, a cada 10 m. Os dados obtidos foram submetidos à an

  17. Environmental conditions enhance toxicant effects in larvae of the ground beetle Pterostichus oblongopunctatus (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarska, Agnieszka J., E-mail: a.bednarska@uj.edu.p [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland); Laskowski, Ryszard, E-mail: ryszard.laskowski@uj.edu.p [Institute of Environmental Sciences, Jagiellonian University, Gronostajowa 7, 30-387 Krakow (Poland)

    2009-05-15

    The wide geographical distribution of ground beetles Pterostichus oblongopunctatus makes them very likely to be exposed to several environmental stressors at the same time. These could include both climatic stress and exposure to chemicals. Our previous studies demonstrated that the combined effect of nickel (Ni) and chlorpyrifos (CHP) was temperature (T)-dependent in adult P. oblongopunctatus. Frequently the different developmental stages of an organism are differently sensitive to single stressors, and for a number of reasons, such as differences in exposure routes, their interactions may also take different forms. Because of this, we studied the effects of the same factors on the beetle larvae. The results showed that all factors, as well as their interactions, influenced larvae survival. The synergistic effect of Ni and CPF was temperature-dependent and the effect of Ni x T interaction on the proportion of emerged imagines indicated stronger toxicity of Ni at 25 deg. C than at 10 deg. C. - Combined negative effects of nickel and chlorpyrifos on carabid beetles depend on ambient temperature.

  18. Behavioral responses of plum curculio (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) to different enantiomer concentrations and blends of the synthetic aggregation pheromone grandisoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host plant odors are important for insect location of food and mates. Synergy between host plant odors and aggregation pheromones occurs in many Curculionidae species. The plum curculio Conotrachelus nenuphar Herbst (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a major pest of pome and stone fruit. Males produce t...

  19. From forest to plantation? Obscure papers reveal alternate host plants for the coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), is the most devastating insect pest of coffee throughout the world. The insect is endemic to Africa but can now be found throughout nearly all coffee producing countries. One area of the basic biology of the insec...

  20. First record of the agave snout weevil, Scyphophorus acupunctatusGyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae), in Puerto Rico

    OpenAIRE

    Setliff, Gregory P.; Anderson, Jesse A.

    2011-01-01

    The agave snout weevil, Scyphophorus acupunctatus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Dryophthorinae), is reported from Puerto Rico for the first time. It was collected on feral sisal, Agave sisalana Perrine (Agavaceae), in the Guánica Dry Forest Reserve in the southwestern part of the island.

  1. Redescription of the Hispaniolan ladybird genus Bura Mulsant (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) and justification for its transfer from Coccidulinae to Sticholotidinae

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the current work, we discuss the features of Bura (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) that justify its transfer from Coccidulinae to Sticholotidinae, speculate on circumstances that led to its prior misclassification, and highlight current problems in the delineation of the afforementioned lady beetle su...

  2. A new genus for Drepanocanthoides larreae (Horn, 1887) and description of a new congeneric Mexican species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Marco DELLACASA; Dellacasa, Giovanni; Gordon, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Drepanocanthoides larreae (Horn, 1887) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) is transferred to the new genus Hornosus and the new species Hornosus turnbowi from Mexico (Nuevo León) is described. A complete set of fi gures is supplied for the taxa dealt with herein.

  3. Saprovisca sarangay, new species, a second species in an unusual Philippine genus of Eupariini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Skelley, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    A new species of Saprovisca Stebnicka (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is described from the Philippines. This new species possesses sexual dimorphism in the form of clypeal horns in males which also show major and minor allometry, both are conditions rare in the Aphodiinae.

  4. Agrilus rubensteini, a new species from the Philippines related to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new species from the Philippines closely related to the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, 1888 (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) is described: Agrilus rubensteini Chamorro & Jendek, new species. This is the first species in the A. cyaneoniger species-group recorded for the Philippines. Agr...

  5. Upper lethal temperature limits of the common furniture beetle Anobium punctatum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Stengård; Jensen, Karl-Martin Vagn

    The susceptibility of the egg, larval and adult stages of Anobium punctatum De Geer (Coleoptera: Anobiidae) to heat (46-54°C, 25-30% RH) was investigated. The larval stage was found to be most tolerant to heat. Very short exposure (5 min) of the larvae to temperatures of 52°C and above led to 100...

  6. Records of unsuccessful attack by Anoplophora glabripennis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) on broadleaf trees of questionable suitability in Ontario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery of the non-native Anoplophora glabripennis Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Ontario, Canada, in 2003 led to the implementation of an eradication program. The plan consisted of removing all infested trees and all trees within 400 m of an infested tree belonging to a genus consider...

  7. Seasonal flight activity and distribution of metallic woodboring beetles (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) collected in North Carolina and Tennessee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallic wood boring insects (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) species are responsible for high levels of host plant injury to deciduous shade and flowering trees in commercial nurseries, urban forests, and managed landscapes. Ornamental plant producers in the southeastern U.S. have ranked borers, includin...

  8. Resistance in Cultivated Sunflower Germplasm to the Red Sunflower Seed Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the Northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    A 6-year field study evaluated 52 sunflower, Helianthus annuus L., accessions, 20 breeding lines, and 9 interspecific crosses for resistance to infestation by naturally occurring populations of the red sunflower seed weevil, Smicronyx fulvus LeConte (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Germplasm with potent...

  9. Introduction and Recovery of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) as a predator of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Alyerodidae) is an important pest of many crops on a global scale. The use of biological control organisms such as coccinelid predators can help manage this pest. Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinelidae) is an obligate predator of whiteflies, in...

  10. Quantitative relationship between potato tuber damage and counts of Pacific Coast wireworm (Coleoptera: Elateridae) in baits: seasonal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plots were baited with rolled oats in spring to assess the relationship between counts of Pacific coast wireworm, Limonius canus (Coleoptera: Elateridae) and damage to potato tubers. Baiting was done at 7 intervals beginning before planting of potatoes and ending following germination. Injury (per...

  11. Self-selection of two diet components by Tennebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) larvae and its impact on fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    We studied the ability of Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) to self-select optimal ratios of two dietary components to approach nutritional balance and maximum fitness. Life table analysis was used to determine the fitness of T. molitor developing in diet mixtures comprised of four dif...

  12. Novos táxons em Acanthocinini sul-americanos (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela L. Monné

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Novos táxons em Acanthocinini sul-americanos (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. São descritos e figurados os novos táxons: Trichonyssodrys nessimiani sp. nov. do Brasil (Bahia a Santa Catarina, Amniscites tavakiliani sp. nov. da Guiana Francesa and A. amboroensis sp. nov. da Bolívia (Cochabamba e Santa Cruz; Trichonius inusitatus sp. nov. e Lophopoenopsis itatiaiensis sp. nov. do Brasil (Rio de Janeiro e Luteolepturges gen. nov., espécie tipo L. galbus sp. nov., do Brasil (Amazonas, Rondônia, Peru e Equador.

  13. Nothoprodontia, um novo gênero de Trachyderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Monné

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Nothoprodontia gen. nov. e sua espécie-tipo, N. boliviana sp. nov., são descritos da Bolívia (Cochabamba. O novo gênero é comparado com Prodontia Audinet-Serville, 1834, Eriphus Audinet-Serville, 1834, and Athetesis Bates, 1870.Nothoprodontia, a new genus of Trachyderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Cerambycinae. Nothoprodontia gen. nov. and its type-species, N. boliviana sp. nov., are described from Bolívia (Cochabamba. Comparative notes with Prodontia Audinet-Serville, 1834, Eriphus Audinet-Serville, 1834, and Athetesis Bates, 1870 are also given.

  14. Resfriamento artificial para o controle de Coleoptera em arroz armazenado em silo metálico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Maria Noemberg Lazzari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Resfriamento artificial para o controle de Coleoptera em arroz armazenado em silo metálico. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar o efeito do resfriamento artificial de grãos de arroz para o controle de coleópteros-praga. O ar frio foi insuflado pelo sistema de aeração em um silo metálico com arroz-em-casca. A avaliação do tratamento foi feita quinzenalmente usando armadilhas caladores. As espécies de Coleoptera capturadas foram: Oryzaephilus surinamensis (60%; Cryptolestes ferrugineus (9%; Rhyzopertha dominica (16,5% e Sitophilus spp. (0,5%. Aos 28 dias, a temperatura média da massa de grãos era de 15ºC, e o número médio de insetos havia diminuído 76,8%. A aplicação de ar frio manteve as populações sob controle por aproximadamente 60 dias. Os resultados do monitoramento dos insetos e da temperatura indicaram que um novo ciclo de ar frio deveria ser aplicado nesse período para manter as populações sob controle. Também o manejo adequado da massa de grãos faz-se necessário para garantir resultados satisfatórios do resfriamento artificial.Artificial chilling to control Coleoptera in paddy rice stored in metallic silo. The objective of this research was to evaluate the effect of artificial chilling for the control of coleopterans in stored paddy rice. The cold air was insufflated through the aeration system of a metallic silo with paddy rice. Evaluation of insect number was made every 15 days using probe traps. The species of Coleoptera captured were: Oryzaephilus surinamensis (60%; Cryptolestes ferrugineus (9%; Rhyzopertha dominica (16.5% and Sitophilus spp. (0.5%. By the 28th day the average temperature of the grain mass was 15ºC, and the mean number of insects decreased 76.8%. The cold air application kept the insect populations under control for approximately 60 days. The results of temperature and insect monitoring indicated that a new cycle of cold air should be applied by that time to keep the populations under

  15. Bioluminescence emissions of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Gohain Barua; S Hazarika; N M Saikia; G D Baruah

    2009-09-01

    We recorded the in vivo emission and time-resolved spectra of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae). The emission spectrum shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for this particular species is 55 nm, which is significantly narrower than the in vivo half-widths reported till now. The time-resolved spectrum reveals that a flash of about 100 ms duration is, in fact, composed of a number of microsecond pulses. This suggests that the speed of the enzyme-catalysed chemiluminescence reaction in the firefly for the emission of light is much faster than was previously believed.

  16. Bioluminescence emissions of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Gohain Barua; S Hazarika; N M Saikia; G D Baruah

    2009-06-01

    We recorded the in vivo emission and time-resolved spectra of the firefly Luciola praeusta Kiesenwetter 1874 (Coleoptera : Lampyridae : Luciolinae). The emission spectrum shows that the full width at half maximum (FWHM) value for this particular species is 55 nm, which is significantly narrower than the in vivo half-widths reported till now. The time-resolved spectrum reveals that a flash of about 100 ms duration is, in fact, composed of a number of microsecond pulses. This suggests that the speed of the enzyme-catalysed chemiluminescence reaction in the firefly for the emission of light is much faster than was previously believed.

  17. Invertebrate fauna (Coleoptera, Collembola, Diplopoda, Isopoda collected in the karst areas of the Aninei - Locvei Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Giurginca

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The authors identified 132 species of invertebrates (14 Oniscidea, 25 Diplopoda,31 Collembola and 62 Coleoptera recently sampled (2001–2006 from the soil and subterranean (MSS and caves environments from the Banat Mountains. Some new,rare and endemic species are discussed. The seasonal changes of the species diversity in the superficial subterranean environments at 0.5 to 1 m in depth are for the first time presented for the Reşiţa – Moldova Nouă synclinorium. The characteristic and preferential species for the mesovoid shallow substratum (MSS, belonging to the analyzed taxa, are identified.

  18. A review of the natural history of adult Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina and adjacent countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Iorio, Osvaldo

    2014-01-01

    A compilation of the known natural history of adult Cetoniinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) from Argentina and adjacent countries is provided. Food items of adult Cetoniinae include pollen and/or nectar (flower visitors), sap and/or slime flux, ripened fruits on plants, green tissues and leaves, and honey. Of the 36 species of Cetoniinae from Argentina, food items are known only for 11 species (30.5%). Attraction to light and bait-traps, adult activity periods, vertebrate predators, and the occurrence in bird nests are presented and discussed. Other insects that share the same food sources and bait-traps with Cetoniinae are mentioned. PMID:24869870

  19. Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Morón

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Description of the third instar larvae of five species of Cyclocephala (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Dynastinae from Mexico. Larvae of four species of Cyclocephala are described for the first time based on specimens collected in Mexican localities: C. barrerai Martínez, 1969 from Puebla, C. sinaloae Howden & Endrödi, 1966 from Sinaloa, C. fasciolata Bates, 1888 from Veracruz, and C. jalapensis Casey, 1915 from Hidalgo. Larva of C. lunulata Burmeister, 1847, is redescribed based on specimens from the Mexican states of Morelos, Puebla, and Veracruz. Diagnostic structures are illustrated and the differences and similarities of each species with other previously described larvae of the genus are commented.

  20. Espécies de Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini ocorrentes na Bolívia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena M. Galileo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Species of Gorybia Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Piezocerini occurring in Bolivia. The genus Gorybia (Cerambycinae, Piezocerini consists of 45 described species with seven species recorded from Bolivia. Nine new species are described herein from Bolivia: G. abnormalis sp. nov.; G. alveolata sp. nov.; G. asyka sp. nov.; G. florida sp. nov.; G. inarmata sp. nov.; G. longithorax sp. nov.; G. guenda sp. nov.; G. tuberosa sp. nov. and G. wappesi sp. nov. A key to the species now known to occur in Bolivia is included.

  1. On the family- and genus-series nomina in Gyrinidae Latreille, 1810 (Coleoptera, Adephaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Grey T; Miller, Kelly B

    2013-01-01

    All available genus- and family- group nomina for the Gyrinidae (Coleoptera: Adephaga) are listed along with original citation, original and current status, type nominal taxon with method of designation, and known synonymies and incorrect subsequent spellings. The nomina included follow the most current classification. Discussion is provided clarifying numerous nomenclatural problems with original spellings, correct authorship and type designation. Dineutini Ochs, 1926 syn. nov. is found to be a junior homonym of Dineutini Desmarest, 1851, and Enhydrini Régimbart, 1882 syn. nov. and its justified emendation Enhydrusini (Anonymous 2012) are here synonymized with Dineutini Desmarest, 1851. PMID:25277555

  2. Gross anatomy of central nervous system in firefly, Pteroptyx tener (Coleoptera: Lampyridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudawiyah, Nur; Wahida, O. Nurul; Norela, S.

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes for the first time the organization and fine structure of the central nervous system (CNS) in the fireflies, Pteroptyx tener (Coleoptera: Lampyridae). The morphology of the CNS was examined by using Carl Zeiss AxioScope A1 photomicroscope with iSolution Lite software. Some specific structural features such as the localization of protocerebrum, deutocerebrum and tritocerebrum in the brain region were analyzed. Other than that, the nerve cord and its peripheral structure were also analyzed. This study suggests that, there is a very obvious difference between male and female central nervous system which illustrates that they may differ in function in controlling physiological and behavioral activities.

  3. Soil and saproxylic species (Coleoptera, Collembola, Araneae in primeval forests from the northern part of South-Easthern Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugen Nitu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2006-2007 we carried out faunal investigations in the vernal, estival and autumnal seasons in the scientific reserve "Codrul Secular Giumalãu" using quantitative sampling methods. We identified 189 species of Coleoptera, 70 of Collembola and 20 of Araneae. Of these, 11 phytophagous, 18 myceto/xylo-mycetophagous,9 mixophagous, 18 xylo- and cambio-xylemophagous, 38 saproxylophagous,125 (55 Coleoptera, 70 Collembola detritivorous (sapro-, copro- andnecrophagous, 60 (40 Coleoptera, 20 Aranea predators/parasitoids. Hymenaphorura polonica Pomorski, 1990 (Collembola, and Leiodes rhaeticus Erichson, 1845 (Coleoptera, Leiodidae, are recorded for the first time in the Romanian fauna. The rare species and characteristic species for the old primeval spruce forests are analysed for each studied taxonomic group. The species richness and faunal diversity from the Giumalãu primeval spruce forest are compared with those of other very well preserved forests from the Carpathians scientific reserves (Codrul Secular Slãtioara,Pietrosul Rodnei. The species abundances were used to compute the similarity indexes between the sampled sectors of forest and to perform Cluster Analysis. We observed that the dead wood in the 2nd-6th phases of decomposition has a great influence not only on the saproxylic species but also on the soil fauna like ground beetles(Carabidae that use the logs as ecologic microrefuges (winter refugees or diurnal refugees. The structure of the soil fauna is influenced by wood extraction from the forest ecosystem or by natural perturbations, this consisting in the appearance of opportunistic species as Orchesella pontica (Collembola and in decreasing ofspecies richness of Carabidae (Coleoptera.

  4. Predatory Ground Beetles (Insecta: Coleoptera: Carabidae) of the Gaoligong Mountain Region of Western Yunnan Province, China: the Tribe Cyclosomini

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva-Dabkoski, M.; Kavanaugh, D.

    2013-12-01

    Between 1998 and 2007, the California Academy of Sciences (CAS) was the lead institution in a multi-national, multi-disciplinary biodiversity inventory project in the Gaoligong Shan region (GLGS) in the Yunnan province of China. The project surveyed the species diversity of both higher plants and bryophytes, fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, mammals and selected groups of arachnids and insects. The GLGS of China is one of the most biodiverse areas in all of Asia, yet it is also very poorly sampled and in great threat from increasing human activities in the region. CAS's biodiversity inventory project there has increased the number of carabid species known from just 50 to more than 550 species, an eleven-fold increase. The task that remains is to identify all of those 500 additional species and describe any that are new to science. This project is part of that larger biodiversity survey. Our objective was to identify and/or describe carabid beetles of the tribe Cyclosomini represented by nearly a hundred specimens collected in the GLSG. Among those specimens, six morphospecies were identified - one belonging to the genus Cyclosomus Latreille 1829, and the other five belonging to the genus Tetragonoderus Dejean 1829. Following this initial identification process, a list of known distributions of taxa in both genera was assembled to determine which described species to consider for comparative work. Original descriptions were then located for candidate species with known distributions in or near the GLGS; and these are being used now in morphological comparison of specimens. Type specimens for each of the candidate species have been requested from various academic institutions, and morphological comparisons with these types are underway. Morphological characteristics being examined include body proportions and overall shape, color of appendages, color and shape of pronotum, elytral color patterns, and shape and internal structure of male genitalia.

  5. Wing-dimorphism and population expansion of Pterostichus melanarius (Illiger, 1798 at small and large scales in central Alberta, Canada (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Pterostichini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Bourassa

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A study spanning ten years revealed changes in wing-morph ratios corroborating the hypothesis that the wing-dimorphic introduced carabid, Pterostichus melanarius Ill., is spreading through flight, from the city of Edmonton, Canada and establishing populations in natural aspen forest of more rural areas 45-50 km to the East. Comparison of wing-morph ratios between P. melanarius and the native wing dimorphic species Agonum retractum LeConte suggests that the spatial variation in ratios for P. melanarius does not reflect underlying environmental variation, but instead the action of selective forces on this wing-dimorphic species. About ten years after its earliest detection in some rural sites the frequency of macropterous individuals in P. melanarius has decreased c. five-fold, but it is still above the level seen in European populations in which the two wing-morphs are thought to exist in equilibrium. P. melanarius is expanding its range in native aspen forest much faster than three other introduced species Clivina fossor L., Carabus granulatus O.F. Müller and Clivina fossor L also encountered in this study. The two Carabus species are flightless, but C. fossor can be dimorphic. Although these four non-native ground beetle species comprise >85% of the carabids collected at sites in urban Edmonton, activity-density of native carabids was similar across the urban-rural gradient, suggesting little direct impact of introduced species on the local abundance of native species. In a second study conducted at a smaller scale near George Lake, Alberta, macropterous individuals of P. melanarius have penetrated furthest and most rapidly into native aspen forest. Furthermore, the percentage of micropterous individuals has increased markedly in areas first colonized a decade previously. Overall, these studies support the idea that macropterous beetles in wing-d dimorphic species are important vanguards for early colonization of unexploited territory, but

  6. The hydraulic mechanism in the hind wing veins of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiyu; Wu, Wei; Ling, Mingze; Bhushan, Bharat; Tong, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The diving beetles (Dytiscidae, Coleoptera) are families of water beetles. When they see light, they fly to the light source directly from the water. Their hind wings are thin and fragile under the protection of their elytra (forewings). When the beetle is at rest the hind wings are folded over the abdomen of the beetle and when in flight they unfold to provide the necessary aerodynamic forces. In this paper, the unfolding process of the hind wing of Cybister japonicus Sharp (order: Coleoptera) was investigated. The motion characteristics of the blood in the veins of the structure system show that the veins have microfluidic control over the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process. A model is established, and the hind wing extending process is simulated. The blood flow and pressure changes are discussed. The driving mechanism for hydraulic control of the folding and unfolding actions of beetle hind wings is put forward. This can assist the design of new deployable micro air vehicles and bioinspired deployable systems. PMID:27547607

  7. Dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae attracted to sheep dung in exotic pastures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César Murilo de Albuquerque Correa

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeinae attracted to sheep dung in exotic pastures. In this study we provide data on the abundance and richness of dung beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Scarabaeinae attracted to sheep dung in exotic pastures (Brachiaria spp.. In four areas of exotic pasture pitfall traps were installed and baited with fresh sheep dung for sampling of dung beetles. A total of 2,290 individuals were captured belonging to 16 species, 10 genera and five tribes of Scarabaeinae beetles. Trichillum externepunctatum Preudhomme de Borre, 1886 and Dichotomius bos (Blanchard, 1843 were dominant. The guild of dwellers was the most abundant in pastures. We demonstrate that dung beetles are attracted to sheep dung. Since the production of both cattle and sheep in the same area is common in tropical pasturelands, results obtained here highlight the need to investigate the actual role of dung sharing (cattle dung + sheep dung by dung beetles. It is also suggested that experiments be performed for evaluation of the ecological functions performed by dung beetles using sheep dung.

  8. Ophiostoma species (Ascomycetes: Ophiostomatales) associated with bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) colonizing Pinus radiata in northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romón, Pedro; Zhou, XuDong; Iturrondobeitia, Juan Carlos; Wingfield, Michael J; Goldarazena, Arturo

    2007-06-01

    Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytinae) are known to be associated with fungi, especially species of Ophiostoma sensu lato and Ceratocystis. However, very little is known about these fungi in Spain. In this study, we examined the fungi associated with 13 bark beetle species and one weevil (Coleoptera: Entiminae) infesting Pinus radiata in the Basque Country of northern Spain. This study included an examination of 1323 bark beetles or their galleries in P. radiata. Isolations yielded a total of 920 cultures, which included 16 species of Ophiostoma sensu lato or their asexual states. These 16 species included 69 associations between fungi and bark beetles and weevils that have not previously been recorded. The most commonly encountered fungal associates of the bark beetles were Ophiostoma ips, Leptographium guttulatum, Ophiostoma stenoceras, and Ophiostoma piceae. In most cases, the niche of colonization had a significant effect on the abundance and composition of colonizing fungi. This confirms that resource overlap between species is reduced by partial spatial segregation. Interaction between niche and time seldom had a significant effect, which suggests that spatial colonization patterns are rarely flexible throughout timber degradation. The differences in common associates among the bark beetle species could be linked to the different niches that these beetles occupy. PMID:17668036

  9. ESCARABAJOS TIGRE (COLEOPTERA: CICINDELIDAE DEL MUSEO ENTOMOLÓGICO FRANCISCO LUÍS GALLEGO: NUEVOS REGISTROS PARA DEPARTAMENTOS DE COLOMBIA TIGER BEETLES (COLEOPTERA: CICINDELIDAE AT THE ENTOMOLOGICAL MUSEUM FRANCISCO LUÍS GALLEGO: NEW RECORDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Alejandro Ramírez Mora

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se registran por primera vez las especies de escarabajos tigre (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae presentes en el Museo Entomológico Francisco Luis Gallego (MEFLG. Se identificaron 167 especimenes distribuidos en ocho géneros y 27 especies, se reportan 24 nuevos registros para diferentes departamentos de Colombia. Se señalan aspectos importantes de la taxonomía y sistemática del grupo. Además, se presentan comentarios biológicos y de distribución de las especies.Tiger beetles (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae species at the Museo Entomológico Francisco Luis Gallego (MEFLG are registered by first time. 167 specimens in 8 genus and 27 species were identified, 24 new records for different Colombian states are reported. Some important aspects of the group’s taxonomy and systematic are pointed. Additionally, species’ biological and distributional comments are presented.

  10. Especies de Megacerus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae y sus plantas hospederas en Yucatán Megacerus species (Coleoptera: Bruchidae and their host plants in Yucatán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Reyes

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Se registra la incidencia de Megacerus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae en semillas de 7 especies de Convolvulaceae de 6 sitios al norte de Yucatán. Las semillas de Ipomoea crinicalyx, I. hederifolia, I. nil, I. triloba, Jacquemontia penthanta, Merremia aegyptia y M. cissoides recolectadas en etapa de dispersión fueron colocadas en sobres limpios de papel y puestas en condiciones de laboratorio hasta la emergencia de los brúquidos. Se obtuvieron 1111 coleópteros pertenecientes a 5 especies: Megacerus (Megacerus cubiculus, M. (M. porosus, Megacerus (M. sp., M. (M. tricolor, y M. (Serratibruchus cubiciformis. Las semillas de I. crinicalyx, M. aegyptia y M. cissoides fueron infestadas principalmente por M. (M. porosus, las de I. hederifolia e I. triloba por M. (M. cubiculus y las de I. nil por M. (M. tricolor. Todos los individuos de Megacerus (M. sp., fueron encontrados en semillas de J. penthanta. En el nivel génerico de hospedero se encontró que las semillas de Ipomoea fueron infestadas principalmente por M. (M. cubiculus y las de Merremia por M. (M. porosus. Estos resultados amplían el rango de plantas hospederas registrado para las especies de Megacerus y resaltan la estrecha asociación que existe entre un linaje de depredadores de semillas Bruchidae y plantas de la familia Convolvulaceae.Seed-attacking by Megacerus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae is reported for 7 Convolvulaceae species from 6 sites at the North of Yucatan. Seeds of Ipomoea crinicalyx, I. hederifolia, I. nil, I. triloba, Jacquemontia penthanta, Merremia aegyptia and M. cissoides were collected and placed in clean envelopes under laboratory conditions to collect all bruchids emerged from seeds. A total of 1111 coleopterans were hatched from seeds, and 5 taxa were identify: Megacerus (Megacerus cubiculus, M. (M. porosus, Megacerus (M. sp., M. (M. tricolor, and M. (Serratibruchus cubiciformis. Seeds of I. crinicalyx, M. aegyptia and M. cissoides were attacked mainly by M. (M. porosus; I

  11. Longhorned Beetles Collection of the Entomology Museum of Central Anatolia Forestry Research Directorship, Ankara, Turkey (Coleoptera,Cerambycidae)

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZDİKMEN, Hüseyin; ŞAHİN, Özlem

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper, specimens of Cerambycidae were examined in the Entomology Museum of Central Anatolia Forestry Research Directorship, Ankara, Turkey. As a result of identification of these specimens, thirty-eight species and two subspecies belonging to twenty-eight genera of five subfamilies were determined. With this paper, new faunistic data and some zoogeographical evaluations were presented on longhorned beetles fauna (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) of Turkey. The faunistic data in the pr...

  12. Synergistic effects of chlorpyrifos with piperonyl butoxide (pbo) against the lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Akter Mst Yeasmin; Talukdar Muhammad Waliullah; ASM Shafiqur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the co-toxicity and co-efficient activity of Chlorpyrifos (Dursban 20EC), an organophosphate and Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) against the lesser meal worm Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) (A. diaperinus). Methods: The repellent activity was carried out by the residual film assay technique. Statistically the dose mortality relationship was expressed as a median lethal dose (LD50) by the probit analysis. The regression lines and isoboles were ...

  13. Survival of Coelaenomenodera lameensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Relation to the Physical Characteristics of Different Oil Palm (Elaeis sp.) Breeding Populations

    OpenAIRE

    Beaudoin-Ollivier, L.; Flori, A.; Coffi, A.; Cros, D.; Glitho, I.; Nodichao, L.

    2015-01-01

    The edibility of different Elaeis sp. breeding populations present in Benin was tested for the leaf miner Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a major oil palm pest in Africa. Experiments carried out in sleeves revealed the oviposition capacities of females and the mortality rates for the different developmental stages by comparing the populations found on two breeding populations of Elaeis oleifera (HBK) Cortes, four of Elaeis guineensis Jacquin and four (E. guineens...

  14. Natural history of Belonuchus Nordmann spp. and allies (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) in Heliconia L. (Zingiberales: Heliconiaceae) flower bracts

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, J. Howard; Barrera, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Adults, and in some species larvae, of several members of Belonuchus Nordmann (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Staphylininae) and a few related genera seem to be to various degrees consistently associated with flower bracts of the genus Heliconia (Zingiberales: Heliconiaceae). They are predators and eat various dipterous and lepidopterous larvae in that habitat. Adults of at least Belonuchus cephalotes (Sharp) and Odontolinus fasciatus Sharp are able to immerse completely in water to capture larva...

  15. Uji Efektifitas Beberapa Insektisida Nabati Terhadap Mortalitas Hama Sitophilus zeamais Motsch. (Coleoptera; Curculionidae) Pada Benih Jagung (Zea mays)

    OpenAIRE

    Subhan, Fadillah

    2011-01-01

    Fadillah Subhan, "Test Effectiveness of Some Insecticides Against Plant Pests Sitophilus zeamais Motsch Mortality. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) In the Seed of Corn (Zea mays). "It was under supervised by Yuswani Pangestiningsih and Fatimah Zahara. S. zeamais is a pest of corn in storage that causes substantial yield losses, one of which effective control is the use of botanical insecticides. Testing the effectiveness of some botanical insecticides on mortality of S. zeamais on maize seed plant...

  16. A review of Elocomosta Hansen with a description of a new species with reduced eyes from China (Coleoptera, Hydrophilidae, Sphaeridiinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Renchao; Jia, Fenglong; Fikáček, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the genus Elocomosta Hansen, 1989 (Coleoptera: Hydrophilidae: Sphaeridiinae: Coelostomatini), Elocomosta lilizheni sp. n., is described from Guangxi Province, China. It is compared in detail with the only other known species of the genus, Elocomosta nigra Hansen, 1989 from Borneo, and the genus is diagnosed from the remaining coelostomatine genera. The new species is unusual among Hydrophilidae by having extremely reduced eyes. PMID:27551232

  17. Diversity and phylogenetic analysis of endosymbiotic bacteria of the date palm root borer Oryctes agamemnon (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sayed, Wael S.; Ibrahim, Reda A

    2015-01-01

    Background The date palm root borer Oryctes agamemnon (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is one of the major pests of palms. In Saudi Arabia, both larvae and adults of Oryctes are particularly troublesome, especially during the establishment of young date palm orchards. Endosymbiotic bacteria are known to have a key role in food digestion and insecticide resistance mechanisms, and therefore are essential to their host insect. Identification of these bacteria in their insect host can lead to developme...

  18. First record of Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Doryctinae as parasitoid of Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Loni

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The species Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall (Hymenoptera: Braconidae was reared from the larvae of the xylophagous beetle Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, an exotic pest of Ficus and Morus species native to eastern Asia. It was recorded in the north of Italy in September 2005. This discovery is the first report of this species as parasitoids of the yellow spotted longicorn beetle all over the world.

  19. First record of Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall ( Hymenoptera , Braconidae , Doryctinae ) as parasitoid of Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe) ( Coleoptera , Cerambycidae )

    OpenAIRE

    Augusto Loni; Costanza Jucker; Sergey Belokobylskij; Daniela Lupi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The species Rhoptrocentrus piceus Marshall ( Hymenoptera : Braconidae ) was reared from the larvae of the xylophagous beetle Psacothea hilaris hilaris (Pascoe) ( Coleoptera : Cerambycidae ), an exotic pest of Ficus and Morus species native to eastern Asia. It was recorded in the north of Italy in September 2005. This discovery is the first report of this species as parasitoids of the yellow spotted longicorn beetle all over the world.

  20. Ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) assemblages in narrow hedgerows in a Danish agricultural landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lövei, G. L.; Magura, T.

    2015-01-01

    The role of hedgerows in supporting ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) in a Danish agricultural landscape was examined. Nine old, well established single-row hedges were selected for the study, three each of a native species (hawthorn, Crataegus monogyna), a non-native deciduous one (rowan...... beetle assemblages. The number of ground beetle individuals and species were significantly the highest in the hawthorn hedges and significantly decreased from the hedges with rowan toward the spruce hedges. The elevated number of ground beetle individuals and species in the hawthorn hedges were due...... to the forest specialist species, as the number of forest specialist ground beetle individuals and species were significantly higher in the hawthorn hedges compared to the hedges with rowan and spruce. Differences in the number of the grassland and the cropland specialist ground beetle individuals and species...

  1. A importância forense de Oxelytrum discicolle (Brullé, 1840) (Coleoptera, Silphidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Camila Kraiczyi Kotzko; V. Costa-Silva; E. G. Silva

    2015-01-01

    Oxelytrum discicolle Brullé, 1840 é a espécie mais coletada de Silphidae (Coleoptera) na América Latina, constituindo um indicador forense na região Neotropical. O objetivo do trabalho é reunir informações sobre biologia e distribuição de O. discicolle, além de ferramentas para utilização desse besouro como indicador forense em casos de morte de humanos. O. discicolle é um besouro de grande porte, de cor preta com um colar vermelho. Larvas da espécie são necrófagas, já os adultos são onívoros...

  2. The first complete mitochondrial genome of stag beetle from China, Prosopocoilus gracilis (Coleoptera, Lucanidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Yu-Yan; Fang, Jie; Wan, Xia

    2016-07-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Prosopocoilus gracilis (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) that is endemic to Southern China is determined. The circular genome is 736 bp in length and comprises 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA, 2 rRNA genes and a control region. Gene order is identical to that of the putative ancestral arrangement of insects. The nucleotide composition of heavy strand is A (36.6%), C (22.6%), T (29.5%) and G (11.3%). All protein-coding genes start with a typical ATN codon except for the gene COI that uses AAC as the start codon. tRNA-Ser (AGN) uses the anticodon UCU instead of the commonly used GCU. Both maximum likelihood and Bayesian analyses support the monophyly of Lucanidae and the sister relationship of Nigidionus and the remaining sampled genera. Two species of Prosopocoilus were not recovered as a monophyletic group. PMID:26024142

  3. Estudos bioecológicos de Syphraea uberabensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Bechyné 1956

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    Charles Wikler

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Tibouchina herbacea (DC. Cog. é uma planta ornamental introduzida propositadamente no arquipélago do Havaí e, devido à ausência de inimigos naturais e condições edafo-climáticas adequadas, está se dispersando rapidamente pelas florestas nativas e regiões úmidas das principais ilhas havaianas. Por ser originária do Brasil, foram realizadas diversas viagens exploratórias em busca de por inimigos naturais específicos que pudessem controlar esta planta. Dentre os agentes selecionados com impacto e potencial de especificidade à T. herbacea encontra-se Syphraea uberabensis (Bechyne, 1955 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae. Este trabalho visa estudos sobre a biologia, ecologia e especificidade deste inseto e também uma avaliação criteriosa dos possíveis impactos causados por este inimigo natural na população da planta.

  4. The mortality of Oryzaephilus surinamensis Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Silvanidae induced by powdered plants

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    Kłyś Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether powdered plants of different species namely: peppermint Mentha piperita (L. (Lamiaceae, wormwood Artemisia absinthium (L. (Asteraceae, common sage Salvia officinalis (L. (Lamiaceae, allspice Pimenta dioica (Linnaeus et Merrill (Myrtaceae and common garlic Allium sativum (L. (Amaryllidaceae, added to semolina using concentrations of 1.23, 3.61, and 5.88%, influence the mortality rate in the saw-toothed grain beetle Oryzaephilus surinamensis Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Silvanidae. Experiments were conducted in a laboratory at 28°C and relative humidity 60±5%. At the concentration of 1.23%, allspice seeds caused the highest mortality amongst the saw-toothed grain beetle. When concentrations of 3.61 and 5.88% were used, sage, peppermint and wormwood caused the highest statistically significant mortality of O. surinamensis

  5. Communication disruption using synthetic sex pheromone for control of sugarcane wireworm. Melanotus okinawensis Ohira (Coleoptera: Elateridae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We tested communication disruption through the use of a synthetic sex pheromone from mid February to early June 2001 at the cultivating land on Minami-Daito Island in order to control the sugarcane wireworm Melanotus okinawensis Ohira (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Although very few males were caught in monitoring traps except a few traps set in a treated area, a large number were caught in traps set in an untreated Japanese pampas grass field. This indicates that communication disruption was effective throughout the period in the treated area. Females collected from treated area of Minami-Daito Island, mating rates that were lower than those of females in the untreated areas on Miyagi Island. We therefore concluded that a communication disruption system is an effective tool for the sugarcane wireworm management. (author)

  6. Synthesis, antifeedant activity against Coleoptera and 3D QSAR study of alpha-asarone derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łozowicka, B; Kaczyński, P; Magdziarz, T; Dubis, A T

    2014-01-01

    For the first time, a set of 56 compounds representing structural derivatives of naturally occurring alpha-asarone as an antifeedants against stored product pests Sitophilus granarius L., Trogoderma granarium Ev., and Tribolium confusum Duv., were subjected to the 3D QSAR studies. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationships (3D-QSAR) for 56 compounds, including 15 newly synthesized, were performed using comparative molecular field analysis s-CoMFA and SOM-CoMSA techniques. QSAR was conducted based on a combination of biological activity (against Coleoptera larvae and beetles) and various geometrical, topological, quantum-mechanical, electronic, and chromatographic descriptors. The CoMSA formalism coupled with IVE (CoMSA-IVE) allowed us to obtain highly predictive models for Trogoderma granarium Ev. larvae. We have found that this novel method indicates a clear molecular basis for activity and lipophilicity. This investigation will facilitate optimization of the design of new potential antifeedants. PMID:24601760

  7. Taxonomy of Colophon Gray (Coleoptera: Lucanidae): new species and a status change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Carmen T; Scholtz, Clarke H; Strümpher, Werner P

    2015-01-01

    Three new species of the Cape high-mountain stag beetle genus, Colophon Gray (Coleoptera: Lucanidae), from South Africa are described. They are C. deschodti new species, C. switalae new species, and C. struempheri new species. The new taxa fall within a species complex of geographically disjunct entities related to Colophon stokoei Barnard. Furthermore, the mitochondrial COI gene shows a high degree of sequence divergence, with pairwise genetic distances between the species ranging between 7.4-10.7%. The new species are illustrated by photographs. Colophon eastmani nagaii Mizukami is raised to species level on the basis of geographic range and molecular differences between it and the nominate subspecies. This brings the total number of described species in the genus to 21. An updated checklist of the South African species of Colophon is also provided. PMID:26701471

  8. Carpophilus zeaphilus, a new sap beetle species acclimatized in Italy (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae

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    Paolo Audisio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Carpophilus zeaphilus Dobson, 1969 (Coleoptera, Nitidulidae, Carpophilinae is an Afrotropical species that has become widespread in Sub-Saharan Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, and southern Mediterranean areas in recent years. The species was first recorded from Europe in Portugal and Spain nearly thirty years ago, and it was later intercepted in Sicily near Trapani in 1991. A few specimens of this species were collected in April, 2015 in a sparsely forested area near Rome, which suggests a recent acclimatization into peninsular Italy. Specimens were taken on flowering trees of Prunus spinosa L. (Rosaceae, an unusual occurrence for most introduced species of Carpophilinae that are normally associated with rotten fruit and other decomposing vegetal matter.

  9. Community Economics

    OpenAIRE

    武藤, 宣道; Nobumichi, MUTOH

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the new field of community economics with respect to Japan. A number of studies in community economics have already been produced in OECD countries including the United States. Although these are of great interest, each country has its own historical, socioeconomic context and must therefore develop its own approach to community economics. Community-oriented economics is neither macro-nor micro-economics in the standard economics textbook sense. Most community economics st...

  10. Functional homogenization of flower visitor communities with urbanization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguines, Nicolas; Julliard, Romain; de Flores, Mathieu; Fontaine, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Land-use intensification and resulting habitat loss are put forward as the main causes of flower visitor decline. However, the impact of urbanization, the prime driver of land-use intensification in Europe, is poorly studied. In particular, our understanding of whether and how it affects the composition and functioning of flower visitor assemblages is scant, yet required to cope with increasing urbanization worldwide. Here, we use a nation-wide dataset of plant-flower visitor (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera) interactions sampled by citizen scientists following a standardized protocol to assess macroecological changes in richness and composition of flower visitor communities with urbanization. We measured the community composition by quantifying the relative occurrence of generalist and specialist flower visitors based on their specialisation on flowering plant families. We show that urbanization is associated with reduced flower visitor richness and a shift in community composition toward generalist insects, indicating a modification of the functional composition of communities. These results suggest that urbanization affects not only the richness of flower visitor assemblages but may also cause their large-scale functional homogenization. Future research should focus on designing measures to reconcile urban development with flower visitor conservation. PMID:27066219

  11. Diversidade de Carabidae (Coleoptera) Amostrados em Áreas de Reflorestamento de Mata Ciliar e Fragmento Florestal, no Estado do Paraná

    OpenAIRE

    Tamara Quinteiro; José Lopes; Ivan Martins

    2012-01-01

    Carabidae são Coleoptera com a maioria de suas espécies apresentando hábito alimentar predatório. O objetivo do presente trabalho foi estudar a diversidade e abundância da família Carabidae (Coleoptera) em áreas de fragmento florestal e em áreas de reflorestamento de mata ciliar, evidenciando a importância deste grupo como indicador da biodiversidade em relação ao sucesso do reflorestamento. Os besouros foram amostrados por meio de armadilhas de solo pitfall, em fragmentos florestais e reflor...

  12. Locomotor activity of Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae on Chilean sandy beaches Actividad locomotora de Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, enebrionidae en playas arenosas chilenas

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    EDUARDO JARAMILLO

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The locomotor activity of the beetle Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera Tenebrionidae was studied on the surface of the substrate in two sandy beaches of the Chilean coast: one in north central (ca. 29ºS and the other in south central Chile (ca.39ºS. During the summer period of 1991 the circadian locomotor activity was studied in the southern beach, while during that of 1997 in both beaches. To analyze the activity, pitfall traps were used which were ordered along two transects extended between the upper beach and the resurgence zone. The traps were checked (i.e. collection of captured insects every two hours for a total period of 26 hours. The results showed that the adults of P. maculata were mostly active during the night hours, whereas the larvae were active during both, the day and night. Studies carried out in the beach located in south central Chile show that differences in the tidal range (neap vs. spring tides do not affect the activity patterns. During the locomotor activity, adult and larvae move to lower intertidal levels than those usually occupied while buried. Results of laboratory experiments using actographs under conditions of darkness and constant temperature, suggest that adults and larvae of P. maculata presented a circadian rhythm similar to that observed in the field experiments. It is concluded that P. maculata presents a behaviour that appear to be under control of an endogenous rhythm, without showing differences in the circadian rhythm of activity when beaches located at different latitudes are comparedSe estudió la actividad locomotriz del escarabajo Phalerisida maculata Kulzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae sobre la superficie del sustrato de dos playas arenosas de la costa de Chile: una en el centro norte (ca. 29ºS y otra en el centro sur (ca. 39ºS. Durante el período estival de 1991 se estudió la actividad locomotriz circadiana en la playa del centro sur y durante el de 1997 en ambas playas. Para analizar

  13. Nuevas citas de Coleoptera para la Argentina (Carabidae, Lucanidae, Scarabaeidae y Tenebrionidae New records of Coleoptera for Argentina (Carabidae, Lucanidae, Scarabeidae and Tenebrionidae

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    Sergio Roig-Juñent

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available En enero de 2003, se realizó un viaje de campaña con el fin de recolectar materiales en áreas poco prospectadas de la estepa patagónica de Mendoza y Neuquén, Argentina, así como en ambientes de bosques de Nothofagus en la provincia de Neuquén. Las recolecciones se realizaron en forma manual, usando trampas con cebo y trampas de luz de mercurio. El material recolectado permite citar por primera vez para la Argentina los géneros Nothobroscus Roig-Juñent & Ball y Mimophilorizus Mateu (Carabidae, Callyntra Solier y Homocyrtus Reitter (Tenebrionidae. Además, se citan por primera vez para la Argentina las especies Cnemalobus sulciferus Philippi (Carabidae, Allidiostoma landbecki (Philippi, Macrodactylus chilensis Solier y Brachysternus marginatus (Germain (Scarabeidae y Pycnosiphorus philippii (Westwood (Lucanidae. Se provee una breve descripción de los ambientes en donde estas especies fueron encontradas.A short expedition to northern Patagonia was made in January 2003. The main goal of the trip was to survey the diversity of some families of Coleoptera in the insufficient explored steppes in Mendoza and Neuquén provinces, Argentina and Nothofagus forests of Neuquén province. The techniques included manual collection and the use of different kinds of traps, such as with bite or artificial light of mercury. The study of the material revealed four new genera records and four new species records for the country: Nothobroscus Roig-Juñent & Ball and Mimophilorizus Mateu (Carabidae, Callyntra Solier and Homocyrtus Reitter (Tenebrionidae are the new genus records. Cnemalobus sulciferus Philippi (Carabidae, Allidiostoma landbecki (Philippi, Macrodactylus chilensis Solier, and Brachysternus marginatus (Germain (Scarabeidae, and Pycnosiphorus philippii (Westwood (Lucanidae are the new species records. A brief description of the habitats where the species were collected is provided.

  14. Molecular species identification of Central European ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae using nuclear rDNA expansion segments and DNA barcodes

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    Raupach Michael J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of vast numbers of unknown organisms using DNA sequences becomes more and more important in ecological and biodiversity studies. In this context, a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI gene has been proposed as standard DNA barcoding marker for the identification of organisms. Limitations of the COI barcoding approach can arise from its single-locus identification system, the effect of introgression events, incomplete lineage sorting, numts, heteroplasmy and maternal inheritance of intracellular endosymbionts. Consequently, the analysis of a supplementary nuclear marker system could be advantageous. Results We tested the effectiveness of the COI barcoding region and of three nuclear ribosomal expansion segments in discriminating ground beetles of Central Europe, a diverse and well-studied invertebrate taxon. As nuclear markers we determined the 18S rDNA: V4, 18S rDNA: V7 and 28S rDNA: D3 expansion segments for 344 specimens of 75 species. Seventy-three species (97% of the analysed species could be accurately identified using COI, while the combined approach of all three nuclear markers provided resolution among 71 (95% of the studied Carabidae. Conclusion Our results confirm that the analysed nuclear ribosomal expansion segments in combination constitute a valuable and efficient supplement for classical DNA barcoding to avoid potential pitfalls when only mitochondrial data are being used. We also demonstrate the high potential of COI barcodes for the identification of even closely related carabid species.

  15. The first precinctive Carabidae from Moorea, Society Islands: new Mecyclothorax spp. (Coleoptera from the summit of Mont Tohiea

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    James Liebherr

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Seven species of Mecyclothorax Sharp from Moorea, Society Islands are newly described; M. perraulti sp. n., M. pahere sp. n., M. menemene sp. n., M. mahatahi sp. n., M. popotioaoa sp. n., M. mapo sp. n., and M. fatata sp. n. These constitute the first Mecyclothorax species described from Moorea, and the first carabid beetle species shown to be geographically restricted to that island. Each of the newly described species is most similar to a different species on the island of Tahiti, suggesting that none of the seven Moorean taxa are evolutionary end-products of autochthonous speciation within Moorea. The occurrence of precinctive Mecyclothorax species on both Moorea and Tahiti demonstrates that radiation of Mecyclothorax in the Society Islands has been facilitated by speciation events implicating both islands. Whether this speciation has been preceded by vicariance or dispersal is discussed, with the generality of a dispersal hypothesis tested using information from Society Island Nabidae (Hemiptera. Salient morphological characters for taxa in the Society and Hawaiian Islands are compared to those representing a broad survey of southwest Pacific Mecyclothorax spp. This comparison supports the independent founding of each radiation in the Societies and Hawaii from an Australian ancestral propagule, likely drawn from the ecologically general, geographically widespread M. punctipennis (Macleay.

  16. Fauna de Coleoptera no Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brasil: abundância e riqueza das famílias capturadas através de armadilhas de solo

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    Marinoni Renato C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a part of the studies on the Coleoptera fauna from Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana gathered through malaise and pitfall traps in sites with different floristic conditions. The present study deal with the data of pitfall trap captures, installed close to the malaise traps. The data were obtained weekly (52 samples, from September 1999 to August 2000. This survey was carried out on five areas, three of them with different plant succession stages (initial, intermediate, and advanced. The other two sites were: in Araucaria angustifolia plantation area, with the understory invaded by native forest vegetation and in the edge area. In the last one, two pitfall traps were installed, one inside the forest and other in the field vegetation. The Coleoptera communities were analyzed according the abundance, family richness, and the floristic conditions of the sites. The total of specimens collected was 13,093 belonging to 35 families. The most abundant site was the one in initial stage of succession; the abundance was lowest in the edge area. The beetle faunal composition of the five sites, including all the families, were not significantly different. However, when listed only the seven dominant families, the results showed the outside edge fauna composition significantly different from the other sites. Among the most abundant families in the Vila Velha litter are Staphylinidae, Ptiliidae, Nitidulidae, Scarabaeidae, Scolytidae, Hydrophilidae and Endomychidae, eventually substituted by Latridiidae, Corylophidae, Curculionidae, Carabidae and Histeridae. Several comparisons were made with the data from malaise and pitfall traps data obtained in Vila Velha, and from other studies in several world regions. From these comparisons was possible to highlight: the beetle family richness is higher when captured by malaise than pitfall trap; the family taxonomic compositions in the litter from several regions of the world are more similar among

  17. Immunofluorescence localization and ultrastructure of Stewart’s wilt disease bacterium Pantoea stewartii in maize leaves and in its flea beetle vector Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoea stewartii is the causal agent of Stewart's wilt of sweet corn, the most serious bacterial disease of sweet corn and maize in the North-Central and Eastern USA. P. stewartii is transmitted mainly by the corn flea beetle Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and this bacterium is a...

  18. Preliminary evaluation of Delphastus catalinae (Coleoptera:Coccinellidae)as a predator of the ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) (Hemiptera:Aleyrodidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The predatory lady beetle Delphastus catalinae (Horn) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) was evaluated as a potential biological control agent against the ficus whitefly, Singhiella simplex (Singh) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae), a newly-invasive pest of ficus plants. Adult D. catalinae females were starved for ...

  19. Brood production by Xylosandrus germanus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) and growth of its fungal symbiont on artificial diet based on sawdust of different species

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ambrosia beetle Xylosandrus germanus (Blanford) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is among the most important exotic pests of orchards and nurseries in the US. It attacks a wide range of hosts and is difficult to control using conventional insecticides. As part of our studies on the biology and cont...

  20. A new genus and species of myrmecophilous aphodiine beetle (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae inhabiting the myrmecophytic epiphyte Platycerium sp. (Polypodiaceae in the Bornean rainforest canopy

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    Munetoshi Maruyama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Pterobius itiokai Maruyama, gen. n. and sp. n., (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae is described from Lambir Hills National Park, Borneo based on specimens collected from a Crematogaster difformis ant nest in the myrmecophytic epiphytic fern genus Platycerium. Pterobius belongs to the tribe Eupariini and is closely related to the Indo-Australian genus Cnematoplatys.

  1. Assembly and annotation of full mitochondrial genomes for the corn rootworm species, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera and D. barberi (Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), using Next Generation Sequence data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complete mitochondrial genomes for two corn rootworm species, Diabrotica v. virgifera (16,747 bp) and D. barberi (16,632; Insecta: Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), were assembled from Illumina HiSeq2000 read data. Annotation indicated that the order and orientation of 13 protein coding genes (PCGs), and...

  2. New records of Paracrias Ashmead (Hymenoptera, Eulophidae as parasitoids on weevil larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae in Brazil, with the description of a new species

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    Luciano Palmieri

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Paracrias strii Schauff, 1985 and P. ceratophaga Palmieri & Hansson sp. nov. are first record in Brazil and both are associated with Ceratopus Schoenherr larvae (Coleoptera, Curculionidae reared from syconia of two species of fig-trees. Both Paracrias species are diagnosed and illustrated. Males of P. ceratophaga sp. nov. are described. The association of Paracrias with weevil larvae is briefly discussed.

  3. Biology of two members of the Euwallacea fornicatus species complex (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), recently invasive in the USA, reared on an ambrosia beetle artificial diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Diet and rearing protocols were developed for two members of the cryptic Euwallacea fornicatus species complex, polyphagous shot hole borer (PSHB) and tea shot hole borer (TSHB) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae), using sawdust from boxelder Acer negundo and avocado Persea americana. 2. Bio...

  4. Releases, distribution and abundance of Gratiana boliviana (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae), a biological control agent of tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum, Solanaceae), in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    A biological control program against tropical soda apple (TSA) (Solanum viarum Dunal (Solanaceae)) released 176,643 Gratiana boliviana Spaeth (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Florida from 2003 to 2008. The spatial distribution of releases was clustered with more beetles released in south/central Flor...

  5. Efeitos da radiação gama do Cobalto-60 em ovos de Tribolium castaneum (Herbst., 1797) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) Gamma radiation effects on eggs of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst., 1797) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    L. S. Fontes; V. Arthur

    1994-01-01

    Este trabalho teve por objetivo determinar as doses esterilizantes e letal para ovos de T. castaneum (Herbst., 1797) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), através de doses crescentes de radiação gama. Utilizou-se uma fonte de Cobalto-60, tipo Gammabeam-650, com taxa de dose de 1,28 kGy/hora. O experimento foi conduzido sob condições controladas com temperatura de 25 ± 2°C e umidade relativa de 70 ± 5%. As doses letal e esterilizante para os ovos foram respectivamente 30 e 20 Gy.The o...

  6. Desenvolvimento de Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae com Zophobas confusa Gebien (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae comparado à duas outras presas alternativas Development of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas (Heteroptera, Pentatomidae fed with Zophobas confusa Gebien (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae compared with two another alternative preys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresinha V Zanuncio

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nymphs of Podisus nigrispinus (Dallas, 1851 were fed with Zophobas confusa Gebien, 1906, Tenebrio molitor Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae and Musca domestica Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Muscidae under 25±0.5ºC, 60±10% of RH and photophase of 12h. Nymphal viability of P. nigrispinus were 64.0%, 80.0% and 92.0% with Z. confusa, M. domestica and T. molitor, respectively. No differences were found for pre-oviposition period, number of egg masses, number of eggs, egg viability, and longevity for females of this predator fed with any of these preys.

  7. Tipos de Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) depositados en la colección entomológica del Museo de La Plata Types of Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) housed at the Museo de La Plata entomological collection

    OpenAIRE

    Analía A. Lanteri; Suárez, Sonia M.; Guadalupe del Río, M.

    2003-01-01

    Esta contribución referida al material tipo de Curculionidae (Coleoptera: Curculionoidea) depositado en la colección entomológica del Museo de La Plata, actualiza la información sobre los tipos depositados durante los últimos diez años. Los 111 tipos examinados en este trabajo corresponden a 52 especies asignadas a las siguientes subfamilias: Curculioninae (5 spp.), Cryptorhynchinae (8 spp.), Cyclominae (4 spp.), Entiminae (31 spp.), y Erirhininae (4 spp.). Los autores de las especies son C. ...

  8. Claiming Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Steffen Bo

    As its point of departure this working paper takes the multitude of different uses and meanings of the concept of community in local politics in Cape Town. Instead of attempting to define it in substantive terms, the paper takes a social constructivist approach to the study of community and...... is termed community work. First, the paper explores how community has become a governmental strategy, employed by the apartheid regime as well, although in different ways, as post-apartheid local government. Secondly, the paper explores the ways in which community becomes the means in which local...... residents lay claim on the state, as well as how it enters into local power struggles between different political groups within the township. In the third part, the paper explores how the meanings of community and the struggles to realise it have changed as South Africa, nationally and locally, has become...

  9. Influence of 60Co γ irradiation on fertility of Japanese pine sawyer beetle Monochamus alternatus hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fertility of the Japanese pine sawyer beetle Monochamus alternatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) irradiated with 60Co γ-rays was remarkable reduced at the doses of 30Gy, 35Gy and 40Gy, especially at 40Gy. When the non-irradiated females were coupled with the irradiated males first, and then coupled with non-irradiated males, the hatchability and the fertility had little higher but lower than the control. It explained that radiation has certain influence to the female gonad. It also has difference between the hatching rate and the amount of eggs in different match. (authors)

  10. A new species of Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae) from southern Argentina, with a key to the species of the genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    A new species of the forensically interesting genus Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae), Oxelytrum selknan, is described from Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego provinces, Argentina. The new species resembles Oxelytrum biguttatum (Philippi) in outer aspect, but has different male genitalia, in particular a median lobe longer than the paramera. All the described species of Oxelytrum have the median lobe shorter than the paramera. The internal sac, as far as it could be reconstructed from dry-pinned specimens, also shows differences between the two species. A key to the species of Oxelytrum is given and illustrated. PMID:22773910

  11. Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, México

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián MUÑOZ-HERNÁNDEZ; Morón, Miguel Angel; Agustín ARAGÓN

    2008-01-01

    Con el propósito de evaluar la riqueza, abundancia y fenología de las especies de Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea o Lamellicornia de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, se realizaron colectas mensuales entre mayo de 1999 y junio de 2000, en sitios con bosques de pino-encino-liquidámbar o zonas de cultivo situados entre 1,990 y 2,000 m de altitud. Se capturaron 2,082 ejemplares que representan a 59 especies de 29 géneros, 18 tribus y 7 subfamilias de Melolonthidae, Scarabaeidae y Passalidae, entre las qu...

  12. A new species of Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae) from southern Argentina, with a key to the species of the genus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A new species of the forensically interesting genus Oxelytrum Gistel (Coleoptera, Silphidae), Oxelytrum selknan, is described from Santa Cruz and Tierra del Fuego provinces, Argentina. The new species resembles Oxelytrum biguttatum (Philippi) in outer aspect, but has different male genitalia, in particular a median lobe longer than the paramera. All the described species of Oxelytrum have the median lobe shorter than the paramera. The internal sac, as far as it could be reconstructed from dry-pinned specimens, also shows differences between the two species. A key to the species of Oxelytrum is given and illustrated. PMID:22773910

  13. Biclique communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann; Hansen-Schwartz, Martin; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    We present a method for detecting communities in bipartite networks. Based on an extension of the k-clique community detection algorithm, we demonstrate how modular structure in bipartite networks presents itself as overlapping bicliques. If bipartite information is available, the biclique...... community detection algorithm retains all of the advantages of the k-clique algorithm, but avoids discarding important structural information when performing a one-mode projection of the network. Further, the biclique community detection algorithm provides a level of flexibility by incorporating independent...... clique thresholds for each of the nonoverlapping node sets in the bipartite network...

  14. Initial Study of the Ground Beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae and Other Invertebrates from “Leshnitsa” Nature Reserve(Central Stara Planina Mountains, Bulgaria

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    Teodora M. Teofilova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The invertebrate fauna of the “Leshnitsa” nature reserve was studied, with particular consideration to the ground beetles. During the study altogether 394 specimens of carabid beetlesbelonging to 32 species and subspecies were captured, as well as 23 other invertebrate species,some of which are with a conservation significance (protected, Bulgarian and Balkan endemics.Ground beetles were characterized and classified according to their zoogeographical belonging,degree of endemism and the life forms they refer to. Threats for the invertebrate fauna and negativefactors of anthropogenic origin were determined and measures for diminishing of their effect wereproposed. So far the invertebrate fauna in this part of the mountain has been insufficiently studied.The real state of the diversity of this group in the area will be revealed only after futureinvestigations and discovery of additional new species for the region.

  15. Molecular identification of Epitrix potato flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Europe and North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Jean-François; Chatot, Catherine; Meusnier, Isabelle; Artige, Emmanuelle; Rasplus, Jean-Yves; Cruaud, Astrid

    2013-06-01

    Epitrix species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feed mostly on plants from the family Solanaceae and some of them are major pests of potato crops. All Epitrix species are morphologically highly similar, which makes them difficult to identify and limits their study and management. Identification of species is mostly based on the observation of the genitalia and requires a high level of expertise. Here, we propose a tool to reliably identify all developmental stages of the most economically important Epitrix species feeding on potato in Europe and North America (Epitrix cucumeris, Epitrix similaris, Epitrix tuberis, Epitrix subcrinita and Epitrix hirtipennis). We first sequenced two DNA markers (mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) and nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2)) to test their effectiveness in differentiating among six Epitrix species (126 specimens). Morphospecies of Epitrix were well-differentiated by both DNA barcodes and no mitochondrial introgression was detected. Then, we developed an RFLP-based diagnostic method and showed that unambiguous species discrimination can be achieved by using the sole restriction enzyme TaqI on COI polymerase chain reaction products. The tool proposed here should improve our knowledge about Epitrix species biology, distribution and host range, three capacities that are particularly important in the detection and management of these pest species. Specifically, this tool should help prevent the introduction of E. tuberis and E. subcrinita in Europe and limit the spread of the recently introduced E. cucumeris and E. similaris, with minimal disruption to Solanaceae trade. PMID:23448201

  16. Sustainable management tactics for control of Phyllotreta cruciferae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) on canola in Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Gadi V P; Tangtrakulwanich, Khanobporn; Miller, John H; Ophus, Victoria L; Prewett, Julie

    2014-04-01

    The crucifer flea beetle, Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), has recently emerged as a serious pest of canola (Brassica napus L.) in Montana. The adult beetles feed on canola leaves, causing many small holes that stunt growth and reduce yield. In 2013, damage to canola seedlings was high (approximately 80%) in many parts of Montana, evidence that when flea beetles emerge in large numbers, they can quickly destroy a young canola crop. In the current study, the effectiveness of several biopesticides was evaluated and compared with two insecticides (deltamethrin and bifenthrin) commonly used as foliar sprays as well as seed treatment with an imidacloprid insecticide for the control of P. cruciferae under field conditions in 2013. The biopesticides used included an entomopathogenic nematode (Steinernema carpocapsae), two entomopathogenic fungi (Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium brunneum), neem, and petroleum spray oils. The control agents were delivered in combination or alone in a single or repeated applications at different times. The plant-derived compound neem (azadirachtin), petroleum spray oil, and fatty acids (M-Pede) only showed moderate effect, although they significantly reduced leaf injuries caused by P. cruciferae and resulted in higher canola yield than the untreated control. Combined use of B. bassiana and M. brunneum in two repeated applications and bifenthrin in five applications were most effective in reducing feeding injuries and improving yield levels at both trial locations. This indicates that entomopathogenic fungi are effective against P. cruciferae, and may serve as alternatives to conventional insecticides or seed treatments in managing this pest. PMID:24772547

  17. Erotylidae (Insecta, Coleoptera of Poland – problematic taxa, updated keys and new records

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    Rafal Ruta

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available New data concerning the occurrence of pleasing fungus beetles (Coleoptera: Erotylidae in Poland are given, with a focus on rare and difficult to identify Central European taxa. Cryptophilus cf. integer (Heer (Cryptophilinae is reported from the Polish territory for the first time based on adult and larval specimens collected in the Wielkopolska-Kujawy Lowland. Identification problems concerning species of Cryptophilus introduced to Europe are discussed. Triplax carpathica Reitter (Erotylinae is recorded from the Białowieża Primeval Forest, which is the first known non-Carpathian finding of this species, located in the close proximity of the Polish-Belarussian UNESCO World Heritage Site “Białowieża Forest”. Discussion of T. carpathica being conspecific with Siberian T. rufiventris Gebler is provided. New Polish localities of several other Erotylidae are reported, and an updated key to Central European species of Triplax is given. The Triplax key is supplemented with dorsal and ventral habitus images of all treated Triplax species. One of the rarest Central European erotyline species Combocerus glaber (Schaller is recorded from xerothermic grasslands in North-West Poland.

  18. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5–7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1–4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. (author)

  19. The complete mitochondrial genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiu-Ning; Bian, Dan-Dan; Jiang, Sen-Hao; Li, Zhen-Xing; Ge, Bao-Ming; Xuan, Fu-Jun; Yang, Li; Li, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Dai-Zhen; Zhou, Chun-Lin; Tang, Bo-Ping

    2016-01-01

    The complete mitochondrial genome (mitogenome) of Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was determined to be 15,883 bp (GenBank accession No. KM009121), which contains 22 tRNA genes, 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 2 rRNA genes and a major non-coding A + T-rich region. It has the typical gene organization and order of mitogenomes from ancestral insects. The nucleotide composition was also biased toward A + T nucleotides (71.72%) and the AT skew of this mitogenome was slightly positive. All of the 22 tRNA genes displayed a typical clover-leaf structure, with the exception of trnS1 (AGN). Thirteen PCGs were initiated by ATN codons, except for cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene which was initiated by AAT. Eight of the 13 PCGs harbor the incomplete termination codon by T or TA. The A + T-rich region of the mitogenome was 1237 bp in length and the A + T content was 82.30%. PMID:25162515

  20. Caracteres preimaginales y aspectos bionómicos de Gyriosomus luczotii Laporte, 1840 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerez, V.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the morphology and microstructure of the egg chorion, and the morphology of the first instar larva of Gyriosomus luczotii Laporte, 1840 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae, Nycteliini. Bionomical and distributional data on this species are also provided. To obtain eggs and larvae, couples were collected in the field and kept in rearing cages until oviposture and ecclosion. The structure and adornment of the egg exochorion, and the exterior morphological features of larvae were examined with electron scanning microscopy. The eggs of G. luczotii showed a rounded micropyle and a smooth exochorion, composed of hexagonal cells without aeropyles. The larvae of G. luczotii showed morphological characteristics suited for an edaphic life similar to that of Pedobionta: digging prothoracic legs, cephalic capsule with abundant sensilla, and well–developed pygopodium. We analysed the importance of larval morphology as an element for specific diagnosis and found that interspecific differences regarding frontal sensilla, clypeus shape, and anterior part of labrum, had a taxonomic value and possibly a phylogenetic value.

  1. Karyotype differentiation patterns in species of the subfamily Scarabaeinae (Scarabaeidae, Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo Cavalcanti; de Oliveira, Sárah Gomes; Ramos, Ituza Celeste; de Moura, Rita de Cássia

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the karyotype of species belonging to the subfamily Scarabaeinae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae) and to compile the conventional cytogenetic data available in the literature for this group. The karyotypes of ten species belonging to the tribes Canthonini, Coprini, Onthophagini and Phanaeini were analyzed by conventional staining. Eight of these species were described for the first time (Canthon aff carbonarius, Canthon chalybaeus, Coprophanaeus dardanus, Deltochilum aff amazonicum, Dichotomius geminatus, Oxysternon silenus, Phanaeus chalcomelas and Malagoniella aff astyanax) and two were redescribed (Diabroctis mimas and Digitonthophagus gazella) since their karyotypes differed from those previously published in the literature. Four species studied showed a diploid number of 2n=20 and a parachute type sex determining system and the karyotype was 2n=20,Xy in two species and 2n=18,Xy(p), 2n=19,X0, 2n=12,XY and 2n=14,neoXY in one each. The chromosome morphology of the different species varied, with the observation of metacentric, submetacentric, subacrocentric and acrocentric chromosomes. The X chromosome was predominantly meta or submetacentric in the species analyzed, whereas the y chromosome presented two arms or was punctiform. In conclusion, the subfamily Scarabaeinae comprises 120 species analyzed cytogenetically, and are observed the occurrence of five chromosome rearrangements (autosome-autosome and X-autosome fusions, pericentric inversions, fissions and loss of the y chromosome) that are related to the chromosome variability and evolution in the group. PMID:18495484

  2. Fruit Damage Patterns Caused by Ovipositing Females of Conotrachelus dimidiatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Guava Trees

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    Felipe Tafoya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the damage patterns produced by females of the guava weevil Conotrachelus dimidiatus Champion, 1904 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, according to the position of the damaged fruit in guava trees Psidium guajava L. in Calvillo, Aguascalientes, Mexico. The trees were subdivided in eight zones, and during one year the level of fruit lesions due to oviposition was registered. Results showed a higher level of damage in the upper and external zone of the trees (P≤.05. We found no significant differences in damage between the four cardinal points (P≥.05. During the year, the level of damage was recorded and was higher in the months of August and September (P≤.05 associated with rainfall (0.86, P=.06 and increase in temperature (0.84, P=.03. The most susceptible fruits were in the size range of 2.1–4.0 cm (polar diameter. The information from this study will be used to design and establish effective control strategies for the guava weevil, taking into account location of the most susceptible fruits, seasonality of the pest, and the abiotic factors.

  3. The Hydraulic Mechanism of the Unfolding of Hind Wings in Dorcus titanus platymelus (Order: Coleoptera

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    Jiyu Sun

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In most beetles, the hind wings are thin and fragile; when at rest, they are held over the back of the beetle. When the hind wing unfolds, it provides the necessary aerodynamic forces for flight. In this paper, we investigate the hydraulic mechanism of the unfolding process of the hind wings in Dorcus titanus platymelus (Oder: Coleoptera. The wing unfolding process of Dorcus titanus platymelus was examined using high speed camera sequences (400 frames/s, and the hydraulic pressure in the veins was measured with a biological pressure sensor and dynamic signal acquisition and analysis (DSA during the expansion process. We found that the total time for the release of hydraulic pressure during wing folding is longer than the time required for unfolding. The pressure is proportional to the length of the wings and the body mass of the beetle. A retinal camera was used to investigate the fluid direction. We found that the peak pressures correspond to two main cross-folding joint expansions in the hind wing. These observations strongly suggest that blood pressure facilitates the extension of hind wings during unfolding.

  4. Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae

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    Andréa Roveré Franz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Toxic effects of essential plant oils in adult Sitophilus oryzae (Linnaeus (Coleoptera, Curculionidae. Stored grains are subject to losses in quality nutritional value and in sanitation from the time they are stored to the time they are consumed. Botanical insecticides may offer an alternative solution for pest control. The objective was to test the insecticidal properties of the essential oils of Cymbopogon citratus (leaf, Zingiber officinale (root and Mentha sp. (leaf. The efficacy of these oils was tested to control the rice weevil, S. oryzae, using hydrodistillation. Chemical analysis of the essential oils was carried out by gas chromatography. Major components of C. citratus were geranial (48% and neral (31%, of Z. officinale were α-zingibereno (13%, geranial (16%, neral (10% and α-farneseno (5% and of Mentha sp. was menthol (92%. Bioassays were carried out by fumigation and topical application. In topical application assays, the essential oil of C. citratus had greater toxicity (LC50 0.027 µL mL-1 and shorter exposure time than the oils of the other two plants. After 24 h and 48 h, 70% and 100% mortality of S. oryzae occurred, respectively. In fumigation assays, essential oil of Z. officinale had a lower LC50 (1.18 µL cm-2 and 70% mortality after 24 h exposure. Therefore, we recommend the use of essential oils of C. citratus and Z. officinale to control the rice weevil S. oryzae.

  5. On the spatial spread of the Rice Water Weevil, Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus Kuschel (Coleoptera: Erirhinidae, in Italy

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    Daniela Lupi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A five year study has been made to establish the spread of the rice water weevil Lissorhoptrus oryzophilus (Coleoptera: Erirhinidae in Northern Italy. Data obtained with GPS from 2005 throughout 2009 were first georeferenced with SW ArcGis® 9.2, then overlapped and compared to the map of the European environmental landscape based on the interpretation of satellite images (CORINE Land Cover map and to the hydrographic chart CT10 (Technical Regional map 10000. The analysis of the radial rate of spread per year indicates a deceleration in the expansion from 10.864 ± 6.801 km/year in 2005 to 5.318 ± 1.401 km/year in 2009. In five years the weevil has expanded its distribution in nearly all rice paddies in Lombardy and Piedmont, over an area of about 200,000 ha, which correspond to 86% of the total Italian rice area. Its expansion is thought to follow a type of stratified dispersal, due both to insect adult active dispersal and to accidental movements caused by human transportation.

  6. Naturally-Occurring Entomopathogenic Fungi on Three Bark Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Bulgaria

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    Slavimira A. Draganova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Bark beetles (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae belong to one of the most damaging groups of forest insects and the activity of their natural enemies –pathogens, parasitoids,parasites or predators suppressing their population density,is of great importance. Biodiversity of entomopathogenic fungi on bark beetles in Bulgaria has been investigated sporadically. The aim of this preliminary study was to find, identify and study morphological characteristics of fungal entomopathogens naturally-occurring in populations of three curculionid species – Ips sexdentatus Boern, Ips typographus (L. and Dryocoetes autographus (Ratz.. Dead pest adults were found under the bark of Pinus sylvestris and Picea abies trees collectedfrom forests in the Maleshevska and Vitosha Mountains. Fungal pathogens were isolated into pure cultures on SDAY (Sabouraud dextrose agar with yeast extract and were identified based on morphological characteristics both on the host and in a culture.Morphological characteristics of the isolates were studied by phenotypic methods. The fungal isolates obtained from dead adults of Ips sexdentatus, Ips typographus and D. autographus were found to belong to the species Beauveria bassiana (Bals. – Criv. Vuillemin,Beauveria brongniartii (Saccardo Petch and Isaria farinosa (Holmsk. Fries (anamorph Ascomycota, Sordariomycetes: Hypocreales, Cordycipitaceae. Morphological traits of the isolates are described.

  7. Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus Derivatives: Extraction Methods and Bioactivity Against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, L P; Ansante, T F; Niculau, E S; Pavarini, R; Silva, M F G F; Seffrin, R C; Vendramim, J D

    2015-12-01

    Plant-based insecticides can play an important role in integrated insect pest management (IPM), especially in protecting stored grains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioactivity of derivatives (powder, ethanolic extract, and essential oil (EO)) from the leaves of Pimenta pseudocaryophyllus (Myrtaceae), a Brazilian native species, against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), the main insect pest of stored corn. The powder and essential oil prepared from leaves showed a repellent effect. Moreover, the EO exhibited promising insecticidal activity through residual contact (LC50 = 1522 mg kg(-1)) and significantly decreased the F 1 progeny and the percentage of damaged grains. However, the essential oil obtained from P. pseudocaryophyllus leaves did not result in significant mortality of S. zeamais adults after 72 h of exposure by fumigation in concentrations up to 400 μL L(-1) of air. Based on GC-MS analysis, 20 compounds were identified in the essential oil of P. pseudocaryophyllus leaves, being chavibetol (38.14%), methyl eugenol (11.35%), and terpinolene (9.17%) as the major constituents. Essential oil from P. pseudocaryophyllus leaves is an interesting source of compounds with grain-protectant properties and should be analyzed in future studies aiming to develop new bioinsecticides to use in the IPM of stored grains. PMID:26285912

  8. Coexistence and Competition between Tomicus yunnanensis and T. minor (Coleoptera: Scolytinae in Yunnan Pine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Chun Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition and cooperation between bark beetles, Tomicus yunnanensis Kirkendall and Faccoli and Tomicus minor (Hartig (Coleoptera: Scolytinae were examined when they coexisted together in living Yunnan pine trees (Pinus yunnanensis Franchet in Yunnan province in Southwest China. T. yunnanensis bark beetles were observed to initiate dispersal from pine shoots to trunks in November, while the majority of T. minor begins to transfer in December. T. yunnanensis mainly attacks the top and middle parts of the trunk, whereas T. minor mainly resides in the lower and middle parts of the trunk. The patterns of attack densities of these two species were similar, but with T. yunnanensis colonizing the upper section of the trunk and T. minor the lower trunk. The highest attack density of T. Yunnanensis was 297 egg galleries/m2, and the highest attack density of T. minor was 305 egg galleries/m2. Although there was significant overlap for the same bark areas, the two species generally colonize different areas of the tree, which reduces the intensity of competition for the relatively thin layer of phloem-cambium tissues where the beetles feed and reside.

  9. Factors Affecting Pheromone Production by the Pepper Weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and Collection Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred J. Eller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Several factors affecting pheromone production by male pepper weevils, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae as well as collection efficiency were investigated. Factors studied included: porous polymer adsorbents (Tenax versus Super Q, male age, time of day, male density, and male diet. Super Q was found to be a superior adsorbent for the male-produced alcohols and geranic acid as well as the plant-produced E-β-ocimene. Pheromone production increased with male age up to about age 15 days old and then tapered off. Male pepper weevils produced the highest amount of pheromone between noon and 2 pm (i.e., 4 to 6 h after “lights on” and were producing ca. 800 ng/h during this period. Thereafter, pheromone production decreased and was extremely low during the scotophase (i.e., ca. 12 ng/h. Male pepper weevil density had a significant effect on both release rate and pheromone composition. Pheromone production on a per male basis was highest for individual males and the percentage of geranic acid in the blend was lowest for individual males. Male pepper weevils produced only extremely low amounts of pheromone when feeding on artificial diet; however, they produced very high amounts when on fresh peppers. Together, this information will be useful in designing better attractant lures for pepper weevils.

  10. The complete mitochondrial genome of Epicauta chinensis (Coleoptera: Meloidae) and phylogenetic analysis among Coleopteran insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Chao; He, Shilin; Song, Xuhao; Liao, Qi; Zhang, Xiuyue; Yue, Bisong

    2016-03-10

    The blister beetle is an important resource insect due to its defensive substance cantharidin, which was widely used in pharmacology and plant protection. We determined the complete mitochondrial genome of Epicauta chinensis Laporte (Coleoptera: Tenebrionoidae: Meloidae). The circular genome is 15,717 bp long, encoding 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), two ribosomal RNAs and 22 tRNAs and containing a A+T-rich region with gene arrangement identical to other Coleopteran species. Twelve PCGs start with typical ATN codon, while ATP8 gene initiate with GTT for first report in Insecta. All PCGs terminate with conventional stop codon TAA or TAG. All tRNAs in E. chinensis are predicted to fold into typical cloverleaf secondary structure, except tRNA-Ser(AGN), in which the dihydrouracil arm (DHU arm) could not form stable stem-loop structure. The secondary structure of lrRNA and srRNA comprises 48 helices and 32 helices respectively. The 1101 bp A+T-rich region contains a 15 bp poly-T stretch and microsatellite-like repeats rather than large tandem repetitive sequences. Phylogenetic analysis, based on 13 PCGs of 45 Coleopteran species, show that E. chinensis grouped with Tenebrionidae species. It also support the topology of (((Chrysomelidae+Curculionoidea)+(Cucujoidea+Cleroidea))+Tenebrionoidea) within Cucujiformia. PMID:26707213

  11. Insecticidal Efficacy of Some Lamiaceae Plant Extracts Against Callosobruchus chinensis Linn. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Kiradoo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was undertaken to screen some plants belonging to family Lamiaceae against Callosobruchus chinensis Linn.. Among fourteen important insect pests of stored grains, the pulse beetle C. chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae is one such pest causing considerable damage to stored pulses. The eggs are laid on the host grains; the larvae bore inside and after feeding and pupating emerge out as adults leaving behind damaged hollow seed-grains. Looking into the hazards of chemical insecticides, there is an utmost need to search for some alternate methods for protection against the damage caused by insects. The leaves of the select plants viz., Ocimum basilicum, O. sanctum and Mentha spicata were employed in the form of various formulations and mortality of the pest insect was assessed. A significant increase in mortality of C. chinensis was observed in all the experimental sets as compared to normal and control sets during the present study. When comparisons were made on the basis of ANOVA to compare the effect of the three plants on mortality, it was found that the treatments of O. basilicum were superior over M. spicata and O. sanctum. The findings overall suggest that all the three plants screened have a potential to be used against the pest C. chinensis and can be employed as an alternate to chemical insecticides in household and storehouses to minimize the infestation and damage caused by the bruchid.

  12. Preliminary Diversity Of Dung Beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae Attracting By Human Dung (Calvario, Meta

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    Ruth Mariela Castillo Morales

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the Private Reserve, Refugio del Oso de Anteojos (El Calvario-Meta, the diversity of dung beetles was studied (Coleoptera: Scarabaeinae, grouped around different types of vegetation (Montane Rain Forest, Rainforest Premontane, Lower Montane Rain Forest, by using pitfall traps baited with human dung. During the samplings carried out in the rainy station on 2008, were captured a total of 177 individuals belonging to 9 species. The tribe Canthonini was the most representative with 87.5%, of the described species, followed by Aechini 10.8%, and Onthophagini 1.7%. The dominant species was Canthon lituratus in the three vegetation units: Lower montane rain forest was the richest (9 species and abundance (86 individuals, compared with other environments sampled. By calculating the complementarity index, shows a similar species composition in the three habitats sampled, possibly, related to the floristic composition presented in each one of them.

  13. Characterization of the complete mitochondrial genome of the firefly, Luciola substriata (Coleoptera: Lampyridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Feng-Juan; Ao, Liang; Zhao, Hua-Bin; Wang, Kai

    2016-09-01

    The firefly, Luciola substriata (Coleoptera: Lampyridae), is an aquatic firefly species, whose larvae inhabit ponds or lakes. Here we present the complete mitochondrial (mt) genome of the firefly (GenBank accession number KP313820) and provide its annotation. This circular genome is 16,248 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, 22 transfer RNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and a non-coding AT-rich region. Similar to other firefly species, the base composition of this mitochondrial genome is also biased toward A and T (44.09% A, 34.00% T, 12.89% C, and 9.01% G). All 13 protein-coding genes start with a typical mitochondrial start codon, and terminate with a usual stop codon TAA, or TAG or a single T. The non-coding AT-rich region (1636 bp in length) include one (A)20, and two (T)15 tandem repeats, and one (AAT)5 element. This mitochondrial genome sequence will promote a better understanding for firefly evolution in the future. PMID:25714154

  14. Identification of candidate chemosensory genes in the antennal transcriptome of Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Su; Rao, Xiang-Jun; Li, Mao-Ye; Feng, Ming-Feng; He, Meng-Zhu; Li, Shi-Guang

    2015-03-01

    We present the first antennal transcriptome sequencing information for the yellow mealworm beetle, Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae). Analysis of the transcriptome dataset obtained 52,216,616 clean reads, from which 35,363 unigenes were assembled. Of these, 18,820 unigenes showed significant similarity (E-value SNMP) genes. BLASTX best hit results indicated that these chemosensory genes were most identical to their respective orthologs from Tribolium castaneum. Phylogenetic analyses also revealed that the T. molitor OBPs and CSPs are closely related to those of T. castaneum. Real-time quantitative PCR assays showed that eight TmolOBP genes were antennae-specific. Of these, TmolOBP5, TmolOBP7 and TmolOBP16 were found to be predominantly expressed in male antennae, while TmolOBP17 was expressed mainly in the legs of males. Several other genes were identified that were neither tissue-specific nor sex-specific. These results establish a firm foundation for future studies of the chemosensory genes in T. molitor. PMID:25665775

  15. Observations on the Cave-Associated Beetles (Coleoptera of Nova Scotia, Canada

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    Moseley M.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The cave-associated invertebrates of Nova Scotia constitute a fauna at a very early stage of post-glacial recolonization. TheColeoptera are characterized by low species diversity. A staphylinid Quedius spelaeus spelaeus, a predator, is the only regularlyencountered beetle. Ten other terrestrial species registered from cave environments in the province are collected infrequently. Theyinclude three other rove-beetles: Brathinus nitidus, Gennadota canadensis and Atheta annexa. The latter two together with Catopsgratiosus (Leiodidae constitute a small group of cave-associated beetles found in decompositional situations. Quedius s. spelaeusand a small suite of other guanophiles live in accumulations of porcupine dung: Agolinus leopardus (Scarabaeidae, Corticariaserrata (Latrididae, and Acrotrichis castanea (Ptilidae. Two adventive weevils Otiorhynchus ligneus and Barypeithes pellucidus(Curculionidae collected in shallow cave passages are seasonal transients; Dermestes lardarius (Dermestidae, recorded fromone cave, was probably an accidental (stray. Five of the terrestrial beetles are adventive Palaearctic species. Aquatic beetles arecollected infrequently. Four taxa have been recorded: Agabus larsoni (Dytiscidae may be habitual in regional caves; another Agabussp. (probably semivittatus, Dytiscus sp. (Dytiscidae, and Crenitis digesta (Hydrophilidae are accidentals. The distribution andecology of recorded species are discussed, and attention is drawn to the association of beetles found in a Nova Scotia “ice cave”.

  16. Population dynamics and spatial distribution of Abaris basistriata Chaudoir, 1873 (Coleoptera: Carabidae

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    Ivan Carlos Fernandes Martins

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Abaris basistriata, a beetle species dominant in agroecosystems and natural habitats, may benefit from the establishment of nearby refuge areas or crop field centers. To confirm this hypothesis, we analyzed the spatial distribution of the species and verified the population dynamics of this predator in a soybean/corn rotation crop and a central refuge area. The 1-ha experimental area was divided in half by a range of herbaceous plants (2 m in width and 80 m in length. Beetle samples were collected using pitfall traps every fortnight during the in-season and every month during the off-season (a total of 27 sampling occurrences. Population fluctuation was analyzed by correlating the total number of specimens with plant phenology. We used multiple regression analysis with variable (stepwise selection to examine the influence of meteorological factors on species occurrence. To determine the spatial distribution, data were analyzed using dispersion indices and probabilistic models based on the Coleoptera frequency distribution. Distribution visualization was assessed using a linear interpolation map. A total of 143 A. basistriata specimens were collected, with 83 from the soybean/corn area and 60 from the refuge area. Periods of large population size occurred during a season with high rainfall and high maximum and minimum temperatures. On the basis of the spatial distribution analysis of A. basistriata, it is likely that the beetles occur in an aggregate form, preferably in the refuge area.

  17. Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil

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    Andreia Mauruto Chernaki-Leffer

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Susceptibility of Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae to cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron in southern Brazil. The lesser mealworm, Alphitobius diaperinus (Panzer, is an important insect pest in poultry houses in Brazil. Susceptibility of the lesser mealworm collected from eight poultry houses in Paraná state, southern Brazil, was evaluated for cypermethrin, dichlorvos and triflumuron. Adult A. diaperinus were tested in bioassays with cypermethrin and dichlorvos. Larvae were fed rabbit feed wetted with a triflumuron-water solution. Concentration-mortality regressions were estimated using Probit analysis and resistance ratios were calculated based on the susceptible population. Among the field populations evaluated, cypermethrin LC50 values for adults, ranged from 68.1 to 6,263 ng (AI/cm². LC50 values for adults challenged with dichlorvos ranged from 10.3 to 1,385 ng (AI/cm². One population from Pato Branco showed reduced susceptibility to triflumuron (LC50 = 272 µg (AI/ml of solution when compared to the most susceptible population (LC50 = 109.8 µg (AI/ml. Application of cypermethrin and dichlorvos analogues should be managed with caution to minimize insecticide resistance problems.

  18. Stenusine, an antimicrobial agent in the rove beetle genus Stenus (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusebrink, Inka; Dettner, Konrad; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2008-08-01

    Stenusine is well known as the alkaloid, discharged by the rove beetle, genus Stenus Latreille (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae). The Stenus beetles employ the alkaloid as an escape mechanism when on water surfaces. In the case of danger, they lower their abdomen and emit stenusine from their pygidial glands. Stenusine shows a low surface tension and therefore a high spreading pressure; these properties propel the beetle quickly over the water. Many Steninae do not live in habitats with open waters, but in detritus, leaf litter, mosses, etc. This raises the possibility that stenusine might also have another function, e.g., as antibiotic or fungicide. Stenus beetles show an intense grooming behaviour. With gas chromatography mass spectrometry analyses we could prove that they cover themselves with their secretion. To tests its antimicrobial properties we conducted agar diffusion tests with stenusine and norstenusine, another substance that is abundant in most Stenus species. Both compounds have an antimicrobial effect on entomopathogenic bacteria and fungi. Stenusine not only allows for an extraordinary method of locomotion on water surfaces, it also protects the Steninae from being infested with microorganisms.

  19. Demographic comparison and population projection of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) reared on sugarcane at different temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lu; Miao, Yunxin; Hou, Youming

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how temperature affects fitness is important for conservation and pest management, especially in the era of global climate change. Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Oliver) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is a worldwide pest of many economically important crops. Although much is known about this pest's life cycle, its adaptability to different temperatures is not fully understood. Here, we used age- and stage-specific life tables to investigate the effects of temperature on fitness-related traits and demographic parameters of R. ferrugineus under eight constant temperature regimens in the laboratory. The growth potential of these populations was also evaluated. The greatest longevity for males and females was 158.0 d at 24 °C and 144.5 d at 21 °C, respectively, but mean total fecundity was the highest at 27 °C. The intrinsic rate of increase (r), finite rate of increase (λ), and net reproductive rate (R0) increased initially at low temperatures and then decreased. All metrics reached a maximum at 27 °C and a minimum at 36 °C. Mean generation times (T ) decreased across the temperature range with a minimum at 36 °C. Our results indicate that the optimum temperature for growth of R. ferrugineus was approximately 27 °C. Our work will be of value for developing strategies for control management of this pest species. PMID:27545594

  20. Notas e novas espécies de Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Novas espécies descritas do Brasil: Hypsioma carioca sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro e Hesychotypa maraba sp. nov. (Pará; do Equador: Sternycha ecuatoriana sp. nov. (Pichincha; da Bolívia (Santa Cruz: Hesychotypa magnifica sp. nov., Tibiosioma maculosa sp. nov. e Alexera secunda sp. nov. Transfere-se Hesycha strandi (Breuning, 1943 para o gênero Cacostola Fairmaire & Germain, 1859. Hesychotypa archippa Dillon & Dillon, 1946 é considerada sinônima de H. miniata Thomson, 1868. Novo registro (Trinidad e figura são dados para Trachysomus surdus.Notes and new species of Onciderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. New species described from Brazil: Hypsioma carioca sp. nov. (Rio de Janeiro and Hesychotypa maraba sp. nov. (Pará; from Ecuador: Sternycha ecuatoriana sp. nov. (Pichincha; from Bolivia (Santa Cruz: Hesychotypa magnifica sp. nov., Tibiosioma maculosa sp. nov. and Alexera secunda sp. nov. Hesycha strandi (Breuning, 1943 is transferred to the genus Cacostola Fairmaire & Germain, 1859. Hesychotypa archippa Dillon & Dillon, 1946 is considered a synonym of H. miniata Thomson, 1868. New record (Trinidad and figure for Trachysomus surdus Dillon & Dillon, 1946 are given.

  1. Stenusine, an antimicrobial agent in the rove beetle genus Stenus (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusebrink, Inka; Dettner, Konrad; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2008-08-01

    Stenusine is well known as the alkaloid, discharged by the rove beetle, genus Stenus Latreille (Coleoptera, Staphylinidae). The Stenus beetles employ the alkaloid as an escape mechanism when on water surfaces. In the case of danger, they lower their abdomen and emit stenusine from their pygidial glands. Stenusine shows a low surface tension and therefore a high spreading pressure; these properties propel the beetle quickly over the water. Many Steninae do not live in habitats with open waters, but in detritus, leaf litter, mosses, etc. This raises the possibility that stenusine might also have another function, e.g., as antibiotic or fungicide. Stenus beetles show an intense grooming behaviour. With gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses we could prove that they cover themselves with their secretion. To tests its antimicrobial properties we conducted agar diffusion tests with stenusine and norstenusine, another substance that is abundant in most Stenus species. Both compounds have an antimicrobial effect on entomopathogenic bacteria and fungi. Stenusine not only allows for an extraordinary method of locomotion on water surfaces, it also protects the Steninae from being infested with microorganisms. PMID:18392795

  2. A multilayer micromechanical model of the cuticle of Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew Jansen, M; Singh, Sudhanshu S; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Franz, Nico M

    2016-08-01

    Curculio longinasus Chittenden, 1927 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is a weevil species common throughout the southwestern United States that uses its rostrum - a very slender, curved, beak-like projection of the head - to excavate tunnels in plant organs (such as acorns) for egg laying (oviposition). Once the apical portion of the rostrum has been inserted into the preferred substrate for oviposition, the female begins rotating around the perimeter of the hole, elevating her head by extending the fore-legs, and rotating the head in place in a drilling motion. This action causes significant elastic deformation of the rostrum, which will bend until it becomes completely straight. To better understand the mechanical behavior of the cuticle as it undergoes deformation during the preparation of oviposition sites, we develop a comprehensive micro/macro model of the micromechanical structure and properties of the cuticle, spanning across all cuticular regions, and reliably mirroring the resultant macroscale properties of the cuticle. Our modeling approach relies on the use of multi-scale, hierarchical biomaterial representation, and employs various micromechanical schemata - e.g., Mori-Tanaka, effective field, and Maxwell - to calculate the homogenized properties of representative volume elements at each level in the hierarchy. We describe the configuration and behavior of this model in detail, and discuss the theoretical implications and limitations of this approach with emphasis on future biomechanical and comparative evolutionary research. Our detailed account of this approach can thereby serve as a methodological template for exploring the biomechanical behavior of new insect structures. PMID:27189867

  3. Transcriptomic Analysis of Eucryptorrhynchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Using 454 Pyrosequencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen-Kai; Wen, Jun-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Eucryptorrhynchus chinensis Olivier (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) is one of the most important pests of Ailanthus altissima; however, so far, no studies on the genome or transcriptome of E. chinensis have been reported. Using the Roche 454 FLX Titanium platform, an RNA pool obtained from E. chinensis eggs, larva, pupae, and adults was sequenced and assembled de novo to achieve maximum diversity of sampled transcripts. We obtained 1,441,137 (∼518 Mb) raw reads with an average length of 360 bp. After trimming, 89% qualified reads were produced and assembled into 35,509 isotigs with an average length of 440 bp, N50 of 1,048 bp, and 111,643 singletons. We generated 87,894 unigenes following a cluster analysis of the isotigs and singletons, and then functionally annotated the unigenes with gene descriptions. We obtained 23,363 GO assignments, and 12,724 unigenes were assigned to KOG. Based on these annotations, 294 biochemical pathways involved in growth, reproduction, and stress or immune responses were predicted. A total of 659,026 single nucleotide variants and 6,112 simple sequence repeats were detected. Our data provide comprehensive information on the sequence and possible functions of E. chinensis transcripts.

  4. Endemic epigean Tenebrionids (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) from the Andean Region: exploring the patagonian-diversification hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Rodolfo; Flores, Gustavo E

    2015-01-01

    Tenebrionidae is a diverse insect family of Coleoptera that shows high levels of endemicity in epigean species. For the Andean region, which is divided into three subregions: Central Chilean, Subantarctic and Patagonian, it has been hypothesized that epigean tenebrionids have diversified in the Patagonian subregion and subsequently, they dispersed to Subantarctic and Central Chilean subregions. In this work, based on information obtained from museum collections and scientific studies, we presented the first list of endemic epigean tenebrionids from the Andean region with their taxonomic arrangement and geographic distribution. Moreover, we used these data to explore the veracity of the Patagonian-diversification hypothesis. A total of 416 species grouped into six subfamilies, 17 tribes and 41 genera were identified as endemic to the Andean region. Considering the spatial distribution it was observed that subfamilies, tribes, genera and species were unequally distributed across subregions. Results did not support the Patagonian-diversification hypothesis; to the contrary, they were more concordant with processes of isolation among subregions that have promoted speciation by interrupting gene flow among populations, resulting in endemism because species can not expand their range sizes. Finally, we discuss the implications of our findings to be considered in biodiversity conservation, because endemic species, by their high extinction risk, are primary targets in conservation strategies. PMID:26623788

  5. Pathology of Yersinia entomophaga MH96 towards Costelytra zealandica (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae) larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, Mark Robin Holmes; van Koten, Chikako; Jackson, Trevor Anthony

    2014-01-01

    The bacterium Yersinia entomophaga was isolated from larvae of the New Zealand grass grub, Costelytra zealandica (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), found in soil. Following ingestion of a lethal dose of bacteria, larvae of C. zealandica reduced feeding activity and movement. After approximately 4h infected larvae convulsed and regurgitated dark digestive fluid and expelled frass pellets leaving the midgut empty and the larva amber in appearance. In the initial stages of infection, ingested bacteria were mostly contained within the peritrophic membrane and expelled with the gut fluid or transferred into the hind gut. While few Y. entomophaga were associated with the midgut epithelial cells, by 24h cells were swelling and bursting with vesicles being expelled into the midgut lumen. By 48h, bacteria had entered the haemocoel and the midgut cells had further deteriorated. After 72h, the cellular remnants were totally detached from the basal membrane the infected insects were filled with bacteria and moribund or dead with septicaemia. Mortality was directly proportional to dose and time after infection. By applying a range of doses, the LD50 was determined as 2.9×10(4)Y. entomophaga per C. zealandica larva, with an LT50 of 2.94days for doses of>1×10(5) per larva. Ingestion of low doses of bacteria did not inhibit feeding activity but led more slowly to death. By time of death, Y. entomophaga had multiplied, approximately 500 fold, in the cadavers of the infected larvae. PMID:24291403

  6. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread. PMID:26470205

  7. Ambrosia Beetle (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) Species, Flight, and Attack on Living Eastern Cottonwood Trees.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coyle, D R; D.C. Booth: M.S. Wallace

    2005-12-01

    ABSTRACT In spring 2002, ambrosia beetles (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) infested an intensively managed 22-ha tree plantation on the upper coastal plain of South Carolina. Nearly 3,500 scolytids representing 28 species were captured in ethanol-baited traps from 18 June 2002 to 18 April 2004. More than 88% of total captures were exotic species. Five species [Dryoxylon onoharaensum (Murayama), Euwallacea validus (Eichhoff), Pseudopityophthorus minutissimus (Zimmermann), Xyleborus atratus Eichhoff, and Xyleborus impressus Eichhoff]) were collected in South Carolina for the first time. Of four tree species in the plantation, eastern cottonwood, Populus deltoides Bartram, was the only one attacked, with nearly 40% of the trees sustaining ambrosia beetle damage. Clone ST66 sustained more damage than clone S7C15. ST66 trees receiving fertilization were attacked more frequently than trees receiving irrigation, irrigation_fertilization, or controls, although the number of S7C15 trees attacked did not differ among treatments. The study location is near major shipping ports; our results demonstrate the necessity for intensive monitoring programs to determine the arrival, spread, ecology, and impact of exotic scolytids.

  8. Evolution of subterranean diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporini, Bidessini) in the arid zone of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leys, Remko; Watts, Chris H S; Cooper, Steve J B; Humphreys, William F

    2003-12-01

    Calcrete aquifers in arid inland Australia have recently been found to contain the world's most diverse assemblage of subterranean diving beetles (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). In this study we test whether the adaptive shift hypothesis (ASH) or the climatic relict hypothesis (CRH) is the most likely mode of evolution for the Australian subterranean diving beetles by using a phylogeny based on two sequenced fragments of mitochondrial genes (CO1 and 16S-tRNA-ND1) and linearized using a relaxed molecular clock method. Most individual calcrete aquifers contain an assemblage of diving beetle species of distantly related lineages and/or a single pair of sister species that significantly differ in size and morphology. Evolutionary transitions from surface to subterranean life took place in a relatively small time frame between nine and four million years ago. Most of the variation in divergence times of the sympatric sister species is explained by the variation in latitude of the localities, which correlates with the onset of aridity from the north to the south and with an aridity maximum in the Early Pliocene (five mya). We conclude that individual calcrete aquifers were colonized by several distantly related diving beetle lineages. Several lines of evidence from molecular clock analyses support the CRH, indicating that all evolutionary transitions took place during the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene as a result of aridification. PMID:14761060

  9. Culturable bacterial microbiota of Plagiodera versicolora (L.) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) and virulence of the isolated strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Meryem; Sevim, Elif; Demir, İsmail; Sevim, Ali

    2013-05-01

    Plagiodera versicolora (Laicharting, 1781) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) is an important forest pest which damages many trees such as willow, poplar, and hazelnut. In order to find new microbes that can be utilized as a possible microbial control agent against this pest, we investigated the culturable bacterial flora of it and tested the isolated bacteria against P. versicolora larvae and adults. We were able to isolate nine bacteria from larvae and adults. The isolates were characterized using a combination of morphological, biochemical, and physiological methods. Additionally, we sequenced the partial sequence of the 16S rRNA gene to verify conventional identification results. Based on characterization studies, the isolates were identified as Staphylococcus sp. Pv1, Rahnella sp. Pv2, Rahnella sp. Pv3, Rahnella sp. Pv4, Rahnella sp. Pv5, Pantoea agglomerans Pv6, Staphylococcus sp. Pv7, Micrococcus luteus Pv8, and Rahnella sp. Pv9. The highest insecticidal activity against larvae and adults was obtained from M. luteus Pv8 with 50 and 40 % mortalities within 10 days after treatment, respectively. Extracellular enzyme activity of the bacterial isolates such as amylase, proteinase, lipase, cellulose, and chitinase was also determined. Consequently, our results show that M. luteus Pv8 might be a good candidate as a possible microbial control agent against P. versicolora and were discussed with respect to biocontrol potential of the bacterial isolates. PMID:23054688

  10. Community Ecology

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of a workshop on community ecology organized at Davis, in April, 1986, sponsored by the Sloan Foundation. There have been several recent symposia on community ecology (Strong et. al., 1984, Diamond and Case, 1987) which have covered a wide range of topics. The goal of the workshop at Davis was more narrow: to explore the role of scale in developing a theoretical approach to understanding communities. There are a number of aspects of scale that enter into attempts to understand ecological communities. One of the most basic is organizational scale. Should community ecology proceed by building up from population biology? This question and its ramifications are stressed throughout the book and explored in the first chapter by Simon Levin. Notions of scale have long been important in understanding physical systems. Thus, in understanding the interactions of organisms with their physical environment, questions of scale become paramount. These more physical questions illustrate the...

  11. Morfología del tracto digestivo y sistema reproductor femenino de Compsus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae Morphology of the digestive tract and female reproductive system of Compsus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ DAVID RUBIO G

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó el estudio morfológico del tracto digestivo y sistema reproductor femenino del picudo de los cítricos, Compsus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. El tracto digestivo presentó un arreglo típico descrito para otros insectos. Se encontraron diferencias morfológicas, sin embargo, en el buche en donde se observan unas estructuras espinosas. A nivel del mesenterón, se observó que el ventrículo anterior se encuentra dividido en sacos de tamaño medio y en el ventrículo posterior se proyectan numerosos ciegos gástricos. El sistema reproductor de la hembra mostró un arreglo estructural común a especímenes de la familia Curculionidae.A morphological examination was conducted on the digestive tract and the female reproductive system of the citrus weevil, Compsus sp. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. The digestive tract of Compsus sp. showed a typical arrangement as described for other insects. Morphological differences, however, were found in the crop of the foregut, which exhibited several spine-like structures. At the midgut level, the anterior ventricle was divided into medium-size sacs and numerous gastric caecae projected into the posterior ventricle. The female reproductive system showed a structural arrangement common to individuals of the family Curculionidae.

  12. Structure and topology of microbial communities in the major gut compartments of Melolontha melolontha larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Egert, M.G.G.; Stingl, U; Dyhrberg Bruun, L.; Pommerenke, B.; Brune, A.; Friedrich, M W

    2005-01-01

    Physicochemical gut conditions and the composition and topology of the intestinal microbiota in the major gut compartments of the root-feeding larva of the European cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha) were studied. Axial and radial profiles of pH, O2, H2, and redox potential were measured with microsensors. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in midgut samples of individual larvae revealed a simple but variable and probably nonspecifi...

  13. Structure and Topology of Microbial Communities in the Major Gut Compartments of Melolontha melolontha Larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Physicochemical gut conditions and the composition and topology of the intestinal microbiota in the major gut compartments of the root-feeding larva of the European cockchafer (Melolontha melolontha) were studied. Axial and radial profiles of pH, O2, H2, and redox potential were measured with microsensors. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in midgut samples of individual larvae revealed a simple but variable and probably nonspecifi...

  14. European Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    The European Community was established in 1951 to reconcile France and Germany after World War II and to make possible the eventual federation of Europe. By 1986, there were 12 member countries: France, Italy, Belgium, the Federal Republic of Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Denmark, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Greece, Spain, and Portugal. Principal areas of concern are internal and external trade, agriculture, monetary coordination, fisheries, common industrial and commercial policies, assistance, science and research, and common social and regional policies. The European Community has a budget of US$34.035 billion/year, funded by customs duties and 1.4% of each member's value-added tax. The treaties establishing the European Community call for members to form a common market, a common customs tariff, and common agricultural, transport, economic, and nuclear policies. Major European Community institutions include the Commission, Council of Ministers, European Parliament, Court of Justice, and Economic and Social Committee. The Community is the world's largest trading unit, accounting for 15% of world trade. The 2 main goals of the Community's industrial policy are to create an open internal market and to promote technological innovation in order to improve international competitiveness. The European Community aims to contribute to the economic and social development of Third World countries as well. PMID:12177941

  15. Cowpea Vicilins: Fractionation of Urea Denatured Sub-Units and Effects on Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Chagas Mota

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Vicilins (7S storage globulins isolated from cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. seeds which were susceptible (S and resistant (R to the cowpea weevil (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae were denatured by urea and fractionated by ion-exchange chromatography. Isolated fractions were incorporated in artificial seeds for assessment of their toxicity to C. maculatus. The most acidic fractions of both susceptible (CE-31 cultivar and resistant (IT81D-1045 line seeds were shown to affect development and survival of the bruchid. Results indicated that vicilin polypeptides of toxic nature were expressed in both types of storage globulins although at different levels.Vicilinas (globulinas de reserva 7S isoladas de sementes de feijão-de-corda (Vigna unguiculata L., susceptíveis (S e resistentes (R ao caruncho/gorgulho (Callosobruchus maculatus F., Coleoptera: Bruchidae foram desnaturadas por uréia e fracionadas por cromatografia de troca iônica. As frações isoladas foram incorporadas em sementes artificiais para avaliação de sua toxicidade a C. maculatus. As fracões mais ácidas de ambas vicilinas afetaram o desenvolvimento e a sobrevivência do bruquídeo. Sugerimos que polipeptídeos de vicilinas de natureza tóxica são expressos em ambos tipos de globulinas de reserva, embora em níveis diferentes.

  16. Stranded Zostera marina L. vs wrack fauna community interactions on a Baltic sandy beach (Hel, Poland: a short-term pilot study. Part II. Driftline effects of succession changes and colonisation of beach fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin F. Jêdrzejczak

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the second part of a three-year field study to investigate the effects of the beach macro- and meiofauna community structure on the decay of stranded wrack on Hel Beach (see Jedrzejczak 2002, focusing on successional changes and the colonisation of wrack by beach fauna. The investigation enabled the associated faunal assemblages to be characterised. Zostera marina tissue was colonised by the supralittoral fauna in two distinct phases. The macrofauna, including the talitrid amphipod Talitrus saltator, adult Diptera and Coleoptera, colonised the wrack within a day, with maximum numbers being recorded after 3 days. Thereafter, their numbers in the samples declined and the meiofauna, consisting of nematodes, oligochaetes, turbellarians and dipteran larvae, became increasingly abundant. After 18 days, the wrack surface was dominated by meiofauna. This faunal succession was not directly related to the degradation of the seagrass tissue, which proceeded linearly throughout the study period. Exclusion of macrofauna from the wrack by the use of T. saltator and Coleoptera, did not affect the rate of seagrass disintegration. The effect of meiofaunal nematodes, oligochaetes, gastrotrichs and turbellarians on wrack breakdown could not be accurately determined. However, the development of the meiofaunal community suggested that changes in the fauna community were linked more closely to successional changes in the chemistry and/or microflora of the beach wrack than to its physical breakdown.

  17. Agricultural policy-induced landscape changes: effects on carabid abundance

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ameixa, Olga; Kindlmann, Pavel

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 4 (2008), s. 467-476. ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06073; GA ČR(CZ) GEDIV/06/E013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : agricultural intensification * biocontrol * density * diversity * species richness * food webs * predatory pressure Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.913, year: 2008

  18. Natural Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset shows the locations of known tracts of high quality natural communities in Kansas, generalized to the PLSS section. It is not a compehensive dataset of...

  19. [Community nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta Bartrina, J; Pérez Rodrigo, C; Serra Majem, L I

    2006-01-01

    A growing body of scientific and epidemiological evidence indicates that diet and health are related: diet may be a risk factor or have potential protective effects. As a consequence, the focus of nutrition research has experienced a shift towards qualitative aspects of diet which could influence chronic disease, longevity, quality of life and physical and cognitive performance, leading to the development of Community Nutrition. The main undertakings in a Community Nutrition Unit are related to the identification, assessment and monitoring of nutrition problems at the community level and to planning, design, implementation and evaluation of nutrition intervention programs. Such programs combine a number of suitable strategies in a whole population approach, a high risk approach or an approach targeted at specific population groups, and are implemented in different settings, such as the work place, schools or community organizations. Community nutrition interventions aim to gradually achieve change in eating patterns towards a healthier profile. Community Nutrition programs require the use of a combination of strategies and a working group of people from different backgrounds. Many factors influence the nutritional status of an individual or a population. In order to gain effective work output, sound understanding of these patterns and a practical surveillance system are required. PMID:17424768

  20. Typhlocharis vicariantes del Estrecho de Gibraltar. I: Typhlocharis armata Coiffait, 1969 (Coleoptera, Caraboidea, Trechidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez González, S.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This first part about the vicariant Typhlocharis from Gibraltar Strait is dedicated to Typhlocharis armata Coiffait, 1969; a second paper will cover T. silvanoides Dieck, 1869. The studied material was obtained in four field campaigns carried out in the south of Spain and north of Morocco between 1997 and 2001 (Zaballos & Banda, 2000; Zaballos, 2005. In these campaigns abundant specimens of Typhlocharis (Coleoptera, Caraboidea, Trechidae were collected in different localities, the majority of them belonging to the species T. armata Coiffait, 1969. Their study and the comparison with the type series of this species allowed its complete redescription and clarification of its status within the genus. Contrary to what has been considered traditionally, the marginal umbilicate series of elytra in T. armata is composed of three, instead of four posterior setae. The taxonomical affinities of this species are established, the morphological weight of the umbilicate group of elytral setae as a lineage and species group defining character is discussed, and the theory of Jeanne (1973 about the relation between shortening of elytra and umbilicate series reduction with a decrease in body size is revised. The dispersal abilities are evaluated and a biogeographical explanation for the new distribution of the species is proposed.Esta primera parte sobre las especies de Typhlocharis vicariantes del Estrecho de Gibraltar está dedicada a Typhlocharis armata Coiffait, 1969; mientras que en un segundo artículo se tratará T. silvanoides Dieck, 1869. El material estudiado procede de cuatro campañas entomológicas realizadas en el sur de España y en el norte de Marruecos entre 1997 y 2001 (Zaballos & Banda, 2000; Zaballos, 2005. En estas campañas se recolectaron, en localidades diferentes, abundantes ejemplares de Typhlocharis (Coleoptera, Caraboidea, Trechidae, la mayoría de los cuales han resultado pertenecer a la especie T. armata Coiffait, 1969. Su estudio y

  1. Morphological and genetic variation in Cicindela lusitanica Mandl, 1935 (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Cicindelinae: implications for conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano, A.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of taxonomic and geographical boundaries is a common problem when analysing clinal distributions. This is of particular concern when the assessment of intraspecific groupings is required for conservation management. The tiger beetle Cicindela lusitanica Mandl, 1935 (Coleoptera, Carabidae is a typical case in which two recognised subspecies are distributed in a clinal latitudinal fashion in the dune systems along the Atlantic coast of Portugal. This habitat is increasingly under threat, and conservation measures are needed. We investigated the validity of the two named subspecies, based on a re-analysis of elytral and genitalic measurements using multivariate analysis. We also analysed variation in mitochondrial Cytochrome Oxidase I gene for a total of six populations along the cline. Multivariate analysis supported the idea of a morphological cline and revealed a clear distinction of the southernmost population and also some degree of distinctiveness of the most northern populations, partially supporting the recognised subspecific ranking. The mtDNA analysis identified two main groups corresponding to northern and southern populations. Both sets of markers showed that variation within the C. lusitanica assemblage is complex, with the boundaries between morphological and mtDNA groups not in agreement. However, populations at either end of the distributional range are clearly distinct from each other, and should be considered as provisional units for conservation programmes.El reconocimiento de límites taxonómicos y geográficos de la variabilidad observada es un problema habitual cuando se analizan distribuciones clinales. Esto es particularmente problemático cuando se requiere la determinación de agrupamientos intraespecíficos para tomar medidas de conservación. El cicindélido Cicindela lusitanica Mandl, 1935 (Coleoptera, Carabidae constituye un caso típico en el que dos subespecies reconocidas se hayan distribuidas a

  2. Observations on sex ratio and behavior of males in Xyleborinus saxesenii Ratzeburg (Scolytinae, Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Biedermann

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Strongly female-biased sex ratios are typical for the fungal feeding haplodiploid Xyleborini (Scolytinae, Coleoptera, and are a result of inbreeding and local mate competition (LMC. These ambrosia beetles are hardly ever found outside of trees, and thus male frequency and behavior have not been addressed in any empirical studies to date. In fact, for most species the males remain undescribed. Data on sex ratios and male behavior could, however, provide important insights into the Xyleborini’s mating system and the evolution of inbreeding and LMC in general. In this study, I used in vitro rearing methods to obtain the first observational data on sex ratio, male production, male and female dispersal, and mating behavior in a xyleborine ambrosia beetle. Females of Xyleborinus saxesenii Ratzeburg produced between 0 and 3 sons per brood, and the absence of males was relatively independent of the number of daughters to be fertilized and the maternal brood sex ratio. Both conformed to a strict LMC strategy with a relatively precise and constant number of males. If males were present they eclosed just before the first females dispersed, and stayed in the gallery until all female offspring had matured. They constantly wandered through the gallery system, presumably in search of unfertilized females, and attempted to mate with larvae, other males, and females of all ages. Copulations, however, only occurred with immature females. From galleries with males, nearly all females dispersed fertilized. Only a few left the natal gallery without being fertilized, and subsequently went on to produce large and solely male broods. If broods were male-less, dispersing females always failed to found new galleries.

  3. Diel Patterns of Colaspis brunnea and Colaspis crinicornis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Southeastern Nebraska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kentaro; Meinke, Lance J

    2015-12-01

    A field study was conducted to increase our understanding of diel activity patterns of Colaspis brunnea (F.) and Colaspis crinicornis Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in key crop habitats. Within 24-h periods, C. brunnea was sampled in clover fields (primarily red clover, Trifolium pretense (L.), with some sweet clover, Melilotus officinalis (L.) Pallas, and downy brome, Bromus tectorum (L.)) and soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, fields, using a sweep-net, while whole-plant-count sampling was used to monitor C. crinicornis densities in field corn, Zea mays (L.). Sweep-net captures of C. brunnea were significantly greater at night than during the day, suggesting possible vertical movement within the canopy during a 24-h period. Colaspis crinicornis densities on corn plants were fairly constant throughout a 24-h period, but beetle activity (e.g., walking, mating) was significantly greater at night than during the day. Results suggest that both Colaspis species may be exhibiting similar increases in activity at night that facilitates movement from more protected to more exposed areas within a habitat. It is unclear what mechanisms drive this diel pattern, but vegetation architecture and associated interactions with environmental conditions may play a role. Sweep-netting in clover or soybean fields and use of whole-plant-counts in cornfields were effective sampling methods for Colaspis adults. However, because activity and behaviors of Colaspis beetles were influenced by time of day in this study, use of a consistent sampling time within a diel period would be recommended for future population studies or integrated pest management decision-making. PMID:26314034

  4. Organization and comparative analysis of the mitochondrial genomes of bioluminescent Elateroidea (Coleoptera: Polyphaga).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Danilo T; Mitani, Yasuo; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Viviani, Vadim R

    2016-07-25

    Mitochondrial genome organization in the Elateroidea superfamily (Coleoptera), which include the main families of bioluminescent beetles, has been poorly studied and lacking information about Phengodidae family. We sequenced the mitochondrial genomes of Neotropical Lampyridae (Bicellonycha lividipennis), Phengodidae (Brasilocerus sp.2 and Phrixothrix hirtus) and Elateridae (Pyrearinus termitilluminans, Hapsodrilus ignifer and Teslasena femoralis). All species had a typical insect mitochondrial genome except for the following: in the elaterid T. femoralis genome there is a non-coding region between NADH2 and tRNA-Trp; in the phengodids Brasilocerus sp.2 and P. hirtus genomes we did not find the tRNA-Ile and tRNA-Gln. The P. hirtus genome showed a ~1.6kb non-coding region, the rearrangement of tRNA-Tyr, a new tRNA-Leu copy, and several regions with higher AT contents. Phylogenetics analysis using Bayesian and ML models indicated that the Phengodidae+Rhagophthalmidae are closely related to Lampyridae family, and included Drilus flavescens (Drilidae) as an internal clade within Elateridae. This is the first report that compares the mitochondrial genomes organization of the three main families of bioluminescent Elateroidea, including the first Neotropical Lampyridae and Phengodidae. The losses of tRNAs, and translocation and duplication events found in Phengodidae mt genomes, mainly in P. hirtus, may indicate different evolutionary rates in these mitochondrial genomes. The mitophylogenomics analysis indicates the monophyly of the three bioluminescent families and a closer relationship between Lampyridae and Phengodidae/Rhagophthalmidae, in contrast with previous molecular analysis. PMID:27060405

  5. The presence of a mycangium in European Sinodendron cylindricum (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) and the associated yeast symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanahashi, Masahiko; Hawes, Colin J.

    2016-01-01

    Part of the exoskeleton of some wood-inhabiting insects is modified to form a mycangium, which is a specialized organ used to convey fungal spores or yeasts to their offspring. Although most stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) are known to have female-specific mycangia and associated yeast symbionts, the evolutionary origin of the mycangium in this group remains unresolved. Here, we report the presence of a mycangium and associated yeast symbionts in the European horned stag beetle Sinodendron cylindricum (L.), which belongs to an ancestral clade of the Lucanidae. The mycangium of S. cylindricum is shown to be female-specific and have the same developmental origin as that of other stag beetles. A total of five yeast strains were isolated from adult mycangia and larval gut of S. cylindricum. Of these, we suggest that SICYAM1 is an undescribed yeast with taxonomic novelty, and have identified SICYLG3 as the xylose-fermenting yeast Scheffersomyces insectosa using nuclear ribosomal RNA and ITS sequences. The remaining three yeast strains, SICYAM2, SICYLG1, and SICYLG2, were assigned to the genus Sugiyamaella. Yeast density in the adult mycangium was lower than that of the more evolutionarily advanced stag beetles, the European Lucanus cervus (L.) and Dorcus parallelipipedus (L.), which were also examined in this study. No living yeasts were isolated from the adult guts. However, a third instar larva of S. cylindricum harbored 104–106 living yeasts in each gut region, which suggests that gut yeasts play an important role in these wood-feeding larvae. PMID:27432353

  6. Relationships of abscised cotton fruit to boll weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) feeding, oviposition, and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showler, Allan T

    2008-02-01

    Abscised cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., fruit in field plots planted at different times were examined to assess adult boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), use of squares and bolls during 2002 and 2003 in the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas. Although boll abscission is not necessarily related to infestation, generally more bolls abscised than squares and abundances of fallen bolls were not related to the planting date treatments. During 2003, fallen squares were most abundant in the late-planted treatment. Although large squares (5.5-8-mm-diameter) on the plant are preferred for boll weevil oviposition, diameter of abscised squares is not a reliable measurement because of shrinkage resulting from desiccation and larval feeding. Fallen feeding-punctured squares and bolls were most abundant in late plantings but differences between fallen feeding-punctured squares versus fallen feeding-punctured bolls were found in only one treatment in 2003. During the same year, fallen oviposition-punctured squares were more numerous in the late-planted treatment than in the earlier treatments. Treatment effects were not found on numbers of oviposition-punctured bolls, but fallen oviposition-punctured squares were more common than bolls in the late-planted treatment compared with earlier treatments each year. Dead weevil eggs, larvae, and pupae inside fallen fruit were few and planting date treatment effects were not detected. Living third instars and pupae were more abundant in fallen squares of the late-planted treatment than in the earlier treatments and bolls of all three treatments. This study shows that fallen squares in late-planted cotton contribute more to adult boll weevil populations than bolls, or squares of earlier plantings. PMID:18330118

  7. Influence of trap color and host volatiles on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Khrimian, Ashot; Cossé, Allard; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

    2012-04-01

    Field trapping assays were conducted in 2009 and 2010 throughout western Michigan, to evaluate lures for adult emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Several ash tree volatiles were tested on purple prism traps in 2009, and a dark green prism trap in 2010. In 2009, six bark oil distillate lure treatments were tested against manuka oil lures (used in 2008 by USDA APHIS PPQ emerald ash borer cooperative program). Purple traps baited with 80/20 (manuka/phoebe oil) significantly increased beetle catch compared with traps baited with manuka oil alone. In 2010 we monitored emerald ash borer attraction to dark green traps baited with six lure combinations of 80/20 (manuka/phoebe), manuka oil, and (3Z)-hexenol. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol caught significantly more male and total count insects than traps baited with manuka oil alone. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol did not catch more beetles when compared with traps baited with (3Z)-hexenol alone. When compared with unbaited green traps our results show that (3Z)-hexenol improved male catch significantly in only one of three field experiments using dark green traps. Dark green traps caught a high number of A. planipennis when unbaited while (3Z)-hexenol was seen to have a minimal (nonsignificant) trap catch effect at several different release rates. We hypothesize that the previously reported kairomonal attractancy of (3Z)-hexenol (for males) on light green traps is not as obvious here because of improved male attractancy to the darker green trap. PMID:22606813

  8. Scarab Beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae Fauna in Ardabil Province, North West Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mowlavi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dung beetles of Coleoptera associated to undisturbed cattle droppings in pastures present great diver¬sity and abundance. Dung beetles also play an important role for transmission of some helminthes to human and cat¬tle. This study was made to survey the biodiversity and abundance of these beetles in Ardebil Province, western Iran.Methods: According to the field study all beetles attracted to fresh cow dung in five areas of Ardebil Province in¬cluding Namin, Ardabil, Meshkinshahr, Neer and Sarein were collected and identified. They were collected during summer 2007 from June to September, with general peaks appearing to be correlated with temperature mainly at 11 a.m to 15 p.m. The samples were identified using appropriate systematic key Results: A total of 231 specimens belonging to 9 beetle genera and at least 15 species were identified as Euoniticel¬lus fulvus, Sisyphus schaffaer, Euonthophagus taurus, Copris lunaris, Chironitis pamphilus, Gymnopleurus coriarus, Euonthophagus amyntas, Caccobius schreberi, Onthophagus speculifer, Onthophagus furcatus, Aphodius, lugens, Apho¬dius fimetarius, A. scrutator, Geotrupes spiniger and G. stercorariusThe most abundant and diverse subfamilies were Coprinae, Geotrupinae, and Aphodiinae. Conclusion: We found 15 species of dung beetles occurred in the region. The prevalence of each species is varied depending on location. Some of them play an important role for helminths transmission of veterinary and public health importance. The finding will provide a clue for pasture management as well as public health monitoring and surveillance of the disease transmitted by dung beetles. 

  9. Scarab Beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae Fauna in Ardabil Province, North West Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Mowlavi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Dung beetles of Coleoptera associated to undisturbed cattle droppings in pastures present great diver¬sity and abundance. Dung beetles also play an important role for transmission of some helminthes to human and cat¬tle. This study was made to survey the biodiversity and abundance of these beetles in Ardebil Province, western Iran."nMethods: According to the field study all beetles attracted to fresh cow dung in five areas of Ardebil Province in¬cluding Namin, Ardabil, Meshkinshahr, Neer and Sarein were collected and identified. They were collected during summer 2007 from June to September, with general peaks appearing to be correlated with temperature mainly at 11 a.m to 15 p.m. The samples were identified using appropriate systematic key "nResults: A total of 231 specimens belonging to 9 beetle genera and at least 15 species were identified as Euoniticel¬lus fulvus, Sisyphus schaffaer, Euonthophagus taurus, Copris lunaris, Chironitis pamphilus, Gymnopleurus coriarus, Euonthophagus amyntas, Caccobius schreberi, Onthophagus speculifer, Onthophagus furcatus, Aphodius, lugens, Apho¬dius fimetarius, A. scrutator, Geotrupes spiniger and G. stercorarius"nThe most abundant and diverse subfamilies were Coprinae, Geotrupinae, and Aphodiinae. "nConclusion: We found 15 species of dung beetles occurred in the region. The prevalence of each species is varied depending on location. Some of them play an important role for helminths transmission of veterinary and public health importance. The finding will provide a clue for pasture management as well as public health monitoring and surveillance of the disease transmitted by dung beetles. 

  10. A comparison of trap type and height for capturing cerambycid beetles (Coleoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Elizabeth E; Poland, Therese M; McCullough, Deborah G; Millar, Jocelyn G

    2012-06-01

    Wood-boring beetles in the family Cerambycidae (Coleoptera) play important roles in many forest ecosystems. However, increasing numbers of invasive cerambycid species are transported to new countries by global commerce and threaten forest health in the United States and worldwide. Our goal was to identify effective detection tools for a broad array of cerambycid species by testing some known cerambycid attractants and a pheromone in different trap designs placed across a range of habitats. We compared numbers and species richness of cerambycid beetles captured with cross-vane panel traps and 12-unit Lindgren multiple-funnel traps, placed either at ground level (1.5 m high) or canopy level (approximately 3-10 m high), at eight sites classified as either residential, industrial, deciduous forest, or conifer forest. We captured 3,723 beetles representing 72 cerambycid species from 10 June to 15 July 2010. Species richness was highest for the subfamilies Cerambycinae and Lamiinae, which accounted for 33 and 46% of all species captured, respectively. Overall, the cross-vane panel traps captured approximately 1.5 times more beetles than funnel traps. Twenty-one species were captured exclusively in traps at one height, either in the canopy or at ground level. More species were captured in hardwood sites (59 species) where a greater diversity of host material was available than in conifer (34 species), residential (41 species), or industrial (49) sites. Low numbers of beetles (n < 5) were recorded for 28 of the beetle species. The number of species captured per week ranged from 49 species on 21 June to 37 species on 12 July. Cross-vane panel traps installed across a vertical gradient should maximize the number of cerambycid species captured. PMID:22812119

  11. Tropical Plant Extracts as Sources of Grain-Protectant Compounds Against Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, L P; Vendramim, J D; Andrade, M S; Bicalho, K U; Silva, M F G F; Vieira, P C; Fernandes, J B

    2014-10-01

    The toxicity of organic plant extracts to Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was assessed for three tropical plant species: branches, leaves, and seeds of Annona montana (Annonaceae), branches of Aristolochia paulistana (Aristolochiaceae), and leaves and branches of Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae). The screening assay resulted that the extracts of A. montana seeds obtained with hexane (LC50 = 534.75 mg kg(-1) and LT50 = 6.10 days) and with dichloromethane (LC50 = 424.67 mg kg(-1) and LT50 = 5.03 days) were the most promising treatments, followed by the extract prepared from A. montana leaves with hexane (LC50 = 837.70 mg kg(-1) and LT50 = 4.90 days). Moreover, extracts (at 1,500 mg kg(-1)) prepared from C. sylvestris branches with dichloromethane and A. paulistana with hexane caused significant mortality (37% and 41.5%, respectively) beyond sublethal effects on S. zeamais. Therefore, based on the biological assays, extraction yield, and evaluation of the chromatographic profile of the crude extracts by TLC, the hexane extract of A. montana seeds was selected and fractioned using liquid-liquid partitioning. The hydroalcoholic fraction caused mortality of 55.5%, significantly superior to dichloromethane fraction, which caused 35.5% of mortality. Chemical analyses ((1)H NMR, HPLC, and TLC) were performed, and the results showed the presence of alkaloids and acetogenins in both active fractions, which have been associated with bioactivity. Therefore, extracts prepared from A. montana seeds (especially) is an interesting source of new compounds with promising grain-protectant properties. PMID:27193958

  12. Variability in Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) Reproduction in Laboratory and Field Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, William G; Holst, Niels; Cook, Steven C; Patt, Joseph M

    2015-06-01

    Experiments were conducted to examine how several key factors affect population growth of the small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae). Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine effects of food quantity and temperature on reproduction of cohorts of young A. tumida adults (1:1 sex ratio) housed in experimental arenas. Daily numbers and total mass of larvae exiting arenas were highly variable within treatment. Either one or two cohorts of larvae were observed exiting the arenas. Food quantity, either 10 g or 20 g, did not significantly affect the number of larvae exiting arenas at 32°C, but did at 28°C; arenas provided 20 g food produced significantly more larvae than arenas provided 10 g. Temperature did not affect the total mass of larvae provided 10 g food, but did affect larval mass provided 20 g; beetles kept at 28°C produced more larval mass than at 32°C. Field experiments were conducted to examine A. tumida reproductive success in full strength bee colonies. Beetles were introduced into hives as egg-infested frames and as adults, and some bee colonies were artificially weakened through removal of sealed brood. Efforts were unsuccessful; no larvae were observed exiting from, or during the inspection of, any hives. Possible reasons for these results are discussed. The variability observed in A. tumida reproduction even in controlled laboratory conditions and the difficulty in causing beetle infestations in field experiments involving full colonies suggest that accurately forecasting the A. tumida severity in such colonies will be difficult. PMID:26470208

  13. Comparative resistance of Russian and Italian honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae) to small hive beetles (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frake, Amanda M; De Guzman, Lilia I; Rinderer, Thomas E

    2009-02-01

    To compare resistance to small hive beetles (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) between Russian and commercial Italian honey bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae), the numbers of invading beetles, their population levels through time and small hive beetle reproduction inside the colonies were monitored. We found that the genotype of queens introduced into nucleus colonies had no immediate effect on small hive beetle invasion. However, the influence of honey bee stock on small hive beetle invasion was pronounced once test bees populated the hives. In colonies deliberately freed from small hive beetle during each observation period, the average number of invading beetles was higher in the Italian colonies (29 +/- 5 beetles) than in the Russian honey bee colonies (16 +/- 3 beetles). A similar trend was observed in colonies that were allowed to be freely colonized by beetles throughout the experimental period (Italian, 11.46 +/- 1.35; Russian, 5.21 +/- 0.66 beetles). A linear regression analysis showed no relationships between the number of beetles in the colonies and adult bee population (r2 = 0.1034, P = 0.297), brood produced (r2 = 0.1488, P = 0.132), or amount of pollen (P = 0.1036, P = 0.295). There were more Italian colonies that supported small hive beetle reproduction than Russian colonies. Regardless of stock, the use of entrance reducers had a significant effect on the average number of small hive beetle (with reducer, 16 +/- 3; without reducer, 27 +/- 5 beetles). However, there was no effect on bee population (with reducer, 13.20 +/- 0.71; without reducer, 14.60 +/- 0.70 frames) or brood production (with reducer, 6.12 +/- 0.30; without reducer, 6.44 +/- 0.34 frames). Overall, Russian honey bees were more resistant to small hive beetle than Italian honey bees as indicated by fewer invading beetles, lower small hive beetle population through time, and lesser reproduction. PMID:19253612

  14. Endophyte isolate and host grass effects on Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Olivier J P; Gwinn, Kimberly D; Pless, Charles D; Popay, Alison J

    2011-04-01

    Endophytic fungi belonging to the genus Neotyphodium, confer resistance to infected host grasses against insect pests. The effect of host species, and endophtye species and strain, on feeding and survival of the corn flea beetle, Chaetocnema pulicaria Melsheimer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was investigated. The grass-endophyte associations included natural and artificially derived associations producing varying arrays of common endophyte-related alkaloids or alkaloid groups, peramine, lolitrem B, ergovaline, and the lolines. Preference and nonpreference tests showed that C. pulicaria feeding and survival were reduced by infection of tall fescue with the wild-type strain of N. coenophialum, the likely mechanism being antixenosis rather than antibiosis. In the preference tests, endophyte and host species effects were observed. Of the 10 different Neotyphodium strains tested in artificially derived tall fescue associations, eight strongly deterred feeding by C. pulicaria, whereas the remaining two strains had little or no effect on feeding. Infection of tall fescue with another fungal symbiont, p-endophyte, had no effect. Perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne L., infected with six strains of endophyte, was moderately resistant to C. pulicaria compared with endophyte-free grass, but four additional strains were relatively inactive. Six Neotyphodium-meadow fescue, Festuca pratensis Huds., associations, including the wild-type N. uncinatum-meadow fescue combination, were resistant, whereas three associations were not effective. Loline alkaloids seemed to play a role in antixenosis to C. pulicaria. Effects not attributable to the lolines or any other of the alkaloids examined also were observed. This phenomenon also has been reported in tests with other insects, and indicates the presence of additional insect-active factors. PMID:21510220

  15. Efficacy of natural products against Callosobruchus chinensis (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Homan; Kafle, Lekhnath; Gc, Yubak Dhoj; Shih, Cheng Jen

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of local natural products against the beetle, Callosobruchus chinensis L. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), in stored chickpea Cicer arietinum L. (Fabaceae) in Chitwan, Nepal. Five natural products and one synthetic pesticide (Malathion) and two storage regimes (aluminum sheet bin vs. jute bags with plastic lining) were tested for their effect on stored pulse with respect to damage by C. chinensis. The five natural products included Xanthoylum armatum DC (Rutaceae) fruit powder, Acorus calamus L. (Araceae) rhizome powder, Cinnamom camphora L. (Lauraceae) balls, oil of Sesamum indicum L. (Pedaliaceae), and leaf powder of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. (Meliaceae). Treatments of stored pulses with natural products or with Malathion all caused significantly higher mortality of C. chinensis at 15 d after treatment (DAT) than stored pulses receiving no treatments. The balls of C. camphora, rhizome powder of A. calamus and sesame oil outperformed all other treatments, including the Malathion at 45 and 75 DAT and resulted in significantly reduced damage or deterioration of stored pulses compared with other treatments. Storage regimes performed similarly, although the jute bags did protect seed integrity for some treatments. Our results indicate that incorporating these natural products into stored pulses can protect the seeds from C. chinensis for up to two generations, something that Malathion cannot do. These products are readily available to most farmers in the region and their use will lead to 1) reduction of losses to significant stored product pests, and 2) a reduction of contamination of foodstuffs and the environment by synthetic pesticides like Malathion. PMID:22812152

  16. Mortality of a wireworm, Agriotes obscurus (Coleoptera: Elateridae), after topical application of various insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herk, W G; Vernon, R S; Tolman, J H; Saavedra, H Ortiz

    2008-04-01

    Ten insecticides representing seven chemical groups were applied at various concentrations topically by using a Potter Spray Tower to evaluate their relative toxicities on the European wireworm Agriotes obscurus L. (Coleoptera: Elateridae). Wireworms were stored at 15 degrees C after exposure to organophosphate (OP) (chlorpyrifos, diazinon), pyrethroid (tefluthrin), thianicotinoid (thiamethoxam, clothianidin), chloronicotinoid (imidacloprid, acetamiprid), phenyl pyrazole (fipronil), organochlorine (lindane), and spinosyn (spinosad) insecticides, and their postapplication health was evaluated weekly for up to 301 d. LC50, LC90, LT50, and LT90 values were calculated for each chemical except acetamiprid, and compared with those of lindane, clothianidin, and chlorpyrifos. Wireworms exposed to OPs died or recovered more quickly (LT50 < 20 d, LT90 < 50 d), than those exposed to all other insecticides tested except tefluthrin (LT50 = 25.5 d, LT90 = 66.5 d). Wireworms exposed to sublethal concentrations of all neonicotinoids quickly became moribund after application but made a full recovery. Wireworms exposed to fipronil at concentrations near the LC90 value showed no intoxication symptoms for up to 35 d, and they did not recover after symptoms developed. For each chemical, increasing the concentration increased the time required for wireworms to recover but decreased the time required to kill wireworms. Fipronil was highly toxic to wireworms (LC50 = 0.0001%), but acetamiprid (LC50 = 1.82%), imidacloprid (LC50 = 0.83%), tefluthrin (LC50 = 0.23%), diazinon (LC50 = 0.54%), and spinosad (LC50 = 0.51%) were not. The toxicity of both clothianidin (LC50 = 0.07%) and thiamethoxam (LC50 = 0.17%) were similar to those oflindane (LC50 = 0.06%) and chlorpyrifos (LC50 = 0.10%). PMID:18459401

  17. Nutritional Physiology of the Khapra Beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) Fed on Various Barley Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, S; Naseri, B; Razmjou, J

    2016-02-01

    The Khapra beetle, Trogoderma granarium Everts (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), is known as one of the mostserious pests of grains in many parts of the world. In this study, the effect of nine barley cultivars (‘Bahman’,‘CB-84-10’, ‘Fajr 30’, ‘Makuyi’, ‘Nosrat’, ‘Yousof’, ‘13A1’, ‘18A1’, and ‘19 A1’) and a wheat cultivar (‘MV17’, as a control) was determined on the nutritional indices and digestive enzymatic activity of T. granarium at 33 6 1C,relative humidity of 6565%, and a photoperiod of 14:10 (L:D) h. The highest and lowest values of larval weight gain of sixth instar were detected on wheat (0.757±0.068 mg) and cultivar Bahman (0.342±0.071 mg). Also, T. granarium larvae fed on cultivar Bahman had the lowest value of efficiency of conversion of ingested food(10.90±2.09%) as compared with wheat and other barley cultivars. Also, the highest midgut amylolytic and proteolytic activities of sixth instar were on cultivar Bahman (0.364±0.024 mU/mg and 80.54±1.73 U/mg, respectively)and the lowest activities were on cultivar Nosrat (0.043±0.004 mU/mg and 7.15±0.01 U/mg, respectively).It is concluded that barley cultivar Bahman was the most unsuitable host for feeding of T. granarium. PMID:26612893

  18. Distribución y patrones de diversidad de los Afódidos en la Comunidad de Madrid (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Aphodiidae, Aphodiinae y Psammodiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hortal, J.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we present an updated checklist of the Aphodiidae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea from Comunidad de Madrid (Spain. In addition, the observed and potential distributions of the 70 species found in Madrid are mapped. The potential spatial distributions of species richness, rarity and endemism in this region are also mapped. Finally, we discuss briefly the origin of the observed patterns.

    En este trabajo se presenta un inventario actualizado de los Aphodiidae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea de la Comunidad de Madrid. Además, se presentan mapas de la distribución observada y potencial de las 70 especies encontradas en Madrid, así como de la distribución espacial de la riqueza, rareza, y endemicidad potencial en la región. Finalmente, se discute brevemente el origen de los patrones observados.

  19. Mass Trapping and Classical Biological Control of Rhynchophorus palmarum L. 1794 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. A hypothesis based in morphological evidences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Miguens

    2011-07-01

    Resumo. Coleópteros têm sido descritos como pragas e vetores de nematódeos causadores de Anel Vermelho em diversas palmeiras da família Arecaceae. Rhynchophorus palmarum L (Coleoptera: Curculionidae é uma praga que afeta a cocoicultura e outras palmeiras; e, vetor de Bursaphelencus cocophilus (Cobb Baujard (Nematoda, agente etiológico de Anel Vermelho e de outros nematódeos. Atualmente, recomenda-se o emprego de inimigos naturais e parasitas no manejo integrado de pragas; dentre elas, Rhynchophorinae. Armadilhas de coleta massal são recomendadas no manejo integrado de pragas. Nosso estudo relata, na cocoicultura, a eficiência de armadilhas artesanais de baixo custo e a utilização cariomônios (toletes de cana-de-açúcar e cariômonios mais feromônios (toletes de cana-de-açúcar e machos adultos de R. palmarum como atrativos nas armadilhas. Ácaros ectoparasitas foram identificados nestes coleópteros, por microscopia, que podem ser propostos como parte do manejo integrado desta praga. Armadilhas de coleta massal com cariômonios foram eficientes na captura de R. palmarum e outros Curculionidae. No entanto, armadilhas de coleta massal com cariômonios e feromônios aumentaram a atratividade, em relação às primeiras, para este Coleoptera e Cosmopolites sordidus (Germar (Coleoptera: Curculionidae. Eventualmente, exemplares de R. palmarum apresentavam infecção fúngica. Ácaros ectoparasitas infestavam mais de 50% dos exemplares de R. palmarum. A microanatomia destes ácaros e sua interação com R. palmarum foi preliminarmente descrita. Todos os estágios do ciclo de vida destes ácaros foram identificados no compartimento dos élitros. As evidências morfológicas suportam a hipótese de que estes ácaros podem ser empregados no controle biológico de R. palmarum em um programa de manejo integrado.

  20. Notes on Diochus Erichson, Lissohypnus Casey, and Oxybleptes Smetana (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) in Florida, including a description of a new species of Lissohypnus

    OpenAIRE

    Frank, J. Howard; Kelly, Sandor L.; Almquist, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The known range of Oxybleptes meridionalis Smetana (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) is expanded in Florida, USA, from Indian River and Manatee counties to now include Brevard, Highlands, Orange, Seminole and Volusia. Oxybleptes davisi (Notman) is confi rmed to exist in Florida, with records from Leon, Liberty and Wakulla counties in the Panhandle, and Orange County in central Florida. Lissohypnus texanus Casey is newly reported from Florida. A new species, Lissohypnus fullertoni, is described from...

  1. Description of a new species of Plesioclytus Giesbert (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae: Cerambycinae) from Georgia, and transfer of the genus to Plesioclytini Wappes and Skelley, new tribe

    OpenAIRE

    Wappes, James E.; Skelley, Paul E.

    2016-01-01

    Plesioclytus morrisi Wappes and Skelley new species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) from the Ohoopee dune system in central Georgia is described with comments on the biology of the new species. The taxonomic placement of Plesioclytus Giesbert in the tribe Clytini is questioned as key characters are found to differ from the current characters used to define the tribe in the New World, resulting in its transfer to the newly erected Plesioclytini Wappes and Skelley new tribe, defined herein. Habitat ...

  2. A Temperature-Dependent Development Model for Willow Beetle Species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Ireland: Simulation of Phenology/Voltinism in Response to Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Pollard, Ciaran P.

    2015-01-01

    Rising fossil fuel prices, energy security and adherence to existing European Union (EU) climate/energy policies means that Ireland must look towards alternative energy sources to meet future demand. Woody biomass in the form of short rotation coppice willow (SRCW) is considered a viable option. SRCW is vulnerable to damage by a range of diseases and pests however. The blue (Phratora vulgatissima) and brown (Galerucella lineola) willow beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) are identified econom...

  3. Mortality and impaired development of Zabrotes subfasciatus Boh. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) induced by extract of sangra d’água Croton urucurana Baill (Euphorbiaceae).

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel dos Santos Carvalho; Leonardo Santana da Silva; Luciana Barboza Silva; Mayra Layra dos Santos Almeida; Bruno Ettore Pavam; Marize Terezinha Lopes Pereira Peres

    2014-01-01

    Phaseolus vulgaris L., the green bean, is an important source of protein and minerals in the diet of the population. But its productivity is affected by the attack of numerous pests, from emergence to storage, Zabrotes subfasciatus Boh. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) being the major pest of stored beans. In the search for alternatives to chemical control of this insect and considering the potential biological activity of plant secondary metabolites, this study was conducted in order to evaluate...

  4. A new species of Drapetes Megerle (Coleoptera: Elateridae), with taxonomic summaries and a key to the species of northern North America

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    Seven species of Drapetes Megerle (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are recognized from northern North America. Drapetes chiricahua new species is described from southeastern Arizona and north-central New Mexico. Drapetes parallelus Van Dyke is a senior homonym of Drapetes paralellus Cobos by variant spelling, and a new synonym of Drapetes cylindricus Fall. Drapetes paralellus Cobos is replaced with Drapetes cobosi new name. Drapetes clarki Bonvouloir is not a North American species and is given a red...

  5. A simultaneous journal / wiki publication and dissemination of a new species description: Neobidessodes darwiniensis sp. n. from northern Australia (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Bidessini)

    OpenAIRE

    Lars Hendrich; Michael Balke

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Here, we describe a new Australian species in journal format and simultaneously open the description in a wiki format on the www.species-id.net. The wiki format will always link to the fixed original journal description of the taxon, however it permits future edits and additions to species' taxonomy and biology. The diving beetle Neobidessodes darwiniensis sp. n. (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae, Bidessini) is described based on a single female, collected in a rest pool of the Harriet Creek i...

  6. A scientific note on a new pest for European honeybees: first report of small hive beetle Aethina tumida, (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Palmeri, Vincenzo; Scirtò, Giuseppe; Malacrinò, Antonino; Laudani, Francesca; Campolo, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    International audience The small hive beetle (SHB), Aethina tumida Murray(Coleoptera Nitidulidae), is an important pest of honeybeesin many parts of the world. The beetle is native tosub-Saharan Africa and was unintentionally introducedinto USA (1996), Australia (2001) and in Canada(2002) (Ellis and Munn, 2005; Neumann and Ellis2008). In Europe the SHB was discovered in 2005 ina consignment of queens imported from Texas (USA)into Portugal and destroyed by the Portuguese NationalVeterinaria...

  7. Plant compounds insecticide activity against Coleoptera pests of stored products Compostos de plantas com atividade inseticida a coleópteros-praga de produtos armazenados

    OpenAIRE

    Márcio Dionizio Moreira; Marcelo Coutinho Picanço; Luiz Cláudio de Almeida Barbosa; Raul Narciso Carvalho Guedes; Mateus Ribeiro de Campos; Gerson Adriano Silva; Júlio Cláudio Martins

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was to screen plants with insecticide activity, in order to isolate, identify and assess the bioactivity of insecticide compounds present in these plants, against Coleoptera pests of stored products: Oryzaephilus surinamensis L. (Silvanidae), Rhyzopertha dominica F. (Bostrichidae) and Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (Curculionidae). The plant species used were: basil (Ocimum selloi Benth.), rue (Ruta graveolens L.), lion's ear (Leonotis nepetifolia (L.) R.Br.), jimson weed...

  8. Biological and Morphological Aspects of Anoxia (Mesanoxia) matutinalis ssp. matutinalis Castelnau, 1832 (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae), a Pest of Apulian Pinewoods in Southern Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Eustachio Tarasco; Oreste Triggiani

    2011-01-01

    Huge defoliations by Anoxia (Mesanoxia) matutinalis spp. matutinalis Castelnau, 1832 (Coleoptera, Scarabeidae) have been observed in recent years in the coastal pinewoods (Pinus halepensis, P. pinea) of the southern Apulia Region of Italy. Starting from adults collected in the field, insect breeding was conducted in the laboratory, following the life-cycle from ovideposition to larval development and emergence. Observations were performed in the laboratory and the field to study the different...

  9. Bioactivity of Indonesian mahogany, Toona sureni (Blume (Meliaceae, against the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae Bioatividade do mogno da Indonésia, Toona sureni (Blume (Meliaceae, contra o besouro-das-farinhas, Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahana Parvin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactivity of Indonesian mahogany, Toona sureni (Blume (Meliaceae, against the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae. The insecticidal activity of Toona sureni (Blume Merr. was evaluated considering repellency, mortality and progeny production of F1 adults of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae. Dried extract of seeds of T. sureni was dissolved in acetone to prepare solution of various concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0%. To test for repellency, the insects were exposed to treated filter paper. Mortality of larvae, pupae and adults was evaluated by the treatment of spraying the insects with different concentrations of T. sureni extract. Residual effect of the extract was also evaluated considering the production of progeny of F1 adults. The highest repellency (93.30% of T. castaneum occurred at the highest concentration (5.0% suspension of T. sureni; while the lowest (0.0% repellency occurred at 0.5% suspension after 1 day of treatment. The highest mortality against adults (86.71%, larvae (88.32% and pupae (85% occurred at 5% suspension at 8 days after application. There was a negative correlation between the concentrations of T. sureni and the production of F1 adult's progeny of T. castaneum. The highest number of progeny (147 of T. castaneum occurred in the control at 7 days after treatment; and the lowest number of progeny (43 occurred at 5.0% concentration in 1 day after treatment. The results show that T. sureni is toxic to T. castaneum and has the potential to control all stages of this insect in stored wheat.Bioatividade do mogno da Indonésia, Toona sureni (Blume (Meliaceae, contra o besouro-das-farinhas, Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae. A atividade inseticida de Toona sureni (Blume Merr. foi avaliada considerando repelência, mortalidade e a produção de progênie de adultos F1 de Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae. Extrato seco de sementes

  10. Attraction of Astylus variegatus (Germ. (Coleoptera: Melyridae by volatile floral attractants Atração de Astylus variegatus (Germ. (Coleoptera: Melyridae por atraentes florais voláteis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício Ursi Ventura

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The beetle Astylus variegatus (Germ. (Coleoptera: Melyridae is frequently found in flowers feeding on pollen. Responses of A. variegatus to volatile floral attractants were studied in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. fields. Traps originally designed to capture Diabrotica speciosa (Germ. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, consisted of plastic bottles (2 L with 150 holes (5-mm diameter yellow gold painted and containing inside a plastic strip (3.5 ´ 25 cm with Lagenaria vulgaris (L. powder (0.28% B cucurbitacin - feeding stimulant and arrestant for diabroticites sprayed with carbaril insecticide. Treatments consisted of 1,4-dimethoxybenzene (one or two dispensers per trap, 1,4-dimethoxybenze + indole, 1,4-dimethoxybenzene + cinnameldehyde and control. Volatile average release rates (over ten days was approximately 32 mg day-1 per dispenser under laboratory conditions. 1,4-dimethoxybenzene-lured traps caught significantly more beetles than the control, three and seven days after trap setting. Ten days after the onset of the experiment, there were no differences in number of beetles caught by treatments. Captures were higher in the 1,4-dimethoxybenzene + cinnamaldehyde treatment than in 1,4-dimethoxybenzene only in the first assessment. Adding indole to 1,4-dimethoxybenzene did not improve beetle captures.O besouro Astylus variegatus (Germ. (Coleoptera: Melyridae é freqüentemente encontrado em flores onde se alimenta de pólen. Respostas de A. variegatus a atraentes voláteis florais foram estudadas em campos de feijão, Phaseolus vulgaris L. Armadilhas, originalmente desenvolvidas para capturar Diabrotica speciosa (Germ. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, consistiram de garrafas plástica (2 L com 150 perfurações (5 mm de diâmetro pintadas com tinta amarelo ouro contendo no seu interior uma fita plástica (3,5 ´ 25,0 cm com pó seco de frutos de Lagenaria vulgaris (L. (0,28% de cucurbitacina B estimulante alimentar e arrestante para diabrotic

  11. Eficiência do inseticida clorpirifós no controle de larvas de Diabrotica speciosa (Germ. (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae na cultura da batata Performance of the insectide chlorpyrifos to control Diabrotica speciosa (Germ. (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae in potato crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Salles

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Foi avaliado o desempenho do inseticida clorpirifós no controle de larvas de Diabrotica speciosa (Germ. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, na cultura da batata. O experimento foi desenvolvido na safra de primavera, quando ocorre maior incidência de insetos pragas e, conseqüentemente, danos nos tubérculos de batata no Rio Grande do Sul. As diferentes dosagens e formulações dos inseticidas foram aplicadas no sulco de plantio, utilizando-se clorpirifós (2, 3 e 4 l i.a./ha de Lorsban 480 CE e 2 e 3kg i.a./ha de Lorsban 10 G e como padrão, forate (2kg i.a./ha de Granutox 50G. Os melhores controles ocorreram nos tratamentos com Granutox 50G, na dosagem de 2kg i.a./ha; seguido por Lorsban 10 G, 3 e 2kg i.a./ha e Lorsban 480 CE, 4 e 3l i.a./ha.A field trial was conducted to evaluate the performance of the insecticide chlorpyrifos in two formulations, emulsifiable and granular, for the control of Diabrotica speciosa (Germ. (Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae in potato. The field trial was conducted during the spring season when incidence of insect pests and, consequently, damage are high in Rio Grande do Sul state, Brazil. The different dosages and formulations of insecticides were applied in the planting furrow utilizing chlorpyrifos (2, 3 and 4l i.a./ha of Lorsban 480 CE and 2 and 3kg i.a./ha de Lorsban 10G and the standard phorate (2kg i.a./ha of Granutox 50G. Best field control performances were obtained with Granutox 50G, in the dosage of 2kg i.a./ha; Lorsban 10G, 3 and 2kg i.a./ha, followed by Lorsban 480 CE, 4 and 3l i.a./ha.

  12. Hexamermis paranaense new species (Nematoda, Mermithidae: a parasite of Diloboderus abderus (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae in Argentina Hexamermis paranaense sp. nov. (Nematoda, Mermithidae: parasito de Diloboderus abderus (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae en Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Achinelly

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species, Hexamermis paranaense n. sp. (Nematoda, Mermithidae, a parasite of larvae of Diloboderus abderus Sturm, 1826 (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae is described and illustrated. This new species is characterized by amphids small, amphidial opening pocket-shaped, the anterior portion of the vagina muscularized and slightly protruding with a descending branch forming a loop before joining the uterus, and three rows of genital papillae: the ventrolateral divided in two rows with eight papillae in the outer row and with six papillae in the inner one; the ventral row with four pairs and one single preanal papillae, and with two pairs, a triplete, one pair, a single and one pair postanal papillae.Una nueva especie, Hexamermis paranaense sp. nov. (Nematoda, Mermithidae, parásito de larvas del gusano blanco, Diloboderus abderus Sturm, 1826 (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, se describe e ilustra. Esta nueva especie se caracteriza por poseer anfidos pequeños, con la apertura en forma de bolsillo, parte anterior de la vagina muscular, con una rama que desciende y forma un lazo antes de la conexión al útero, tres hileras de papilas genitales: la hilera de posición ventro-lateral dividida en dos hileras con ocho papilas en la hilera externa y con seis papilas en la interna; la hilera ventral con una papila, seguida de cuatro pares, todas en posición preanal y dos pares, interrumpidos por tres papilas, seguida de un par, una simple, y un par, todas de posición postanal.

  13. Morphological and isozymic banding pattern study of white grubs (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae as pest of bark crop in mounth Merapi’s slope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUGIYARTO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available White grub (Coleoptera: Melolonthidae is a group of soil pest at any agrosystem., especially at Salak pondoh (Salacca zalacca (Gaert. Voss. crop. The characteristics of this specimen were very crucial to be studied in order to find the exact biocontrol. The aim of this research was to know the characteristics of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera based on morphological and isozyme banding patterns. This research was conducted on August - November 2007 at Sleman and Magelang districts for the morphological purposes, while for the isozyme data were conducted at Sub Laboratory Biology, Central Laboratory of Sebelas Maret University Surakarta. Sample was taken by using stratified random sampling method, on five stations. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE using the vertical type was taken to isozyme analysis. The enzyme used in this research were peroxidase and esterase to detect the isozyme banding patterns. The results showed that there was no morphological variation of white grubs (Melolonthidae: Coleoptera at salak pondoh agroecosystem in Mounth Merapi’s slope. Based on this character, there was one species of white grub found, i.e. Holotrichia javana. There was a genetic variation based on the variation of isozyme banding patterns.

  14. Walkable Communities

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast is for a general audience and discusses the benefits of walkable communities, as they relate to health, the environment, and social interaction.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH), ATSDR.   Date Released: 5/8/2008.

  15. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönnicke, M. G.; Cusatis, C.; Rigon, L.; Menk, R.-H.; Arfelli, F.; Foerster, L. A.; Rosado-Neto, G. H.

    2010-08-01

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures ( Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  16. Predation potential of Chilocorus cacti (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to the prickly pear cacti pest Dactylopius opuntiae (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, A; Olvera, H; Rodríguez, S; Barranco, J

    2013-08-01

    Functional response of the predator Chilocorus cacti (Linnaeus) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) on five densities of Dactylopius opuntiae (Cockerell) (Hemiptera: Dactylopiidae) female adults was assessed under laboratory conditions. The searching efficiency of C. cacti significantly decreased as prey density increased. The logistic regression for the predator had a negative and significant linear parameter indicating a type II functional response. Non-linear regression for Holling predator equation estimated a handling time of 1.79 ± 0.129 h and attack rate coefficient of 0.1003 ± 0.030. Most of this handling time was because the predator spent a lot of time removing the waxy coating that protects adult females of D. opuntiae. Chilocorus cacti consumes females of D. opuntiae in their reproductive stage; therefore, it could be an effective natural enemy to suppress or regulate low density populations of D. opuntiae, preventing them to reach high densities. PMID:23949861

  17. Characterization of the proteases in the midgut of the xylophagous larvae of Oemona hirta (Coleoptera:Cerambycidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Brian David Shaw; John Tane Christeller

    2009-01-01

    The protein digestive capability oftbe larvae of the longhorn beetle (Oemona hirta,Coleoptera:Cerambycidae,Fabricius,1775) was investigated.This species feeds only on wood where there is a high proportion of vascular tissue.The pH of the midgut,the major digestive organ,was alkaline and protein hydrolysis was maximal at alkaline pH.Use of specific synthetic peptide substrates showed that the major protease activities were the endopeptidases,trypsin and chymotrypsin-like activity,and the exopeptidase,leucine aminopeptidase and the pH curves corresponded to that with protein substrate.Studies using a range ofsefine protease inhibitors as well as specific inhibitors ofmetalloproteases,cysteine proteases and aspartate proteases confirmed a serine protease-based digestive system similar to earlier reports of sapwood-feeding Cerambycids.Control of these insect pests using protease inhibitors is discussed.

  18. Toxicities of azadirachtin and polychlorinated petroleum Hydrocarbon against resist and susceptible strains of tribolium castaneum (coleoptera: tenebrionidae) adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LC/sub 50/ values for malathion-resistant (PAK) and organo-50 phosphate-susceptible (FSS-II) strains of red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) adult beetles were determined through filter paper impregnated method against azadirachtin (Nimbokil 60 EC) and polychlorinated petroleum hydrocarbon (Tenekil 100 EC). The LC values of these insecticides were worked out as 12830 and 50 9331 ppm for azadirachtin and 5148 and 4047 ppm for Tenekil 100 EC against PAK and FSS-II strains, respectively. The results revealed that polychlorinated petroleum hydrocarbon was more toxic than the azadirachtin. Furthermore, both the insecticides were equally toxic to the adult beetles of T. castaneum as the difference was non-significant because of overlapping 95% FLs to LC./sub 50/. (author)

  19. External and internal structure of weevils (Insecta: Coleoptera) investigated with phase-contrast X-ray imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) are identified by the external structure (dorsal, ventral and lateral features) and also by internal structure. The genitalia can be used to distinguish the sex and to identify the insects when the external structure appears identical. For this purpose, a destructive dissecting microscopy procedure is usually employed. In this paper, phase contrast X-ray imaging (radiography and tomography) is employed to investigate the internal structure (genitalia) of two entire species of weevils that presents very similar external structures (Sitophilus oryzae and Sitophilus zeamais). The detection of features, which looks like the genital structure, shows that such non-destructive technique could be used as an alternative method for identification of insects. This method is especially useful in examining the internal features of precious species from museum collections, as already described in the recent literature.

  20. The effects of temperature, diet, and other factors on development, survivorship, and oviposition of Aethina tumida (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meikle, William G; Patt, Joseph M

    2011-06-01

    Developmental rate and survivorship of small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), life stages were measured across different temperatures (21, 25, 28, 32 and 35 degrees C) and diets, which included natural and artificial pollen, honey, and bee pupae. Temperature affected hatch success, time to hatching, and larval growth. Eggs hatched in 61 h at 21 degrees C but in Beetles lived longer at 28 degrees C or lower but produced the most eggs per female, regardless of diet, at 32 degrees C. Beetle density influenced fecundity: beetles kept at three pairs per vial laid 6.7 times more eggs per female than those kept as single pairs. Overall, beetles fared best at 28-32 degrees C with mortality of all stages highest at 35 degrees C. PMID:21735891

  1. Genetic differentiation among populations of the beetle Bolitophagus reticulatus (Coleoptera: tenebrionidae) in a fragmented and a continuous landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, H; Rukke, B A; Jorde, P E; Ims, R A

    2000-06-01

    The effect of habitat fragmentation on genetic differentiation among local populations of the fungivorous beetle Bolitophagus reticulatus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) was studied in two contrasting landscapes: one heavily fragmented with forest fragments of variable size surrounded by inhabitable agricultural fields, the other an old forest providing a continuous habitat. The genetic structure of the beetle within each of the two contrasting areas was investigated by means of protein electrophoresis, screening four polymorphic loci in 20 populations from each area. In both areas there were significant genetic differences among local populations, but on average differentiation in the fragmented area was three times greater than in the continuous one, strongly indicating a genetic isolation effect of habitat fragmentation. These genetic results are in accordance with previous studies on dispersal in this species. PMID:10886382

  2. Biological control agent of larger black flour beetles (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae): a nuisance pest developing in cotton gin trash piles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nansen, Christian; Stokes, Bryan; James, Jacob; Porter, Patrick; Shields, Eilson J; Wheeler, Terry; Meikle, William G

    2013-04-01

    The larger black flour beetles, Cynaeus angustus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), feeds on saprophytic fungi found in gin trash piles and occasionally becomes a nuisance pest in adjacent homes and businesses. The potential of Steinernema carpocapsae 'NY 001,' as a potential control agent of larger black flour beetle under experimental conditions was examined with particular reference to the importance of soil moisture content. Without prospects of insecticides being labeled for control of larger black flour beetle in gin trash, the data presented here support further research into applications of entomopathogenic nematodes underneath gin trash piles as a way to minimize risk of larger black flour beetle populations causing nuisance to nearby homes and businesses. PMID:23786050

  3. Bioactivity of Indonesian mahogany, Toona sureni (Blume (Meliaceae, against the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahana Parvin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bioactivity of Indonesian mahogany, Toona sureni (Blume (Meliaceae, against the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae. The insecticidal activity of Toona sureni (Blume Merr. was evaluated considering repellency, mortality and progeny production of F1 adults of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst, 1797 (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae. Dried extract of seeds of T. sureni was dissolved in acetone to prepare solution of various concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 2.5 and 5.0%. To test for repellency, the insects were exposed to treated filter paper. Mortality of larvae, pupae and adults was evaluated by the treatment of spraying the insects with different concentrations of T. sureni extract. Residual effect of the extract was also evaluated considering the production of progeny of F1 adults. The highest repellency (93.30% of T. castaneum occurred at the highest concentration (5.0% suspension of T. sureni; while the lowest (0.0% repellency occurred at 0.5% suspension after 1 day of treatment. The highest mortality against adults (86.71%, larvae (88.32% and pupae (85% occurred at 5% suspension at 8 days after application. There was a negative correlation between the concentrations of T. sureni and the production of F1 adult's progeny of T. castaneum. The highest number of progeny (147 of T. castaneum occurred in the control at 7 days after treatment; and the lowest number of progeny (43 occurred at 5.0% concentration in 1 day after treatment. The results show that T. sureni is toxic to T. castaneum and has the potential to control all stages of this insect in stored wheat.

  4. Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp. (Tylenchida: Allantonematidae parasitizing Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poinar George O

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae is native to central and eastern Asia and was purposely introduced into Europe to control aphids. While it proved to be a good biological control agent, its rapid spread and buildup of large populations made it a nuisance, since it overwinters in homes, emits unpleasant odors, stains fabrics, occasionally bites humans and feeds on apples, pears and grapes. Aside from the above, the ravenous appetite of H. axyridis results in their consumption of harmless native insects, including even other ladybird beetles. A study of the natural enemies of H. axyridis in Denmark revealed the presence of nematodes. The present study describes this nematode parasite and discusses aspects of its development and ecology. Methods Adult harlequin ladybird beetles were collected from March to November from four localities in Copenhagen on different plant species. In addition, groups of last-instar larvae and pupae (n = 50 were examined for the presence of nematodes. Living and recently dead nematodes were removed from adult H. axyridis in 0.5% saline solution, the nematodes were then heat killed (at 75C, fixed in 5% formalin and transferred to glycerin on slides for further examination and measurements. Results A new species of Allantonematidae (Tylenchida, Parasitylenchus bifurcatus n. sp., is described from adults of the harlequin ladybird, Harmonia axyridis in Denmark. The new species is characterized by a straight stylet lacking basal thickenings, a bursa and a forked tail tip in the vermiform (infective females and juvenile males. The new species is compared with P. coccinellinae previously described from ladybird beetles in France. Parasitism resulted in depletion of the fat body and partial or complete atrophy of the reproductive organs of the beetles. Infections occurred throughout the year with rates of parasitism reaching up to 35%. The rate increased to 60

  5. Entomofauna Associada a Galhos de Acacia mangium Willd. Roletados por Oncideres saga (Dalman (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gláucia Cordeiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O estudo da entomofauna associada aos galhos e fustes roletados por Oncideres saga (Dalman é importante para conhecermos seus possíveis inimigos naturais. Portanto, este trabalho teve como objetivo registrar os insetos associados aos galhos e fustes de Acacia mangium Willd. roletados por O. saga, em Coimbra-MG. Galhos e fustes roletados de A. mangium foram coletados de janeiro a abril de 2007. Este material foi vistoriado, armazenados em sacolas, feitas com tela plástica, e mantidos em sala com condições controladas (25,4±0,3°C e 66,7±1,4%. Constatou-se a presença de uma espécie, não determinada, de Scolytidae e a emergência de quatro espécies de Cerambycidae: Engyum quadrinotatum Thomsom; Eburodacrys sexmaculata (Olivier; Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus e Neoclytus pusillus (Laporte & Gory. Isto posto, fica evidenciada a necessidade de estudos com o objetivo de verificar qual o comportamento destes insetos em relação ao serrador O. saga.Insects associated with branches of Acacia mangium Willd. girdled by Oncideres saga (Dalman (Coleoptera: CerambycidaeAbstract. The study of the insects associated with branches and stems girdled by Oncideres saga (Dalman is important to know its possible natural enemies. Therefore, these work had the objective of register the insects associated with branches and stems girdled of Acacia mangium Willd. by this twig girdler beetle, in Coimbra, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. Stems and branches of A. mangium were collected in January/2007 to April/2007. This material has been inspected, stored in plastic bags, and kept in a room with controlled conditions (25.4 ± 0.3°C and 66.7 ± 1.4%. It was noted the presence of a non-determined species of Scolytidae and the emergence of four species of Cerambycidae: Engyum quadrinotatum Thomsom; Eburodacrys sexmaculata (Olivier; Achryson surinamum (Linnaeus and Neoclytus pusillus (Laporte & Gory. It can be concluded that studies are needed with the objective of

  6. Karyotypes of some medium-sized Dytiscidae (Agabinae and Colymbetinae (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Angus

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available An account is given of the karyotypes of 29 species of medium sized Dytiscidae (Coleoptera. Of the 20 species of Agabus Leach, 1817, 18 have karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are either X0(♂ or XX (♀. These species are A. serricornis (Paykull, 1799, A. labiatus (Brahm, 1791, A. congener (Thunberg, 1794, A. lapponicus (Thomson, 1867, A. thomsoni (J. Sahlberg, 1871, A. confinis (Gyllenhal, 1808, A. sturmii (Gyllenhal, 1808, A. bipustulatus (Linnaeus, 1767, A. nevadensis Håkan Lindberg, 1939, A. wollastoni Sharp, 1882, A. melanarius Aubé, 1837, A. biguttatus (Olivier, 1795, A. binotatus Aubé, 1837, A. affinis (Paykull, 1798, A. unguicularis (Thomson, 1867, A. ramblae Millan & Ribera, 2001, A. conspersus (Marsham, 1802 and A. nebulosus (Forster, 1771. However two species, A. infuscatus Aubé, 1838 and A. adpressus Aubé, 1837, have developed a neo-XY system, with karyotypes comprising 21 pairs of autosomes and XY sex chromosomes (♂. No chromosomal differences have been detected between typical A. bipustulatus and A. bipustulatus var. solieri Aubé, 1837, nor have any been found between the three species of the A. bipustulatus complex (A. bipustulatus, A. nevadensis and A. wollastoni. The four species of Colymbetes Clairville, 1806, C. fuscus (Linnaeus, 1758, C. paykulli Erichson, 1837, C. piceus Klug, 1834 and C. striatus (Linnaeus, 1758 have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and sex chromosomes which are X0 (♂, XX (♀. Two of the species of Rhantus Dejean, 1833, R. exsoletus (Forster, 1771 and R. suturellus (Harris, 1828 have karyotypes comprising 20 pairs of autosomes and X0/XX sex chromosomes, but the other three species, R. grapii (Gyllenhal, 1808, R. frontalis (Marsham, 1802 and R. suturalis (Macleay, 1825 have 22 pairs of autosomes and X0/XX sex chromosomes. Agabus congener and Rhantus suturellus may have one B-chromosome. Nine of the species have previously published karyotype data but

  7. Susceptibility of Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Houping; Bauer, Leah S

    2006-08-01

    The susceptibility of Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) to selected strains of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metschnikoff) Sorokin was evaluated through bioassays with direct immersion or foliar exposure under laboratory conditions. Results showed that A. planipennis adults were susceptible to B. bassiana and M. anisoplae. Significant time-mortality response was found for each isolates. Isolate B. bassiana GHA killed A. planipennis adults at a faster rate compared with other isolates tested, with the lowest average time-to-death values. The LC50 values estimated under direct immersion method ranged from 1.7 x 10(5) to 1.9 x 10(7), 3.5 x 10(4) to 5.3 x 10(5), and 4.1 x 10(3) to 2.9 x 10(5) conidia/ml for B. basissiana and from 3.2 x 10(6) to 1.1 x 10(7), 4.5 x 10(3) to 4.5 x 10(5), and 1.4 x 10(2) to 1.2 x 10(5) conidia/ml for M. anisopliae at 4, 5, and 6 d after treatment, respectively. By days 5 and 6, B. bassiana GHA outperformed all other isolates tested except ARSEF 7234, followed by ARSEF 7152, 6393, and 7180. Significant concentration-mortality response was also observed for two B. bassiana GHA formulations, BotaniGard ES and Mycotrol O, and M. anisopliae F52 when insects were treated through foliar exposure. The LC50 values ranged from 114.5 to 309.6, 18.4 to 797.3, and 345.3 to 362.0 conidia/cm2 for BotaniGard, Mycotrol, and M. anisopliae F52, respectively. Based on the results of these bioassays, the efficacy of both B. bassiana GHA formulations and M. anisopliae F52 were similar against adult A. planipennis. The potential use of entomopathogenic fungi for management of A. planipennis in North America is discussed. PMID:16937660

  8. Diversity and altitudinal distribution of Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera in Peregrina Canyon, Tamaulipas, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uriel Jeshua Sánchez-Reyes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Chrysomelidae (Coleoptera is a highly speciose family that has been poorly studied at the regional level in Mexico. In the present study, we estimated species richness and diversity in oak-pine forest, Tamaulipan thorny scrub and in tropical deciduous forests in Peregrina Canyon within the Altas Cumbres Protected Area of the northeastern state of Tamaulipas, Mexico. Sampling of Chrysomelidae consisted of five sweep net samples (200 net sweeps within each of three sites during four sample periods: early dry season, late dry season, early wet season, and late wet season. Species were identified and total numbers per species were recorded for each sample. A total of 2,226 specimens were collected belonging to six subfamilies, 81 genera and 157 species of Chrysomelidae from the study area. Galerucinae was the most abundant subfamily with 1,828 specimens, representing 82.1% of total abundance in the study area. Lower abundance was recorded in Cassidinae (8.5%, Eumolpinae (3.6%, Cryptocephalinae (2.2%, Chrysomelinae (2.2%, and finally Criocerinae (1.3%. The highest species richness was also presented in the subfamily Galerucinae with 49% of the total obtained species followed by Cassidinae (20%, Cryptocephalinae (9.7%, Eumolpinae (9.7%, Chrysomelinae (6.5% and Criocerinae (5.2%. The most common species were Centralaphthona fulvipennis Jacoby (412 individuals, Centralaphthona diversa (Baly (248, Margaridisa sp.1 (219, Acallepitrix sp.1 (134, Longitarsus sp.1 (104, Heterispa vinula (Erichson (91, Epitrix sp.1 (84 and Chaetocnema sp.1 (72. Twenty-two species were doubletons (1.97% of total abundance and 52 were singletons (2.33%. The estimated overall density value obtained was 0.0037 individuals/m2. The greatest abundance and density of individuals were recorded at the lowest elevation site. However, alpha diversity increased with increasing altitude. Similarity values were less than 50% among the three sites indicating that each site had distinct

  9. Interfirm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergenholtz, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Strong and trust-based ties are usually related to homogeneous and complex knowledge, while weak ties are associated with heterogeneous and simple knowledge. Interfirm communities have been shown to depend on trust-based ties, while also relying on getting access to heterogeneous knowledge. These...... results yield a paradox which the present paper aims to address. Based on an in-depth case study of how a high-tech small firm organizes its interfirm activity, I show how a hybrid social relation, that is neither weak nor strong, is a useful conception for interfirm communities. Hereby, the study also...... goes beyond a mere structural approach to the organization of social networks and hence proposes a tighter integration between research on social networks and organizational design....

  10. Designed communities?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Marie

    2013-01-01

    In current residential spaces there seem to be an increasing emphasis on small-scale communities. A number of new, high profiled residential complexes thus seek to promote new ways of social living by rethinking architectural design, typologies and concepts. In this paper I explore the emergence of...... these designed communities: What social life is promoted in such recent architectural visions? And to what extent can the social life and identity of a place actually be designed? The paper discusses these questions based on a fieldwork in three new housing complexes in the Copenhagen Region: The A......-house by architect Carsten Holgaard, the 8-house by BIG, and Lange Eng (The Long Meadow) by Dorte Mandrup. Rather than taking the perspective of either architect or user, the fieldwork has ethnographically traced the entire process from design to occupancy. The aim is to explore how the social life and...

  11. Community Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Bródka, Piotr; Kazienko, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    The continuous interest in the social network area contributes to the fast development of this field. The new possibilities of obtaining and storing data facilitate deeper analysis of the entire social network, extracted social groups and single individuals as well. One of the most interesting research topic is the network dynamics and dynamics of social groups in particular, it means analysis of group evolution over time. It is the natural step forward after social community extraction. Having communities extracted, appropriate knowledge and methods for dynamic analysis may be applied in order to identify changes as well as to predict the future of all or some selected groups. Furthermore, knowing the most probably change of a given group some additional steps may be performed in order to change this predicted future according to specific needs. Such ability would be a powerful tool in the hands of human resource managers, personnel recruitment, marketing, telecommunication companies, etc.

  12. Economic Community

    OpenAIRE

    Brent Chrite; David Hudson

    1998-01-01

    This is an exploratory paper aimed at analyzing some of the many environmental and organizational influences that impact the competitiveness of business enterprises within the Southern African Development Community'. Specifically, we present results from a survey of managers in small, medium and large organizations within three member nations of SADC, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Namibia. The results of the surveys are presented in the context of existing dynamics and forces of emerging markets...

  13. Community development

    OpenAIRE

    Mavis Arthur

    1981-01-01

    HEALTH EDUCATION — THE NEED TO MAKE IT WORK It is increasingly apparent that the major health problems in the world today — ranging from malnutrition and communicable diseases; many forms of mental ill-health and cardiac conditions; accidents and alcoholism, are primarily attributable to unsatisfactory living conditions, lack of knowledge and harmful practices on the part of individuals, families and communities. Advances in the field of science and technology can do no more towards the promo...

  14. Creating Community

    OpenAIRE

    Budin, Wendy C.

    2009-01-01

    In this column, the editor of The Journal of Perinatal Education describes ways that Lamaze International is helping to create a community for those who share a common interest in promoting, supporting, and protecting natural, safe, and healthy childbirth. The editor also describes the contents of this issue, which offer a broad range of resources, research, and inspiration for childbirth educators in their efforts to promote normal birth.

  15. Land management practices interactively affect wetland beetle ecological and phylogenetic community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sandor L; Song, Hojun; Jenkins, David G

    2015-06-01

    Management practices can disturb ecological communities in grazing lands, which represent one-quarter of land surface. But three knowledge gaps exist regarding disturbances: disturbances potentially interact but are most often studied singly; experiments with multiple ecosystems as treatment units are rare; and relatively new metrics of phylogenetic community structure have not been widely applied. We addressed all three of these needs with a factorial experiment; 40 seasonal wetlands embedded in a Florida ranch were treated with pasture intensification, cattle exclosure, and prescribed fire. Treatment responses were evaluated through four years for aquatic beetle (Coleoptera: Adephaga) assemblages using classic ecological metrics (species richness, diversity) and phylogenetic community structure (PCS) metrics. Adephagan assemblages consisted of 23 genera representing three families in a well-resolved phylogeny. Prescribed fire significantly reduced diversity one year post-fire, followed by a delayed pasture X fire interaction. Cattle exclosure significantly reduced one PCS metric after one year and a delayed pasture x fence x fire interaction was detected with another PCs metric. Overall, effects of long-term pasture intensification were modified by cattle exclosure and prescribed fire. Also, PCS metrics revealed effects otherwise undetected by classic ecological metrics. Management strategies (e.g., "flash grazing," prescribed fires) in seasonal wetlands may successfully balance economic gains from high forage quality with ecological benefits of high wetland diversity in otherwise simplified grazing lands. Effects are likely taxon specific; multiple taxa should be similarly evaluated. PMID:26465031

  16. Community perspectives: Community check cashing

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Leibsohn

    2011-01-01

    In May of 2009, Community Development Finance (CDF) opened the first nonprofit, full-service check cashing store in the country in Fruitvale, California. The project is designed to provide low-income households with the financial services they need, without the asset-stripping characteristics common to the fringe banking industry. In addition to providing affordable check cashing services and a payday loan product, CDF also provides financial coaching and literacy training, small business ass...

  17. Online Communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann; Gorm Hansen, Katrine;

    ”Online Communities” er et medie for brugere og fagfolk, hvor de kan mødes digitalt for at dele erfaringer, og dette kan anvendes som inspiration indenfor Brugerdreven Innovation. Via ”desk research” kan virksomheder opnå adgang til varierende mængder af brugere på en forholdsvist enkelt måde. I...... denne rapport beskrives eksperimentets opbygning, resultater og mulige værdi. Vi håber hermed på at kunne give praktisk indsigt i, hvorledes virksomheder fra byggematerialeindustrien kan agere i online communities....

  18. Oryctini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae da coleção de invertebrados do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA, Manaus, Amazonas, Brasil Oryctini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae of the invertebrate collection of the National Institute of Research of Amazonia (INPA, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Jaime Gasca

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A Coleção de Invertebrados do Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA possui 554 espécimes de Oryctini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae, pertencentes a 7 gêneros, 16 espécies e 2 subespécies. As distribuições geográficas das espécies são fornecidas, sendo que 97% do material examinado procedem de coletas feitas em diferentes locais da Amazônia brasileira.The Invertebrate Collection of the Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA, Manaus, Amazonas, Brazil, has 554 specimens of Oryctini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae, belonging to seven genera, 16 species and two subspecies. Information about geographical distribution are provided, of which 97% of the material examined was collected from several places in the Brazilian Amazon.

  19. Impacts of an invasive non-native annual weed, Impatiens glandulifera, on above- and below-ground invertebrate communities in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Robert A; Varia, Sonal; Eschen, René; Wood, Suzy; Murphy, Sean T; Gange, Alan C

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation community composition and the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities are linked intrinsically, though few studies have assessed the impact of non-native plants on both these parts of the community together. We evaluated the differences in the above- (foliage- and ground-dwelling) and below-ground invertebrate communities in nine uninvaded plots and nine plots invaded by the annual invasive species Impatiens glandulifera, in the UK during 2007 and 2008. Over 139,000 invertebrates were identified into distinct taxa and categorised into functional feeding groups. The impact of I. glandulifera on the vegetation and invertebrate community composition was evaluated using multivariate statistics including principal response curves (PRC) and redundancy analysis (RDA). In the foliage-dwelling community, all functional feeding groups were less abundant in the invaded plots, and the species richness of Coleoptera and Heteroptera was significantly reduced. In the ground-dwelling community, herbivores, detritivores, and predators were all significantly less abundant in the invaded plots. In contrast, these functional groups in the below-ground community appeared to be largely unaffected, and even positively associated with the presence of I. glandulifera. Although the cover of I. glandulifera decreased in the invaded plots in the second year of the study, only the below-ground invertebrate community showed a significant response. These results indicate that the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities respond differently to the presence of I. glandulifera, and these community shifts can potentially lead to a habitat less biologically diverse than surrounding native communities; which could have negative impacts on higher trophic levels and ecosystem functioning. PMID:23840648

  20. Impacts of an invasive non-native annual weed, Impatiens glandulifera, on above- and below-ground invertebrate communities in the United Kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Tanner

    Full Text Available Vegetation community composition and the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities are linked intrinsically, though few studies have assessed the impact of non-native plants on both these parts of the community together. We evaluated the differences in the above- (foliage- and ground-dwelling and below-ground invertebrate communities in nine uninvaded plots and nine plots invaded by the annual invasive species Impatiens glandulifera, in the UK during 2007 and 2008. Over 139,000 invertebrates were identified into distinct taxa and categorised into functional feeding groups. The impact of I. glandulifera on the vegetation and invertebrate community composition was evaluated using multivariate statistics including principal response curves (PRC and redundancy analysis (RDA. In the foliage-dwelling community, all functional feeding groups were less abundant in the invaded plots, and the species richness of Coleoptera and Heteroptera was significantly reduced. In the ground-dwelling community, herbivores, detritivores, and predators were all significantly less abundant in the invaded plots. In contrast, these functional groups in the below-ground community appeared to be largely unaffected, and even positively associated with the presence of I. glandulifera. Although the cover of I. glandulifera decreased in the invaded plots in the second year of the study, only the below-ground invertebrate community showed a significant response. These results indicate that the above- and below-ground invertebrate communities respond differently to the presence of I. glandulifera, and these community shifts can potentially lead to a habitat less biologically diverse than surrounding native communities; which could have negative impacts on higher trophic levels and ecosystem functioning.

  1. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae) parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Neotropical region Ocorrência e biologia de Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae) parasitando diferentes espécies de Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) na região Neotropical

    OpenAIRE

    RB Silva; I Cruz; MLC Figueiredo; AG Pereira; AM Penteado-Dias

    2012-01-01

    Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824) and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866), by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae). Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milh...

  2. Fauna de Coleoptera no Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brasil: abundância e riqueza das famílias capturadas através de armadilhas de solo Coleoptera fauna in the Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brazil: abundance and family richness captured with pitfall traps

    OpenAIRE

    Renato C. Marinoni; Norma G. Ganho

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a part of the studies on the Coleoptera fauna from Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana gathered through malaise and pitfall traps in sites with different floristic conditions. The present study deal with the data of pitfall trap captures, installed close to the malaise traps. The data were obtained weekly (52 samples), from September 1999 to August 2000. This survey was carried out on five areas, three of them with different plant succession stages (initial, intermediate, and advan...

  3. Biological and Morphological Aspects of Anoxia (Mesanoxia) matutinalis ssp. matutinalis Castelnau, 1832 (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae), a Pest of Apulian Pinewoods in Southern Italy Aspetos da Biologia e Morfologia da Anoxia (Mesanoxia) matutinalis ssp. matutinalis Castelnau, 1832 (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae), Praga nos Pinhais da Apúlia, Sul de Itália

    OpenAIRE

    Eustachio Tarasco; Oreste Triggiani

    2011-01-01

    Huge defoliations by Anoxia (Mesanoxia) matutinalis spp. matutinalis Castelnau, 1832 (Coleoptera, Scarabeidae) have been observed in recent years in the coastal pinewoods (Pinus halepensis, P. pinea) of the southern Apulia Region of Italy. Starting from adults collected in the field, insect breeding was conducted in the laboratory, following the life-cycle from ovideposition to larval development and emergence. Observations were performed in the laboratory and the field to study the different...

  4. Levantamento da fauna de Coleoptera que habita a carcaça de Sus scrofa L., em Curitiba, Paraná A study of the Coleoptera (Insecta fauna that inhabits Sus scrofa L. carcass in Curitiba, Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleber Makoto Mise

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho visou levantar a fauna de Coleoptera associada à carcaça de Sus scrofa L.,1758, espécie utilizada como modelo em Entomologia Forense. O acréscimo ou a substituição seqüencial das espécies de insetos pode ser utilizado para estimar o intervalo post mortem (IPM. O experimento foi realizado no Centro Politécnico (UFPR, de setembro de 2005 a setembro de 2006. A cada estação foi sacrificado um suíno de 15 kg no local, colocado em gaiola. A captura dos insetos foi realizada diariamente em bandeja posicionada abaixo da carcaça e em armadilha tipo Shannon modificada, e a cada 14 dias em cinco armadilhas do tipo pit-fall. Foram coletados 4.360 Coleoptera, pertencentes a 112 espécies de 26 famílias, 12 consideradas de importância forense. A coleta ativa realizada na bandeja foi responsável pela maior captura (2.023 espécimes, seguida pela armadilha Shannon modificada (2.016 espécimes e por último pelas do tipo pit-fall (324 espécimes. Staphylinidae foi mais coletada na bandeja e Shannon modificada, e Silphidae na armadilha pit-fall. Os principais hábitos encontrados foram predador/parasita (55%e onívoro (38,05%, com poucas espécies consideradas necrófagas (1,31%.This paper sought to assess the Coleoptera fauna associated with carcasses of Sus scrofa L., 1758, which is usually used as model in Forensic Entomology. The addition and sequential substitution of insect species could be used to estimate the post mortem interval (PMI. The present study took place in Centro Politécnico (UFPR, between september 2005 to september 2006. A pig weighting 15 kg was sacrificed each season and put inside a cage. Sampling is made daily in a tray placed below the carcass and in a Shannon modified trap, and each 14 days in five pit-fall traps. 4,360 beetles were collected, belonging to 112 species of 26 families, 12 were considered of forensic potential. The active collecting made in the tray was responsible for the largest number of

  5. Differences Found in the Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in the Presence or Absence of the Invasive Alien Crayfish, Orconectes hylas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland-Riggert, Brandye T; Cairns, Stefan H; Poulton, Barry C; Riggert, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Introductions of alien species into aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, including invasions of crayfish species; however, little is known about the effects of these introductions on macroinvertebrate communities. The woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas (Faxon)) has been introduced into the St. Francis River watershed in southeast Missouri and has displaced populations of native crayfish. The effects of O. hylas on macroinvertebrate community composition were investigated in a fourth-order Ozark stream at two locations, one with the presence of O. hylas and one without. Significant differences between sites and across four sampling periods and two habitats were found in five categories of benthic macroinvertebrate metrics: species richness, percent/composition, dominance/diversity, functional feeding groups, and biotic indices. In most seasons and habitat combinations, the invaded site had significantly higher relative abundance of riffle beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae), and significantly lower Missouri biotic index values, total taxa richness, and both richness and relative abundance of midges (Diptera: Chironomidae). Overall study results indicate that some macroinvertebrate community differences due to the O. hylas invasion were not consistent between seasons and habitats, suggesting that further research on spatial and temporal habitat use and feeding ecology of Ozark crayfish species is needed to improve our understanding of the effects of these invasions on aquatic communities. PMID:26986207

  6. Differences Found in the Macroinvertebrate Community Composition in the Presence or Absence of the Invasive Alien Crayfish, Orconectes hylas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland-Riggert, Brandye T.

    2016-01-01

    Introductions of alien species into aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, including invasions of crayfish species; however, little is known about the effects of these introductions on macroinvertebrate communities. The woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas (Faxon)) has been introduced into the St. Francis River watershed in southeast Missouri and has displaced populations of native crayfish. The effects of O. hylas on macroinvertebrate community composition were investigated in a fourth-order Ozark stream at two locations, one with the presence of O. hylas and one without. Significant differences between sites and across four sampling periods and two habitats were found in five categories of benthic macroinvertebrate metrics: species richness, percent/composition, dominance/diversity, functional feeding groups, and biotic indices. In most seasons and habitat combinations, the invaded site had significantly higher relative abundance of riffle beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae), and significantly lower Missouri biotic index values, total taxa richness, and both richness and relative abundance of midges (Diptera: Chironomidae). Overall study results indicate that some macroinvertebrate community differences due to the O. hylas invasion were not consistent between seasons and habitats, suggesting that further research on spatial and temporal habitat use and feeding ecology of Ozark crayfish species is needed to improve our understanding of the effects of these invasions on aquatic communities. PMID:26986207

  7. Differences found in the macroinvertebrate community composition in the presence or absence of the invasive alien crayfish, Orconectes hylas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland-Riggert, Brandye T.; Cairns, Stefan H.; Poulton, Barry C.; Riggert, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Introductions of alien species into aquatic ecosystems have been well documented, including invasions of crayfish species; however, little is known about the effects of these introductions on macroinvertebrate communities. The woodland crayfish (Orconectes hylas (Faxon)) has been introduced into the St. Francis River watershed in southeast Missouri and has displaced populations of native crayfish. The effects of O. hylas on macroinvertebrate community composition were investigated in a fourth-order Ozark stream at two locations, one with the presence of O. hylas and one without. Significant differences between sites and across four sampling periods and two habitats were found in five categories of benthic macroinvertebrate metrics: species richness, percent/composition, dominance/diversity, functional feeding groups, and biotic indices. In most seasons and habitat combinations, the invaded site had significantly higher relative abundance of riffle beetles (Coleoptera: Elmidae), and significantly lower Missouri biotic index values, total taxa richness, and both richness and relative abundance of midges (Diptera: Chironomidae). Overall study results indicate that some macroinvertebrate community differences due to the O. hylas invasion were not consistent between seasons and habitats, suggesting that further research on spatial and temporal habitat use and feeding ecology of Ozark crayfish species is needed to improve our understanding of the effects of these invasions on aquatic communities.

  8. Os besouros (Insecta: Coleoptera na concepção dos moradores de Pedra Branca, Santa Terezinha, Estado da Bahia = The term “beetle” (Insecta: Coleoptera as perceived and used by dwellers of Pedra Branca, Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eraldo Medeiros Costa Neto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Besouros (Insecta: Coleoptera são percebidos, conhecidos e utilizados por moradores do povoado de Pedra Branca, localizado no Estado da Bahia, Brasil. O trabalho de campo foi realizado entre abril e dezembro de 2004. Os dados foram obtidos com 49 indivíduos (20 do sexo masculino e 29 do sexo feminino por meio de entrevistas semiestruturadas e gravadas, seguindo-se uma abordagem emicista. Os resultados mostram que o genérico “besouro” é usado como uma categoria etnotaxonômica que reúne organismos sistematicamente não relacionados, além dos coleópteros da classificação lineana. Foramcitados 43 nomes locais de besouros. Os informantes atribuíram características qualitativas aos “besouros”, muitas das quais são antropomórficas. Algumas etnoespécies de “besouros” causam danos aos moradores de Pedra Branca, uma vez que ameaçam a saúde, os materiais,os cultivos locais e plantas frutíferas. Registrou-se informação sobre a história natural de “besouros” culturalmente importantes. Conclui-se que o conhecimento etnoentomológico dos moradores de Pedra Branca sobre besouros é importante como uma fonte de informação sobre as espécies locais.Fieldwork was carried out from April to December 2004. Data were obtained from 49 individuals (20 men and 29 women by means of open-ended tape-recorded interviews and following an emicist approach. Results show that the generic taxon “beetle” is used as an ethnotaxonomic category that brings together not systematically related organisms, besides the Coleoptera of the Linnaean classification. A total of 43 beetle local names were cited. People have attributed qualitative characteristics to these “beetles”, many of which are anthropomorphic. “Beetles” cause damages to human beings since they harm their health, materials, and local crops and fructiferous plants. Information on the natural history of culturally significant “beetles” was recorded. It is concluded that

  9. Notes on three braconid wasps (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Doryctinae) parasitizing oak long-horned beetle, Massicus raddei (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), a severe pest of Quercus spp. in China, together with the description of a new species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liangming; Yang, Zhongqi; Tang, Yanlong; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Three species of Doryctinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) parasitize larvae of oak longhorn beetle Massicus raddei Blessig (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), a serious wood borer pest in North China. Rhoptrocentrus quercusi sp. nov., is described as a new species and Doryctes petiolatus Shestakov, as well as Zombrus bicolor (Enderlein). The three species are idiobiont ectoparasitoids, and may have potential for biological control of oak longhorn beetle. PMID:26624143

  10. Rozšíření rýhovců Rhysodes sulcatus (Fabricius, 1787) a Omoglymmius germari (Ganglbauer, 1892) (Coleoptera: Rhysodidae) v České republice

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvička, Ondřej; Čížek, Lukáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 6, Sept 1 (2015), s. 111-114. ISSN 1804-2732 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/12/1952 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera * distributional maps * faunistics Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour

  11. Efecto de la dieta artificial MP sobre la emergencia y relacion de sexos de Phymastichus coffea (Hymenoptera:Eulophidae) mantenido sobre su hueped, Hypothenemus hampei (Coleoptera: Scloytidae)a traves de generaciones contin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phymastichus coffea La Salle (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is an endoparasitoid that attacks the adult coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei Ferrari (Coleoptera: Scolytidae). The MP diet developed by Portilla and Streett is the only reported diet that allows cultures of P. coffea to develop and repr...

  12. Developing Learning Communities: Using Communities of Practice within Community Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawthom, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The idea that communities need to be inclusive is almost axiomatic. The process, whereby, community members engage in inclusive practices is far less understood. Similarly, UK universities are being encouraged to include the wider community and extent campus boundaries. Here, I suggest a particular theoretical lens which sheds light on engagement…

  13. Field parasitism of nontarget weevil species (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) by the introduced biological control agent Microctonus aethiopoides Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) over an altitude gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, B I P; Ferguson, C M; Bixley, A S; Crook, K E; Barton, D M; Johnstone, P D

    2007-08-01

    The parasitoid, Microctonus aethiopoides Loan (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was introduced into New Zealand in 1982 to control the alfalfa pest, Sitona discoideus Gyllenhal (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). Studies have shown that a number of nontarget weevil species are attacked in the field by this parasitoid. A field study was carried out to investigate nontarget parasitism by M. aethiopoides over an altitudinal sequence from the target host habitat (alfalfa) into native grassland. Three locations were selected for the study, and at each, the alfalfa growing in the valley floor was sampled annually for parasitism of the target pest that ranged between 17 and 78%. At progressively higher altitudes, three further grassland sites at each location were sampled monthly during spring to autumn for up to 6 yr. Weevil densities were estimated, species identified, and dissections carried out to determine reproductive status and parasitism. Almost 12,000 weevils were collected during the study, which were identified as 36 species in total from the three locations. Eight weevil species were found to be parasitized, including S. discoideus, the target host that was found at all sites. Parasitism of nontarget species was approximately 2% overall but varied with location, site, and season. Substantial nontarget parasitism was found at only one of the locations, with up to 24% parasitism of a native weevil, Nicaeana fraudator Broun (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), recorded. Another species, Irenimus egens (Broun) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), was also found at this location at similar population densities but was attacked far less by M. aethiopoides. Results are discussed in relation to weevil phenology. PMID:17716473

  14. Aspectos biológicos e técnica de criação do gorgulho-da-goiaba, Conotrachelus psidii marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Fabricio Iglesias Valente; Vera Lúcia Rodrigues Machado Benassi

    2014-01-01

    Considerada praga-chave da cultura da goiaba, Conotrachelus psidii Marshall (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) tem causado grandes prejuízos em vários países produtores desta fruta. A pesquisa objetivou avaliar os parâmetros biológicos da praga, sob condições controladas, através do desenvolvimento de uma técnica de criação que permitiu efetuar observações diárias de pré-pupas e pupas. Constatou-se que o substrato adequado para manutenção dessas fases foi o solo argiloso umedecido com viabilidade de...

  15. Description of the male of Eburella pinima Martins and notes on the geographical distribution of Eburodacrys aenigma Galileo & Martins and Eburodacrys lanei Zajciw (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Botero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Description of the male of Eburella pinima Martins and notes on the geographical distribution of Eburodacrys aenigma Galileo & Martins and Eburodacrys lanei Zajciw (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae. The male of Eburella pinima Martins, 1997 is described and illustrated for the first time. Information on Eburodacrys aenigma Galileo & Martins, 2006, previously known only from the female holotype, which lacked locality label, is herein complemented. This species is recorded from Brazil and the male is depicted for the first time. The geographical distribution of Eburodacrys lanei Zajciw, 1958 is further restricted here as some previous records are confirmed to result from misidentifications of E. aenigma.

  16. The infestation by an exotic ambrosia beetle, Euplatypus parallelus (F. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Platypodinae of Angsana trees (Pterocarpus indicus Willd. in southern Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Bumrungsri

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An exotic ambrosia beetle, Euplatypus parallelus (F. was collected from infested Pterocarpus indicus Willd. trees in Prince of Songkla University. Larvae and eggs were found in simple galleries with a single branch. Either a single male or a male and a female were found in each gallery. Half of these infested trees were previously attacked by long-horned beetles probably Aristobia horridula (Hope (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, while some of them appeared to be healthy. Fusarium oxysporum Schlecht.:Fr. was isolated from frass, sapwood samples and insect larvae, and might be a cause of death of P.indicus.

  17. A new species of endogean, anophthalmous Parazuphium Jeannel from Northern Morocco (Coleoptera: Carabidae, with new molecular data for the tribe Zuphiini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Andújar

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of the genus Parazuphium (Coleoptera, Carabidae, Zuphiini, Parazuphium aguilerai sp.n., is described from the Tingitan peninsula in North Morocco. The single known specimen was found below a large stone deeply inserted in the substratum, and it is anophthalmous, depigmented and flattened. This is the second species of blind Parazuphium, the other being P. feloi Machado 1998 from a lave tube in the Canary Islands. Molecular data of the unique known P. aguilerai sp.n. specimen is provided, and a molecular phylogeny confirm its inclusion inside Zuphiini within Harpalinae. Identification keys to the Mediterranean and Macaronesian species of Parazuphium are provided.

  18. Estudio taxonómico de las especies de la familia bruchidae (Insecta: Coleoptera) relacionadas con el género Desmodium (Fabaceae) en el mundo.

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez Chan, Adriano

    2011-01-01

    La presente investigación se realizó con el propósito de determinar las especies de brúquidos (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) que se alimentan de semillas de plantas del género Desmodium Desv. (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae) en el mundo. Se desarrollaron claves dicotómicas para determinar géneros y especies de brúquidos del Nuevo y Viejo Mundo, además de ampliar la información existente sobre la asociación brúquido-Desmodium de la base de datos BRUCOL. Se revisaron semillas de Desmodium infestadas por ...

  19. A new species of bromeliad-feeding Cephaloleia Chevrolat (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae, Cassidinae from Costa Rica: evidence from DNA barcodes, larval and adult morphology and insect diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Garcia-Robledo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Neotropical genus Cephaloleia Chevrolat (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Cassidinae includes 214 species distributed from the south of Mexico to Argentina. Cephaloleia beetles feed mostly on plants from the order Zingiberales. The interactions between Cephaloleia beetles and their Zingiberales host plants is proposed as one of the oldest and most conservative associations. Here we describe a new species of Cephaloleia (C. kuprewiczae sp. n. that feeds on two species of bromeliads (Pitcairnia arcuata and P. brittoniana, Bromeliaceae: Pitcairnioideae. Cephaloleia kuprewiczae was previously described as Cephaloleia histrionica. This study includes evidence from DNA barcodes (COI, larval and adult morphology and insect diets that separates C. kuprewiczae from C. histrionica as a new species.

  20. Efeitos da radiação gama do Cobalto-60 em ovos de Tribolium castaneum (Herbst., 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae Gamma radiation effects on eggs of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst., 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Fontes

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve por objetivo determinar as doses esterilizantes e letal para ovos de T. castaneum (Herbst., 1797 (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae, através de doses crescentes de radiação gama. Utilizou-se uma fonte de Cobalto-60, tipo Gammabeam-650, com taxa de dose de 1,28 kGy/hora. O experimento foi conduzido sob condições controladas com temperatura de 25 ± 2°C e umidade relativa de 70 ± 5%. As doses letal e esterilizante para os ovos foram respectivamente 30 e 20 Gy.The objective of this research was to verify the effects of gamma radiation of a Cobalt-60 source on eggs of the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum (Herbst., 1797. The used dose rate was 1.28 kGy per hour, and the irradiated insects were kept under controlled environment condition: 25 ± 2°C and 70 ± 5% relative humidity. For eggs the sterilizing and lethal dose were respectively, 20 and 30 Gy.

  1. Los ejemplares tipo de Dryopidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae y Psephenidae (Coleoptera: Byrrhoidea, depositados en la colección del Museo de La Plata The types of Dryopidae, Elmidae, Limnichidae and Psephenidae (Coleoptera: Byrrhoidea housed at the Museo de La Plata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana A. Fernández

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Se examinaron los ejemplares tipo depositados en la colección de la División Entomología del Museo de La Plata, pertenecientes a diversas especies nominales de Byrrhoidea: Dryopidae (1 especie, 1 ejemplar tipo, Elmidae (4, 9, Limnichidae (29, 47 y Psephenidae (1, 2. El material tipo fue estudiado por los siguientes autores: Pic, Spangler, Spangler & Brown, Spangler & Perkins, Spangler & Santiago, Spilman y Wooldridge. Para cada taxón se indica la publicación original, datos de colección y condición del material.The types of species of Byrrhoidea (Coleoptera housed in the collection of the División Entomología of Museo de La Plata were examined and listed. They belong to 35 species distributed in the families Dryopidae (1 species, 1 type, Elmidae (4, 9, Limnichidae (29, 47 and Psephenidae (1, 2. The types were described by Pic, Spangler, Spangler & Brown, Spangler & Perkins, Spangler & Santiago, Spilman, and Wooldridge. For each taxon, complete information about categories of types, reference original descriptions, collection data and specimen condition are given.

  2. The effects of heavy metal contamination on the soil arthropod community of a shooting range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliorini, Massimo; Pigino, Gaia; Bianchi, Nicola; Bernini, Fabio; Leonzio, Claudio

    2004-05-01

    Soils in clay pigeon shooting ranges can be seriously contaminated by heavy metals. The pellets contained in ammunition are composed of Pb, Sb, Ni, Zn, Mn and Cu. The total concentrations of these metals in soils, and the effects of their increasing levels on the arthropod community were investigated at seven sampling sites in a clay pigeon shooting range and compared with two controls. Research revealed that the spatial distribution of Pb and Sb contamination in the shot-fall area was strongly correlated with the flight path of the pellets. Ordination obtained through Redundance Analysis showed that Collembola, Protura and Diplura were positively correlated with major detected contaminants (Pb, Sb), while Symphyla showed a negative correlation with these pollutants. Determination of the soluble lead fraction in soil, and of its bioaccumulation in the saprophagous Armadillidium sordidum (Isopoda) and the predator Ocypus olens (Coleoptera), showed that a significant portion of metallic Pb from spent pellets is bioavailable in the soil and can be bioaccumulated by edaphic organisms, entering the soil trophic network, but without biomagnification. - Significant relationships were found between lead accumulation in soil from a shooting range and inhabiting arthropod communities.

  3. Macroinvertebrate response to acid mine drainage: community metrics and on-line behavioural toxicity bioassay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hypothesis is tested that toxicity of acid mine drainage can be detected by a selection of existing macroinvertebrate community and bioindicator metrices supplemented by toxicity tests with the local mosquitofish Gambusia holbrooki Girard and the shrimp Atyaephyra desmaresti Millet. The behavioural responses of A. desmaresti to acid mine drainage were recorded in the Multispecies Freshwater Biomonitor[reg], based on behaviour and survival as parameters. Bioassessment methods were based on community diversity, structure, function, and bioindicators and supplemented by chemical analysis (temperature, pH, metals). The Biological Monitoring Working Party adapted for the Iberian Peninsula, the number of predators (Coleoptera, Hemiptera) and the number of Ephemeroptera and Trichoptera taxa differentiated the sites well. The on-line toxicity test revealed pH-dependent acute toxicity of the acid mine drainage for the shrimp (LC50-48 h: pH-AMD=5.8) and a pH- dependent decrease in locomotory activity with the lowest-observed-response-times (LORTs) within 5 h of exposure. Shrimp were more sensitive to acid mine drainage than fish (LC50-48 h: pH-AMD=4.9). A new multimetric index combining toxicity testing and bioassessment methods is proposed. - Toxicity of acid mine drainage was evaluated by macroinvertebrate bioassessment and a new on-line rapid behavioural toxicity test with Atyaephyra desmaresti (Crustacea)

  4. Diversity and ecological aspects of aquatic insect communities from montane streams in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Marmitt Braun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: In this study, the diversity of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera and Coleoptera communities was surveyed in the Toropi River basin, a watershed localized in a slope region, in southernmost Brazil. The influence of some local abiotic factors on the most common genera was also analyzed. METHODS: Samplings were conducted at 40 sites in 1st-4th order streams, along a short elevation gradient (70-500 m, with a Surber sampler. Water physico-chemical factors, as well as substrate type, were obtained at each site. RESULTS: At all, 5,320 specimens were collected, belonging to 18 families and 52 genera. The caddisflies Austrotinodes and Celaenotrichia, and an undescribed Elmidae, Genus M, are new records for the region. The caddisfly Smicridea was the most frequent genus in the study area. The mayflies Camelobaetidius, Paracloeodes and Americabaetis were influenced by stream order. Smicridea was related to air temperature, while the mayfly Thraulodes was influenced by high levels of electrical conductivity. CONCLUSIONS: The high diversity found in the study area, compared to other Brazilian regions, reflects the environmental heterogeneity in the region. These data show that hydrographic basins in slope areas from extreme Southern Brazil sustain high levels of diversity of aquatic insect communities.

  5. The effects of heavy metal contamination on the soil arthropod community of a shooting range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soils in clay pigeon shooting ranges can be seriously contaminated by heavy metals. The pellets contained in ammunition are composed of Pb, Sb, Ni, Zn, Mn and Cu. The total concentrations of these metals in soils, and the effects of their increasing levels on the arthropod community were investigated at seven sampling sites in a clay pigeon shooting range and compared with two controls. Research revealed that the spatial distribution of Pb and Sb contamination in the shot-fall area was strongly correlated with the flight path of the pellets. Ordination obtained through Redundance Analysis showed that Collembola, Protura and Diplura were positively correlated with major detected contaminants (Pb, Sb), while Symphyla showed a negative correlation with these pollutants. Determination of the soluble lead fraction in soil, and of its bioaccumulation in the saprophagous Armadillidium sordidum (Isopoda) and the predator Ocypus olens (Coleoptera), showed that a significant portion of metallic Pb from spent pellets is bioavailable in the soil and can be bioaccumulated by edaphic organisms, entering the soil trophic network, but without biomagnification. - Significant relationships were found between lead accumulation in soil from a shooting range and inhabiting arthropod communities

  6. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Read more information on enabling JavaScript. Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" ... population is immunized, protecting most community members. The principle of community immunity applies to control of a ...

  7. Rediscovering community: Interethnic relationships and community gardening

    OpenAIRE

    August John Hoffman; Julie Wallach; Eduardo Sanchez

    2010-01-01

    Community service work, volunteerism and mentoring have recently become popular topics of research as effective methods in improving self-esteem and civic responsibility. In the current study we explored the relationship between participation in a community service gardening program and ethnocentrism. We hypothesised that an inverse correlation would emerge where students who participated in a community service-gardening program would increase their perceptions of the importance of community ...

  8. Occurrence of adults and biological aspects of Geniates borelli Camerano (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae in Aquidauana, MS, Brazil

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    Sergio Roberto Rodrigues

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence of adults and biological aspects of Geniates borelli Camerano (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae, Rutelinae in Aquidauana, Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Due to the importance of Geniates borelli Camerano as a pest in many crops, studies were developed at Universidade Estadual de Mato Grosso do Sul, Aquidauana campus, MS, Brazil. Adults were collected with a light trap from January 2006 to December 2007. 3,320 adults were collected, and the highest quantities were obtained in October 2006 and November 2007, with 1,548 and 802 adults recorded, respectively. Collected adults were kept in plastic containers with soil and Brachiaria decumbens seedlings for oviposition. 535 eggs measuring 2.30 × 1.60 mm were obtained. As the embryonic development progressed, eggs increased in size to 3.00 × 2.70 mm, and this change occurred between 6 and 10 days after oviposition. The embryonic period lasted 17.9 days. The first, second, and third instars lasted 37.6, 49.7, and 74 days, respectively. The prepupal stage lasted 65.9 days and the pupal stage lasted an average of 18.5 days. The biological cycle is completed in 315.8 days, which characterizes the species as univoltine. The average longevity of females was 35.4 days and 28.5 days for males.

  9. Molecular phylogeny of Diabrotica beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) inferred from analysis of combined mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, T L; Meinke, L J; Foster, J E

    2001-08-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of thirteen Diabrotica (representing virgifera and fucata species groups) and two outgroup Acalymma beetle species (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were inferred from the phylogenetic analysis of a combined data set of 1323 bp of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and the entire second internal transcribed spacer region (ITS-2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA of 362 characters. Species investigated were D. adelpha, D. balteata, D. barberi, D. cristata, D. lemniscata, D. longicornis, D. porracea, D. speciosa, D. undecimpunctata howardi, D. u. undecimpunctata, D. virgifera virgifera, D. v. zeae, D. viridula, and outgroup A. blandulum and A. vittatum. Maximum parsimony (MP), minimum evolution (ME), and maximum likelihood (ML) analyses of combined COI and ITS-2 sequences clearly place species into their traditional morphological species groups with MP and ME analyses resulting in identical topologies. Results generally confer with a prior work based on allozyme data, but within the virgifera species group, D. barberi and D. longicornis strongly resolve as sister taxa as well as monophyletic with the neotropical species, D. viridula, D. cristata and D. lemniscata also resolve as sister taxa. Both relationships are not in congruence with the prior allozyme-based hypothesis. Within the fucata species group, D. speciosa and D. balteata resolve as sister taxa. Results also strongly supported the D. virgifera and D. undecimpunctata subspecies complexes. Our proposed phylogeny provides some insight into current hypotheses regarding distribution status and evolution of various life history traits for Diabrotica. PMID:11520353

  10. Updated distribution of Osmoderma eremita in Abruzzo (Italy and agro-pastoral practices affecting its conservation (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae

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    Patrizia Giangregorio

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available New records of Osmoderma eremita (Scopoli, 1763 (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Cetoniinae are reported for Abruzzo (Italy, together with a review of its distribution in this region. O. eremita is a saproxylic beetle dependent on the presence of hollow deciduous trees with abundant wood mould in their cavities. The major threats for the species are habitat loss and fragmentation. EU Habitats Directive requests to the member States its protection and the monitoring of its conservation status. Detection of its occurrence is the first step to protect the species. The surveys have been carried out in ten sites of Abruzzo by using black cross-windows traps baited with specific pheromone. The species has been recorded for the first time in the Sant’Antonio forest and its presence is confirmed in the Peligna Valley, after a decade. The populations seem to be confined to small patches of suitable habitats. At local level, the abandonment of the pollarding practice (willow and beech forests and the use of pollarded trees as biomass for fuel are the major threats for this species. Indeed some key actions, such as the protection of old hollow trees and the continuation of pollarding practice in rural landscape, could be key factors for the conservation strategies of the species in the study area.

  11. Population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of beetles (Coleoptera: Histeridae and Staphylinidae) from the Sonoran Desert associated with rotting columnar cacti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiler, Edward; Johnson, Sarah; Richmond, Maxi Polihronakis; Markow, Therese A

    2013-12-01

    Dozens of arthropod species are known to feed and breed in the necrotic tissues (rots) of columnar cacti in the Sonoran Desert. Because the necrotic patches are ephemeral, the associated arthropods must continually disperse to new cacti and therefore the populations of any given species are expected to show very little local genetic differentiation. While this has been found to be true for the cactophilic Drosophila, the evolutionary histories and characteristics of other arthropods inhabiting the same necrotic patches, especially the beetles, have yet to be examined. Here we used nucleotide sequence data from segments of the mitochondrial 16S rRNA and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) genes to examine population structure and demographic history of three sympatric beetle species (Coleoptera: Histeridae and Staphylinidae) collected on senita cactus (Lophocereus schottii) from six widely-separated localities on the Baja California peninsula of northwestern Mexico. Two histerids, Iliotona beyeri and Carcinops gilensis, and an unidentified staphylinid, Belonuchus sp., showed little or no population structure over a broad geographic area on the peninsula, consistent with the prediction that these beetles should show high dispersal ability. Demographic tests revealed varying levels of historical population expansion among the beetle species analyzed, which are discussed in light of their ecologies and concurrent biogeographic events. Additionally, phylogenetic analyses of COI sequences in Carcinops collected on a variety of columnar cacti from both peninsular and mainland Mexico localities revealed several species-level partitions, including a putative undescribed peninsular species that occurred sympatrically with C. gilensis on senita. PMID:23948866

  12. Incidence of turf-damaging white grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and associated pathogens and parasitoids on Kentucky golf courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, Carl T; Potter, Daniel A

    2010-12-01

    Root-feeding grubs (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) were sampled from damaged areas of 61 irrigated roughs on 32 Kentucky golf courses to determine species composition and natural enemy incidence, the first such survey in the United States' transitional turfgrass climatic zone. Masked chafers (Cyclocephala lurida Bland and C. borealis Arrow) and Japanese beetle (Popillia japonica Newman) accounted for ≈73 and 26% of grubs found in an autumn survey, with Cyclocephala spp. predominating at most sites, although mixed infestations were common. Only a few Phyllophaga spp., and no exotic species other than P. japonica were found. Cyclocephala spp. also predominated in seasonal and statewide surveys regardless of whether a course had cool- or warm-season grass fairways. Pathogenic bacteria, Paenibacillus and Serratia spp., and the autumn-active parasitoid Tiphia pygidialis Allen were the main enemies associated with Cyclocephala spp. Predominant enemies of P. japonica were Paenibacillus, Serratia, and Metarhizium spp. in autumn, and eugregarines, Stictospora sp. (probably S. villani Hays and Clopton) and Tiphia vernalis Rohwer in spring. Entomopathogenic nematodes and the microsporidian Ovavesicula popilliae Andreadis & Hanula were nearly absent in our samples. No predictive relationships were found between soil parameters and proportionate abundance of Cyclocephala or P. japonica, or with natural enemy incidence at particular sites. Although incidence of individual enemies was generally low (hosts' prolonged development they may take a significant toll on grub populations. PMID:22182549

  13. Attraction of Tomicus yunnanensis (Coleoptera: Scolytidae to Yunnan Pine Logs with and without Periderm or Phloem: An Effective Monitoring Bait

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    Rong Chun Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Yunnan pine shoot beetle, Tomicus yunnanensis Kirkendall and Faccoli (Coleoptera: Scolytinae is an important pest of Yunnan pine (Pinus yunnanensis Franch in China. Experiments with host log baits were done to develop a pest monitoring system using host tree kairomone. Five Yunnan pine logs (each 10–15 cm diam. × 30-cm long in a trap-log bundle were treated by peeling periderm (outer bark off to expose the phloem, and half of each log was covered with sticky adhesive to capture any attracted adult beetles. Significantly, more beetles were attracted and caught on the periderm-peeled logs (ca 30 beetles/m2 log surface/day than on untreated control logs with adhesive (ca 2.5/m2/day. No significant differences were observed between catches on logs taken from lower or upper halves of Yunnan pines. T. yunnanensis flies mostly during the afternoon according to trap catches throughout the day. Attraction to the periderm-peeled logs decreased considerably when they were peeled further to remove the phloem, indicating phloem volatiles play a role in selection of the host by the beetle. The readily-available log baits appear useful for monitoring pine shoot beetle populations in integrated pest management programs.

  14. Morfología e histología del sistema digestivo del burrito del frambueso Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    VIVIAN MEDEL

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó el estudio morfológico e histológico del sistema digestivo de Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, plaga de importancia económica en el sur de Chile. Esta especie presenta un sistema digestivo característico para la mayoría de los insectos, siendo similar en machos y hembras, pero de mayor longitud en las últimas, llegando a medir el doble del tamaño del insecto. El sistema digestivo es un tubo largo de diámetro variable, dividido en tres regiones: intestino anterior (estomodeo, intestino medio (mesenterón e intestino posterior (proctodeo. Histológicamente presenta un tejido epitelial similar al descrito para otras especies y externamente un tejido muscular, sin diferencias entre machos y hembras. No obstante, presenta características que difieren en otros curculiónidos y coleópteros tales como: ausencia de buche, ubicación y número de los ciegos gástricos, presencia de membrana peritrófica y ausencia de almohadillas rectales.

  15. Occurrence and biology of Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae) parasitising different species of Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Neotropical region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, R B; Cruz, I; Figueiredo, M L C; Pereira, A G; Penteado-Dias, A M

    2012-02-01

    Surveys on Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) in Sete Lagoas city, Minas Gerais state, Brazil, indicated the parasitism of adults of the species Coleomegilla maculata De Geer, 1775, Eriopis connexa (Germar, 1824) and Olla v-nigrum (Mulsant, 1866), by Dinocampus coccinellae (Schrank, 1802) (Hymenoptera; Braconidae: Euphorinae). Since then, the parasitoid have been maintained in its original hosts at the Insect Rearing Laboratory - LACRI of the Brazilian Agricultural Research Institution - Embrapa Milho e Sorgo. Besides the citation of occurrence in Brazil, this work also indicates the parasitoid preference for C. maculata (70% of parasitism), followed by O. v-nigrum (43.3% of parasitism) and E. connexa (36.7% of parasitism). Total life cycle of D. coccinellae was longer on C. maculata (32.4 ± 0.48 days), compared to O. v-nigrum (29.5 ± 0.49 days) and E. connexa (27.8 ± 0.4 days). Due to the relatively high percentage of field parasitism, D. coccinellae can reduce the efficiency of biological pest control by Coccinellidae predators especially in the case of C. maculata. PMID:22437405

  16. Coleoptera families other than Cerambycidae, Curculionidae sensu lato, Chrysomelidae sensu lato and Coccinelidae. Chapter 8.5

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    Olivier Denux

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we consider 274 alien Coleoptera species belonging to 41 of the 137 beetle families in Europe (Cerambycidae, Curculionidae sensu lato, Chrysomelidae sensu lato and Coccinelidae are treated separately elsewhere. Among the families we consider asinvaded the European fauna, Acanthocnemidae and Ptilodactylidae represent new arrivals. Many species-rich families have surprisingly few aliens, whereas some relatively minor families such as Dermestidae, Nitidulidae and Anobiidae have a relatively high representation of alien species. Since the start of the 19th century, the number of coleopteran aliens introduced into Europe has continued to increase. Alien species colonizing Europe derive from a wide range of geographic regions as well as ecozones, but the most important source area is Asia. The countries with the largest number of alien species established are France, Germany and Italy. The majority have been introduced accidentally via international transport mechanisms. The most important route for importation is stored products and crops, followed by transport of wood, then horticultural and ornamental plants. Most alien species in these families are found within anthropogenic habitats in Europe. The introduction of invasive alien beetles in these families has had significant economic impacts, particularly as pests of stored foodstuffs, as well as serious ecological impacts. For example, the buprestid species Agrilus planipennis, recently recorded in Russia, is an important potential economic threat which may also impact the biodiversity associated with ash trees.

  17. Inheritance and Fitness Costs of Resistance to Cry3Bb1 Corn by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, David A; Gassmann, Aaron J

    2015-10-01

    Transgenic crops that produce insecticidal toxins derived from the bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely planted to manage pest insects. One of the primary pests targeted by Bt corn in the United States is western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae). Cry3Bb1 corn for management of western corn rootworm was commercialized in 2003, and beginning in 2009, populations of western corn rootworm with field-evolved resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn were found in Iowa. Here we quantify the magnitude, inheritance, and fitness costs of resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn in two strains (Hopkinton and Cresco) derived from field populations that evolved resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn. For Hopkinton, we found evidence for complete resistance to Cry3Bb1 corn and nonrecessive inheritance. Additionally, no fitness costs of Cry3Bb1 resistance were detected for Hopkinton. For Cresco, resistance was incomplete and recessive, and we detected fitness costs affecting developmental rate, survival to adulthood, and fecundity. These results suggest that variation may exist among field populations in both the inheritance and accompanying fitness costs of resistance. To the extent that field populations exhibit nonrecessive inheritance and a lack of fitness cost, this will favor more rapid evolution of resistance than would be expected when resistance is functionally recessive and is accompanied by fitness costs. PMID:26453731

  18. A DNA barcode library of the beetle reference collection (Insecta: Coleoptera in the National Science Museum, Korea

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    Sang Woo Jung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coleoptera is a group of insects that are most diverse among insect resources. Although used as indicator species and applied in developing new drugs, it is difficult to identify them quickly. Since the development of a method using mitochondrial DNA information for identification, studies have been conducted in Korea to swiftly and accurately identify species. The National Science Museum of Korea (NSMK has been collecting and morphologically identifying domestic reference insects since 2013, and building a database of DNA barcodes with digital images. The NSMK completed construction of a database of digital images and DNA barcodes of 60 beetle species in the Korean National Research Information System. A total of 179 specimens and 60 species were used for the analysis, and the averages of intraspecific and interspecific variations were 0.70±0.45% and 26.34±6.01%, respectively, with variation rates ranging from 0% to 1.45% and 9.83% to 56.23%, respectively.

  19. Revision of the Neotropical diving beetle genus Hydrodessus J. Balfour-Browne, 1953 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Hydroporinae, Bidessini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The Neotropical diving beetle genus Hydrodessus J. Balfour-Browne, 1953 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Bidessini) is revised. Thirty species are recognized. The following new species are described: Hydrodessus bimaculatus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus brevis sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus concolorans sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus continuus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus disjunctus sp. n. (Suriname), Hydrodessus fasciatus sp. n. (Brazil), Hydrodessus imparilis sp. n. (Ecuador), Hydrodessus keithi sp. n. (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador), Hydrodessus kurti sp. n. (Suriname), Hydrodessus kylei sp. n. (Suriname, Venezuela), Hydrodessus laetus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus latotibialis sp. n. (Peru), Hydrodessus maculatus sp. n. (Guyana, Venezuela), Hydrodessus morsus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus palus sp. n. (Venezuela), and Hydrodessus tenuatus sp. n. (Suriname). The following new synonyms are established: Hydrodessus fragrans Spangler, 1985 = Hydrodessus biguttatus (Guignot, 1957) syn. n. and Hydrodessus robinae Spangler, 1985 = Hydrodessus octospilus (Guignot, 1957), syn. n. One species is transferred from Hydrodessus to Amarodytes Régimbart, Amarodytes soekhnandanae (Makhan, 1994), comb. n. Habitus photographs (dorsal and lateral) and photos of the ventral surfaces are provided for most species. Line drawings of male and female genitalia and other diagnostic features are also provided along with distribution maps.

  20. Effects of irradiated diet on longevity and prolificity of successive generations of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman, 1833) (Coleoptera, Bruchidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study was done in the laboratory of Entomology of the Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), University of Sao Paulo, in Piracicaba, State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. This research was carried out to observe the effect of irradiated beans (Phaseolus vulgaris, (L.), cultivar Rosinha) on the longevity and prolificity of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Boheman, 1833) (Coleoptera, Bruchidae). The first part of the study included the rearing of five generations of Zabrotes subfasciatus which were fed with irradiated beans (0, 10, 20, 100 e 200 krad, with a dose rate of approximately 70 krad/h). The second one consisted of growth of seven generations on irradiated beans (0, 100, 500, 1500 and 3000 krad, with a dose rate of approximately 70 krad/h). The data were obtained through daily countings of insect birth and death rates. It was concluded that irradiation modified the nutritional quality of beans, affecting the development of Zabrotes subfasciatus. This effect was studied through the longevity and prolificity, which were altered as compared with the control, once they were higher for the dosis of 1500 and 3000 krad. (author)

  1. Effects of seed type and bruchid genotype on the performance and oviposition behavior of Zabrotes subfasciatus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ERICK D. M. CAMPAN; BETTY BENREY

    2006-01-01

    The effect of different bean varieties on the performance of the bruchid beetle Zabrotes subfasciatus Boheman (Coleoptera: Bruchidae), was determined by using wild and cultivated seeds of the genus Phaseolus. Results showed that the quality of the host plant affected the performance and the oviposition behavior of female beetles. Overall, bruchid performance was higher on cultivated seeds than on wild seeds. It was also found that the oviposition behavior and the performance of their offspring differed between females that originated from wild versus cultivated seeds. We also demonstrated the importance of a genetic component in bruchid performance: longevity, fecundity, larval development, adult For example, on the same host type, some females laid twice as many eggs as females from Thus, the performance and behavior of Z. subfasciatus are not only affected by environmental factors such as the quality of the seeds on which they develop, but also have a genetic basis which can counterbalance a less suitable quality of the host plant. For a crop pest such as Z.subfasciatus, its ability to survive and adapt on host plants of differing quality may be an important attribute to consider for pest management.

  2. Knockdown, residual, and antifeedant activity of pyrethroids and home landscape bioinsecticides against Japanese beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) on Linden foliage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumler, Rebecca E; Potter, Daniel A

    2007-04-01

    Residual toxicity and leaf protection capability of five pyrethroids, professional and home garden azadirachtin formulations, and six other bioinsecticides for the home landscape were evaluated against the Japanese beetle, Popillia japonica Newman (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), on linden, Tilia cordata L. Capacity of intoxicated beetles to recover and subsequently feed and disperse also was evaluated to provide insight on activity characteristics of the different compounds. Intact shoots were sprayed and left in the field for varying intervals before being challenged with beetles in no-choice and choice tests. All pyrethroids except permethrin gave greater leaf protection, knockdown, and kill than did carbaryl, the standard, after 14 d of weathering. Deltamethrin, cyfluthrin, bifenthrin, and lamda-cyhalothrin gave a high level of protection for at least 19 d, and azadirachtin (Azatin XL) deterred feeding in choice tests for as long as 14 d. Home garden formulations containing pyrethrins in canola oil (Pyola) or azadiractin (Neem-Away) gave good short-term (< 3-d) protection. Formulations of capsaicin, rotenone + pyrethrins, kaolin particle film, D-limonene, or garlic extract were ineffective, the latter two formulations being highly phytotoxic to linden. Results of this study should help support updating of guidelines for insecticidal control of Japanese beetles. PMID:17461070

  3. Biology and host preferences of Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), a possible biocontrol agent for Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) in Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Elisabeth; Johnson, M Tracy; Chacón, Eduardo; Anderson, Robert S; Wheeler, Terry A

    2010-12-01

    The introduced plant Miconia calvescens (Melastomataceae) poses a grave threat to Hawaii's native ecosystems and biodiversity. One potential candidate for classical biological control is Cryptorhynchus melastomae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae), a stem-boring weevil from Central and South America. This weevil feeds on M. calvescens in its native Costa Rica and has been successfully reared under greenhouse conditions. Comparison of its environmental conditions in Costa Rica with those in the Miconia infested areas of Hawaii indicates the latter is a suitable habitat for C. melastomae. C. melastomae has one or two generations per year. Adults feed on new stems, petioles, leaf buds, veins, and lamina, whereas larvae mine the stem until pupation. Adults appear to prefer saplings for oviposition and feeding. Under greenhouse conditions both adults and larvae can seriously damage and kill small M. calvescens. Preliminary host testing indicates that C. melastomae may be family specific on Melastomataceae. However, because Hawaii lacks native melastomes and has many other serious melastome weeds, a family specific insect may be suitable as a biocontrol agent in this case. PMID:22182550

  4. Acute toxicity of plant essential oils to scarab larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) and their analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Christopher M; Reding, Michael E; Oliver, Jason B; Moyseenko, James J; Youssef, Nadeer; Krause, Charles R

    2013-02-01

    Larvae of scarab beetles (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) are important contaminant and root-herbivore pests of ornamental crops. To develop alternatives to conventional insecticides, 24 plant-based essential oils were tested for their acute toxicity against third instars of the Japanese beetle Popillia japonica Newman, European chafer Rhizotrogus majalis (Razoumowsky), oriental beetle Anomala orientalis (Waterhouse), and northern masked chafer Cyclocephala borealis Arrow. Diluted solutions were topically applied to the thorax, which allowed for calculating LD50 and LD90 values associated with 1 d after treatment. A wide range in acute toxicity was observed across all four scarab species. Of the 24 oils tested, allyl isothiocyanate, cinnamon leaf, clove, garlic, and red thyme oils exhibited toxicity to all four species. Allyl isothiocyanate was the most toxic oil tested against the European chafer, and among the most toxic against the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, and northern masked chafer. Red thyme was also comparatively toxic to the Japanese beetle, oriental beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer. Interspecific variability in susceptibility to the essential oils was documented, with 12, 11, 8, and 6 of the 24 essential oils being toxic to the oriental beetle, Japanese beetle, European chafer, and northern masked chafer, respectively. Analysis of the active oils by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry revealed a diverse array of compounds, mostly consisting of mono- and sesquiterpenes. These results will aid in identifying active oils and their constituents for optimizing the development of plant essential oil mixtures for use against scarab larvae. PMID:23448028

  5. Revision of the Neotropical diving beetle genus Hydrodessus J. Balfour-Browne, 1953 (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Hydroporinae, Bidessini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Kelly B

    2016-01-01

    The Neotropical diving beetle genus Hydrodessus J. Balfour-Browne, 1953 (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae: Hydroporinae: Bidessini) is revised. Thirty species are recognized. The following new species are described: Hydrodessus bimaculatus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus brevis sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus concolorans sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus continuus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus disjunctus sp. n. (Suriname), Hydrodessus fasciatus sp. n. (Brazil), Hydrodessus imparilis sp. n. (Ecuador), Hydrodessus keithi sp. n. (Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador), Hydrodessus kurti sp. n. (Suriname), Hydrodessus kylei sp. n. (Suriname, Venezuela), Hydrodessus laetus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus latotibialis sp. n. (Peru), Hydrodessus maculatus sp. n. (Guyana, Venezuela), Hydrodessus morsus sp. n. (Venezuela), Hydrodessus palus sp. n. (Venezuela), and Hydrodessus tenuatus sp. n. (Suriname). The following new synonyms are established: Hydrodessus fragrans Spangler, 1985 = Hydrodessus biguttatus (Guignot, 1957) syn. n. and Hydrodessus robinae Spangler, 1985 = Hydrodessus octospilus (Guignot, 1957), syn. n. One species is transferred from Hydrodessus to Amarodytes Régimbart, Amarodytes soekhnandanae (Makhan, 1994), comb. n. Habitus photographs (dorsal and lateral) and photos of the ventral surfaces are provided for most species. Line drawings of male and female genitalia and other diagnostic features are also provided along with distribution maps. PMID:27110208

  6. Developmental Biology and Effects of Adult Diet on Consumption, Longevity, and Fecundity of Colaspis crinicornis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miwa, Kentaro; Meinke, Lance J

    2015-01-01

    The chrysomelid beetle Colaspis crinicornis Schaeffer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) occurs primarily in the Great Plains region of the United States. Little is known about the biology and ecology of this species, but over the last decade, it has become increasingly common in the corn, Zea mays L., and soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merrill, agroecosystem of southeastern Nebraska. As part of a larger comprehensive project to understand the natural history and pest potential of this species, laboratory experiments were conducted to study the developmental biology, morphological characters of immature stages, and the effect of adult diet on consumption, longevity, and fecundity. Females readily deposited egg clusters in the soil, and percentage egg hatch was high under laboratory conditions. Larvae and pupae were confirmed to be soil-dwelling stages. C. crinicornis has relatively short egg, pupal, and adult stages with the majority of its life cycle spent in the larval stage. Results of choice and no-choice adult feeding experiments indicate that diets of corn or soybean leaves did not significantly affect consumption, longevity, or fecundity of adult C. crinicornis, suggesting that corn and soybean leaves are similarly suitable food sources for adults. The ability to effectively utilize tissues from very different plant families as adult food sources suggests that C. crinicornis is polyphagous in the field. PMID:26106090

  7. Repellent Activity of the Essential Oil from the Heartwood of Pilgerodendron uviferum (D. Don) Florin against Aegorhinus superciliosus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Javier; Urzúa, Alejandro; Tampe, Jocelyne; Parra, Leonardo; Quiroz, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The weevil Aegorhinus superciliosus Guérin (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), which is endemic to Central-Southern Chile and Argentina, is one of the major berry pests in Chile and the most important pest in the La Araucanía Region (38°44'9″S, 72°35'25″W). Due to the poor effectiveness and problems surrounding the implementation of the traditional control methods using organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, new strategies for controlling this pest are needed. In this communication, we evaluated the behavioral responses of male and female A. superciliosus to volatile compounds released from the essential oil (EO) obtained from the heartwood of Pilgerodendron uviferum (D. Don) Florin using olfactometric bioassays. The composition of the EO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). According to these analyses, δ-cadinol (24.16%), cubenol (22.64%), 15-copaenol (15.46%) and δ-cadinene (10.81%) were the principal components of the EO. The Pilgerodendron uviferum EO, which is almost exclusively composed of sesquiterpenes (99.5%), exhibited a repellent effect against A. superciliosus adults, regardless of the sex or concentration used (56.6 mg/cm³ and 1.58 × 10(-2) mg/cm³). The EO has low volatility and greater persistence than the EOs composed of monoterpenes and is considered a good model in the search for raspberry weevil repellents. PMID:27110756

  8. Keeping "Community" in a Community Land Trust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Karen A.; Galande, Mugdha

    2011-01-01

    This instrumental case study examined the role of grassroots community organizing in a community land trust (CLT) in a southern U.S. city. Twenty-nine homeowners, renters, board members, community members, and current and former CLT employees were interviewed. In addition, two focus groups of 11 and six participants composed of CLT residents and…

  9. Protestant communities as mission communities / by Hyun Jin Kim

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Huyan Jin

    2011-01-01

    Community is an integrative motif and the central message of the Bible. The divine goal of history is God's establishment of community. The Triune God is the origin of community and community is the mode of existence of God. Christian community is derived from God's community. The church is a community restored by the Triune God, and so the essence of the church is Christian community. The Bible is the history of community involving the beginning of community, the destruction of community, th...

  10. Calliini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae: descrições, homonímia, novo registro e chave para as espécies de Graminea Thomson, 1864

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Calliini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae: descrições, homonímia, novo registro e chave para as espécies de Graminea Thomson, 1864. Espécies novas descritas: Paracallia giesberti sp. nov. da Bolívia (Cochabamba, Colombicallia albofasciata sp. nov. e Graminea rubra sp. nov. da Bolívia (Santa Cruz; Asemolea flava sp. nov. da Costa Rica, (Heredia; Callia potiaiuba sp. nov. do Brasil (Rondônia e da Bolívia (Cochabamba e Santa Cruz. É proposto o nome Rumuara nom. nov. para Paracladus Martins & Galileo, 1990 non Carpenter, 1966 (Orthoptera. Apresenta-se novo registro para a Bolívia para Eumimesis trilineata Magno & Monné, 1990. Acrescenta-se chave para as espécies de Graminea.Calliini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae: descriptions, homonym, new record and key to the species of Graminea Thomson,1864. New species described: Paracallia giesberti sp. nov. from Bolivia (Cochabamba, Colombicallia albofasciata sp. nov. and Graminea rubra sp. nov. from Bolivia (Santa Cruz; Asemolea flava sp. nov. from Costa Rica, (Heredia; Callia potiaiuba sp. nov. from Brazil (Rondônia and Bolivia (Cochabamba and Santa Cruz. Rumuara nom. nov. is proposed for Paracladus Martins & Galileo, 1990 non Carpenter, 1966 (Orthoptera. Eumimesis trilineata Magno & Monné, 1990 is recorded for Bolivia. A key to the species of Graminea is added.

  11. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the sex-determination gene doublesex in the sexually dimorphic broad-horned beetle Gnatocerus cornutus (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Hiroki; Ishiguro, Mai; Nishikawa, Hideto; Morita, Shinichi; Okada, Kensuke; Miyatake, Takahisa; Yaginuma, Toshinobu; Niimi, Teruyuki

    2016-01-01

    Various types of weapon traits found in insect order Coleoptera are known as outstanding examples of sexually selected exaggerated characters. It is known that the sex determination gene doublesex (dsx) plays a significant role in sex-specific expression of weapon traits in various beetles belonging to the superfamily Scarabaeoidea. Although sex-specific weapon traits have evolved independently in various Coleopteran groups, developmental mechanisms of sex-specific expression have not been studied outside of the Scarabaeoidea. In order to test the hypothesis that dsx-dependent sex-specific expression of weapon traits is a general mechanism among the Coleoptera, we have characterized the dsx in the sexually dimorphic broad-horned beetle Gnatocerus cornutus (Tenebrionidea, Tenebirionidae). By using molecular cloning, we identified five splicing variants of Gnatocerus cornutus dsx (Gcdsx), which are predicted to code four different isoforms. We found one male-specific variant (GcDsx-M), two female-specific variants (GcDsx-FL and GcDsx-FS) and two non-sex-specific variants (correspond to a single isoform, GcDsx-C). Knockdown of all Dsx isoforms resulted in intersex phenotype both in male and female. Also, knockdown of all female-specific isoforms transformed females to intersex phenotype, while did not affect male phenotype. Our results clearly illustrate the important function of Gcdsx in determining sex-specific trait expression in both sexes. PMID:27404087

  12. Notas e descrições em Acanthoderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. I. Novos táxons, nova sinonímia e novos registros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara R. Martins

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Notas e descrições em Acanthoderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. I. Novos táxons e novos registros. Descrição de espécies novas: Zikanita egregia sp. nov. (Bolívia, Santa Cruz; Dufauxia thomasi sp. nov. (Bolívia, Santa Cruz; Irundisaua punctata sp. nov. (Colômbia, Cauca; Cotyzineus gen. nov., espécie-tipo C. bruchi (Melzer, 1931 comb. nov. Novos registros: Zikanita argenteofasciata (Tippmann, 1960 é assinalada para o Brasil (Maranhão e Cotyzineus bruchi para a Bolívia (Santa Cruz. Novo sinônimo: Ateralphus diringsi Martins & Monné, 1993 = A. javariensis Lane, 1965.Notes and descriptions on Acanthoderini (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. I. New taxa and new records. New taxa described: Zikanita egregia, sp. nov. from Bolivia (Santa Cruz; Dufauxia thomasi sp. nov. from Bolivia (Santa Cruz; Irundisaua punctata sp. nov. from Colombia (Cauca; Cotyzineus gen. nov. type species C. bruchi (Melzer, 1931 comb. nov. New records: Zikanita argenteofasciata (Tippmann, 1960 for Brazil (Maranhão; Cotyzineus bruchi for Bolivia (Santa Cruz. New synomym: Ateralphus diringsi Martins & Monné, 1993 = A. javariensis Lane, 1965.

  13. Impact of wildfire on the edaphic microarthropod community in a Pinus pinaster forest in central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the response of the soil microarthropod community to wildfire in forest ecosystems. The edaphic microarthropod communities of pine stands burned in 2001, in 2009, both in 2001 and in 2009, in 2012 were compared to an area never burned. Sampling was conducted in the spring and autumn of 2011 and 2012 in the areas burned in 2001, in 2009 and those never burned, while in the area burned in 2012, soil samples were collected in March (10 days after fire, June and September. The abundance and biodiversity of the microarthropod community were assessed. A multitemporal analysis was also carried out to assess the effect of fire on soil microarthropod abundance 5 months, 2-3 years and 10-11 years after fire. The results showed that the abundance of edaphic microarthropod communities decreased dramatically in areas burned twice, but also in areas burned once in 2009 and five months after the fire in the area burned in 2012. Different taxonomic groups did not seem to respond to fire in the same way, some taxa being more sensitive than others. Pseudoscorpionida decreased in both the short- and the long-term, while Diplopoda, Thysanoptera and Symphyla showed a reduction in the intermediate- and long-term. In the short-term, Diptera and Coleoptera larvae appeared to be the most influenced taxonomic groups. Our study shows that biomonitoring is a valuable tool to investigate the reaction of forest ecosystems to fire, and that edaphic microarthropods can provide interesting answers about the direct and indirect effects of fire on soil.

  14. Comparative analysis of microbial diversity in Longitarsus flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Scott T; Dobler, Susanne

    2011-05-01

    Herbivorous beetles comprise a significant fraction of eukaryotic biodiversity and their plant-feeding adaptations make them notorious agricultural pests. Despite more than a century of research on their ecology and evolution, we know little about the diversity and function of their symbiotic microbial communities. Recent culture-independent molecular studies have shown that insects possess diverse gut microbial communities that appear critical for their survival. In this study, we combined culture-independent methods and high-throughput sequencing strategies to perform a comparative analysis of Longitarsus flea-beetles microbial community diversity (MCD). This genus of beetle herbivores contains host plant specialists and generalists that feed on a diverse array of toxic plants. Using a deep-sequencing approach, we characterized the MCD of eleven Longitarsus species across the genus, several of which represented independent shifts to the same host plant families. Database comparisons found that Longitarsus-associated microbes came from two habitat types: insect guts and the soil rhizosphere. Statistical clustering of the Longitarsus microbial communities found little correlation with the beetle phylogeny, and uncovered discrepancies between bacterial communities extracted directly from beetles and those from frass. A Principal Coordinates Analysis also found some correspondence between beetle MCD and host plant family. Collectively, our data suggest that environmental factors play a dominant role in shaping Longitarsus MCD and that the root-feeding beetle larvae of these insects are inoculated by soil rhizosphere microbes. Future studies will investigate MCD of select Longitarsus species across their geographic ranges and explore the connection between the soil rhizosphere and the beetle MCD. PMID:20844936

  15. Bayesian community detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Schmidt, Mikkel N

    2012-01-01

    community detection consistent with an intuitive definition of communities and present a Markov chain Monte Carlo procedure for inferring the community structure. A Matlab toolbox with the proposed inference procedure is available for download. On synthetic and real networks, our model detects communities...

  16. Community development planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The focus of this paper will be methods of local community involvement in the community development planning efforts which will be required at the recommended sites. Community development planning will include capital improvement plans, housing plans, zoning changes, business development plans and other community service and fiscal plans required to meet the projected needs of new residents as a result of the repository construction and operation. This paper will present, (1) the need for community planning, (2) methods of responding to community planning needs, (3) current community planning issues to be addressed. 2 references, 1 figure

  17. Aspectos biológicos de Coccidophilus citricola (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae sobre Aspidiotus nerii e Chrysomphalus aonidum (Homoptera, Diaspididae Biological studies of Coccidophilus citricola (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae on Aspidiotus nerii and Chrysomphalus aonidum (Homoptera, Diaspididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Cesar dos Santos

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Aspectos biológicos de Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes (Coleoptera, Coccinellidae foram estudados sobre Chrysomphalus aonidum Linnaeus e Aspidiotus nerii Bouchè (Homoptera, Diaspididae criadas sobre abóbora. Observou-se a duraç��o (dias do período de ovo, dos quatro ínstares, pré-pupa, pupa, longevidade de adultos e a proporção machos: fêmeas de C. citricola. Determinou-se também verificar a eficiência de predação de adultos de C. citricola sobre A. nerii. C. aonidum e A. nerii são presas adequadas para C. citricola, com desenvolvimento semelhante do coccinelídeo sobre essas cochonilhas; o período de incubação do ovo foi de 7,9 e 8,1 dias com A. nerii e C. aonidum; a duração (dias de cada ínstar larval de C. citricola sobre A. nerii e C. aonidum foram respectivamente de: (I 2,7 e 2,9; (II 3,1 e 3,3; (III 3,0 e 3,3 e (IV 3,2 e 3,1 dias. A duração das fases de pré-pupa e pupa foi de 2,5 e 4,5 dias sobre A. nerii e 2,8 e 4,8 dias sobre C. aonidum e a viabilidade de ovo a adulto foi de 63,2% e 62,7% respectivamente para indivíduos criados sobre essas presas. A longevidade de adultos de C. citricola foi de 57,0 dias com A. nerii e de 62,0 dias com C. aonidum. A proporção macho: fêmea foi de 0,82:1,00. O consumo diário de C. citricola foi de 1,15 adultos ou 2,35 ninfas de 2o ínstar ou 3,16 ninfas de 1o ínstar de A. nerii por dia.Laboratory trials were carried out to study biological aspects of Coccidophilus citricola Brèthes (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae on Chrysomphalus aonidum Linnaeus and Aspidiotus nerii Bouché (Homoptera: Diaspididae. The scales were reared on squashes and then served as food source to the predator. The period of egg, larvae (four ínstars, pre-pupae, pupae, adults’ longevity and male: female ratio was observed. Predatory efficacy of C. citricola on A. nerii was also determined. The period of egg was 7.9 and 8.1 days on A. nerii and C. aonidum. The development (days of different stages of C

  18. Viabilidade de sementes de trigo tratadas com fenitrotion e infestadas por Sitophilus oryzae (L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae durante o armazenamento Viability of stored wheat seeds when treated with fenitrothion and infested by Sitophilus oryzae (L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Helena de Almeida Zeituni Plazas

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available O esclarecimento de aspectos do comportamento de gorgulhos (Sitophilus spp. em sementes de trigo armazenadas e o acompanhamento da qualidade física e fisiológica das sementes neste contexto, é essencial para aprimorar o monitoramento das sementes durante a armazenagem. Com o objetivo de avaliar a eficiência do inseticida fenitrotion, quanto à proteção oferecida às sementes de trigo contra os insetos Sitophilus oryzae (L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae e de acompanhar a germinação das sementes tratadas ou não com inseticida, durante o armazenamento, sementes de trigo dos cultivares IAC-120 e IAC-350 foram tratadas ou não com fenitrotion três meses após a colheita e armazenadas em condições de ambiente de laboratório, em Campinas (SP, durante 15 meses. Em intervalos trimestrais, adultos de S. oryzae foram colocados nas amostras de sementes de cada uma das repetições dos tratamentos com insetos. Avaliou-se a sobrevivência desses insetos, bem como a progênie resultante. Em seguida, as sementes das amostras das repetições de todos os tratamentos com e sem insetos foram analisadas quanto ao grau de umidade, germinação e infestação por insetos. O inseticida fenitrotion, na dose recomendada pelo fabricante, não permitiu a proteção das sementes contra a infestação por S. oryzae, mesmo por períodos curtos de dois meses e que, na ausência de insetos, as sementes de trigo com elevado potencial de germinação inicial podem mantê-lo inalterado por períodos de 14 a 17 meses após a colheita, quando armazenadas em condições ambientes, em regiões com clima semelhante ao de Campinas.Clarifying aspects of the weevils (Sitophilus spp. behavior on stored wheat seeds, considering the seed quality, is essential to improve the seed management during storage. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the insecticide fenitrothion as protecting wheat seeds against Sitophilus oryzae (L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae and to measure the seed

  19. 太湖湿地昆虫群落的生态位%Ecological Niches of Insect Community in Taihu Wetland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩争伟; 马玲; 张曼胤; 石小亮

    2014-01-01

    To understand the structure of insect community and insight into its inner connections,we classified insect communities in Taihu Wetland into different groups based on their taxonomic status and analyzed the relationships of niches between the groups in this study. The results showed that the spatial niche breadth,temporal niche breadth and temporal-spatial niche breadth were obviously different between different groups,indicating the groups fully utilized resources in Taihu Wetland. Among these groups,Hemiptera community had the widest temporal-spatial niche breadth,reflecting Hemiptera insects had the widest distribution and longest activity period; By contrast Dermaptera community had the narrowest temporal-spatial niche breadth,showing Dermaptera insects needed strict habitats and had relatively narrow distribution. Diptera and Coleoptera had relatively large spatial-temporal niche overlap value,which indicated that they had similar unitization of resource and a predator-prey or competitive relationship could be existed between the two groups in Taihu Wetland.

  20. Addenda and Corrigenda to the Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera, volumes 7 and 8 (Curculionoidea

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    Alonso-Zarazaga, Miguel A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Additions, corrections, comments and nomenclatural novelties for the volumes 7 and 8 of the Catalogue of Palaearctic Coleoptera are provided. For the exact authorship of these check the text. One new species is described: Mecinus tavaresi Caldara & Fogato, sp. nov. from Portugal and Spain. New synonymies are: Compsapoderus (Compsapoderus erythropterus (Gmelin, 1790 = Attelabus intermedius Hellwig, 1795, syn. nov.; Paroplapoderus (Erycapoderus angulipennis (Kolbe, 1886 = Paroplapoderus (Erycapoderus angulipennis shaanxinsis Legalov, 2004, syn. nov. (Attelabidae; Aspidapion (Koestlinia aeneum (Fabricius, 1775 = Aspidapion (Koestlinia motschulskyi (Hochhuth, 1847, syn. nov., Taeniapion rufescens (Gyllenhal, 1833 = Taeniapion notatum (Wagner, 1912, syn. nov. (Apionidae; Larinus (Larinomesius scolymi (Olivier, 1807 = Curculio teres Hellwig, 1795, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Lixus paraplecticus (Linnaeus, 1758 = Curculio phellandrii Linnaeus, 1764, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Curculio alternans Hellwig, 1795= Curculio alternans Herbst, 1795, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Sibinia lyrata Faust, 1889= Sibinia attalica var. judea Pic, 1901, syn. nov. (Curculionidae; Phyllobius (Metaphyllobius pomaceus Gyllenhal, 1834= Curculio prasinus Olivier, 1791, syn. nov. (Curculionidae. New homonymies are: Attelabus intermedius Hellwig, 1795 (non Attelabus intermedius Illiger, 1794; Baris marshalli Ramesha & Ramamurthy, 2011 (non Baris marshalli Hustache, 1938. New replacement names are: Baris ramamurthyi Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Baris bimaculata Pajni & Kohli, 1990 (non Hustache, 1932; Archarius (Archarius kwonleeanus Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Archarius (Archarius parvus (Kwon & Lee, 1990 (non Archarius (Archarius parvus (Hong & Wang, 1987, a fossil species; Curculio (Curculio zhangianus Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Curculio (Curculio helleri Pelsue & Zhang, 2002 (non Curculio (Curculio helleri (Voss, 1932; Lixus trichromus Alonso-Zarazaga nom. nov. for Lixus

  1. Rediscovering community: Interethnic relationships and community gardening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    August John Hoffman

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Community service work, volunteerism and mentoring have recently become popular topics of research as effective methods in improving self-esteem and civic responsibility. In the current study we explored the relationship between participation in a community service gardening program and ethnocentrism. We hypothesised that an inverse correlation would emerge where students who participated in a community service-gardening program would increase their perceptions of the importance of community service work and decrease their scores in ethnocentrism. Results of the paired samples t-test strongly support the hypothesis that community service gardening work significantly reduces reports of ethnocentrism: t(10 = -2.52, (p < .03 for community college students. The ramifications of the study and ramifications for future research are offered.

  2. From Community Detection to Community Deception

    CERN Document Server

    Fionda, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    The community deception problem is about how to hide a target community C from community detection algorithms. The need for deception emerges whenever a group of entities (e.g., activists, police enforcements) want to cooperate while concealing their existence as a community. In this paper we introduce and formalize the community deception problem. To solve this problem, we describe algorithms that carefully rewire the connections of C's members. We experimentally show how several existing community detection algorithms can be deceived, and quantify the level of deception by introducing a deception score. We believe that our study is intriguing since, while showing how deception can be realized it raises awareness for the design of novel detection algorithms robust to deception techniques.

  3. Isolation and Identification of Cellulolytic Bacteria from the Gut of Holotrichia parallela Larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Hongyu Zhang; Ping Sheng; Shengwei Huang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, 207 strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from the gut of Holotrichia parallela larvae. These bacterial isolates were assigned to 21 genotypes by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). A partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis and standard biochemical and physiological tests were used for the assignment of the 21 representative isolates. Our results show that the cellulolytic bacterial community is dominated by the Proteoba...

  4. Cellulolytic Bacteria Associated with the Gut of Dendroctonus armandi Larvae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Xia Hu; Jiamin Yu; Chunyan Wang; Hui Chen

    2014-01-01

    The object of this study was to investigate the cellulolytic bacterial community in the intestine of the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi) larvae. A total of 91 cellulolytic bacteria were isolated and assigned to 11 genotypes using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis and morphological tests were used to assign the 11 representative isolates. The results showed that the isolates belonged to α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria a...

  5. Pepper Weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Preferences for Specific Pepper Cultivars, Plant Parts, Fruit Colors, Fruit Sizes, and Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Dakshina R; Martin, Cliff G

    2016-01-01

    Peppers (Capsicum spp.) are an important crop in the USA, with about 32,000 ha cultivated in 2007, which resulted in $588 million in farm revenue. The pepper weevil, Anthonomus eugenii Cano (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), is the most troublesome insect pest of peppers in the southern United States. It is therefore urgent to find different vulnerabilities of pepper cultivars, fruit and plants parts, fruit colors and sizes, and timing to infestation by A. eugenii. Also relevant is testing whether fruit length and infestation state affect fruit numbers, weights, and proportions of fruit that are infested. Counts of A. eugenii adults and marks from oviposition and feeding suggested that C. chinense Jacquin "Habanero" was least susceptible, and C. annuum L. cultivars "SY" and "SR" were most susceptible. Comparison of plant parts and fruit sizes revealed that A. eugenii preferred the peduncle, calyx, and top of pepper fruits over the middle, bottom, leaves, or remainder of flowers. Anthonomus eugenii does not discriminate between green or yellow fruit color nor vary diurnally in numbers. Based on adult counts, medium to extra-large fruits (≥1.5 cm long) attracted more weevils than small fruits (<1.5 cm). However based on proportions of fruit numbers or fruit weights that were infested, there were no differences between large and small fruits. Choice of pepper cultivar can thus be an important part of an IPM cultural control program designed to combat A. eugenii by reduced susceptibility or by synchronous fruit drop of infested fruits. Our results are potentially helpful in developing scouting programs including paying particular attention to the preferred locations of adults and their sites of feeding and oviposition on the fruit. The results also suggested the potential value of spraying when the fruits are still immature to prevent and control infestation. PMID:26959066

  6. Taxonomic revision of Madagascan Rhantus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae with an emphasis on Manjakatompo as a conservation priority

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Hjalmarsson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the diving-beetle genus Rhantus Dejean of Madagascar (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae, Colymbetinae based on museum collection holdings and recently collected expedition material. Both morphology and DNA is used to test species boundaries, in particular whether newly collected material from the Tsaratanana mountains in the north represent a new species or are conspecific with Rhantus manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi 2009, described based on a single male specimen from the central Ankaratra mountains. DNA of the holotype of R. manjakatompo was successfully extracted in a non-destructive way and sequenced. The general mixed Yule coalescent model applied to an ultrametric tree constructed from mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI sequence data delimited three species. Morphological characters supported the same species unambiguously. We therefore recognise three species of Rhantus to occur in Madagascar: R. latus (Fairmaire, 1869, R. bouvieri Régimbart, 1900 and R. manjakatompo Pederzani and Rocchi, 2009. All three species are endemic to Madagascar and restricted to the highlands of the island. Rhantus stenonychus Régimbart, 1895, syn. n., is considered a junior synonym of R. latus. We designate lectotypes for R. bouvieri and R. goudoti Sharp, 1882, the latter a junior synonym of R. latus. We provide descriptions, a determination key, SEM-images of fine pronotal and elytral structures, distribution maps, habitus photos, and illustrations of male genitalia and pro- and mesotarsal claws. We discuss the role of the Manjakatompo forest as a refugium for Madagascan Rhantus diversity and other endemics of the montane central high plateau.

  7. Potential of two entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), as biological control agents against the June beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erler, Fedai; Ates, A Ozgur

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the entomopathogenic fungi (EPF), Beauveria bassiana (Bals.) Vuill. (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes) strain PPRI 5339 [BroadBand, an emulsifiable spore concentrate (EC) formulation] and Metarhizium anisopliae (Metsch.) Sorokin (Hypocreales: Clavicipitaceae) strain F52 [Met52, both EC and granular (GR) formulations] against the larvae of Polyphylla fullo (L.) (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Larvicidal bioassays were performed in foam boxes (100 by 75 by 50 cm; length by width by height), containing moist soil medium with some humus and potato tubers as food. Although the B. bassiana product (min. 4 × 10(9) conidia/ml) was applied at 100, 150, and 200 ml/100 l water; M. anisopliae strain F52 was applied at 500, 1,000, and 1,500 g/m(3) of moist soil medium for GR (9 × 10(8) cfu/g) and 75, 100, and 125 ml/100 l water for EC (5.5 × 10(9) conidia/ml) formulation. Both fungi were pathogenic to larvae of the pest; however, young larvae (1st and 2nd instars) were more susceptible to infection than older ones (3rd instar). Mortality rates of young and older larvae varied with conidial concentration of both fungi and elapsed time after application. The B. bassiana product was more effective than both of the formulations of the M. anisopliae product, causing mortalities up to 79.8 and 71.6% in young and older larvae, respectively. The highest mortality rates of young and older larvae caused by the M. anisopliae product were 74.1 and 67.6% for the GR formulation, 70.2 and 61.8% for the EC formulation, respectively. These results may suggest that both fungi have potential to be used for management of P. fullo. PMID:25881632

  8. Determinants of acute mortality of Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) to ultra-low volume permethrin used for mosquito management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preftakes, Collin J.; Bodin, Jennifer L.; Brown, Christopher R.; Piccolomini, Alyssa M.; Schleier, Jerome J.

    2016-01-01

    There are relatively few experimental studies and risk assessments of the effects on non-target insects from ultra-low volume (ULV) insecticides used for management of adult mosquitoes. Therefore, we evaluated factors that may influence the ability of an insect to intercept the insecticide at the time of application by using Hippodamia convergens (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in field bioassay experiments in 2011 and 2015. Treatment factors included different distances, two cage heights (ground-level and 1.5 m above ground) to the point of the application, and covered vs. uncovered cage faces (2015 only). Insecticides used included a water-based formulation (Aqua-Reslin®) and an oil-based formulation (Permanone® 30-30) of permethrin. Cage height was highly significant both years, with much less acute (i.e., short-term exposure) mortality at ground-level compared with 1.5 m. In 2011, acute mortality was less at ground-level (mean = 3.2%, median = 0%) compared to 1.5 m (mean = 85.2%, median = 100%). Cage type also was highly significant, with less mortality in covered cages compared to uncovered cages. Mortality by cage height and cage type was as follows: ground level, covered cage (mean = 2.8%, median = 0.1%); ground level, uncovered cage (mean = 41.9%, median = 9.6%); 1.5 m, covered cage (mean = 6.8%, median = 0%); 1.5 m, uncovered cage (mean = 83.7%, median = 100%). Results suggest that acute mortality to non-target insects may vary considerably based on their height and their ability to directly intercept the insecticide as the aerosol passes through the area being sprayed. PMID:27366655

  9. Host Resistance of Five Fraxinus Species to Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) and Effects of Paclobutrazol and Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanis, Sara R; Mccullough, Deborah G

    2015-04-01

    Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) has killed millions of Fraxinus spp. trees in North America. While all Fraxinus species assessed to date can be colonized, A. planipennis attraction to host trees varies among species and with tree health. We established a plantation of 105 trees (21 trees each of four North American species Fraxinus americana L., Fraxinus nigra Marshall, Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall, Fraxinus quadrangulata Michaux, and the Asian species, Fraxinus mandshurica Ruprecht), and determined whether resistance to A. planipennis could be enhanced by fertilizer or paclobutrazol applications. Differences among species overshadowed most treatment effects. In 2010, A. planipennis survival over 14 d was 53% when beetles were caged with F. nigra, 30-32% when beetles were caged with F. americana, F. pennsylvanica, or F. mandshurica, and only 14% for beetles caged with F. quadrangulata. In 2011, beetle survival was lower for beetles caged with F. quadrangulata (33%) than F. americana (72%) or F. mandshurica (80%). In 2010 and 2011, leaf weight consumed by beetles was the same among Fraxinus species. However, beetles caged on F. quadrangulata consumed less leaf area than that by beetles caged with other ash species. In 2011, when trees were exposed to wild A. planipennis, larval density (per m(2)) was highest on F. nigra (235.9 ± 36.41) and F. pennsylvanica (220.1 ± 39.77), intermediate on F. americana (40.7 ± 11.61), and lowest on F. quadrangulata and F. mandshurica (2.0 ± 0.98 and 1.5 ± 0.67, respectively). Results indicate F. quadrangulata and F. mandshurica were relatively resistant to A. planipennis, F. nigra and F. pennsylvanica were highly vulnerable, and F. americana was intermediate. PMID:26313182

  10. All European Ash Species are Susceptible to Emerald Ash Borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae – a Far Eastern Invader

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    Yu. N. Baranchikov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerald ash borer Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae – an example of a destructive invasive insect which abruptly enlarged its initially East-Asian area in 80–90s of the previous century. Nowadays this species is the main pest of ash (Fraxinus trees in USA and Canada and is quickly spreading over 11 administrative regions of Russia. It is very important to determine a list of possible host plants of A. planipennis for the pest risk assessment of invasion of this pest over the territory of Central and Western Europe. In its native area – North-Eastern Asia – this buprestid is a secondary consumer of dying trees of East-Asian ash species F. сhinensis and F. mandshurica. Healthy trees of these species are highly resistant to the pest. No examples of resistant ash species were found at North American continent. Documentary data are presented for the first time on infestation of three European ash species at the territory of the Main Botanical Garden of the Russian Academy of Sciences in Moscow, Russia by the emerald ash borer. At the first time this pest was registered at the garden in 2011. During the period of 2010–2014 EAB killed from 70 to 100 % of trees of European ash species: Fraxinus excelsior, F. angustifolia (= F. oxycarpa and F. ornus. At the same period from 81 to 90 % of specimens of North American ash species (F. pennsylvanica and F. americana were killed by this buprestid. Simultaneously dead trees of Asian species F. mandshurica and F. chinensis (= F. rhynchophyla did not carry any trace of EAB infestation. This case study is a good example of the «sentinel trees» concept’s usefulness. Arboretums with collections of non-native plants may serve as «ecological traps» for the local pests and pathogens – potential invasive organisms in the source regions of introduced plants.

  11. Effects of host plant and larval density on intraspecific competition in larvae of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jian J; Larson, Kristi; Watt, Tim; Gould, Juli; Lelito, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    Competition for food, mates, and space among different individuals of the same insect species can affect density-dependent regulation of insect abundance or population dynamics. The emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), is a serious invasive pest of North American ash (Fraxinus spp.) trees, with its larvae feeding in serpentine galleries between the interface of sapwood and phloem tissues of ash trees. Using artificial infestation of freshly cut logs of green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) and tropical ash (Fraxinus uhdei [Wenzig] Lingelsh) with a series of egg densities, we evaluated the mechanism and outcome of intraspecific competition in larvae of A. planipennis in relation to larval density and host plant species. Results from our study showed that as the egg densities on each log (1.5-6.5 cm in diameter and 22-25 cm in length) increased from 200 to 1,600 eggs per square meter of surface area, larval survivorship declined from ≍68 to 10% for the green ash logs, and 86 to 55% for tropical ash logs. Accordingly, larval mortality resulting from cannibalism, starvation, or both, significantly increased as egg density increased, and the biomass of surviving larvae significantly decreased on both ash species. When larval density was adjusted to the same level, however, larval mortality from intraspecific competition was significantly higher and mean biomasses of surviving larvae was significantly lower in green ash than in tropical ash. The role of intraspecific competition of A. planipennis larvae in density-dependent regulation of its natural population dynamics is discussed. PMID:24280666

  12. Survival of Coelaenomenodera lameensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Relation to the Physical Characteristics of Different Oil Palm (Elaeis sp.) Breeding Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin-Ollivier, L; Flori, A; Coffi, A; Cros, D; Glitho, I; Nodichao, L

    2015-01-01

    The edibility of different Elaeis sp. breeding populations present in Benin was tested for the leaf miner Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a major oil palm pest in Africa. Experiments carried out in sleeves revealed the oviposition capacities of females and the mortality rates for the different developmental stages by comparing the populations found on two breeding populations of Elaeis oleifera (HBK) Cortes, four of Elaeis guineensis Jacquin and four (E. guineensis × E. oleifera) × E. guineensis backcrosses. Females laid their eggs similarly on all breeding populations, with a preference for the E. guineensis La Mé origin. The average hatching rate reached 80% for the La Mé origin as opposed to 28% for the Deli origin. The mortality rates for the larval instars were greater on E. oleifera, on certain backcrosses and on the Deli origin of E. guineensis. Development at the second- and third- larval instars was the most affected, with a mortality rate of three to five times greater than that seen on La Mé. Epidermis and cuticle measurements indicated which breeding populations were suitable or unsuitable for the development of C. lameensis. E. guineensis, with its thin epidermis (12 µm) and cuticle (2 µm), proved to be highly susceptible to C. lameensis attacks. On the other hand, E. oleifera, which is very resistant, exhibited a thicker epidermis (17 µm) and cuticle (4 µm). The breeding populations were thus classified according to the positive or negative influence they exerted on the insect's egg laying and feeding. PMID:26113512

  13. Virulência de nematóides entomopatogênicos (Nematoda: Rhabditida a Sphenophorus levis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae

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    Fernando Henrique Carvalho Giometti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O bicudo da cana-de-açúcar, Sphenophorus levis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, é uma importante praga de solo dos canaviais no Estado de São Paulo, ocasionando prejuízos de até 30 t de cana/ha/ano. Visando ao controle biológico desta praga, esse estudo teve por objetivo avaliar a virulência de 17 isolados de nematóides entomopatogênicos do gênero Steinernema e Heterorhabditis contra adultos de S. levis, e o efeito dos quatro nematóides mais virulentos em três dosagens cada um. A pesquisa foi realizada em condições de laboratório, sendo realizados quatro ensaios para o estudo de virulência. Os nematóides selecionados como mais virulentos em cada teste foram S. brazilense IBCB n6, Heterorhabditis sp. IBCB n10, Heterorhabditis sp. IBCB n24 e Heterorhabditis sp. IBCB n44, sendo os únicos que diferenciaram significativamente das respectivas testemunhas com 45%, 40%, 20% e 31% de mortalidade do inseto na concentração de 240 juvenis infectivos (JI/inseto. No teste de dose, os isolados de Heterorhabditis identificados como IBCB n10, IBCB n24 e IBCB n44 destacaram-se quanto à virulência para os adultos do bicudo da cana-de-açúcar, diferindo significativamente da testemunha na maior dose avaliada (1200 JI/inseto com níveis de mortalidade do inseto de 60%, 65,7% e 74,3% respectivamente.

  14. Ácaros asociados al coleóptero Passalus cognatus (Coleoptera: Passalidae de Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, México

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    Gabriel A Villegas-Guzmán

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Se revisaron 35 ejemplares de Passalus cognatus Truqui recolectados en Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, México. En 20 de ellos se encontraron 245 ácaros pertenecientes a ocho especies, ocho géneros, ocho familias y tres subórdenes. Las especies de acáros más abundantes fueron Uroobovella californiana Wisniewski y Hirschmann (35%, Euzercon hyatti Hunter y Rosario (20% y Uropoda sp. (17.5%. Las zonas de fijación preferidas por los ácaros fueron las coxas; en menor proporción el mesoesternón y los húmeros. Los pasálidos infestados presentaron de 1 a 40 ácaros, con un promedio de 12. El número de especies de ácaros por pasálido infestado fue de 1 a 4.Mites associated to the Coleopteran Passalus cognatus (Coleoptera:Passalidae from Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz, Mexico. There are few records of mites associated with the tropical coleopterans of Mexico. We examined 35 passalid beetles (bessbugs Passalus cognatus from Los Tuxtlas region in Veracruz State, Mexico. Twenty of them had a total of 245 mites (representing eight species, eight genera, eight families and three suborders. The most abundant species were Uroobovella californiana Wisniewski & Hirschmann (35%, Euzercon hyatti Hunter & Rosario (20%, and Uropoda sp. (17.5%. The preferred attachment areas were the coxae; followed by the mesosternum and the humeri. Each beetle had 1 to 40 mites (average: 12; and we found 1-4 mite species per beetle. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (3: 1261-1268. Epub 2008 September 30.

  15. Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, México

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    Adrián MUÑOZ-HERNÁNDEZ

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de evaluar la riqueza, abundancia y fenología de las especies de Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea o Lamellicornia de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, se realizaron colectas mensuales entre mayo de 1999 y junio de 2000, en sitios con bosques de pino-encino-liquidámbar o zonas de cultivo situados entre 1,990 y 2,000 m de altitud. Se capturaron 2,082 ejemplares que representan a 59 especies de 29 géneros, 18 tribus y 7 subfamilias de Melolonthidae, Scarabaeidae y Passalidae, entre las que destacan Phyllophaga godmani (Bates, Isonychus piperitus Bates, Anomala terroni Morón, Chrysina peruviana Kirby, Plusiotis aurofoveata Morón, Cyclocephala fasciolata Bates, Dynastes hyllus Chevrolat, Deltochilum mexicanum Bates, Ontherus mexicanus Harold, Onthophagus cyanellus Bates, Passalus punctatostriatus Percheron, Proculejus hirtus (Truqui y Odontotaenius zodiacus Truqui. La riqueza específica es elevada y representativa de ese tipo de bosques a pesar de la perturbación existente. Las especies más abundantes fueron Phyllophaga vetula (Horn, P. xanthe (Bates, Macrodactylus mexicanus Burmeister, Hoplia squamifera Burmeister, Cyclocephala jalapensis Casey, C. weidneri Endrodi, y Chrysina macropus Francillon. Los adultos de la mayor parte de las especies están activos entre abril y junio. De acuerdo con el índice de Simpson la fauna de lamelicornios de Teziutlán presenta un 80% de similitud con la fauna de las montañas del noreste de Hidalgo, un 33% con la región vecina de Cuetzalan, Puebla, y un 17% con el área de Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz. Se incluye una clave para separar las 59 especies encontradas.

  16. Coleoptera scarabaeoidea de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, México

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    Adri\\u00E1n Mu\\u00F1oz Hern\\u00E1ndez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Con el propósito de evaluar la riqueza, abundancia y fenología de las especies de Coleoptera Scarabaeoidea o Lamellicornia de la región de Teziutlán, Puebla, se realizaron colectas mensuales entre mayo de 1999 y junio de 2000, en sitios con bosques de pino-encino-liquidámbar o zonas de cultivo situados entre 1,990 y 2,000 m de altitud. Se capturaron 2,082 ejemplares que representan a 59 especies de 29 géneros, 18 tribus y 7 subfamilias de Melolonthidae, Scarabaeidae y Passalidae, entre las que destacan Phyllophaga godmani (Bates, Isonychus piperitus Bates, Anomala terroni Morón, Chrysina peruviana Kirby, Plusiotis aurofoveata Morón, Cyclocephala fasciolata Bates, Dynastes hyllus Chevrolat, Deltochilum mexicanum Bates, Ontherus mexicanus Harold, Onthophagus cyanellus Bates, Passalus punctatostriatus Percheron, Proculejus hirtus (Truqui y Odontotaenius zodiacus Truqui. La riqueza específica es elevada y representativa de ese tipo de bosques a pesar de la perturbación existente. Las especies más abundantes fueron Phyllophaga vetula (Horn, P. xanthe (Bates, Macrodactylus mexicanus Burmeister, Hoplia squamifera Burmeister, Cyclocephala jalapensis Casey, C. weidneri Endrodi, y Chrysina macropus Francillon. Los adultos de la mayor parte de las especies están activos entre abril y junio. De acuerdo con el índice de Simpson la fauna de lamelicornios de Teziutlán presenta un 80% de similitud con la fauna de las montañas del noreste de Hidalgo, un 33% con la región vecina de Cuetzalan, Puebla, y un 17% con el área de Los Tuxtlas, Veracruz. Se incluye una clave para separar las 59 especies encontradas.

  17. Biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae in crop succession at central Brazil

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    Alex Furquim Pereira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus (Coleoptera, Melolonthidae, Rutelinae in crop succession at central Brazil. Beetles of the family Melolonthidae make up a large group and some species are considered pests of planted crops. Little information is available on the basic biological aspects of the genus Leucothyreus, such as association with cultivated crops and their occurrence periods. Therefore studies were developed in soybean and corn crops in Tangará da Serra, Mato Grosso, Brazil, with the objective of studying the occurrence and biological aspects of Leucothyreus alvarengai Frey and Leucothyreus aff. semipruinosus Ohaus. For acquisition of immature specimens of both species, in April 2011 sampling was performed in corn fields, in July and October in the fallow area, and in soybeans fields planted in December; in 2012 sampling was performed in January and February in soybean fields and in March in corn fields. In 2011 the total number of larvae obtained in April, July, October and December were 100, 6, 30 and 27, and in January, February and March of 2012 these quantities were 32, 52 and 65 larvae, respectively. In all sampling events the larvae of L. alvarengai were collected in greater quantity. At the beginning of the reproductive period of L. alvarengai and L. aff. semipruinosus, it was observed that the adults began to fly and soon after started oviposition in the field in September. The appearance of larvae coincides with the time of soybean planting in the field, thus the larvae feed on roots of soybean plants at the beginning of their development and the cycle from egg to adult of the two species was completed in one year.

  18. Effect of temperature and tree species on damage progression caused by whitespotted sawyer (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) larvae in recently burned logs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bélanger, Sébastien; Bauce, Eric; Berthiaume, Richard; Long, Bernard; Labrie, Jacques; Daigle, Louis-Frédéric; Hébert, Christian

    2013-06-01

    The whitespotted sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus scutellatus (Say) (Coleoptera: Ce-rambycidae), is one of the most damaging wood-boring insects in recently burned boreal forests of North America. In Canada, salvage logging after wildfire contributes to maintaining the timber volume required by the forest industry, but larvae of this insect cause significant damage that reduces the economic value of lumber products. This study aimed to estimate damage progression as a function of temperature in recently burned black spruce (Picea mariana (Miller) Britton, Sterns, and Poggenburg) and jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lambert) trees. Using axial tomographic technology, we modeled subcortical development and gallery depth progression rates as functions of temperature for both tree species. Generally, these rates were slightly faster in black spruce than in jack pine logs. Eggs laid on logs kept at 12 degrees C did not hatch or larvae were unable to establish themselves under the bark because no larval development was observed. At 16 degrees C, larvae stayed under the bark for > 200 d before penetrating into the sapwood. At 20 degrees C, half of the larvae entered the sapwood after 30-50 d, but gallery depth progression stopped for approximately 70 d, suggesting that larvae went into diapause. The other half of the larvae entered the sapwood only after 100-200 d. At 24 and 28 degrees C, larvae entered the sapwood after 26-27 and 21 d, respectively. At 28 degrees C, gallery depth progressed at a rate of 1.44 mm/d. Temperature threshold for subcortical development was slightly lower in black spruce (12.9 degrees C) than in jack pine (14.6 degrees C) and it was 1 degrees C warmer for gallery depth progression for both tree species. These results indicate that significant damage may occur within a few months after fire during warm summers, particularly in black spruce, which highlights the importance of beginning postfire salvage logging as soon as possible to reduce economic

  19. Field trial of diatomaceous earth in cotton gin trash against the larger black flour beetle, Cynaeus angustus (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, N E; Porter, P

    2004-04-01

    The larger black flour beetle, Cynaeus angustus (LeConte) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), is an agricultural and home nuisance pest in North America. In the Southern High Plains of Texas, the larger black flour beetle is associated with cotton gin trash, by-products of cotton ginning that are field stored in large piles for economic reasons. Larger black flour beetle overwinter in gin trash piles but may disperse by the millions in summer and autumn, entering houses as far as 2 km away where they cause distress to homeowners. Because > 1.2 billion kg of gin trash is produced annually in Texas alone, the potential consequences of the larger black flour beetle are enormous. We conducted a field experiment that evaluated the efficacy of diatomaceous earth (DE) on the abundance of the larger black flour beetle in gin trash. There were no significant differences in numbers of larger black flour beetle among treatments and controls (mean number of adults summed over time: controls = 115.41, layered treatment = 87.60, top and bottom treatment = 96.50, bottom treatment = 115.16). There were sufficient numbers of beetles in treated piles to still pose a potential home nuisance problem, likely because the moisture content of field-stored gin trash is too high for DE to work effectively. Therefore, treating cotton gin trash with diatomaceous earth will probably be unable to prevent home infestations of larger black flour beetle. Location within a gin trash pile and season influenced pest numbers, which has implications for long-term field storage of cotton gin trash. PMID:15154486

  20. Community Bioethics: The Health Decisions Community Council.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallegos, Tom; Mrgudic, Kate

    1993-01-01

    Sees health care decision making posing variety of complex issues for individuals, families, and providers. Describes Health Decisions Community Council (HDCC), community-based bioethics committee established to offer noninstitutional forum for discussion of health care dilemmas. Notes that social work skills and values for autonomy and…

  1. Community structures of soil fauna in reclaimed copper mine tailings and suburb forest land

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    Yongheng Zhu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Soil fauna were very important for the ecological reconstruction of mine tailings. We investigated community characteristics of soil fauna at two sites, including reclamated copper-mine-tailings (RCMT and suburb forest land of reclamated copper-mine-tailings (SFL in Tongling City to test and illustrate the value of soil fauna for mitigating the impacts of heavy metal pollution. In the spring of 2011, we established four transects (150 m at the two sites and collected soil samples of macro-, meso- and micro- soil fauna from four depths (0–5 cm, 5–10 cm, 10–15 cm, 15–20 cm at 13 30 cm× 30 cm sampling quadrats. Our results showed that at RCMT, the Acarina, Collembola and Nematoda were dominant groups; the Formicidae, Coleoptera larvae, Oligochaeta, Diptera larvae and Diplura were frequent groups; and the additional 16 groups were less commonly encountered. While at SFL the Collembola and Acarina were dominant groups and the Nematoda and Oligochaeta were frequent groups. Overall abundance of soil fauna at RCMT were significantly less than that of SFL (F=20.65, P<0.01, and number of faunal groups were lower at RCMT (F=5.88, P<0.05. We did not find a significant difference between the density of macro-soil fauna at RCMT and SFL, but found that the density of meso- and micro- soil fauna at RCMT was significantly lower than that of SFL (F=29.99, P<0.01. The Shannon-Wiener diversity index (H at RCMT was higher than that of SFL (F=24.06, P<0.01, but DG diversity index was lower at RCMT compared to SFL (F=4.75, P<0.05. There was evident surface aggregation of soil fauna at RCMT, especially in the differences between the first layer and the other layers of the soil profile (Find.=17.80, Fgro.=33.33, P<0.01. Redundancy analysis indicated that soil macro-, dry-type, wet-type meso- and micro-fauna at different habitats were differentially affected by various environmental factors. At reclaimed land with higher copper concentrations, we found a higher

  2. The Ceratocanthinae of Ulu Gombak: high species richness at a single site, with descriptions of three new species and an annotated checklist of the Ceratocanthinae of Western Malaysia and Singapore (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Hybosoridae

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    Alberto Ballerio

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable species richness of Ceratocanthinae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeoidea: Hybosoridae found at Ulu Gombak (Selangor, West Malaysia, a secondary rainforest research station, is discussed. Eighteen species have been collected, mainly in nests of termites (Isoptera and bess beetles (Coleoptera: Passalidae. Among them at least seven are new species, three of them here described: Madrasostes hashimi sp. n., Madrasostes mirificum sp. n., and Pterorthochaetes tsurui sp. n. Four other species (Madrasostes agostii Paulian, Madrasostes clypeale Paulian, Madrasostes depressum Paulian, and Madrasostes simplex Paulian are recorded for the first time for West Malaysia and three for new states within West Malaysia (Pterorthochaetes insularis Gestro, Madrasostes malayanum Paulian and Madrasostes sculpturatum Paulian. A checklist of the 34 Ceratocanthinae recorded so far from West Malaysia and Singapore is provided with taxonomic, distributional and morphological remarks on some species.

  3. Los Escarabeidos y Geotrúpidos de la Comunidad de Madrid: lista de especies, distribución geográfica y patrones de diversidad (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea, Scarabaeidae y Geotrupidae

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    Lobo, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we summarize the main characteristics of Geotrupidae and Scarabaeidae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea fauna inhabiting Comunidad de Madrid, including an updated checklist of species as well as maps representing the observed and potential distributions of all species. Geographical variation in species richness, rarity or endemicity was also estimated, with a brief discussion on the geographical pattern obtained.

    En este trabajo se resumen las características fundamentales de la fauna de Geotrupidae y Scarabaeidae (Coleoptera, Scarabaeoidea que habita la Comunidad de Madrid, presentándose un inventario actualizado así como mapas que representan la distribución observada y potencial de todas las especies. Finalmente, se estima la variación geográfica de la riqueza de especies, la rareza o la endemicidad, discutiendo brevemente el patrón geográfico encontrado.

  4. Flutuação Populacional de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em Plantios de Palma de Óleo em Roraima

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    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa teve como objetivo avaliar a flutuação populacional de Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae em plantios de Elaeis guineensis Jacq, em ecossistemas de savana e floresta no estado de Roraima. A pesquisa foi desenvolvida durante o período de janeiro de 2011 a fevereiro de 2012 nos campos experimentais da Embrapa Roraima: Monte Cristo e Caroebe, numa área de 2 hectares com a cultura da Palma de Óleo, em cada campo. Foram distribuídas armadilhas iscadas com roletes de cana-de-açúcar e feromônio de agregação para captura dos insetos no entorno dos plantios. Ocorreu flutuação de R. palmarum com picos populacionais nos meses de julho e agosto no ecossistema de savana e de abril a setembro no ambiente de floresta. A população de R. palmarum foi menor em meses de baixa precipitação pluviométrica nos dois ambientes avaliados com a Palma de Óleo em Roraima Population Fluctuation of Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Plantations of Oil Palm in Roraima Abstract. This research aimed to evaluate the population fluctuation Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae in Elaeis guineensis Jacq plantations in forest and savanna ecosystems in the state of Roraima. The research was conducted during the period from January 2011 to February 2012 in the experimental field of Embrapa Roraima: Monte Cristo and Caroebe in an area of 2 hectares with culture Oil Palm in each field. Traps baited with rollers cane sugar and aggregation pheromone for capturing insects in the vicinity of the plantations were distributed. Fluctuation occurred R. palmarum with population peaks in the months of July and August in the savanna ecosystem and from April to September in the forest environment. The population of R. palmarum was lower in months of low rainfall in the two environments assessed with a palm-oil-in Roraima.

  5. South American Coccinellidae (Coleoptera) : part 7, new name for Cyra Mulsant, review of Brachiacanthini genera, and systematic revision of Cleothera Mulsant, Hinda Mulsant and Serratitibia Gordon and Canepari, new genus

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Robert D.; Canepari, Claudio; Hanley, Guy A.

    2013-01-01

    Genera of Brachiacanthini (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae: Hyperaspidinae) are discussed and a key to all recognized genera provided. Cyrea, new genus, is proposed, and Serratitibia, new genus, is erected and revised, Cleothera Mulsant and Hinda Mulsant are recognized as valid genera and revised. Helesius caseyi Sicard is transferred to Hinda and recognized as a synonym of Hinda designata Mulsant, new synonymy. Brachiacantha brethesi (Korschefsky), Cleothera abendrothi Kirsch, Cleothera ambigua Mu...

  6. Natural history, ecology, and conservation of the genus Polyphylla Harris, 1841. 1. New species from the southwestern United States and Baja California, Mexico, with notes on distribution and synonymy (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae)

    OpenAIRE

    La Rue, Delbert A.

    2016-01-01

    Four new species of the genus Polyphylla Harris (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) from the southwestern United States and Baja California, Mexico, are described and illustrated: Polyphylla anivallis, P. koso, P. morroensis, and P. socorriana. Two nomenclatural changes are proposed: Polyphylla ratcliffei Young is placed into synonymy with P. avittata Hardy and Andrews, new synonymy; P. uteana Tanner is removed from synonymy and reinstated as a valid species, reinstated status. The fema...

  7. Biology and Host-Range Testing of Laricobius kangdingensis sp. n. (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), a Newly Discovered Predator of Hemlock Woolly Adelgid, Adelges tsugae Annand (Homoptera: Adelgidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Gatton, Holly A.

    2005-01-01

    The biology and host-specificity of Laricobius kangdingensis sp. n. (Coleoptera: Derodontidae), a new predator of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA), Adelges tsugae Annand (Homoptera: Adelgidae) were investigated and compared with that of a related predator of HWA, L. nigrinus Fender. Adults became active in June 2003; the males emerged first and in greater numbers than the females. The sex ratio of female to male was 1: 1.1. Laricobius kangdingensis sp. n. has four larval instars. The total nu...

  8. Una nueva especie de Meloe Linnaeus, 1758 del suroeste de Marruecos incluida en el grupo de M. (Eurymeloe) rugosus Marsham, 1802 (Coleoptera: Meloidae)

    OpenAIRE

    JOSÉ L. RUIZ; García-París, M.

    2015-01-01

    The scientific collections of the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales (MNCN-CSIC, Madrid) hold an extense set of entomological materials collected in Morocco along the first decades of the XXth century by the preeminent naturalist M. Martínez de la Escalera. Morphological studies of the specimens of the genus Meloe Linnaeus, 1758 (Coleoptera: Meloidae) reveals the existence of populations morphologically differentiated along the coastal regions of Essaouira and Ifni. These populations are in...

  9. Bioactivity of Powder and Extracts from Garlic, Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae) and Spring Onion, Allium fistulosum L. (Alliaceae) against Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) on Cowpea, Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp (Leguminosae) Seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Abiodun A. Denloye

    2010-01-01

    Laboratory bioassays were conducted to investigate the bioactivity of powders, extracts, and essential oils from Allium sativum L. (Alliaceae) and A. fistulosum L. (Liliaceae) against adults, eggs, and larvae of Callosobruchus maculatus F. (Coleoptera: Bruchidae). On the basis of 48 hr median lethal toxicity (LC50), test plant powders and extracts from A. sativum were more toxic to C. maculatus adults than those from A. fistulosum. The 48 hr LC50 values for the powder against the test insect ...

  10. Eucnemid larvae of the Nearctic region. Part V: Fifth instar larval descriptions for eight species of Microrhagus Dejean, 1833 (Coleoptera: Eucnemidae: Melasinae: Dirhagini), with descriptions of four new species and notes on their biology

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Fifth instars for eight of the nine species of Microrhagus Dejean (Coleoptera: Eucnemidae: Melasinae: Dirhagini), all endemic in the Nearctic region, are described and illustrated. Biological information is provided, along with a brief discussion of the larval morphology among the eight Nearctic species of Microrhagus. Adult descriptions are provided for four new species. These new species include Microrhagus breviangularis new species, Microrhagus carinicollis new species, Microrhagus ...

  11. Fauna de Coleoptera no Parque Estadual de Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Paraná, Brasil: abundância e riqueza das famílias capturadas através de armadilhas de solo

    OpenAIRE

    Marinoni Renato C.; Ganho Norma G.

    2003-01-01

    This paper is a part of the studies on the Coleoptera fauna from Vila Velha, Ponta Grossa, Parana gathered through malaise and pitfall traps in sites with different floristic conditions. The present study deal with the data of pitfall trap captures, installed close to the malaise traps. The data were obtained weekly (52 samples), from September 1999 to August 2000. This survey was carried out on five areas, three of them with different plant succession stages (initial, intermediate, and advan...

  12. Dispersal of individuals of the flightless grassland ground beetle, Carabus hungaricus (Coleoptera: Carabidae), in three populations and what they tell us about mobility estimates based on mark-recapture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Elek, Z.; Drag, Lukáš; Pokluda, Pavel; Čížek, Lukáš; Bérces, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 111, č. 5 (2014), s. 663-668. ISSN 1210-5759 Grant ostatní: Hungarian Academy of Sciences(HU) BO/00045/11/8; European Social Fund(CZ) CZ.1.07/2.3.00/20.0064 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Coleoptera * Carabidae * Carabus hungaricus Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.975, year: 2014 http://www.eje.cz/pdfs/eje/2014/05/10.pdf

  13. Community Challenge Grantees

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HUD's Community Challenge Grants aim to reform and reduce barriers to achieving affordable, economically vital and sustainable communities. The funds are awarded to...

  14. Unsewered Communities in Iowa

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — The unsewered communities file was originally conceived as a representation of communities without a municipal sewer system or on-site septic systems. The selection...

  15. Community Nursing Home (CNH)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Community Nursing Home (CNH) database contains a list of all Community Nursing Home facilities under local contract to Veterans Health Administration (VHA). CNH...

  16. Effects of the Diet on the Microbiota of the Red Palm Weevil (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae)

    KAUST Repository

    Montagna, Matteo

    2015-01-30

    Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, also known as the red palm weevil, is regarded as the major pest of palm trees. Although studies of the microbiota associated with this species have been performed in recent years, little attention has been dedicated to the influence of the diet in shaping the host bacterial community. Here, we investigated the influence of food sources (i.e. palm tissues vs apple based substrate) on the microbial diversity associated with RPW, which was compared with the microbiota associated with wild individuals of the sister species Rhynchophorus vulneratus. The bacterial characterization was performed using a culture independent approach, i.e. the 16S rRNA pyrotag, and a culture dependent approach for a subset of the samples, in order to obtain bacterial isolates from RPW tissues. The bacterial community appeared significantly influenced by diet. Proteobacteria resulted to be the most abundant clade and was present in all the specimens of the three examined weevil groups. Within Proteobacteria, Enterobacteriaceae were identified in all the organs analysed, including hemolymph and reproductive organs. The apple-fed RPWs and the wild R. vulneratus showed a second dominant taxon within Firmicutes that was scarcely present in the microbiota associated with palm-fed RPWs. A comparative analysis on the bacteria associated with the palm tissues highlighted that 12 bacterial genera out of the 13 identified in the plant tissues were also present in weevils, thus indicating that palm tissues may present a source for bacterial acquisition.

  17. Effects of the diet on the microbiota of the red palm weevil (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Montagna

    Full Text Available Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, also known as the red palm weevil, is regarded as the major pest of palm trees. Although studies of the microbiota associated with this species have been performed in recent years, little attention has been dedicated to the influence of the diet in shaping the host bacterial community. Here, we investigated the influence of food sources (i.e. palm tissues vs apple based substrate on the microbial diversity associated with RPW, which was compared with the microbiota associated with wild individuals of the sister species Rhynchophorus vulneratus. The bacterial characterization was performed using a culture independent approach, i.e. the 16S rRNA pyrotag, and a culture dependent approach for a subset of the samples, in order to obtain bacterial isolates from RPW tissues. The bacterial community appeared significantly influenced by diet. Proteobacteria resulted to be the most abundant clade and was present in all the specimens of the three examined weevil groups. Within Proteobacteria, Enterobacteriaceae were identified in all the organs analysed, including hemolymph and reproductive organs. The apple-fed RPWs and the wild R. vulneratus showed a second dominant taxon within Firmicutes that was scarcely present in the microbiota associated with palm-fed RPWs. A comparative analysis on the bacteria associated with the palm tissues highlighted that 12 bacterial genera out of the 13 identified in the plant tissues were also present in weevils, thus indicating that palm tissues may present a source for bacterial acquisition.

  18. A la Carte Community

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundelach, Peter; Brincker, Benedikte

    2010-01-01

    The exchange of open source software is a phenomenon that is becoming in- creasingly significant to IT users. This article presents the results of a study of the TYPO3 community, a community related to an open source CMS software. The article explores the community, identity and values of TYPO3 and...

  19. Community Information Network

    OpenAIRE

    A. Amudhavalli

    1999-01-01

    This article overviews what community information means and its implications on the role of a library and information centre. No single institution can meet the general information requirements of any given community. It attempts to examine how .a cooperative venture of interagency network can lead to an effective community information service suitable for the local population.

  20. Defining Geographic Communities

    OpenAIRE

    Maré, David C; Michelle Poland

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a guide to concepts, ideas, and measurements of geographic communities. The paper investigates the various concepts of geographic communities found in the literature and reviews existing studies to determine how researchers measure geographic communities in practice.

  1. The Community View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBray, Dan

    A community college instructor has incorporated the philosophy of Blaise Pascal into a course on organizational communication by providing community college students with a pragmatic small group exercise that requires them to see what communication skills are necessary to succeed within business and the community. This paper discusses how…

  2. Community forestry in Nederland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambregts, L.; Wiersum, K.F.

    2002-01-01

    Uitleg over de oorsprong en betekenis van het gegrip 'community forestry', en een inventarisatie van de verschillende vormen van community forestry die in Nederland voorkomen en de motieven voor deelname aan community forestry activiteiten. Vooral twee categorieën van bosbeheer worden beschouwd als

  3. Litteratura Coleopterologica (1758–1900): a guide to selected books related to the taxonomy of Coleoptera with publication dates and notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousquet, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bibliographic references to works pertaining to the taxonomy of Coleoptera published between 1758 and 1900 in the non-periodical literature are listed. Each reference includes the full name of the author, the year or range of years of the publication, the title in full, the publisher and place of publication, the pagination with the number of plates, and the size of the work. This information is followed by the date of publication found in the work itself, the dates found from external sources, and the libraries consulted for the work. Overall, more than 990 works published by 622 primary authors are listed. For each of these authors, a biographic notice (if information was available) is given along with the references consulted. PMID:27231436

  4. A novel 8.7 kDa protease inhibitor from chan seeds (Hyptis suaveolens L.) inhibits proteases from the larger grain borer Prostephanus truncatus (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Cesar; Valdés-Rodríguez, Silvia; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Blanco-Labra, Alejandro

    2004-05-01

    A novel trypsin inhibitor purified from chan seeds (Hyptis suaveolens, Lamiaceae) was purified and characterized. Its apparent molecular mass was 8700 Da with an isoelectric point of 3.4. Its N-terminal sequence showed a high content of acidic amino acids (seven out of 18 residues). Its inhibitory activity was potent toward all trypsin-like proteases extracted from the gut of the insect Prostephanus truncatus (Coleoptera: Bostrichidae), a very important pest of maize. This activity was highly specific, because among proteases from seven different insects, only those from P. truncatus and Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) were inhibited. This inhibitor has potential to enhance the defense mechanism of maize against the attack of P. truncatus. PMID:15142539

  5. Effet structurant de la plante hôte chez la bruche de l'arachide, Caryedon serratus (Olivier, 1790 (Coleoptera : Bruchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sembène, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Structuring effect of the host plant in the groundnut bruchid, Caryedon serratus (Olivier, 1790 (Coleoptera: Bruchidae. Twenty-six samples of the groundnut seed-beetle which were reared from pods of five different host plants (Arachis hypogaea L., Bauhinia rufescens Lam., Cassia sieberiana DC., Piliostigma reticulatum (DC. Hochst. and Tamarindus indica L. in four localities of Senegal were compared using electrophoresis based on six loci of four enzymatic systems. The population structure of Caryedon serratus Olivier was analysed using Weir and Cockerham's estimator of Wright's F-statistics. θ value (0.235 and the dendrogram of Rogers'genetic distances revealed a high degree of genetic differentiation between host plants. Genetic analysis without C. sieberiana samples indicated that populations form host races which are partially isolated according to their host plants (θ = 0.035. Geographical distances between localities are not decisive for genetic structuration of C. serratus populations from a given host plant.

  6. Flea beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Alticinae collected by malaise trap method in Gölcük Natural Park (Isparta, Turkey, with a new record for Turkish fauna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aslan Gül E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on Alticinae (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae material collected by Malaise trapping which is different from other standardized collecting methods. A total of 19 flea beetle species belonging to 6 genera were collected from Gölcük Natural Park, Isparta (Turkey during 2009. The species are listed in a table together with distributional data in Turkey. Among them, Longitarsus curtus (Allard, 1860 is recorded for the first time in Turkey. L. monticola Kutschera, 1863 and L. curtus are recently separated synonyms and thus all data referring to the distribution of both species are currently important. Hence, the zoogeographical distribution of the new record is reviewed with some remarks; habitus and genitalia are illustrated.

  7. Elemental distribution in reproductive and neural organs of the Epilachna nylanderi (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), a phytophage of nickel hyperaccumulator Berkheya coddii (Asterales: Asteraceae) by micro-PIXE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesjasz-Przybyłowicz, Jolanta; Orłowska, Elżbieta; Augustyniak, Maria; Nakonieczny, Mirosław; Tarnawska, Monika; Przybyłowicz, Wojciech; Migula, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of metal hyperaccumulation by plants is often explained by a pathogen or herbivore defense hypothesis. However, some insects feeding on metal hyperaccumulating plants are adapted to the high level of metals in plant tissues. Former studies on species that feed on the leaves of Berkheya coddii Roessler 1958 (Asteraceae), a nickel-hyperaccumulating plant, demonstrated several protective mechanisms involved in internal distribution, immobilization, and elimination of Ni from the midgut and Malpighian tubules. These species are mainly coleopterans, including the lady beetle, Epilachna nylanderi (Mulsant 1850) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), collected from the ultramafic ecosystem near Barberton in South Africa. By performing particle-induced X-ray emission microanalysis elemental microanalysis (PIXE), this study examined whether Ni may be harmful to internal body systems that decide on insect reactivity (central nervous system [CNS]), their reproduction, and the relationships between Ni and other micronutrients. Data on elemental distribution of nine selected elements in target organs of E. nylanderi were compared with the existing data for other insect species adapted to the excess of metals. Micro-PIXE maps of seven regions of the CNS showed Ni mainly in the neural connectives, while cerebral ganglia were better protected. Concentrations of other bivalent metals were lower than those of Ni. Testis, compared with other reproductive organs, showed low amounts of Ni. Zn was effectively regulated at physiological dietary levels. In insects exposed to excess dietary Zn, it was also accumulated in the reproductive organs. Comparison of E. nylanderii with other insects that ingest hyperaccumulating plants, especially chrysomelid Chrysolina clathrata (Clark) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), showed lower protection of the CNS and reproductive organs. PMID:25399425

  8. Discourse Communities and Communities of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pogner, Karl-Heinz

    2005-01-01

    -cise is to determine the degree to which the concepts of discourse commu-nity and community of practice are suitable for investigating the social and organizational context of text and knowledge production. Finally, the paper examines the explanatory value of the two concepts for analyzing text and knowledge......This paper aims at giving a more detailed description and discussion of two concepts of `community' developed in the research areas of text production/ writing and social learning / information management / knowledge sharing and comparing them with each other. The purpose of this theoretical exer...... production at different Danish workplaces (a consulting engi-neering company, a university department and a bank) and discusses their significance in the context of co-located as well as geographically distrib-uted communities....

  9. Community 21: Digital toolbox for sustainable communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Gant

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article will describe the 'Toolbox for the 21st Century Village' action research project and outline the critical research contexts that underpin its development as an online informatics and social engagement tool aimed at facilitating understanding, sharing and planning of integrated sustainability by individual communities. This will include exposing the context of ‘mis-communication’ of sustainability issues in society by visual culture, the media and politics. The article argues that this has served to alienate, demoralise and disenfranchise many individuals and communities. Being rural does not necessarily mean being ‘green’ and the article will describe the ‘green dichotomy’ and how rural behaviours are disproportionately dependent on natural resources and as a consequence are ‘less sustainable’, despite relative autonomy and community potential to make significant gains. The article will also unpack and explore how the loaded term sustainability only serves to divide and detract as a polemic and absolute term; whereas self-sufficiency is a demonstrable concern of vulnerable rural communities; a by-product of which can be genuine and valued, measurable and meaningful sustainable development. The above provides a contextual backdrop and rationale for the formation of a project that enables communities to frame their own concerns and envision themselves and their problems and responses as part of a larger system. The project is developed around an experimental online content management system (CMS platform that will facilitate sustainable development through envisioning, action planning and networking – connecting the ‘knots in the net’ of an active patchwork of ‘multi-local communities’. The platform design will provide methodology, process and capacity to enable reconciliation between the manifold concerns of social, economic and environmental sustainability whilst providing community facilitators with new

  10. Research into the Application of the Sterile-Male Release Technique to the Rhinoceros Beetle (Coleoptera:Scarabaeidae)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The control of the Rhinoceros beetle, which causes considerable damage in palm and coconut plantations in the tropical regions of the world, meets with difficulties resulting from the habits of the insects. Chemical and biological control methods have not yet produced economically worthwhile results. It was therefore proposed, under the Joint Project established by the UN Special Fund and the South Pacific Commission for devising a method of controlling the main pest in this group, Oryctes rhinoceros, that the possibility be investigated of using against these coleoptera the technique of releasing males sterilized by radiation. Studies have been made involving the two most important species O. monoceros Ol. and O. rhinoceros L. The first stage was the development of a continuous breeding method, which had not hitherto been possible because of the large-scale slaughter arising from fungus attacks by Metarrhizium anisopliae Metsch. For the larvae the technique used involved first individual rearing, followed by group rearing tests with 100 or so insects in tanks. The average temperature in both cases was close to 30°C and the insects were fed on a mixture of rotten wood and leaf mould mixed with the faeces of domestic animals. The adults, fed on banana slices, are placed in troughs or tanks containing sieved-earth. It was thus possible to rear Oryctes in several successive cycles, avoiding the epizooic stage of Metarrhizium, with a multiplication rate from one generation to the next of close on 10, Tests on radiation sterilization procedures taking as variables the gamma-ray dose, the stage of the insect and the physiological state of the imago, showed that O. monoceros adults were sterilized by a single application of 4000 rad, with a slight reduction in their length of life. The same was true of O. rhinoceros, which however required a dose greater than 6000 rad to sterilize it. The mating urge and sexual vigour of the irradiated insects are, however, reduced

  11. Simulação do dano causado por larvas de Oryzophagus oryzae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae a cultivares de arroz irrigado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martins José Francisco da Silva

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Oryzophagus oryzae (Costa Lima, 1936 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae é a praga-chave da cultura do arroz irrigado na Região Sul do Brasil. As larvas causam os principais danos ao cortarem drasticamente as raízes das plantas. Dois experimentos sobre simulação do dano larval foram realizados testando um equipamento cujo componente principal é uma lâmina metálica em forma de U, para corte das raízes. Raízes das cultivares BR-Irga 414 e Bluebelle, de ciclo biológico curto, e suscetíveis ao inseto e BR-Irga 410 e Dawn, de ciclo médio e resistentes, foram submetidas aos tratamentos de (1 corte artificial, com o simulador, (2 corte natural, pelas larvas e (3 sem corte, artificial ou natural, protegidas com inseticida. A simulação foi praticada na fase vegetativa das plantas, 31 dias pós-irrigação por inundação, época do pico da população larval nas raízes. Avaliaram-se dados sobre comprimento, peso de matéria seca e volume de raízes, imediatamente após a aplicação do tratamento de simulação e na pré-emissão de panículas, população larval em plantas submetidas ao dano natural, e produtividade de grãos. Na avaliação efetuada imediatamente após a simulação, em todas as cultivares, não ocorreu diferença entre índices de dano às raízes resultantes do uso do simulador e da alimentação de larvas. Na fase de pré-emissão das panículas, os índices de recuperação do sistema radicular das plantas submetidas aos danos natural e artificial, também foram similares. As cultivares de ciclo médio apresentaram maior recuperação dos tecidos radiculares e menor perda de produtividade de grãos, confirmando o maior grau de resistência a O. oryzae. Concluiu-se que o método de simulação é aplicável em pesquisas sobre resistência de arroz ao inseto, principalmente na identificação de genótipos tolerantes.

  12. Prediction of the key binding site of odorant-binding protein of Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeida).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X; Wang, Q; Wang, B; Zhong, T; Cao, Y; Li, K; Yin, J

    2014-06-01

    The scarab beetle Holotrichia oblita Faldermann (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) is a predominant underground pest in the northern parts of China, and its larvae (grubs) cause great economic losses because of its wide range of host plants and covert habitats. Environmentally friendly strategies for controlling adults would have novel and broad potential applications. One potential pest management measure is the regulation of olfactory chemoreception to control target insect pests. In the process of olfactory recognition, odorant-binding proteins (OBPs) are believed to carry hydrophobic odorants from the environment to the surface of olfactory receptor neurons. To obtain a better understanding of the relationship between OBP structures and their ligands, homology modelling and molecular docking have been conducted on the interaction between HoblOBP1 and hexyl benzoate in the present study. Based on the results, site-directed mutagenesis and binding experiments were combined to describe the binding sites of HoblOBP1 and to explore its ligand-binding mechanism. After homology modelling of HoblOBP1, it was found that the three-dimensional structure of HoblOBP1 consists of six α-helices and three disulphide bridges that connect the helices, and the hydrophobic pockets are both composed of five helices. Based on the docking study, we found that van der Waals interactions and hydrophobic interactions are both important in the bonding between HoblOBP1 and hexyl benzoate. Intramolecular residues formed the hydrogen bonds in the C terminus of the protein and the bonds are crucial for the ligand-binding specificity. Finally, MET48, ILE80 and TYR111 are binding sites predicted for HoblOBP1. Using site-directed mutagenesis and fluorescence assays, it was found that ligands could not be recognized by mutant of Tyr111. A possible explanation is that the compound could not be recognized by the mutant, and remains in the binding cavity because of the loss of the intramolecular

  13. EXTRATO AQUOSO DE FOLHAS DE Azadirachta indica A. Juss NO CONTROLE DE Sitophilus zeamais Mots. (COLEOPTERA: CURCULIONIDAE EM MILHO ARMAZENADO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Toller Borsonaro

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work had as objective to test different dosages of aqueous extract of leaves of neem(Azadirachta indica as natural alternative and of easy application in the control of Sitophilus zeamais in grains of corn, seeing it is one of main stored corn pests. Were evaluated the following concentrations: 10%, 20%, 30% and witness. They were applied directly on the mass of grains and the insects with a pressurized pulverizer model Guarany PCP-1P in the dosage of 0,56 mL for dish. The treatments did not present significant difference as the reduction of weight of grains, but there was significant difference in relation to the population control. As for this parameter, the aqueous extract of leaves of neem in concentration 30,3%, can be considered an alternative treatment against S. zeamais in stored corn grains.O presente trabalho teve como objetivo testar diferentes dosagens de extrato aquoso de folhas de Nim (Azadirachta indica A Juss como alternativa natural e de fácil aplicação no controle de Sitophilus zeamais Mots.(Coleoptera: Curculionidae em grãos de milho (Zea mays L., visto que esta é uma das principais pragas do milhoarmazenado. Avaliaram-se as seguintes concentrações: 10%, 20%, 30,3%, além do tratamento testemunha. Foram aplicados diretamente sobre a massa de grãos e sobre os insetos com um pulverizador pressurizado modelo Guarany PCP-1P na dosagem de 0,56 mL por placa. Os tratamentos não apresentaram diferença significativa quanto à redução de peso de grãos, mas houve diferença significativa em relação ao controle populacional. Quanto a este parâmetro, o extrato aquoso de folhas de Nim na concentração 30,3%, pode ser considerado um tratamento alternativo no controle de S. zeamais em grãos de milho armazenado.

  14. ABUNDÂNCIA RELATIVA DAS ESPÉCIES DE CERAMBYCIDAE (INSECTA-COLEOPTERA EM POMAR DE FRUTÍFERAS MISTO RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OF SPECIES OF THE CERAMBYCIDAE FAMILY (INSECTA-COLEOPTERA IN MIXED ORCHARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Rose Pereira da Silva

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Estudou-se a abundância relativa das espécies da família Cerambycidae (Insecta-Coleoptera em um pomar de frutíferas misto composto por 28 diferentes espécies, no período de dezembro de 1997 a maio de 1999 em Ceres, Estado de Goiás, Brasil. Foram utilizadas armadilhas luminosas modelo “Luiz de Queiroz” com lâmpadas Bl-15 wats. Essas armadilhas foram ligadas por 12 horas em dois dias consectivos num total de 24 horas de coletas semanais. Coletaram-se 1.474 cerambicídeos, agrupados em 39 gêneros e 49 espécies. Acanthoderes jaspidea, Achryson surinamum, Chlorida festiva, Eurodacrys sexgutatta, Gnomibidion fulvipes, Lophopoeum timbouve, Megacyllene acuta, Rhopalophora collaris e Trichophorus distinctus foram as espécies classificadas como muito abundantes. Das espécies coletadas, 48,98 % foram classificadas como raras, 12,24 % como dispersas, 20,41 % como comuns e 18,37 % como muito abundantes. Dentre os 39 gêneros, Oreodera foi representado por três espécies (6,13 %, os gêneros Acanthoderes, Aerenica, Chrysoprasis, Colobothea, Eutrypanus, Megacylene, Myoxomorpha e Nyssodrysternum por duas espécies (4,08 %, e os demais gêneros por apenas uma espécie.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Levantamento; riqueza de espécies; ecologia; comportamento.

    It was studied the relative abundance to the species of the family Cerambycidae (Insecta-Coleoptera in a mixed orchard composed by 28 diferent species in the period from decembre 1997 to may 1999 in Ceres, state of Goi

  15. Community energy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, S. [BC Energy Aware Committee, Richmond, BC (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    The mandate of the BC Energy Aware Committee is to promote and assist in the implementation of community energy planning by working with local governments, developers and utilities to integrate energy into local planning processes and to use local resources in the design and operation of communities. This paper presented the basic concepts of how energy is used in communities and how its use impacts the community. It was demonstrated that designing for energy supports community livability objectives. Energy considerations can be incorporated in existing community planning processes, thereby playing an important role in reducing Canada's greenhouse gas emissions and slowing down climate change. The paper also provided some practical advice that will help communities move toward sustainable energy development. Community energy planning encompasses land use planning and transportation, infrastructure efficiency, and alternative energy supply. The strategies that are related to each of these components were highlighted. The community energy planning program in Kamloops was presented as a case study of a specific initiative to build a community that is socially, environmentally and fiscally sustainable. tabs., figs.

  16. Survival of Coelaenomenodera lameensis (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in Relation to the Physical Characteristics of Different Oil Palm (Elaeis sp.) Breeding Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin-Ollivier, L.; Flori, A.; Coffi, A.; Cros, D.; Glitho, I.; Nodichao, L.

    2015-01-01

    The edibility of different Elaeis sp. breeding populations present in Benin was tested for the leaf miner Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), a major oil palm pest in Africa. Experiments carried out in sleeves revealed the oviposition capacities of females and the mortality rates for the different developmental stages by comparing the populations found on two breeding populations of Elaeis oleifera (HBK) Cortes, four of Elaeis guineensis Jacquin and four (E. guineensis × E. oleifera) × E. guineensis backcrosses. Females laid their eggs similarly on all breeding populations, with a preference for the E. guineensis La Mé origin. The average hatching rate reached 80% for the La Mé origin as opposed to 28% for the Deli origin. The mortality rates for the larval instars were greater on E. oleifera, on certain backcrosses and on the Deli origin of E. guineensis. Development at the second- and third- larval instars was the most affected, with a mortality rate of three to five times greater than that seen on La Mé. Epidermis and cuticle measurements indicated which breeding populations were suitable or unsuitable for the development of C. lameensis. E. guineensis, with its thin epidermis (12 µm) and cuticle (2 µm), proved to be highly susceptible to C. lameensis attacks. On the other hand, E. oleifera, which is very resistant, exhibited a thicker epidermis (17 µm) and cuticle (4 µm). The breeding populations were thus classified according to the positive or negative influence they exerted on the insect’s egg laying and feeding. RÉSUMÉ. La comestibilité de différents matériels végétaux d’Elaeis sp. présents au Bénin est testée pour Coelaenomenodera lameensis Berti (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), important ravageur du palmier à huile en Afrique. Des expérimentations en manchons ont permis de déterminer les capacités d’oviposition des femelles et les taux de mortalité des différents stades de d

  17. Communities and community genetics in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadesse, Luche; Tafesse, Fikru; Hamamy, Hanan

    2014-01-01

    The rates of congenital and genetic disorders in low and middle income countries are similar or might be higher than in high income countries due to a multitude of risk factors and the dearth of community genetic services. To direct effective preventive, diagnostic and counseling services, collecting data on the incidence and prevalence of various congenital and genetic disorders and their risk factors is a pre-requisite for establishing genetic services at the community level and mainly at the primary health care setting. This brief review is meant to assess the available epidemiological data in Ethiopia pertaining to congenital and genetic disorders on which the future community genetic services could be built. Existing epidemiological data on congenital and genetic disorders in Ethiopia is limited, and the few studies conducted revealed that folate and iodine deficiencies are prevalent among women in the reproductive age. Pregnant women's infection with syphilis and rubella is prevailing. Based on available data, cleft lip and palate, congenital heart diseases, club-foot, and gastro-intestinal malformations are the most common birth defects in Ethiopia. Community based studies to accurately demonstrate the incidence and prevalence levels of these disorders are almost unavailable. To plan for organization and implementation of community genetic services at the primary health care level in Ethiopia, conducting standardized epidemiological studies is currently highly recommended. PMID:25404975

  18. Community Engaged Research: Student and Community Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Schwartz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Engaged scholarship is defined by Stanton (2008 as research that partners university scholarly resources with those in the public and private sectors to enrich knowledge, address and help solve critical social issues and contribute to the public good. To be truly engaged and of high quality, engagement must take place in the development of the purpose, throughout the research process and in the compilation of the research product. It includes research that incorporates only a few elements of community-engagement, for example having the researchers control the research with the community in more of a consultative role, to research in which both are equal partners throughout the process. This paper will report on a community engaged research course. Feedback from the community agencies and the students involved in the course will be examined in terms of the level of engagement and whether the students were able to make a contribution to the organization. KEYWORDScommunity engaged research, pedagogy, community partnerships

  19. Coal, culture and community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-11-01

    16 papers are presented with the following titles: the miners; municipalisation and the millenium - Bolton-upon-Dearne Urban District Council 1899-1914; the traditional working class community revisited; the cultural capital of coal mining communities; activities, strike-breakers and coal communities; the limits of protest - media coverage of the Orgreave picket during the miners` strike; in defence of home and hearth? Families, friendships and feminism in mining communities; young people`s attitudes to the police in mining communities; the determinants of productivity growth in the British coal mining industry, 1976-1989; strategic responses to flexibility - a case study in coal; no coal turned in Yorkshire?; the North-South divide in the Central Coalfields; the psychological effects of redundancy and worklessness - a case study from the coalfields; the Dearne Valley initiative; the future under labour: and coal, culture and the community.

  20. Collaborative Communities of Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøllingtoft, Anne; Müller, Sabine; Ulhøi, John Parm; Snow, Charles C.

    organizational model called the collaborative community of firms. This chapter addresses an important organizational role in a collaborative community, that of the shared services provider. The shared services provider acts as a facilitator in the community, helping member firms collaborate with one another and...... developing strategic initiatives that aid the community as a whole. We discuss the facilitator role of the shared services provider, contrasting it with the coordinator role found in other multi-firm organizations, and we show how shared services providers function by describing three examples of...... collaborative communities of firms from different sectors: the U.S.-based Blade.org and two Denmark-based communities, the Kalundborg Industrial Symbiosis and MG50. Implications for the theory and practice of organization design are discussed....

  1. Isolation and Identification of Cellulolytic Bacteria from the Gut of Holotrichia parallela Larvae (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Zhang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 207 strains of aerobic and facultatively anaerobic cellulolytic bacteria were isolated from the gut of Holotrichia parallela larvae. These bacterial isolates were assigned to 21 genotypes by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA. A partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis and standard biochemical and physiological tests were used for the assignment of the 21 representative isolates. Our results show that the cellulolytic bacterial community is dominated by the Proteobacteria (70.05%, followed by the Actinobacteria (24.15%, the Firmicutes (4.35%, and the Bacteroidetes (1.45%. At the genus level, Gram-negative bacteria including Pseudomonas, Ochrobactrum, Rhizobium, Cellulosimicrobium, and Microbacterium were the predominant groups, but members of Bacillus, Dyadobacter, Siphonobacter, Paracoccus, Kaistia, Devosia, Labrys, Ensifer, Variovorax, Shinella, Citrobacter, and Stenotrophomonas were also found. Furthermore, our results suggest that a significant amount of bacterial diversity exists among the cellulolytic bacteria, and that Siphonobacter aquaeclarae, Cellulosimicrobium funkei, Paracoccus sulfuroxidans, Ochrobactrum cytisi, Ochrobactrum haematophilum, Kaistia adipata, Devosia riboflavina, Labrys neptuniae, Ensifer adhaerens, Shinella zoogloeoides, Citrobacter freundii, and Pseudomonas nitroreducens are reported to be cellulolytic for the first time in this study. Our results indicate that the scarab gut is an attractive source for the study of novel cellulolytic microorganisms and enzymes useful for cellulose degradation.

  2. Cellulolytic Bacteria Associated with the Gut of Dendroctonus armandi Larvae (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Scolytinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Hu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The object of this study was to investigate the cellulolytic bacterial community in the intestine of the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi larvae. A total of 91 cellulolytic bacteria were isolated and assigned to 11 genotypes using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA. Partial 16S rDNA sequence analysis and morphological tests were used to assign the 11 representative isolates. The results showed that the isolates belonged to α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Members of γ-Proteobacteria were the most frequently represented species and accounted for 73.6% of all the cellulolytic bacteria. The majority of cellulolytic bacteria in D. armandi larva gut were identified as Serratia and accounted for 49.5%, followed by Pseudomonas, which accounted for 22%. In addition, members of Bacillus, Brevundimonas, Paenibacillus, Pseudoxanthomonas, Methylobacterium and Sphingomonas were found in the D. armandi larva gut. Brevundimonas kwangchunensis, Brevundimonas vesicularis, Methylobacterium populi and Pseudoxanthomonas mexicana were reported to be cellulolytic for the first time in this study. Information generated from the present study might contribute towards understanding the relationship between bark beetle and its gut flora.

  3. Elevated atmospheric CO2 alters the arthropod community in a forest understory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jason; Zangerl, Arthur R.; Berenbaum, May R.; Sparks, Jed P.; Elich, Lauren; Eisenstein, Alissa; DeLucia, Evan H.

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which overall population sizes and community composition of arthropods in a naturally occurring forest understory are altered by elevated CO2. The Free Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) method was used to fumigate large, replicated plots in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, USA to achieve the CO2 concentration predicted for 2050 (˜580 μl l-1). In addition, the extent to which unrestricted herbivorous arthropods were spatially delimited in their resource acquisition was determined. Stable isotope data for spiders (δ13C and δ15N) were collected in ambient and elevated CO2 plots and analyzed to determine whether their prey species moved among plots. Elevated CO2 had no effect on total arthropod numbers but had a large effect on the composition of the arthropod community. Insects collected in our samples were identified to a level that allowed for an assignment of trophic classification (generally to family). For the groups of insects sensitive to atmospheric gas composition, there was an increase in the numbers of individuals collected in primarily predaceous orders (Araneae and Hymenoptera; from 60% to more than 150%) under elevated CO2 and a decrease in the numbers in primarily herbivorous orders (Lepidoptera and Coleoptera; from -30 to -45%). Isotopic data gave no indication that the treatment plots represented a "boundary" to the movement of insects or that there were distinct and independent insect populations inside and outside the treatment plots. A simple two-ended mixing model estimates 55% of the carbon and nitrogen in spider biomass originated external to the elevated CO2 plots. In addition to changes in insect performance, decreases in herbivorous arthropods and increases in predaceous arthropods may also be factors involved in reduced herbivory under elevated CO2 in this forest.

  4. Responses of epibenthic and nektonic macroinvertebrate communities to a gradient of fish size in ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Nieoczym

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Size relationships between fish and organisms from adjacent trophic levels are crucial for predicting the structure and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. We compared macroinvertebrate communities along a fish-size gradient created by separate stocking of three age cohorts of common carp Cyprinus carpio in semi-natural ponds. The specific size range of fish (small, medium and large corresponding to fish age in ponds was the factor most strongly associated with macroinvertebrate composition. The other significant habitat variables were dissolved oxygen concentration in the water and submerged vegetation abundance in the open-water zone. Among the most numerous taxa in the ponds, relative abundances of Hirudinea, Gastropoda, Odonata and Coleoptera were larger in the presence of small-sized than of larger-sized carp. However, fish size effect was not linear, in that macroinvertebrate assemblages were less similar between ponds containing medium- vs large-sized fish than between ponds with small- vs large-sized fish. The dissimilarity patterns were mainly determined by disparities in abundance of Corixidae, which unlike other taxa common in the ponds occurred in the greatest numbers in the presence of large-sized carp. Macroinvertebrate diversity was greatest in ponds with small-sized fish and was positively related to emergent macrophyte cover. Enhancement of emergent vegetation is recommended as the most effective management strategy to buffer adverse impacts of fish on macroinvertebrates. If fish are present in the system, assessment of the size structure of fish populations can be advantageous in unravelling the essential processes driving the variation in pond communities.

  5. Rethinking Community Economic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Ron Shaffer; Steve Deller; Dave Marcouiller

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors present arguments for a more interdisciplinary approach to community economic development. Building an alternative paradigm that includes six elements—resources, markets, institutions, society, decision making, and space—they rethink the framework that links economic theory to the practice of community economic development. Major attention is paid to the integration of economic and noneconomic factors in the practice of community economic development. In the e...

  6. Community response to noise

    OpenAIRE

    Takashi Yano; Truls Gjestland; Soogab Lee

    2012-01-01

    Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI) and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI) were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate co...

  7. Community-focused strategies

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the notion of community-focused strategies to refer to the set of actions, activities and policies that firms undertake to establish connections or relational links with one or more target communities of (potential) customers. Drawing on social identity theory and strategy research, this study begins with a proposed taxonomy of different community-focused strategies. Then it illustrates how such strategies contribute to the creation of competitive advantage and explore...

  8. Defining political community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sladeček Michal M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the concept of political community, its constitution and value. The starting point is that the concept of community is not sufficiently recognized in modern political theories, as well as in contemporary liberal theory. In the last two decades communitarian and republican political theory attempted to revitalize this notion. The first part of the paper elaborates on the polemics between these three theoretical orientations. The concluding part examines the possibilities and prospect for stable political community in conditions of pluralism of particular social communities and ethnocultural heterogeneity.

  9. Nuclear Community in network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The internet has revolutionized the ways of communication and many companies/ organizations have adapted to the change but others have not, or have done it halfway. This presentation is a review of the main characteristics of virtual communities and their typology. The status of the Nuclear Online Community, both pro nuclear and antinuclear is analysed , and their main similarities and differences are discussed. The Pro nuclear Online Community is formed gradually. This presentation attempts to define some ways to increase the scope of the Community and encourage greater dissemination of the characteristics of nuclear energy. (Author)

  10. MBS Native Plant Communities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data layer contains results of the Minnesota County Biological Survey (MCBS). It includes polygons representing the highest quality native plant communities...

  11. Partitioning Breaks Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Fergal; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    Considering a clique as a conservative definition of community structure, we examine how graph partitioning algorithms interact with cliques. Many popular community-finding algorithms partition the entire graph into non-overlapping communities. We show that on a wide range of empirical networks, from different domains, significant numbers of cliques are split across the separate partitions produced by these algorithms. We then examine the largest connected component of the subgraph formed by retaining only edges in cliques, and apply partitioning strategies that explicitly minimise the number of cliques split. We further examine several modern overlapping community finding algorithms, in terms of the interaction between cliques and the communities they find, and in terms of the global overlap of the sets of communities they find. We conclude that, due to the connectedness of many networks, any community finding algorithm that produces partitions must fail to find at least some significant structures. Moreover, contrary to traditional intuition, in some empirical networks, strong ties and cliques frequently do cross community boundaries; much community structure is fundamentally overlapping and unpartitionable in nature.

  12. Collaborative Communities of Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøllingtoft, Anne; Müller, Sabine; Ulhøi, John Parm;

    2011-01-01

    is an organizational model called the collaborative community of firms. This chapter addresses an important organizational role in a collaborative community, that of the shared services provider. The shared services provider acts as a facilitator in the community, helping member firms collaborate with one another...... and developing strategic initiatives that aid the community as a whole. We discuss the facilitator role of the shared services provider, contrasting it with the coordinator role found in other multi-firm organizations, and we show how shared services providers function by describing three examples...

  13. A Red List of Italian Saproxylic Beetles: taxonomic overview, ecological features and conservation issues (Coleoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maria Carpaneto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this review are: 1 the compilation and updating of a reference database for Italian saproxylic beetles, useful to assess the trend of their populations and communities in the next decades; 2 the identification of the major threats involving the known Italian species of saproxylic beetles; 3 the evaluation of the extinction risk for all known Italian species of saproxylic beetles; 4 the or- ganization of an expert network for studying and continuous updating of all known species of saproxylic beetle species in Italy; 5 the creation of a baseline for future evaluations of the trends in biodiversity conservation in Italy; 6 the assignment of ecological categories to all the Italian saproxylic beetles, useful for the aims of future researches on their communities and on forest environments. The assess- ments of extinction risk are based on the IUCN Red List Categories and Criteria and the most updated guidelines. The assessments have been carried out by experts covering different regions of Italy, and have been evaluated according to the IUCN standards. All the beetles whose larval biology is sufficiently well known as to be considered saproxylic have been included in the Red List, either the autochtho- nous species (native or possibly native to Italy or a few allochthonous species recently introduced or probably introduced to Italy in his- toric times. The entire national range of each saproxylic beetle species was evaluated, including large and small islands; for most species, the main parameters considered for evaluation were the extent of their geographical occurrence in Italy, and the number of known sites of presence. 2049 saproxylic beetle species (belonging to 66 families have been listed, assigned to a trophic category (Table 3 and 97% of them have been assessed. On the whole, threatened species (VU + EN + CR are 421 (Fig. 6, corresponding to 21 % of the 1988 as- sessed species; only two species are formally

  14. Brood ball-mediated transmission of microbiome members in the dung beetle, Onthophagus taurus (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M Estes

    chamber. The transmission of the dung beetle microbiome highlights the maintenance and likely importance of this newly-characterized bacterial community.

  15. OCCURRENCE OF SPECIES FAMILY CARABIDAE (COLEOPTERA INDEPENCE ON THE INPUT OF ORGANIC MATTER INTO SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Porhajašová

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the effects of different rates of organic fertilizers (farmyard manure and bio sludge on occurrence of soil organisms with focus to species of family Carabidae. During 2001-2003, samples of biological material were collected using the earth trap method. Samples were taken from five treatments (i unfertilized, (ii 25 t ha-1 farmyard manure, (iii 50 t ha-1 bio sludge, (iv 50 t ha-1 farmyard manure, (v 100 t ha-1 bio sludge which cover area of 9 000 m2 at experimental farm of Slovak Agricultural University Kolíňany. Totally 59 054 individuals of soil edaphon belong to 23 epigeic groups was collected from which 25 species totally 21 189 individuals belong to the target group Carabidae. The attributes of specific identity according Jaccard (IA ranged from 45.45 to 71.43 % and those of dominant identity (ID from 94.20 to 97.72 %. The attributes of diversity (d achieved a level from 0.5406 to 0.8986. Harpalus rufipes (De Geer, 1774 occurring on arid to damp soil, mostly in light places, was determined as the dominant species. The attributes of individual treatments are influenced by the quantity of organic mater inputs into soil that affects the formation of well-defined communities with the characteristic species composition. A comparison of individual treatments in terms of the occurrence of zooedaphon showed that application of 100 t ha-1 bio sludge create the most suitable soil condition for zooedaphon development.

  16. Early Detection and Mitigation of Resistance to Bt Maize by Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andow, David A; Pueppke, Steven G; Schaafsma, Arthur W; Gassmann, Aaron J; Sappington, Thomas W; Meinke, Lance J; Mitchell, Paul D; Hurley, Terrance M; Hellmich, Richard L; Porter, R Pat

    2016-02-01

    Transgenic Bt maize that produces less than a high-dose has been widely adopted and presents considerable insect resistance management (IRM) challenges. Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, has rapidly evolved resistance to Bt maize in the field, leading to local loss of efficacy for some corn rootworm Bt maize events. Documenting and responding to this resistance has been complicated by a lack of rapid diagnostic bioassays and by regulatory triggers that hinder timely and effective management responses. These failures are of great concern to the scientific and agricultural community. Specific challenges posed by western corn rootworm resistance to Bt maize, and more general concerns around Bt crops that produce less than a high-dose of Bt toxin, have caused uncertainty around current IRM protocols. More than 15 years of experience with IRM has shown that high-dose and refuge-based IRM is not applicable to Bt crops that produce less than a high-dose. Adaptive IRM approaches and pro-active, integrated IRM-pest management strategies are needed and should be in place before release of new technologies that produce less than a high-dose. We suggest changes in IRM strategies to preserve the utility of corn rootworm Bt maize by 1) targeting local resistance management earlier in the sequence of responses to resistance and 2) developing area-wide criteria to address widespread economic losses. We also favor consideration of policies and programs to counteract economic forces that are contributing to rapid resistance evolution. PMID:26362989

  17. Acts of Hospitality: The Community in Community Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Lee

    2007-01-01

    This article will investigate the notion of "community" within the aspirations of Community Music. Guiding this study are the questions: How is community made manifest through Community Music? What joins the notion of community to that of music? Two distinct sections will frame this research: (1) an etymological consideration of the word…

  18. Resistência de genótipos de batata (Solanum spp. a Diabrotica speciosa (Germar, 1824 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae Resistence of potatoes genotypes (Solanum spp. to Diabrotica speciosa (Germar,1824 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Mesquita Lara

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se a resistência de genótipos de batata (Solanum spp. a Diabrotica speciosa (Germar,1824 em condições de campo e laboratório. O plantio de campo foi efetuado em julho de 1997, na FCAV/ UNESP, Campus de Jaboticabal, utilizando-se os seguintes genótipos: Achat, NYL 235-4, 288.759-16, 288. 771-6, 288.776-3, 288.776-6, 288.787-5, 288.801-8 e 288.814-7. Avaliaram-se o consumo de área foliar em levantamentos realizados aos 70 e 90 dias após plantio e os danos ocasionados pelas larvas aos tubérculos, após a colheita. Em laboratório, foram realizados testes de preferência para alimentação com plantas de 40 dias (teste sem chance de escolha, envolvendo os nove genótipos presentes no campo, e com plantas de 47 e 68 dias (com e sem chance de escolha, avaliando-se cinco genótipos. Constatou-se, no ensaio de campo, que os genótipos 288.759-16, 288.776-3, 288.776-6, 288.787-5 e 288.814-7 foram menos consumidos por adultos de D. speciosa que a cultivar Achat, porém, em laboratório, 288.759-16 e 288.776-6 não rev elaram essa característica. O consumo em NYL 235-4 e 288.801-8 foi intermediário, não diferindo dos demais. NYL 235-4 e 288.801-8 foram resistentes às larvas, apresentando, em média, menos que 3 furos por tubérculo. O genótipo 288.776-3 destacou-se como resistente a larvas e adultos de D. speciosa, sendo a resistência a adultos do tipo não-preferência para alimentação (antixenose.The resistance of potato genotypes to Diabroticaspeciosa (Germar,1824 (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae, was evaluated under field and laboratory conditions. The field trial was set up in the experimental farm of FCAV - UNESP, Jaboticabal, SP, and the following genotypes were compared: Achat, NYL 235-4, 288.759-16, 288.771-6, 288.776-3, 288.776-6, 288.787-5, 288.801-8 e 288.814-7. The leaf area consumption by adults was evaluated at 70 and 90 days after planting, and, after harvest, larval damage to tubers (number of perforations was assessed

  19. A Community Like "Philadelphia."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookey, Robert Alan

    1996-01-01

    Argues that applications of "queer theory" must extend beyond questions of sexual representation. Contends that rhetorical theory can contribute to the investigation of sexuality, offering as an example an analysis of mainstream media representations of the homosexual "community." Concludes that the presentation of this community operates…

  20. The Community College Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Argues that the community college's mission has been and will be constant with respect to its social role to educate; its responsiveness to community needs; its focus on teaching; its open access philosophy; and its commitment to a comprehensive curriculum. Examines social tensions affecting the mission. (DMM)