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Sample records for capturing molecular structural

  1. Protein-mineral Interactions: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Capture Importance of Variations in Mineral Surface Composition and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Amity; Reardon, Patrick N.; Chacon, Stephany S.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Washton, Nancy M.; Kleber, Markus

    2016-05-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations, conventional and metadynamics, were performed to determine the interaction of model protein Gb1 over kaolinite (001), Na+-montmorillonite (001), Ca2+-montmorillonite (001), goethite (100), and Na+-birnessite (001) mineral surfaces. Gb1, a small (56 residue) protein with a well-characterized solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure and having α-helix, four-fold β-sheet, and hydrophobic core features, is used as a model protein to study protein soil mineral interactions and gain insights on structural changes and potential degradation of protein. From our simulations, we observe little change to the hydrated Gb1 structure over the kaolinite, montmorillonite, and goethite surfaces relative to its solvated structure without these mineral surfaces present. Over the Na+-birnessite basal surface, however, the Gb1 structure is highly disturbed as a result of interaction with this birnessite surface. Unraveling of the Gb1 β-sheet at specific turns and a partial unraveling of the α-helix is observed over birnessite, which suggests specific vulnerable residue sites for oxidation or hydrolysis possibly leading to fragmentation.

  2. Protein-Mineral Interactions: Molecular Dynamics Simulations Capture Importance of Variations in Mineral Surface Composition and Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Amity; Reardon, Patrick N; Chacon, Stephany S; Qafoku, Nikolla P; Washton, Nancy M; Kleber, Markus

    2016-06-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations, conventional and metadynamics, were performed to determine the interaction of model protein Gb1 over kaolinite (001), Na(+)-montmorillonite (001), Ca(2+)-montmorillonite (001), goethite (100), and Na(+)-birnessite (001) mineral surfaces. Gb1, a small (56 residue) protein with a well-characterized solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure and having α-helix, 4-fold β-sheet, and hydrophobic core features, is used as a model protein to study protein soil mineral interactions and gain insights on structural changes and potential degradation of protein. From our simulations, we observe little change to the hydrated Gb1 structure over the kaolinite, montmorillonite, and goethite surfaces relative to its solvated structure without these mineral surfaces present. Over the Na(+)-birnessite basal surface, however, the Gb1 structure is highly disturbed as a result of interaction with this birnessite surface. Unraveling of the Gb1 β-sheet at specific turns and a partial unraveling of the α-helix is observed over birnessite, which suggests specific vulnerable residue sites for oxidation or hydrolysis possibly leading to fragmentation. PMID:27243116

  3. Structure of the Hemoglobin-IsdH Complex Reveals the Molecular Basis of Iron Capture by Staphylococcus aureus*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F.; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A.; Malmirchegini, G. Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P.; Clubb, Robert T.; Guss, J. Mitchell; Gell, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins. PMID:24425866

  4. Structure of the hemoglobin-IsdH complex reveals the molecular basis of iron capture by Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, Claire F; Kumar, Kaavya Krishna; Jacques, David A; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Spirig, Thomas; Mackay, Joel P; Clubb, Robert T; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2014-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes life-threatening disease in humans. The S. aureus surface protein iron-regulated surface determinant H (IsdH) binds to mammalian hemoglobin (Hb) and extracts heme as a source of iron, which is an essential nutrient for the bacteria. However, the process of heme transfer from Hb is poorly understood. We have determined the structure of IsdH bound to human Hb by x-ray crystallography at 4.2 Å resolution, revealing the structural basis for heme transfer. One IsdH molecule is bound to each α and β Hb subunit, suggesting that the receptor acquires iron from both chains by a similar mechanism. Remarkably, two near iron transporter (NEAT) domains in IsdH perform very different functions. An N-terminal NEAT domain binds α/β globin through a site distant from the globin heme pocket and, via an intervening structural domain, positions the C-terminal heme-binding NEAT domain perfectly for heme transfer. These data, together with a 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of the isolated N-terminal domain bound to Hb and small-angle x-ray scattering of free IsdH, reveal how multiple domains of IsdH cooperate to strip heme from Hb. Many bacterial pathogens obtain iron from human hemoglobin using proteins that contain multiple NEAT domains and other domains whose functions are poorly understood. Our results suggest that, rather than acting as isolated units, NEAT domains may be integrated into higher order architectures that employ multiple interaction interfaces to efficiently extract heme from host proteins.

  5. Molecular Profiling of Activated Neurons by Phosphorylated Ribosome Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Zachary A.; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L.; Wysocki, Robert W.; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I.; Friedman, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, there...

  6. Molecular profiling of activated neurons by phosphorylated ribosome capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Zachary A; Tan, Keith; Birsoy, Kivanc; Schmidt, Sarah; Garrison, Jennifer L; Wysocki, Robert W; Emiliano, Ana; Ekstrand, Mats I; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2012-11-21

    The mammalian brain is composed of thousands of interacting neural cell types. Systematic approaches to establish the molecular identity of functional populations of neurons would advance our understanding of neural mechanisms controlling behavior. Here, we show that ribosomal protein S6, a structural component of the ribosome, becomes phosphorylated in neurons activated by a wide range of stimuli. We show that these phosphorylated ribosomes can be captured from mouse brain homogenates, thereby enriching directly for the mRNAs expressed in discrete subpopulations of activated cells. We use this approach to identify neurons in the hypothalamus regulated by changes in salt balance or food availability. We show that galanin neurons are activated by fasting and that prodynorphin neurons restrain food intake during scheduled feeding. These studies identify elements of the neural circuit that controls food intake and illustrate how the activity-dependent capture of cell-type-specific transcripts can elucidate the functional organization of a complex tissue. PMID:23178128

  7. The mechanism of selective molecular capture in carbon nanotube networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yu; Guan, Jun; Yang, Xudong; Zheng, Quanshui; Xu, Zhiping

    2014-07-28

    Recently, air pollution issues have drawn significant attention to the development of efficient air filters, and one of the most promising materials for this purpose is nanofibers. We explore here the mechanism of selective molecular capture of volatile organic compounds in carbon nanotube networks by performing atomistic simulations. The results are discussed with respect to the two key parameters that define the performance of nanofiltration, i.e. the capture efficiency and flow resistance, which demonstrate the advantages of carbon nanotube networks with high surface-to-volume ratio and atomistically smooth surfaces. We also reveal the important roles of interfacial adhesion and diffusion that govern selective gas transport through the network.

  8. From yield to fracture, failure initiation captured by molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, Laurent; Tejada, Ignacio G.; Sab, Karam

    2016-10-01

    While failure of cracked bodies with strong stress concentrations is described by an energy criterion (fracture mechanics), failure of flawless bodies with uniform stresses is captured by a criterion on stress (yielding). In-between those two cases, the problem of failure initiation from flaws that moderately concentrate stresses is debated. In this paper, we propose an investigation of the process of failure initiation at the atomic scale by means of molecular simulations. We first discuss the appropriate scaling conditions to capture initiation, since system sizes that can be simulated by molecular mechanics are strongly limited. Then, we perform a series of molecular simulations of failure of a 2D model material, which exhibits strength and toughness properties that are suitable to capture initiation with systems of reasonable sizes. Transition from fracture failure to yield failure is well characterized. Interestingly, in some specific cases, failure exceeds yield failure which is in contradiction with most initiation theories. This occurs when stress are highly concentrated while little mechanical energy is stored in the material. This observation calls for a theory of initiation which requires that both stress and energy are necessary conditions of failure. Such an approach was proposed by Leguillon (2002). We show that the predictions of this theory are consistent with the molecular simulation results.

  9. Valency and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Cartmell, E

    1977-01-01

    Valency and Molecular Structure, Fourth Edition provides a comprehensive historical background and experimental foundations of theories and methods relating to valency and molecular structures. In this edition, the chapter on Bohr theory has been removed while some sections, such as structures of crystalline solids, have been expanded. Details of structures have also been revised and extended using the best available values for bond lengths and bond angles. Recent developments are mostly noted in the chapter on complex compounds, while a new chapter has been added to serve as an introduction t

  10. Theory and Application of Dissociative Electron Capture in Molecular Identification

    CERN Document Server

    Havey, C D; Jones, T; Voorhees, K J; Laramee, J A; Cody, R B; Clougherty, D P; Eberhart, Mark; Voorhees, Kent J.; Laramee, James A.; Cody, Robert B.; Clougherty, Dennis P.

    2006-01-01

    The coupling of an electron monochromator (EM) to a mass spectrometer (MS) has created a new analytical technique, EM-MS, for the investigation of electrophilic compounds. This method provides a powerful tool for molecular identification of compounds contained in complex matrices, such as environmental samples. EM-MS expands the application and selectivity of traditional MS through the inclusion of a new dimension in the space of molecular characteristics--the electron resonance energy spectrum. However, before this tool can realize its full potential, it will be necessary to create a library of resonance energy scans from standards of the molecules for which EM-MS offers a practical means of detection. Here, an approach supplementing direct measurement with chemical inference and quantum scattering theory is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of directly calculating resonance energy spectra. This approach makes use of the symmetry of the transition-matrix element of the captured electron to discriminat...

  11. Longitudinal capture in the radio-frequency-quadrupole structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inagaki, S.

    1980-03-01

    The radio-frequency-quadrupole (RFQ) linac structure not only can attain easily transverse focusing in the low-beta region, but also can obtain very high capture efficiency because of its low beta-lambda and low-particle rigidity. An optimization study of the zero space-charge longitudinal capture in an RFQ linac that yields configurations with large capture efficiency is described.

  12. Molecular Spectrum Capture by Tuning the Chemical Potential of Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yue; Yang, Jingjing; Lu, Qiannan; Tang, Hao; Huang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Due to its adjustable electronic properties and effective excitation of surface plasmons in the infrared and terahertz frequency range, research on graphene has attracted a great deal of attention. Here, we demonstrate that plasmon modes in graphene-coated dielectric nanowire (GNW) waveguides can be excited by a monolayer graphene ribbon. What is more the transverse resonant frequency spectrum of the GNW can be flexibly tuned by adjusting the chemical potential of graphene, and amplitude of the resonance peak varies linearly with the imaginary part of the analyte permittivity. As a consequence, the GNW works as a probe for capturing the molecular spectrum. Broadband sensing of toluene, ethanol and sulfurous anhydride thin layers is demonstrated by calculating the changes in spectral intensity of the propagating mode and the results show that the intensity spectra correspond exactly to the infrared spectra of these molecules. This may open an effective avenue to design sensors for detecting nanometric-size molecules in the terahertz and infrared regimes. PMID:27240372

  13. Molecular Spectrum Capture by Tuning the Chemical Potential of Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Due to its adjustable electronic properties and effective excitation of surface plasmons in the infrared and terahertz frequency range, research on graphene has attracted a great deal of attention. Here, we demonstrate that plasmon modes in graphene-coated dielectric nanowire (GNW waveguides can be excited by a monolayer graphene ribbon. What is more the transverse resonant frequency spectrum of the GNW can be flexibly tuned by adjusting the chemical potential of graphene, and amplitude of the resonance peak varies linearly with the imaginary part of the analyte permittivity. As a consequence, the GNW works as a probe for capturing the molecular spectrum. Broadband sensing of toluene, ethanol and sulfurous anhydride thin layers is demonstrated by calculating the changes in spectral intensity of the propagating mode and the results show that the intensity spectra correspond exactly to the infrared spectra of these molecules. This may open an effective avenue to design sensors for detecting nanometric-size molecules in the terahertz and infrared regimes.

  14. Molecular electronic-structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helgaker, Trygve; Jorgensen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry is increasingly paired with computational methods to solve intractable problems in chemistry and molecular physics. Now in a paperback edition, this comprehensive and technical work covers all the important aspects of modern molecular electronic-structure theory, clearly explaining quantum-mechanical methods and applications to molecular equilibrium structure, atomization energies, and reaction enthalpies. Extensive numerical examples illustrate each method described. An excellent resource for researchers in quantum chemistry and anyone interested in the theory and its applications.

  15. CO2 Capture with Ionic Liquids: Experiments and Molecular Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramdin, M.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, we investigated the potential of physical ILs for CO2 capture at pre-combustion and natural gas sweetening conditions. The performance of ILs with respect to conventional solvents is assessed in terms of gas solubilities and selectivities. The work discussed in this thesis consists o

  16. Molecular template-directed synthesis of microporous polymer networks for highly selective CO2 capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yao-Qi; Zhu, Jing; Liu, Xiao-Qin; Geng, Jian-Cheng; Sun, Lin-Bing

    2014-11-26

    Porous polymer networks have great potential in various applications including carbon capture. However, complex monomers and/or expensive catalysts are commonly used for their synthesis, which makes the process complicated, costly, and hard to scale up. Herein, we develop a molecular template strategy to fabricate new porous polymer networks by a simple nucleophilic substitution reaction of two low-cost monomers (i.e., chloromethylbenzene and ethylene diamine). The polymerization reactions can take place under mild conditions in the absence of any catalysts. The resultant materials are interconnected with secondary amines and show well-defined micropores due to the structure-directing role of solvent molecules. These properties make our materials highly efficient for selective CO2 capture, and unusually high CO2/N2 and CO2/CH4 selectivities are obtained. Furthermore, the adsorbents can be completely regenerated under mild conditions. Our materials may provide promising candidates for selective capture of CO2 from mixtures such as flue gas and natural gas.

  17. CO{sub 2} Capture from Flue Gas Using Solid Molecular Basket Sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillerup, Eric; Zhang, Zhonghua; Peduzzi, Emanuela; Wang, Dongxiang; Guo, Jiahua; Ma, Xiaoliang; Wang, Xiaoxing; Song, Chunshan

    2012-08-31

    The objective of this project is to develop a new generation of solid, regenerable polymeric molecular basket sorbent (MBS) for more cost-efficient capture and separation of CO{sub 2} from flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The primary goal is to develop a cost-effective MBS sorbent with better thermal stability. To improve the cost-effectiveness of MBS, we have explored commercially available and inexpensive support to replace the more expensive mesoporous molecular sieves like MCM-41 and SBA- 15. In addition, we have developed some advanced sorbent materials with 3D pore structure such as hexagonal mesoporous silica (HMS) to improve the CO{sub 2} working capacity of MBS, which can also reduce the cost for the whole CO{sub 2} capture process. During the project duration, the concern regarding the desorption rate of MBS sorbents has been raised, because lower desorption rate increases the desorption time for complete regeneration of the sorbent which in turn leads to a lower working capacity if the regeneration time is limited. Thus, the improvement in the thermal stability of MBS became a vital task for later part of this project. The improvement in the thermal stability was performed via increasing the polymer density either using higher molecular weight PEI or PEI cross-linking with an organic compound. Moreover, we have used the computational approach to estimate the interaction of CO{sub 2} with different MBSs for the fundamental understanding of CO{sub 2} sorption, which may benefit the development, design and modification of the sorbents and the process.

  18. Molecular simulation of carbon dioxide adsorption for carbon capture and storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenney, Craig M.

    Capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power plants and sequestration in unmineable coal seams are achievable methods for reducing atmospheric emissions of this greenhouse gas. To aid the development of effective CO2 capture and sequestration technologies, a series of molecular simulation studies were conducted to study the adsorption of CO2 and related species onto heterogeneous, solid adsorbents. To investigate the influence of surface heterogeneity upon adsorption behavior in activated carbons and coal, isotherms were generated via grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulation for CO2 adsorption in slit-shaped pores with several variations of chemical and structural heterogeneity. Adsorption generally increased with increasing oxygen content and the presence of holes or furrows, which acted as preferred binding sites. To investigate the potential use of the flexible metal organic framework (MOF) Cu(BF4)2(bpy)2 (bpy=bipyridine) for CO2 capture, pure- and mixed-gas adsorption was simulated at conditions representative of power plant process streams. This MOF was chosen because it displays a novel behavior in which the crystal structure reversibly transitions from an empty, zero porosity state to a saturated, expanded state at the "gate pressure". Estimates of CO2 capacity above the gate pressure from GCMC simulations using a rigid MOF model showed good agreement with experiment. The CO2 adsorption capacity and estimated heats of adsorption are comparable to common physi-adsorbents under similar conditions. Mixed-gas simulations predicted CO2/N2 and CO2/H 2selectivities higher than typical microporous materials. To more closely investigate this gating effect, hybrid Monte-Carlo/molecular-dynamics (MCMD) was used to simulate adsorption using a flexible MOF model. Simulation cell volumes remained relatively constant at low gas pressures before increasing at higher pressure. Mixed-gas simulations predicted CO2/N 2 selectivities comparable to other microporous adsorbents. To

  19. Molecular electronic-structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Helgaker, Trygve; Olsen, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry has emerged as an important tool in chemical research and is appliced to a wide variety of problems in chemistry and molecular physics. Recent developments of computational methods have enabled previously intractable chemical problems to be solved using rigorous quantum-mechanical methods. This is the first comprehensive, up-to-date and technical work to cover all the important aspects of modern molecular electronic-structure theory. Topics covered in the book include: * Second quantization with spin adaptation * Gaussian basis sets and molecular-integral evaluati

  20. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Beyer, T

    2001-01-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of parac...

  1. Systematic Fragmentation Method and the Effective Fragment Potential: An Efficient Method for Capturing Molecular Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Jonathan M.; Roskop, Luke B.; Pruitt, Spencer R.; Collins, Michael A.; Gordon, Mark S.

    2009-08-01

    The systematic fragmentation method fragments a large molecular system into smaller pieces, in such a way as to greatly reduce the computational cost while retaining nearly the accuracy of the parent ab initio electronic structure method. In order to attain the desired (sub-kcal/mol) accuracy, one must properly account for the nonbonded interactions between the separated fragments. Since, for a large molecular species, there can be a great many fragments and therefore a great many nonbonded interactions, computations of the nonbonded interactions can be very time-consuming. The present work explores the efficacy of employing the effective fragment potential (EFP) method to obtain the nonbonded interactions since the EFP method has been shown previously to capture nonbonded interactions with an accuracy that is often comparable to that of second-order perturbation theory. It is demonstrated that for nonbonded interactions that are not high on the repulsive wall (generally >2.7 Å), the EFP method appears to be a viable approach for evaluating the nonbonded interactions. The efficacy of the EFP method for this purpose is illustrated by comparing the method to ab initio methods for small water clusters, the ZOVGAS molecule, retinal, and the α-helix. Using SFM with EFP for nonbonded interactions yields an error of 0.2 kcal/mol for the retinal cis-trans isomerization and a mean error of 1.0 kcal/mol for the isomerization energies of five small (120-170 atoms) α-helices.

  2. Ordered structures of molecular bottlebrushes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, G.; Ikkala, O.

    1997-01-01

    In this review 'molecular bottlebrushes' are flexible polymers densely loaded with equally flexible side chains. Interest in these structures arises from the possibility of lyotropic behaviour in dilute solution in a good solvent, as well as the possibility, of highly, ordered microphase-separated s

  3. Ordered Structures of Molecular Bottlebrushes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinke, Gerrit ten; Ikkala, Olli

    1997-01-01

    In this review 'molecular bottlebrushes' are flexible polymers densely loaded with equally flexible side chains. Interest in these structures arises from the possibility of lyotropic behaviour in dilute solution in a good solvent, as well as the possibility of highly ordered microphase-separated sta

  4. Prediction of molecular crystal structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyer, Theresa

    2001-07-01

    The ab initio prediction of molecular crystal structures is a scientific challenge. Reliability of first-principle prediction calculations would show a fundamental understanding of crystallisation. Crystal structure prediction is also of considerable practical importance as different crystalline arrangements of the same molecule in the solid state (polymorphs)are likely to have different physical properties. A method of crystal structure prediction based on lattice energy minimisation has been developed in this work. The choice of the intermolecular potential and of the molecular model is crucial for the results of such studies and both of these criteria have been investigated. An empirical atom-atom repulsion-dispersion potential for carboxylic acids has been derived and applied in a crystal structure prediction study of formic, benzoic and the polymorphic system of tetrolic acid. As many experimental crystal structure determinations at different temperatures are available for the polymorphic system of paracetamol (acetaminophen), the influence of the variations of the molecular model on the crystal structure lattice energy minima, has also been studied. The general problem of prediction methods based on the assumption that the experimental thermodynamically stable polymorph corresponds to the global lattice energy minimum, is that more hypothetical low lattice energy structures are found within a few kJ mol{sup -1} of the global minimum than are likely to be experimentally observed polymorphs. This is illustrated by the results for molecule I, 3-oxabicyclo(3.2.0)hepta-1,4-diene, studied for the first international blindtest for small organic crystal structures organised by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC) in May 1999. To reduce the number of predicted polymorphs, additional factors to thermodynamic criteria have to be considered. Therefore the elastic constants and vapour growth morphologies have been calculated for the lowest lattice energy

  5. Molecular Simulation on Microstructure of Ionic Liquids in Capture of CO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Zhen-uo; LIU Xiao-min; ZHAO Yu-ling; ZHANG Xiao-chun; LU Xing-mei; ZHANG Suo-jiang

    2011-01-01

    Molecular dynamic simulation is used to study the microstructure of four kinds of ionic liquids (ILs),[Emim]PF6,[Emim][Tf2N],[PC6,6,6,14]PF6 and [PC6,6,6,14][Tf2N] in the capture process of CO2.Radial distribution function (RDF) and spatial distribution function (SDF) are used to analyze the microscopic properties of these systems.The calculated results show that the space distribution of CO2 around ILs determines the capability of ionic liquids for capturing CO2.Based on the analysis of SDF,CO2 and PF6- are overlapped partially around [Emim]+ in [Emim]PF6-CO2 mixture.When the anion is [Tf2N]-,cations are mainly distributed on one side of [Tf2N]- near N atom,and CO2 is concentrated on two sides near the fluoroalkylgroup (-CF3),and there is little overlapped district between cation and CO2.In [PC6,6,6,14]PF6-CO2 mixture,layered structure is found and CO2 is much nearer to PF6- than [PC6,6,6,14]+.Based on the analysis of RDF,in the phosphonium-based ILs,the highest distribution densities of anions and CO2 around cations are about 6 and 3 times as their average ones respectively,while in the imidazolium-based ILs,they are about 3 and 2 respectively,this means that the distributions of CO2 and anions around the imidazolium-based ILs are more evenly distributed than those around the phosphonium-bascd ILs.

  6. Molecular dynamics study of ion capture from water by a model ionophore, tetraprotonated cryptand SC24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owenson, Brian; Macelroy, Robert D.; Pohorille, Andrew

    1988-01-01

    The molecular dynamics of chloride capture from water by the tetraprotonated cryptand SC24 has been studied for the cases of 19 distances between the criptand and the chloride. The chloride capture is found to be characterized by a rapid cooperative change in the conformation of the cryptand when the Cl(-) begins to enter the ligand and just as it encounters the energy barrier. The conformational transition is associated with a shift of three N-H bonds from the pure endo orientation, such that they point toward the chloride.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations capture the misfolding of the bovine prion protein at acidic pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chin Jung; Daggett, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), or mad cow disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is transmissible to humans and that is currently incurable. BSE is caused by the prion protein (PrP), which adopts two conformers; PrPC is the native innocuous form, which is α-helix rich; and PrPSc is the β-sheet rich misfolded form, which is infectious and forms neurotoxic species. Acidic pH induces the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of bovine PrP at various pH regimes. An acidic pH environment induced conformational changes that were not observed in neutral pH simulations. Putative misfolded structures, with nonnative β-strands formed in the flexible N-terminal domain, were found in acidic pH simulations. Two distinct pathways were observed for the formation of nonnative β-strands: at low pH, hydrophobic contacts with M129 nucleated the nonnative β-strand; at mid-pH, polar contacts involving Q168 and D178 facilitated the formation of a hairpin at the flexible N-terminus. These mid- and low pH simulations capture the process of nonnative β-strand formation, thereby improving our understanding of how PrPC misfolds into the β-sheet rich PrPSc and how pH factors into the process. PMID:24970211

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Capture the Misfolding of the Bovine Prion Protein at Acidic pH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Jung Cheng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE, or mad cow disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that is transmissible to humans and that is currently incurable. BSE is caused by the prion protein (PrP, which adopts two conformers; PrPC is the native innocuous form, which is α-helix rich; and PrPSc is the β-sheet rich misfolded form, which is infectious and forms neurotoxic species. Acidic pH induces the conversion of PrPC to PrPSc. We have performed molecular dynamics simulations of bovine PrP at various pH regimes. An acidic pH environment induced conformational changes that were not observed in neutral pH simulations. Putative misfolded structures, with nonnative β-strands formed in the flexible N-terminal domain, were found in acidic pH simulations. Two distinct pathways were observed for the formation of nonnative β-strands: at low pH, hydrophobic contacts with M129 nucleated the nonnative β-strand; at mid-pH, polar contacts involving Q168 and D178 facilitated the formation of a hairpin at the flexible N-terminus. These mid- and low pH simulations capture the process of nonnative β-strand formation, thereby improving our understanding of how PrPC misfolds into the β-sheet rich PrPSc and how pH factors into the process.

  9. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  10. Rotational spectra and molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Wollrab, James E

    1967-01-01

    Physical Chemistry, A Series of Monographs: Rotational Spectra and Molecular Structure covers the energy levels and rotational transitions. This book is divided into nine chapters that evaluate the rigid asymmetric top molecules and the nuclear spin statistics for asymmetric tops. Some of the topics covered in the book are the asymmetric rotor functions; rotational transition intensities; classes of molecules; nuclear spin statistics for linear molecules and symmetric tops; and classical appearance of centrifugal and coriolis forces. Other chapters deal with the energy levels and effects of ce

  11. CSMB | Center For Structural Molecular Biology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Structural Molecular Biologyat ORNL is dedicated to developing instrumentation and methods for determining the 3-dimensional structures of proteins,...

  12. Rapid discovery of peptide capture candidates with demonstrated specificity for structurally similar toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkes, Deborah A.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Coppock, Matthew B.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.

    2016-05-01

    Peptides have emerged as viable alternatives to antibodies for molecular-based sensing due to their similarity in recognition ability despite their relative structural simplicity. Various methods for peptide capture reagent discovery exist, including phage display, yeast display, and bacterial display. One of the primary advantages of peptide discovery by bacterial display technology is the speed to candidate peptide capture agent, due to both rapid growth of bacteria and direct utilization of the sorted cells displaying each individual peptide for the subsequent round of biopanning. We have previously isolated peptide affinity reagents towards protective antigen of Bacillus anthracis using a commercially available automated magnetic sorting platform with improved enrichment as compared to manual magnetic sorting. In this work, we focus on adapting our automated biopanning method to a more challenging sort, to demonstrate the specificity possible with peptide capture agents. This was achieved using non-toxic, recombinant variants of ricin and abrin, RiVax and abrax, respectively, which are structurally similar Type II ribosomal inactivating proteins with significant sequence homology. After only two rounds of biopanning, enrichment of peptide capture candidates binding abrax but not RiVax was achieved as demonstrated by Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) studies. Further sorting optimization included negative sorting against RiVax, proper selection of autoMACS programs for specific sorting rounds, and using freshly made buffer and freshly thawed protein target for each round of biopanning for continued enrichment over all four rounds. Most of the resulting candidates from biopanning for abrax binding peptides were able to bind abrax but not RiVax, demonstrating that short peptide sequences can be highly specific even at this early discovery stage.

  13. A Versatile Simple Capture Assay for Assessing the Structural Integrity of MHC Multimer Reagents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan K Reed

    Full Text Available Antigen-specific T cell responses can be visualized using MHC:peptide multimers. In cases where robust T cell controls are not readily available to assess the integrity of multimer reagents prior to analyzing limited sample, the ability to assess the structural integrity of MHC multimers before their use in critical experiments would be useful. We present a method to probe the structural integrity of MHC multimers using antibodies specific for conformational determinants. Beads coated with anti-mouse Ig are incubated with conformation-specific mouse monoclonal antibody and then with fluorescently tagged MHC multimer. The ability of the bead to capture the labeled multimer can be measured semi-quantitatively by flow cytometry. In this manner, the correct folding of MHC multimers can be visualized and batches of multimer can be compared for quality control. Because there are multiple conformational epitopes formed by various molecular interactions among heavy chain, peptide, and β2M, this capture assay can assess the fidelity of each aspect of multimer structure, depending on the availability of antibodies. The described approach could be particularly useful for studies using irreplaceable samples, including patient samples collected in clinical trials.

  14. Molecularly Rigid Microporous Polyamine Captures and Stabilizes Conducting Platinum Nanoparticle Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Daping; He, Dong Sheng; Yang, Jinlong; Low, Ze-Xian; Malpass-Evans, Richard; Carta, Mariolino; McKeown, Neil B; Marken, Frank

    2016-08-31

    A molecularly rigid polyamine based on a polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-EA-TB) is shown to capture and stabilize platinum nanoparticles during colloid synthesis in the rigid framework. Stabilization here refers to avoiding aggregation without loss of surface reactivity. In the resulting rigid framework with embedded platinum nanoparticles, the volume ratio of platinum to PIM-EA-TB in starting materials is varied systematically from approximately 1.0 to 0.1 with the resulting platinum nanoparticle diameter varying from approximately 4.2 to 3.1 nm, respectively. Elemental analysis suggests that only a fraction of the polymer is "captured" to give nanocomposites rich in platinum. A transition occurs from electrically conducting and electrochemically active (with shorter average interparticle distance) to nonconducting and only partially electrochemically active (with longer average interparticle distance) polymer-platinum composites. The conducting nanoparticle network in the porous rigid macromolecular framework could be beneficial in electrocatalysis and in sensing applications. PMID:27509837

  15. Search for electromagnetic transitions between molecular states : results from the radiative capture channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the characterization of the cluster nature of resonances in 12C+12C and 12C+16O by measuring their γ decay. Results from resonant radiative capture measurements in these systems are presented. Spin attributions as well as specificities of the decay pattern are described. For the 12C+12C system, identification of γ transitions within the molecular band are discussed as well as a new method to measure the eventual persistence of the resonant behaviour down to astrophysical energies

  16. Molecular simulation studies of CO2 adsorption by carbon model compounds for carbon capture and sequestration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyang; Wilcox, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Effects of oxygen-containing surface functionalities on the adsorption of mixtures including CO(2)/CH(4), CO(2)/N(2), and CO(2)/H(2)O have been investigated in the current work. Together with Bader charge analysis, electronic structure calculations have provided the initial framework comprising both the geometry and corresponding charge information required to carry out statistical-based molecular simulations. The adsorption isotherms and selectivity of CO(2) from CO(2)/N(2), CO(2)/CH(4), and CO(2)/H(2)O gas mixtures were determined by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations at temperature/pressure conditions relevant to carbon capture and sequestration applications. The interactions between the surfaces with induced polarity and nonpolar/polar molecules have been investigated. It has been observed that, due to the induced polarity of the surface functionalization, the selectivity of CO(2) over CH(4) increases from approximately 2 to higher than 5, and the selectivity of CO(2) over N(2) increases from approximately 5 to 20, especially in the low-pressure regime. However, water vapor will always preferentially adsorb over CO(2) in carbon-based systems containing oxygen functionalized surfaces at conditions relevant to carbon capture application. Molecular simulation results indicate that the surface chemistry in micropores is tunable thereby influencing the selectivity for enhanced uptake of CO(2).

  17. Polysaccharides: Molecular and Supramolecular Structures. Terminology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heinze, Thomas; Petzold-Welcke, Katrin; Dam, van J.E.G.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter summarises important issues
    about the molecular and supramolecular structure
    of polysaccharides. It describes the terminology
    of polysaccharides systematically. The
    polysaccharides are divided regarding the
    molecular structures in glucans, polyoses,
    polysaccharid

  18. Structures for capturing CO.sub.2, methods of making the structures, and methods of capturing CO.sub.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher W; Hicks, Jason C; Fauth, Daniel J; McMahan, Gray

    2012-10-30

    Briefly described, embodiments of this disclosure, among others, include carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sorption structures, methods of making CO.sub.2 sorption structures, and methods of using CO.sub.2 sorption structures.

  19. "Smart" molecularly imprinted monoliths for the selective capture and easy release of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liyin; Tan, Xinyi; Sun, Qi; Svec, Frantisek; Lv, Yongqin

    2016-08-01

    A new thermally switchable molecularly imprinted monolith for the selective capture and release of proteins has been designed. First, a generic poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethylene dimethacrylate) monolith reacted with ethylenediamine followed by functionalization with 2-bromoisobutyryl bromide to introduce the initiator for atom transfer radical polymerization. Subsequently, a protein-imprinted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) layer was grafted onto the surface of the monolithic matrix by atom transfer radical polymerization. Scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy of the cross-sections of imprinted monoliths confirmed the formation of dense poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) brushes on the pore surface. The imprinted monolith exhibited high specificity and selectivity toward its template protein myoglobin over competing proteins and a remarkably large maximum adsorption capacity of 1641 mg/g. Moreover, this "smart" imprinted monolith featured thermally responsive characteristics that enabled selective capture and easy release of proteins triggered only by change in temperature with water as the mobile phase and avoided use of stronger organic solvents or change in ionic strength and pH. PMID:27352958

  20. Structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in molecular tunneling ionization theory (so called MO-ADK theory) for 22 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model.

  1. Molecular and Supermolecular Structure of Commercial Pyrodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Thanh-Blicharz, Joanna; Błaszczak, Wioletta; Szwengiel, Artur; Paukszta, Dominik; Lewandowicz, Grażyna

    2016-09-01

    Size exclusion chromatography with triple detection as well as infrared spectroscopy studies of commercially available pyrodextrins proved that these molecules are characterized not only by significantly lower molecular mass, in comparison to that of native starch, but also by increased branching. Therefore, pyrodextrins adopt a very compact structure in solution and show Newtonian behavior under shear in spite of their molecular masses of tens of thousands Daltons. The results also indicate that 50% reduction of digestibility of pyrodextrins is, to a minor extent, caused by formation of low-molecular color compounds containing carbonyl functional groups. The main reason is, as postulated in the literature, transglycosidation that leads to decreased occurrence of α-1,4-glycoside bonds in the molecular structure. In the process of dextrinization starch also undergoes changes in supermolecular structure, which, however, have no influence on digestibility. Likewise, the effect of formation of low-molecular colorful compounds containing carbonyl groups is not crucial.

  2. Molecular and Supermolecular Structure of Commercial Pyrodextrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Thanh-Blicharz, Joanna; Błaszczak, Wioletta; Szwengiel, Artur; Paukszta, Dominik; Lewandowicz, Grażyna

    2016-09-01

    Size exclusion chromatography with triple detection as well as infrared spectroscopy studies of commercially available pyrodextrins proved that these molecules are characterized not only by significantly lower molecular mass, in comparison to that of native starch, but also by increased branching. Therefore, pyrodextrins adopt a very compact structure in solution and show Newtonian behavior under shear in spite of their molecular masses of tens of thousands Daltons. The results also indicate that 50% reduction of digestibility of pyrodextrins is, to a minor extent, caused by formation of low-molecular color compounds containing carbonyl functional groups. The main reason is, as postulated in the literature, transglycosidation that leads to decreased occurrence of α-1,4-glycoside bonds in the molecular structure. In the process of dextrinization starch also undergoes changes in supermolecular structure, which, however, have no influence on digestibility. Likewise, the effect of formation of low-molecular colorful compounds containing carbonyl groups is not crucial. PMID:27447364

  3. Molecular basis for mid-region amyloid-β capture by leading Alzheimer's disease immunotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespi, Gabriela A N; Hermans, Stefan J; Parker, Michael W; Miles, Luke A

    2015-01-01

    Solanezumab (Eli Lilly) and crenezumab (Genentech) are the leading clinical antibodies targeting Amyloid-β (Aβ) to be tested in multiple Phase III clinical trials for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease in at-risk individuals. Aβ capture by these clinical antibodies is explained here with the first reported mid-region Aβ-anti-Aβ complex crystal structure. Solanezumab accommodates a large Aβ epitope (960 Å(2) buried interface over residues 16 to 26) that forms extensive contacts and hydrogen bonds to the antibody, largely via main-chain Aβ atoms and a deeply buried Phe19-Phe20 dipeptide core. The conformation of Aβ captured is an intermediate between observed sheet and helical forms with intramolecular hydrogen bonds stabilising residues 20-26 in a helical conformation. Remarkably, Aβ-binding residues are almost perfectly conserved in crenezumab. The structure explains the observed shared cross reactivity of solanezumab and crenezumab with proteins abundant in plasma that exhibit this Phe-Phe dipeptide. PMID:25880481

  4. Capturing Ion-Solid Interactions with MOS structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, R.; Harrell, W. R.; Harriss, J. E.; Sosolik, C. E.

    2012-02-01

    We have fabricated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices for a study of implantation rates and damage resulting from low energy ion-solid impacts. Specifically, we seek to capture ion irradiation effects on oxides by exposing as-grown SiO2 layers (50 nm to 200 nm) to incident beams of alkali ions with energies in the range of 100 eV to 10 keV. The oxide is analyzed post exposure by encapsulating the irradiated region under a top metallic contact or within a finished MOS device. Characterization of the resulting ion-modified MOS device involves the standard techniques of room temperature and bias-dependent capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. The C-V results reveal alkali ion-induced changes in the flatband voltage of irradiated devices which can be used to extract both the range and implantation probabilities of the ions. Biased C-V measurements are utilized to confirm the concentration or dosage of ions in the oxide. A triangular voltage sweep (TVS) measurement at elevated temperatures also reveals the total ionic space charge in the oxide and can be used to extract a mobility for the ions as they pass through the damaged oxide. Comparisons of these measurements to standard device models as well as to ion range calculations in the oxide are presented.

  5. A viral-human interactome based on structural motif-domain interactions captures the human infectome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Segura-Cabrera

    Full Text Available Protein interactions between a pathogen and its host are fundamental in the establishment of the pathogen and underline the infection mechanism. In the present work, we developed a single predictive model for building a host-viral interactome based on the identification of structural descriptors from motif-domain interactions of protein complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB. The structural descriptors were used for searching, in a database of protein sequences of human and five clinically important viruses; therefore, viral and human proteins sharing a descriptor were predicted as interacting proteins. The analysis of the host-viral interactome allowed to identify a set of new interactions that further explain molecular mechanism associated with viral infections and showed that it was able to capture human proteins already associated to viral infections (human infectome and non-infectious diseases (human diseasome. The analysis of human proteins targeted by viral proteins in the context of a human interactome showed that their neighbors are enriched in proteins reported with differential expression under infection and disease conditions. It is expected that the findings of this work will contribute to the development of systems biology for infectious diseases, and help guide the rational identification and prioritization of novel drug targets.

  6. Capturing the age and spatial structures of migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rogers, A; Raymer, J; Willekens, F

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we model the structures found in the level (generation) and allocation (distribution) components of age-specific and origin-destination-specific migration flows. For the examples, we examine the regional migration patterns in the USA for four periods: 1955-60, 1965-70, 1975-80, and 198

  7. Hamiltonian Mapping Revisited: Calibrating Minimalist Models to Capture Molecular Recognition by Intrinsically Disordered Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Law, Sean M.; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Panahi, Afra; Brooks, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular recognition by intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) plays a central role in many critical cellular processes. Toward achieving detailed mechanistic understanding of IDP–target interactions, here we employ the “Hamiltonian mapping” methodology, which is rooted in the weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM), for the fast and efficient calibration of structure-based models in studies of IDPs. By performing reference simulations on a given Hamiltonian, we illustrate for two model ...

  8. The Molecular Structure of Penicillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Ronald

    2004-01-01

    Overviews of the observations that constitute a structure proof for penicillin, specifically aimed at the general student population, are presented. Melting points and boiling points were criteria of purity and a crucial tool was microanalysis leading to empirical formulas.

  9. STRUCTURED MOLECULAR GAS REVEALS GALACTIC SPIRAL ARMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 13CO J = 1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formation. These results support a possible evolutionary sequence in which unstructured, diffuse gas transforms itself into a structured state on encountering the spiral arms, followed by star formation and an eventual return to the unstructured state after the spiral arm passage.

  10. Structure of an 'open' clamp type II topoisomerase-DNA complex provides a mechanism for DNA capture and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laponogov, Ivan; Veselkov, Dennis A; Crevel, Isabelle M-T; Pan, Xiao-Su; Fisher, L Mark; Sanderson, Mark R

    2013-11-01

    Type II topoisomerases regulate DNA supercoiling and chromosome segregation. They act as ATP-operated clamps that capture a DNA duplex and pass it through a transient DNA break in a second DNA segment via the sequential opening and closure of ATPase-, G-DNA- and C-gates. Here, we present the first 'open clamp' structures of a 3-gate topoisomerase II-DNA complex, the seminal complex engaged in DNA recognition and capture. A high-resolution structure was solved for a (full-length ParE-ParC55)2 dimer of Streptococcus pneumoniae topoisomerase IV bound to two DNA molecules: a closed DNA gate in a B-A-B form double-helical conformation and a second B-form duplex associated with closed C-gate helices at a novel site neighbouring the catalytically important β-pinwheel DNA-binding domain. The protein N gate is present in an 'arms-wide-open' state with the undimerized N-terminal ParE ATPase domains connected to TOPRIM domains via a flexible joint and folded back allowing ready access both for gate and transported DNA segments and cleavage-stabilizing antibacterial drugs. The structure shows the molecular conformations of all three gates at 3.7 Å, the highest resolution achieved for the full complex to date, and illuminates the mechanism of DNA capture and transport by a type II topoisomerase.

  11. Structured Molecular Gas Reveals Galactic Spiral Arms

    CERN Document Server

    Sawada, Tsuyoshi; Koda, Jin

    2012-01-01

    We explore the development of structures in molecular gas in the Milky Way by applying the analysis of the brightness distribution function (BDF) and the brightness distribution index (BDI) in the archival data from the Boston University-Five College Radio Astronomy Observatory 13CO J=1-0 Galactic Ring Survey. The BDI measures the fractional contribution of spatially confined bright molecular emission over faint emission extended over large areas. This relative quantity is largely independent of the amount of molecular gas and of any conventional, pre-conceived structures, such as cores, clumps, or giant molecular clouds. The structured molecular gas traced by higher BDI is located continuously along the spiral arms in the Milky Way in the longitude-velocity diagram. This clearly indicates that molecular gas changes its structure as it flows through the spiral arms. Although the high-BDI gas generally coincides with H II regions, there is also some high-BDI gas with no/little signature of ongoing star formati...

  12. Differential Estimates of Southern Flying Squirrel (Glaucomys volans) Population Structure Based on Capture Method.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laves, Kevin S.; Loeb, Susan C.

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT.—It is commonly assumed that population estimates derived from trapping small mammals are accurate and unbiased or that estimates derived from different capture methods are comparable. We captured southern flying squirrels (Glaucomys volans) using two methods to study their effect on red-cockaded woodpecker (Picoides borealis) reproductive success. Southern flying squirrels were captured at and removed from 30 red-cockaded woodpecker cluster sites during March to July 1994 and 1995 using Sherman traps placed in a grid encompassing a red-cockaded woodpecker nest tree and by hand from red-cockaded woodpecker cavities. Totals of 195 (1994) and 190 (1995) red-cockaded woodpecker cavities were examined at least three times each year. Trappability of southern flying squirrels in Sherman traps was significantly greater in 1995 (1.18%; 22,384 trap nights) than in 1994 (0.42%; 20,384 trap nights), and capture rate of southern flying squirrels in cavities was significantly greater in 1994 (22.7%; 502 cavity inspections) than in 1995 (10.8%; 555 cavity inspections). However, more southern flying squirrels were captured per cavity inspection than per Sherman trap night in both years. Male southern flying squirrels were more likely to be captured from cavities than in Sherman traps in 1994, but not in 1995. Both male and female juveniles were more likely to be captured in cavities than in traps in both years. In 1994 males in reproductive condition were more likely to be captured in cavities than in traps and in 1995 we captured significantly more reproductive females in cavities than in traps. Our data suggest that population estimates based solely on one trapping method may not represent true population size or structure of southern flying squirrels.

  13. [Oligoglycine surface structures: molecular dynamics simulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gus'kova, O A; Khalatur, P G; Khokhlov, A R; Chinarev, A A; Tsygankova, S V; Bovin, N V

    2010-01-01

    The full-atomic molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of adsorption mode for diantennary oligoglycines [H-Gly4-NH(CH2)5]2 onto graphite and mica surface is described. The resulting structure of adsorption layers is analyzed. The peptide second structure motives have been studied by both STRIDE (structural identification) and DSSP (dictionary of secondary structure of proteins) methods. The obtained results confirm the possibility of polyglycine II (PGII) structure formation in diantennary oligoglycine (DAOG) monolayers deposited onto graphite surface, which was earlier estimated based on atomic-force microscopy measurements.

  14. Reaction dynamics following electron capture of chlorofluorocarbon adsorbed on water cluster : a direct density functional theory molecular dynamics study

    OpenAIRE

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; ABE, Shigeaki

    2007-01-01

    The electron capture dynamics of halocarbon and its water complex have been investigated by means of the full dimensional direct density functional theory molecular dynamics method in order to shed light on the mechanism of electron capture of a halocarbon adsorbed on the ice surface. The CF2Cl2 molecule and a cyclic water trimer (H2O)3 were used as halocarbon and water cluster, respectively. The dynamics calculation of CF2Cl2 showed that both C–Cl bonds are largely elongated after the electr...

  15. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecular modelling is adequate to rapidly tackle the structure of RNA molecules. With new structured RNAs constituting a central class of cellular regulators discovered every year, the need for swift and reliable modelling methods is more crucial than ever. The pragmatic method based...... on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded...... in three dimensions (3D) and used as building blocks assembled manually during a bioinformatic interactive process. Comparing the models to the corresponding crystal structures has validated the method as being powerful to predict the RNA topology and architecture while being less accurate regarding...

  16. Rotational structure in molecular infrared spectra

    CERN Document Server

    di Lauro, Carlo

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in infrared molecular spectroscopy have resulted in sophisticated theoretical and laboratory methods that are difficult to grasp without a solid understanding of the basic principles and underlying theory of vibration-rotation absorption spectroscopy. Rotational Structure in Molecular Infrared Spectra fills the gap between these recent, complex topics and the most elementary methods in the field of rotational structure in the infrared spectra of gaseous molecules. There is an increasing need for people with the skills and knowledge to interpret vibration-rotation spectra in ma

  17. Study on Molecular Structure of TATFIW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Li-jie; LI Yan-yue; LU Lin; CHEN Shu-sen; CHEN Hua-xiong; JIN Shao-hua; ZHAO Xin-qi

    2008-01-01

    The molecular structure of triacetyltriformylhexaazaisowurtzitane (TATFIW) is optimized by using Gaussian98 software package at the level of B3LYP/6-31G. Theoretically analyzed the TATFIW molecular structure, namely bond length, bond angle, dihedral angle and the charge distribution, it was found that hydrogen bond exists in TATFIW, and acetyl is easily taken off than formyl in the nitrolysis with nitric-sulfuric mixed acid. These results mentioned above agree with experiments. The comparison of calculated vibration frequency and intensity with the experiment values are also given.

  18. Capturing the transient species at the electrode-electrolyte interface by in situ dynamic molecular imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jiachao; Zhou, Yufan; Hua, Xin; Liu, Songqin; Zhu, Zihua; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2016-09-01

    The electrochemical interface between the solid electrode and liquid electrolyte has long been studied because of its importance in electrical energy storage, material synthesis, catalysis, and energy conversions.1 However, such interfaces are complex and extremely difficult to observe directly and are poorly under-stood due to lack of true in situ tools.2 Although electrochemical techniques have been widely used to investigate such interfaces, they are based on macroscopic models or current changes that could not provide direct ionic and molecular information of the interfacial structure. Many in situ and ex situ spectroscopy and microscopy techniques have been used to study the solid–liquid (s–l) interface.3,4 In situ TEM in sealed liquid cells has notably become a popular choice to provide structural information of s–l at the atomic level.5,6 However, real-time spatial mapping of the ionic and molecular intermediate species at the dynamic inter-face still remains a key challenge.

  19. Irreversible Change of the Pore Structure of ZIF-8 in Carbon Dioxide Capture with Water Coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Huang; Guo, Ping; Regueira Muñiz, Teresa;

    2016-01-01

    showed an irreversible change of its framework, which occurs during the CO2 capture process. It was found that there is an irreversible chemical reaction among ZIF-8, water, and CO2, which creates both zinc carbonate (or zinc carbonate hydroxides) and single 2-methylimidazole crystals, and therefore......The performance of zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8) for CO2 capture under three different conditions (wetted ZIF-8, ZIF-8/water slurry, and ZIF-8/water-glycol slurry) was systemically investigated. This investigation included the study of the pore structure stability of ZIF-8 by using X...... the pore structure of ZIF-8 collapses. It is suggested therefore that care must be taken when using ZIF-8 or products containing ZIF-8 for gas capture, gas separation, or other applications where both water and acid gases coexist....

  20. Anatomy of molecular structures in $^{20}$Ne

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, E F; Li, Z P; Meng, J; Ring, P

    2015-01-01

    We present a beyond mean-field study of clusters and molecular structures in low-spin states of $^{20}$Ne with a multireference relativistic energy density functional, where the dynamical correlation effects of symmetry restoration and quadrupole-octupole shapes fluctuation are taken into account with projections on parity, particle number and angular momentum in the framework of the generator coordinate method. Both the energy spectrum and the electric multipole transition strengths for low-lying parity-doublet bands are better reproduced after taking into account the dynamical octupole vibration effect. Consistent with the finding in previous antisymmetrized molecular dynamics studies, a rotation-induced dissolution of the $\\alpha+^{16}$O molecular structure in $^{20}$Ne is predicted and this peculiar phenomenon is partially attributed to the special deformation-dependent moment of inertia.

  1. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Deng

    Full Text Available Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets.

  2. Molecular Structure of Human-Liver Glycogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bin; Sullivan, Mitchell A.; Chen, Cheng; Li, Jialun; Powell, Prudence O.; Hu, Zhenxia; Gilbert, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    Glycogen is a highly branched glucose polymer which is involved in maintaining blood-sugar homeostasis. Liver glycogen contains large composite α particles made up of linked β particles. Previous studies have shown that the binding which links β particles into α particles is impaired in diabetic mice. The present study reports the first molecular structural characterization of human-liver glycogen from non-diabetic patients, using transmission electron microscopy for morphology and size-exclusion chromatography for the molecular size distribution; the latter is also studied as a function of time during acid hydrolysis in vitro, which is sensitive to certain structural features, particularly glycosidic vs. proteinaceous linkages. The results are compared with those seen in mice and pigs. The molecular structural change during acid hydrolysis is similar in each case, and indicates that the linkage of β into α particles is not glycosidic. This result, and the similar morphology in each case, together imply that human liver glycogen has similar molecular structure to those of mice and pigs. This knowledge will be useful for future diabetes drug targets. PMID:26934359

  3. Solvents for CO2 capture. Structure-activity relationships combined with vapour-liquid-equilibrium measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mergler, Y.L.; Rumley-Van Gurp, R.; Brasser, P.; Koning, M.C. de; Goetheer, E.L.V.

    2011-01-01

    In this study a systematic approach was chosen to test and characterize amine systems for CO2 capture. Vapour-liquid-equilibrium measurements were performed on a homologue series of amines, with ethylene amine as base structure. Various functional groups were used that ranged in chemical and physica

  4. Mercury capture by selected Bulgarian fly ashes: Influence of coal rank and fly ash carbon pore structure on capture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostova, I.J.; Hower, J.C.; Mastalerz, Maria; Vassilev, S.V.

    2011-01-01

    Mercury capture by fly ash C was investigated at five lignite- and subbituminous-coal-burning Bulgarian power plants (Republika, Bobov Dol, Maritza East 2, Maritza East 3, and Sliven). Although the C content of the ashes is low, never exceeding 1.6%, the Hg capture on a unit C basis demonstrates that the low-rank-coal-derived fly ash carbons are more efficient in capturing Hg than fly ash carbons from bituminous-fired power plants. While some low-C and low-Hg fly ashes do not reveal any trends of Hg versus C, the 2nd and, in particular, the 3rd electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows at the Republika power plant do have sufficient fly ash C range and experience flue gas sufficiently cool to capture measurable amounts of Hg. The Republika 3rd ESP row exhibits an increase in Hg with increasing C, as observed in other power plants, for example, in Kentucky power plants burning Appalachian-sourced bituminous coals. Mercury/C decreases with an increase in fly ash C, suggesting that some of the C is isolated from the flue gas stream and does not contribute to Hg capture. Mercury capture increases with an increase in Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and micropore surface area. The differences in Hg capture between the Bulgarian plants burning low-rank coal and high volatile bituminous-fed Kentucky power plants suggests that the variations in C forms resulting from the combustion of the different ranks also influence the efficiency of Hg capture. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Structural Analysis of Molecular Clouds: Dendrograms

    CERN Document Server

    Rosolowsky, E W; Kauffmann, J; Goodman, A A

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of dendrograms at representing the essential features of the hierarchical structure of the isosurfaces for molecular line data cubes. The dendrogram of a data cube is an abstraction of the changing topology of the isosurfaces as a function of contour level. The ability to track hierarchical structure over a range of scales makes this analysis philosophically different from local segmentation algorithms like CLUMPFIND. Points in the dendrogram structure correspond to specific volumes in data cubes defined by their bounding isosurfaces. We further refine the technique by measuring the properties associated with each isosurface in the analysis allowing for a multiscale calculation of molecular gas properties. Using COMPLETE 13CO(1-0) data from the L1448 region in Perseus and mock observations of a simulated data cube, we identify regions that have a significant contribution by self-gravity to their energetics on a range of scales. We find evidence for self-gravitation on all spatial sc...

  6. Molecular and structural analysis of viscoelastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yapp, Rebecca D.; Kalyanam, Sureshkumar; Insana, Michael F.

    2007-03-01

    Elasticity imaging is emerging as an important tool for breast cancer detection and monitoring of treatment. Viscoelastic image contrast in breast lesions is generated by disease specific processes that modify the molecular structure of connective tissues. We showed previously that gelatin hydrogels exhibit mechanical behavior similar to native collagen found in breast tissue and therefore are suitable as phantoms for elasticity imaging. This paper summarizes our study of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogels designed to discover molecular-scale sources of elasticity image contrast.

  7. Dynamics of fragment capture for cluster structures of weakly bound 7Li

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrivastava A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Role of cluster structures of 7Li on reaction dynamics have been studied by performing exclusive measurements of prompt-γ rays from residues with scattered particles at energy, E/Vb = 1.6, with 198Pt target. Yields of the residues resulting after capture of t and 4,5,6He, corresponding to different excitation energies of the composite system were estimated. The results were compared with three body classical-dynamical model for breakup fusion, constrained by the measured fusion, α and t capture cross-sections. The cross-section of residues from capture of α and t agreed well with the prediction of the model showing dominance of the two step process - breakup fusion, while those from tightly bound 6He showed massive transfer to be the dominant mechanism.

  8. Turbulent Velocity Structure in Molecular Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ossenkopf, V; Ossenkopf, Volker; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2002-01-01

    We compare velocity structure observed in the Polaris Flare molecular cloud at scales ranging from 0.015 pc to 20 pc to the velocity structure of a suite of simulations of supersonic hydrodynamic and MHD turbulence computed with the ZEUS MHD code. We examine different methods of characterising the structure, including a scanning-beam size-linewidth relation, structure functions, velocity and velocity difference probability distribution functions (PDFs), and the Delta-variance wavelet transform, and use them to compare models and observations. The Delta-variance is most sensitive in detecting characteristic scales and varying scaling laws, but is limited in the observational application by its lack of intensity weighting. We compare the true velocity PDF in our models to simulated observations of velocity centroids and average line profiles in optically thin lines, and find that the line profiles reflect the true PDF better. The observed velocity structure is consistent with supersonic turbulence showing a com...

  9. Likelihood analysis of spatial capture-recapture models for stratified or class structured populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew; Sutherland, Christopher S.; Fuller, Angela K.; Sun, Catherine C.

    2015-01-01

    We develop a likelihood analysis framework for fitting spatial capture-recapture (SCR) models to data collected on class structured or stratified populations. Our interest is motivated by the necessity of accommodating the problem of missing observations of individual class membership. This is particularly problematic in SCR data arising from DNA analysis of scat, hair or other material, which frequently yields individual identity but fails to identify the sex. Moreover, this can represent a large fraction of the data and, given the typically small sample sizes of many capture-recapture studies based on DNA information, utilization of the data with missing sex information is necessary. We develop the class structured likelihood for the case of missing covariate values, and then we address the scaling of the likelihood so that models with and without class structured parameters can be formally compared regardless of missing values. We apply our class structured model to black bear data collected in New York in which sex could be determined for only 62 of 169 uniquely identified individuals. The models containing sex-specificity of both the intercept of the SCR encounter probability model and the distance coefficient, and including a behavioral response are strongly favored by log-likelihood. Estimated population sex ratio is strongly influenced by sex structure in model parameters illustrating the importance of rigorous modeling of sex differences in capture-recapture models.

  10. Magnetic Capture of a Molecular Biomarker from Synovial Fluid in a Rat Model of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmola, Elena G; Shah, Yash; Arnold, David P; Dobson, Jon; Allen, Kyle D

    2016-04-01

    Biomarker development for osteoarthritis (OA) often begins in rodent models, but can be limited by an inability to aspirate synovial fluid from a rodent stifle (similar to the human knee). To address this limitation, we have developed a magnetic nanoparticle-based technology to collect biomarkers from a rodent stifle, termed magnetic capture. Using a common OA biomarker--the c-terminus telopeptide of type II collagen (CTXII)--magnetic capture was optimized in vitro using bovine synovial fluid and then tested in a rat model of knee OA. Anti-CTXII antibodies were conjugated to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide-containing polymeric particles. Using these anti-CTXII particles, magnetic capture was able to estimate the level of CTXII in 25 μL aliquots of bovine synovial fluid; and under controlled conditions, this estimate was unaffected by synovial fluid viscosity. Following in vitro testing, anti-CTXII particles were tested in a rat monoiodoacetate model of knee OA. CTXII could be magnetically captured from a rodent stifle without the need to aspirate fluid and showed tenfold changes in CTXII levels from OA-affected joints relative to contralateral control joints. Combined, these data demonstrate the ability and sensitivity of magnetic capture for post-mortem analysis of OA biomarkers in the rat. PMID:26136062

  11. 2004 Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward Eisenstein Nancy Ryan Gray

    2005-03-23

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Gordon Research Conference on Reversible Associations in Structure & Molecular Biology was held at Four Points Sheraton, CA, 1/25-30/2004. The Conference was well attended with 82 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students.

  12. Molecular sieve supported ionic liquids as efficient adsorbent for CO2 capture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Na

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [NH3e-mim][BF4], [OHe-mim][BF4] and [HOEAm] were selected and supported onto molecular sieves NaY, USY, SAPO-34 and MCM-41, to prepare supported ionic liquids. It was found that [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY has excellent CO2 adsorption performance, with adsorption capacity of 0.108 mmolCO2/g. This paper investigates the optimal adsorption conditions and recyclability of [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY. The results show that [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY has good CO2 adsorption under the condition of 20°C and 20% ILs loading amount. By vacuum heating, CO2 adsorption capacity reaches 0.451mmolCO2/g at fifth runs and reduces to 0.29mmolCO2/g at tenth runs. The structure and characterization of the [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY was examined by FT-IR, XRD, SEM and TG-DSC. TG-DSC also shows that it has good thermostability below 50°C.

  13. Structural basis for hemoglobin capture by Staphylococcus aureus cell-surface protein, IsdH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Kumar, Kaavya; Jacques, David A; Pishchany, Gleb; Caradoc-Davies, Tom; Spirig, Thomas; Malmirchegini, G Reza; Langley, David B; Dickson, Claire F; Mackay, Joel P; Clubb, Robert T; Skaar, Eric P; Guss, J Mitchell; Gell, David A

    2011-11-01

    Pathogens must steal iron from their hosts to establish infection. In mammals, hemoglobin (Hb) represents the largest reservoir of iron, and pathogens express Hb-binding proteins to access this source. Here, we show how one of the commonest and most significant human pathogens, Staphylococcus aureus, captures Hb as the first step of an iron-scavenging pathway. The x-ray crystal structure of Hb bound to a domain from the Isd (iron-regulated surface determinant) protein, IsdH, is the first structure of a Hb capture complex to be determined. Surface mutations in Hb that reduce binding to the Hb-receptor limit the capacity of S. aureus to utilize Hb as an iron source, suggesting that Hb sequence is a factor in host susceptibility to infection. The demonstration that pathogens make highly specific recognition complexes with Hb raises the possibility of developing inhibitors of Hb binding as antibacterial agents.

  14. Low-cost structured-light based 3D capture system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jing; Bengtson, Kurt R.; Robinson, Barrett F.; Allebach, Jan P.

    2014-03-01

    Most of the 3D capture products currently in the market are high-end and pricey. They are not targeted for consumers, but rather for research, medical, or industrial usage. Very few aim to provide a solution for home and small business applications. Our goal is to fill in this gap by only using low-cost components to build a 3D capture system that can satisfy the needs of this market segment. In this paper, we present a low-cost 3D capture system based on the structured-light method. The system is built around the HP TopShot LaserJet Pro M275. For our capture device, we use the 8.0 Mpixel camera that is part of the M275. We augment this hardware with two 3M MPro 150 VGA (640 × 480) pocket projectors. We also describe an analytical approach to predicting the achievable resolution of the reconstructed 3D object based on differentials and small signal theory, and an experimental procedure for validating that the system under test meets the specifications for reconstructed object resolution that are predicted by our analytical model. By comparing our experimental measurements from the camera-projector system with the simulation results based on the model for this system, we conclude that our prototype system has been correctly configured and calibrated. We also conclude that with the analytical models, we have an effective means for specifying system parameters to achieve a given target resolution for the reconstructed object.

  15. Interatomic Coulombic electron capture in atomic, molecular, and quantum dot systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bande Annika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The interatomic Coulombic electron capture (ICEC process has recently been predicted theoretically for clusters of atoms and molecules. For an atom A capturing an electron e(ε it competes with the well known photorecombination, because in an environment of neutral or anionic neighboring atoms B, A can transfer its excess energy in the ultrafast ICEC process to B which is then ionized. The cross section for e(ε + A + B → A− + B+ + e(ε′ has been obtained in an asymptotic approximation based on scattering theory for several clusters [1,2]. It was found that ICEC starts dominating the PR for distances among participating species of nanometers and lower. Therefore, we believe that the ICEC process might be of importance in the atmosphere, in biological systems, plasmas, or in nanostructured materials. As an example for the latter, ICEC has been investigated by means of electron dynamics in a model potential for semiconductor double quantum dots (QDs [3]. In the simplest case one QD captures an electron while the outgoing electron is emitted from the other. The reaction probability for this process was found to be relatively large.

  16. Molecular Models of Genetic and Organismic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baianu, I C

    2004-01-01

    In recent studies we showed that the earlier relational theories of organismic sets (Rashevsky,1967), Metabolic-Replication (M,R)-systems (Rosen,1958)and molecular sets (Bartholomay,1968) share a joint foundation that can be studied within a unified categorical framework of functional organismic structures (Baianu,1980. This is possible because all relational theories have a biomolecular basis, that is, complex structures such as genomes, cells,organs and biological organisms are mathematically represented in terms of biomolecular properties and entities,(that are often implicit in their representation axioms. The definition of organismic sets, for example, requires that certain essential quantities be determined from experiment: these are specified by special sets of values of general observables that are derived from physicochemical measurements(Baianu,1970; Baianu,1980; Baianu et al, 2004a.)Such observables are context-dependent and lead directly to natural transformations in categories and Topoi, that are...

  17. Effects of problem characteristics, capturing problem structure and using analogies on high school students’ success on problem-solving

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro GARCÍA GALLEGO; Sanjosé López, Vicente; SOLAZ-PORTOLÉS, Joan Josep

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses the influence of academic level, academic itinerary, word problem’s context and structure, capturing problem structure, and using analogies on problem-solving. A factorial design was used with one within-subjects variable and several between-subjects variables, which have been selected depending on the hypothesis in question. Two types of booklets containing two word problems and questions about capturing problem structure and using analogies in problem solving, were admin...

  18. Molecular Modeling of the Chain Structures of Polybenzoxazines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The structures and properties of benzoxazines were investigated by virtue of molecular modeling at a molecular level. By means of Cerius software(version 4.0) supplied by Molecular Simulations Inc., the molecular mechanics and the molecular dynamics were performed under a PCFF force field. Five kinds of the polymeric chains of benzoxazines were created by using polymer builder and energy minimization. The relaxation process was conducted with both energy minimization and molecular dynamics.

  19. Laser slowing of CaF molecules to near the capture velocity of a molecular MOT

    CERN Document Server

    Hemmerling, Boerge; Ravi, Aakash; Anderegg, Loic; Drayna, Garrett K; Hutzler, Nicholas R; Collopy, Alejandra L; Ye, Jun; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Doyle, John M

    2016-01-01

    Laser slowing of CaF molecules down to the capture velocity of a magneto-optical trap (MOT) for molecules is achieved. Starting from a two-stage buffer gas beam source, we apply frequency-broadened "white-light" slowing and observe approximately 6x10^4 CaF molecules with velocities near 10\\,m/s. CaF is a candidate for collisional studies in the mK regime. This work represents a significant step towards magneto-optical trapping of CaF.

  20. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; Li, F.; Pai, C.-H.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.

    2016-07-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method.

  1. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C J; Hua, J F; Xu, X L; Li, F; Pai, C-H; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Gu, Y Q; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method. PMID:27403561

  2. Capturing relativistic wakefield structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C. J.; Hua, J. F.; Xu, X. L.; Li, F.; Pai, C.-H.; Wan, Y.; Wu, Y. P.; Gu, Y. Q.; Mori, W. B.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.

    2016-01-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime, and it can also qualitatively map the major features of nonlinear wakes. The capturing of the injection in a nonlinear wake is demonstrated through 3D PIC simulations as an example of the application of this new method. PMID:27403561

  3. Molecular basis and consequences of a deletion in the amelogenin gene, analyzed by capture PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Pettersson, U.; Landegren, U. (Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-07-01

    A mutation that disrupts the gene for one of the major proteins in tooth enamel has been investigated. The mutation is located in the amelogenin gene and causes X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, characterized by defective mineralization of tooth enamel. The authors have isolated the breakpoints of a 5-kb deletion in the amelogenin gene on the basis of nucleotide sequence information located upstream of the lesion, using a technique termed capture PCR. The deletion removes five of the seven exons, spanning from the second intron to the last exon. Only the first two codons for the mature protein remain, consistent with the relatively severe phenotype of affected individuals in the present family. The mutation appears to have arisen as an illegitimate recombination event since of 11 nucleotide positions immediately surrounding the two breakpoints, 9 are identical. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Plant sex chromosomes: molecular structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilena, M; Mariotti, B; Manzano, S

    2008-01-01

    Recent molecular and genomic studies carried out in a number of model dioecious plant species, including Asparagus officinalis, Carica papaya, Silene latifolia, Rumex acetosa and Marchantia polymorpha, have shed light on the molecular structure of both homomorphic and heteromorphic sex chromosomes, and also on the gene functions they have maintained since their evolution from a pair of autosomes. The molecular structure of sex chromosomes in species from different plant families represents the evolutionary pathway followed by sex chromosomes during their evolution. The degree of Y chromosome degeneration that accompanies the suppression of recombination between the Xs and Ys differs among species. The primitive Ys of A. officinalis and C. papaya have only diverged from their homomorphic Xs in a short male-specific and non-recombining region (MSY), while the heteromorphic Ys of S. latifolia, R. acetosa and M. polymorpha have diverged from their respective Xs. As in the Y chromosomes of mammals and Drosophila, the accumulation of repetitive DNA, including both transposable elements and satellite DNA, has played an important role in the divergence and size enlargement of plant Ys, and consequently in reducing gene density. Nevertheless, the degeneration process in plants does not appear to have reached the Y-linked genes. Although a low gene density has been found in the sequenced Y chromosome of M. polymorpha, most of its genes are essential and are expressed in the vegetative and reproductive organs in both male and females. Similarly, most of the Y-linked genes that have been isolated and characterized up to now in S. latifolia are housekeeping genes that have X-linked homologues, and are therefore expressed in both males and females. Only one of them seems to be degenerate with respect to its homologous region in the X. Sequence analysis of larger regions in the homomorphic X and Y chromosomes of papaya and asparagus, and also in the heteromorphic sex chromosomes

  5. A Structure-Based Mechanism for Vesicle Capture by the Multisubunit Tethering Complex Dsl1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y.; Yip, C; Tripathi, A; Huie, D; Jeffrey, P; Walz, T; Hughson, F

    2009-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking requires membrane fusion, mediated by SNARE proteins, and upstream events that probably include tethering, an initial long-range attachment between a vesicle and its target organelle. Among the factors proposed to mediate tethering are a set of multisubunit tethering complexes (MTCs). The Dsl1 complex, with only three subunits, is the simplest known MTC and is essential for the retrograde traffic of COPI-coated vesicles from the Golgi to the ER. To elucidate structural principles underlying MTC function, we have determined the structure of the Dsl1 complex, revealing a tower containing at its base the binding sites for two ER SNAREs and at its tip a flexible lasso for capturing vesicles. The Dsl1 complex binds to individual SNAREs via their N-terminal regulatory domains and also to assembled SNARE complexes; moreover, it is capable of accelerating SNARE complex assembly. Our results suggest that even the simplest MTC may be capable of orchestrating vesicle capture, uncoating, and fusion.

  6. Molecular Component Structures Mediated Formation of Self-assemblies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Molecular recognition directed self-assemblies from complementary molecular components, melamine and barbituric acid derivatives were studied by means of NMR, fluorescence, and TEM. It was found that both the process of the self-assembly and the morphologies of the result ed self-assemblies could be mediated by modifying the structures of the molecular components used. The effect of the structures of the molecular components on the formation of the self-as semblies was discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions.

  7. Molecular structure input on the web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A molecule editor, that is program for input and editing of molecules, is an indispensable part of every cheminformatics or molecular processing system. This review focuses on a special type of molecule editors, namely those that are used for molecule structure input on the web. Scientific computing is now moving more and more in the direction of web services and cloud computing, with servers scattered all around the Internet. Thus a web browser has become the universal scientific user interface, and a tool to edit molecules directly within the web browser is essential. The review covers a history of web-based structure input, starting with simple text entry boxes and early molecule editors based on clickable maps, before moving to the current situation dominated by Java applets. One typical example - the popular JME Molecule Editor - will be described in more detail. Modern Ajax server-side molecule editors are also presented. And finally, the possible future direction of web-based molecule editing, based on technologies like JavaScript and Flash, is discussed.

  8. Molecular sieve supported ionic liquids as efficient adsorbent for CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Na; Wang Rui

    2015-01-01

    [NH3e-mim][BF4], [OHe-mim][BF4] and [HOEAm] were selected and supported onto molecular sieves NaY, USY, SAPO-34 and MCM-41, to prepare supported ionic liquids. It was found that [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY has excellent CO2 adsorption performance, with adsorption capacity of 0.108 mmolCO2/g. This paper investigates the optimal adsorption conditions and recyclability of [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY. The results show that [NH3e-mim][BF4]/NaY has good CO2 adsorption under the ...

  9. Effects of problem characteristics, capturing problem structure and using analogies on high school students’ success on problem-solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro GARCÍA GALLEGO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study analyses the influence of academic level, academic itinerary, word problem’s context and structure, capturing problem structure, and using analogies on problem-solving. A factorial design was used with one within-subjects variable and several between-subjects variables, which have been selected depending on the hypothesis in question. Two types of booklets containing two word problems and questions about capturing problem structure and using analogies in problem solving, were administered to a total of 181 grade-10 and grade-12 students. The results of non-parametric statistical tests showed that: a Academic level and academic itinerary are decisive variables in problem solving, b Capturing problem structure is needed to solve problems, but the use of analogies is not needed, and c Problems increase in difficulty when they have complex structure and low familiarity context.

  10. A structured approach for selecting carbon capture process models : A case study on monoethanolamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Spek, Mijndert; Ramirez, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Carbon capture and storage is considered a promising option to mitigate CO2 emissions. This has resulted in many R&D efforts focusing at developing viable carbon capture technologies. During carbon capture technology development, process modeling plays an important role. Selecting an appropriate pro

  11. Freezing capture of polymorphic aggregates of bolaamphiphilic (L)-valine-based molecular hydrogelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebot, Vicent J; Díaz-Oltra, Santiago; Smets, Johan; Fernández Prieto, Susana; Miravet, Juan F; Escuder, Beatriu

    2014-05-01

    Nanostructured xerogels have been prepared by the freeze-drying of hydrogels and aggregates formed by bolaamphiphilic L-valine derivatives after aging under different environmental conditions. A wide variety of shapes and sizes has been achieved by a simple methodology. These nanostructures have been studied by SEM and WAXD and a dramatic influence of structural flexibility on the kinetics of aggregation has been observed. Such flexibility and a modulation of the hydrophobic effect have shown a profound influence in the packing of these compounds and revealed a high degree of polymorphism.

  12. Nanotexture optimization by oxygen plasma of mesoporous silica thin film for enrichment of low molecular weight peptides captured from human serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louis; BROUSSEAU; Ali; BOUAMRANI; Mauro; FERRARI

    2010-01-01

    The optimization of mesoporous silica thin films by nanotexturing using oxygen plasma versus thermal oxidation was investigated.Calcination in oxygen plasma provides superior control over pore formation with regard to the pore surface and higher fidelity to the structure of the polymer template.The resulting porous film offers an ideal substrate for the selective partitioning of peptides from complex mixtures.The improved chemico-physical characteristics of porous thin films(pore size distribution,nanostructure,surface properties and pore connectivity) were systematically characterized with XRD,Ellipsometry,FTIR,TEM and N2 adsorption/desorption isotherm.The enrichment of low molecular weight proteins captured from human serum on mesoporous silica thin films fabricated by both methodologies was investigated by comparison of their MALDI-TOF MS profiles.This novel on-chip fractionation technology offers advantages in recovering the low molecular weight peptides from human serum,which has been recognized as an informative resource for early diagnosis of cancer and other diseases.

  13. Vision-based system identification technique for building structures using a motion capture system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Byung Kwan; Hwang, Jin Woo; Kim, Yousok; Cho, Tongjun; Park, Hyo Seon

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a new vision-based system identification (SI) technique for building structures by using a motion capture system (MCS). The MCS with outstanding capabilities for dynamic response measurements can provide gage-free measurements of vibrations through the convenient installation of multiple markers. In this technique, from the dynamic displacement responses measured by MCS, the dynamic characteristics (natural frequency, mode shape, and damping ratio) of building structures are extracted after the processes of converting the displacement from MCS to acceleration and conducting SI by frequency domain decomposition. A free vibration experiment on a three-story shear frame was conducted to validate the proposed technique. The SI results from the conventional accelerometer-based method were compared with those from the proposed technique and showed good agreement, which confirms the validity and applicability of the proposed vision-based SI technique for building structures. Furthermore, SI directly employing MCS measured displacements to FDD was performed and showed identical results to those of conventional SI method.

  14. Capturing relativistic wake eld structures in plasmas using ultrashort high-energy electrons as a probe

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, C J; Xu, X L; Li, F; Pai, C -H; Wan, Y; Wu, Y P; Gu, Y Q; Mori, W B; Joshi, C; Lu, W

    2016-01-01

    A new method capable of capturing coherent electric field structures propagating at nearly the speed of light in plasma with a time resolution as small as a few femtoseconds is proposed. This method uses a few femtoseconds long relativistic electron bunch to probe the wake produced in a plasma by an intense laser pulse or an ultra-short relativistic charged particle beam. As the probe bunch traverses the wake, its momentum is modulated by the electric field of the wake, leading to a density variation of the probe after free-space propagation. This variation of probe density produces a snapshot of the wake that can directly give many useful information of the wake structure and its evolution. Furthermore, this snapshot allows detailed mapping of the longitudinal and transverse components of the wakefield. We develop a theoretical model for field reconstruction and verify it using 3-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. This model can accurately reconstruct the wakefield structure in the linear regime...

  15. Molecular structure and motion in zero field magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero field magnetic resonance is well suited for the determination of molecular structure and the study of motion in disordered materials. Experiments performed in zero applied magnetic field avoid the anisotropic broadening in high field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. As a result, molecular structure and subtle effects of motion are more readily observed

  16. Investigation of CO2 capture mechanisms of liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials via structural characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Park, Youngjune

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) have been recently developed that comprise an oligomeric or polymeric canopy tethered to surface-modified nanoparticles via ionic or covalent bonds. It has already been shown that the tunable nature of the grafted polymeric canopy allows for enhanced CO 2 capture capacity and selectivity via the enthalpic intermolecular interactions between CO2 and the task-specific functional groups, such as amines. Interestingly, for the same amount of CO2 loading NOHMs have also exhibited significantly different swelling behavior compared to that of the corresponding polymers, indicating a potential structural effect during CO2 capture. If the frustrated canopy species favor spontaneous ordering due to steric and/or entropic effects, the inorganic cores of NOHMs could be organized into unusual structural arrangements. Likewise, the introduction of small gaseous molecules such as CO2 could reduce the free energy of the frustrated canopy. This entropic effect, the result of unique structural nature, could allow NOHMs to capture CO2 more effectively. In order to isolate the entropic effect, NOHMs were synthesized without the task-specific functional groups. The relationship between their structural conformation and the underlying mechanisms for the CO2 absorption behavior were investigated by employing NMR and ATR FT-IR spectroscopies. The results provide fundamental information needed for evaluating and developing novel liquid-like CO2 capture materials and give useful insights for designing and synthesizing NOHMs for more effective CO2 capture. © the Owner Societies 2011.

  17. Molecular structure and centrifugal distortion in methylthioethyne

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelsen, D. den

    1969-01-01

    The investigation of the microwave spectra of five isotopic species of methylthioethyne, HCCSCH3 enabled a fairly reliable calculation to be made of bond lengths and angles. The centrifugal distortion parameters are related to molecular vibrations.

  18. Lifetime and structures of TLEs captured by high-speed camera on board aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sanmiya, Y.; Sato, M.; Kudo, T.; Inoue, T.

    2012-12-01

    Temporal development of sprite streamer is the manifestation of the local electric field and conductivity. Therefore, in order to understand the mechanisms of sprite, which show a large variety in temporal and spatial structures, the detailed analysis of both fine and macro-structures with high time resolution are to be the key approach. However, due to the long distance from the optical equipments to the phenomena and to the contamination by aerosols, it's not easy to get clear images of TLEs on the ground. In the period of June 27 - July 10, 2011, a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign, in support of NHK Cosmic Shore project, was carried with two jet airplanes under collaboration between NHK, Japan Broadcasting Corporation, and universities. On 8 nights out of 16 standing-by, the jets took off from the airport near Denver, Colorado, and an airborne high speed camera captured over 60 TLE events at a frame rate of 8000-10,000 /sec. Some of them show several tens of streamers in one sprite event, which repeat splitting at the down-going end of streamers or beads. The velocities of the bottom ends and the variations of their brightness are traced carefully. It is found that the top velocity is maintained only for the brightest beads and others become slow just after the splitting. Also the whole luminosity of one sprite event has short time duration with rapid downward motion if the charge moment change of the parent lightning is large. The relationship between diffuse glows such as elves and sprite halos, and subsequent discrete structure of sprite streamers is also examined. In most cases the halo and elves seem to show inhomogenous structures before being accompanied by streamers, which develop to bright spots or streamers with acceleration of the velocity. Those characteristics of velocity and lifetime of TLEs provide key information of their generation mechanism.

  19. Topological Indices Study of Molecular Structure in Anticancer Drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Gao; Weifan Wang; Mohammad Reza Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies indicate that there is strong inherent relationship between the chemical characteristics of chemical compounds and drugs (e.g., boiling point and melting point) and their molecular structures. Topological indices defined on these chemical molecular structures can help researchers better understand the physical features, chemical reactivity, and biological activity. Thus, the study of the topological indices on chemical structure of chemical materials and drugs can make up for...

  20. Age-structured mark-recapture analysis: A virtual-population-analysis-based model for analyzing age-structured capture-recapture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggins, L.G., Jr.; Pine, William E., III; Walters, C.J.; Martell, S.J.D.

    2006-01-01

    We present a new model to estimate capture probabilities, survival, abundance, and recruitment using traditional Jolly-Seber capture-recapture methods within a standard fisheries virtual population analysis framework. This approach compares the numbers of marked and unmarked fish at age captured in each year of sampling with predictions based on estimated vulnerabilities and abundance in a likelihood function. Recruitment to the earliest age at which fish can be tagged is estimated by using a virtual population analysis method to back-calculate the expected numbers of unmarked fish at risk of capture. By using information from both marked and unmarked animals in a standard fisheries age structure framework, this approach is well suited to the sparse data situations common in long-term capture-recapture programs with variable sampling effort. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  1. Capturing structure and function in an embryonic heart with Biophotonic tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ganga eKarunamuni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Disturbed cardiac function (flow, excitation, contraction, calcium transients at an early stage of development has been shown to correlate with and may lead to cellular/molecular, functional and structural cardiac anomalies at later stages culminating in the congenital heart defects (CHDs that present at birth. It is not surprising that cardiac function, which drives embryonic and extraembryonic circulation, is also connected to neural and placental development. While our knowledge of molecular and cellular steps in cardiac development is growing rapidly, our understanding of the role of cardiovascular function in the embryo is still rudimentary. One reason for the scanty information in this area is that the tools to study early cardiac function are limited. Recently developed and adapted Biophotonic tools may overcome the challenges of studying the tiny fragile beating heart. In this chapter, the strengths and limitations of Biophotonic tools will be described with emphasis on Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT. OCT can be used for detailed structural and functional studies of the tubular and looping avian embryo heart under physiological conditions. The same hearts can be subsequently rapidly and quantitatively phenotyped at a later stage using OCT. When combined with other tools such as Optimal Mapping (OM and Optical Pacing (OP, OCT has the potential to reveal in spatial and temporal detail the biophysical changes that can potentially impact mechanotransduction pathways. This information may provide better explanations for the etiology of the CHDs when interwoven with our understanding of the multiple molecular pathways that have been described to be involved. Examples of application of these tools to study the etiology of CHDs are presented. Directions for future directions and advances in the use of Biophotonic tools are discussed.

  2. High-Throughput Analysis of T-DNA Location and Structure Using Sequence Capture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichi Inagaki

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of plants with T-DNA is used both to introduce transgenes and for mutagenesis. Conventional approaches used to identify the genomic location and the structure of the inserted T-DNA are laborious and high-throughput methods using next-generation sequencing are being developed to address these problems. Here, we present a cost-effective approach that uses sequence capture targeted to the T-DNA borders to select genomic DNA fragments containing T-DNA-genome junctions, followed by Illumina sequencing to determine the location and junction structure of T-DNA insertions. Multiple probes can be mixed so that transgenic lines transformed with different T-DNA types can be processed simultaneously, using a simple, index-based pooling approach. We also developed a simple bioinformatic tool to find sequence read pairs that span the junction between the genome and T-DNA or any foreign DNA. We analyzed 29 transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, each containing inserts from 4 different T-DNA vectors. We determined the location of T-DNA insertions in 22 lines, 4 of which carried multiple insertion sites. Additionally, our analysis uncovered a high frequency of unconventional and complex T-DNA insertions, highlighting the needs for high-throughput methods for T-DNA localization and structural characterization. Transgene insertion events have to be fully characterized prior to use as commercial products. Our method greatly facilitates the first step of this characterization of transgenic plants by providing an efficient screen for the selection of promising lines.

  3. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technological innovation system in China: Structure, function evaluation and policy implication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) can be an important technology option for China in addressing global climate change and developing clean energy technologies. Promoted by international climate conventions and supported by government research and development programs, an increasing number of CCS pilot and demonstration projects have been launched in China. In this study, we analyze the structure of China’s CCS effort from a technological innovation system (TIS) perspective. Within this system, key socio-political components, including institutions, actor-networks, and technology development, are examined to evaluate the state of the innovation system. The study assessed the perceived capacity of seven functional areas of the CCS innovation system through a survey of key CCS actors and stakeholders. The findings suggest that China’s CCS innovation system has a strong functional capacity for knowledge and technology development. It is significantly weaker in the innovative functions of knowledge diffusion, market formation, facilitating entrepreneurs and new entrants into the CCS market. Based on the evaluation of China’s technological innovation system to develop CCS, the article articulates specific public policies to formulate a more robust innovation system to traverse the “valley of death” from research and development to commercial deployment and accelerate energy innovation in China. - Highlights: ► We analyze and evaluate China’s CCS innovation system from TIS perspective. ► Strong and systematic CCS innovation system structure has come into being in China. ► The system has acquired high knowledge development and accumulation. ► Weak innovation functions are identified: market creation, guidance, etc. ► Public policies are needed to improve the innovation system performance.

  4. MOLECULAR DYNAMICS SIMULATION OF STRUCTURE STABILITY OF SILVER NANOCLUSTERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    W.H. Qi

    2006-01-01

    The structures of Ag clusters with sizes n=13 to 1157 are studied by tight binding molecular dynamics simulation. It is found that the stable structures of Ag clusters follow the sequence amorphous-crystalline-amorphous-crystalline with the cluster size increasing from 13 to 1157.Furthermore, all the shells of Ag clusters are different from the structure of the corresponding bulk Ag.

  5. Molecular structural order and anomalies in liquid silica

    OpenAIRE

    Shell, M. S.; Debenedetti, P. G.; Panagiotopoulos, A. Z.

    2002-01-01

    The present investigation examines the relationship between structural order, diffusivity anomalies, and density anomalies in liquid silica by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We use previously defined orientational and translational order parameters to quantify local structural order in atomic configurations. Extensive simulations are performed at different state points to measure structural order, diffusivity, and thermodynamic properties. It is found that silica shares many trends ...

  6. Molecular and Crystal Structures of Three Berberine Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Dostál

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Berberine azide, berberine thiocyanate, and 8-cyano-8H-berberine were prepared from berberine chloride, a quaternary protoberberine alkaloid. The molecular and crystal structures of all compounds are reported and discussed.

  7. Molecular and Crystal Structures of Three Berberine Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Jiří Dostál; Zdirad Žák; Marek NeÄÂas; Milan PotáÄÂek; Stanislav Man

    2001-01-01

    Berberine azide, berberine thiocyanate, and 8-cyano-8H-berberine were prepared from berberine chloride, a quaternary protoberberine alkaloid. The molecular and crystal structures of all compounds are reported and discussed.

  8. Colour Chemistry, Part I, Principles, Colour, and Molecular Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallas, G.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses various topics in color chemistry, including the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorption and reflection of light, additive and subtractive color mixing, and the molecular structure of simple colored substances. (MLH)

  9. The Epistemological Status of Theoretical Models of Molecular Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zeidler

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available For many decades, chemists regarded rigid models of molecular structure as representing structures of real molecules as their attributes. However, new experimental data required a new theoretical conceptualization. The rigid model has been replaced with a dynamic model in which molecular structure is changed under the influence of environmental conditions. The above case shows some problems connected with recognizing theoretical models as structural representations of real empirical systems. Owing to the fact that theoretical models of molecular structure obtain local interpretations with a procedural character, they can be carriers of specific information about structures of real molecules. Finally, I argue that, although theoretical models can be well corroborated empirically, they cannot be treated as representations of real empirical systems but can play a very important role in experimental practice.

  10. Experimental determination of neutron capture cross sections of fast reactor structure materials integrated in intermediate energy spectra. Vol. 2: description of experimental structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A selection of technical documents is given concerning the experimental determination of the neutron capture cross-sections of fast reactor structural materials (Fe, Cr, Ni...) integrated over the intermediate energy spectra. The experimental structure project and modifications of the reactor RB2 for this experiment, together with criticality and safety calculations, are presented

  11. Cost structure of a postcombustion CO2 capture system using CaO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanades, J Carlos; Grasa, G; Alonso, M; Rodriguez, N; Anthony, E J; Romeo, L M

    2007-08-01

    This paper presents the basic economics of an emerging concept for CO2 capture from flue gases in power plants. The complete system includes three key cost components: a full combustion power plant, a second power plant working as an oxy-fired fluidized bed calciner, and a fluidized bed carbonator interconnected with the calciner and capturing CO2 from the combustion power plant. The simplicity in the economic analysis is possible because the key cost data for the two major first components are well established in the open literature. It is shown that there is clear scope for a breakthrough in capture cost to around 15 $/t of CO2 avoided with this system. This is mainly because the capture system is generating additional power (from the additional coal fed to the calciner) and because the avoided CO2 comes from the capture of the CO2 generated by the coal fed to the calciner and the CO2 captured (as CaCO3) from the flue gases of the existing power plant, that is also released in the calciner.

  12. The Chain Structure of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyacrylonitrile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The chemical composition, molecular weight and its distribution, the bonding structure and the regulation of ultranigh molecular weight polyacrylonitrile (UHMW-PAN)prepared by aqueous suspension polymerization were determined by FIIR, viscometry, GPC, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. The mechanical properties of the porous hollow fiber prepared by UHMW-PAN were discussed to provide a theoretical basis for the preparation of ideal precursors of the porous hollow oxidation fiber.Ke ywords : ultrahigh molecular weight, pol yacrylonitrile ,chain structure.

  13. Accelerated electronic structure-based molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawkwell, Marc

    2015-06-01

    The initiation and progression of shock-induced chemistry in organic materials at moderate temperatures and pressures are slow on the time scales available to regular molecular dynamics simulations. Accessing the requisite time scales is particularly challenging if the interatomic bonding is modeled using accurate yet expensive methods based explicitly on electronic structure. We have combined fast, energy conserving extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics with the parallel replica accelerated molecular dynamics formalism to study the relatively sluggish shock-induced chemistry of benzene around 13-20 GPa. We model interatomic bonding in hydrocarbons using self-consistent tight binding theory with an accurate and transferable parameterization. Shock compression and its associated transient, non-equilibrium effects are captured explicitly by combining the universal liquid Hugoniot with a simple shrinking-cell boundary condition. A number of novel methods for improving the performance of reactive electronic structure-based molecular dynamics by adapting the self-consistent field procedure on-the-fly will also be discussed. The use of accelerated molecular dynamics has enabled us to follow the initial stages of the nucleation and growth of carbon clusters in benzene under thermodynamic conditions pertinent to experiments.

  14. Neutron capture and total cross-section measurements on fast reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture and total cross-sections of a series of nuclides in the mass range 46 to 62 have been measured at Harwell by the time-of-flight method. The capture cross-sections were measured for incident neutron energies from a few eV to 800 keV using the neutron booster target of the 45 MeV electron linac. High resolution total cross-section measurements were made with the transmission facility on the 160 MeV proton synchrocyclotron. The results of preliminary analyses of the data are presented on the capture cross-sections of Fe, 47Ti, and 49Ti and the total cross-sections of 56Fe, 58Ni and 60Ni. (author)

  15. Crystal and molecular structure of paclitaxel (taxol).

    OpenAIRE

    Mastropaolo, D; Camerman, A; Luo, Y.; Brayer, G. D.; Camerman, N

    1995-01-01

    Paclitaxel (formerly called taxol), an important anticancer drug, inhibits cell replication by binding to and stabilizing microtubule polymers. As drug-receptor interactions are governed by the three-dimensional stereochemistries of both participants, we have determined the crystal structure of paclitaxel to identify its conformational preferences that may be related to biological activity. The monoclinic crystals contain two independent paclitaxel molecules in the asymmetric unit plus severa...

  16. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William G. Harter

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES. Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES used in Born-Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v, then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters.

  17. Molecular Structure of Aminoguanidine Sulfate Monohydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Hong-yan; ZHANG Tong-lai; QIAO Xiao-jing; YANG Li; SHAO Feng-lei

    2006-01-01

    The single crystal of aminoguanidine sulfate monohydrate [(AG)2SO4·H2O] is obtained and its structure is determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The compound crystallizes in orthorhombic system with space group Pnma and the empirical formula C2H16N8O5S. The unit cell parameters are as follows: a=0.6759(2)nm, b=1.4131(5)nm, c=1.1650(4)nm, V=1.1128(6)n m3, Z=4, Dc=1.578g/cm3, F(000)=560, s=1.069, μ(MoKα)=0.318mm-1. The final R and Wr are 0.0312 and 0.0833, respectively. The title compound is an ionic compound and its structure unit consists of two aminoguanidium cations, one sulfate anion and one crystal water molecule, which are interconnected by electrostatic forces and hydrogen bond s into net structure, making the title compound very stable. Under a linear heat ingrate, the thermal decomposition processes of (AG)2SO4·H2O have one en dothermal dehydration stage, one melting process and one exothermic decomposition stage at 50-400℃, and can evolve abundant gas products.

  18. Continuous Molecular Fields Approach Applied to Structure-Activity Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Baskin, Igor I

    2013-01-01

    The Method of Continuous Molecular Fields is a universal approach to predict various properties of chemical compounds, in which molecules are represented by means of continuous fields (such as electrostatic, steric, electron density functions, etc). The essence of the proposed approach consists in performing statistical analysis of functional molecular data by means of joint application of kernel machine learning methods and special kernels which compare molecules by computing overlap integrals of their molecular fields. This approach is an alternative to traditional methods of building 3D structure-activity and structure-property models based on the use of fixed sets of molecular descriptors. The methodology of the approach is described in this chapter, followed by its application to building regression 3D-QSAR models and conducting virtual screening based on one-class classification models. The main directions of the further development of this approach are outlined at the end of the chapter.

  19. Capturing Thoughts, Capturing Minds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni

    2004-01-01

    Think Aloud is cost effective, promises access to the user's mind and is the applied usability technique. But 'keep talking' is difficult, besides, the multimodal interface is visual not verbal. Eye-tracking seems to get around the verbalisation problem. It captures the visual focus of attention...

  20. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  1. Linking numerical simulations of molecular cloud structure with observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the physical processes that control the life-cycle of the cold interstellar medium (ISM) is one of the key themes in the astrophysics of galaxies today. This importance derives from the role of the cold ISM as the birthplace of new stars, and consequently, as an indivisible constituent of galaxy evolution. In the current paradigm of turbulence-regulated ISM, star formation is controlled by the internal structure of individual molecular clouds, which in turn is set by a complex interplay of turbulence, gravity, and magnetic fields in the clouds. It is in the very focus of the field to determine how these processes give rise to the observed structure of molecular clouds. In this talk, I will review our current efforts to confront this paradigm with the goal of observationally constraining how different processes regulate molecular cloud structure and star formation. At the heart of these efforts lies the use of numerical simulations of gravo-turbulent media to A) define physically meaningful characteristics that are sensitive to the different cloud-shaping processes, and B) determine if and how such characteristics can be recovered by observations. I will show in my talk how this approach has recently led to new constraints for some fundamental measures of the molecular cloud structure. Such constraints allow us to assess the roles of turbulence and gravity in controlling the ISM structure and star formation. I will also highlight specific recent results, focusing on the nature of filamentary structures within molecular clouds. These results may provide a novel set of observational constraints with which to challenge the turbulence-regulated ISM paradigm. Finally, I will discuss the current challenges and open questions in understanding the link between molecular cloud structure and star formation, and speculate on key directions to aim the near-future studies.

  2. Experimental study of the collision mechanisms involved in one-electron capture by slow N5+ ions in atomic and molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Translational energy spectroscopy (TES) in the range 214-857 eV amu-1 has been used to study the collision mechanisms involved in one-electron capture by slow helium-like N5+ in both atomic and molecular hydrogen. In the case of N5+-H2 collisions, our measurements show that non-dissociative electron capture leading to the N4+ (n=3) states is the main product channel at the higher impact energies with smaller contributions to the N4+ (n=4) states. While this has also been observed in previous studies based on photon emission spectroscopy (PES), there are substantial differences in both magnitude and energy dependence between the TES and PES results. Theoretical predictions for n=3 formation are also in poor accord with experiment. Unlike previous PES measurements, the present TES study has been able to identify the presence of dissociative one-electron capture channels and two-electron autoionizing capture channels, both leading to N4+ (n=2) formation. Two-electron autoionizing electron capture is found to be the main collision mechanism leading to N4+ ions at the lowest energies considered. Our measurements of one-electron capture in N5+ + H(1s) are in excellent accord with previous higher measurements based on PES and now provide a useful extension to energies below 1 keV amu-1. In this case, only the N4+ (n=4) and N4+ (n=3) product channels are observed, with contributions from the latter becoming insignificant at our lowest energies

  3. Watching coherent molecular structural dynamics during photoreaction: beyond kinetic description

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Henrik T; Hartsock, Robert; van Driel, Tim Brandt; Chollet, Matthieu; Glownia, J M; Song, Sanghoon; Zhu, Diling; Pace, Elisabetta; Nielsen, Martin M; Benfatto, Maurizio; Gaffney, Kelly J; Collet, Eric; Cammarata, Marco

    2015-01-01

    A deep understanding of molecular photo-transformations occurring is challenging because of the complex interaction between electronic and nuclear structure. The initially excited electronic energy dissipates into electronic and structural reconfigurations often in less than a billionth of a second. Molecular dynamics induced by photoexcitation have been very successfully studied with femtosecond optical spectroscopies, but electronic and nuclear dynamics are often very difficult to disentangle. X-ray based spectroscopies can reduce the ambiguity between theoretical models and experimental data, but it is only with the recent development of bright ultrafast X-ray sources, that key information during transient molecular processes can be obtained on their intrinsic timescale. We use Free Electron Laser (FEL) based time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements around the Iron K-edge of a spin crossover prototypical compound. We reveal its transformation from the ligand-located electroni...

  4. Crystal and molecular structure of aflatrem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno N. Lenta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The crystal structure of the title compound, C32H39NO4, confirms the absolute configuration of the seven chiral centres in the molecule. The molecule has a 1,1-dimethylprop-2-enyl substituent on the indole nucleus and this nucleus shares one edge with the five-membered ring which is, in turn, connected to a sequence of three edge-shared fused rings. The skeleton is completed by the 7,7-trimethyl-6,8-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one group connected to the terminal cyclohexene ring. The two cyclohexane rings adopt chair and half-chair conformations, while in the dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]oct-3-en-2-one unit, the six-membered ring has a half-chair conformation. The indole system of the molecule exhibits a tilt of 2.02 (1° between its two rings. In the crystal, O—H...O hydrogen bonds connect molecules into chains along [010]. Weak N—H...π interactions connect these chains, forming sheets parallel to (10-1.

  5. On the structure of molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ballesteros-Paredes,; D'Alessio,; P.,; Hartmann,; W., L

    2012-01-01

    We show that the inter-cloud Larson scaling relation between mean volume density and size $\\rho\\propto R^{-1}$, which in turn implies that mass $M\\propto R^2$, or that the column density $N$ is constant, is an artifact of the observational methods used. Specifically, setting the column density threshold near or above the peak of the column density probability distribution function Npdf ($N\\sim 10^{21}$ cm\\alamenos 2) produces the Larson scaling as long as the Npdf decreases rapidly at higher column densities. We argue that the physical reasons behind local clouds to have this behavior are that (1) this peak column density is near the value required to shield CO from photodissociation in the solar neighborhood, and (2) gas at higher column densities is rare because it is susceptible to gravitational collapse into much smaller structures in specific small regions of the cloud. Similarly, we also use previous results to show that if instead a threshold is set for the volume density, the density will appear to be...

  6. Importance of Molecular Structure on the Thermophoresis of Binary Mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pardeep; Goswami, Debabrata

    2014-12-26

    Using thermal lens spectroscopy, we study the role of molecular structural isomers of butanol on the thermophoresis (or Soret effect) of binary mixtures of methanol in butanol. In this study, we show that the thermal lens signal due to the Soret effect changes its sign for all the different concentrations of binary mixtures of butanol with methanol except for the one containing tertiary-butanol. The magnitude and sign of the Soret coefficients strongly depend on the molecular structure of the isomers of butanol in the binary mixture with methanol. This isomerization dependence is in stark contrast to the expected mass dependence of the Soret effect.

  7. Capturing intracellular pH dynamics by coupling its molecular mechanisms within a fully tractable mathematical model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann Bouret

    Full Text Available We describe the construction of a fully tractable mathematical model for intracellular pH. This work is based on coupling the kinetic equations depicting the molecular mechanisms for pumps, transporters and chemical reactions, which determine this parameter in eukaryotic cells. Thus, our system also calculates the membrane potential and the cytosolic ionic composition. Such a model required the development of a novel algebraic method that couples differential equations for slow relaxation processes to steady-state equations for fast chemical reactions. Compared to classical heuristic approaches based on fitted curves and ad hoc constants, this yields significant improvements. This model is mathematically self-consistent and allows for the first time to establish analytical solutions for steady-state pH and a reduced differential equation for pH regulation. Because of its modular structure, it can integrate any additional mechanism that will directly or indirectly affect pH. In addition, it provides mathematical clarifications for widely observed biological phenomena such as overshooting in regulatory loops. Finally, instead of including a limited set of experimental results to fit our model, we show examples of numerical calculations that are extremely consistent with the wide body of intracellular pH experimental measurements gathered by different groups in many different cellular systems.

  8. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: Integrated molecular dynamics—Statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capar, M. Ilk; Nar, A.; Ferrarini, A.; Frezza, E.; Greco, C.; Zakharov, A. V.; Vakulenko, A. A.

    2013-03-01

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio.

  9. Molecular structure and elastic properties of thermotropic liquid crystals: integrated molecular dynamics--statistical mechanical theory vs molecular field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilk Capar, M; Nar, A; Ferrarini, A; Frezza, E; Greco, C; Zakharov, A V; Vakulenko, A A

    2013-03-21

    The connection between the molecular structure of liquid crystals and their elastic properties, which control the director deformations relevant for electro-optic applications, remains a challenging objective for theories and computations. Here, we compare two methods that have been proposed to this purpose, both characterized by a detailed molecular level description. One is an integrated molecular dynamics-statistical mechanical approach, where the bulk elastic constants of nematics are calculated from the direct correlation function (DCFs) and the single molecule orientational distribution function [D. A. McQuarrie, Statistical Mechanics (Harper & Row, New York, 1973)]. The latter is obtained from atomistic molecular dynamics trajectories, together with the radial distribution function, from which the DCF is then determined by solving the Ornstein-Zernike equation. The other approach is based on a molecular field theory, where the potential of mean torque experienced by a mesogen in the liquid crystal phase is parameterized according to its molecular surface. In this case, the calculation of elastic constants is combined with the Monte Carlo sampling of single molecule conformations. Using these different approaches, but the same description, at the level of molecular geometry and torsional potentials, we have investigated the elastic properties of the nematic phase of two typical mesogens, 4'-n-pentyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl and 4'-n-heptyloxy-4-cyanobiphenyl. Both methods yield K3(bend) >K1 (splay) >K2 (twist), although there are some discrepancies in the average elastic constants and in their anisotropy. These are interpreted in terms of the different approximations and the different ways of accounting for the structural properties of molecules in the two approaches. In general, the results point to the role of the molecular shape, which is modulated by the conformational freedom and cannot be fully accounted for by a single descriptor such as the aspect ratio

  10. Optimization techniques in molecular structure and function elucidation

    OpenAIRE

    Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses recent optimization approaches to the protein side-chain prediction problem, protein structural alignment, and molecular structure determination from X-ray diffraction measurements. The machinery employed to solve these problems has included algorithms from linear programming, dynamic programming, combinatorial optimization, and mixed-integer nonlinear programming. Many of these problems are purely continuous in nature. Yet, to this date, they have been approached mostly ...

  11. THE REFINEMENT OF NMR STRUCTURES BY MOLECULAR-DYNAMICS SIMULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TORDA, AE; VANGUNSTEREN, WF

    1991-01-01

    We discuss the use of molecular dynamics simulations as a tool for the refinement of structures based on NMR data. The procedure always involves the construction of a pseudo-energy term to model the experimental data and we consider the various approaches to this problem. We detail recent work where

  12. Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullenbach, Tyler K; McGarry, Kathryn A; Luhman, Wade A; Douglas, Christopher J; Holmes, Russell J

    2013-07-19

    Connecting molecular structure and exciton diffusion length in rubrene derivatives demonstrates how the diffusion length of rubrene can be enhanced through targeted functionalization aiming to enhance self-Förster energy transfer. Functionalization adds steric bulk, forcing the molecules farther apart on average, and leading to increased photoluminescence efficiency. A diffusion length enhancement greater than 50% is realized over unsubstituted rubrene. PMID:23754475

  13. Crystalline molecular complexes and compounds structures and principles

    CERN Document Server

    Herbstein, Frank H

    2005-01-01

    This book provides an account of the structure and properties of crystalline binary adducts. Such crystals are perhaps better known as molecular compounds and complexes and are estimated to make up one quarter of the world's crystals. More than 600 figures, 200 tables and 3500 references are included in the book.

  14. A SAPO-11 Silicoaluminophosphate Molecular Sieve with Stable Crystal Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue Ming LIU; Feng Mei ZHANG; Hai Hong WU; Hai Jiao ZHANG; Jian Guo YANG; Xing Tian SHU; Ming Yuan HE

    2004-01-01

    A SAPO-11 silicoaluminophosphate molecular sieve with stable crystal structure was synthesized for the first time. After removing template by calcination, its crystal space group still retains Icm2 which the as-synthesized has. The catalyst deriving from the present SAPO-11materials shows higher isomerization selectivity and higher paraffin hydroisomerization yield than those reported elsewhere.

  15. Chiral fluorinated α-sulfonyl carbanions: enantioselective synthesis and electrophilic capture, racemization dynamics, and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Gunther; Hack, Achim; Thiemermann, Eric; Luche, Olaf; Raabe, Gerhard; Gais, Hans-Joachim

    2013-03-18

    Enantiomerically pure triflones R(1) CH(R(2) )SO2 CF3 have been synthesized starting from the corresponding chiral alcohols via thiols and trifluoromethylsulfanes. Key steps of the syntheses of the sulfanes are the photochemical trifluoromethylation of the thiols with CF3 Hal (Hal=halide) or substitution of alkoxyphosphinediamines with CF3 SSCF3 . The deprotonation of RCH(Me)SO2 CF3 (R=CH2 Ph, iHex) with nBuLi with the formation of salts [RC(Me)SO2 CF3 ]Li and their electrophilic capture both occurred with high enantioselectivities. Displacement of the SO2 CF3 group of (S)-MeOCH2 C(Me)(CH2 Ph)SO2 CF3 (95 % ee) by an ethyl group through the reaction with AlEt3 gave alkane MeOCH2 C(Me)(CH2 Ph)Et of 96 % ee. Racemization of salts [R(1) C(R(2) )SO2 CF3 ]Li follows first-order kinetics and is mainly an enthalpic process with small negative activation entropy as revealed by polarimetry and dynamic NMR (DNMR) spectroscopy. This is in accordance with a Cα S bond rotation as the rate-determining step. Lithium α-(S)-trifluoromethyl- and α-(S)-nonafluorobutylsulfonyl carbanion salts have a much higher racemization barrier than the corresponding α-(S)-tert-butylsulfonyl carbanion salts. Whereas [PhCH2 C(Me)SO2 tBu]Li/DMPU (DMPU = dimethylpropylurea) has a half-life of racemization at -105 °C of 2.4 h, that of [PhCH2 C(Me)SO2 CF3 ]Li at -78 °C is 30 d. DNMR spectroscopy of amides (PhCH2 )2 NSO2 CF3 and (PhCH2 )N(Ph)SO2 CF3 gave NS rotational barriers that seem to be distinctly higher than those of nonfluorinated sulfonamides. NMR spectroscopy of [PhCH2 C(Ph)SO2 R]M (M=Li, K, NBu4 ; R=CF3 , tBu) shows for both salts a confinement of the negative charge mainly to the Cα atom and a significant benzylic stabilization that is weaker in the trifluoromethylsulfonyl carbanion. According to crystal structure analyses, the carbanions of salts {[PhCH2 C(Ph)SO2 CF3 ]Li⋅L}2 (L=2 THF, tetramethylethylenediamine (TMEDA)) and [PhCH2 C(Ph)SO2 CF3 ]NBu4 have

  16. Molecular simulation of multi-component adsorption processes related to carbon capture in a high surface area, disordered activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Di Biase, Emanuela; Sarkisov, Lev

    2015-01-01

    We employ a previously developed model of a high surface area activated carbon, based on a random packing of small fragments of a carbon sheet, functionalized with hydroxyl surface groups, to explore adsorption of water and multicomponent mixtures under conditions representing typical carbon capture processes. Adsorption of water is initialized and proceeds through the growth of clusters around the surface groups, in a process predominantly governed by hydrogen bond interactions. In contrast,...

  17. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Oliva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of polycarborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photoenergy processes.

  18. Effect of the porous structure in carbon materials for CO2 capture at atmospheric and high-pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Casco, Mirian Elizabeth; Martínez Escandell, Manuel; Silvestre Albero, Joaquín; Rodríguez Reinoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbons prepared from petroleum pitch and using KOH as activating agent exhibit an excellent behavior in CO2 capture both at atmospheric (∼168 mg CO2/g at 298 K) and high pressure (∼1500 mg CO2/g at 298 K and 4.5 MPa). However, an exhaustive evaluation of the adsorption process shows that the optimum carbon structure, in terms of adsorption capacity, depends on the final application. Whereas narrow micropores (pores below 0.6 nm) govern the sorption behavior at 0.1 MPa, large microp...

  19. Electron capture decay of 116In and nuclear structure of double β decays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation (QRPA) calculations of double β decays have not been able to reproduce data in the A=100 system. We propose the A=116 system emdash because of its smaller deformation emdash as a simpler system to test QRPA calculations. We present results of two experiments we performed, which determine the electron-capture-decay branch of 116In to be (2.27±0.63)x10-2%, from which we deduce logft=4.39-0.15+0.10. We present QRPA calculations and compare their predictions to experimental data. Finally we use these calculations to predict the 2ν double-β-decay rate of 116Cd to the ground and excited states of 116Sn. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  20. Electron capture decay of {sup 116}In and nuclear structure of double {beta} decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, M.; Garcia, A.; Ortiz, C.E.; Kaloskamis, N.I. [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Hindi, M.M. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Norman, E.B. [Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Davids, C.N. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Civitarese, O. [Department of Physics, University of La Plata, C. C. 67, 1900-La Plata (Argentina); Suhonen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, SF-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1998-08-01

    Quasiparticle-random-phase-approximation (QRPA) calculations of double {beta} decays have not been able to reproduce data in the A=100 system. We propose the A=116 system{emdash}because of its smaller deformation{emdash}as a simpler system to test QRPA calculations. We present results of two experiments we performed, which determine the electron-capture-decay branch of {sup 116}In to be (2.27{plus_minus}0.63){times}10{sup {minus}2}{percent}, from which we deduce logft=4.39{sub {minus}0.15}{sup +0.10}. We present QRPA calculations and compare their predictions to experimental data. Finally we use these calculations to predict the 2{nu} double-{beta}-decay rate of {sup 116}Cd to the ground and excited states of {sup 116}Sn. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. A detailed study of cholinium chloride and levulinic acid deep eutectic solvent system for CO2 capture via experimental and molecular simulation approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Ruh; Atilhan, Mert; Anaya, Baraa; Khraisheh, Majeda; García, Gregorio; ElKhattat, Ahmed; Tariq, Mohammad; Aparicio, Santiago

    2015-08-28

    Choline chloride + levulinic acid deep eutectic solvent is studied as a suitable material for CO2 capturing purposes. The most relevant physicochemical properties of this solvent are reported together with the CO2 solubility as a function of temperature. The corrosivity of this solvent is studied showing better performance than amine-based solvents. A theoretical study using both density functional theory and molecular dynamics approaches is carried out to analyze the properties of this fluid from the nanoscopic viewpoint, and their relationship with the macroscopic behavior of the system and its ability for CO2 capturing. The behavior of the liquid-gas interface is also studied and its role on the CO2 absorption mechanism is analyzed. The reported combined experimental and theoretical approach leads to a complete picture of the behavior of this new sorbent with regard to CO2, which together with its low cost, and the suitable environmental and toxicological properties of this solvent, lead to a promising candidate for CO2 capturing technological applications. PMID:26214080

  2. Molecular spectroscopy and molecular structure - Selected communications presented at the 1st International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durig, James R.; Fausto, Rui; Ünsalan, Ozan; Bayarı, Sevgi; Kuş, Nihal; Ildız, Gülce Ö.

    2016-01-01

    The First International Turkish Congress on Molecular Spectroscopy (TURCMOS 2013) took place at the Harbiye Cultural Center & Museum, Istanbul, Turkey, September 15-20, 2013. The main aim of the congress was to encourage the exchange of scientific ideas and collaborations all around the world, introduce new techniques and instruments, and discuss recent developments in the field of molecular spectroscopy. Among the different subjects covered, particular emphasis was given to the relevance of spectroscopy to elucidate details of the molecular structure and the chemical and physical behavior of systems ranging from simple molecules to complex biochemical molecules. Besides experimental spectroscopic approaches, related computational and theoretical methods were also considered. In this volume, selected contributions presented at the congress were put together.

  3. Molecular docking and structure-based drug design strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Dos Santos, Ricardo N; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2015-07-22

    Pharmaceutical research has successfully incorporated a wealth of molecular modeling methods, within a variety of drug discovery programs, to study complex biological and chemical systems. The integration of computational and experimental strategies has been of great value in the identification and development of novel promising compounds. Broadly used in modern drug design, molecular docking methods explore the ligand conformations adopted within the binding sites of macromolecular targets. This approach also estimates the ligand-receptor binding free energy by evaluating critical phenomena involved in the intermolecular recognition process. Today, as a variety of docking algorithms are available, an understanding of the advantages and limitations of each method is of fundamental importance in the development of effective strategies and the generation of relevant results. The purpose of this review is to examine current molecular docking strategies used in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry, exploring the advances in the field and the role played by the integration of structure- and ligand-based methods.

  4. The effect of molecular dynamics sampling on the calculated observable gas-phase structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Denis S; Otlyotov, Arseniy A; Rybkin, Vladimir V

    2016-07-21

    In this study, we compare the performance of various ab initio molecular dynamics (MD) sampling methods for the calculation of the observable vibrationally-averaged gas-phase structures of benzene, naphthalene and anthracene molecules. Nose-Hoover (NH), canonical and quantum generalized-Langevin-equation (GLE) thermostats as well as the a posteriori quantum correction to the classical trajectories have been tested and compared to the accurate path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD), static anharmonic vibrational calculations as well as to the experimental gas electron diffraction data. Classical sampling methods neglecting quantum effects (NH and canonical GLE thermostats) dramatically underestimate vibrational amplitudes for the bonded atom pairs, both C-H and C-C, the resulting radial distribution functions exhibit nonphysically narrow peaks. This deficiency is almost completely removed by taking the quantum effects on the nuclei into account. The quantum GLE thermostat and a posteriori correction to the canonical GLE and NH thermostatted trajectories capture most vibrational quantum effects and closely reproduce computationally expensive PIMD and experimental radial distribution functions. These methods are both computationally feasible and accurate and are therefore recommended for calculations of the observable gas-phase structures. A good performance of the quantum GLE thermostat for the gas-phase calculations is encouraging since its parameters have been originally fitted for the condensed-phase calculations. Very accurate molecular structures can be predicted by combining the equilibrium geometry obtained at a high level of electronic structure theory with vibrational amplitudes and corrections calculated using MD driven by a lower level of electronic structure theory. PMID:27331660

  5. Structural basis for arabinoxylo‐oligosaccharide capture by the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl‐04

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Ejby; Fredslund, Folmer; Vujicic‐Zagar, Andreja;

    2013-01-01

    Glycan utilization plays a key role in modulating the composition of the gut microbiota, but molecular insight into oligosaccharide uptake by this microbial community is lacking. Arabinoxylo‐oligosaccharides (AXOS) are abundant in the diet, and are selectively fermented by probiotic bifidobacteria...... analyses show that BlAXBP is highly conserved within Bifidobacterium, but is lacking in other gut microbiota members. These data indicate niche adaptation within Bifidobacterium and highlight the metabolic syntrophy (cross‐feeding) among the gut microbiota....

  6. Structural basis for arabinoxylo-oligosaccharide capture by the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp lactis Bl-04

    OpenAIRE

    Ejby, Morten; Fredslund, Folmer; Vujicic-Zagar, Andreja; Svensson, Birte; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2013-01-01

    Glycan utilization plays a key role in modulating the composition of the gut microbiota, but molecular insight into oligosaccharide uptake by this microbial community is lacking. Arabinoxylo-oligosaccharides (AXOS) are abundant in the diet, and are selectively fermented by probiotic bifidobacteria in the colon. Here we show how selectivity for AXOS uptake is established by the probiotic strain Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactisBl-04. The binding protein BlAXBP, which is associated with an...

  7. Molecular Medicine: Synthesis and In Vivo Detection of Agents for use in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabalka, G. W.

    2005-06-28

    The primary objective of the project was the development of in vivo methods for the detection and evaluation of tumors in humans. The project was focused on utilizing positron emission tomography (PET) to monitor the distribution and pharamacokinetics of a current boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) agent, p-boronophenylalanine (BPA) by labeling it with a fluorine-18, a positron emitting isotope. The PET data was then used to develop enhanced treatment planning protocols. The study also involved the synthesis of new tumor selective BNCTagents that could be labeled with radioactive nuclides for the in vivo detection of boron.

  8. Effect of Water Concentration on the Molecular Structure of Polyacrylate Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Sriramvignesh; Khabaz, Fardin; Khare, Rajesh

    2015-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested pervaporation to be a promising alternative method for separation of aqueous solution of alcohol compared to distillation based separation processes. The ability to tune the hydrophobic/hydrophilic character makes polyacrylate gels attractive candidate materials for separating water-alcohol mixture by pervaporation. Experimentally, it is observed that the amount of water absorbed in the gel i.e. the degree of swelling of the gel shows a large variation with polymer chemistry. Relatively few studies exist highlighting the effects of water concentration on the membrane separation efficiency which in turn is directly related to the internal molecular structure of the water rich membranes. In this regard, an all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is employed to study water structure in polyacrylate gels. As a first step, polyacrylate copolymer systems with varying degree of hydrophobicity are prepared using the simulated annealing polymerization technique. Atomistic structures of gels containing different amounts of water are also prepared. Effect of water content on the acrylate-water system microstructure is determined by characterizing the packing of water molecules as well as the hydrogen bonding in these systems. In addition, the change in dynamics of water molecules due to the interactions with polymer is captured by monitoring the auto-correlation function of their dipole vector.

  9. A Modiifed Molecular Structure Mechanics Method for Analysis of Graphene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Jun; LI Dongbo; ZHAO Dong; LIANG Shengwei; LIU Qinlong; JIA Ruiyan

    2015-01-01

    Based on molecular mechanics and the deformation characteristics of the atomic lattice structure of graphene, a modiifed molecular structure mechanics method was developed to improve the original one, that is, the semi-rigid connections were used to model the bond angle variations between the C-C bonds in graphene. The simulated results show that the equivalent space frame model with semi-rigid connections for graphene proposed in this article is a simple, efifcient, and accurate model to evaluate the equivalent elastic properties of graphene. Though the present computational model of the semi-rigid connected space frame is only applied to characterize the mechanical behaviors of the space lattices of graphene, it has more potential applications in the static and dynamic analyses of graphene and other nanomaterials.

  10. Preparation and structure characterization of nanospherical MCM- 41 molecular sieves

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ting; WEI Yiting; Guo, Yajun; CHU Lianfeng; Guo, Yaping

    2013-01-01

    Nanospherical MCM-41 molecular sieves have been synthesized by using hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as templates and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as silicon sources. XRD,SEM,FT-IR,TEM,and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms were used to investigate the effects of the reaction temperature and aging time on the morphology and structure of the samples. The results show that the nanospherical MCM-41 particles can be obtained at reaction temperatures between 20 to 80℃. With the reac...

  11. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure

    OpenAIRE

    Laikov, Dimitri N.

    2011-01-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good...

  12. The Pivotal Role of Alumina Pore Structure in HF Capture and Fluoride Return in Aluminum Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Grant J.; Agbenyegah, Gordon E. K.; Hyland, Margaret M.; Metson, James B.

    2016-07-01

    Fluoride emissions during primary aluminum production are mitigated by dry scrubbing on alumina which, as the metal feedstock, also returns fluoride to the pots. This ensures stable pot operation and maintains process efficiency but requires careful optimization of alumina for both fluoride capture and solubility. The Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 70-80 m2 g-1 is currently accepted. However, this does not account for pore accessibility. We demonstrate using industry-sourced data that pores <3.5 nm are not correlated with fluoride return. Reconstructing alumina pore size distributions (PSDs) following hydrogen fluoride (HF) adsorption shows surface area is not lost by pore diameter shrinkage, but by blocking the internal porosity. However, this alone cannot explain this 3.5 nm threshold. We show this is a consequence of surface diffusion-based inhibition with surface chemistry probably playing an integral role. We advocate new surface area estimates for alumina which account for pore accessibility by explicitly ignoring <3.5 nm pores.

  13. Tailoring the Pore Environment of Metal-Organic and Molecular Materials Decorated with Inorganic Anions: Platforms for Highly Selective Carbon Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Patrick S.

    Due to their high surface areas and structural tunability, porous metal-organic materials, MOMs, have attracted wide research interest in areas such as carbon capture, as the judicious choice of molecular building block (MBB) and linker facilitates the design of MOMs with myriad topologies and allows for a systematic variation of the pore environment. Families of MOMs with modular components, i.e. MOM platforms, are eminently suitable for targeting the selective adsorption of guest molecules such as CO2 because their pore size and pore functionality can each be tailored independently. MOMs with saturated metal centers (SMCs) that promote strong yet reversible CO2 binding in conjunction with favorable adsorption kinetics are an attractive alternative to MOMs containing unsaturated metal centers (UMCs) or amines. Whereas MOMs with SMCs and exclusively organic linkers typically have poor CO2 selectivity, it has been shown that a versatile, long known platform with SMCs, pillared square grids with inorganic anion pillars and pcu topology, exhibits high and selective CO 2 uptake, a moderate CO2 binding affinity, and good stability under practical conditions. As detailed herein, the tuning of pore size and pore functionality in this platform has modulated the CO2 adsorption properties and revealed variants with unprecedented selectivity towards CO 2 under industrially relevant conditions, even in the presence of moisture. With the aim of tuning pore chemistry while preserving pore size, we initially explored the effect of pillar substitution upon the carbon capture properties of a pillared square grid, [Cu(bipy)2(SiF6)] (SIFSIX-1-Cu). Room temperature CO2, CH4, and N 2 adsorption isotherms revealed that substitution of the SiF6 2- ("SIFSIX") inorganic pillar with TiF6 2- ("TIFSIX") or SnF62- ("SNIFSIX") modulated CO2 uptake, CO2 affinity (heat of adsorption, Qst), and selectivity vs. CH4 and N2. TIFSIX-1-Cu and SNIFSIX-1-Cu were calculated to exhibit the highest CO2/N 2

  14. Microspectroscopy as applied to the study of wood molecular structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fackler, Karin; Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht

    2013-01-01

    -induced dimensional changes, decay resistance or mechanical properties. It is, however, important to choose the right technique for the purpose at hand and to apply it in a suitable way if any new insights are to be gained. This review presents and compares three different microspectroscopic techniques: infrared......Microspectroscopy gives access to spatially resolved information on the molecular structure and chemical composition of a material. For a highly heterogeneous and anisotropic material like wood, such information is essential when assessing structure/property relationships such as moisture...

  15. Dynamical structure of fluid mercury: Molecular-dynamics simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshino, Kozo; Tanaka, Shunichiro; Shimojo, Fuyuki

    2007-01-01

    We have carried out molecular-dynamics simulations for nonmetallic fluid mercury in liquid and vapor phases using a Lennard-Jones type effective potential and shown that the structure factors S(Q) and the dynamic structure factors S(Q, omega) of nonmetallic fluid mercury obtained by our MD simulations are in good agreement with recent X-ray diffraction and inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. We conclude from these results that, though the fluid mercury which shows a metal-nonmetal transit...

  16. Optimization techniques in molecular structure and function elucidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinidis, Nikolaos V

    2009-12-01

    This paper discusses recent optimization approaches to the protein side-chain prediction problem, protein structural alignment, and molecular structure determination from X-ray diffraction measurements. The machinery employed to solve these problems has included algorithms from linear programming, dynamic programming, combinatorial optimization, and mixed-integer nonlinear programming. Many of these problems are purely continuous in nature. Yet, to this date, they have been approached mostly via combinatorial optimization algorithms that are applied to discrete approximations. The main purpose of the paper is to offer an introduction and motivate further systems approaches to these problems. PMID:20160866

  17. Capturing hammerhead ribozyme structures in action by modulating general base catalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-In Chi

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We have obtained precatalytic (enzyme-substrate complex and postcatalytic (enzyme-product complex crystal structures of an active full-length hammerhead RNA that cleaves in the crystal. Using the natural satellite tobacco ringspot virus hammerhead RNA sequence, the self-cleavage reaction was modulated by substituting the general base of the ribozyme, G12, with A12, a purine variant with a much lower pKa that does not significantly perturb the ribozyme's atomic structure. The active, but slowly cleaving, ribozyme thus permitted isolation of enzyme-substrate and enzyme-product complexes without modifying the nucleophile or leaving group of the cleavage reaction, nor any other aspect of the substrate. The predissociation enzyme-product complex structure reveals RNA and metal ion interactions potentially relevant to transition-state stabilization that are absent in precatalytic structures.

  18. Assessing the structure and temporal dynamics of seabird communities: the challenge of capturing marine ecosystem complexity

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno, Rocio; Stowasser, Gabriele; McGill, Rona A.R.; Bearhop, Stuart; Phillips, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Summary 1.Understanding interspecific interactions, and the influences of anthropogenic disturbance and environmental change on communities, are key challenges in ecology. Despite the pressing need to understand these fundamental drivers of community structure and dynamics, only 17% of ecological studies conducted over the past three decades have been at the community level. 2.Here, we assess the trophic structure of the procellariiform community breeding at South Georgia, to identify ...

  19. Structural Modeling and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Actin Filament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas [University of Heidelberg; Holmes, Kenneth [Max Planck Institute, Heidelberg, Germany; Noe, Frank [DFG Research Center Matheon, FU Berlin, Germany; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Actin is a major structural protein of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and enables cell motility. Here, we present a model of the actin filament (F-actin) that not only incorporates the global structure of the recently published model by Oda et al. but also conserves internal stereochemistry. A comparison is made using molecular dynamics simulation of the model with other recent F-actin models. A number of structural determents such as the protomer propeller angle, the number of hydrogen bonds, and the structural variation among the protomers are analyzed. The MD comparison is found to reflect the evolution in quality of actin models over the last 6 years. In addition, simulations of the model are carried out in states with both ADP or ATP bound and local hydrogen-bonding differences characterized.

  20. Preparation and structure characterization of nanospherical MCM- 41 molecular sieves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Ting

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanospherical MCM-41 molecular sieves have been synthesized by using hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB as templates and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS as silicon sources. XRD,SEM,FT-IR,TEM,and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms were used to investigate the effects of the reaction temperature and aging time on the morphology and structure of the samples. The results show that the nanospherical MCM-41 particles can be obtained at reaction temperatures between 20 to 80℃. With the reaction temperature increasing,the diameter of the nanospheres increases. When the reaction temperature reaches 110℃,MCM-41 molecular sieves exhibit irregular particle morphology. With the aging time of 0-15 h,the dispersion of nanospherical MCM-41 molecular sieves is very good. However,as the aging time increases,the particle size is also increased,while agglomeration is also more serious. Besides,the optimal synthesis conditions of the nanospherical MCM-41 molecular sieves were obtained by analyzing their formation mechanism.

  1. A 3D visualization system for molecular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Terry J.

    1989-01-01

    The properties of molecules derive in part from their structures. Because of the importance of understanding molecular structures various methodologies, ranging from first principles to empirical technique, were developed for computing the structure of molecules. For large molecules such as polymer model compounds, the structural information is difficult to comprehend by examining tabulated data. Therefore, a molecular graphics display system, called MOLDS, was developed to help interpret the data. MOLDS is a menu-driven program developed to run on the LADC SNS computer systems. This program can read a data file generated by the modeling programs or data can be entered using the keyboard. MOLDS has the following capabilities: draws the 3-D representation of a molecule using stick, ball and ball, or space filled model from Cartesian coordinates, draws different perspective views of the molecule; rotates the molecule on the X, Y, Z axis or about some arbitrary line in space, zooms in on a small area of the molecule in order to obtain a better view of a specific region; and makes hard copy representation of molecules on a graphic printer. In addition, MOLDS can be easily updated and readily adapted to run on most computer systems.

  2. Assessing the structure and temporal dynamics of seabird communities: the challenge of capturing marine ecosystem complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Rocío; Stowasser, Gabriele; McGill, Rona A R; Bearhop, Stuart; Phillips, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding interspecific interactions, and the influences of anthropogenic disturbance and environmental change on communities, are key challenges in ecology. Despite the pressing need to understand these fundamental drivers of community structure and dynamics, only 17% of ecological studies conducted over the past three decades have been at the community level. Here, we assess the trophic structure of the procellariiform community breeding at South Georgia, to identify the factors that determine foraging niches and possible temporal changes. We collected conventional diet data from 13 sympatric species between 1974 and 2002, and quantified intra- and inter-guild, and annual variation in diet between and within foraging habits. In addition, we tested the reliability of stable isotope analysis (SIA) of seabird feathers collected over a 13-year period, in relation to those of their potential prey, as a tool to assess community structure when diets are diverse and there is high spatial heterogeneity in environmental baselines. Our results using conventional diet data identified a four-guild community structure, distinguishing species that mainly feed on crustaceans; large fish and squid; a mixture of crustaceans, small fish and squid; or carrion. In total, Antarctic krill Euphausia superba represented 32%, and 14 other species a further 46% of the combined diet of all 13 predators, underlining the reliance of this community on relatively few types of prey. Annual variation in trophic segregation depended on relative prey availability; however, our data did not provide evidence of changes in guild structure associated with a suggested decline in Antarctic krill abundance over the past 40 years. Reflecting the differences in δ(15) N of potential prey (crustaceans vs. squid vs. fish and carrion), analysis of δ(15) N in chick feathers identified a three-guild community structure that was constant over a 13-year period, but lacked the trophic cluster representing

  3. Radiation track structure simulation in a molecular medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A problem in the simulation of track structures is identified; because the underlying medium is assumed to be a continuum in the simulation, events (and therefore chemical species) can be generated unphysically close together. The problem is particularly severe for low-energy electrons, which are responsible for inducing most of the observed chemistry. Two modified simulation methods are proposed to investigate this effect. The first method modifies the density of the medium using the radial distribution function, to ensure that events can not be generated closer to one another than nearest neighbour molecules. The second method simulates the track in a molecular medium, using configurations generated by molecular dynamics. When gas phase cross-sections are used these two methods have large effects on the mean electron range and the mean inter-event distance, but surprisingly, they act in opposite directions. When condensed phase cross-sections are used the effects are much smaller. (author)

  4. Quantum information analysis of electronic states at different molecular structures

    CERN Document Server

    Barcza, G; Marti, K H; Reiher, M

    2010-01-01

    We have studied transition metal clusters from a quantum information theory perspective using the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) method. We demonstrate the competition between entanglement and interaction localization. We also discuss the application of the configuration interaction based dynamically extended active space procedure which significantly reduces the effective system size and accelerates the speed of convergence for complicated molecular electronic structures to a great extent. Our results indicate the importance of taking entanglement among molecular orbitals into account in order to devise an optimal orbital ordering and carry out efficient calculations on transition metal clusters. We propose a recipe to perform DMRG calculations in a black-box fashion and we point out the connections of our work to other tensor network state approaches.

  5. Molecular structure and pathophysiological roles of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mammucari, Cristina; Raffaello, Anna; Vecellio Reane, Denis; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2016-10-01

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake regulates a wide array of cell functions, from stimulation of aerobic metabolism and ATP production in physiological settings, to induction of cell death in pathological conditions. The molecular identity of the Mitochondrial Calcium Uniporter (MCU), the highly selective channel responsible for Ca(2+) entry through the IMM, has been described less than five years ago. Since then, research has been conducted to clarify the modulation of its activity, which relies on the dynamic interaction with regulatory proteins, and its contribution to the pathophysiology of organs and tissues. Particular attention has been placed on characterizing the role of MCU in cardiac and skeletal muscles. In this review we summarize the molecular structure and regulation of the MCU complex in addition to its pathophysiological role, with particular attention to striated muscle tissues. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:26968367

  6. Theoretical investigation of the molecular structure of the isoquercitrin molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornard, J. P.; Boudet, A. C.; Merlin, J. C.

    1999-09-01

    Isoquercitrin is a glycosilated flavonoid that has received a great deal of attention because of its numerous biological effects. We present a theoretical study on isoquercitrin using both empirical (Molecular Mechanics (MM), with MMX force field) and quantum chemical (AM1 semiempirical method) techniques. The most stable structures of the molecule obtained by MM calculations have been used as input data for the semiempirical treatment. The position and orientation of the glucose moiety with regard to the remainder of the molecule have been investigated. The flexibility of isoquercitrin principally lies in rotations around the inter-ring bond and the sugar link. In order to know the structural modifications generated by the substitution by a sugar, geometrical parameters of quercetin (aglycon) and isoquercitrin have been compared. The good accordance between theoretical and experimental electronic spectra permits to confirm the reliability of the structural model.

  7. Ordered molecular layer structure of lubricating oil adsorbed films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Low-angle X-ray diffraction has been applied to analyze the structure of stearic acid LB films and self-grown surface adsorbed films of aluminium product metalworking lubricants. The results show that LB films exhibit a good layer-like ordered structure in the normal direction of film-carrying surface, while in the tangential direction, they do not show a cyclically ordered molecular arrangement; as for the self-grown surface adsorbed films of aluminium sheet and strip metalworking lubricants, their molecules are orderly arranged to certain degree in both the tangential and the normal directions of film-carrying surface, and they have a short-range ordered structure. Moreover, the better the orientation of normal molecules is, the higher the oil film strength is, and the smaller the friction factor is.

  8. Capturing the Energy Absorbing Mechanisms of Composite Structures under Crash Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Bonnie

    As fiber reinforced composite material systems become increasingly utilized in primary aircraft and automotive structures, the need to understand their contribution to the crashworthiness of the structure is of great interest to meet safety certification requirements. The energy absorbing behavior of a composite structure, however, is not easily predicted due to the great complexity of the failure mechanisms that occur within the material. Challenges arise both in the experimental characterization and in the numerical modeling of the material/structure combination. At present, there is no standardized test method to characterize the energy absorbing capability of composite materials to aide crashworthy structural design. In addition, although many commercial finite element analysis codes exist and offer a means to simulate composite failure initiation and propagation, these models are still under development and refinement. As more metallic structures are replaced by composite structures, the need for both experimental guidelines to characterize the energy absorbing capability of a composite structure, as well as guidelines for using numerical tools to simulate composite materials in crash conditions has become a critical matter. This body of research addresses both the experimental characterization of the energy absorption mechanisms occurring in composite materials during crushing, as well as the numerical simulation of composite materials undergoing crushing. In the experimental investigation, the specific energy absorption (SEA) of a composite material system is measured using a variety of test element geometries, such as corrugated plates and tubes. Results from several crush experiments reveal that SEA is not a constant material property for laminated composites, and varies significantly with the geometry of the test specimen used. The variation of SEA measured for a single material system requires that crush test data must be generated for a range of

  9. Capturing Structural Dynamics in Crystalline Silicon Using Chirped Electrons from a Laser Wakefield Accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    He, Z -H; Nees, J A; Gallé, G; Scott, S A; Pérez, J R Sanchez; Lagally, M G; Krushelnick, K; Thomas, A G R; Faure, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in laser wakefield acceleration has led to the emergence of a new generation of electron and X-ray sources that may have enormous benefits for ultrafast science. These novel sources promise to become indispensable tools for the investigation of structural dynamics on the femtosecond time scale, with spatial resolution on the atomic scale. Here, we demonstrate the use of laser-wakefield-accelerated electron bunches for time-resolved electron diffraction measurements of the structural dynamics of single-crystal silicon nano-membranes pumped by an ultrafast laser pulse. In our proof-of-concept study, we resolve the silicon lattice dynamics on a picosecond time scale by deflecting the momentum-time correlated electrons in the diffraction peaks with a static magnetic field to obtain the time-dependent diffraction efficiency. Further improvements may lead to femtosecond temporal resolution, with negligible pump-probe jitter being possible with future laser-wakefield-accelerator ultrafast-electron-di...

  10. The molecular structure of the left-handed supra-molecular helix of eukaryotic polyribosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myasnikov, Alexander G; Afonina, Zhanna A; Ménétret, Jean-François; Shirokov, Vladimir A; Spirin, Alexander S; Klaholz, Bruno P

    2014-11-07

    During protein synthesis, several ribosomes bind to a single messenger RNA (mRNA) forming large macromolecular assemblies called polyribosomes. Here we report the detailed molecular structure of a 100 MDa eukaryotic poly-ribosome complex derived from cryo electron tomography, sub-tomogram averaging and pseudo-atomic modelling by crystal structure fitting. The structure allowed the visualization of the three functional parts of the polysome assembly, the central core region that forms a rather compact left-handed supra-molecular helix, and the more open regions that harbour the initiation and termination sites at either ends. The helical region forms a continuous mRNA channel where the mRNA strand bridges neighbouring exit and entry sites of the ribosomes and prevents mRNA looping between ribosomes. This structure provides unprecedented insights into protein- and RNA-mediated inter-ribosome contacts that involve conserved sites through 40S subunits and long protruding RNA expansion segments, suggesting a role in stabilizing the overall polyribosomal assembly.

  11. Structure of a molecular liquid GeI4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchizaki, Kazuhiro; Sakagami, Takahiro; Kohara, Shinji; Mizuno, Akitoshi; Asano, Yuta; Hamaya, Nozomu

    2016-11-01

    A molecular liquid GeI4 is a candidate that undergoes a pressure-induced liquid-to-liquid phase transition. This study establishes the reference structure of the low-pressure liquid phase. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were carried out at several temperatures between the melting and the boiling points under ambient pressure. The molecule has regular tetrahedral symmetry, and the intramolecular Ge-I length of 2.51 Å is almost temperature-independent within the measured range. A reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) analysis is employed to find that the distribution of molecular centers remains self-similar against heating, and thus justifying the length-scaling method adopted in determining the density. The RMC analysis also reveals that the vertex-to-face orientation of the nearest molecules are not straightly aligned, but are inclined at about 20 degrees, thereby making the closest intermolecular I-I distance definitely shorter than the intramolecular one. The prepeak observed at  ˜1 Å-1 in the structural factor slightly shifts and increases in height with increasing temperature. The origin of the prepeak is clearly identified to be traces of the 111 diffraction peak in the crystalline state. The prepeak, assuming the residual spatial correlation between germanium sites in the densest direction, thus shifts toward lower wavenumbers with thermal expansion. The aspect that a relative reduction in molecular size associated with the volume expansion is responsible for the increase in the prepeak’s height is confirmed by a simulation, in which the molecular size is changed.

  12. III - V semiconductor structures for biosensor and molecular electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luber, S.M.

    2007-01-15

    The present work reports on the employment of III-V semiconductor structures to biosensor and molecular electronics applications. In the first part a sensor based on a surface-near two dimensional electron gas for a use in biological environment is studied. Such a two dimensional electron gas inherently forms in a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown, doped aluminum gallium arsenide - gallium arsenide (AlGaAs-GaAs) heterostructure. Due to the intrinsic instability of GaAs in aqueous solutions the device is passivated by deposition of a monolayer of 4'-substituted mercaptobiphenyl molecules. The influence of these molecules which bind to the GaAs via a sulfur group is investigated by Kelvin probe measurements in air. They reveal a dependence of GaAs electron affinity on the intrinsic molecular dipole moment of the mercaptobiphenyls. Furthermore, transient surface photovoltage measurements are presented which demonstrate an additional influence of mercaptobiphenyl chemisorption on surface carrier recombination rates. As a next step, the influence of pH-value and salt concentration upon the sensor device is discussed based on the results obtained from sensor conductance measurements in physiological solutions. A dependence of the device surface potential on both parameters due to surface charging is deduced. Model calculations applying Poisson-Boltzmann theory reveal as possible surface charging mechanisms either the adsorption of OH- ions on the surface, or the dissociation of OH groups in surface oxides. A comparison between simulation settings and physical device properties indicate the OH- adsorption as the most probable mechanism. In the second part of the present study the suitability of MBE grown III-V semiconductor structures for molecular electronics applications is examined. In doing so, a method to fabricate nanometer separated, coplanar, metallic electrodes based on the cleavage of a supporting AlGaAs-GaAs heterostructure is presented. This is followed

  13. Capturing in Vivo Plant Metabolism by Real-Time Analysis of Low to High Molecular Weight Volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios-Collado, César; García-Gómez, Diego; Zenobi, Renato; Vidal-de-Miguel, Guillermo; Ibáñez, Alfredo J; Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo

    2016-02-16

    We have deployed an efficient secondary electrospray ionization source coupled to an Orbitrap mass analyzer (SESI-MS) to investigate the emissions of a Begonia semperflorens. We document how hundreds of species can be tracked with an unparalleled time resolution of 2 min during day-night cycles. To further illustrate the capabilities of this system for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) analysis, we subjected the plant to mechanical damage and monitored its response. As a result, ∼1200 VOCs were monitored displaying different kinetics. To validate the soundness of our in vivo measurements, we fully characterized some key compounds via tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and confirmed their expected behavior based on prior gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) studies. For example, β-caryophyllene, which is directly related to photosynthesis, was found to show a periodic day-night pattern with highest concentrations during the day. We conclude that the capability of SESI-MS to capture highly dynamic VOC emissions and wide analyte coverage makes it an attractive tool to complement GC/MS in plant studies. PMID:26814403

  14. Neighborhood structure influences the convergence in light capture efficiency and carbon gain: an architectural approach for cloud forest shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Q, J Antonio; Cordero S, Roberto A

    2016-06-01

    Although plant competition is recognized as a fundamental factor that limits survival and species coexistence, its relative importance on light capture efficiency and carbon gain is not well understood. Here, we propose a new framework to explain the effects of neighborhood structures and light availability on plant attributes and their effect on plant performance in two understory shade-tolerant species (Palicourea padifolia (Roem. & Schult.) C.M. Taylor & Lorence and Psychotria elata (Swartz)) within two successional stages of a cloud forest in Costa Rica. Features of plant neighborhood physical structure and light availability, estimated by hemispherical photographs, were used to characterize the plant competition. Plant architecture, leaf attributes and gas exchange parameters extracted from the light-response curve were used as functional plant attributes, while an index of light capture efficiency (silhouette to total area ratio, averaged over all viewing angles, STAR) and carbon gain were used as indicators of plant performance. This framework is based in a partial least square Path model, which suggests that changes in plant performance in both species were affected in two ways: (i) increasing size and decreasing distance of neighbors cause changes in plant architecture (higher crown density and greater leaf dispersion), which contribute to lower STAR and subsequently lower carbon gain; and (ii) reductions in light availability caused by the neighbors also decrease plant carbon gain. The effect of neighbors on STAR and carbon gain were similar for the two forests sites, which were at different stages of succession, suggesting that the architectural changes of the two understory species reflect functional convergence in response to plant competition. Because STAR and carbon gain are variables that depend on multiple plant attributes and environmental characteristics, we suggest that changes in these features can be used as a whole-plant response approach to

  15. Neighborhood structure influences the convergence in light capture efficiency and carbon gain: an architectural approach for cloud forest shrubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Q, J Antonio; Cordero S, Roberto A

    2016-06-01

    Although plant competition is recognized as a fundamental factor that limits survival and species coexistence, its relative importance on light capture efficiency and carbon gain is not well understood. Here, we propose a new framework to explain the effects of neighborhood structures and light availability on plant attributes and their effect on plant performance in two understory shade-tolerant species (Palicourea padifolia (Roem. & Schult.) C.M. Taylor & Lorence and Psychotria elata (Swartz)) within two successional stages of a cloud forest in Costa Rica. Features of plant neighborhood physical structure and light availability, estimated by hemispherical photographs, were used to characterize the plant competition. Plant architecture, leaf attributes and gas exchange parameters extracted from the light-response curve were used as functional plant attributes, while an index of light capture efficiency (silhouette to total area ratio, averaged over all viewing angles, STAR) and carbon gain were used as indicators of plant performance. This framework is based in a partial least square Path model, which suggests that changes in plant performance in both species were affected in two ways: (i) increasing size and decreasing distance of neighbors cause changes in plant architecture (higher crown density and greater leaf dispersion), which contribute to lower STAR and subsequently lower carbon gain; and (ii) reductions in light availability caused by the neighbors also decrease plant carbon gain. The effect of neighbors on STAR and carbon gain were similar for the two forests sites, which were at different stages of succession, suggesting that the architectural changes of the two understory species reflect functional convergence in response to plant competition. Because STAR and carbon gain are variables that depend on multiple plant attributes and environmental characteristics, we suggest that changes in these features can be used as a whole-plant response approach to

  16. Benchmarking Close-range Structure from Motion 3D Reconstruction Software under Varying Capturing Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Ivan Adriyanov; Madsen, Claus B.

    2016-01-01

    . In this paper we analyse the state of the art of these software applications, by comparing the resultant 3D meshes qualitatively and quantitatively. We propose a number of testing scenarios using different lighting conditions, camera positions and image acquisition methods for the best in-depth analysis......Structure from Motion 3D reconstruction has become widely used in recent years in a number of fields such as industrial surface in- inspection, archeology, cultural heritage preservation and geomapping. A number of software solutions have been released using variations of this technique...

  17. Surface Structure of Hydroxyapatite from Simulated Annealing Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hong; Xu, Dingguo; Yang, Mingli; Zhang, Xingdong

    2016-05-10

    The surface structure of hydroxyapatite (HAP) is crucial for its bioactivity. Using a molecular dynamics simulated annealing method, we studied the structure and its variation with annealing temperature of the HAP (100) surface. In contrast to the commonly used HAP surface model, which is sliced from HAP crystal and then relaxed at 0 K with first-principles or force-field calculations, a new surface structure with gradual changes from ordered inside to disordered on the surface was revealed. The disordering is dependent on the annealing temperature, Tmax. When Tmax increases up to the melting point, which was usually adopted in experiments, the disordering increases, as reflected by its radial distribution functions, structural factors, and atomic coordination numbers. The disordering of annealed structures does not show significant changes when Tmax is above the melting point. The thickness of disordered layers is about 10 Å. The surface energy of the annealed structures at high temperature is significantly less than that of the crystal structure relaxed at room temperature. A three-layer model of interior, middle, and surface was then proposed to describe the surface structure of HAP. The interior layer retains the atomic configurations in crystal. The middle layer has its atoms moved and its groups rotated about their original locations. In the surface layer, the atomic arrangements are totally different from those in crystal. In particular for the hydroxyl groups, they move outward and cover the Ca(2+) ions, leaving holes occupied by the phosphate groups. Our study suggested a new model with disordered surface structures for studying the interaction of HAP-based biomaterials with other molecules. PMID:27096760

  18. [Cardiac potassium channels: molecular structure, physiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic implications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironov, N Iu; Golitsyn, S P

    2013-01-01

    Potassium channels and currents play essential roles in cardiac repolarization. Potassium channel blockade by class III antiarrhythmic drugs prolongs cardiac repolarization and results in termination and prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. Excessive inhomogeneous repolarization prolongation may lead to electrical instability and proarrhythmia (Torsade de Pointes tachycardia). This review focuses on molecular structure, physiology, pathophysiology and therapeutic potential of potassium channels of cardiac conduction system and myocardium providing information on recent findings in pathogenesis of cardiac arrhythmias, including inherited genetic abnormalities, and future perspectives. PMID:24654438

  19. Structures of mammalian ER α-glucosidase II capture the binding modes of broad-spectrum iminosugar antivirals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputo, Alessandro T; Alonzi, Dominic S; Marti, Lucia; Reca, Ida-Barbara; Kiappes, J L; Struwe, Weston B; Cross, Alice; Basu, Souradeep; Lowe, Edward D; Darlot, Benoit; Santino, Angelo; Roversi, Pietro; Zitzmann, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    The biosynthesis of enveloped viruses depends heavily on the host cell endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glycoprotein quality control (QC) machinery. This dependency exceeds the dependency of host glycoproteins, offering a window for the targeting of ERQC for the development of broad-spectrum antivirals. We determined small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and crystal structures of the main ERQC enzyme, ER α-glucosidase II (α-GluII; from mouse), alone and in complex with key ligands of its catalytic cycle and antiviral iminosugars, including two that are in clinical trials for the treatment of dengue fever. The SAXS data capture the enzyme's quaternary structure and suggest a conformational rearrangement is needed for the simultaneous binding of a monoglucosylated glycan to both subunits. The X-ray structures with key catalytic cycle intermediates highlight that an insertion between the +1 and +2 subsites contributes to the enzyme's activity and substrate specificity, and reveal that the presence of d-mannose at the +1 subsite renders the acid catalyst less efficient during the cleavage of the monoglucosylated substrate. The complexes with iminosugar antivirals suggest that inhibitors targeting a conserved ring of aromatic residues between the α-GluII +1 and +2 subsites would have increased potency and selectivity, thus providing a template for further rational drug design. PMID:27462106

  20. Molecular Docking and Structure-Based Drug Design Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo G. Ferreira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical research has successfully incorporated a wealth of molecular modeling methods, within a variety of drug discovery programs, to study complex biological and chemical systems. The integration of computational and experimental strategies has been of great value in the identification and development of novel promising compounds. Broadly used in modern drug design, molecular docking methods explore the ligand conformations adopted within the binding sites of macromolecular targets. This approach also estimates the ligand-receptor binding free energy by evaluating critical phenomena involved in the intermolecular recognition process. Today, as a variety of docking algorithms are available, an understanding of the advantages and limitations of each method is of fundamental importance in the development of effective strategies and the generation of relevant results. The purpose of this review is to examine current molecular docking strategies used in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry, exploring the advances in the field and the role played by the integration of structure- and ligand-based methods.

  1. Molecular structural order and anomalies in liquid silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, M Scott; Debenedetti, Pablo G; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z

    2002-07-01

    The present investigation examines the relationship between structural order, diffusivity anomalies, and density anomalies in liquid silica by means of molecular dynamics simulations. We use previously defined orientational and translational order parameters to quantify local structural order in atomic configurations. Extensive simulations are performed at different state points to measure structural order, diffusivity, and thermodynamic properties. It is found that silica shares many trends recently reported for water [J. R. Errington and P. G. Debenedetti, Nature 409, 318 (2001)]. At intermediate densities, the distribution of local orientational order is bimodal. At fixed temperature, order parameter extrema occur upon compression: a maximum in orientational order followed by a minimum in translational order. Unlike water, however, silica's translational order parameter minimum is broad, and there is no range of thermodynamic conditions where both parameters are strictly coupled. Furthermore, the temperature-density regime where both structural order parameters decrease upon isothermal compression (the structurally anomalous regime) does not encompass the region of diffusivity anomalies, as was the case for water. PMID:12241346

  2. Observation of edge filamentary structure motion during supersonic molecular-beam injection using a fast camera in Heliotron J

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A perpendicular-view fast video camera has been installed in Heliotron J to observe the behavior of filamentary structures of edge plasma turbulence across the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Supersonic molecular-beam injection (SMBI) can greatly increase the edge Hα emission; hence, we used the high imaging rate and shutter speed of the camera to capture the behavior of the fast propagating filamentary structures. A high-pass fast Fourier transform filter on the time dimension was adopted to extract the fluctuation component from the raw data for each pixel. The motion of the filamentary structures was clearly visible when we applied an amplitude threshold to identify the intense structures. In addition, a time-resolved 2D cross-correlation technique was adopted to estimate the poloidal phase velocity of turbulence. The motion direction was found to be reversed dramatically just after an SMBI pulse. (author)

  3. Capturing the Magnetic and Structural Phase Transition of Ferh using Extreme Ultraviolet Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusin, Dmitriy; Grychtol, Patrik; Gentry, Christian; Murnane, Margaret; Kapteyn, Henry; Canton, Sophie; Knut, Ronny; Shaw, Justin; Nembach, Hans; Silva, Thomas; Ceballos, Alejandro; Bordel, Catherine; Fischer, Peter; Hellman, Frances

    2015-03-01

    The temperature dependent transition from the anti-ferromagnetic to the ferromagnetic phase in FeRh is accompanied by a modification of its crystal lattice. The interplay between the magnetic and the structural transition is a matter of strong debate. It is important to better understand the mechanism(s) of the transition since it can be induced by femtosecond laser pulses and, unlike slower (nanosecond) magnetic phase transitions, does not seem to be limited by heat transfer. In this work, we use extreme ultraviolet light generated by a tabletop high harmonics source to perform element-selective investigations of the temperature-dependent magneto-optical response of a thin film FeRh sample. We study the optically induced phase transition using two ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy approaches: by monitoring the time-resolved transversal magneto-optical Kerr effect (T-MOKE) and the transient change in reflectivity. PF acknowledges support from BES MSD DOE # DE-AC02-05-CH11231 and LFRIR program (# 2012K1A4A3053565) through NRF Korea funded by MEST, and JILA from DOE # DE-FG02-09ER4665.

  4. Space structure capturing and assembling by experimental free-floating robot satellite (EFFORTS) simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K.

    1993-09-01

    In order to study and validate practical availability of control schemes for in-orbit operational free-floating robots, a research group at the Tokyo Institute of Technology has developed the Experimental Free-FlOating RoboT Satellite (EFFORTS-I and II) simulators, which enable to examine 2-dimensional pseudo-micro gravity motion dynamics by air lift system. The robot model comprising a satellite base body and articulated manipulator arms with grippers and wrist force sensors, makes horizontal motion without mechanical disturbances or external forces. This paper presents the control methods and experimental results for spacecraft/manipulator control paying attention to the reaction dynamics, and assembly and deployment operation of space structures. The paper focuses the discussion of (1) hardware design of EFFORTS simulators, (2) dynamic modeling and a basic control concept for space free-floating manipulators, (3) satellite attitude control coordinating with manipulator dynamics, (4) practical force control for dexterous manipulation, and (5) experimental results on above topics.

  5. Study on multimers and their structures in molecular association mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NI Yi; DOU XiaoMing; ZHAO HaiYing; YIN GuangZhong; YAMAGUCHI Yoshinori; OZAKI Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    Self-association system of (R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) solution is studied as a model of molecular association mixture. Analysis methods including FSMWEFA (fixed-size moving window evolving factor analysis) combined with PCA (principal component analysis), SIMPLISMA (simple-to-use interactive self-modeling mixture analysis), and ITTFA (iterative target transformation factor analysis) are adopted to resolve infrared spectra of (R)-1,3-butanediol solution. Association number and equilibrium constant are computed. (R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute inert solution is determined as a monomer-trimer equilibrium system. Theoretical investigation of trimer structures is carried out with DFT (density functional theory), and structural factors are analyzed.

  6. Molecular structure and reversible photodegradation in anthraquinone dyes

    CERN Document Server

    Dhakal, Prabodh

    2016-01-01

    Reversible photodegradation is a process that has been observed in several dye molecules, but the underlying mechanisms are not still well understood. In this contribution, we characterize a series of anthraquinone dyes to determine how self-healing depends on molecular structure. Past studies have used probing techniques that rely on linear absorption, two-photon fluorescence, and amplified spontaneous emission. Each of these probes provide an indirect measure of the populations of the damaged and undamaged species, requiring calibrations or assumptions to be made that might affect the accuracy of the results. The present studies use fluorescence as a probe, which is shown to directly measure the undamaged population. It is found that certain anthraquinone classes share common structural features that are associated with self healing. Furthermore, the time and temperature dependence of photodegradation and self-healing is found to be consistent with the domain model of self healing.

  7. Study on multimers and their structures in molecular association mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAMAGUCHI; Yoshinori; OZAKI; Yukihiro

    2007-01-01

    Self-association system of(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute carbon tetrachloride(CCl4)solution is studied as a model of molecular association mixture.Analysis methods including FSMWEFA(fixed-size moving window evolving factor analysis)combined with PCA(principal component analysis),SIMPLISMA (simple-to-use interactive self-modeling mixture analysis),and ITTFA(iterative target transformation factor analysis)are adopted to resolve infrared spectra of(R)-1,3-butanediol solution.Association number and equilibrium constant are computed.(R)-1,3-butanediol in dilute inert solution is determined as a monomer-trimer equilibrium system.Theoretical investigation of trimer structures is carried out with DFT(density functional theory),and structural factors are analyzed.

  8. A model for the internal structure of molecular cloud cores

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, D E; McLaughlin, Dean E; Pudritz, Ralph E

    1996-01-01

    We generalize the classic Bonnor-Ebert stability analysis of pressure-truncated, self-gravitating gas spheres, to include clouds with arbitrary equations of state. A virial-theorem analysis is also used to incorporate mean magnetic fields into such structures. The results are applied to giant molecular clouds (GMCs), and to individual dense cores, with an eye to accounting for recent observations of the internal velocity-dispersion profiles of the cores in particular. We argue that GMCs and massive cores are at or near their critical mass, and that in such a case the size-linewidth and mass-radius relations between them are only weakly dependent on their internal structures; any gas equation of state leads to essentially the same relations. We briefly consider the possibility that molecular clouds can be described by polytropic pressure-density relations (of either positive or negative index), but show that these are inconsistent with the apparent gravitational virial equilibrium, 2U + W = 0 of GMCs and of ma...

  9. Capturing state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-receptors: a microscopic look into the structural and functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payghan, Pavan V; Bera, Indrani; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay; Ghoshal, Nanda

    2016-08-01

    The γ-amino butyric acid type A receptors (GABAA-Rs) are the key players in the mammalian brain that meditate fast inhibitory neurotransmission events. The structural integrity of these ligand-gated ion channel controls chloride ion permeability, which in turn monitors important pharmacological functions. Despite ample studies on GABAA-Rs, there was a need for a study on full-length receptor structures, devoted to track structure-function correlations based on their dynamic behavior consideration. We have employed molecular dynamics simulations accompanied by other biophysical methods to shed light on sequential and unaddressed questions like How GABAA-R structure facilitates the entry of GABA molecules at its two orthosteric binding sites? After entry, what structural features and changes monitor site-wise GABA binding differences? In the same context, what are the roles and responsibilities of loops such as C and F? On physiologically relevant time scales, how open to close state transition occurs? How salt bridges such as E155-R207 and E153-R207 maintain state-dependent C-loop structures? In an attempt, our simulation study unravels the complete course of GABA binding-unbinding pathway. This provides us with the relevant understanding of state-dependent dynamic events of GABAA-Rs. PMID:26372345

  10. Molecular interrogation of the feeding behaviour of field captured individual insects for interpretation of multiple host plant use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Hereward

    Full Text Available The way in which herbivorous insect individuals use multiple host species is difficult to quantify under field conditions, but critical to understanding the evolutionary processes underpinning insect-host plant relationships. In this study we developed a novel approach to understanding the host plant interactions of the green mirid, Creontiades dilutus, a highly motile heteropteran bug that has been associated with many plant species. We combine quantified sampling of the insect across its various host plant species within particular sites and a molecular comparison between the insects' gut contents and available host plants. This approach allows inferences to be made as to the plants fed upon by individual insects in the field. Quantified sampling shows that this "generalist" species is consistently more abundant on two species in the genus Cullen (Fabaceae, its primary host species, than on any other of its numerous listed hosts. The chloroplast intergenic sequences reveal that C. dilutus frequently feeds on plants additional to the one from which it was collected, even when individuals were sampled from the primary host species. These data may be reconciled by viewing multiple host use in this species as an adaptation to survive spatiotemporally ephemeral habitats. The methodological framework developed here provides a basis from which new insights into the feeding behaviour and host plant relationships of herbivorous insects can be derived, which will benefit not only ecological interpretation but also our understanding of the evolution of these relationships.

  11. Teaching Structure-Property Relationships: Investigating Molecular Structure and Boiling Point

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Peter M.

    2007-01-01

    A concise, well-organized table of the boiling points of 392 organic compounds has facilitated inquiry-based instruction in multiple scientific principles. Many individual or group learning activities can be derived from the tabulated data of molecular structure and boiling point based on the instructor's education objectives and the students'…

  12. Crystal and molecular structures of some organophosphorus insecticides and computer methods for structure determination. [Dissertation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapp, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    Molecular structure investigations of a set of organophosphorus insecticides have been carried out in order to acquire the data base to develop correlations between such parameters and their toxicities. The crystal and molecular structures of dimethoate (LD/sub 50/ (rats) = 600 mg/kg), IPAT, and leptophos (LD/sub 50/ (rats) = 90 mg/kg) have been determined via three-dimensional x-ray analysis. The crystal and molecular structure of (-)-..cap alpha..-phenylethylammonium (-)-0-methyl-phenylphosphonothioate was solved by conventional Patterson and Fourier techniques to a final R value of 0.057. The crystal and molecular structures of two crystalline forms of calcium formate were determined. A new least-squares refinement program was written which is much more general and efficient than any previous program. In particular, a new block-diagonal approximation has been devised which is much more economical than full-matrix refinement and appears to work much better than previous block-diagonal methods. A Howells, Phillips and Rogers test for a center of symmetry and a Wilson plot have been programmed into the data collection algorithm. Some approximations and special problems are discussed relative to implementing these routines in a real-time mode on a minicomputer. A mathematical background and program description are included for each program.

  13. Molecular Modeling and Structural Analysis of Arylesterase of Ancylostoma Duodenale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Subhamay; Panda, Santamay; Kumari, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worm infection of humans is one of the most commonly prevalent helminth infection that has imposed great impact on society and public health in the developing world. The two species of hookworm, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus may be primarily responsible for causing parasitic infections in human beings. The highly prevalent areas for Ancylostoma duodenale infections are mainly India, Middle East, Australia, northern Africa and other parts of the world. The serum arylesterases/paraoxonases are family of enzymes that is involved in the hydrolysis of a number of organophosphorus insecticides to the nontoxic products. The participation of the enzymes in the breakdown of a variety of organophosphate substrates that is generally made up of paraoxon and numerous aromatic carboxylic acid esters (e.g., phenyl acetate), and hence combats the toxic effect of organophosphates. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale giving special importance to structure generation, validation of the generated models, distribution of secondary structural elements and positive charge distribution over the structure. By the implementation of comparative modeling approach we propose the first molecular model structure of arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale.

  14. Molecular Dynamics of Shock Wave Interaction with Nanoscale Structured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qananwah, Ahmad K.

    Typical theoretical treatments of shock wave interactions are based on a continuum approach, which cannot resolve the spatial variations in solids with nano-scale porous structure. Nano-structured materials have the potential to attenuate the strength of traveling shock waves because of their high surface-to-volume ratio. To investigate such interactions we have developed a molecular dynamics simulation model, based on Short Range Attractive interactions. A piston, modeled as a uni-directional repulsive force field translating at a prescribed velocity, impinges on a region of gas which is compressed to form a shock, which in turn is driven against an atomistic solid wall. Periodic boundary conditions are used in the directions orthogonal to the piston motion, and we have considered solids based on either embedded atom potentials (target structure) or tethered potential (rigid piston, holding wall). Velocity, temperature and stress fields are computed locally in both gas and solid regions, and displacements within the solid are interpreted in terms of its elastic constants. In this work we present results of the elastic behavior of solid structures subjected to shock wave impact and analysis of energy transport and absorption in porous materials. The results indicated that the presence of nano-porous material layers in front of a target wall reduced the stress magnitude detected inside and the energy deposited there by about 30 percent while, at the same time, its loading rate was decreased substantially.

  15. Molecular Modeling and Structural Analysis of Arylesterase of Ancylostoma Duodenale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Subhamay; Panda, Santamay; Kumari, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worm infection of humans is one of the most commonly prevalent helminth infection that has imposed great impact on society and public health in the developing world. The two species of hookworm, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus may be primarily responsible for causing parasitic infections in human beings. The highly prevalent areas for Ancylostoma duodenale infections are mainly India, Middle East, Australia, northern Africa and other parts of the world. The serum arylesterases/paraoxonases are family of enzymes that is involved in the hydrolysis of a number of organophosphorus insecticides to the nontoxic products. The participation of the enzymes in the breakdown of a variety of organophosphate substrates that is generally made up of paraoxon and numerous aromatic carboxylic acid esters (e.g., phenyl acetate), and hence combats the toxic effect of organophosphates. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale giving special importance to structure generation, validation of the generated models, distribution of secondary structural elements and positive charge distribution over the structure. By the implementation of comparative modeling approach we propose the first molecular model structure of arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale. PMID:27642240

  16. CO{sub 2} capture using fly ash-derived activated carbons impregnated with low molecular mass amines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.M.; Arenillas, A.; Drage, T.C.; Snape, C.E. [University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre

    2005-07-01

    Two different approaches to develop high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbents are presented. Firstly, the modification of the surface chemistry of low cost carbons by impregnation with a basic nitrogen-containing polymer (i.e.polyethylenimine) is described. Relatively low molecular mass (MM) amines, namely diethanolamine (DEA, MM 105) and tetraethylenepentaamineacrylonitrile (TEPAN, MM 311) are used to produce high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbents from activated carbons derived from unburned carbon in fly ash, which have low mesoporosities. The CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity and thermal stability of the prepared sorbents was measured as a function of temperature in a thermogravimetric analyser. The results indicate that TEPAN is more effective than DEA; at a temperature of 75{sup o}C, fly ash-derived activated carbons loaded with TEPAN achieved CO{sub 2} adsorption capacities in excess of 5 wt%, which compares fabvourably with the CO{sub 2} absorption capacity of 6.5 wt% achieved with a mesoporous silica loaded with TEPAN, and outperforms fly ash-derived activated carbons loaded with PEI. TEPAN has also been shown to have a higher thermal stability than DEA. The second approach involves the development of high nitrogen content carbon matrix adsorbents by carbonisation and subsequent thermal or chemical activation of a range of materials (polyacrylonitrile, glucose-amine mixtures, melamine and urea/melamine-formaldehyde resins). The results show that although the amount of nitrogen incorporated to the final adsorbent is important, the N-functionality seems to be more relevant for increasing CO{sub 2} uptake. However, the adsorbent obtained from carbazole-sugar co-pyrolysis, despite the lower amount of N incorporated, shows high CO{sub 2} uptake, up to 9 wt%, probably because the presence of more basic functionalities as determined by XPS analysis. 9 refs., 2 figs.

  17. Amino Acid Molecular Units: Building Primary and Secondary Protein Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecido R. Silva

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to guarantee the learning quality and suitable knowledge  use  about structural biology, it is fundamental to  exist, since the beginning of  students’ formation, the possibility of clear visualization of biomolecule structures. Nevertheless, the didactic books can only bring  schematic  drawings; even more elaborated figures and graphic computation  do not permit the necessary interaction.  The representation of three-dimensional molecular structures with ludic models, built with representative units, have supplied to the students and teachers a successfully experience to  visualize such structures and correlate them to the real molecules.  The design and applicability of the representative units were discussed with researchers and teachers before mould implementation.  In this stage  it  will be presented the  developed  kit  containing the  representative  plastic parts of the main amino acids.  The kit can demonstrate the interaction among the amino acids  functional groups  (represented by colors, shapes,  sizes and  the peptidic bonds between them  facilitating the assembly and visuali zation of the primary and secondary protein structure.  The models were designed for  Ca,  amino,  carboxyl groups  and  hydrogen. The  lateral chains have  well defined models that represent their geometrical shape.  The completed kit set  will be presented in this meeting (patent requested.  In the last phase of the project will be realized  an effective evaluation  of the kit  as a facilitative didactic tool of the teaching/learning process in the Structural Molecular Biology area.

  18. Mathematical analysis of compressive/tensile molecular and nuclear structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dayu

    Mathematical analysis in chemistry is a fascinating and critical tool to explain experimental observations. In this dissertation, mathematical methods to present chemical bonding and other structures for many-particle systems are discussed at different levels (molecular, atomic, and nuclear). First, the tetrahedral geometry of single, double, or triple carbon-carbon bonds gives an unsatisfying demonstration of bond lengths, compared to experimental trends. To correct this, Platonic solids and Archimedean solids were evaluated as atoms in covalent carbon or nitrogen bond systems in order to find the best solids for geometric fitting. Pentagonal solids, e.g. the dodecahedron and icosidodecahedron, give the best fit with experimental bond lengths; an ideal pyramidal solid which models covalent bonds was also generated. Second, the macroscopic compression/tension architectural approach was applied to forces at the molecular level, considering atomic interactions as compressive (repulsive) and tensile (attractive) forces. Two particle interactions were considered, followed by a model of the dihydrogen molecule (H2; two protons and two electrons). Dihydrogen was evaluated as two different types of compression/tension structures: a coaxial spring model and a ring model. Using similar methods, covalent diatomic molecules (made up of C, N, O, or F) were evaluated. Finally, the compression/tension model was extended to the nuclear level, based on the observation that nuclei with certain numbers of protons/neutrons (magic numbers) have extra stability compared to other nucleon ratios. A hollow spherical model was developed that combines elements of the classic nuclear shell model and liquid drop model. Nuclear structure and the trend of the "island of stability" for the current and extended periodic table were studied.

  19. Molecular Clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaobo; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji

    2014-03-01

    We present observations of a 4.25 deg2 area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of 12CO, 13CO, and C18O. Three molecules show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with a surface density of over 500 M ⊙ pc-2 and a mean H2 column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9 × 1021 cm-2 for 12CO, 13CO, and C18O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of 5.4 × 104 M ⊙ (12CO), 2.0 × 104 M ⊙ (13CO), and 6.1 × 103 M ⊙ (C18O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phases of gas: cold gas (~10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas (>20 K) outlines the edge of the cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud: the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Islands and Sea, and Pelican's Beak, Hat, and Neck. The areas of 13CO emission range within 2-10 pc2 with mass of (1-5) × 103 M ⊙ and line width of a few km s-1. The different line properties and signs of star-forming activity indicate they are in different evolutionary stages. Four filamentary structures with complicated velocity features are detected along the dark lane in LDN 935. Furthermore, a total of 611 molecular clumps within the 13CO tracing cloud are identified using the ClumpFind algorithm. The properties of the clumps suggest that most of the clumps are gravitationally bound and at an early stage of evolution with cold and dense molecular gas.

  20. Selective capture and rapid identification of Panax notoginseng metabolites in rat faeces by the integration of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers and high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qizhi; Yang, Zaiyue; Chen, Ning; Zhou, Xuemin; Hong, Junli

    2016-07-15

    In the present work, an advanced pretreatment method magnetic molecular imprinted polymers-dispersive solid phase extraction (MMIPs-DSPE) combined with the high sensitivity LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry was applied to the complicated metabolites analysis of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCMs) in complex matrices. The ginsenoside Rb1 magnetic molecular imprinted polymers (Rb1-MMIPs) were successfully synthesized for specific recognition and selective enrichment of Panax notoginseng saponin metabolites in rat faeces. The polymers were prepared by using Fe3O4@SiO2 as the supporting material, APTES as the functional monomer and TEOS as the cross-linker. The Rb1-MMIPs showed quick separation (10.8 emu/g), large adsorption capacity (636μmol/g), high selectivity and fast binding kinetics (25min). Dispersion solid-phase extraction using Rb1-MMIPs (Rb1-MMIPs-DSPE) integrated with LTQ-Orbitrap MS was applied to fish out and identify saponin metabolites from rat faeces, and totally 58 related compounds were detected within 20min, including 26 PPD-group and 32 PPT-group notoginsenoside metabolites. Parallel tests showed that Rb1-MMIPs-DSPE obtained the lowest matrix effects of 0.98-14.84% and captured the largest number of structural analogues compared with traditional pretreatment methods organic solvent extraction (OSE) and solid phase extraction (SPE). PMID:27295967

  1. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laikov, Dimitri N.

    2011-10-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good dipole polarizabilities and improved intermolecular potentials with dispersion terms. The molecular integrals include up to three-center one-electron and two-center two-electron terms, all in simple analytical forms. A method to extract the effective one-electron Hamiltonian of nonlocal-exchange Kohn-Sham theory from the coupled-cluster one-electron density matrix is designed and used to get its matrix representation in a molecule-intrinsic minimal basis as an input to the parametrization procedure - making a direct link to the correlated wavefunction theory. The model has been trained for 15 elements (H, Li-F, Na-Cl, 720 parameters) on a set of 5581 molecules (including ions, transition states, and weakly bound complexes) whose first- and second-order properties were computed by the coupled-cluster theory as a reference, and a good agreement is seen. The model looks promising for the study of large molecular systems, it is believed to be an important step forward from the traditional semiempirical models towards higher accuracy at nearly as low a computational cost.

  2. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehere, P.; Robinson, H.; Han, Q.; Lemkul, J. A.; Vavricka, C. J.; Bevan, D. R.; Li, J.

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  3. Tyrosine Aminotransferase: Biochemical and Structural Properties and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P Mehere; Q Han; J Lemkul; C Vavricka; H Robinson; D Bevan; J Li

    2011-12-31

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using {alpha}-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 {angstrom} resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  4. Tyrosine aminotransferase: biochemical and structural properties and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehere, Prajwalini; Han, Qian; Lemkul, Justin A; Vavricka, Christopher J; Robinson, Howard; Bevan, David R; Li, Jianyong

    2010-11-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) catalyzes the transamination of tyrosine and other aromatic amino acids. The enzyme is thought to play a role in tyrosinemia type II, hepatitis and hepatic carcinoma recovery. The objective of this study is to investigate its biochemical and structural characteristics and substrate specificity in order to provide insight regarding its involvement in these diseases. Mouse TAT (mTAT) was cloned from a mouse cDNA library, and its recombinant protein was produced using Escherichia coli cells and purified using various chromatographic techniques. The recombinant mTAT is able to catalyze the transamination of tyrosine using α-ketoglutaric acid as an amino group acceptor at neutral pH. The enzyme also can use glutamate and phenylalanine as amino group donors and p-hydroxy-phenylpyruvate, phenylpyruvate and alpha-ketocaproic acid as amino group acceptors. Through macromolecular crystallography we have determined the mTAT crystal structure at 2.9 Å resolution. The crystal structure revealed the interaction between the pyridoxal-5'-phosphate cofactor and the enzyme, as well as the formation of a disulphide bond. The detection of disulphide bond provides some rational explanation regarding previously observed TAT inactivation under oxidative conditions and reactivation of the inactive TAT in the presence of a reducing agent. Molecular dynamics simulations using the crystal structures of Trypanosoma cruzi TAT and human TAT provided further insight regarding the substrate-enzyme interactions and substrate specificity. The biochemical and structural properties of TAT and the binding of its cofactor and the substrate may help in elucidation of the mechanism of TAT inhibition and activation.

  5. Introductory group theory and its application to molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1975-01-01

    The success of the first edition of this book has encouraged us to revise and update it. In the second edition we have attempted to further clarify por­ tions of the text in reference to point symmetry, keeping certain sections and removing others. The ever-expanding interest in solids necessitates some discussion on space symmetry. In this edition we have expanded the discus­ sion on point symmetry to include space symmetry. The selection rules in­ clude space group selection rules (for k = 0). Numerous examples are pro­ vided to acquaint the reader with the procedure necessary to accomplish this. Recent examples from the literature are given to illustrate the use of group theory in the interpretation of molecular spectra and in the determination of molecular structure. The text is intended for scientists and students with only a limited theoretical background in spectroscopy. For this reason we have presented detailed procedures for carrying out the selection rules and normal coor­ dinate treatment of ...

  6. Effect of processing on carbon molecular sieve structure and performance

    KAUST Repository

    Das, Mita

    2010-11-01

    Sub-micron sized carbon molecular sieve (CMS) materials were produced via ball milling for subsequent use in hybrid material formation. A detailed analysis of the effects of the milling process in the presence of different milling environments is reported. The milling process apparently alters the molecular scale structure and properties of the carbon material. Three cases: unmilled, air milled and nitrogen milled, were analyzed in this work. The property changes were probed using equilibrium sorption experiments with different gases. Furthermore, WAXD and BET results also showed differences between milling processes. Finally in order to improve the interfacial polymer-sieve region of hybrid membranes, the CMS surface was chemically modified with a linkage unit capable of covalently bonding the polymer to the sieve. A published single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) modification method was adopted to attach a primary aromatic amine to the surface. Several aspects including rigidity, chemical composition, bulky groups and length were considered in selecting the preferred linkage unit. Fortunately kinetic and equilibrium sorption properties of the modified sieves showed very little difference from unmodified samples, suggesting that the linkage unit is not excessively filling or obstructing access to the pores of the CMSs during the modification process. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure

    CERN Document Server

    Laikov, Dimitri N

    2011-01-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good dipole polarizabilities and improved intermolecular potentials with dispersion terms. The molecular integrals include up to three-center one-electron and two-center two-electron terms, all in simple analytical forms. A method to extract the effective one-electron Hamiltonian of nonlocal-exchange Kohn-Sham theory from the coupled-cluster one-electron density matrix is designed and used to get its matrix representation in a molecule-intrinsic minimal basis as an input to the paramtrization procedure -- making a direct link...

  8. How does the molecular network structure influence PDMS elastomer wettability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melillo, Matthew; Genzer, Jan

    Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is one of the most common elastomers, with applications ranging from medical devices to absorbents for water treatment. Fundamental understanding of how liquids spread on the surface of and absorb into PDMS networks is of critical importance for the design and use of another application - microfluidic devices. We have systematically studied the effects of polymer molecular weight, loading of tetra-functional crosslinker, end-group chemical functionality, and the extent of dilution of the curing mixture on the mechanical and surface properties of end-linked PDMS networks. The gel and sol fractions, storage and loss moduli, liquid swelling ratios, and water contact angles have all been shown to vary greatly based on the aforementioned variables. Similar trends were observed for the commercial PDMS material, Sylgard-184. Our results have confirmed theories predicting the relationships between modulus and swelling. Furthermore, we have provided new evidence for the strong influence that substrate modulus and molecular network structure have on the wettability of PDMS elastomers. These findings will aid in the design and implementation of efficient microfluidics and other PDMS-based materials that involve the transport of liquids.

  9. Influence of the molecular structure on hydrolyzability of epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EDF has decided to use glass reinforced composites for certain pipework in Pressurized Water Reactors (service water, emergency-supplied service water, fine pipe works, etc...) as a replacement for traditional materials. In practice, steel is prone to rapid corrosion in these circuits; introducing composites could prove economically viable if their long term behaviour can be demonstrated. However, composite materials can undergo deterioration in service through hydrolysis of the resin or the fibre-matrix interface. Different resins can be chosen depending on the programmed use. A first study has covered the hydrolyzability of polyester and vinyl ester resins. The present document undertakes the resistance to hydrolysis of epoxy resins, concentrating on those reputed to withstand high temperatures. This research uses model monomer, linking the molecular structure of the materials to their resistance to hydrolysis. (author)

  10. Calculations of optical rotation: Influence of molecular structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF method and Density Functional Theory (DFT were used to calculate the optical rotation of 26 chiral compounds. The effects of theory and basis sets used for calculation, solvents influence on the geometry and values of calculated optical rotation were all discussed. The polarizable continuum model, included in the calculation, did not improve the accuracy effectively, but it was superior to γs. Optical rotation of five or sixmembered of cyclic compound has been calculated and 17 pyrrolidine or piperidine derivatives which were calculated by HF and DFT methods gave acceptable predictions. The nitrogen atom affects the calculation results dramatically, and it is necessary in the molecular structure in order to get an accurate computation result. Namely, when the nitrogen atom was substituted by oxygen atom in the ring, the calculation result deteriorated.

  11. Genetic structure of Triatoma venosa (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: molecular and morphometric evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Vargas

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Triatoma venosa presents a restricted geographical distribution in America and is considered as a secondary vector of Chagas disease in Colombia and Ecuador. A total of 120 adult insects were collected in domestic and peridomestic habitats in an endemic area of the department of Boyacá, Colombia, in order to determine their genetic structure through morphometric and molecular techniques. The head and wings of each specimen were used for the analyses of size, shape, and sexual dimorphism. A significant sexual dimorphism was found, although no differences in size among the studied groups were detected. Differences were found in the analyzed structures except for male heads. DNA was extracted from the legs in order to carry out the internal transcriber space-2 (ITS-2 amplification and the randon amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analyses. Length polymorphisms were not detected in the ITS-2. Fst and Nm values were estimated (0.047 and 3.4, respectively. The high genetic flow found among the insects captured in the domicile and peridomiciliary environment does not permit a genetic differentiation, thus establishing the peridomicile as an important place for epidemiological surveillance.

  12. Inter-molecular β-sheet structure facilitates lung-targeting siRNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jihan; Li, Dong; Wen, Hao; Zheng, Shuquan; Su, Cuicui; Yi, Fan; Wang, Jue; Liang, Zicai; Tang, Tao; Zhou, Demin; Zhang, Li-He; Liang, Dehai; Du, Quan

    2016-03-01

    Size-dependent passive targeting based on the characteristics of tissues is a basic mechanism of drug delivery. While the nanometer-sized particles are efficiently captured by the liver and spleen, the micron-sized particles are most likely entrapped within the lung owing to its unique capillary structure and physiological features. To exploit this property in lung-targeting siRNA delivery, we designed and studied a multi-domain peptide named K-β, which was able to form inter-molecular β-sheet structures. Results showed that K-β peptides and siRNAs formed stable complex particles of 60 nm when mixed together. A critical property of such particles was that, after being intravenously injected into mice, they further associated into loose and micron-sized aggregates, and thus effectively entrapped within the capillaries of the lung, leading to a passive accumulation and gene-silencing. The large size aggregates can dissociate or break down by the shear stress generated by blood flow, alleviating the pulmonary embolism. Besides the lung, siRNA enrichment and targeted gene silencing were also observed in the liver. This drug delivery strategy, together with the low toxicity, biodegradability, and programmability of peptide carriers, show great potentials in vivo applications.

  13. STUDIES OF RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN MOLECULAR STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY BY PATTERN RECOGNITION METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The attempt to rationalize the connections between the molecular structures of organic compounds and their biological activities comprises the field of structure-activity relations (SAR) studies. Correlations between structure and activity are important for the understanding and ...

  14. A multi-resolution model to capture both global fluctuations of an enzyme and molecular recognition in the ligand-binding site

    CERN Document Server

    Fogarty, Aoife C; Kremer, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    In multi-resolution simulations, different system components are simultaneously modelled at different levels of resolution, these being smoothly coupled together. In the case of enzyme systems, computationally expensive atomistic detail is needed in the active site to capture the chemistry of substrate binding. Global properties of the rest of the protein also play an essential role, determining the structure and fluctuations of the binding site; however, these can be modelled on a coarser level. Similarly, in the most computationally efficient scheme only the solvent hydrating the active site requires atomistic detail. We present a methodology to couple atomistic and coarse-grained protein models, while solvating the atomistic part of the protein in atomistic water. This allows a free choice of which protein and solvent degrees of freedom to include atomistically, without loss of accuracy in the atomistic description. This multi-resolution methodology can successfully model stable ligand binding, and we furt...

  15. Derivatives of Ergot-alkaloids: Molecular structure, physical properties, and structure-activity relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka B.; Spiteller, Michael

    2012-09-01

    A comprehensive screening of fifteen functionalized Ergot-alkaloids, containing bulk aliphatic cyclic substituents at D-ring of the ergoline molecular skeleton was performed, studying their structure-active relationships and model interactions with α2A-adreno-, serotonin (5HT2A) and dopamine D3 (D3A) receptors. The accounted high affinity to the receptors binding loops and unusual bonding situations, joined with the molecular flexibility of the substituents and the presence of proton accepting/donating functional groups in the studied alkaloids, may contribute to further understanding the mechanisms of biological activity in vivo and in predicting their therapeutic potential in central nervous system (CNS), including those related the Schizophrenia. Since the presented correlation between the molecular structure and properties, was based on the comprehensively theoretical computational and experimental physical study on the successfully isolated derivatives, through using routine synthetic pathways in a relatively high yields, marked these derivatives as 'treasure' for further experimental and theoretical studied in areas such as: (a) pharmacological and clinical testing; (b) molecular-drugs design of novel psychoactive substances; (c) development of the analytical protocols for determination of Ergot-alkaloids through a functionalization of the ergoline-skeleton, and more.

  16. Molecular clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaobo; Xu, Ye; Yang, Ji, E-mail: shbzhang@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, and Key Laboratory for Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2014-03-01

    We present observations of a 4.25 deg{sup 2} area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the J = 1-0 transitions of {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O. Three molecules show different emission areas with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with a surface density of over 500 M {sub ☉} pc{sup –2} and a mean H{sub 2} column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} for {sup 12}CO, {sup 13}CO, and C{sup 18}O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of 5.4 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} ({sup 12}CO), 2.0 × 10{sup 4} M {sub ☉} ({sup 13}CO), and 6.1 × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} (C{sup 18}O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phases of gas: cold gas (∼10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas (>20 K) outlines the edge of the cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud: the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Islands and Sea, and Pelican's Beak, Hat, and Neck. The areas of {sup 13}CO emission range within 2-10 pc{sup 2} with mass of (1-5) × 10{sup 3} M {sub ☉} and line width of a few km s{sup –1}. The different line properties and signs of star-forming activity indicate they are in different evolutionary stages. Four filamentary structures with complicated velocity features are detected along the dark lane in LDN 935. Furthermore, a total of 611 molecular clumps within the {sup 13}CO tracing cloud are identified using the ClumpFind algorithm. The properties of the clumps suggest that most of the clumps are gravitationally bound and at an early stage of evolution with cold and dense molecular gas.

  17. A chloride capturing system via proton-induced structure transformation between opened- and closed-forms of dodecavanadates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yoshitaka; Kikukawa, Yuji; Kuwajima, Sho; Hayashi, Yoshihito

    2016-05-01

    Chloride-incorporated dodecavanadates show two distinct structures of the monoprotonated-form [HV12O32(Cl)](4-) (closed-V12) with a spherical closed-structure and the opened-form [V12O32(Cl)](5-) (opened-V12). The reaction of closed-V12 with a stoichiometric amount of ethylenediamine drives the structure transformation reaction to opened-V12, quantitatively. From time dependent observations of (51)V NMR, a tube-type intermediate [V12O32(Cl)](5-) (tube-V12) was observed in the transformation process. Isolation of the intermediate was achieved by the deprotonation reaction of closed-V12 with diethylamine, and the structure transformation was confirmed by using the isolated intermediate. The reverse transformation from opened-V12 to closed-V12 was also achieved by addition of trifluoroacetic acid. The geometrical difference between closed-V12 and opened-V12 is reflected in the reactivity difference to the external reagents, and this was demonstrated by examining the chloride removal reaction by using a silver cation. The incorporated chloride was preserved in the closed-V12 cage even in the presence of a silver cation. In contrast, the chloride in opened-V12 was removed as AgCl by the silver cation. In addition, by the reaction of chloride-free opened-V12 with a quantitative amount of {Et4N}Cl retrieved opened-V12, showing the capability of opened-V12 to recapture a guest chloride in the cavity. This transformation between two isomeric dodecavanadate structures is regarded as the movement of a molecular mitt to catch a ball and secure it.

  18. Structure and molecular modeling of tungsten borotellurate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rada, S., E-mail: Simona.Rada@phys.utcluj.ro [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca 400020 (Romania); Rada, M. [Nat. Inst. for R and D of Isotopic and Molec. Technologies, Cluj-Napoca 400293 (Romania); Culea, E., E-mail: eugen.culea@phys.utcluj.ro [Department of Physics and Chemistry, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca, Cluj-Napoca 400020 (Romania)

    2013-03-05

    Highlights: ► The [WO{sub 6}] structural units are highly deformed. ► EPR spectra reveal the existence of W{sup +5} ions situated in distorted octahedral positions and the oxygen ions defects. ► The presence of W{sup +5} ions confers to the glass colors that change with composition. -- Abstract: Glasses of the xWO{sub 3} (100−x)[3TeO{sub 2}·2B{sub 2}O{sub 3}] system where x = 0–40 mol% WO{sub 3} were synthesized and characterized by investigations on FTIR, UV–VIS, EPR spectroscopy and molecular modeling calculations in order to obtain information about the structural changes of the glass network determined by the evolution of tungsten ions states, glass composition and WO{sub 3} concentration. Our spectroscopic data show that the incorporation of WO{sub 3} into borate–tellurate glasses causes both the formation of Te–O–W as well as B–O–W linkages and the increase of the number of non-bridging oxygens. The accommodation of the network with the excess of oxygen and the higher capacity of migration of the tungsten ions inside the host network can be associated with a change of tungsten coordination, from [WO{sub 4}] to [WO{sub 6}] structural units. This conversion is accompaniment of a large displacement of the tungsten atom from the centre of the octahedral geometry. EPR spectra reveal the existence of two signals associated with the presence of W{sup +5} ions situated in distorted octahedral positions and the oxygen ions defects. The presence of W{sup +5} ions confers to the glass colors that change with composition.

  19. Understanding nucleic acid structural changes by comparing wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments to molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabit, Suzette A.; Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2016-05-01

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however, the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively characterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight into understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  20. Understanding Nucleic Acid Structural Changes by Comparing Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS) Experiments to Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabit, Suzette; Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Drozdetski, Aleksander; Baker, Nathan A.; Onufriev, Alexey; Pollack, Lois

    2016-05-24

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) is emerging as a powerful tool for increasing the resolution of solution structure measurements of biomolecules. Compared to its better known complement, small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), WAXS targets higher scattering angles and can enhance structural studies of molecules by accessing finer details of solution structures. Although the extension from SAXS to WAXS is easy to implement experimentally, the computational tools required to fully harness the power of WAXS are still under development. Currently, WAXS is employed to study structural changes and ligand binding in proteins; however the methods are not as fully developed for nucleic acids. Here, we show how WAXS can qualitatively char- acterize nucleic acid structures as well as the small but significant structural changes driven by the addition of multivalent ions. We show the potential of WAXS to test all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and to provide insight in understanding how the trivalent ion cobalt(III) hexammine (CoHex) affects the structure of RNA and DNA helices. We find that MD simulations capture the RNA structural change that occurs due to addition of CoHex.

  1. Population structure in Tunisian indigenous rabbit ascertained using molecular information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manel Ben Larbi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic structure of domestic species provides a window into the process of domestication. This study attempts to offer an insight into the prevailing genetic status of Tunisian indigenous rabbit breeds using molecular markers. Thirty-six microsatellite loci were used to provide a comprehensive insight into the genetic status and relationship among 12 Tunisian indigenous rabbit populations. A total of 264 rabbits from villages of the Tozeur and Kebili regions were studied. Standard statistics parameters of genetic variability within and between populations were calculated. The observed heterozygosity, unbiased expected heterozygosity and the effective number of alleles were used to assess the genetic variation of each indigenous breed. Results show a high genetic diversity and observed heterozygosity ranged between 0.3 and 0.5, which implies that there is an abundant genetic variation stored in Tunisian indigenous rabbit breeds. Significant population differentiation was observed (Fst=0.11, which means that most of the genetic variation resides within breeds. The percentage of individuals correctly classified to their population was 85%. Breeds with more than one breeder origin were divided into subgroups, due to differences in gene frequencies between breeders, which in some cases creates a genetic differentiation even higher than that observed between distinct breeds. The current study is the first detailed analysis of the genetic diversity of Tunisian indigenous rabbit populations. The data generated here provides valuable information about the genetic structure of the 12 rabbit populations and this can be used to designate priorities for their conservation.

  2. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A A; Bogaert, Debby

    2016-01-01

    The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem-also called "microbiome"-is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1):e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting. PMID:26838716

  3. Unraveling the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying the Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Community Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter A. A. de Steenhuijsen Piters

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The upper respiratory tract is colonized by a diverse array of commensal bacteria that harbor potential pathogens, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. As long as the local microbial ecosystem—also called “microbiome”—is in balance, these potentially pathogenic bacterial residents cause no harm to the host. However, similar to macrobiological ecosystems, when the bacterial community structure gets perturbed, potential pathogens can overtake the niche and cause mild to severe infections. Recent studies using next-generation sequencing show that S. pneumoniae, as well as other potential pathogens, might be kept at bay by certain commensal bacteria, including Corynebacterium and Dolosigranulum spp. Bomar and colleagues are the first to explore a specific biological mechanism contributing to the antagonistic interaction between Corynebacterium accolens and S. pneumoniae in vitro [L. Bomar, S. D. Brugger, B. H. Yost, S. S. Davies, K. P. Lemon, mBio 7(1:e01725-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01725-15]. The authors comprehensively show that C. accolens is capable of hydrolyzing host triacylglycerols into free fatty acids, which display antipneumococcal properties, suggesting that these bacteria might contribute to the containment of pneumococcus. This work exemplifies how molecular epidemiological findings can lay the foundation for mechanistic studies to elucidate the host-microbe and microbial interspecies interactions underlying the bacterial community structure. Next, translation of these results to an in vivo setting seems necessary to unveil the magnitude and importance of the observed effect in its natural, polymicrobial setting.

  4. Structural effect of the in situ generated titania on its ability to oxidize and capture the gas-phase elemental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hyun, Jung Eun

    2006-01-01

    Structural effect of the in situ generated TiO(2) sorbent particle was examined for its ability to capture elemental mercury under UV irradiation in a simulated combustion flue gas. Titania particles were prepared by thermal gas-phase oxidation of Titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) using a high temperature electric furnace reactor. The structural characteristics of the in situ generated TiO(2) at various synthesis temperatures were investigated; size distribution and the geometric mean diameter were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer, while fractal dimension and radius of gyration were evaluated from the transmission electron microscopy images. Results from the Hg(0) capture experiment show that with increasing titania synthesis temperature, the overall aggregate size increases and the morphology becomes more open-structured to gas-phase Hg(0) and UV light, resulting in the improved mercury removal capability. PMID:15949836

  5. Mineral-Biochar Composites: Molecular Structure and Porosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawal, Aditya; Joseph, Stephen D; Hook, James M; Chia, Chee H; Munroe, Paul R; Donne, Scott; Lin, Yun; Phelan, David; Mitchell, David R G; Pace, Ben; Horvat, Joseph; Webber, J Beau W

    2016-07-19

    Dramatic changes in molecular structure, degradation pathway, and porosity of biochar are observed at pyrolysis temperatures ranging from 250 to 550 °C when bamboo biomass is pretreated by iron-sulfate-clay slurries (iron-clay biochar), as compared to untreated bamboo biochar. Electron microscopy analysis of the biochar reveals the infusion of mineral species into the pores of the biochar and the formation of mineral nanostructures. Quantitative (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy shows that the presence of the iron clay prevents degradation of the cellulosic fraction at pyrolysis temperatures of 250 °C, whereas at higher temperatures (350-550 °C), the clay promotes biomass degradation, resulting in an increase in both the concentrations of condensed aromatic, acidic, and phenolic carbon species. The porosity of the biochar, as measured by NMR cryoporosimetry, is altered by the iron-clay pretreatment. In the presence of the clay, at lower pyrolysis temperatures, the biochar develops a higher pore volume, while at higher temperature, the presence of clay causes a reduction in the biochar pore volume. The most dramatic reduction in pore volume is observed in the kaolinite-infiltrated biochar at 550 °C, which is attributed to the blocking of the mesopores (2-50 nm pore) by the nonporous metakaolinite formed from kaolinite. PMID:27284608

  6. Characterization of Chitin and Chitosan Molecular Structure in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franca, Eduardo D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lins, Roberto D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Freitas, Luiz C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Straatsma, t. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2008-11-08

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to characterize the structure of chitin and chitosan fibers in aqueous solutions. Chitin fibers, whether isolated or in the form of a β-chitin nanoparticle, adopt the so-called 2-fold helix with Φ and φ values similar to its crystalline state. In solution, the intramolecular hydrogen bond HO3(n)•••O5(n+1) responsible for the 2-fold helical motif is stabilized by hydrogen bonds with water molecules in a well-defined orientation. On the other hand, chitosan can adopt five distinct helical motifs and its conformational equilibrium is highly dependent on pH. The hydrogen bond pattern and solvation around the O3 atom of insoluble chitosan (basic pH) are nearly identical to these quantities in chitin. Our findings suggest that the solubility and conformation of these polysaccharides are related to the stability of the intrachain HO3(n)•••O5(n+1) hydrogen bond, which is affect by the water exchange around the O3-HO3 hydroxyl group.

  7. Molecular Diversity and Genetic Structure of Durum Wheat Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GULNAR SHIKHSEYIDOVA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine the genetic diversity of durum wheat, 41 accessions from Morocco, Ethiopia, Turkey, Lebanon, Kazakhstan, China, and Mongolia were analyzed through Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR molecular markers. Out of the used twenty primers, 15 primers that included a considerable polymorphism were selected for the analyses. Among the genotypes under study, 163 fragments (73.7% were polymorph. Several indexes were used to determine the most appropriate primers. While UBC812, UBC864, UBC840, and UBC808 primers were among those markers which produced the highest number of bands and polymorphic bands, they also dedicated the highest rate of polymorphic index content (PIC. These primers also possessed the highest amounts of effective multiplex ratio (EMR and marker index (MI. Therefore, these primers can be recommended for genetic evaluation of the durum wheat. The results of cluster analysis and principle component analysis indicated that the observed genetic diversity in wheat materials under study is geographically structured. The results also indicated that the genetic diversity index based on ISSR markers was higher for Turkey, Lebanon, Morocco, and Ethiopia accessions than for other countries. The high level of polymorphism in this collections durum wheat would agree with the suggestion that Fertile Crescent and parts of Africa are first possible diversity center of this crop.

  8. Crystal and molecular structure of four adamantyl-substituted tetrazoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakova, I. N., E-mail: polyakova@igic.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Saraev, V. V.; Gavrilov, A. S.; Golod, E. L. [St. Petersburg State Technological Institute (Technical University) (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    Four adamantyltetrazoles-1-(1-adamantyl)tetrazole (I), 2-(1-adamantyl)tetrazole (II), 2-(3-aminoadamantyl-1)tetrazole (III), and 2-(3-aminoadamantyl-1)-5-methyltetrazole (IV)-are synthesized, and their crystal structures are studied. It is found that the tetrazole rings in the 1-substituted molecule I and 2-substituted molecules II-IV have close linear parameters but differ significantly in endocyclic angles. The degree of delocalization of double bonds in I is somewhat smaller than that in II-IV. The identical relative orientation of the tetrazole ring and adamantyl fragment in I-IV is stabilized by intramolecular C-H...N interactions (H...N, 2.57(2)-2.76(2) A). The molecular packings of crystals I-IV are determined by weak intermolecular C-H...N interactions; in III and IV, the packings are in addition affected by N-H...N interactions that involve NH{sub 2} groups. In the series of compounds I-IV, a qualitative dependence of the lengths of intermolecular H...N contacts and antiviral activity on the basicity of nitrogen atoms in the molecules is revealed.

  9. Automatic molecular structure perception for the universal force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemova, Svetlana; Jaillet, Léonard; Redon, Stephane

    2016-05-15

    The Universal Force Field (UFF) is a classical force field applicable to almost all atom types of the periodic table. Such a flexibility makes this force field a potential good candidate for simulations involving a large spectrum of systems and, indeed, UFF has been applied to various families of molecules. Unfortunately, initializing UFF, that is, performing molecular structure perception to determine which parameters should be used to compute the UFF energy and forces, appears to be a difficult problem. Although many perception methods exist, they mostly focus on organic molecules, and are thus not well-adapted to the diversity of systems potentially considered with UFF. In this article, we propose an automatic perception method for initializing UFF that includes the identification of the system's connectivity, the assignment of bond orders as well as UFF atom types. This perception scheme is proposed as a self-contained UFF implementation integrated in a new module for the SAMSON software platform for computational nanoscience (http://www.samson-connect.net). We validate both the automatic perception method and the UFF implementation on a series of benchmarks. PMID:26927616

  10. Death Associated Protein Kinases: Molecular Structure and Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain damage underlies an important share of motor and neurodevelopmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy, cognitive impairment, visual dysfunction and epilepsy. Clinical, epidemiological, and experimental studies have revealed that factors such as inflammation, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress contribute considerably to both white and grey matter injury in the immature brain. A member of the death associated protein kinase (DAPk family, DAPk1, has been implicated in cerebral ischemic damage, whereby DAPk1 potentiates NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity through interaction with the NR2BR subunit. DAPk1 also mediate a range of activities from autophagy, membrane blebbing and DNA fragmentation ultimately leading to cell death. DAPk mRNA levels are particularly highly expressed in the developing brain and thus, we hypothesize that DAPk1 may play a role in perinatal brain injury. In addition to reviewing current knowledge, we present new aspects of the molecular structure of DAPk domains, and relate these findings to interacting partners of DAPk1, DAPk-regulation in NMDA-induced cerebral injury and novel approaches to blocking the injurious effects of DAPk1.

  11. Compact structure and proteins of pasta retard in vitro digestive evolution of branched starch molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Sissons, Mike; Warren, Frederick J; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2016-11-01

    The roles that the compact structure and proteins in pasta play in retarding evolution of starch molecular structure during in vitro digestion are explored, using four types of cooked samples: whole pasta, pasta powder, semolina (with proteins) and extracted starch without proteins. These were subjected to in vitro digestion with porcine α-amylase, collecting samples at different times and characterizing the weight distribution of branched starch molecules using size-exclusion chromatography. Measurement of α-amylase activity showed that a protein (or proteins) from semolina or pasta powder interacted with α-amylase, causing reduced enzymatic activity and retarding digestion of branched starch molecules with hydrodynamic radius (Rh)protein(s) was susceptible to proteolysis. Thus the compact structure of pasta protects the starch and proteins in the interior of the whole pasta, reducing the enzymatic degradation of starch molecules, especially for molecules with Rh>100nm. PMID:27516291

  12. Laser capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  13. Structural fluctuations and quantum transport through DNA molecular wires: a combined molecular dynamics and model Hamiltonian approach

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez, R.; Caetano, R.; Woiczikowski, P. B.; Kubar, T.; Elstner, M; Cuniberti, G.

    2009-01-01

    Charge transport through a short DNA oligomer (Dickerson dodecamer) in presence of structural fluctuations is investigated using a hybrid computational methodology based on a combination of quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations and classical molecular dynamics simulations with a model Hamiltonian approach. Based on a fragment orbital description, the DNA electronic structure can be coarse-grained in a very efficient way. The influence of dynamical fluctuations arising either fr...

  14. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagaoka, Masataka [Graduate School of Information Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Honmachi, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyodai Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8520 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method.

  15. Computational molecular technology towards macroscopic chemical phenomena-molecular control of complex chemical reactions, stereospecificity and aggregate structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new efficient hybrid Monte Carlo (MC)/molecular dynamics (MD) reaction method with a rare event-driving mechanism is introduced as a practical ‘atomistic’ molecular simulation of large-scale chemically reactive systems. Starting its demonstrative application to the racemization reaction of (R)-2-chlorobutane in N,N-dimethylformamide solution, several other applications are shown from the practical viewpoint of molecular controlling of complex chemical reactions, stereochemistry and aggregate structures. Finally, I would like to mention the future applications of the hybrid MC/MD reaction method

  16. Extremely small hole capture cross sections in HfO2/HfxSiyOz/p-Si structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, M. Y. A.; Johansson, M.; Engström, O.

    2007-05-01

    Defects in Al /HfO2/HfxSiyOz/p-Si capacitors have been characterized using thermally stimulated current at temperatures between 30 and 300K. The hole activation energy and capture cross section were extracted from the results. The authors observed shallow traps that move with changing the discharging voltage, giving rise to activation energies in the range 0.03-0.14eV. Postmetallization anneal passivated these traps and a deeper trap appears with a significantly lower shift with the discharging voltage. Very small apparent capture cross sections (capture cross section times tunneling probability) have been extracted (10-26-10-18cm2). Simulations agree very well with experimental data.

  17. Interordinal gene capture, the phylogenetic position of Steller's sea cow based on molecular and morphological data, and the macroevolutionary history of Sirenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, Mark S; Signore, Anthony V; Paijmans, Johanna L A; Vélez-Juarbe, Jorge; Domning, Daryl P; Bauer, Cameron E; He, Kai; Crerar, Lorelei; Campos, Paula F; Murphy, William J; Meredith, Robert W; Gatesy, John; Willerslev, Eske; MacPhee, Ross D E; Hofreiter, Michael; Campbell, Kevin L

    2015-10-01

    The recently extinct (ca. 1768) Steller's sea cow (Hydrodamalis gigas) was a large, edentulous North Pacific sirenian. The phylogenetic affinities of this taxon to other members of this clade, living and extinct, are uncertain based on previous morphological and molecular studies. We employed hybridization capture methods and second generation sequencing technology to obtain >30kb of exon sequences from 26 nuclear genes for both H. gigas and Dugong dugon. We also obtained complete coding sequences for the tooth-related enamelin (ENAM) gene. Hybridization probes designed using dugong and manatee sequences were both highly effective in retrieving sequences from H. gigas (mean=98.8% coverage), as were more divergent probes for regions of ENAM (99.0% coverage) that were designed exclusively from a proboscidean (African elephant) and a hyracoid (Cape hyrax). New sequences were combined with available sequences for representatives of all other afrotherian orders. We also expanded a previously published morphological matrix for living and fossil Sirenia by adding both new taxa and nine new postcranial characters. Maximum likelihood and parsimony analyses of the molecular data provide robust support for an association of H. gigas and D. dugon to the exclusion of living trichechids (manatees). Parsimony analyses of the morphological data also support the inclusion of H. gigas in Dugongidae with D. dugon and fossil dugongids. Timetree analyses based on calibration density approaches with hard- and soft-bounded constraints suggest that H. gigas and D. dugon diverged in the Oligocene and that crown sirenians last shared a common ancestor in the Eocene. The coding sequence for the ENAM gene in H. gigas does not contain frameshift mutations or stop codons, but there is a transversion mutation (AG to CG) in the acceptor splice site of intron 2. This disruption in the edentulous Steller's sea cow is consistent with previous studies that have documented inactivating mutations in

  18. Neurobiological mechanisms of treatment resistant depression: Functional, structural and molecular imaging studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.P. de Kwaasteniet

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigated the neurobiological mechanisms of TRD using functional, structural and molecular imaging studies. First the neurobiological mechanisms of MDD were investigated and revealed decreased functional connectivity between the ventral and dorsal network. Thereafter, structural conne

  19. Effect of molecular structure and slump loss resistance of polycarboxylate superplasticizers on self-compacting concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LAN Zi-dong

    2016-01-01

    A new kind of polycarboxylate superplasticizer with high slump loss resistance was obtained by designing scheduled molecular structure. The number average molecular mass of the polymer was characterized by thegel permeation chromatography measurements. And chemical structure of the polymer was observed by the Fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy(FT-IR). The results showthat the good workablemaintaining ofself-compacting concretecould be achieved through direct adjustmentof number average molecular mass and different unsaturated monomer in synthetic process. The FT-IR analysis illustrated that the high slump loss resistance of polycarboxylate superplasticizers with ester and carboxyl group and expectations of molecular structure were designed.

  20. Molecular Structural and Properties of 3-chloro-4 (dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2 [5H] -furanone (MX)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李欣; 龙运前; 齐晶瑶; 王郁萍

    2004-01-01

    3 - chloro - 4 (dichloromethyl) - 5 - hydroxy - 2 [5H] - furanone (MX) formed during chlorination of water containing natural organic substances, is a very potent bacterial mutgen. Molecular mechanics calculations to evaluate the conformation of structure, and to determine structure relationship properties are put forward. The investigations allow the correlation of molecular structures of MX with its properties, such as mass,partial charges, steric energy, frontier molecular orbital. The VRML molecular models have been investigated using Virtual Reality software. The spectral simulation of MX is illustrated. The principal aim is to develop an efficient method which control of MX.

  1. Molecular Electronics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Karsten Stein

    This thesis includes the synthesis and characterisation of organic compounds designed for molecular electronics. The synthesised organic molecules are mainly based on two motifs, the obigo(phenyleneethynylenes) (OPE)s and tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) as shown below. These two scaffolds (OPE and TTF......) are chemically merged together to form cruciform-like structures that are an essential part of the thesis. The cruciform molecules were subjected to molecular conductance measurements to explore their capability towards single-crystal field-effect transistors (Part 1), molecular wires, and single electron......, however, was obtained by a study of a single molecular transistor. The investigated OPE5-TTF compound was captured in a three-terminal experiment, whereby manipulation of the molecule’s electronic spin was possible in different charge states. Thus, we demonstrated how the cruciform molecules could...

  2. Photographic images captured while sampling for bald eagles near the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure in Barataria Bay, Louisiana (2009-10)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Jeske, Clinton W.; Allain, Larry K.

    2011-01-01

    The implementation of freshwater diversions in large-scale coastal restoration schemes presents several scientific and management considerations. Large-scale environmental restructuring necessitates aquatic biomonitoring, and during such field studies, photographs that document animals and habitat may be captured. Among the biomonitoring studies performed in conjunction with the Davis Pond freshwater diversion structure south of New Orleans, Louisiana, only postdiversion study images are readily available, and these are presented here.

  3. Compact structure and proteins of pasta retard in vitro digestive evolution of branched starch molecular structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Sissons, Mike; Warren, Frederick J; Gidley, Michael J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2016-11-01

    The roles that the compact structure and proteins in pasta play in retarding evolution of starch molecular structure during in vitro digestion are explored, using four types of cooked samples: whole pasta, pasta powder, semolina (with proteins) and extracted starch without proteins. These were subjected to in vitro digestion with porcine α-amylase, collecting samples at different times and characterizing the weight distribution of branched starch molecules using size-exclusion chromatography. Measurement of α-amylase activity showed that a protein (or proteins) from semolina or pasta powder interacted with α-amylase, causing reduced enzymatic activity and retarding digestion of branched starch molecules with hydrodynamic radius (Rh)pasta protects the starch and proteins in the interior of the whole pasta, reducing the enzymatic degradation of starch molecules, especially for molecules with Rh>100nm.

  4. Laser pulse induced multiple exciton kinetics in molecular ring structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xiao; Wang, Luxia

    2016-11-01

    Multiple excitons can be formed upon strong optical excitation of molecular aggregates and complexes. Based on a theoretical approach on exciton-exciton annihilation dynamics in supramolecular systems (May et al., 2014), exciton interaction kinetics in ring aggregates of two-level molecules are investigated. Excited by the sub-picosecond laser pulse, multiple excitons keep stable in the molecular ring shaped as a regular polygon. If the symmetry is destroyed by changing the dipole of a single molecule, the excitation of different molecules becomes not identical, and the changed dipole-dipole interaction initiates subsequent energy redistribution. Depending on the molecular distance and the dipole configuration, the kinetics undergo different types of processes, but all get stable within some hundreds of femtoseconds. The study of exciton kinetics will be helpful for further investigations of the efficiency of optical devices based on molecular aggregates.

  5. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Energy and Sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2001-01-01

    An overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems is presented. This unit discusses methods used to treat the energy and to sample representative configurations. Emphasis is placed on molecular mechanics and empirical force fields.

  6. Molecular evolution, intracellular organization, and the quinary structure of proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    McConkey, E H

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that at least half of 370 denatured polypeptides from hamster cells and human cells are indistinguishable in terms of isoelectric points and molecular weights. Molecular evolution may have been more conservative for this set of proteins than sequence studies on soluble proteins have implied. This may be a consequence of complexities of intracellular organization and the numerous macromolecular interactions in which most ...

  7. Solution NMR structure of a designed metalloprotein and complementary molecular dynamics refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Liu, Weixia; Spiegel, Katrin; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Klein, Michael L; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua; DeGrado, William F

    2008-02-01

    We report the solution NMR structure of a designed dimetal-binding protein, di-Zn(II) DFsc, along with a secondary refinement step employing molecular dynamics techniques. Calculation of the initial NMR structural ensemble by standard methods led to distortions in the metal-ligand geometries at the active site. Unrestrained molecular dynamics using a nonbonded force field for the metal shell, followed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical dynamics of DFsc, were used to relax local frustrations at the dimetal site that were apparent in the initial NMR structure and provide a more realistic description of the structure. The MD model is consistent with NMR restraints, and in good agreement with the structural and functional properties expected for DF proteins. This work demonstrates that NMR structures of metalloproteins can be further refined using classical and first-principles molecular dynamics methods in the presence of explicit solvent to provide otherwise unavailable insight into the geometry of the metal center.

  8. Insights from the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Cellobiohydrolase Cel6A Molecular Structural Model from Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodda, Subba Reddy; Sarkar, Nibedita; Aikat, Kaustav; Krishnaraj, Navanietha R; Bhattacharjee, Sanchari; Bagchi, Angshuman; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S

    2016-01-01

    Global demand for bioethanol is increasing tremendously as it could help to replace the conventional fossil fuel and at the same time supporting the bioremediation of huge volume of cellulosic wastes generated from different sources. Ideal genetic engineering approaches are essential to improve the efficacy of the bioethanol production processes for real time applications. A locally isolated fungal strain Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3 was used in our laboratory for the hydrolysis of lignocellulose with good cellulolytic activity when compared with other contemporary fungal strains. An attempt is made to sequence the cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, model its structure to predict its catalytic activity towards improving the protein by genetic engineering approaches. Herein, the structure of the sequenced Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, modelled by homology modelling and its validation is reported. Further the catalytic activity of the modelled CBH enzyme was assessed by molecular docking analysis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CBH from A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3 belongs to the Glycohydro 6 (Cel6A) super family. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation suggest the structural and functional mechanism of the enzyme. The structures of both the cellulose binding (CBD) and catalytic domain (CD) have been compared with most widely studied CBH of Trichoderma reesei. The molecular docking with cellulose suggests that Gln 248, Pro 287, Val236, Asn284, and Ala288 are the main amino acids involved in the hydrolysis of the β, 1-4, glycosidic bonds of cellulose. PMID:27109185

  9. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  10. Reply to comments on `Structure effects in the $^{15}$N($n,\\gamma$)$^{16}$N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of $^{16}$N'

    CERN Document Server

    Shubhchintak,; Chatterjee, R

    2016-01-01

    We reply to the comments (arXiv:1605.07499 [nucl-th]) on "Structure effects in the $^{15}$N($n,\\gamma$)$^{16}$N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of $^{16}$N". We have investigated the issue of "energy dependence of branching ratios" and believe that this energy dependence is due to the proper inclusion of the non-resonant continuum in the post-form reaction theory. Interestingly, this energy dependence is sensitive to the relative orbital angular momentum content of the state. We reiterate that we have attempted to resolve the discrepancy in the spectroscopic factors of low-lying $^{16}$N levels and that it is essential to know the low energy $^{15}$N($n,\\gamma$)$^{16}$N capture cross section, especially below 0.25 MeV.

  11. Earle K. Plyler Prize for Molecular Spectroscopy & Dynamics Lecture: Broadband Rotational Spectroscopy for Chemical Kinetics, Molecular Structure, and Analytical Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pate, Brooks

    2013-03-01

    Advances in high-speed digital electronics have enabled a new generation of molecular rotational spectroscopy techniques that provide instantaneous broadband spectral coverage. These techniques use a chirped excitation pulse to coherently excite the molecular sample over a spectral bandwidth of 10 GHz or larger through rapid passage. The subsequent time-domain emission is recorded using high-speed digitizers (up to 100 Gigasample/s) and the frequency domain spectrum is produced by fast Fourier transformation. The chirped-pulse Fourier transform (CP-FT) method has been implemented in the microwave frequency range (2-40 GHz) for studies of cold samples in pulsed jet sources and in the mm-wave/terahertz (THz) frequency range for studies of samples at room-temperature. The method has opened new applications for molecular rotational spectroscopy in the area of chemical kinetics where dynamic rotational spectroscopy is used to measure the rates of unimolecular isomerization reactions in highly excited molecules prepared by pulsed infrared laser excitation. In these applications, the isomerization rate is obtained from an analysis of the overall line shapes which are modified by chemical exchange leading to coalescence behavior similar to the effect in NMR spectroscopy. The sensitivity of the method and the ability to extend it to low frequency (2-8 GHz) have significantly increased the size range of molecules and molecular clusters for structure determination using isotopic substitution to build up the 3D molecular structures atom-by-atom. Application to the structure of water clusters with up to 15 water molecules will be presented. When coupled with advances in solid-state mm-wave/THz devices, this method provides a direct digital technique for analytical chemistry of room-temperature gases based on molecular rotational spectroscopy. These high-throughput methods can analyze complex sample mixtures with unmatched chemical selectivity and short analysis times. Work

  12. Molecular and structural preservation of dehydrated bio-tissue for THz spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Png, Gretel M.; Choi, Jin Wook; Guest, Ian; Ng, Brian W.-H.; Mickan, Samuel P.; Abbott, Derek; Zhang, Xi-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    Terahertz transmission through freshly excised biological tissue is limited by the tissue's high water content. Tissue fixation methods that remove water, such as fixation in Formalin, destroy the structural information of proteins hence are not suitable for THz applications. Dehydration is one possible method for revealing the tissue's underlying molecular structure and components. In this study, we measured the THz responses over time of dehydrating fresh, necrotic and lyophilized rat tissue. Our results show that as expected, THz absorption increases dramatically with drying and tissue freshness can be maintained through lyophilization. Dehydrated biological tissue with retained molecular structure can be useful for future laser-based THz wave molecular analysis.

  13. A parity function for studying the molecular electronic structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmider, Hartmut

    1996-01-01

    Sections through the molecular Wigner function with zero momentum variable are shown to provide important information about the off-diagonal regions of the spinless one-particle reduced density matrix. Since these regions are characteristic for the bonding situation in molecules, the sections...

  14. Motion Tree Delineates Hierarchical Structure of Protein Dynamics Observed in Molecular Dynamics Simulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Moritsugu

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics (MD simulations of proteins provide important information to understand their functional mechanisms, which are, however, likely to be hidden behind their complicated motions with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. A straightforward and intuitive analysis of protein dynamics observed in MD simulation trajectories is therefore of growing significance with the large increase in both the simulation time and system size. In this study, we propose a novel description of protein motions based on the hierarchical clustering of fluctuations in the inter-atomic distances calculated from an MD trajectory, which constructs a single tree diagram, named a "Motion Tree", to determine a set of rigid-domain pairs hierarchically along with associated inter-domain fluctuations. The method was first applied to the MD trajectory of substrate-free adenylate kinase to clarify the usefulness of the Motion Tree, which illustrated a clear-cut dynamics picture of the inter-domain motions involving the ATP/AMP lid and the core domain together with the associated amplitudes and correlations. The comparison of two Motion Trees calculated from MD simulations of ligand-free and -bound glutamine binding proteins clarified changes in inherent dynamics upon ligand binding appeared in both large domains and a small loop that stabilized ligand molecule. Another application to a huge protein, a multidrug ATP binding cassette (ABC transporter, captured significant increases of fluctuations upon binding a drug molecule observed in both large scale inter-subunit motions and a motion localized at a transmembrane helix, which may be a trigger to the subsequent structural change from inward-open to outward-open states to transport the drug molecule. These applications demonstrated the capabilities of Motion Trees to provide an at-a-glance view of various sizes of functional motions inherent in the complicated MD trajectory.

  15. Neutron Capture and Neutron Halos

    OpenAIRE

    A.Mengoni; Otsuka, T; Nakamura, T.(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan); Ishihara, M.

    1996-01-01

    The connection between the neutron halo observed in light neutron rich nuclei and the neutron radiative capture process is outlined. We show how nuclear structure information such as spectroscopic factors and external components of the radial wave function of loosely bound states can be derived from the neutron capture cross section. The link between the direct radiative capture and the Coulomb dissociation process is elucidated.

  16. Molecular Characterisation of Structural Chromosomal Abnormalities Associated with Congenital Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mansouri, Mahmoud R.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are defined as changes in the chromosome structure and fall in one of two categories. The first category is numerical alterations while the second category consists of structural abnormalities. Structural chromosomal abnormalities do not always interrupt genes in order to cause disease. They can also affect gene expression by separating a gene and its promoter element from distant regulatory elements. We have used characterisation of structural chromosomal abnormalit...

  17. Molecular conformation and structural correlations of liquid D-1-propanol through neutron diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sahoo; S Sarkar; P S R Krishna; V Bhagat; R N Joarder

    2008-07-01

    An analysis of neutron diffraction data of liquid deuterated 1-propanol at room temperature to extract its molecular conformation is presented. Being a big molecule with twelve atomic sites, the analysis is tricky and needs careful consideration. The resulting molecular parameters are compared with electron diffraction (gas phase), X-ray diffraction (liquid phase) and MD simulation results. Information about the hydrogen-bonded intermolecular structure in liquid is extracted and nature of the probable molecular association suggested.

  18. Non-Newtonian behavior and molecular structure of Cooee bitumen under shear flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemarchand, Claire; Bailey, Nicholas; Daivis, Peter;

    2015-01-01

    The rheology and molecular structure of a model bitumen (Cooee bitumen) under shear are investigated in the non-Newtonian regime using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The shear viscosity, normal stress differences, and pressure of the bitumen mixture are computed at different shea...

  19. Molecular Modeling on Berberine Derivatives toward BuChE: An Integrated Study with Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships Models, Molecular Docking, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jiansong; Pang, Xiaocong; Wu, Ping; Yan, Rong; Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Lian, Wenwen; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A dataset of 67 berberine derivatives for the inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) was studied based on the combination of quantitative structure-activity relationships models, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics methods. First, a series of berberine derivatives were reported, and their inhibitory activities toward butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were evaluated. By 2D- quantitative structure-activity relationships studies, the best model built by partial least-square had a conventional correlation coefficient of the training set (R(2) ) of 0.883, a cross-validation correlation coefficient (Qcv2) of 0.777, and a conventional correlation coefficient of the test set (Rpred2) of 0.775. The model was also confirmed by Y-randomization examination. In addition, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed to better elucidate the inhibitory mechanism of three typical berberine derivatives (berberine, C2, and C55) toward BuChE. The predicted binding free energy results were consistent with the experimental data and showed that the van der Waals energy term (ΔEvdw ) difference played the most important role in differentiating the activity among the three inhibitors (berberine, C2, and C55). The developed quantitative structure-activity relationships models provide details on the fine relationship linking structure and activity and offer clues for structural modifications, and the molecular simulation helps to understand the inhibitory mechanism of the three typical inhibitors. In conclusion, the results of this study provide useful clues for new drug design and discovery of BuChE inhibitors from berberine derivatives. PMID:26648584

  20. Molecular and electronic structure of osmium complexes confined to Au(111) surfaces using a self-assembled molecular bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llave, Ezequiel de la; Herrera, Santiago E.; Adam, Catherine; Méndez De Leo, Lucila P.; Calvo, Ernesto J.; Williams, Federico J., E-mail: fwilliams@qi.fcen.uba.ar [INQUIMAE-CONICET, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Analítica y Química-Física, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellón 2, Buenos Aires C1428EHA (Argentina)

    2015-11-14

    The molecular and electronic structure of Os(II) complexes covalently bonded to self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) surfaces was studied by means of polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopies, scanning tunneling microscopy, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations. Attachment of the Os complex to the SAM proceeds via an amide covalent bond with the SAM alkyl chain 40° tilted with respect to the surface normal and a total thickness of 26 Å. The highest occupied molecular orbital of the Os complex is mainly based on the Os(II) center located 2.2 eV below the Fermi edge and the LUMO molecular orbital is mainly based on the bipyridine ligands located 1.5 eV above the Fermi edge.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  2. The large-scale structure of molecular clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the large-scale properties of molecular clouds. Most extensive studies of these clouds are made in 12CO line at 2.6 mm and this line being optically thick, the analysis is strongly dependent on the much less abundant 13CO. In addition there exists some discord about the abundance of CO with respect to H2. The results of observations of large clouds in the local arm are presented: the clouds near Mon OB 1 and Mon OB 2, the Ophiuchus complex near Sco OB2 and the extended complexes of molecular clouds in Taurus. Observations of local clouds between l = 1000 and l = 1400 near the galactic plane are also discussed, as is the distribution of molecular clouds and other spiral arm tracers in the Perseus arm. The author concludes with a comparison of different models of cloud formation. In his opinion the model of Blitz and Shu agrees best with the observations in this part of the galaxy. However he considers it improbable that every individual cloud was formed in that way. It is more likely that a number of clouds with a range of sizes is formed at the same time and that they gradually move apart, which may be the situation in the Perseus arm around l = 1100. (Auth.)

  3. Knowledge-Based Optimization of Molecular Geometries Using Crystal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Jason C; Groom, Colin R; Korb, Oliver; McCabe, Patrick; Shields, Gregory P

    2016-04-25

    This paper describes a novel way to use the structural information contained in the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) to drive geometry optimization of organic molecules. We describe how CSD structural information is transformed into objective functions for gradient-based optimization to provide good quality geometries for a large variety of organic molecules. Performance is assessed by minimizing different sets of organic molecules reporting RMSD movements for bond lengths, valence angles, torsion angles, and heavy atom positions. PMID:26977906

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations on structural conformations of rhodopsin and prion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the structural conformation of the rhodopsin and prion proteins. We have estimated the effect of specific disease-related amino acid mutations on the dynamics and conformational changes

  5. SERS and RAIR for Molecular Structure of Phenylazonaphthalene terminated Self-Assembled Monolayer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The SAMs of 10-[4-(4-phenylazo)naphth-l-oxyl]-l-decanethiol (Compound 1) on gold were prepared. Their molecular structures were determined by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIR).

  6. Representation of molecular structure using quantum topology with inductive logic programming in structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttingsrud, Bård; Ryeng, Einar; King, Ross D; Alsberg, Bjørn K

    2006-06-01

    The requirement of aligning each individual molecule in a data set severely limits the type of molecules which can be analysed with traditional structure activity relationship (SAR) methods. A method which solves this problem by using relations between objects is inductive logic programming (ILP). Another advantage of this methodology is its ability to include background knowledge as 1st-order logic. However, previous molecular ILP representations have not been effective in describing the electronic structure of molecules. We present a more unified and comprehensive representation based on Richard Bader's quantum topological atoms in molecules (AIM) theory where critical points in the electron density are connected through a network. AIM theory provides a wealth of chemical information about individual atoms and their bond connections enabling a more flexible and chemically relevant representation. To obtain even more relevant rules with higher coverage, we apply manual postprocessing and interpretation of ILP rules. We have tested the usefulness of the new representation in SAR modelling on classifying compounds of low/high mutagenicity and on a set of factor Xa inhibitors of high and low affinity. PMID:17054018

  7. Adsorption and double layer charging in molecular sieve carbons in relation to molecular dimensions and pore structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pore structure of a fibrous carbon molecular sieve was studied by adsorption of molecular probes. Mild activation steps enabled the graduated opening of critical pore dimensions in the range 3.1-5.0 A, which keeps adsorption selectivity between molecules differing by 0.2 A in cross section diameter, to be considerably greater than 100/1. High adsorption stereospecificity over a wide pore dimension range enabled the studied adsorbates to be ordered in a sequence of increasing critical molecular dimension. Estimation of molecular dimensions by various experimental methods was discussed and their relevance to nonspherical molecules was evaluated. Polar molecules assume different dimensions depending on whether the carbon surface was polar (oxidized) or not. Hydrogen acquires, surprisingly, large width in accordance with its high liquid molar volume. Adsorbent-adsorbate interactions play a crucial role in determining molecular dimensions. Adsorption of ions from aqueous solutions into the developed ultramicropores of fibrous carbon electrodes was also studied. The dependence of the double layer capacitance and the charging rate on the pore critical dimension and on surface oxidation was studied using linear potential sweep voltametry. (Author)

  8. Bias-dependent molecular-level structure of electrical double layer in ionic liquid on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jennifer M; Walters, Deron; Labuda, Aleksander; Feng, Guang; Hillesheim, Patrick C; Dai, Sheng; Cummings, Peter T; Kalinin, Sergei V; Proksch, Roger; Balke, Nina

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the bias-evolution of the electrical double layer structure of an ionic liquid on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite measured by atomic force microscopy. We observe reconfiguration under applied bias and the orientational transitions in the Stern layer. The synergy between molecular dynamics simulation and experiment provides a comprehensive picture of structural phenomena and long and short-range interactions, which improves our understanding of the mechanism of charge storage on a molecular level.

  9. Effects of molecular structure parameters on ring-openingreaction of benzoxazines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A colorless monoclinic crystal of dichloro-benzoxazine was obtained and examined bysingle crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. At the same time, molecular modeling analysis of ninebenzoxazine compounds with different substituting groups was performed. Both single crystalX-ray diffraction analysis and molecular modeling analysis provide a detailed picture of molecularstructure on molecular level and show good consistence with each other. On the basis of structuralanalysis, the effects of molecular structure parameters on ring-opening polymerization of ben-zoxazines have been explored.

  10. Structural basis for molecular recognition at serotonin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jinming; Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, X Edward; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Chenghai; Bai, Fang; Yang, Huaiyu; Yang, Linlin; Jiang, Hualiang; Roth, Bryan L; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C; Xu, H Eric

    2013-05-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) regulates a wide spectrum of human physiology through the 5-HT receptor family. We report the crystal structures of the human 5-HT1B G protein-coupled receptor bound to the agonist antimigraine medications ergotamine and dihydroergotamine. The structures reveal similar binding modes for these ligands, which occupy the orthosteric pocket and an extended binding pocket close to the extracellular loops. The orthosteric pocket is formed by residues conserved in the 5-HT receptor family, clarifying the family-wide agonist activity of 5-HT. Compared with the structure of the 5-HT2B receptor, the 5-HT1B receptor displays a 3 angstrom outward shift at the extracellular end of helix V, resulting in a more open extended pocket that explains subtype selectivity. Together with docking and mutagenesis studies, these structures provide a comprehensive structural basis for understanding receptor-ligand interactions and designing subtype-selective serotonergic drugs. PMID:23519210

  11. Application of the AMPLE cluster-and-truncate approach to NMR structures for molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bibby, Jaclyn [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Keegan, Ronan M. [Research Complex at Harwell, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot OX11 0FA (United Kingdom); Mayans, Olga [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Winn, Martyn D. [Science and Technology Facilities Council Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Rigden, Daniel J., E-mail: drigden@liv.ac.uk [University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Processing of NMR structures for molecular replacement by AMPLE works well. AMPLE is a program developed for clustering and truncating ab initio protein structure predictions into search models for molecular replacement. Here, it is shown that its core cluster-and-truncate methods also work well for processing NMR ensembles into search models. Rosetta remodelling helps to extend success to NMR structures bearing low sequence identity or high structural divergence from the target protein. Potential future routes to improved performance are considered and practical, general guidelines on using AMPLE are provided.

  12. Crystal structural and diffusion property in titanium carbides: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yanan; Gao, Weimin

    2016-09-01

    Titanium carbides were studied via molecular dynamics simulation to characterize TiCx structures with respect to the carbon diffusion properties in this study. The effect of carbon concentration on atomic structures of titanium carbides was investigated through discussing the structure variation and the radial distribution functions of carbon atoms in titanium carbides. The carbon diffusion in titanium carbides was also analyzed, focusing on the dependence on carbon concentration and carbide structure. Carbon diffusivity with different carbon concentrations was determined by molecular dynamics (MD) calculations and compared with the available experimental data. The simulation results showed an atomic exchange mechanism for carbon diffusion in titanium carbide.

  13. Molecular-Field Calculation of the Magnetic Structure in Erbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.

    1976-01-01

    A molecular-field calculation of the magnetic configurations in Er is found to reproduce the neutron diffraction results of the three different magnetic phases and to give a reasonable fit to the magnetization data at 4.2K. The two-ion coupling is considered to be described by the inter......-planar coupling parameters deduced from the dispersion of the spin waves in the low temperature conical phases. The four (effective) crystal-field parameters are determined by the fit to the experimental data. Projecting the magnetic moments present in the intermediate phase of Er (18-52.4K) to a common origin...

  14. Accelerating convergence of molecular dynamics-based structural relaxation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Asbjørn

    2005-01-01

    We describe strategies to accelerate the terminal stage of molecular dynamics (MD)based relaxation algorithms, where a large fraction of the computational resources are used. First, we analyze the qualitative and quantitative behavior of the QuickMin family of MD relaxation algorithms and explore...... an MD trajectory, as another route for final phase acceleration. Our suggestions may be implemented within most MD quench implementations with a few, straightforward lines of code, thus maintaining the appealing simplicity of the MD quench algorithms. In this paper, we also bridge the conceptual gap...

  15. The structural biology of molecular recognition by vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loll, P J; Axelsen, P H

    2000-01-01

    Vancomycin is the archetype among naturally occurring compounds known as glycopeptide antibiotics. Because it is a vital therapeutic agent used world-wide for the treatment of infections with gram-positive bacteria, emerging bacterial resistance to vancomycin is a major public health threat. Recent investigations into the mechanisms of action of glycopeptide antibiotics are driven by a need to understand their detailed mechanism of action so that new agents can be developed to overcome resistance. These investigations have revealed that glycopeptide antibiotics exhibit a rich array of complex cooperative phenomena when they bind target ligands, making them valuable model systems for the study of molecular recognition. PMID:10940250

  16. A biomimetic molecular switch at work: coupling photoisomerization dynamics to peptide structural rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Iriepa, Cristina; Gueye, Moussa; Léonard, Jérémie; Martínez-López, David; Campos, Pedro J; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Sampedro, Diego; Marazzi, Marco

    2016-03-01

    In spite of considerable interest in the design of molecular switches towards photo-controllable (bio)materials, few studies focused on the major influence of the surrounding environment on the switch photoreactivities. We present a combined experimental and computational study of a retinal-like molecular switch linked to a peptide, elucidating the effects on the photoreactivity and on the α-helix secondary structure. Temperature-dependent, femtosecond UV-vis transient absorption spectroscopy and high-level hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics methods were applied to describe the photoisomerization process and the subsequent peptide rearrangement. It was found that the conformational heterogeneity of the ground state peptide controls the excited state potential energy surface and the thermally activated population decay. Still, a reversible α-helix to α-hairpin conformational change is predicted, paving the way for a fine photocontrol of different secondary structure elements, hence (bio)molecular functions, using retinal-inspired molecular switches. PMID:26876376

  17. Complex molecular gas structure in the Medusa merger

    CERN Document Server

    Aalto, S

    2000-01-01

    High resolution OVRO aperture synthesis maps of the 12CO 1-0 emission in the `Medusa' galaxy merger (NGC4194) reveal the molecular emission being surprisingly extended. It is distributed on a total scale of 25$''$ (4.7 kpc) - despite the apparent advanced stage of the merger. The complex, striking CO morphology occupies mainly the center and the north-eastern part of the main optical body. The extended 12CO flux is tracing two prominent dust lanes: one which is crossing the central region at right angle and a second which curves to the north-east and then into the beginning of the northern tidal tail. The bulk of the 12CO emission (67%) can be found in a complex starburst region encompassing the central 2kpc. The molecular gas is distributed in five major emission regions of typical size 300pc. About 15% of the total 12CO flux is found in a bright region 1.5'' south of the radio continuum nucleus. We suggest that this region together with the kpc sized central starburst is being fueled by gas flows along the ...

  18. Crystal and molecular structure of Np(4) sulfate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monocrystals are prepared and crystal structure of Np(SO4)2·4H2O is detected: a=14.597(4), b=11.036(2), c=5.663(2) A, space group - Pnma. The structure is layered, electroneutral layers of [Np(SO4)2(H2O)4]n are perpendicular to [100] direction, hydrogen bonds combine layers into three-dimensional packing. Coordination Np(4) polyhedron is quadratic prism and is formed by oxygen atoms of bidentate-bridge sulfate ions and four water molecules. Np-O bond lengths and bond angles are determined. Peculiarities of structure of double neptunium sulfates with K, Na, Cs in dependence on ligand number and effect of outer spheric cations and water molecules on structure of coordination spheres of Np atoms are considered

  19. Structural Basis for Molecular Recognition at Serotonin Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chong; Jiang, Yi; Ma, Jinming; Wu, Huixian; Wacker, Daniel; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Wei; Huang, Xi-Ping; Vardy, Eyal; McCorvy, John D.; Gao, Xiang; Zhou, Edward X.; Melcher, Karsten; Zhang, Chenghai

    2013-01-01

    Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) regulates a wide spectrum of human physiology through the 5-HT receptor family. We report the crystal structures of the human 5-HT1B G protein-coupled receptor bound to the agonist anti-migraine medications ergotamine and dihydroergotamine. The structures reveal similar binding modes for these ligands, which occupy the orthosteric pocket and an extended binding pocket close to the extracellular loops. The orthosteric pocket is formed by residues conserv...

  20. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessmann, Renate; Kourtis, Nikos; Petratos, Kyriacos; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2010-09-16

    The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel) protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1). MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  1. Molecular modeling of mechanosensory ion channel structural and functional features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Gessmann

    Full Text Available The DEG/ENaC (Degenerin/Epithelial Sodium Channel protein family comprises related ion channel subunits from all metazoans, including humans. Members of this protein family play roles in several important biological processes such as transduction of mechanical stimuli, sodium re-absorption and blood pressure regulation. Several blocks of amino acid sequence are conserved in DEG/ENaC proteins, but structure/function relations in this channel class are poorly understood. Given the considerable experimental limitations associated with the crystallization of integral membrane proteins, knowledge-based modeling is often the only route towards obtaining reliable structural information. To gain insight into the structural characteristics of DEG/ENaC ion channels, we derived three-dimensional models of MEC-4 and UNC-8, based on the available crystal structures of ASIC1 (Acid Sensing Ion Channel 1. MEC-4 and UNC-8 are two DEG/ENaC family members involved in mechanosensation and proprioception respectively, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We used these models to examine the structural effects of specific mutations that alter channel function in vivo. The trimeric MEC-4 model provides insight into the mechanism by which gain-of-function mutations cause structural alterations that result in increased channel permeability, which trigger cell degeneration. Our analysis provides an introductory framework to further investigate the multimeric organization of the DEG/ENaC ion channel complex.

  2. Relationship between structures of sprite streamers and inhomogeneity of preceding halos captured by high-speed camera during a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Sato, M.; Kudo, T.; Shima, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Inoue, T.; Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.; McHarg, M. G.; Haaland, R. K.; Kammae, T.; Yair, Y.; Lyons, W. A.; Cummer, S. A.; Ahrns, J.; Yukman, P.; Warner, T. A.; Sonnenfeld, R. G.; Li, J.; Lu, G.

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between diffuse glows such as elves and sprite halos and subsequent discrete structure of sprite streamers is considered to be one of the keys to solve the mechanism causing a large variation of sprite structures. However, it's not easy to image at high frame rate both the diffuse and discrete structures simultaneously, since it requires high sensitivity, high spatial resolution and high signal-to-noise ratio. To capture the real spatial structure of TLEs without influence of atmospheric absorption, spacecraft would be the best solution. However, since the imaging observation from space is mostly made for TLEs appeared near the horizon, the range from spacecraft to TLEs becomes large, such as few thousand km, resulting in low spatial resolution. The aircraft can approach thunderstorm up to a few hundred km or less and can carry heavy high-speed cameras with huge size data memories. In the period of June 27 - July 10, 2011, a combined aircraft and ground-based campaign, in support of NHK Cosmic Shore project, was carried with two jet airplanes under collaboration between NHK (Japan Broadcasting Corporation) and universities. On 8 nights out of 16 standing-by, the jets took off from the airport near Denver, Colorado, and an airborne high speed camera captured over 40 TLE events at a frame rate of 8300 /sec. Here we introduce the time development of sprite streamers and the both large and fine structures of preceding halos showing inhomogeneity, suggesting a mechanism to cause the large variation of sprite types, such as crown like sprites.

  3. Introductory group theory and its application to molecular structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ferraro, John R

    1969-01-01

    This volume is a consequence of a series of seminars presented by the authors at the Infrared Spectroscopy Institute, Canisius College, Buffalo, New York, over the last nine years. Many participants on an intermediate level lacked a sufficient background in mathematics and quantum mechan­ ics, and it became evident that a non mathematical or nearly nonmathe­ matical approach would be necessary. The lectures were designed to fill this need and proved very successful. As a result of the interest that was developed in this approach, it was decided to write this book. The text is intended for scientists and students with only limited theore­ tical background in spectroscopy, but who are sincerely interested in the interpretation of molecular spectra. The book develops the detailed selection rules for fundamentals, combinations, and overtones for molecules in several point groups. Detailed procedures used in carrying out the normal coordinate treatment for several molecules are also presented. Numerous examples...

  4. The Molecular Structure of the Liquid Ordered Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyman, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations reveal substructures within the liquid-ordered phase of lipid bilayers. These substructures, identified in a 10 μsec all-atom trajectory of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered coexistence (Lo/Ld) , are composed of saturated hydrocarbon chains packed with local hexagonal order, and separated by interstitial regions enriched in cholesterol and unsaturated chains. Lipid hydrocarbon chain order parameters calculated from the Lo phase are in excellent agreement with 2H NMR measurements; the local hexagonal packing is also consistent with 1H-MAS NMR spectra of the Lo phase, NMR diffusion experiments, and small angle X-ray- and neutron scattering. The balance of cholesterol-rich to local hexagonal order is proposed to control the partitioning of membrane components into the Lo regions. The latter have been frequently associated with formation of so-called rafts, platforms in the plasma membranes of cells that facilitate interaction between components of signaling pathways.

  5. The Structural, Functional and Molecular Organization of the Brainstem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf eNieuwenhuys

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available According to Wilhelm His (1891, 1893 the brainstem consists of two longitudinal zones, the dorsal alar plate (sensory in nature and the ventral basal plate (motor in nature. Johnston and Herrick indicated that both plates can be subdivided into separate somatic and visceral zones, distinguishing somatosensory and viscerosensory zones within the alar plate, and visceromotor and somatomotor zones within the basal plate. To test the validity of this ‘four-functional-zones’ concept, I developed a topological procedure, surveying the spatial relationships of the various cell masses in the brainstem in a single figure. Brainstems of 16 different anamniote species were analyzed, and revealed that the brainstems are clearly divisible into four morphological zones, which correspond largely with the functional zones of Johnston and Herrick. Exceptions include (1 the magnocellular vestibular nucleus situated in the viscerosensory zone; (2 the basal plate containing a number of evidently non-motor centres (superior and inferior olives. Nevertheless the ‘functional zonal model’ has explanatory value. Thus, it is possible to interpret certain brain specializations related to particular behavioural profiles, as ‘local hypertrophies’ of one or two functional columns. Recent developmental molecular studies on brains of birds and mammals confirmed the presence of longitudinal zones, and also showed molecularly defined transverse bands or neuromeres throughout development. The intersecting boundaries of the longitudinal zones and the transverse bands appeared to delimit radially arranged histogenetic domains. Because neuromeres have been observed in embryonic and larval stages of numerous anamniote species, it may be hypothesized that the brainstems of all vertebrates share a basic organizational plan, in which intersecting longitudinal and transverse zones form fundamental histogenetic and genoarchitectonic units.

  6. Molecular structural analysis of HPRT mutations induced by thermal and epithermal neutrons in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinashi, Y; Sakurai, Y; Masunaga, S; Suzuki, M; Takagaki, M; Akaboshi, M; Ono, K

    2000-09-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were exposed to thermal and epithermal neutrons, and the occurrence of mutations at the HPRT locus was investigated. The Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which has been improved for use in neutron capture therapy, was the neutron source. Neutron energy spectra ranging from nearly pure thermal to epithermal can be chosen using the spectrum shifters and thermal neutron filters. To determine mutant frequency and cell survival, cells were irradiated with thermal and epithermal neutrons under three conditions: thermal neutron mode, mixed mode with thermal and epithermal neutrons, and epithermal neutron mode. The mutagenicity was different among the three irradiation modes, with the epithermal neutrons showing a mutation frequency about 5-fold that of the thermal neutrons and about 1.5-fold that of the mixed mode. In the thermal neutron and mixed mode, boron did not significantly increase the frequency of the mutants at the same dose. Therefore, the effect of boron as used in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is quantitatively minimal in terms of mutation induction. Over 300 independent neutron-induced mutant clones were isolated from 12 experiments. The molecular structure of HPRT mutations was determined by analysis of all nine exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. In the thermal neutron and mixed modes, total and partial deletions were dominant and the fraction of total deletions was increased in the presence of boron. In the epithermal neutron mode, more than half of the mutations observed were total deletions. Our results suggest that there are clear differences between thermal and epithermal neutron beams in their mutagenicity and in the structural pattern of the mutants that they induce. Mapping of deletion breakpoints of 173 partial-deletion mutants showed that regions of introns 3-4, 7/8-9 and 9-0 are sensitive to the induction of mutants by neutron irradiation.

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations on the relationship between the elastic parameters and the molecular structures of nano-hybrid POSS materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Fan-lin; SUN Yi; HU Li-jiang

    2006-01-01

    To research the relationship between the elastic parameters and the molecular structures of nano hybrid polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) materials, the mechanical properties at different temperatures for three POSS polymers with different molecular architectures, polymerlized norbornene POSS homopolymer (PNPOSS, pedant architecture), γ - (2, 3 glycidoxy) propyl diaminoethane POSS polymer (GPDP, catena architecture) and trimethoxysilylcyclopentyl POSS polymer (TSCP, cage -cage network architecture) were obtained by molecular dynamics simulations based on the Compass force-field. Results indicate that the molecular architectures of the POSS polymers have great influence on the reinforced effects. The effect of the cage-cage network architecture is best, while that of the catena architecture takes second place and the pedant architecture has the least influence comparatively. The reinforced effects of the POSS monomers were examined. The influences of the temperatures on these effects were analyzed also. It may provide some basis for the reasonable applications of the excellent mechanical properties of the organic-inorganic nano-hybrid materials. It may also provide references for exploitation and design of the POSS materials.

  8. Nuclear structure of 241Pu from neutron-capture, (d,p)-, and (d,t)-reaction measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report experimental measurements in 241Pu of the following: primary and secondary γ rays and conversion electrons from thermal neutron capture in 240Pu;γ rays from 245Cm α decay; proton and triton spectra, respectively, from (d,p) and (d,t) reactions on 240Pu and 242Pu targets. From these data and those of other investigations, we have identified 53 excited levels in 241Pu below 1400 keV. Of these, 44 are placed in 10 rotational bands (with connecting transitions) that have been assigned Nilsson configurations. For the bands below 1 MeV in 241Pu that are largely of single-particle character, there is good correspondence with similar bands in 239U and with the theoretical model of Gareev et al. For those bands in 241Pu where there is mixing between single-particle and vibrational modes, we find some significant deviations from theoretical predictions. For example, the (5) /(2) [622]circle-times 0- state at 519 keV appears to mix less with other states than predicted, while a trio of Kπ= (1) /(2) - bands show unexpected mixing patterns. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  9. Effect of Molecular Structure on the Performance of Polyacrylic Acid Superplasticizer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Rongguo; GUO Huiling; LEI Jiaheng; ZHANG Anfu; GU Huajun

    2007-01-01

    The effects of structure parameters, such as molecular structure, segment kinds, molecular weight, and organic functional groups, on the performance of polyacrylic acid superplasticizer were discussed. According to the differences of chain sections, functional groups, etc, polyacrylic acid superplasticizer could be divided into A, B, C three parts. Among them, A chain section included sulfonic acid groups, B chain section carboxyl groups, C chain section polyester. Polyacrylic acid superplasticizers with different matching of A, B, C chain sections, different length of C chain section and different molecular weights were synthesized by acrylic acid, polyethylene glycol, sodium methyl allylsulfonate; the relation between the molecular structure and performance was also studied. The expetimental results indicate that the water-reduction ratio increases obviously with the increment of the proportion of sodium methyl allylsulfonate chain section in the molecular; the slump retention increases greatly with the increment of the proportion of acrylic acid chain section; the dispersion of cement particles increases with the increment of the chain length of polyethylene glycol; when the molecular weight is in the range of 5000, the dispersion and slump retentibity increase with the increment of the average molecular weight of polymers.

  10. Molecular structures of viruses from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Hecht, Lutz; Syme, Christopher D.;

    2002-01-01

    A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity to chira...

  11. Molecular flexibility and structural instabilities in crystalline L-methionine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer, Jennifer; Lima, Jose A.; Freire, Paulo T. C.; Melo, Francisco E. A.; Havenith, Remco W. A.; Mendes Filho, Josue; Broer, Ria; Eckert, Juergen; Bordallo, Heloisa N.

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the dynamics in polycrystalline samples of L-methionine related to the structural transition at about 307 K by incoherent inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering, X-ray powder diffraction as well as ab-initio calculations. L-Methionine is a sulfur amino acid which can be c

  12. Elucidation of Drug Metabolite Structural Isomers Using Molecular Modeling Coupled with Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading, Eamonn; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Roberts, Andrew D; Dear, Gordon J; Robinson, Carol V; Beaumont, Claire

    2016-02-16

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in combination with molecular modeling offers the potential for small molecule structural isomer identification by measurement of their gas phase collision cross sections (CCSs). Successful application of this approach to drug metabolite identification would facilitate resource reduction, including animal usage, and may benefit other areas of pharmaceutical structural characterization including impurity profiling and degradation chemistry. However, the conformational behavior of drug molecules and their metabolites in the gas phase is poorly understood. Here the gas phase conformational space of drug and drug-like molecules has been investigated as well as the influence of protonation and adduct formation on the conformations of drug metabolite structural isomers. The use of CCSs, measured from IM-MS and molecular modeling information, for the structural identification of drug metabolites has also been critically assessed. Detection of structural isomers of drug metabolites using IM-MS is demonstrated and, in addition, a molecular modeling approach has been developed offering rapid conformational searching and energy assessment of candidate structures which agree with experimental CCSs. Here it is illustrated that isomers must possess markedly dissimilar CCS values for structural differentiation, the existence and extent of CCS differences being ionization state and molecule dependent. The results present that IM-MS and molecular modeling can inform on the identity of drug metabolites and highlight the limitations of this approach in differentiating structural isomers. PMID:26752623

  13. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  14. STRUCTURAL BIOLOGY AND MOLECULAR MEDICINE RESEARCH PROGRAM (LSBMM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisenberg, David S.

    2008-07-15

    The UCLA-DOE Institute of Genomics and Proteomics is an organized research unit of the University of California, sponsored by the Department of Energy through the mechanism of a Cooperative Agreement. Today the Institute consists of 10 Principal Investigators and 7 Associate Members, developing and applying technologies to promote the biological and environmental missions of the Department of Energy, and 5 Core Technology Centers to sustain this work. The focus is on understanding genomes, pathways and molecular machines in organisms of interest to DOE, with special emphasis on developing enabling technologies. Since it was founded in 1947, the UCLA-DOE Institute has adapted its mission to the research needs of DOE and its progenitor agencies as these research needs have changed. The Institute started as the AEC Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, directed by Stafford Warren, who later became the founding Dean of the UCLA School of Medicine. In this sense, the entire UCLA medical center grew out of the precursor of our Institute. In 1963, the mission of the Institute was expanded into environmental studies by Director Ray Lunt. I became the third director in 1993, and in close consultation with David Galas and John Wooley of DOE, shifted the mission of the Institute towards genomics and proteomics. Since 1993, the Principal Investigators and Core Technology Centers are entirely new, and the Institute has separated from its former division concerned with PET imaging. The UCLA-DOE Institute shares the space of Boyer Hall with the Molecular Biology Institute, and assumes responsibility for the operation of the main core facilities. Fig. 1 gives the organizational chart of the Institute. Some of the benefits to the public of research carried out at the UCLA-DOE Institute include the following: The development of publicly accessible, web-based databases, including the Database of Protein Interactions, and the ProLinks database of genomicly inferred protein function linkages

  15. Molecular conformation and liquid structure of 2-propanol through neutron diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Sahoo; S Sarkar; P S R Krishna; R N Joarder

    2010-05-01

    The neutron diffraction data analysis of deuterated liquid 2-propanol at room temperature to define its molecular conformation is presented. 2-Propanol being a large molecule with twelve atomic sites, the conformation analysis is tricky and an improved method of data analysis is given. The intermolecular structural correlations, i.e., hydrogen-bonded liquid structure, can be modelled accurately to extract the nature of the average hydrogen-bonded molecular association in liquid state at room temperature. Like other alcohols these are mostly hexamer ring chain (HRC) clusters. The cluster analysis of recent X-ray data available in the literature also support the same liquid structure.

  16. Molecular and supra-molecular structure of waxy starches developed from cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Sanchez, Teresa; Buléon, Alain; Colonna, Paul; Ceballos, Hernan; Zhao, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Peng; Dufour, Dominique

    2013-02-15

    The aim of this work was to characterize the amylopectin of low amylose content cassava starches obtained from transgenesis comparatively with a natural waxy cassava starch (WXN) discovered recently in CIAT (International Center for Tropical Agriculture). Macromolecular features, starch granule morphology, crystallinity and thermal properties of these starches were determined. M¯(w) of amylopectin from the transgenic varieties are lower than WXN. Branched and debranched chain distributions analyses revealed slight differences in the branching degree and structure of these amylopectins, principally on DP 6-9 and DP>37. For the first time, a deep structural characterization of a series of transgenic lines of waxy cassava was carried out and the link between structural features and the mutated gene expression approached. The transgenesis allows to silenced partially or totally the GBSSI, without changing deeply the starch granule ultrastructure and allows to produce clones with similar amylopectin as parental cassava clone.

  17. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Electronic Structure of Polymers and Molecular Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Ladik, János

    1975-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute on "Electronic Structure of Polymers and Molecular Crystals" was held at the Facultes Universi­ taires de Namur (F.U.N.) from September 1st till September 14th, 1974. We wish to express our appreciation to the NATO Scientific Affairs Division whose generous support made this Institute possible and to the Facultes Universitaires de Namur and the Societe Chimique de Belgique which provided fellowships and travel grants to a number of students. This volume contains the main lectures about the basic principles of the field and about different recent developments of the theory of the electronic structure of polymers and molecular crystals. The school started with the presentation of the basic SCF-LCAO theory of the electronic structure of periodic polymers and molecular crystals (contributions by Ladik, Andre & Delhalle) showing how a combination of quantum chemical and solid state physical methods can provide band structures for these systems. The numerical aspects of these ...

  18. A holistic molecular docking approach for predicting protein-protein complex structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A holistic protein-protein molecular docking approach,HoDock,was established,composed of such steps as binding site prediction,initial complex structure sampling,refined complex structure sampling,structure clustering,scoring and final structure selection.This article explains the detailed steps and applications for CAPRI Target 39.The CAPRI result showed that three predicted binding site residues,A191HIS,B512ARG and B531ARG,were correct,and there were five submitted structures with a high fraction of correct receptor-ligand interface residues,indicating that this docking approach may improve prediction accuracy for protein-protein complex structures.

  19. Capturing Structural Complexity of Innovation Diffusion through System Dynamics: A Discussion on Model Development, Calibration and Simulation Results

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjay Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    This paper shows the utility of systems approach by extending the traditional innovation models and incorporating and integrating into them selective critical structural variables to map their interaction and explain the inherent dynamism. Conventionally, the approaches in explaining the innovation diffusion process assume that the process takes place in a stable and homogeneous system in which the innovation diffuses or spreads without being affected by the system’s structural variables ev...

  20. Changes of the molecular structure in polyelectrolyte multilayers under stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Früh, Johannes; Köhler, Ralf; Möhwald, Helmuth; Krastev, Rumen

    2010-10-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) produced by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly find different applications. Often the PEMs are exposed to mechanical stress which they have to sustain. A correlation of the mechanical properties of PEM on macroscopic level with the ordering of polyelectrolyte molecules on molecular level is of interest. Our study is focused on the changes of orientation of the polyelectrolyte molecules when the PEM is under lateral mechanical stress. The PEM was prepared from pyrene (PY) labeled polystyrene sulfonate (PSS-PY) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium) chloride (PDDA) on sheets of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) rubber used as substrates. The LbL dipping technique was used for the formation of PEMs. A special stretching device was constructed which allows the fluorescence of the films under stress to be observed. The change in the fluorescence spectra which can be attributed to a PY ordering change from the PEM under stress of up to 10% was monitored. We observed that PEMs undergo a plastic deformation under external mechanical stretching. We conclude that under mechanical stress the polyelectrolyte molecules organized in polyelectrolyte multilayers experience an irreversible transition from the coiled to decoiled state. PMID:20809658

  1. Do Giant Molecular Clouds Care About the Galactic Structure?

    CERN Document Server

    Fujimoto, Yusuke; Wakayama, Mariko; Habe, Asao

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the impact of galactic environment on the properties of simulated giant molecular clouds formed in a M83-type barred spiral galaxy. Our simulation uses a rotating stellar potential to create the grand design features and resolves down to 1.5 pc. From the comparison of clouds found in the bar, spiral and disc regions, we find that the typical GMC is environment independent, with a mass of 5e+5 Msun and radius 11 pc. However, the fraction of clouds in the property distribution tails varies between regions, with larger, more massive clouds with a higher velocity dispersion being found in greatest proportions in the bar, spiral and then disc. The bar clouds also show a bimodality that is not reflected in the spiral and disc clouds except in the surface density, where all three regions show two distinct peaks. We identify these features as being due to the relative proportion of three cloud types, classified via the mass-radius scaling relation, which we label A, B and C. Type A clouds have the typi...

  2. Crystal and molecular structure of perindopril erbumine salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remko, M.; Bojarska, J.; Ježko, P.; Sieroń, L.; Olczak, A.; Maniukiewicz, W.

    2011-06-01

    The crystal structure of perindopril (2S,3aS,7aS)-1-[(2S)-2-[[(2S)-1-ethoxy-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]propanoyl]-2,3,3a,4,5,6,7,7a-octahydroindole-2-carboxylic acid) erbumine salt C 23H 43N 3O 5, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. The compound crystallizes in the triclinic, non-centrosymetric space group P1, with unit cell dimensions a = 6.575(3), b = 12.165(5), c = 16.988(8) Å and α = 97.153(4), β = 94.417(4), γ = 90.349(4)°, Z = 2. The structure was refined by full matrix least squares methods to R = 0.037. In the solid state ionized molecules of perindopril and erbumine are linked together forming a complex via O⋯HN + hydrogen bonds between the positively charged amino groups of the erbuminium cations and oxygen atoms of the perindopril carboxylate groups. Intermolecular N sbnd H⋯O and C sbnd H⋯O contacts seem to be effective in the stabilization of the structure, resulting in the formation of a three-dimensional network. The gas-phase structure of perindopril-erbumine complex was optimized by the HF/6-31G(d) and Becke3LYP/6-31G(d) methods. The conformational behavior of this salt in water was examined using the CPCM and Onsager models. In both the gas phase and water solution the perindopril erbumine will exist in prevailing triclinic form.

  3. Molecular Structure of Humin and Melanoidin via Solid State NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Herzfeld, Judith; Rand, Danielle; Matsuki, Yoh; Daviso, Eugenio; Mak-Jurkauskas, Melody; Mamajanov, Irena

    2011-01-01

    Sugar-derived humins and melanoidins figure significantly in food chemistry, agricultural chemistry, biochemistry and prebiotic chemistry. Despite wide interest and significant experimental attention, the amorphous and insoluble nature of the polymers has made them resistant to conventional structural characterization. Here we make use of solid-state NMR methods, including selective 13C substitution, 1H-dephasing, and double quantum filtration. The spectra, and their interpretation, are simpl...

  4. A first-principles density functional theory study of the electronic structural and thermodynamic properties of M2ZrO3 and M2CO3 (M=Na, K) and their capabilities for CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuhua Duan

    2012-01-01

    Alkali metal zirconates could be used as solid sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture. The structural, electronic, and phonon properties of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3} are investigated by combining the density functional theory with lattice phonon dynamics. The thermodynamics of CO{sub 2} absorption/desorption reactions of these two zirconates are analyzed. The calculated results show that their optimized structures are in a good agreement with experimental measurements. The calculated band gaps are 4.339 eV (indirect), 3.641 eV (direct), 3.935 eV (indirect), and 3.697 eV (direct) for Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, and K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, respectively.The calculated phonon dispersions and phonon density of states for M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and M{sub 2}CO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) revealed that from K to Na to Li, their frequency peaks are shifted to high frequencies due to the molecular weight decreased from K to Li. From the calculated reaction heats and relationships of free energy change versus temperatures and CO{sub 2} pressures of the M{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} (M = K, Na, Li) reacting with CO{sub 2}, we found that the performance of Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} capturing CO{sub 2} is similar to that of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and is better than that of K{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Therefore, Na{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} are good candidates of high temperature CO{sub 2} sorbents and could be used for post combustion CO{sub 2} capture technologies.

  5. Role of crystal structure on CO2 capture by limestone derived CaO subjected to carbonation/recarbonation/calcination cycles at Ca-looping conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CO2 capture of limestone subjected to carbonation/recarbonation/calcination cycles is affected by diffusion. • A reduction of crystallinity by ball milling favors diffusion and promotes recarbonation. • Thermal annealing enhances crystallinity and hinders recarbonation. • Milling promotes friability whereas annealing enhances the resistance of particles to fragmentation. • The solid crystal structure determines the efficiency of the novel Ca-looping concept. - Abstract: Large scale pilot plants are currently demonstrating the feasibility of the Calcium-looping (CaL) technology built on the multicyclic calcination/carbonation of natural limestone for post-combustion and pre-combustion CO2 capture. Yet, limestone derived CaO exhibits a drop of conversion when subjected to multiple carbonation/calcination cycles, which lessens the efficiency of the technology. In this paper we analyze a novel CaL concept recently proposed to mitigate this drawback based on the introduction of an intermediate stage wherein carbonation is intensified at high temperature and high CO2 partial pressure. It is shown that carbonation in this stage is mainly driven by solid-state diffusion, which is determined by the solid’s crystal structure. Accordingly, a reduction of crystallinity by ball milling, which favors diffusion, serves to promote recarbonation. Conversely, thermal annealing, which enhances crystallinity, hinders recarbonation. An initial fast phase has been identified in the recarbonation stage along which the rate of carbonation is also a function of the crystal structure indicating a relevant role of surface diffusion. This is consistent with a recently proposed mechanism for nucleation of CaCO3 on the CaO surface in islands with a critical size determined by surface diffusion. A further issue analyzed has been the effects of pretreatment and cycling on the mechanical strength of the material, whose fragility hampers the CaL process efficiency

  6. Electric Double-Layer Structure in Primitive Model Electrolytes. Comparing Molecular Dynamics with Local-Density Approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluate the accuracy of local-density approximations (LDAs) using explicit molecular dynamics simulations of binary electrolytes comprised of equisized ions in an implicit solvent. The Bikerman LDA, which considers ions to occupy a lattice, poorly captures excluded volume interactions between primitive model ions. Instead, LDAs based on the Carnaha-Starling (CS) hard-sphere equation of state capture simulated values of ideal and excess chemical potential profiles extremely well, as is the relationship between surface charge density and electrostatic potential. Excellent agreement between the EDL capacitances predicted by CS-LDAs and computed in molecular simulations is found even in systems where ion correlations drive strong density and free charge oscillations within the EDL, despite the inability of LDAs to capture the oscillations in the detailed EDL profiles

  7. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiqiang Yu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1 using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2 revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3 prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4 obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  8. FlaME: Flash Molecular Editor - a 2D structure input tool for the web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallakian Pavel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far, there have been no Flash-based web tools available for chemical structure input. The authors herein present a feasibility study, aiming at the development of a compact and easy-to-use 2D structure editor, using Adobe's Flash technology and its programming language, ActionScript. As a reference model application from the Java world, we selected the Java Molecular Editor (JME. In this feasibility study, we made an attempt to realize a subset of JME's functionality in the Flash Molecular Editor (FlaME utility. These basic capabilities are: structure input, editing and depiction of single molecules, data import and export in molfile format. Implementation The result of molecular diagram sketching in FlaME is accessible in V2000 molfile format. By integrating the molecular editor into a web page, its communication with the HTML elements on this page is established using the two JavaScript functions, getMol( and setMol(. In addition, structures can be copied to the system clipboard. Conclusion A first attempt was made to create a compact single-file application for 2D molecular structure input/editing on the web, based on Flash technology. With the application examples presented in this article, it could be demonstrated that the Flash methods are principally well-suited to provide the requisite communication between the Flash object (application and the HTML elements on a web page, using JavaScript functions.

  9. Advances in Rosetta structure prediction for difficult molecular-replacement problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modeling advances using Rosetta structure prediction to aid in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems are discussed. Recent work has shown the effectiveness of structure-prediction methods in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems. The Rosetta protein structure modeling suite can aid in the solution of difficult molecular-replacement problems using templates from 15 to 25% sequence identity; Rosetta refinement guided by noisy density has consistently led to solved structures where other methods fail. In this paper, an overview of the use of Rosetta for these difficult molecular-replacement problems is provided and new modeling developments that further improve model quality are described. Several variations to the method are introduced that significantly reduce the time needed to generate a model and the sampling required to improve the starting template. The improvements are benchmarked on a set of nine difficult cases and it is shown that this improved method obtains consistently better models in less running time. Finally, strategies for best using Rosetta to solve difficult molecular-replacement problems are presented and future directions for the role of structure-prediction methods in crystallography are discussed

  10. Advances in Rosetta structure prediction for difficult molecular-replacement problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMaio, Frank, E-mail: dimaio@u.washington.edu [University of Washington, UW Box 357350, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Modeling advances using Rosetta structure prediction to aid in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems are discussed. Recent work has shown the effectiveness of structure-prediction methods in solving difficult molecular-replacement problems. The Rosetta protein structure modeling suite can aid in the solution of difficult molecular-replacement problems using templates from 15 to 25% sequence identity; Rosetta refinement guided by noisy density has consistently led to solved structures where other methods fail. In this paper, an overview of the use of Rosetta for these difficult molecular-replacement problems is provided and new modeling developments that further improve model quality are described. Several variations to the method are introduced that significantly reduce the time needed to generate a model and the sampling required to improve the starting template. The improvements are benchmarked on a set of nine difficult cases and it is shown that this improved method obtains consistently better models in less running time. Finally, strategies for best using Rosetta to solve difficult molecular-replacement problems are presented and future directions for the role of structure-prediction methods in crystallography are discussed.

  11. A Quantitative Structure Property Relationship for Prediction of Flash Point of Alkanes Using Molecular Connectivity Indices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Morteza Atabati; Reza Emamalizadeh

    2013-01-01

    Many structure-property/activity studies use graph theoretical indices,which are based on the topological properties of a molecule viewed as a graph.Since topological indices can be derived directly from the molecular structure without any experimental effort,they provide a simple and straightforward method for property prediction.In this work the flash point of alkanes was modeled by a set of molecular connectivity indices (x),modified molecular connectivity indices (mx(1)h) and valance molecular connectivity indices (mxv),with mxv calculated using the hydrogen perturbation.A stepwise Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) method was used to select the best indices.The predicted flash points are in good agreement with the experimental data,with the average absolute deviation 4.3 K.

  12. A circumstellar molecular gas structure associated with the massive young star Cepheus A-HW 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrelles, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Canto, Jorge; Ho, Paul T. P.

    1993-01-01

    We report the detection via VLA-D observations of ammonia of a circumstellar high-density molecular gas structure toward the massive young star related to the object Cepheus A-HW 2, a firm candidate for the powering source of the high-velocity molecular outflow in the region. We suggest that the circumstellar molecular gas structure could be related to the circumstellar disk previously suggested from infrared, H2O, and OH maser observations. We consider as a plausible scenario that the double radio continuum source of HW 2 could represent the ionized inner part of the circumstellar disk, in the same way as proposed to explain the double radio source in L1551. The observed motions in the circumstellar molecular gas can be produced by bound motions (e.g., infall or rotation) around a central mass of about 10-20 solar masses (B0.5 V star or earlier).

  13. Molecular modeling of the ion channel-like nanotube structure of amyloid β-peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIAO Yong; YANG Pin

    2007-01-01

    The ion channel-like nanotube structure of the oligomers of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) was first investigated by molecular modeling. The results reveal that the hydrogen bond net is one of the key factors to stabilize the structure. The hydrophobicity distribution mode of the side chains is in favor of the structure inserting into the bilayers and forming a hydrophilic pore. The lumen space is under the control of the negative potential, weaker but spreading continuously, to which the cation selectivity attributes; meanwhile, the alternate distribution of the stronger positive and negative potentials makes the electrostatic distribution of the structure framework balance, which is also one of the key factors stabilizing the structure. The results lay the theoretical foundation for illuminating the structure stability and the ion permeability, and give a clue to elucidating the molecular mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and designing novel drugs to prevent or reverse AD at the root.

  14. Structure of beryllium isotopes in fermionic molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Bahram Ramin

    2009-02-16

    Modern theoretical nuclear physics faces two major challenges. The first is finding a suitable interaction, which describes the forces between nucleons. The second challenge is the solution of the nuclear many-body problem for a given nucleus while applying a realistic potential. The potential used in the framework of this thesis is based on the Argonne AV18 potential. It was transformed by means of the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) to optimize convergence. The usual phenomenological corrections were applied to improve the potential for the Hilbert space used in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD). FMD is an approach to solve the nuclear many-body problem. It uses a single-particle basis which is a superposition of Gaussian distributions in phase-space. The most simple many-body state is the antisymmetric product of the singleparticle states: a Slater determinant, the so called intrinsic state. This intrinsic state is projected on parity, total angular momentum and a center of mass momentum zero. The Hilbert space is spanned by several of these projected states. The states are obtained by minimizing their energy while demanding certain constraints. The expectation values of Slater determinants, parity projected and additionally total angular momentum projected Slater determinants are used. The states that are relevant in the low energy regime are obtained by diagonalization. The lowest moments of the mass-, proton- or neutron-distribution and the excitation in proton- and neutron-shells of a harmonic oscillator are some of the used constraints. The low energy regime of the Beryllium isotopes with masses 7 to 14 is calculated by using these states. Energies, radii, electromagnetic transitions, magnetic moments and point density distributions of the low lying states are calculated and are presented in this thesis. (orig.)

  15. Structure of beryllium isotopes in fermionic molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modern theoretical nuclear physics faces two major challenges. The first is finding a suitable interaction, which describes the forces between nucleons. The second challenge is the solution of the nuclear many-body problem for a given nucleus while applying a realistic potential. The potential used in the framework of this thesis is based on the Argonne AV18 potential. It was transformed by means of the Unitary Correlation Operator Method (UCOM) to optimize convergence. The usual phenomenological corrections were applied to improve the potential for the Hilbert space used in Fermionic Molecular Dynamics (FMD). FMD is an approach to solve the nuclear many-body problem. It uses a single-particle basis which is a superposition of Gaussian distributions in phase-space. The most simple many-body state is the antisymmetric product of the singleparticle states: a Slater determinant, the so called intrinsic state. This intrinsic state is projected on parity, total angular momentum and a center of mass momentum zero. The Hilbert space is spanned by several of these projected states. The states are obtained by minimizing their energy while demanding certain constraints. The expectation values of Slater determinants, parity projected and additionally total angular momentum projected Slater determinants are used. The states that are relevant in the low energy regime are obtained by diagonalization. The lowest moments of the mass-, proton- or neutron-distribution and the excitation in proton- and neutron-shells of a harmonic oscillator are some of the used constraints. The low energy regime of the Beryllium isotopes with masses 7 to 14 is calculated by using these states. Energies, radii, electromagnetic transitions, magnetic moments and point density distributions of the low lying states are calculated and are presented in this thesis. (orig.)

  16. Molecular structure and biological function of proliferating cell nuclear antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is the core component of replication complex in eukaryote.As a processive factor of DNA polymerase delta, PCNA coordinates the replication process by interacting with various replication proteins. PCNA appears to play an essential role in many cell events, such as DNA damage repair, cell cycle regulation, and apoptosis, through the coordination or organization of different partners. PCNA is an essential factor in cell proliferation, and has clinical significance in tumor research. In this article we review the functional structure of PCNA, which acts as a function switch in different cell events.

  17. Muon capture probability of carbon and oxygen for CO, CO2, and COS under low-pressure gas conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a negatively charged muon is stopped in a substance, it is captured by an atom of the substance, and the muonic atom is formed. The muon capture process is significantly affected by the chemical environment of the atom and factors such as molecular structure (chemical effect). In this study, we performed muon irradiation for low-pressure CO, CO2, and COS molecules and measured the muonic X-rays emitted immediately after muon capture by an atom. In this paper, we quantitatively discuss the muon capture probability of each type of atom using the LMM model. (author)

  18. DFT study of the effect of substitution on the molecular structure of copper phthalocyanine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Prabhjot; Sachdeva, Ritika; Singh, Sukhwinder; Saini, G. S. S.

    2016-05-01

    To study the effect of sulfonic acid group as substituent on the molecular structure of an organic compound copper Phthalocyanine, the optimized geometry, mulliken charges, energies and dipole momemts of copper phthalocyanine and copper phthalocyaninetetrasulfonic acid tetra sodium salt have been investigated using density functional theory. Also to predict the change in reactive sites after substitution, molecular electrostatic potential maps for both the molecules have been calculated.

  19. Crystal and molecular structure of N-(-nitrobenzylidene)-3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Arjuna Gowda; M K Kokila; Puttaraja; M V Kulkarni; N C Shivaprakash

    2000-09-01

    The crystal structure of N-(-nitrobenzylidene)-3-chloro-4-fluoroaniline (II) has been determined by X-ray structure analysis. This belongs to a class of benzylidene anilines. The structure was solved by direct method. The molecular packing of the non-planar molecules are held by Van der Waals and F$\\cdots\\cdot$H7, O$\\cdots\\cdot$Cl, F$\\cdots\\cdot$F and N$\\cdots\\cdot$H interactions.

  20. Lithium diffusion in silicon and induced structure disorder: A molecular dynamics study

    OpenAIRE

    Huanyu Wang; Xiao Ji; Chi Chen; Kui Xu; Ling Miao

    2013-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics method, we investigate the diffusion property of lithium in different silicon structures and silicon structure's disorder extent during lithium's diffusion process. We find that the pathway and the incident angle between the direction of barrier and diffusion of lithium are also the essential factors to the lithium's diffusion property in silicon anode besides the barrier. Smaller incident angle could decrease the scattering of lithium in silicon structure effectively...

  1. Molecular Determinants of Staphylococcal Biofilm Dispersal and Structuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Y Le

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococci are frequently implicated in human infections, and continue to pose a therapeutic dilemma due to their ability to form deeply seated microbial communities, known as biofilms, on the surfaces of implanted medical devices and host tissues. Biofilm development has been proposed to occur in three stages: 1 attachment, 2 proliferation/structuring, and 3 detachment/dispersal. Although research within the last several decades has implicated multiple molecules in the roles as effectors of staphylococcal biofilm proliferation/structuring and detachment/dispersal, to date, only phenol soluble modulins (PSMs have been consistently demonstrated to serve in this role under both in-vitro and in-vivo settings. PSMs are regulated directly through a density-dependent manner by the accessory gene regulator (Agr system. They disrupt the non-covalent forces holding the biofilm extracellular matrix together, which is necessary for the formation of channels, a process essential for the delivery of nutrients to deeper biofilm layers, and for dispersal/dissemination of clusters of biofilm to distal organs in acute infection. Given their relevance in both acute and chronic biofilm-associated infections, the Agr system and the psm genes hold promise as potential therapeutic targets.

  2. Molecular Clouds in the North American and Pelican Nebulae: Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shaobo; Yang, Ji

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of 4.25 square degree area toward the North American and Pelican Nebulae in the $J = 1-0$ transitions of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O. Three molecules show different emission area with their own distinct structures. These different density tracers reveal several dense clouds with surface density over 500 $M_\\odot$ pc$^{-2}$ and a mean H$_2$ column density of 5.8, 3.4, and 11.9$\\times10^{21}$ cm$^{-2}$ for $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO, and C$^{18}$O, respectively. We obtain a total mass of $5.4\\times10^4 M_\\odot$ ($^{12}$CO), $2.0\\times10^4 M_\\odot$ ($^{13}$CO), and $6.1\\times10^3 M_\\odot$ (C$^{18}$O) in the complex. The distribution of excitation temperature shows two phase of gas: cold gas ($\\sim$10 K) spreads across the whole cloud; warm gas ($>$20 K) outlines the edge of cloud heated by the W80 H II region. The kinetic structure of the cloud indicates an expanding shell surrounding the ionized gas produced by the H II region. There are six discernible regions in the cloud including t...

  3. Extraordinary capture of a Randall's snapper Randallichthys filamentosus in the temperate south-eastern Indian Ocean and its molecular phylogenetic relationship within the Etelinae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, C B; Moore, G I; Bertram, A E; Snow, M; Newman, S J

    2016-02-01

    The capture of a rarely encountered Randall's snapper Randallichthys filamentosus (female, 587 mm fork length) from the upper continental slope (c. 350 m) off the south coast of Western Australia (c. 34·5° S; 122·5° E) in January 2014 represents its first record from the temperate Indian Ocean and a southern range extension. This record suggests that spawning of this predominantly tropical species may probably be occurring in the eastern Indian Ocean, considering the extensive, and unlikely, distance the progeny would have otherwise travelled from its typical distribution in the western and central Pacific Ocean.

  4. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Ohmura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the best stability. Also, at a given molecule size, better stability may be available when the large molecule guest substance has a larger molar mass.

  5. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  6. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16{plus_minus}2{degree} from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94{plus_minus}0.02{Angstrom}. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27{plus_minus}0.04{Angstrom}, up from 1.10{Angstrom} for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25{Angstrom} Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20{Angstrom} and 15--23{degrees}) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16{Angstrom} and 19{degrees}. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95{Angstrom} for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius {approximately} 1.5 {Angstrom} for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  7. PREVALENCE OF SOME HELMINTHS IN RODENTS CAPTURED FROM DIFFERENT CITY STRUCTURES INCLUDING POULTRY FARMS AND HUMAN POPULATION OF FAISALABAD, PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. RAFIQUE, S. A. RANA, H. A. KHAN AND A. SOHAIL1

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate prevalence of zoonotic helminths from human, Rattus rattus (R. rattus, Rattus norvegicus (R. norvegicus and Mus musculus of eight different structures, namely grain shops in grain market, departmental stores, railway godowns, food processing plants (bakeries, poultry farms, houses in kachi-abadies, houses in departmental colonies and posh residences and banglows in Faisalabad city. All the structures were sampled for 2 months each and completed in 16 months. Highest prevalence (70% of Vsmpirolepis spp. was observed in R. rattus sampled from poultry farms, which was significantly higher (P<0.05 than the prevalence of all the helminths recovered from other structures. Hymenolepis nana (H. nana was observed in 60% of the sampled Mus musculus collected from kachi-abadies, which was significantly higher (P<0.05 than all other structures studies for H. nana, except R. rattus from kachi-abadies (55% and R. norvegicus from grain shops in grain market (55%. The rodent’s endo-parasites viz., Hymenolepis nana, Teania taenaeformis, Entrobius spps and Trichuiris spps observed in R. rattus, R. norvegicus and M. musculus at different percentages were also recorded in human stool samples with an incidence of 48, 21, 76 and 10%, respectively.

  8. Linking microbial community structure to biogeochemical function in coastal marine sediments: Stable isotope probing combined with magnetic bead capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Miyatake

    2011-01-01

    Microbial community structure and its biogeochemical functions in marine sediments can be successfully linked by using the improved Mag-SIP method in combination with other approaches. In this thesis, we were able to provide detailed information on the microorganisms responsible for the utilization

  9. Capturing coherent structures and turbulent interfaces in wake flows by means of the Organised Eddy Simulation, OES and by Tomo-PIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deri, E.; Ouvrard, H.; Braza, M.; Hunt, J.; Hoarau, Y.; Cazin, S.; Cid, E.; Harran, G.

    2011-12-01

    The present study aims at a physical analysis of the coherent and chaotic vortex dynamics in the near wake around a flat plate at incidence, to provide new elements in respect of the flow physics turbulence modelling for high-Reynolds number flows around bodies. This constitutes nowadays a challenge in the aeronautics design. A special attention is paid to capture the thin shear layer interfaces downstream of the separation, responsible for aeroacoustics phenomena related to noise reduction and directly linked to an accurate prediction of the aerodynamic forces. The experimental investigation is carried out by means of tomographic PIV. The interaction of the most energetic coherent structures with the random turbulence is discussed. Furthermore, the POD analysis allowed evaluation of 3D phase averaged dynamics as well as the influence of higher modes associated with the finer-scale turbulence. The numerical study by means of the Organised Eddy Simulation, OES approach ensured a reduced turbulence diffusion that allowed development of the von Karman instability and of capturing of the thin shear-layer interfaces, by using appropriate criteria based on vorticity and dissipation rate of kinetic energy. A comparison between the experiments and the simulations concerning the coherent vortex pattern is carried out.

  10. EFFECTS OF MATRIX MOLECULAR WEIGHT ON STRUCTURE AND REINFORCEMENT OF HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE/MICA COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Chen; Yu-fang Xiang; Ke Wang; Qin Zhang; Rong-ni Du; Qiang Fu

    2011-01-01

    Three types of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) with different molecular weights (high, medium and Iow) were adopted to evaluate the influence of matrix molecular weight on the structure-property relation of injection-molded HDPE/mica composites through a combination of SEM, 2d-WAXS, DSC, DMA and tensile testing. Various structural factors including orientation, filler dispersion, interfacial interaction between HDPE and mica, etc., which can impact the macroscopic mechanics, were compared in detail among the three HDPE/mica composites. The transcrystallization of HDPE on the mica surface was observed and it exhibited strong matrix molecular weight dependence. Obvious transcrystalline structure was found in the composite with Iow molecular weight HDPE, whereas it was hard to be detected in the composites with increased HDPE molecular weight. The best reinforcement effect in the composite with low molecular weight HDPE can be understood as mainly due to substantially improved interracial adhesion between matrix and mica filler, which arises from the transerystallization mechanism.

  11. Two-dimensional topological insulator molecular networks: dependence on structure, symmetry, and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Liang Z.; Louie, Steven G.

    2014-03-01

    2D molecular networks can be fabricated from a wide variety of molecular building blocks, arranged in many different configurations. Interactions between neighboring molecular building blocks result in the formation of new 2D materials. Examples of 2D organic topological insulators, that contain molecular building blocks and heavy elements arranged in a hexagonal lattice, have been recently proposed by Feng Liu and coworkers (Nano Lett., 13, 2842 (2013)). In this work, we present a systematic study of the design space of 2D molecular network topological insulators, elucidating the role of structure, symmetry, and composition of the networks. We show that the magnitude and presence of spin-orbit gaps in the electronic band structure is strongly dependent on the symmetry properties and arrangement of the individual components of the molecular lattice. We present general rules to maximize the magnitude of spin-orbit gaps and perform ab-initio calculations on promising structures derived from these guidelines. This work was supported by National Science Foundation Grant No. DMR10-1006184, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Computational resources have been provided by the NSF through XSEDE resources at NICS.

  12. Coalescence of silver unidimensional structures by molecular dynamics simulation; Coalescencia de estructuras unidimensionales de plata por simulacion dinamica molecular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.E.; Mondragon, G. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Arenas, J. [IFUNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The study of nanoparticles coalescence and silver nano rods phenomena by means of molecular dynamics simulation under the thermodynamic laws is reported. In this work we focus ourselves to see the conditions under which the one can be given one dimension growth of silver nano rods for the coalescence phenomenon among two nano rods or one nano rod and one particle; what allows us to study those structural, dynamic and morphological properties of the silver nano rods to different thermodynamic conditions. The simulations are carried out using the Sutton-Chen potentials of interaction of many bodies that allow to obtain appropriate results with the real physical systems. (Author)

  13. Molecular Structure and Reactivity in the Pyrolysis of Aldehydes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sias, Eric; Cole, Sarah; Sowards, John; Warner, Brian; Wright, Emily; McCunn, Laura R.

    2016-06-01

    The effect of alkyl chain structure on pyrolysis mechanisms has been investigated in a series of aldehydes. Isovaleraldehyde, CH_3CH(CH_3)CH_2CHO, and pivaldehyde, (CH_3)_3CCHO, were subject to thermal decomposition in a resistively heated SiC tubular reactor at 800-1200 °C. Matrix-isolation FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify pyrolysis products. Carbon monoxide and isobutene were major products from each of the aldehydes, which is consistent with what is known from previous studies of unbranched alkyl-chain aldehydes. Other products observed include vinyl alcohol, propene, acetylene, and ethylene, revealing complexities to be considered in the pyrolysis of large, branched-chain aldehydes.

  14. Molecular Variability in Barley Structural Mutants Produced by Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single Sequence Repeat (SSR) and Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to survey gamma ray induced genetic variation in a set of 13 originally produced structural barley (H. vulgare L.) mutants from cv. Freya; including 8 single translocation lines, 3 double translocation lines and 2 multiple reconstructed karyotypes. Both marker systems contributed to the evaluation of the radiation induced DNA alterations and revealed in general 0.49% polymorphisms in the studied genotypes. AFLPs were observed with 3 out of 10 PstI/MseI primer combinations. Transmissible microsatellite instability at loci with perfect (AT)n repeats located in the introns of the rubisco activase and waxy was documented in three mutant lines. The results emphasize that in addition to point mutations, small indels (2bp) form the major group of the gamma induced DNA alterations. (author)

  15. Molecular tools for investigating ANME community structure and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallam, Steven J.; Page, Antoine P.; Constan, Lea; Song, Young C.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Brewer, Heather M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2011-05-20

    Methane production and consumption in anaerobic marine sediments 1 is catalyzed by a series of reversible tetramethanopterin (H4MPT)-linked C1 transfer reactions. Although many of these reactions are conserved between one-carbon compound utilizing microorganisms, two remain diagnostic for archaeal methane metabolism. These include reactions catalyzed by N5-methyltetrahydromethanopterin: coenzyme M methyltransferase and methyl coenzyme M reductase. The latter enzyme is central to C-H bond formation and cleavage underlying methanogenic and reverse methanogenic phenotypes. Here we describe a set of novel tools for the detection and functional analysis of H4MPT-linked C1 transfer reactions mediated by uncultivated anaerobic methane oxidizing archaea (ANME). These tools include polymerase chain reaction primers targeting ANME methyl coenzyme M reductase subunit A subgroups and protein extraction methods from marine sediments compatible with high-resolution mass spectrometry for profiling population structure and functional dynamics. [910, 1,043

  16. Three decades of structure- and property-based molecular design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    . These developments were accompanied by the rise of miniaturized parallel compound property analytics which resulted in a major paradigm shift in medicinal chemistry from linear to multi-dimensional lead optimization. The rapid growth of huge collections of property data stimulated the development of various novel...... involved in this transformation process, to have been able to collaborate with, direct, guide, or simply encourage outstanding experts in various disciplines to build and further develop what has become a major pillar of modern small-molecule drug discovery. This article is an account of major events......-oriented medicinal chemistry. The exploration of oxetane is given as an example. For the sake of brevity, this account cannot detail all further developments that have taken place in each individual area of structure- and property-based drug discovery and it can only hint at important developments in other...

  17. Fragment-Based Electronic Structure Approach for Computing Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Chemical Shifts in Molecular Crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Joshua D; Beran, Gregory J O

    2014-11-11

    First-principles chemical shielding tensor predictions play a critical role in studying molecular crystal structures using nuclear magnetic resonance. Fragment-based electronic structure methods have dramatically improved the ability to model molecular crystal structures and energetics using high-level electronic structure methods. Here, a many-body expansion fragment approach is applied to the calculation of chemical shielding tensors in molecular crystals. First, the impact of truncating the many-body expansion at different orders and the role of electrostatic embedding are examined on a series of molecular clusters extracted from molecular crystals. Second, the ability of these techniques to assign three polymorphic forms of the drug sulfanilamide to the corresponding experimental (13)C spectra is assessed. This challenging example requires discriminating among spectra whose (13)C chemical shifts differ by only a few parts per million (ppm) across the different polymorphs. Fragment-based PBE0/6-311+G(2d,p) level chemical shielding predictions correctly assign these three polymorphs and reproduce the sulfanilamide experimental (13)C chemical shifts with 1 ppm accuracy. The results demonstrate that fragment approaches are competitive with the widely used gauge-invariant projector augmented wave (GIPAW) periodic density functional theory calculations. PMID:26584373

  18. Theoretical study on molecular packing and electronic structure of bi-1,3,4-oxadiazole derivatives

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Haitao

    2014-01-01

    The molecular aggregation structure of 5,5′-bis(naphthalen-2-yl)-2,2′-bi(1,3,4-oxadiazole) (BOXD-NP) was studied by computing the intermolecular interaction potential energy surface (PES) at density functional theory level based on a dimer model. All B3LYP, CAM-B3LYP and M062x functionals can yield a reliable isolated molecular geometry. The conformation of BOXD-NP obtained with all methods is perfectly planar, indicating good conjugation ability between oxadiazole and naphthalene rings. The vibrational frequencies of BOXD-NP were also calculated using the B3LYP/6-311+G∗∗ method, which showed great consistency with the experimental observations and makes the assignments of the IR spectra more solid. It was revealed that the lowest excited state of BOXD-NP should be assigned as a highly allowed π-π∗ state by TD-DFT calculation. Considering the non-covalent interactions in molecular aggregates, the M062x functional was applied in the construction of the PES. Besides the packing structure found in the crystals, PES also predicted several stable structures, indicating that PES has great ability in guiding molecular self-assembly. Symmetry Adapted Perturbation Theory (SAPT) analysis on these energy-minimum molecular stacking structures revealed that London dispersion forces are the strongest attractive component in the binding. This journal is

  19. Linking microbial community structure to biogeochemical function in coastal marine sediments: Stable isotope probing combined with magnetic bead capture

    OpenAIRE

    Stal, L.J.; Boschker, H.T.S.; Miyatake, T.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial community structure and its biogeochemical functions in marine sediments can be successfully linked by using the improved Mag-SIP method in combination with other approaches. In this thesis, we were able to provide detailed information on the microorganisms responsible for the utilization of major substrates in marine sediments. It was shown that a number of important groups in the microbial community played a broader role than expected. Some surprising results are that oxygenic pho...

  20. Molecular Structure of Aggregated Amyloid-β: Insights from Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tycko, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides aggregate to form polymorphic amyloid fibrils and a variety of intermediate assemblies, including oligomers and protofibrils, both in vitro and in human brain tissue. Since the beginning of the 21st century, considerable progress has been made to characterize the molecular structures of Aβ aggregates. Full molecular structural models based primarily on data from measurements using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (ssNMR) have been developed for several in vitro Aβ fibrils and one metastable protofibril. Partial structural characterization of other aggregation intermediates has been achieved. One full structural model for fibrils derived from brain tissue has also been reported. Future work is likely to focus on additional structures from brain tissue and on further clarification of nonfibrillar Aβ aggregates. PMID:27481836

  1. The Coevolution of Phycobilisomes: Molecular Structure Adapting to Functional Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Shi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phycobilisome is the major light-harvesting complex in cyanobacteria and red alga. It consists of phycobiliproteins and their associated linker peptides which play key role in absorption and unidirectional transfer of light energy and the stability of the whole complex system, respectively. Former researches on the evolution among PBPs and linker peptides had mainly focused on the phylogenetic analysis and selective evolution. Coevolution is the change that the conformation of one residue is interrupted by mutation and a compensatory change selected for in its interacting partner. Here, coevolutionary analysis of allophycocyanin, phycocyanin, and phycoerythrin and covariation analysis of linker peptides were performed. Coevolution analyses reveal that these sites are significantly correlated, showing strong evidence of the functional and structural importance of interactions among these residues. According to interprotein coevolution analysis, less interaction was found between PBPs and linker peptides. Our results also revealed the correlations between the coevolution and adaptive selection in PBS were not directly related, but probably demonstrated by the sites coupled under physical-chemical interactions.

  2. Can we predict lattice energy from molecular structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouvrard, Carole; Mitchell, John B O

    2003-10-01

    By using simply the numbers of occurrences of different atom types as descriptors, a conceptually transparent and remarkably accurate model for the prediction of the enthalpies of sublimation of organic compounds has been generated. The atom types are defined on the basis of atomic number, hybridization state and bonded environment. Models of this kind were applied firstly to aliphatic hydrocarbons, secondly to both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, thirdly to a wide range of non-hydrogen-bonding molecules, and finally to a set of 226 organic compounds including 70 containing hydrogen-bond donors and acceptors. The final model gives squared correlation coefficients of 0.925 for the 226 compounds in the training set and 0.937 for an independent test set of 35 compounds. The success of such a simple model implies that the enthalpy of sublimation can be predicted accurately without knowledge of the crystal packing. This hypothesis is in turn consistent with the idea that, rather than being determined by the particular features of the lowest-energy packing, the lattice energy is similar for a number of hypothetical alternative crystal structures of a molecule.

  3. Molecular Structure, Theoretical Calculation and Thermodynamic Properties of Tebuconazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Haixia; SONG Jirong; HUANG Ting; LU Xingqiang; XU Kangzhen; SUN Xiaohong

    2009-01-01

    Single crystals of 5-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dimethyl-3-(1,2,4-triazol-1-ylmethyl)-pentom-3-ol (tebuconazole) were obtained in toluene. The single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed that it crystallized in the monoclinic system, with space group P2(1)/c and crystal parameters of a= 1.1645(1) nm, b= 1.6768(2) nm, c= 1.7478(2) nm,β=92.055(2)°, Dc= 1.199 g/cm3, Z=4 and F(000)= 1312. Density functional theory (DFT) B3LYP was employed to optimize the structure and calculate the frequencies of tebuconazole. The calculated geometrical parameters are close to the corresponding experimental ones. The specific heat capacity of the title compound was determined with continuous Cp mode of a mircocalorimeter. In the determining temperature range from 283 to 353 K, the special heat capacity of the title compound presents good linear relation with temperature. Using the determined relation-ship of Cp with temperature T, thermodynamic functions (enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy) of the title compound between 283 and 353 K, relative to the standard temperature 298.15 K, were derived through thermody-namic relationship.

  4. Computational nanochemistry study of the molecular structure and properties of ethambutol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Morán, Guillermo; Ruiz-Nieto, Samuel; Gerli-Candia, Lorena; Flores-Holguín, Norma; Favila-Pérez, Alejandra; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    The M06 family of density functionals was employed to calculate the molecular structure and properties of the ethambutol molecule. Besides determination of molecular structures, UV-vis spectra were computed using TD-DFT in the presence of a solvent and the results compared with available experimental data. The chemical reactivity descriptors were calculated through conceptual DFT. The active sites for nucleophilic and electrophilic attacks have been chosen by relating them to Fukui function indices. A comparison between the descriptors calculated through vertical energy values and those arising from Koopmans' theorem approximation were performed in order to check the validity of the latter procedure.

  5. Study of the molecular structure and dynamics of bakelite with neutron cross section measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structure and dynamics of calcined bakelite were studied with neutron transmission and scattering cross section measurements. The total cross sections determined were correlated with data obtained with infra-red spectroscopy, elemental analysis and other techniques to get the probable molecular formulae of bakelite. The total cross section determined showed a deviation smaller than 5% from the literature values. The frequency distribution as well as overall experimental results allowed to suggest a structural model like polycyclic hydrocarbons for bakelite calcined at 8000 C. (F.E.). 65 refs, 31 figs, 5 tabs

  6. Structure enhancement methodology using theory and experiment: gas-phase molecular structures using a dynamic interaction between electron diffraction, molecular mechanics, and ab initio data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafka, Graeme R; Masters, Sarah L; Rankin, David W H

    2007-07-01

    A new method of incorporating ab initio theoretical data dynamically into the gas-phase electron diffraction (GED) refinement process has been developed to aid the structure determination of large, sterically crowded molecules. This process involves calculating a set of differences between parameters that define the positions of peripheral atoms (usually hydrogen), as determined using molecular mechanics (MM), and those which use ab initio methods. The peripheral-atom positions are then updated continually during the GED refinement process, using MM, and the returned positions are modified using this set of differences to account for the differences between ab initio and MM methods, before being scaled back to the average parameters used to define them, as refined from experimental data. This allows the molecule to adopt a completely asymmetric structure if required, without being constrained by the MM parametrization, whereas the calculations can be performed on a practical time scale. The molecular structures of tri-tert-butylphosphine oxide and tri-tert-butylphosphine imide have been re-examined using this new technique, which we call SEMTEX (Structure Enhancement Methodology using Theory and EXperiment).

  7. A molecular dynamics calculation of the fluctuation structure in the diatomic fluids around the critical points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principle of corresponding state on the fluctuation structure, which is the spatial distribution of various clusters of molecules caused by density fluctuations, in supercritical states around the critical points has been investigated. In this paper, we performed Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation to extract the fluctuation structure around the critical points of 2-Center-Lennard-Jones (2CLJ) fluids, whose characteristics change by their molecular elongations. First, we indentified some critical points of 2CLJ fluids with comparatively shorter elongations applying Lotfi's function, which correctly describes the liquid-vapor coexistence line of Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid, and successfully defined each critical point. Next, two methods were applied in the estimation of the fluctuation structure: one is the evaluation of the dispersion of the number of molecules at a certain domain, and the other is the calculation of static structure factor. As a result, in 2CLJ fluids which have shorter molecular elongations comparatively, the principle of corresponding state is satisfied because of the small differences in the fluctuation structures extracted in the present two methods. On the other hand, some results imply that the fluctuation may decrease in 2CLJ fluids which have the longer molecular elongations although more accurate evaluation of the critical points in those fluids is necessary for the further investigation. (author)

  8. Probing the 12C-12C and 12C-16O molecular states by radiative capture reactions: present status and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete γ-decay in the 12C(12C,γ)24Mg and 12C(16O,γ)28Si reactions has been measured at energies close to the Coulomb Barrier using the DRAGON spectrometer and its associated BGO γ-array at the TRIUMF facility. The experimental data show an important feeding of doorway states around 10-11 MeV in both reactions. Comparisons with simulations allow to extract the full capture cross section and the main spin involved in the process. Different models are confronted to the results: completely statistical, semi-statistical with an unique entrance spin and cluster. The resolution of the BGO enables to eliminate a fully statistical scenario but is not enough to disentangle the two remaining scenarios. It is shown that the future PARIS array composed of the recently developed LaBr3 scintillators will have capabilities to distinguish between these two scenarios. (authors)

  9. Profiling of the Molecular Weight and Structural Isomer Abundance of Macroalgae-Derived Phlorotannins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Heffernan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Phlorotannins are a group of complex polymers of phloroglucinol (1,3,5-trihydroxybenzene unique to macroalgae. These phenolic compounds are integral structural components of the cell wall in brown algae, but also play many secondary ecological roles such as protection from UV radiation and defense against grazing. This study employed Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography (UPLC with tandem mass spectrometry to investigate isomeric complexity and observed differences in phlorotannins derived from macroalgae harvested off the Irish coast (Fucus serratus, Fucus vesiculosus, Himanthalia elongata and Cystoseira nodicaulis. Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content assays were used as an index for producing phlorotannin fractions, enriched using molecular weight cut-off dialysis with subsequent flash chromatography to profile phlorotannin isomers in these macroalgae. These fractions were profiled using UPLC-MS with multiple reaction monitoring (MRM and the level of isomerization for specific molecular weight phlorotannins between 3 and 16 monomers were determined. The majority of the low molecular weight (LMW phlorotannins were found to have a molecular weight range equivalent to 4–12 monomers of phloroglucinol. The level of isomerization within the individual macroalgal species differed, resulting in substantially different numbers of phlorotannin isomers for particular molecular weights. F. vesiculosus had the highest number of isomers of 61 at one specific molecular mass, corresponding to 12 phloroglucinol units (PGUs. These results highlight the complex nature of these extracts and emphasize the challenges involved in structural elucidation of these compounds.

  10. Lithium diffusion in silicon and induced structure disorder: A molecular dynamics study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanyu Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics method, we investigate the diffusion property of lithium in different silicon structures and silicon structure's disorder extent during lithium's diffusion process. We find that the pathway and the incident angle between the direction of barrier and diffusion of lithium are also the essential factors to the lithium's diffusion property in silicon anode besides the barrier. Smaller incident angle could decrease the scattering of lithium in silicon structure effectively. Moreover, lithium diffuses easier in the Li-Si alloy structure of higher lithium concentration with deeper injection depth. The silicon's structure will be damaged gradually during the charge and discharge process. However, it will also recover to initial state to a great extent after relaxation. Therefore, the damage of lithium diffusion to silicon anode in the structure of low lithium concentration is reversible to a great degree. In addition, the silicon structure of crystal orientation perform better properties in both lithium's diffusivity and structural stability.

  11. Loading Actinides in Multilayered Structures for Nuclear Waste Treatment: The First Case Study of Uranium Capture with Vanadium Carbide MXene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Yuan, Liyong; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Yujuan; Deng, Qihuang; Du, Shiyu; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Zhifang; Barsoum, Michel W; Wang, Xiangke; Shi, Weiqun

    2016-06-29

    Efficient nuclear waste treatment and environmental management are important hurdles that need to be overcome if nuclear energy is to become more widely used. Herein, we demonstrate the first case of using two-dimensional (2D) multilayered V2CTx nanosheets prepared by HF etching of V2AlC to remove actinides from aqueous solutions. The V2CTx material is found to be a highly efficient uranium (U(VI)) sorbent, evidenced by a high uptake capacity of 174 mg g(-1), fast sorption kinetics, and desirable selectivity. Fitting of the sorption isotherm indicated that the sorption followed a heterogeneous adsorption model, most probably due to the presence of heterogeneous adsorption sites. Density functional theory calculations, in combination with X-ray absorption fine structure characterizations, suggest that the uranyl ions prefer to coordinate with hydroxyl groups bonded to the V-sites of the nanosheets via forming bidentate inner-sphere complexes. PMID:27267649

  12. Loading Actinides in Multilayered Structures for Nuclear Waste Treatment: The First Case Study of Uranium Capture with Vanadium Carbide MXene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Yuan, Liyong; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Yujuan; Deng, Qihuang; Du, Shiyu; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Lirong; Zhang, Jing; Chai, Zhifang; Barsoum, Michel W; Wang, Xiangke; Shi, Weiqun

    2016-06-29

    Efficient nuclear waste treatment and environmental management are important hurdles that need to be overcome if nuclear energy is to become more widely used. Herein, we demonstrate the first case of using two-dimensional (2D) multilayered V2CTx nanosheets prepared by HF etching of V2AlC to remove actinides from aqueous solutions. The V2CTx material is found to be a highly efficient uranium (U(VI)) sorbent, evidenced by a high uptake capacity of 174 mg g(-1), fast sorption kinetics, and desirable selectivity. Fitting of the sorption isotherm indicated that the sorption followed a heterogeneous adsorption model, most probably due to the presence of heterogeneous adsorption sites. Density functional theory calculations, in combination with X-ray absorption fine structure characterizations, suggest that the uranyl ions prefer to coordinate with hydroxyl groups bonded to the V-sites of the nanosheets via forming bidentate inner-sphere complexes.

  13. Molecular structures and metabolic characteristics of protein in brown and yellow flaxseed with altered nutrient traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nazir Ahmad; Booker, Helen; Yu, Peiqiang

    2014-07-16

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the chemical profiles; crude protein (CP) subfractions; ruminal CP degradation characteristics and intestinal digestibility of rumen undegraded protein (RUP); and protein molecular structures using molecular spectroscopy of newly developed yellow-seeded flax (Linum usitatissimum L.). Seeds from two yellow flaxseed breeding lines and two brown flaxseed varieties were evaluated. The yellow-seeded lines had higher (P < 0.001) contents of oil (44.54 vs 41.42% dry matter (DM)) and CP (24.94 vs 20.91% DM) compared to those of the brown-seeded varieties. The CP in yellow seeds contained lower (P < 0.01) contents of true protein subfraction (81.31 vs 92.71% CP) and more (P < 0.001) extensively degraded (70.8 vs 64.9% CP) in rumen resulting in lower (P < 0.001) content of RUP (29.2 vs 35.1% CP) than that in the brown-seeded varieties. However, the total supply of digestible RUP was not significantly different between the two seed types. Regression equations based on protein molecular structural features gave relatively good estimation for the contents of CP (R(2) = 0.87), soluble CP (R(2) = 0.92), RUP (R(2) = 0.97), and intestinal digestibility of RUP (R(2) = 0.71). In conclusion, molecular spectroscopy can be used to rapidly characterize feed protein molecular structures and predict their nutritive value. PMID:24931851

  14. Targeting the untargeted in molecular phenomics with structurally-selective ion mobility-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jody Christopher; Gant-Branum, Randi Lee; McLean, John Allen

    2016-06-01

    Systems-wide molecular phenomics is rapidly expanding through technological advances in instrumentation and bioinformatics. Strategies such as structural mass spectrometry, which utilizes size and shape measurements with molecular weight, serve to characterize the sum of molecular expression in biological contexts, where broad-scale measurements are made that are interpreted through big data statistical techniques to reveal underlying patterns corresponding to phenotype. The data density, data dimensionality, data projection, and data interrogation are all critical aspects of these approaches to turn data into salient information. Untargeted molecular phenomics is already having a dramatic impact in discovery science from drug discovery to synthetic biology. It is evident that these emerging techniques will integrate closely in broad efforts aimed at precision medicine. PMID:27132126

  15. Structural Changes of a Doubly Spin-Labeled Chemically Driven Molecular Shuttle Probed by PELDOR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franchi, Paola; Bleve, Valentina; Mezzina, Elisabetta; Schäfer, Christian; Ragazzon, Giulio; Albertini, Marco; Carbonera, Donatella; Credi, Alberto; Di Valentin, Marilena; Lucarini, Marco

    2016-06-20

    Gaining detailed information on the structural rearrangements associated with stimuli-induced molecular movements is of utmost importance for understanding the operation of molecular machines. Pulsed electron-electron double resonance (PELDOR) was employed to monitor the geometrical changes arising upon chemical switching of a [2]rotaxane that behaves as an acid-base-controlled molecular shuttle. To this aim, the rotaxane was endowed with stable nitroxide radical units in both the ring and axle components. The combination of PELDOR data and molecular dynamic calculations indicates that in the investigated rotaxane, the ring displacement along the axle, caused by the addition of a base, does not alter significantly the distance between the nitroxide labels, but it is accompanied by a profound change in the geometry adopted by the macrocycle. PMID:27123774

  16. Molecular structure and dynamical properties of niosome bilayers with and without cholesterol incorporation: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritwiset, Aksornnarong; Krongsuk, Sriprajak; Johns, Jeffrey Roy

    2016-09-01

    Niosomes are non-ionic surfactant vesicles having a bilayer structure formed by self-assembly of hydrated surfactants, usually with cholesterol incorporation. Stability and mechanical properties of niosomes strongly depend on type of non-ionic surfactants and compositions used. In this study we present the structural and dynamical properties of niosome bilayers composed of sorbitan monostearate (Span60) with 0% and 50% cholesterol compositions which are investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations reveal that niosome bilayer without cholesterol prefer to form in the gel phase with a higher order structure, while in the presence of cholesterol the bilayer exhibits more fluidity having a less ordered structure. The niosome bilayer with 50% cholesterol inclusion shows an increase of area per lipid (∼11%) and thickness (∼39%) compared with the niosome bilayer without cholesterol. The Span60 tailgroup orientation of the niosome bilayers without cholesterol exhibits more tilt (34.5o ± 0.5) than that of the bilayer with 50% cholesterol (15.4o ± 0.8). Additionally, our results show that the addition of cholesterol to the bilayer causes the higher in lateral and transverse diffusion, as well as an increase in the hydrogen bond number between Span60 and water. Such characteristics not only enhance the niosome stability but also increase the fluidity, which are necessary for the niosomal drug delivery.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Sanat Kumar, E-mail: sanat-tiwari86@yahoo.co.in; Das, Amita; Sen, Abhijit; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar - 382428 (India)

    2015-03-15

    The existence and evolution of soliton-like structures in a dusty plasma medium are investigated in a first principles approach using molecular dynamic (MD) simulations of particles interacting via a Yukawa potential. These localized structures are found to exist in both weakly and strongly coupled regimes with their structures becoming sharper as the correlation effects between the dust particles get stronger. A surprising result, compared to fluid simulations, is the existence of rarefactive soliton-like structures in our non-dissipative system, a feature that arises from the charge conjugation symmetry property of the Yukawa fluid. Our simulation findings closely resemble many diverse experimental results reported in the past.

  18. De Novo generation of molecular structures using optimization to select graphs on a given lattice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bywater, R.P.; Poulsen, Thomas Agersten; Røgen, Peter;

    2004-01-01

    A recurrent problem in organic chemistry is the generation of new molecular structures that conform to some predetermined set of structural constraints that are imposed in an endeavor to build certain required properties into the newly generated structure. An example of this is the pharmacophore...... model, used in medicinal chemistry to guide de novo design or selection of suitable structures from compound databases. We propose here a method that efficiently links up a selected number of required atom positions while at the same time directing the emergent molecular skeleton to avoid forbidden...... positions. The linkage process takes place on a lattice whose unit step length and overall geometry is designed to match typical architectures of organic molecules. We use an optimization method to select from the many different graphs possible. The approach is demonstrated in an example where crystal...

  19. Molecular Structures and Mechanical Properties of Microbe Rapid Coagulation Natural Rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yue; HUANG Mao-Fang; ZENG Zong-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    In this work,molecular structures,dynamic mechanical properties and glass transition temperatures of microbe coagulated natural rubber(NR) samples were analyzed by using pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry(py-GC/MS),rubber process analyzer(RPA) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis(DMA).And the cross-linked network structures and mechanical properties of the corresponding NR vulcanizates were further determined by using nuclear magnetic resonance(NMR) crosslink density spectrometer(XLDS-15) and universal testing machines.The results show that NR raw rubber produced by rapidly coagulated with microorganism exhibits a simple molecular structure composition and good dynamic mechanical properties,and the corresponding NR vulcanizates possess the aggregation structure of high cross-linked density,a high glass transition temperature of-61.5 ℃ and high mechanical properties(tensile strength reaches 25.2 MPa),as compared with that coagulated with acetic acid.

  20. Synthesis and X-ray Crystal Structure of a New Molecular Clip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The synthesis and X-ray crystal structure of a new molecular clip 2 was reported.It (C24H24N4O2, Mr = 400.47) crystallizes in the space group C2/c with a = 15.587(2), b =8.5805(12), c = 15.259(2)(A),β= 102.448(3)°, V = 1992.9 (5)(A)3, Z= 4, Dc = 1.335 g/cm3,μ= 0.087mm-1 and F(000) = 848.It remains monomeric in the crystal and a tape-like structure is formed in the crystal structure of molecular clip.The most unusual structural feature of 2 is the boat conformation of its cyclohexyl ring imposed by the ring fusion at C(9)-C(9a).

  1. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Vectorization of Advanced Methods for Molecular Electronic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    That there have been remarkable advances in the field of molecular electronic structure during the last decade is clear not only to those working in the field but also to anyone else who has used quantum chemical results to guide their own investiga­ tions. The progress in calculating the electronic structures of molecules has occurred through the truly ingenious theoretical and methodological developments that have made computationally tractable the underlying physics of electron distributions around a collection of nuclei. At the same time there has been consider­ able benefit from the great advances in computer technology. The growing sophistication, declining costs and increasing accessibi­ lity of computers have let theorists apply their methods to prob­ lems in virtually all areas of molecular science. Consequently, each year witnesses calculations on larger molecules than in the year before and calculations with greater accuracy and more com­ plete information on molecular properties. We can surel...

  2. Atomic and molecular physics, physicochemical properties of biologically important structure, and high-voltage research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research in atomic and molecular physics is reported. Studies included: experimental evidence for the existence of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in liquid methane and liquid argon; discovery of a Ramsauer-Townsend minimum in gaseous ethane and propane; motion of thermal electrons in n-alkane vapors; electron mobilities in high pressure gases; electron capture and drift in liquid media; electron attachment to molecules in dense gases; attachment of slow electrons to hexafluorobenzene; fragmentation of atmospheric halocarbons under electron impact; negative ion resonances and threshold electron excitation spectra of organic molecules; theoretical studies of negative-ion resonance states of organic molecules; kinetics of electron capture by sulfur hexafluoride in solution; interactions of slow electrons with benzene and benzene derivatives; Stokes and anti-Stokes fluorescence of 1 : 12-benzoperylene in solution; photoionization of molecules in liquid media; construction of high-voltage breakdown apparatus for gaseous insulation studies; measurements of the breakdown strengths of gaseous insulators and their relation to basic electron-collision processes; accuracy of the breakdown voltage measurements; and assembling basic data on electronegative gases of significance to breakdown

  3. The effect of glycosylation on the transferrin structure: A molecular dynamic simulation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbari, Z; Housaindokht, M R; Bozorgmehr, M R; Izadyar, M

    2016-09-01

    Transferrins have been defined by the highly cooperative binding of iron and a carbonate anion to form a Fe-CO3-Tf ternary complex. As such, the layout of the binding site residues affects transferrin function significantly; In contrast to N-lobe, C-lobe binding site of the transferrin structure has been less characterized and little research which surveyed the interaction of carbonate with transferrin in the C-lobe binding site has been found. In the present work, molecular dynamic simulation was employed to gain access into the molecular level understanding of carbonate binding site and their interactions in each lobe. Residues responsible for carbonate binding of transferrin structure were pointed out. In addition, native human transferrin is a glycoprotein that two N-linked complex glycan chains located in the C-lobe. Usually, in the molecular dynamic simulation for simplifying, glycan is removed from the protein structure. Here, we explore the effect of glycosylation on the transferrin structure. Glycosylation appears to have an effect on the layout of the binding site residue and transferrin structure. On the other hand, sometimes the entire transferrin formed by separated lobes that it allows the results to be interpreted in a straightforward manner rather than more parameters required for full length protein. But, it should be noted that there are differences between the separated lobe and full length transferrin, hence, a comparative analysis by the molecular dynamic simulation was performed to investigate such structural variations. Results revealed that separation in C-lobe caused a significant structural variation in comparison to N-lobe. Consequently, the separated lobes and the full length one are different, showing the importance of the interlobe communication and the impact of the lobes on each other in the transferrin structure. PMID:27235585

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation study on zwitterionic structure to maintain the normal conformations of Glutathione

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Han; ZHU; HaoMiao; SHEN; Jian

    2007-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were applied to normal conformational Glutathione (GSH) and GSH over zwitterionic and hydrophobic surfaces respectively. Conformational analysis of GSH during the simulation time on RMSD, conformational flexibility and dihedral distribution were performed. The results showed that zwitterionic structure maintains the normal conformations of GSH to a better extent, which should be a first good proof of the hypothesis of "maintain of normal structure".

  5. Presentation of thermodynamic functions of isotopic forms using terms of molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Precise mathematical representation of vibration contributions to thermodynamic functions and to their isotopic differences as a matrix of contributions of natural vibration coordinates associated with structural elements of a molecule is developed. The obtained representation permit to unambiguously interpret the given values in terms of molecular structure without using the notion of vibration frquency. It is shown to have essential advantages at interpretation of isotopic effects

  6. Molecular Structure, Function, and Dynamics of Clathrin-Mediated Membrane Traffic

    OpenAIRE

    Kirchhausen, Tom; Owen, David; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Clathrin is a molecular scaffold for vesicular uptake of cargo at the plasma membrane, where its assembly into cage-like lattices underlies the clathrin-coated pits of classical endocytosis. This review describes the structures of clathrin, major cargo adaptors, and other proteins that participate in forming a clathrin-coated pit, loading its contents, pinching off the membrane as a lattice-enclosed vesicle, and recycling the components. It integrates as much of the structural information as ...

  7. Linear hydrogen adsorbate structures on graphite induced by self-assembled molecular monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Louis; Sljivancanin, Zeljko; Balog, Richard;

    2012-01-01

    Combined scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements and density functional theory calculations reveal a method to induce linear structures of hydrogen adsorbates on graphite by covering the surface with a self-assembled molecular monolayer of cyanuric acid and exposing it to atomic hydrogen...

  8. Pump–probe spectrum of molecular assemblies of arbitrary structure and dimension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juzeliūnas, Gediminas; Knoester, Jasper

    2000-01-01

    Using the hard-core boson approach, we study the pump-probe spectrum of molecular assemblies carrying Frenkel excitons of arbitrary structure and dimension. We present a rigorous justification of the hard-core boson approach by using the Agranovich–Toshich transformation from paulions to bosons. The

  9. Structural investigation of bistrifluron using x-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy, and molecular modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, J K; Rhee, S K; Kim, G B; Yun, H S; Chung, B J; Lee, S S; Lim, Y H

    2002-01-01

    A new insecticide, bistrifluron acts as an inhibitor of insect development and interferes with the cuticle formation of insects. Since it shows low acute oral and dermal toxicities, it can be one of potent insecticides. Based on X-ray crystallography, NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling, the structural studies of bistrifluron have been carried out.

  10. Structural organization of surfactant aggregates in vacuo: a molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Giovanna; Fornili, Sandro L; Turco Liveri, Vincenzo

    2015-07-01

    Experimental investigations using mass spectrometry have established that surfactant molecules are able to form aggregates in the gas phase. However, there is no general consensus on the organization of these aggregates and how it depends on the aggregation number and surfactant molecular structure. In the present paper we investigate the structural organization of some surfactants in vacuo by molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations to widely explore the space of their possible conformations in vacuo. To study how the specific molecular features of such compounds affect their organization, we have considered as paradigmatic surfactants, the anionic single-chain sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the anionic double-chain sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) and the zwitterionic single-chain dodecyl phosphatidyl choline (DPC) within a wide aggregation number range (from 5 to 100). We observe that for low aggregation numbers the aggregates show in vacuo the typical structure of reverse micelles, while for large aggregation numbers a variety of globular aggregates occur that are characterized by the coexistence of interlaced domains formed by the polar or ionic heads and by the alkyl chains of the surfactants. Well-tempered metadynamics simulations allows us to confirm that the structural organizations obtained after 50 ns of molecular dynamics simulations are practically the equilibrium ones. Similarities and differences of surfactant aggregates in vacuo and in apolar media are also discussed. PMID:26050747

  11. A method for generating information of a 3-dimensional molecular structure of a molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flohil, J.A.; Wolf, M.G.; De Leeuw, S.W.

    2009-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for generating information of a 3 -dimensional molecular structure of a molecule, said method being executable by a computer under the control of a program stored in the computer, said method comprising the steps of : (a) receiving a 3 -dimensional represent

  12. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  13. Revealing structural and dynamical properties of high density lipoproteins through molecular simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koivuniemi, A.; Vattulainen, I.

    2012-01-01

    essentially atomistic considerations of HDL particles over microsecond time scales, thereby proving substantial added value to experimental research. In this article, we discuss recent highlights concerning the structure and dynamics of HDL particles as revealed by atomistic and coarse-grained molecular...

  14. Semiempirical Predictions of Chemical Degradation Reaction Mechanisms of CL-20 as Related to Molecular Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qasim, Mohammad M.; Furey, John; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Szecsody, Jim E.; Mcgrath, Chris J.; Bajpai, Rakesh

    2004-10-01

    Quantum mechanical methods and force field molecular mechanics were used to characterize cage cyclic nitramines and to predict environmental degradation mechanisms. Due to structural similarities it is predicted that, under homologous circumstances, the major environmental RDX degradation pathways should also be effective for CL-20 and similar cyclic nitramines.

  15. Refinement of homology-based protein structures by molecular dynamics simulation techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fan, H; Mark, AE

    2004-01-01

    The use of classical molecular dynamics simulations, performed in explicit water, for the refinement of structural models of proteins generated ab initio or based on homology has been investigated. The study involved a test set of 15 proteins that were previously used by Baker and coworkers to asses

  16. Fine tuning of the rotary motion by structural modification in light-driven unidirectional molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicario, J; Walko, M; Meetsma, A; Feringa, Ben L.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of bulky substituents at the stereogenic center of light-driven second-generation molecular motors results in an acceleration of the speed of rotation. This is due to a more strained structure with elongated C=C bonds and a higher energy level of the ground state relative to the tra

  17. Efficient 3D Kinetic Monte Carlo Method for Modeling of Molecular Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panshenskov, Mikhail; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly of molecular systems is an important and general problem that intertwines physics, chemistry, biology, and material sciences. Through understanding of the physical principles of self-organization, it often becomes feasible to control the process and to obtain complex structures...

  18. (TMTSF)2X materials and structural implications for low-dimensional polymeric and disordered molecular semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechgaard, Klaus; Nielsen, Martin Meedom; Krebs, Frederik C

    2000-01-01

    The structural characteristics and the relation to the electronic properties of three types of molecular materials are discussed. In TMTSF2X salts a triclinic unit cell it suggested to be important in avoiding a 2k(F) Peierls distortion. In polythiophenes appropriate ordering of microcrystallites...

  19. Structure and properties of simple molecular systems at very high density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of computer simulations in the study of molecular systems at very high density is reviewed. Applications to the thermodynamics of dense fluid nitrogen and phase transitions in solid oxygen are presented. The effects of changes in the atomic electronic structure on the equation of state of very dense helium are discussed. 19 refs., 2 figs

  20. Looking beyond Lewis Structures: A General Chemistry Molecular Modeling Experiment Focusing on Physical Properties and Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Cole, Renee S.; Sarkar, Somnath

    2011-01-01

    We present a guided-inquiry experiment using Spartan Student Version, ready to be adapted and implemented into a general chemistry laboratory course. The experiment provides students an experience with Spartan Molecular Modeling software while discovering the relationships between the structure and properties of molecules. Topics discussed within…

  1. The effect of molecular mass on the polymorphism and crystalline structure of isotactic polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study is devoted to the investigation of the effect of molecular mass on the α-, β- and γ-crystallization tendency of isotactic polypropylene (iPP. The crystalline structure was studied by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS and by polarised light microscopy (PLM. The melting and crystallization characteristics were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The results indicate clearly that iPP with low molecular mass crystallizes essentially in α-modification. However, it crystallizes in β-form in the presence of a highly efficient and selective β-nucleating agent. The α- and β-modifications form in wide molecular mass range. The decreasing molecular mass results in increased structural instability in both α- and β-modifications and consequently enhanced inclination to recrystallization during heating. The formation of γ-modification could not be observed, although some literature sources report that γ-form develops in iPP with low molecular mass.

  2. Theoretical Study of Donor - Spacer - Acceptor Structure Molecule for Molecular Rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kenji, Niimura; Belosludov, Rodion; Farajian, Amir; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2003-03-01

    Recently, the molecular electronics has attracted strong attention as a ``post-silicone technology'' to establish a future nanoscale electronic devices. To realize this molecular device, unimolecular rectifiering function is one of the most important constituents in nanotechnology [C. Majumder, H. Mizuseki, and Y. Kawazoe, Molecular Scale Rectifier: Theoretical Study, J. Phys. Chem. A, 105 (2001) 9454-9459.]. In the present study, the geometric and electronic structure of alkyl derivative C37H50N4O4 (PNX) molecule, (donor - spacer - acceptor), a leading candidate of molecular rectifying device, has been investigated theoretically using ab initio quantum mechanical calculation. The results suggest that in such donor-acceptor molecular complexes, while the lowest unoccupied orbital concentrates on the acceptor subunit, the highest occupied molecular orbital is localized on the donor subunit. The approximate potential differences for optimized PNX molecule have been estimated at the B3PW91/6-311g++(d,p) level of theory, which achieves quite good agreement with experimentally reported results. This study was performed through Special Coordination Funds for Promoting Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of the Japanese Government.

  3. Protein-protein structure prediction by scoring molecular dynamics trajectories of putative poses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarti, Edoardo; Gladich, Ivan; Zamuner, Stefano; Correia, Bruno E; Laio, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The prediction of protein-protein interactions and their structural configuration remains a largely unsolved problem. Most of the algorithms aimed at finding the native conformation of a protein complex starting from the structure of its monomers are based on searching the structure corresponding to the global minimum of a suitable scoring function. However, protein complexes are often highly flexible, with mobile side chains and transient contacts due to thermal fluctuations. Flexibility can be neglected if one aims at finding quickly the approximate structure of the native complex, but may play a role in structure refinement, and in discriminating solutions characterized by similar scores. We here benchmark the capability of some state-of-the-art scoring functions (BACH-SixthSense, PIE/PISA and Rosetta) in discriminating finite-temperature ensembles of structures corresponding to the native state and to non-native configurations. We produce the ensembles by running thousands of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent starting from poses generated by rigid docking and optimized in vacuum. We find that while Rosetta outperformed the other two scoring functions in scoring the structures in vacuum, BACH-SixthSense and PIE/PISA perform better in distinguishing near-native ensembles of structures generated by molecular dynamics in explicit solvent. Proteins 2016; 84:1312-1320. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27253756

  4. Structural characterization of interfacial n-octanol and 3-octanol using molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoleon, Raeanne L; Moore, Preston B

    2006-03-01

    Structurally isomeric octanol interfacial systems, water/vapor, 3-octanol/vapor, n-octanol/vapor, 3-octanol/water, and n-octanol/water are investigated at 298 K using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. The present study is intended to investigate strongly associated liquid/liquid interfaces and probe the atomistic structure of these interfaces. The octanol and water molecules were initially placed randomly into a box and were equilibrated using constant pressure techniques to minimize bias within the initial conditions as well as to fully sample the structural conformations of the interface. An interface formed via phase separation during equilibration and resulted in a slab geometry with a molecularly sharp interface. However, some water molecules remained within the octanol phase with a mole fraction of 0.12 after equilibration. The resulting "wet" octanol interfaces were analyzed using density profiles and orientational order parameters. Our results support the hypothesis of an ordered interface only 1 or 2 molecular layers deep before bulk properties are reached for both the 3-octanol and water systems. However, in contrast to most other interfacial systems studied by molecular dynamics simulations, the n-octanol interface extends for several molecular layers. The octanol hydroxyl groups form a hydrogen-bonding network with water which orders the surface molecules toward a preferred direction and produces a hydrophilic/hydrophobic layering. The ordered n-octanol produces an oscillating low-high density of oxygen atoms out of phase with a high-low density of carbon atoms, consistent with an oscillating dielectric. In contrast, the isomeric 3-octanol has only a single carbon-rich layer directly proximal to the interface, which is a result of the different molecular topology. Both 3-octanol and n-octanol roughen the water interface with respect to the water/vapor interface. The "wet" octanol phases, in the octanol/water systems reach bulk properties in a

  5. SGC method for predicting the standard enthalpy of formation of pure compounds from their molecular structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albahri, Tareq A., E-mail: toalbahri@gmail.com; Aljasmi, Abdulla F.

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: • ΔH°{sub f} is predicted from the molecular structure of the compounds alone. • ANN-SGC model predicts ΔH°{sub f} with a correlation coefficient of 0.99. • ANN-MNLR model predicts ΔH°{sub f} with a correlation coefficient of 0.90. • Better definition of the atom-type molecular groups is presented. • The method is better than others in terms of combined simplicity, accuracy and generality. - Abstract: A theoretical method for predicting the standard enthalpy of formation of pure compounds from various chemical families is presented. Back propagation artificial neural networks were used to investigate several structural group contribution (SGC) methods available in literature. The networks were used to probe the structural groups that have significant contribution to the overall enthalpy of formation property of pure compounds and arrive at the set of groups that can best represent the enthalpy of formation for about 584 substances. The 51 atom-type structural groups listed provide better definitions of group contributions than others in the literature. The proposed method can predict the standard enthalpy of formation of pure compounds with an AAD of 11.38 kJ/mol and a correlation coefficient of 0.9934 from only their molecular structure. The results are further compared with those of the traditional SGC method based on MNLR as well as other methods in the literature.

  6. Structure and mechanical characterization of DNA i-motif nanowires by molecular dynamics simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Raghvendra Pratap; Cleri, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    We studied the structure and mechanical properties of DNA i-motif nanowires by means of molecular dynamics computer simulations. We built up to 230 nm long nanowires, based on a repeated TC5 sequence from crystallographic data, fully relaxed and equilibrated in water. The unusual stacked C*C+ stacked structure, formed by four ssDNA strands arranged in an intercalated tetramer, is here fully characterized both statically and dynamically. By applying stretching, compression and bending deformation with the steered molecular dynamics and umbrella sampling methods, we extract the apparent Young's and bending moduli of the nanowire, as wel as estimates for the tensile strength and persistence length. According to our results, the i-motif nanowire shares similarities with structural proteins, as far as its tensile stiffness, but is closer to nucleic acids and flexible proteins, as far as its bending rigidity is concerned. Furthermore, thanks to its very thin cross section, the apparent tensile toughness is close to...

  7. Correlating Molecular Structures with Transport Dynamics in High-Efficiency Small-Molecule Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiajun; Chen, Yani; Wu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Qian; Kan, Bin; Chen, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yongsheng; Huang, Jia; Liang, Ziqi

    2015-06-24

    Efficient charge transport is a key step toward high efficiency in small-molecule organic photovoltaics. Here we applied time-of-flight and organic field-effect transistor to complementarily study the influences of molecular structure, trap states, and molecular orientation on charge transport of small-molecule DRCN7T (D1) and its analogue DERHD7T (D2). It is revealed that, despite the subtle difference of the chemical structures, D1 exhibits higher charge mobility, the absence of shallow traps, and better photosensitivity than D2. Moreover, charge transport is favored in the out-of-plane structure within D1-based organic solar cells, while D2 prefers in-plane charge transport.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Study of Carbon Nanotubes/Polyamide Reverse Osmosis Membranes: Polymerization, Structure, and Hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araki, Takumi; Cruz-Silva, Rodolfo; Tejima, Syogo; Takeuchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Takuya; Inukai, Shigeki; Noguchi, Toru; Tanioka, Akihiko; Kawaguchi, Takeyuki; Terrones, Mauricio; Endo, Morinobu

    2015-11-11

    Carbon nanotubes/polyamide (PA) nanocomposite thin films have become very attractive as reverse osmosis (RO) membranes. In this work, we used molecular dynamics to simulate the influence of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in the polyamide molecular structure as a model case of a carbon nanotubes/polyamide nanocomposite RO membrane. It was found that the addition of SWCNTs decreases the pore size of the composite membrane and increases the Na and Cl ion rejection. Analysis of the radial distribution function of water confined in the pores of the membranes shows that SWCNT+PA nanocomposite membranes also exhibit smaller clusters of water molecules within the membrane, thus suggesting a dense membrane structure (SWCNT+PA composite membranes were 3.9% denser than bare PA). The results provide new insights into the fabrication of novel membranes reinforced with tubular structures for enhanced desalination performance. PMID:26505521

  9. Structure-activity relationship study between baicalein and wogonin by spectrometry, molecular docking and microcalorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Bao; Li, Rong-Rong; Liu, Zhi-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Feng; Ouyang, Yu; Hu, Yan-Jun

    2016-10-01

    Flavones (e.g. baicalein and wogonin) extensively used worldwide in food preparation and traditional medicine. In this study, a systematically comparative study of their structure-activity relationships (SAR) on their interaction with BSA, antioxidant activity and antibacterial activity has been carried out by spectrometry, molecular docking and microcalorimetry. Our results show that the skeleton structure of flavones, the number of hydroxyl groups, the type of functional group, conjugated system and the steric hindrance may be responsible for their different biological activity. These findings not only would lay a scientific foundation for discovering and designing flavones-based food and drug, may also help us to understanding the structure-activity relationship between flavones at the molecular level. PMID:27132840

  10. Similarity boosted quantitative structure-activity relationship--a systematic study of enhancing structural descriptors by molecular similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girschick, Tobias; Almeida, Pedro R; Kramer, Stefan; Stålring, Jonna

    2013-05-24

    The concept of molecular similarity is one of the most central in the fields of predictive toxicology and quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) research. Many toxicological responses result from a multimechanistic process and, consequently, structural diversity among the active compounds is likely. Combining this knowledge, we introduce similarity boosted QSAR modeling, where we calculate molecular descriptors using similarities with respect to representative reference compounds to aid a statistical learning algorithm in distinguishing between different structural classes. We present three approaches for the selection of reference compounds, one by literature search and two by clustering. Our experimental evaluation on seven publicly available data sets shows that the similarity descriptors used on their own perform quite well compared to structural descriptors. We show that the combination of similarity and structural descriptors enhances the performance and that a simple stacking approach is able to use the complementary information encoded by the different descriptor sets to further improve predictive results. All software necessary for our experiments is available within the cheminformatics software framework AZOrange.

  11. Revision of the Crystal Structure of the First Molecular Polymorph in History

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer E.; van de Streek, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    Despite being the earliest reported case of polymorphism in a molecular crystal, the unstable form II of benzamide has thus far evaded thorough structural characterization because collection of experimental data at atomic resolution has proven extremely challenging. Using a highly validated...... computational crystal structure prediction (CSP) method based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory, we correctly predict the stable form I with the lowest energy among all sampled structures and its polytypic form III with slightly higher energy. From Rietveld refinement of selected CSP models...... against synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data of the historical polymorph, we are able to identify a subtle weakness in the available experimental data and arrive at a revised structure of form II. The revised crystal structure is the first benzamide structure to form catemers rather than dimers...

  12. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yajiang; Inhester, Ludger; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-07-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging. PMID:26798806

  13. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Yajiang; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  14. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajiang Hao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of silicate and borate glasses and melts : structure, diffusion dynamics and vibrational properties

    OpenAIRE

    Scherer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of silicate and borate glasses and melts: Structure, diffusion dynamics and vibrational properties. In this work computer simulations of the model glass formers SiO2 and B2O3 are presented, using the techniques of classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanical calculations, based on density functional theory (DFT). The latter limits the system size to about 100−200 atoms. SiO2 and B2O3 are the two most important network formers for industri...

  16. Theoretical Study of Copper Complexes: Molecular Structure, Properties, and Its Application to Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Baldenebro-Lopez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a theoretical investigation of copper complexes with potential applications as sensitizers for solar cells. The density functional theory (DFT and time-dependent DFT were utilized, using the M06 hybrid meta-GGA functional with the LANL2DZ (D95V on first row and DZVP basis sets. This level of calculation was used to find the optimized molecular structure, the absorption spectra, the molecular orbitals energies, and the chemical reactivity parameters that arise from conceptual DFT. Solvent effects have been taken into account by an implicit approach, namely, the polarizable continuum model (PCM, using the nonequilibrium version of the IEF-PCM model.

  17. The structure and molecular orientation of polytetrafluoroethylene coatings deposited from active gas phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structure of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coatings deposited on aluminium substrates was investigated by the method of attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). It has been shown experimentally that PTFE coatings deposited by the electron-beam dispersion method have molecular orientation and are ordered nonmonotonously during the process of coating growth. Maximum order and orientation of molecules along the normal to the substrate are observed in an interfacial layer located within up to 100 nm to the substrate. The observed morphological and orientation features of the formed layers were explained using the proposed adsorption-diffusion mechanism of polymer coating formation.

  18. Structural and Dynamic Properties of Amorphous Silicon:Tight-Binding Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Shi-Ping; WANG Wen-Chuan

    2004-01-01

    @@ The tight-binding molecular dynamics simulation has been performed to study structural and dynamical properties of amorphous silicon. It is found that the radial distribution function and static structure factor are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The bond order parameters Ql are sensitive to the structure change at different quenching rates. For the dynamical properties, we have calculated the vibration and electronic density of states. The simulation results show that the transverse acoustic is in good agreement with the experimental data, and the high frequency transverse optical (TO) peak shifts to the right of the experimental TO peak.

  19. History, Classification, Molecular Structure and Properties of Dendrimers which are a New Concept in Textile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman NAMIRTI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 20 years polymer chemistry has created a number of non-lineer structures and introduction of a large number of branches during the polymer synthesis leads to obtain molecules with many end groups. Two types of these polymers are regularly branched "dendrimers" and "hyperbranched polymers" where branching is formed randomly. In this article knowledge about history, classification, molecular structure and properties of dendrimers which have found various application areas also in textile due to their special structures is given.

  20. Demonstration of molecular beam epitaxy and a semiconducting band structure for I-Mn-V compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our ab initio theory calculations predict a semiconducting band structure of I-Mn-V compounds. We demonstrate on LiMnAs that high-quality materials with group-I alkali metals in the crystal structure can be grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Optical measurements on the LiMnAs epilayers are consistent with the theoretical electronic structure. Our calculations also reproduce earlier reports of high antiferromagnetic ordering temperature and predict large, spin-orbit-coupling-induced magnetic anisotropy effects. We propose a strategy for employing antiferromagnetic semiconductors in high-temperature semiconductor spintronics.

  1. Molecules and Models The molecular structures of main group element compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Haaland, Arne

    2008-01-01

    This book provides a systematic description of the molecular structures and bonding in simple compounds of the main group elements with particular emphasis on bond distances, bond energies and coordination geometries. The description includes the structures of hydrogen, halogen and methyl derivatives of the elements in each group, some of these molecules are ionic, some polar covalent. The survey of molecules whose structures conform to well-established trends is followed byrepresentative examples of molecules that do not conform. We also describe electron donor-acceptor and hydrogen bonded co

  2. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  3. THE ROTATING MOLECULAR STRUCTURES AND THE IONIZED OUTFLOW ASSOCIATED WITH IRAS 16547-4247

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Very Large Array 1.3 cm radio continuum and water maser observations as well as Submillimeter Array SO2 (226.300 GHz) and 1.3 mm dust continuum observations toward the massive star formation region IRAS 16547-4247. We find evidence of multiple sources in the central part of the region. There is evidence of a rotating structure associated with the most massive of these sources, traced at small scales (∼50 AU) by the water masers. At large scales (∼1000 AU), we find a velocity gradient in the SO2 molecular emission with a barely resolved structure that can be modeled as a rotating ring or two separate objects. The velocity gradients of the masers and of the molecular emission have the same sense and may trace the same structure at different size scales. The position angles of the structures associated with the velocity gradients are roughly perpendicular to the outflow axis observed in radio continuum and several molecular tracers. We estimate the mass of the most massive central source to be around 30 solar masses from the velocity gradient in the water maser emission. The main source of error in this estimate is the radius of the rotating structure. We also find water masers that are associated with the large-scale molecular outflow of the system, as well as water masers that are associated with other sources in the region. Our results suggest that the formation of this source, one of the most luminous protostars or protostellar clusters known, is taking place with the presence of ionized jets and disk-like structures.

  4. A Study on the Structure and Photodetachment Dynamics of Copper Based Molecular Anions Using Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrewe, Nicholas Stephen

    This dissertation represents a study of the effects of electron molecule interactions in the detachment and dissociation dynamics of copper based molecular anions. Results are presented on the photodetachment of small copper oxide CuOn-- (n = 1, 2) and copper fluoride CuFn-- (n = 1, 2) molecular anions. Effects of different resonances are explored using the photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) and the relative intensity variations in vibrational channel cross sections. The specific resonances studied include dipole bound resonances, in which the electric dipole moment of the neutral molecule captures the outgoing electron, and electronic Feshbach resonances, in which the anion undergoes absorption to an excited anion state (lying energetically above the neutral) followed by relaxation via autodetachment into the electronic continuum. In addition to electron scattering resonances, the effects of dissociation dynamics on linear CuO2-- are studied, wherein the linear anion isomer was found to dissociate to Cu-- fragments. This dissociation process is interpreted with experimental data acquired from nanosecond photoelectron images and a femtosecond time resolved study.

  5. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization: II. Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization and hyperfine-selective generation of molecular cations

    CERN Document Server

    Germann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) is a widely used technique for studying molecular photoionization and producing molecular cations for spectroscopy and dynamics studies. Here, we present a model for describing hyperfine-structure effects in the REMPI process and for predicting hyperfine populations in molecular ions produced by this method. This model is a generalization of our model for fine- and hyperfine- structure effects in one-photon ionization of molecules presented in the preceding companion article. This generalization is achieved by covering two main aspects: (1) treatment of the neutral bound-bound transition including hyperfine structure that makes up the first step of the REMPI process and (2) modification of our ionization model to account for anisotropic populations resulting from this first excitation step. Our findings may be used for analyzing results from experiments with molecular ions produced by REMPI and may serve as a theoretical background for hyperfine-selective ioni...

  6. Diversity, population structure, and individual behaviour of parasitoids as seen using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nouhuys, Saskya

    2016-04-01

    Parasitoids have long been models for host-parasite interactions, and are important in biological control. Neutral molecular markers have become increasingly accessible tools, revealing previously unknown parasitoid diversity. Thus, insect communities are now seen as more speciose. They have also been found to be more complex, based on trophic links detected using bits of parasitoid DNA in hosts, and host DNA in adult parasitoids. At the population level molecular markers are used to determine the influence of factors such as host dynamics on parasitoid population structure. Finally, at the individual level, they are used to identify movement of individuals. Overall molecular markers greatly increase the value of parasitoid samples collected, for both basic and applied research, at all levels of study. PMID:27436653

  7. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S.; Schreiber, Kathrin; Pröpper, Kevin; Becker, Stefan; Usón, Isabel; Sheldrick, George M.; Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph; Steinfeld, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder. PMID:24816101

  8. Unoccupied electronic structure and molecular orientation of rubrene; from evaporated films to single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueba, T.; Park, J.; Terawaki, R.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamada, T.; Munakata, T.

    2016-07-01

    Two-photon photoemission (2PPE) spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) have been performed for rubrene single crystals and evaporated thin films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The changes in the 2PPE intensity from the single crystals by the polarization of the light and by the angle of the light incident plane against the crystalline axes indicate that the molecular arrangement on the surface is similar to that in the bulk crystal. On the other hand, in the case of evaporated films, the polarization dependence of 2PPE indicates that the tetracene backbone becomes standing upright as the thickness increases. In spite of the alignment of molecules, the broadened 2PPE spectral features for thick films suggest that the films are amorphous and molecules are in largely different environments. The film structures are confirmed by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) derived levels of the single crystal are shifted by + 0.18 and - 0.20 eV, respectively, from those of the 0.8 ML film. The shifts are attributed to the packing density of molecules. It is shown that the unoccupied electronic structure is more sensitively affected by the film structure than the occupied electronic structure.

  9. Molecular dynamics studies on the structural stability of wild-type dog prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiapu; Liu, David D W

    2011-06-01

    Prion diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases, Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, Fatal Familial Insomnia, Kuru in humans, scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or 'mad-cow' disease) and chronic wasting disease in cattle are invariably fatal and highly infectious neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. However, by now there have not been some effective therapeutic approaches to treat all these prion diseases. In 2008, canine mammals including dogs (canis familials) were the first time academically reported to be resistant to prion diseases (Vaccine 26: 2601-2614 (2008)). Thus, it is very worth studying the molecular structures of dog prion protein to obtain insights into the immunity of dogs to prion diseases. This paper studies the molecular structural dynamics of wild-type dog prion protein. The comparison analyses with rabbit prion protein show that the dog prion protein has stable molecular structures whether under neutral or low pH environments. We also find that the salt bridges such as D177-R163 contribute to the structural stability of wild-type rabbit prion protein under neutral pH environment. PMID:21469747

  10. Method for predicting the standard net heat of combustion for pure hydrocarbons from their molecular structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • QSPR method predicts ΔHc∘ of pure hydrocarbons from their molecular structures alone. • The method is better than others in terms of simplicity and accuracy. • ΔHc∘ is calculated using a simple correlation. • The calculated values of 32 atom-type groups predict ΔHc∘ with 0.71% error and 0.998 R2. • The method is notable for being the first to predict ΔHc∘ of hydrocarbon isomers. - Abstract: A group contribution method is used to predict the standard net heat of combustion of pure hydrocarbons from their molecular structures. A multivariable nonlinear regression based on the least square method was used to arrive at a set of 32 atom-type structural groups that can best represent the standard net heat of combustion for about 452 pure hydrocarbon substances. The proposed method is very simple, requires no experimental data, and can predict the standard net heat of combustion from the knowledge of the molecular structure alone with an average absolute error of 0.71% and a correlation coefficient of 0.9982. The method can predict the standard net heat of combustion of hydrocarbon isomers as well

  11. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder

  12. Structure of sulfamidase provides insight into the molecular pathology of mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, Navdeep S. [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Schreiber, Kathrin [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany); Pröpper, Kevin [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Becker, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Am Fassberg 11, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Usón, Isabel [Instituto de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona (IBMB–CSIC), Barcelona Science Park, Baldiri Reixach 15, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), (Spain); Sheldrick, George M. [University of Göttingen, Tammannstrasse 4, 37077 Göttingen (Germany); Gärtner, Jutta; Krätzner, Ralph, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de; Steinfeld, Robert, E-mail: rkraetz@gwdg.de [University of Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Strasse 40, 37075 Göttingen (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIA is a fatal neurodegenerative disease that typically manifests itself in childhood and is caused by mutations in the gene for the lysosomal enzyme sulfamidase. The first structure of this enzyme is presented, which provides insight into the molecular basis of disease-causing mutations, and the enzymatic mechanism is proposed. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA (Sanfilippo A syndrome), a fatal childhood-onset neurodegenerative disease with mild facial, visceral and skeletal abnormalities, is caused by an inherited deficiency of the enzyme N-sulfoglucosamine sulfohydrolase (SGSH; sulfamidase). More than 100 mutations in the SGSH gene have been found to reduce or eliminate its enzymatic activity. However, the molecular understanding of the effect of these mutations has been confined by a lack of structural data for this enzyme. Here, the crystal structure of glycosylated SGSH is presented at 2 Å resolution. Despite the low sequence identity between this unique N-sulfatase and the group of O-sulfatases, they share a similar overall fold and active-site architecture, including a catalytic formylglycine, a divalent metal-binding site and a sulfate-binding site. However, a highly conserved lysine in O-sulfatases is replaced in SGSH by an arginine (Arg282) that is positioned to bind the N-linked sulfate substrate. The structure also provides insight into the diverse effects of pathogenic mutations on SGSH function in mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIA and convincing evidence for the molecular consequences of many missense mutations. Further, the molecular characterization of SGSH mutations will lay the groundwork for the development of structure-based drug design for this devastating neurodegenerative disorder.

  13. Molecular dynamics simulation of the structure and dynamics of 5-HT3 serotonin receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, M. Yu.; Popinako, A. V.; Prokopiev, G. A.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, we investigated structure, dynamics and ion transportation in transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 serotonin receptor. High-resolution (0.35 nm) structure of the 5-HT3 receptor in complex with stabilizing nanobodies was determined by protein crystallography in 2014 (Protein data bank (PDB) code 4PIR). Transmembrane domain of the structure was prepared in complex with explicit membrane environment (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC)) and solvent (TIP3P water model). Molecular dynamics protocols for simulation and stabilization of the transmembrane domain of the 5-HT3 receptor model were developed and 60 ns simulation of the structure was conducted in order to explore structural parameters of the system. We estimated the mean force profile for Na+ ions using umbrella sampling method.

  14. Correlation between Molecular Structures and Relative Electrophoretic Mobility in Capillary Electrophoresis: Alkylpyridines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO, Xiao-Jun; FAN, Bo-Tao; DOUCET, J. P.; PANAYE, A.; LIU, Man-Cang; ZHANG, Rui-Sheng; HU, Zhi-De

    2003-01-01

    The quantitative relationship between relative electrophoretic mobility in capillary electrophoresis for a series of 31 closely related alkylpyridines and their molecular structures was studied by using CODESSA. According to the t-test on the results, we found that the three most important descriptors affecting the mobility are the relative number of rings (NR), Min e-n attraction for a C-N bond (MEN) and average complementary information index (ACIC). With these structure descriptors a good three-parameter linear model was developed to correlate the mobility of these compounds with their structures. This model can not only correctly predict the migration behavior of these compounds, but also find the structural factors which are responsible for the migration behavior of these compounds,thus can help to explain the separation mechanism of these compounds. The method used in this work can also be extended to the mobility-structure relationship research of other compounds.

  15. Predicting anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols using molecular docking and quantitative structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianhai; Liu, Huihui; Yang, Qian; Liu, Jining; Chen, Jingwen; Shi, Lili

    2016-11-01

    Both in vivo and in vitro assay indicated that bisphenols can inhibit the androgen receptor. However, the underlying antagonistic mechanism is unclear. In this study, molecular docking was employed to probe the interaction mechanism between bisphenols and human androgen receptor (hAR). The binding pattern of ligands in hAR crystal structures was also analyzed. Results show that hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions are the dominant interactions between the ligands and hAR. The critical amino acid residues involved in forming hydrogen bonding between bisphenols and hAR is Asn 705 and Gln 711. Furthermore, appropriate molecular structural descriptors were selected to characterize the non-bonded interactions. Stepwise multiple linear regressions (MLR) analysis was employed to develop quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for predicting the anti-androgenic activity of bisphenols. Based on the QSAR development and validation guideline issued by OECD, the goodness-of-fit, robustness and predictive ability of constructed QSAR model were assessed. The model application domain was characterized by the Euclidean distance and Williams plot. The mechanisms of the constructed model were also interpreted based on the selected molecular descriptors i.e. the number of hydroxyl groups (nROH), the most positive values of the molecular surface potential (Vs,max) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (ELUMO). Finally, based on the model developed, the data gap for other twenty-six bisphenols on their anti-androgenic activity was filled. The predicted results indicated that the anti-androgenic activity of seven bisphenols was higher than that of bisphenol A. PMID:27561732

  16. A general protocol for determining the structures of molecularly ordered but noncrystalline silicate frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwer, Darren H; Cadars, Sylvian; Eckert, Juergen; Liu, Zheng; Terasaki, Osamu; Chmelka, Bradley F

    2013-04-17

    A general protocol is demonstrated for determining the structures of molecularly ordered but noncrystalline solids, which combines constraints provided by X-ray diffraction (XRD), one- and two-dimensional solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and first-principles quantum chemical calculations. The approach is used to determine the structure(s) of a surfactant-directed layered silicate with short-range order in two dimensions but without long-range periodicity in three-dimensions (3D). The absence of long-range 3D molecular order and corresponding indexable XRD reflections precludes determination of a space group for this layered silicate. Nevertheless, by combining structural constraints obtained from solid-state (29)Si NMR analyses, including the types and relative populations of distinct (29)Si sites, their respective (29)Si-O-(29)Si connectivities and separation distances, with unit cell parameters (though not space group symmetry) provided by XRD, a comprehensive search of candidate framework structures leads to the identification of a small number of candidate structures that are each compatible with all of the experimental data. Subsequent refinement of the candidate structures using density functional theory calculations allows their evaluation and identification of "best" framework representations, based on their respective lattice energies and quantitative comparisons between experimental and calculated (29)Si isotropic chemical shifts and (2)J((29)Si-O-(29)Si) scalar couplings. The comprehensive analysis identifies three closely related and topologically equivalent framework configurations that are in close agreement with all experimental and theoretical structural constraints. The subtle differences among such similar structural models embody the complexity of the actual framework(s), which likely contain coexisting or subtle distributions of structural order that are intrinsic to the material. PMID:23560776

  17. Effect of shampoo, conditioner and permanent waving on the molecular structure of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Alsop, Richard J; Soomro, Asfia; Yang, Fei-Chi; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-01-01

    The hair is a filamentous biomaterial consisting of the cuticle, the cortex and the medulla, all held together by the cell membrane complex. The cortex mostly consists of helical keratin proteins that spiral together to form coiled-coil dimers, intermediate filaments, micro-fibrils and macro-fibrils. We used X-ray diffraction to study hair structure on the molecular level, at length scales between ∼3-90 Å, in hopes of developing a diagnostic method for diseases affecting hair structure allowing for fast and noninvasive screening. However, such an approach can only be successful if common hair treatments do not affect molecular hair structure. We found that a single use of shampoo and conditioner has no effect on packing of keratin molecules, structure of the intermediate filaments or internal lipid composition of the membrane complex. Permanent waving treatments are known to break and reform disulfide linkages in the hair. Single application of a perming product was found to deeply penetrate the hair and reduce the number of keratin coiled-coils and change the structure of the intermediate filaments. Signals related to the coiled-coil structure of the α-keratin molecules at 5 and 9.5 Å were found to be decreased while a signal associated with the organization of the intermediate filaments at 47 Å was significantly elevated in permed hair. Both these observations are related to breaking of the bonds between two coiled-coil keratin dimers. PMID:26557428

  18. Effect of shampoo, conditioner and permanent waving on the molecular structure of human hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuchen; Alsop, Richard J; Soomro, Asfia; Yang, Fei-Chi; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-01-01

    The hair is a filamentous biomaterial consisting of the cuticle, the cortex and the medulla, all held together by the cell membrane complex. The cortex mostly consists of helical keratin proteins that spiral together to form coiled-coil dimers, intermediate filaments, micro-fibrils and macro-fibrils. We used X-ray diffraction to study hair structure on the molecular level, at length scales between ∼3-90 Å, in hopes of developing a diagnostic method for diseases affecting hair structure allowing for fast and noninvasive screening. However, such an approach can only be successful if common hair treatments do not affect molecular hair structure. We found that a single use of shampoo and conditioner has no effect on packing of keratin molecules, structure of the intermediate filaments or internal lipid composition of the membrane complex. Permanent waving treatments are known to break and reform disulfide linkages in the hair. Single application of a perming product was found to deeply penetrate the hair and reduce the number of keratin coiled-coils and change the structure of the intermediate filaments. Signals related to the coiled-coil structure of the α-keratin molecules at 5 and 9.5 Å were found to be decreased while a signal associated with the organization of the intermediate filaments at 47 Å was significantly elevated in permed hair. Both these observations are related to breaking of the bonds between two coiled-coil keratin dimers.

  19. Univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses of lipid related molecular structural components in relation to nutrient profile in feed and food mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeysekara, Saman; Damiran, Daalkhaijav; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-02-01

    The objectives of this study were (i) to determine lipid related molecular structures components (functional groups) in feed combination of cereal grain (barley, Hordeum vulgare) and wheat (Triticum aestivum) based dried distillers grain solubles (wheat DDGSs) from bioethanol processing at five different combination ratios using univariate and multivariate molecular spectral analyses with infrared Fourier transform molecular spectroscopy, and (ii) to correlate lipid-related molecular-functional structure spectral profile to nutrient profiles. The spectral intensity of (i) CH3 asymmetric, CH2 asymmetric, CH3 symmetric and CH2 symmetric groups, (ii) unsaturation (Cdbnd C) group, and (iii) carbonyl ester (Cdbnd O) group were determined. Spectral differences of functional groups were detected by hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results showed that the combination treatments significantly inflicted modifications (P molecular spectral intensity (CH2 asymmetric stretching peak height, CH2 symmetric stretching peak height, ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak area). Ratio of CH2 to CH3 symmetric stretching peak intensity, and carbonyl peak significantly correlated with nutrient profiles. Both PCA and HCA differentiated lipid-related spectrum. In conclusion, the changes of lipid molecular structure spectral profiles through feed combination could be detected using molecular spectroscopy. These changes were associated with nutrient profiles and functionality.

  20. A nitrogen-vacancy spin based molecular structure microscope using multiplexed projection reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Lazariev, Andrii

    2015-01-01

    Methods and techniques to measure and image beyond the state-of-the-art have always been influential in propelling basic science and technology. Because current technologies are venturing into nanoscopic and molecular-scale fabrication, atomic-scale measurement techniques are inevitable. One such emerging sensing method uses the spins associated with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. The uniqueness of this NV sensor is its atomic size and ability to perform precision sensing under ambient conditions conveniently using light and microwaves (MW). These advantages have unique applications in nanoscale sensing and imaging of magnetic fields from nuclear spins in single biomolecules. During the last few years, several encouraging results have emerged towards the realization of an NV spin-based molecular structure microscope. Here, we present a projection-reconstruction method that retrieves the three-dimensional structure of a single molecule from the nuclear spin noise signatures. We validate this method ...

  1. Molecular structure in correlation with electrochemical properties of mixed-ligand cobalt(III complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. BABIĆ-SAMARDZIJA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Four mixed-ligand cobalt(III complexes (1–4 of the general formula [Co(Rdtccyclam](ClO42 and [Co(Raccyclam](ClO42 (cyclam = 1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane; Rdtc = thiomorpholine-(Timdtc or 2-methylpiperidine-(2-Mepipdtc dithiocarbamates; Rac = 1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-pentanedionato (Hfac or 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato (Tmhd, respectively were electro­chemically examined on a glassy carbon and an iron electrode in perchloric acid solution. The obtained results showed the influence of these complexes on hydrogen evolution, the oxygen reduction reaction and iron dissolution. The exhibited effects of the complexes on these reactions depend on structure related to the bidentate dithiocarbamato or b-diketonato ligand. The electrochemical properties of the complexes were correlated with molecular structure and parameters derived from spectral analysis and molecular modeling.

  2. Equilibrium and dynamics of ionic solutions and molten salts: from the primitive model to molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this HDR (Accreditation to supervise researches) thesis, the author first recalls his research thesis work which addressed the study of structural properties of simple electrolyte solutions by neutron scattering and interpretation by using integral equations of statistic mechanics. He also evokes other related research works he supervised, and more recent research works he performed on a GDR Practis issue (the solubility of ionic compounds) in collaboration with German and Italian researchers. Thus, the author describes how his scientific activity has known a double evolution: on the experimental point of view (determination of scattering coefficients on long durations), and on the modelling point of view (transition from a model based on a continuous solvent to a model based on molecular structures, which meant a transition from integral equations of Brownian dynamics to a molecular dynamics)

  3. Crystal and Molecular Structure of N-(Pyridin-2-yl- carbonyl)-2-ethoxycarbonyl-benzene sulfonamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜林; 李正名; 翁林红; 冷雪冰

    2002-01-01

    The crystal and molecular structures of the title compound (C15H14N2O5S, Mr = 334.34) were determined by X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure is of triclinic, space group P ī with a = 7.306(1), b = 7.933(1), c =14.146(2) ? , ( = 81.95, ( = 80.28, ( = 72.92°, V = 768.9(2) ?3, Z = 2, Dc = 1.444 g/cm3 , μ= 0.238mm-1, F(000) = 348, S = 1.033, the final R = 0.0453 and wR = 0.1181 for 2704 observed reflections with I >2((I). In the molecule there are three different planes. In each of them a conjugated system is formed. The intra-molecular hydrogen bond between N and H atoms was ascertained and a five-membered ring including hydrogen bond is formed.

  4. Molecular Weight and Proposed Structure of the Angelica sinensis Polysaccharide-iron Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Kai-Ping; CHEN,Zhi-Xiang; ZHANG,Yu; WANG,Pei-Pei; WANG,Ji-Hong; DAI,Li-Quan

    2008-01-01

    The molecular weight and the proposed structure of the Angelica sinensis polysaccharide-iron complex (APIC) were studied.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,X-ray powder diffraction,differential scanning calorimetry,transmission electron microscopy,electron paramagnetic resonance,thermogravimetric analysis,atomic force microscopy,and gel filtration chromatography were used to characterize APIC,which is a macromolecule complex composed of Angelica sinensis polysaccharide (ASP) and iron.The structure of APIC was proposed to be a polynuclear ferrihydrite core chelated firmly by an encircling framework of ASP chains,forming a core molecule,which is surrounded by a removable outer protective sheath of colloidal ASP.And the molecular formula of APIC was proposed to be { [(Fe2O3·2.2H2O)1043(ASP)32](ASP)12 },with MW=270000 Da.

  5. Density functional theory study of the structural, electronic, lattice dynamical, and thermodynamic properties of Li4SiO4 and its capability for CO2 capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Yuhua; Parlinski, K.

    2011-01-01

    The structural, electronic, lattice dynamical, optical, thermodynamic, and CO{sub 2} capture properties of monoclinic and triclinic phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are investigated by combining density functional theory with phonon lattice dynamics calculations. We found that these two phases have some similarities in their bulk and thermodynamic properties. The calculated bulk modulus and the cohesive energies of these two phases are close to each other. Although both of them are insulators, the monoclinic phase of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} has a direct band gap of 5.24 eV while the triclinic Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} phase has an indirect band gap of 4.98 eV. In both phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, the s orbital of O mainly contributes to the lower-energy second valence band (VB{sub 2}) and the p orbitals contribute to the fist valence band (VB{sub 1}) and the conduction bands (CBs). The s orbital of Si mainly contributes to the lower portions of the VB1 and VB{sub 2}, and Si p orbitals mainly contribute to the higher portions of the VB{sub 1} and VB{sub 2}. The s and p orbitals of Li contribute to both VBs and to CBs, and Li p orbitals have a higher contribution than the Li s orbital. There is possibly a phonon soft mode existing in triclinic {gamma}-Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}; in the monoclinic Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, there are three phonon soft modes, which correspond to the one type of Li disordered over a few sites. Their LO-TO splitting indicates that both phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} are polar anisotropic materials. The calculated infrared absorption spectra for LO and TO modes are different for these two phases of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}. The calculated relationships of the chemical potential versus temperature and CO{sub 2} pressure for reaction of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} with CO{sub 2} shows that Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} could be a good candidate for a high-temperature CO{sub 2} sorbent while used for postcombustion capture technology.

  6. Molecular Simulation Study on the Influence of Dimethylsulfoxide on the Structure of Phospholipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Sum, Amadeu K.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayer/water systems were performed in the presence of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) at 2, 5, 10, and 100 mol % DMSO (lipid-free basis). The equilibrium structure and several dynamic properties were determined for these systems. Results show that DMSO penetrates much deeper into the bilayer than water does. It is also found that DMSO molecules do not interact with the polar groups of the lipid headgroup, but exhibit a p...

  7. Effect of water vapour on the molecular structures of supported vanadium oxide catalysts at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehng, Jih-Mirn; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of water vapor on the molecular structures of V2O3-supported catalysts (SiO2, Al2o3, TiO2, and CeO2) was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of temperature (from 500°C to 120°C). Under dry conditions only isolated surface VO4 species are present on the dehydrated SiO2

  8. Mesoscopic superposition and sub-Planck-scale structure in molecular wave packets

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Suranjana; Chiruvelli, Aravind; Banerji, J.; P. K. Panigrahi

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of realizing sub-Planck-scale structures in the mesoscopic superposition of molecular wave packets involving vibrational levels. The time evolution of the wave packet, taken here as the SU(2) coherent state of the Morse potential describing hydrogen iodide molecules, produces macroscopicquantum- superposition-like states, responsible for the above phenomenon. We investigate the phase-space dynamics of the coherent state through the Wigner function approach and i...

  9. Molecular and crystal structure of liquid crystalline p-octyloxyphenyl p′-pentyloxybenzoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystal and molecular structure of p-octyloxyphenyl p′-pentyloxybenzoate C5H11-O-C6H4-C(O)-O-C6H4-O-C8H17, which forms a nematic mesophase upon melting, was determined by X-ray diffraction. There is one system of weak directional intermolecular C-H…π interactions responsible for the formation of the nematic phase in these crystals.

  10. Solution structure of copper ion-induced molecular aggregates of tyrosine melanin.

    OpenAIRE

    Gallas, J M; Littrell, K. C.; Seifert, S; Zajac, G W; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1999-01-01

    Melanin, the ubiquitous biological pigment, provides photoprotection by efficient filtration of light and also by its antioxidant behavior. In solutions of synthetic melanin, both optical and antioxidant behavior are affected by the aggregation states of melanin. We have utilized small-angle x-ray and neutron scattering to determine the molecular dimensions of synthetic tyrosine melanin in its unaggregated state in D(2)O and H(2)O to study the structure of melanin aggregates formed in the pre...

  11. Structural insights into the molecular ruler mechanism of the endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase ERAP1

    OpenAIRE

    Amit Gandhi; Damodharan Lakshminarasimhan; Yixin Sun; Hwai-Chen Guo

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) is an essential component of the immune system, because it trims peptide precursors and generates the N--restricted epitopes. To examine ERAP1's unique properties of length- and sequence-dependent processing of antigen precursors, we report a 2.3 Å resolution complex structure of the ERAP1 regulatory domain. Our study reveals a binding conformation of ERAP1 to the carboxyl terminus of a peptide, and thus provides direct evidence for the molecular...

  12. Ultra-spatial synchrotron radiation for imaging molecular chemical structure: Applications in plant and animal studies

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Peiqiang

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (S-FTIR) has been developed as a rapid, direct, non-destructive, bioanalytical technique. This technique takes advantage of synchrotron light brightness and small effective source size and is capable of exploring the molecular chemical features and make-up within microstructures of a biological tissue without destruction of inherent structures at ultra-spatial resolutions within cellular dimension. To date there has been very litt...

  13. PASBio: predicate-argument structures for event extraction in molecular biology

    OpenAIRE

    Shah Parantu K; Wattarujeekrit Tuangthong; Collier Nigel

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background The exploitation of information extraction (IE), a technology aiming to provide instances of structured representations from free-form text, has been rapidly growing within the molecular biology (MB) research community to keep track of the latest results reported in literature. IE systems have traditionally used shallow syntactic patterns for matching facts in sentences but such approaches appear inadequate to achieve high accuracy in MB event extraction due to complex sen...

  14. X-ray diffraction and molecular-dynamics studies: Structural analysis of phases in diglyceride monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Larsen, Niels Bent; Bjørnholm, T.;

    1998-01-01

    We report a detailed structural analysis of the phases of 1,2-sn-dipalmitoylglycerol Langmuir monolayers at room temperature. Pressure-induced transitions have been investigated by combination of molecular-dynamics simulations and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (XRD). The diglyceride film un...... indicate that in the simulated monolayer the finite size with periodic boundary conditions imposes a higher degree of order....

  15. Unravelling the Structural and Molecular Basis Responsible for the Anti-Biofilm Activity of Zosteric Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina Cattò; Silvia Dell'Orto; Federica Villa; Stefania Villa; Arianna Gelain; Alberto Vitali; Valeria Marzano; Sara Baroni; Fabio Forlani; Francesca Cappitelli

    2015-01-01

    The natural compound zosteric acid, or p-(sulfoxy)cinnamic acid (ZA), is proposed as an alternative biocide-free agent suitable for preventive or integrative anti-biofilm approaches. Despite its potential, the lack of information concerning the structural and molecular mechanism of action involved in its anti-biofilm activity has limited efforts to generate more potent anti-biofilm strategies. In this study a 43-member library of small molecules based on ZA scaffold diversity was designed and...

  16. Electrotunable friction with ionic liquid lubricants: how important is the molecular structure of the ions?

    OpenAIRE

    Fajardo, O. Y.; Bresme, Fernando; Kornyshev, Alexei A.; Urbakh, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations and a coarse grained model of ionic liquids, we have investigated the impact that the shape and the intramolecular charge distribution of the ions have on the electrotuneable friction with ionic-liquid nanoscale films. We show that the electric-field induces significant structural changes in the film, leading to dramatic modifications of the friction force. Comparison of the present work with previous studies using different models of ionic...

  17. Molecular Modeling of the Three-Dimensional Structure of Human Sphingomyelin Synthase%Molecular Modeling of the Three-Dimensional Structure of Human Sphingomyelin Synthase

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张亚; 林赋; 邓晓东; 王任小; 叶德泳

    2011-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) produces sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol from ceramide and phosphatidyl- choline. It plays an important role in cell survival and apoptosis, inflammation, and lipid homeostasis, and therefore has been noticed in recent years as a novel potential drug target. In this study, we combined homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and normal mode analysis to derive a three-dimensional struc- ture of human sphingomyelin synthase (hSMS 1) in complex with sphingomyelin. Our model provides a reasonable explanation on the catalytic mechanism of hSMS 1. It can also explain the high selectivity of hSMS 1 towards phos- phocholine and sphingomyelin as well as some other known experimental results about hSMS1. Moreover, we also derived a complex model of D609, the only known small-molecule inhibitor of hSMS 1 so far. Our hSMS 1 model may serve as a reasonable structural basis for the discovery of more effective small-molecule inhibitors of hSMS 1.

  18. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Hiroki, E-mail: matsubara@microheat.ifs.tohoku.ac.jp; Kikugawa, Gota; Ohara, Taku [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji [Higashifuji Technical Center, Toyota Motor Corporation, 1200 Mishuku, Susono, Shizuoka 410-1193 (Japan)

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7T{sub c}) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs.

  19. Effects of molecular structure on microscopic heat transport in chain polymer liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Hiroki; Kikugawa, Gota; Bessho, Takeshi; Yamashita, Seiji; Ohara, Taku

    2015-04-28

    In this paper, we discuss the molecular mechanism of the heat conduction in a liquid, based on nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of a systematic series of linear- and branched alkane liquids, as a continuation of our previous study on linear alkane [T. Ohara et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034507 (2011)]. The thermal conductivities for these alkanes in a saturated liquid state at the same reduced temperature (0.7Tc) obtained from the simulations are compared in relation to the structural difference of the liquids. In order to connect the thermal energy transport characteristics with molecular structures, we introduce the new concept of the interatomic path of heat transfer (atomistic heat path, AHP), which is defined for each type of inter- and intramolecular interaction. It is found that the efficiency of intermolecular AHP is sensitive to the structure of the first neighbor shell, whereas that of intramolecular AHP is similar for different alkane species. The dependence of thermal conductivity on different lengths of the main and side chain can be understood from the natures of these inter- and intramolecular AHPs. PMID:25933776

  20. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Allen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  1. The molecular clock of neutral evolution can be accelerated or slowed by asymmetric spatial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Benjamin; Sample, Christine; Dementieva, Yulia; Medeiros, Ruben C; Paoletti, Christopher; Nowak, Martin A

    2015-02-01

    Over time, a population acquires neutral genetic substitutions as a consequence of random drift. A famous result in population genetics asserts that the rate, K, at which these substitutions accumulate in the population coincides with the mutation rate, u, at which they arise in individuals: K = u. This identity enables genetic sequence data to be used as a "molecular clock" to estimate the timing of evolutionary events. While the molecular clock is known to be perturbed by selection, it is thought that K = u holds very generally for neutral evolution. Here we show that asymmetric spatial population structure can alter the molecular clock rate for neutral mutations, leading to either Ku. Our results apply to a general class of haploid, asexually reproducing, spatially structured populations. Deviations from K = u occur because mutations arise unequally at different sites and have different probabilities of fixation depending on where they arise. If birth rates are uniform across sites, then K ≤ u. In general, K can take any value between 0 and Nu. Our model can be applied to a variety of population structures. In one example, we investigate the accumulation of genetic mutations in the small intestine. In another application, we analyze over 900 Twitter networks to study the effect of network topology on the fixation of neutral innovations in social evolution.

  2. Resolving detailed molecular structures in complex organic mixtures and modeling their secondary organic aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin A. S.; Zhuang, Yang R.; Amirav, Aviv; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) remains an ongoing challenge towards developing detailed and accurate inputs for modeling secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Traditional techniques based on gas chromatography/electron impact-mass spectrometry induce excessive fragmentation, making it difficult to speciate and quantify isomers precisely. The goal of this study is to identify individual organic isomers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB-GC/MS, also known as GC/MS with Cold EI) and to incorporate speciated isomers into an SOA model that accounts for the specific structures elucidated. Two samples containing atmospherically relevant UCMs are analyzed. The relative isomer distributions exhibit remarkably consistent trends across a wide range of carbon numbers. Constitutional isomers of different alkanes are speciated and individually quantified as linear, branched - for the first time by position of branching - multiply branched, or unsaturated - by degree of ring substitution and number of rings. Relative amounts of exact molecular structures are used as input parameters in an SOA box model to study the effects of molecular structures on SOA yields and volatility evolution. Highly substituted cyclic, mono-substituted cyclic, and linear species have the highest SOA yields while branched alkanes formed the least SOA. The rate of functionalization of a representative UCM is found to be in agreement with current volatility basis set (VBS) parameterizations based on detailed knowledge of composition and known oxidation mechanisms, confirming the validity of VBS parameters currently used in air quality models.

  3. The structural molecular biology network of the State of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João A.R.G. Barbosa

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the achievements of the Structural Molecular Biology Network (SMolBNet, a collaborative program of structural molecular biology, centered in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, and supported by São Paulo State Funding Agency (FAPESP. It gathers twenty scientific groups and is coordinated by the scientific staff of the Center of Structural Molecular Biology, at the National Laboratory of Synchrotron Light (LNLS, in Campinas. The SMolBNet program has been aimed at 1 solving the structure of proteins of interest related to the research projects of the groups. In some cases, the choice has been to select proteins of unknown function or of possible novel structure obtained from the sequenced genomes of the FAPESP genomic program; 2 providing the groups with training in all the steps of the protein structure determination: gene cloning, protein expression, protein purification, protein crystallization and structure determination. Having begun in 2001, the program has been successful in both aims. Here, four groups reveal their participation in the program and describe the structural aspects of the proteins they have selected to study.Esse artigo descreve realizações do Programa SMolBNet (Rede de Biologia Molecular Estrutural do Estado de São Paulo, apoiado pela FAPESP (Fundação de Apoio à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo. Ele reúne vinte grupos de pesquisa e é coordenado pelos pesquisadores do Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS, em Campinas. O Programa SMolBNet tem como metas: Elucidar a estrutura tridimensional de proteínas de interesse aos grupos de pesquisa componentes do Programa; Prover os grupos com treinamento em todas as etapas de determinação de estrutura: clonagem gênica, expressão de proteínas, purificação de proteínas, cristalização de proteínas e elucidação de suas estruturas. Tendo começado em 2001, o Programa alcançou sucesso em ambas as metas. Neste artigo, quatro dos grupos

  4. FlaME: Flash Molecular Editor - a 2D structure input tool for the web

    OpenAIRE

    Dallakian Pavel; Haider Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background So far, there have been no Flash-based web tools available for chemical structure input. The authors herein present a feasibility study, aiming at the development of a compact and easy-to-use 2D structure editor, using Adobe's Flash technology and its programming language, ActionScript. As a reference model application from the Java world, we selected the Java Molecular Editor (JME). In this feasibility study, we made an attempt to realize a subset of JME's functionality i...

  5. Molecular structure, function, and dynamics of clathrin-mediated membrane traffic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchhausen, Tom; Owen, David; Harrison, Stephen C

    2014-05-01

    Clathrin is a molecular scaffold for vesicular uptake of cargo at the plasma membrane, where its assembly into cage-like lattices underlies the clathrin-coated pits of classical endocytosis. This review describes the structures of clathrin, major cargo adaptors, and other proteins that participate in forming a clathrin-coated pit, loading its contents, pinching off the membrane as a lattice-enclosed vesicle, and recycling the components. It integrates as much of the structural information as possible at the time of writing into a sketch of the principal steps in coated-pit and coated-vesicle formation.

  6. Quantum chemistry the development of ab initio methods in molecular electronic structure theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer III, Henry F

    2004-01-01

    This guide is guaranteed to prove of keen interest to the broad spectrum of experimental chemists who use electronic structure theory to assist in the interpretation of their laboratory findings. A list of 150 landmark papers in ab initio molecular electronic structure methods, it features the first page of each paper (which usually encompasses the abstract and introduction). Its primary focus is methodology, rather than the examination of particular chemical problems, and the selected papers either present new and important methods or illustrate the effectiveness of existing methods in predi

  7. Structures of pattern recognition receptors reveal molecular mechanisms of autoinhibition, ligand recognition and oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Jin, Tengchuan; Ravilious, Geoffrey; Xiao, T Sam

    2014-02-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are essential sentinels for pathogens or tissue damage and integral components of the innate immune system. Recent structural studies have provided unprecedented insights into the molecular mechanisms of ligand recognition and signal transduction by several PRR families at distinct subcellular compartments. Here we highlight some of the recent discoveries and summarize the common themes that are emerging from these exciting studies. Better mechanistic understanding of the structure and function of the PRRs will improve future prospects of therapeutic targeting of these important innate immune receptors.

  8. Caracterização molecular do vírus da raiva isolado de Desmodus rotundus capturados no Estado do Rio de Janeiro Molecular characterization of rabies virus isolated from Desmodus rotundus captured in Rio de Janeiro State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F.P. Vieira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Caracterizou-se filogeneticamente o vírus da raiva, isolado de morcegos hematógafos (Demodus rotundus. Cento e noventa e nove D. rotundus foram capturados em cinco abrigos, no Norte e Noroeste do Estado do Rio de Janeiro e sul do Espírito Santo. Sete deles foram positivos para a raiva. Amostras desses vírus foram sequenciadas e comparadas com sequências provenientes de diversos estados brasileiros. As sequências de vírus da raiva isoladas, na região norte do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, mostraram características que as distinguem de amostras de vírus isoladas em outras regiões do país, no entanto foram idênticas às isoladas de bovinos no noroeste do Rio de Janeiro.Rabies samples isolated from vampire bats captured in the Rio de Janeiro State were phylogenetically analyzed. One hundred and ninety nine vampire bats were captured from five shelters from North and Northwest of Rio de Janeiro and South of Espírito Santo States. Seven of them were positive for rabies. Theses samples were sequenced and compared with rabies virus sequences from several Brazilian states. The sequences of rabies virus, isolated in the present work, from North of Rio de Janeiro State, showed characteristics that differ of the sequences isolated from bats from other Brazilian regions. However, they were identical to samples isolated from cattle in Northwest of Rio de Janeiro state.

  9. A molecular dynamics study on the structural and electronic properties of two-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster based structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, Cherno Baba; Yu, M.; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2014-03-01

    Our previous study on one-dimensional icosahedral B12 cluster (α-B12) based chain [Bulletin of APS Annual Meeting, p265 (2013)] and ring structures has prompted us to study the two-dimensional (2D) α-B12 based structures. Recently, we have carried out a systematic molecular dynamics study on the structural stabilities and electronic properties of the 2D α-B12 based structures using the SCED-LCAO method [PRB 74, 15540 (2006)]. We have considered several types of symmetry for these 2D structures such as δ3, δ4, δ6 (flat triangular), and α' types. We have found that the optimized structures are energetically in the order of δ6 < α' < δ3 < δ4 which is different from the energy order of α'< δ6 < δ4 < δ3 found in the 2D boron monolayer sheets [ACS Nano 6, 7443 (2012)]. A detailed discussion of this study will be presented. The first author acknowledges the McSweeny Fellowship for supporting his research in this work.

  10. Molecular dynamics approach to water structure of HII mesophase of monoolein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Vesselin; Ivanova, Anela; Madjarova, Galia; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2012-02-01

    The goal of the present work is to study theoretically the structure of water inside the water cylinder of the inverse hexagonal mesophase (HII) of glyceryl monooleate (monoolein, GMO), using the method of molecular dynamics. To simplify the computational model, a fixed structure of the GMO tube is maintained. The non-standard cylindrical geometry of the system required the development and application of a novel method for obtaining the starting distribution of water molecules. A predictor-corrector schema is employed for generation of the initial density of water. Molecular dynamics calculations are performed at constant volume and temperature (NVT ensemble) with 1D periodic boundary conditions applied. During the simulations the lipid structure is kept fixed, while the dynamics of water is unrestrained. Distribution of hydrogen bonds and density as well as radial distribution of water molecules across the water cylinder show the presence of water structure deep in the cylinder (about 6 Å below the GMO heads). The obtained results may help understanding the role of water structure in the processes of insertion of external molecules inside the GMO/water system. The present work has a semi-quantitative character and it should be considered as the initial stage of more comprehensive future theoretical studies.

  11. Molecular basis of classic galactosemia from the structure of human galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCorvie, Thomas J.; Kopec, Jolanta; Pey, Angel L.; Fitzpatrick, Fiona; Patel, Dipali; Chalk, Rod; Shrestha, Leela; Yue, Wyatt W.

    2016-01-01

    Classic galactosemia is a potentially lethal disease caused by the dysfunction of galactose 1-phosphate uridylyltransferase (GALT). Over 300 disease-associated GALT mutations have been reported, with the majority being missense changes, although a better understanding of their underlying molecular effects has been hindered by the lack of structural information for the human enzyme. Here, we present the 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of human GALT (hGALT) ternary complex, revealing a homodimer arrangement that contains a covalent uridylylated intermediate and glucose-1-phosphate in the active site, as well as a structural zinc-binding site, per monomer. hGALT reveals significant structural differences from bacterial GALT homologues in metal ligation and dimer interactions, and therefore is a zbetter model for understanding the molecular consequences of disease mutations. Both uridylylation and zinc binding influence the stability and aggregation tendency of hGALT. This has implications for disease-associated variants where p.Gln188Arg, the most commonly detected, increases the rate of aggregation in the absence of zinc likely due to its reduced ability to form the uridylylated intermediate. As such our structure serves as a template in the future design of pharmacological chaperone therapies and opens new concepts about the roles of metal binding and activity in protein misfolding by disease-associated mutants. PMID:27005423

  12. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies. PMID:26758200

  13. Advanced Structural Determination of Diterpene Esters Using Molecular Modeling and NMR Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothias-Scaglia, Louis-Félix; Gallard, Jean-François; Dumontet, Vincent; Roussi, Fanny; Costa, Jean; Iorga, Bogdan I; Paolini, Julien; Litaudon, Marc

    2015-10-23

    Three new jatrophane esters (1-3) were isolated from Euphorbia amygdaloides ssp. semiperfoliata, including an unprecedented macrocyclic jatrophane ester bearing a hemiketal substructure, named jatrohemiketal (3). The chemical structures of compounds 1-3 and their relative configurations were determined by spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of compound 3 was determined unambiguously through an original strategy combining NMR spectroscopy and molecular modeling. Conformational search calculations were performed for the four possible diastereomers 3a-3d differing in their C-6 and C-9 stereocenters, and the lowest energy conformer was used as input structure for geometry optimization. The prediction of NMR parameters ((1)H and (13)C chemical shifts and (1)H-(1)H coupling constants) by density functional theory (DFT) calculations allowed identifying the most plausible diastereomer. Finally, the stereostructure of 3 was solved by comparison of the structural features obtained by molecular modeling for 3a-3d with NMR-derived data (the values of dihedral angles deduced from the vicinal proton-proton coupling constants ((3)JHH) and interproton distances determined by ROESY). The methodology described herein provides an efficient way to solve or confirm structural elucidation of new macrocyclic diterpene esters, in particular when no crystal structure is available.

  14. Coarse-grained/molecular mechanics of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor: experimentally-validated detailed structural prediction of agonist binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Marchiori

    Full Text Available Bitter molecules in humans are detected by ∼25 G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. The lack of atomic resolution structure for any of them is complicating an in depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying bitter taste perception. Here, we investigate the molecular determinants of the interaction of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor with its agonists phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and propylthiouracil (PROP. We use the recently developed hybrid Molecular Mechanics/Coarse Grained (MM/CG method tailored specifically for GPCRs. The method, through an extensive exploration of the conformational space in the binding pocket, allows the identification of several residues important for agonist binding that would have been very difficult to capture from the standard bioinformatics/docking approach. Our calculations suggest that both agonists bind to Asn103, Phe197, Phe264 and Trp201, whilst they do not interact with the so-called extra cellular loop 2, involved in cis-retinal binding in the GPCR rhodopsin. These predictions are consistent with data sets based on more than 20 site-directed mutagenesis and functional calcium imaging experiments of TAS2R38. The method could be readily used for other GPCRs for which experimental information is currently lacking.

  15. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  16. Coexisting Honeycomb and Kagome Characteristics in the Electronic Band Structure of Molecular Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paavilainen, Sami; Ropo, Matti; Nieminen, Jouko; Akola, Jaakko; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-06-01

    We uncover the electronic structure of molecular graphene produced by adsorbed CO molecules on a copper (111) surface by means of first-principles calculations. Our results show that the band structure is fundamentally different from that of conventional graphene, and the unique features of the electronic states arise from coexisting honeycomb and Kagome symmetries. Furthermore, the Dirac cone does not appear at the K-point but at the Γ-point in the reciprocal space and is accompanied by a third, almost flat band. Calculations of the surface structure with Kekulé distortion show a gap opening at the Dirac point in agreement with experiments. Simple tight-binding models are used to support the first-principles results and to explain the physical characteristics behind the electronic band structures.

  17. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1: A nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooke, R.M.; Harvey, T.S.; Campbell, I.D. (Univ. of Oxford (England))

    1991-06-04

    The solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1 has been investigated with a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics methods. The results show that the solution structure is similar to that of insulin, but minor differences exist. The regions homologous to insulin are well-defined, while the remainder of the molecular exhibits greater disorder. The resultant structures have been used to visualize the sites for interaction with a number of physiologically important protein.

  18. Solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1: A nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The solution structure of human insulin-like growth factor 1 has been investigated with a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance and restrained molecular dynamics methods. The results show that the solution structure is similar to that of insulin, but minor differences exist. The regions homologous to insulin are well-defined, while the remainder of the molecular exhibits greater disorder. The resultant structures have been used to visualize the sites for interaction with a number of physiologically important protein

  19. Sampling Enrichment toward Target Structures Using Hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kecheng; Różycki, Bartosz; Cui, Fengchao; Shi, Ce; Chen, Wenduo; Li, Yunqi

    2016-01-01

    Sampling enrichment toward a target state, an analogue of the improvement of sampling efficiency (SE), is critical in both the refinement of protein structures and the generation of near-native structure ensembles for the exploration of structure-function relationships. We developed a hybrid molecular dynamics (MD)-Monte Carlo (MC) approach to enrich the sampling toward the target structures. In this approach, the higher SE is achieved by perturbing the conventional MD simulations with a MC structure-acceptance judgment, which is based on the coincidence degree of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) intensity profiles between the simulation structures and the target structure. We found that the hybrid simulations could significantly improve SE by making the top-ranked models much closer to the target structures both in the secondary and tertiary structures. Specifically, for the 20 mono-residue peptides, when the initial structures had the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD) from the target structure smaller than 7 Å, the hybrid MD-MC simulations afforded, on average, 0.83 Å and 1.73 Å in RMSD closer to the target than the parallel MD simulations at 310K and 370K, respectively. Meanwhile, the average SE values are also increased by 13.2% and 15.7%. The enrichment of sampling becomes more significant when the target states are gradually detectable in the MD-MC simulations in comparison with the parallel MD simulations, and provide >200% improvement in SE. We also performed a test of the hybrid MD-MC approach in the real protein system, the results showed that the SE for 3 out of 5 real proteins are improved. Overall, this work presents an efficient way of utilizing solution SAXS to improve protein structure prediction and refinement, as well as the generation of near native structures for function annotation.

  20. Effects of molecular structural variants on serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 levels in sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigemura Masahiko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serum Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6, which is classified as human mucin-1 (MUC1, is used as a marker of sarcoidosis and other interstitial lung diseases. However, there remain some limitations due to a lack of information on the factors contributing to increased levels of serum KL-6. This study was designed to investigate the factors contributing to increased levels of serum KL-6 by molecular analysis. Methods Western blot analysis using anti-KL-6 antibody was performed simultaneously on the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF and serum obtained from 128 subjects with sarcoidosis. Results KL-6/MUC1 in BALF showed three bands and five band patterns. These band patterns were associated with the MUC1 genotype and the KL-6 levels. KL-6/MUC1 band patterns in serum were dependent on molecular size class in BALF. Significantly increased levels of serum KL-6, serum/BALF KL-6 ratio and serum soluble interleukin 2 receptor were observed in the subjects with influx of high molecular size KL-6/MUC1 from the alveoli to blood circulation. The multivariate linear regression analysis involving potentially relevant variables such as age, gender, smoking status, lung parenchymal involvement based on radiographical stage and molecular size of KL-6/MUC1 in serum showed that the molecular size of KL-6/MUC1 in serum was significant independent determinant of serum KL-6 levels. Conclusions The molecular structural variants of KL-6/MUC1 and its leakage behavior affect serum levels of KL-6 in sarcoidosis. This information may assist in the interpretation of serum KL-6 levels in sarcoidosis.

  1. Radiative electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some data are presented for radiative electron capture by fast moving ions. The radiative electron capture spectrum is shown for O8+ in Ag, along with the energy dependence of the capture cross-section. A discrepancy between earlier data, theoretical prediction, and the present data is pointed out. (3 figs) (U.S.)

  2. Automatic identification of mobile and rigid substructures in molecular dynamics simulations and fractional structural fluctuation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Martínez

    Full Text Available The analysis of structural mobility in molecular dynamics plays a key role in data interpretation, particularly in the simulation of biomolecules. The most common mobility measures computed from simulations are the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD and Root Mean Square Fluctuations (RMSF of the structures. These are computed after the alignment of atomic coordinates in each trajectory step to a reference structure. This rigid-body alignment is not robust, in the sense that if a small portion of the structure is highly mobile, the RMSD and RMSF increase for all atoms, resulting possibly in poor quantification of the structural fluctuations and, often, to overlooking important fluctuations associated to biological function. The motivation of this work is to provide a robust measure of structural mobility that is practical, and easy to interpret. We propose a Low-Order-Value-Optimization (LOVO strategy for the robust alignment of the least mobile substructures in a simulation. These substructures are automatically identified by the method. The algorithm consists of the iterative superposition of the fraction of structure displaying the smallest displacements. Therefore, the least mobile substructures are identified, providing a clearer picture of the overall structural fluctuations. Examples are given to illustrate the interpretative advantages of this strategy. The software for performing the alignments was named MDLovoFit and it is available as free-software at: http://leandro.iqm.unicamp.br/mdlovofit.

  3. Surface-Bound Molecular Film Structure Effects on Electronic and Magnetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pronschinske, Alex M.

    This thesis dissertation will discuss the importance of understanding the driving forces of molecular assembly on surfaces and the need to characterize the electronic and magnetic properties of the resulting organic films. Furthermore, experimental results on model organic molecular assemblies, benzoate on Cu(110) and Fe[(H2BPz2)2bpy] ("Fe-bpy") on Au(111), and their novel film properties will be presented. The primary experimental techniques used in this work are scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM, STS), and so a theoretical characterization of constant current distance-voltage STS (z(V)-STS) will also be developed. Deposition of benzoic acid (C6H5COOH) on to Cu(110) will be used to create a diverse molecular environment of benzoate molecules (C6H5COO+). In this film we will utilize structural phases consisting of co-existing orientation (alpha-phase) and uniform molecular orientation (c(8x2) phase) to probe electric potential variation across the surface of the film. Using z( V)-STS find that the electron affinity level of a molecule's near-neighbor will exert a substrate-mediated influence on the energy of the molecule's image potential state; which we describe using a 1-D dielectric continuum model. Motivated by the unique utility of z(V)-STS for gentle probing of molecular electronic structure and electric potential we perform a thorough theoretical characterize of z( V)-STS. We derive a differential equation for simulating z(V)-STS spectra under the standard approximation of a square tunneling barrier. Moreover, we derive an equation for sample density of states (DOS) that is applicable for all modes of STS. The central result of this work for interpretation of z(V)-STS results is a characterization of systematic error between state energy and z(V)-STS peak location, as well we show that empirical normalization procedure for removing background distortion from constant height current-voltage STS, (V/I)dI/dV, is also applicable to z(V)-STS is

  4. Correlation between the molecular structure and the inhibiting effect of some benzimidazole derivatives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niamien, P.M., E-mail: niamienfr@yahoo.fr [Laboratoire de chimie physique, Universite de Cocody-Abidjan, 22 BP 582 Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire); Essy, F.K.; Trokourey, A.; Yapi, A.; Aka, H.K. [Laboratoire de chimie physique, Universite de Cocody-Abidjan, 22 BP 582 Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire); Diabate, D. [Laboratoire de chimie physique, Universite de Cocody-Abidjan, 22 BP 582 Abidjan (Cote d' Ivoire); Institut UTINAM-UMR CNRS 6213 Equipe capteurs et membranes 25013 Besancon cedex, 22 BP 582 Abidjan 22 (Cote d' Ivoire)

    2012-09-14

    Quantum chemical parameters of 2-thiobenzylbenzimidazole (TBBI), 2-thiomethylbenzimidazole (TMBI), and 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI) were calculated. The correlation between molecular structure of these compounds and their inhibition efficiency IE (%) against copper corrosion in 1 M HNO{sub 3} was found by considering Density Functional Theory DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) level. The properties most relevant to their potential action as corrosion inhibitors have been calculated: highest occupied molecular orbital energy (E{sub HOMO}), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy (E{sub LUMO}), energy gap ({Delta}E), dipole moment ({mu}) and parameters that provide informations about the chemical reactivity: electronegativity ({chi}), global hardness ({eta}), global softness ({sigma}) and electrophilicity index ({omega}). All calculations have been performed using the Gaussian 03W suite of programs. It was found that theoretical data support experimental results. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Benzimidazole derivatives (TBBI, TMBI, MBI) as corrosion inhibitors of copper in 1 M HNO{sub 3}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibition process evaluated by weight loss indicates that the investigated compounds are good inhibitors of copper. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inhibition efficiency is found to be in the following order: TBBI > TMBI > MBI. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The studied molecules adsorbed on the metal surface according to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the calculated molecular parameters by DFT/B3LYP/6-31G (d, p) show excellent correlation with the inhibition efficiency.

  5. Resolving Intra- and Inter-Molecular Structure with Non-Contact Atomic Force Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Paul Jarvis

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in molecular investigations at surfaces has been to image individual molecules, and the assemblies they form, with single-bond resolution. Scanning probe microscopy, with its exceptionally high resolution, is ideally suited to this goal. With the introduction of methods exploiting molecularly-terminated tips, where the apex of the probe is, for example, terminated with a single CO, Xe or H2 molecule, scanning probe methods can now achieve higher resolution than ever before. In this review, some of the landmark results related to attaining intramolecular resolution with non-contact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM are summarised before focussing on recent reports probing molecular assemblies where apparent intermolecular features have been observed. Several groups have now highlighted the critical role that flexure in the tip-sample junction plays in producing the exceptionally sharp images of both intra- and apparent inter-molecular structure. In the latter case, the features have been identified as imaging artefacts, rather than real intermolecular bonds. This review discusses the potential for NC-AFM to provide exceptional resolution of supramolecular assemblies stabilised via a variety of intermolecular forces and highlights the potential challenges and pitfalls involved in interpreting bonding interactions.

  6. Weak links between fast mobility and local structure in molecular and atomic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate by molecular-dynamics simulations, the fast mobility—the rattling amplitude of the particles temporarily trapped by the cage of the neighbors—in mildly supercooled states of dense molecular (linear trimers) and atomic (binary mixtures) liquids. The mixture particles interact by the Lennard-Jones potential. The non-bonded particles of the molecular system are coupled by the more general Mie potential with variable repulsive and attractive exponents in a range which is a characteristic of small n-alkanes and n-alcohols. Possible links between the fast mobility and the geometry of the cage (size and shape) are searched. The correlations on a per-particle basis are rather weak. Instead, if one groups either the particles in fast-mobility subsets or the cages in geometric subsets, the increase of the fast mobility with both the size and the asphericity of the cage is revealed. The observed correlations are weak and differ in states with equal relaxation time. Local forces between a tagged particle and the first-neighbour shell do not correlate with the fast mobility in the molecular liquid. It is concluded that the cage geometry alone is unable to provide a microscopic interpretation of the known, universal link between the fast mobility and the slow structural relaxation. We suggest that the particle fast dynamics is affected by regions beyond the first neighbours, thus supporting the presence of collective, extended fast modes

  7. Weak links between fast mobility and local structure in molecular and atomic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernini, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica “Enrico Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Puosi, F. [Laboratoire de Physique de l’École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, UMR CNRS 5672, 46 allée d’Italie, 69007 Lyon (France); Leporini, D., E-mail: dino.leporini@df.unipi.it [Dipartimento di Fisica “Enrico Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); IPCF-CNR, UOS Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2015-03-28

    We investigate by molecular-dynamics simulations, the fast mobility—the rattling amplitude of the particles temporarily trapped by the cage of the neighbors—in mildly supercooled states of dense molecular (linear trimers) and atomic (binary mixtures) liquids. The mixture particles interact by the Lennard-Jones potential. The non-bonded particles of the molecular system are coupled by the more general Mie potential with variable repulsive and attractive exponents in a range which is a characteristic of small n-alkanes and n-alcohols. Possible links between the fast mobility and the geometry of the cage (size and shape) are searched. The correlations on a per-particle basis are rather weak. Instead, if one groups either the particles in fast-mobility subsets or the cages in geometric subsets, the increase of the fast mobility with both the size and the asphericity of the cage is revealed. The observed correlations are weak and differ in states with equal relaxation time. Local forces between a tagged particle and the first-neighbour shell do not correlate with the fast mobility in the molecular liquid. It is concluded that the cage geometry alone is unable to provide a microscopic interpretation of the known, universal link between the fast mobility and the slow structural relaxation. We suggest that the particle fast dynamics is affected by regions beyond the first neighbours, thus supporting the presence of collective, extended fast modes.

  8. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Debora Lika, E-mail: dmakino@biochem.mpg.de; Conti, Elena [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented.

  9. Insights into the structural stability of Bax from molecular dynamics simulations at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Trigueros, Jorge Luis; Correa-Basurto, José; Guadalupe Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom

    2011-01-01

    Bax is a member of the Bcl-2 protein family that participates in mitochondrion-mediated apoptosis. In the early stages of the apoptotic pathway, this protein migrates from the cytosol to the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is inserted and usually oligomerizes, making cytochrome c-compatible pores. Although several cellular and structural studies have been reported, a description of the stability of Bax at the molecular level remains elusive. This article reports molecular dynamics simulations of monomeric Bax at 300, 400, and 500 K, focusing on the most relevant structural changes and relating them to biological experimental results. Bax gradually loses its α-helices when it is submitted to high temperatures, yet it maintains its globular conformation. The resistance of Bax to adopt an extended conformation could be due to several interactions that were found to be responsible for maintaining the structural stability of this protein. Among these interactions, we found salt bridges, hydrophobic interactions, and hydrogen bonds. Remarkably, salt bridges were the most relevant to prevent the elongation of the structure. In addition, the analysis of our results suggests which conformational movements are implicated in the activation/oligomerization of Bax. This atomistic description might have important implications for understanding the functionality and stability of Bax in vitro as well as within the cellular environment. PMID:21936009

  10. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-05-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials.

  11. Structural studies on Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA: Molecular plasticity and interspecies variability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anu V Chandran; J Rajan Prabu; Astha Nautiyal; K Neelakanteshwar Patil; K Muniyappa; M Vijayan

    2015-03-01

    Structures of crystals of Mycobacterium tuberculosis RecA, grown and analysed under different conditions, provide insights into hitherto underappreciated details of molecular structure and plasticity. In particular, they yield information on the invariant and variable features of the geometry of the P-loop, whose binding to ATP is central for all the biochemical activities of RecA. The strengths of interaction of the ligands with the P-loop reveal significant differences. This in turn affects the magnitude of the motion of the `switch’ residue, Gln195 in M. tuberculosis RecA, which triggers the transmission of ATP-mediated allosteric information to the DNA binding region. M. tuberculosis RecA is substantially rigid compared with its counterparts from M. smegmatis and E. coli, which exhibit concerted internal molecular mobility. The interspecies variability in the plasticity of the two mycobacterial proteins is particularly surprising as they have similar sequence and 3D structure. Details of the interactions of ligands with the protein, characterized in the structures reported here, could be useful for design of inhibitors against M. tuberculosis RecA.

  12. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented

  13. Effects of Irradiation on the Structure-activity Relationship of Konjac Glucomannan Molecular Chain Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Chun-Hua; PENG Shu-Hui; WEN Cheng-Rong; WANG Li-Xia; XIONG Bo; LIU Ya-Nan; FAN Lin-Lin; YAO Min-Na; PANG Jie

    2012-01-01

    To know the effects of irradiation on the konjac glucomannan (KGM) molecular chain membrane, KGM membrane solution was treated with the irradiation dose of 0-20 kGy in this study, and the structure and properties of KGM membrane were analyzed with Infrared spectrum, Raman spectrum, X-ray, SEM scanning and so on. The results revealed that the effects of different irradiation doses on the KGM molecular chain structure were different. Higher irradiation dose (20 kGy) resulted in partial damage against KGM membrane crystal structure, and there was no obvious change for the amorphous structure; with membrane property test, the tensile strength of KGM membrane gradually increased with the increase of irradiation dose and its elongation at break reduced, but these changes were not significant, WVP value reduced; with SEM, the membrane surface treated with irradiation was smoother even than the membrane without treatment. In addition, when increasing the irradiation dose, membrane surface became more even, and arrangement was more orderly and compact. KGM membrane nrooerties, and it is an ideal Irradiation modification could effectively improve the modification method.

  14. Animal Hairs as Water-stimulated Shape Memory Materials: Mechanism and Structural Networks in Molecular Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xueliang; Hu, Jinlian

    2016-01-01

    Animal hairs consisting of α-keratin biopolymers existing broadly in nature may be responsive to water for recovery to the innate shape from their fixed deformation, thus possess smart behavior, namely shape memory effect (SME). In this article, three typical animal hair fibers were first time investigated for their water-stimulated SME, and therefrom to identify the corresponding net-points and switches in their molecular and morphological structures. Experimentally, the SME manifested a good stability of high shape fixation ratio and reasonable recovery rate after many cycles of deformation programming under water stimulation. The effects of hydration on hair lateral size, recovery kinetics, dynamic mechanical behaviors and structural components (crystal, disulfide and hydrogen bonds) were then systematically studied. SME mechanisms were explored based on the variations of structural components in molecular assemblies of such smart fibers. A hybrid structural network model with single-switch and twin-net-points was thereafter proposed to interpret the water-stimulated shape memory mechanism of animal hairs. This original work is expected to provide inspiration for exploring other natural materials to reveal their smart functions and natural laws in animals including human as well as making more remarkable synthetic smart materials. PMID:27230823

  15. Stability of Y/MCM-48 composite molecular sieve with mesoporous and microporous structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Y/MCM-48 composite molecular sieve was hydrothermally synthesized at different crystallization temperatures and crystallization times using ethyl orthosilicate as Si source and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide as template with the aid of fluoride ions and was characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 physical adsorption technique, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The thermal, hydrothermal, acidic, and basic stabilities of the Y/MCM-48 composite were investigated. The results show that Y/MCM-48 composite molecular sieve with meso- and microporous structures was synthesized successfully at 120 °C for 36 h. The Y/MCM-48 composite has the surface area of 864 m2/g and the average pore size is ca. 2.48 nm. The bi-porous structure in composite molecular sieve still maintains its stability even after thermal treatment at 800 °C for 4 h or hydrothermal treatment at 100 °C for 48 h. After treatment in 1 mol/L hydrochloric acid solution or 1 mol/L sodium hydroxide solution for 48 h, the Y/MCM-48 composite exhibits good acidic stability. The acidic stability is superior to the basic stability at the same treatment time.

  16. The Structure of a Low-Metallicity Giant Molecular Cloud Complex

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, A K; Bot, C; Engelbracht, C W; Gordon, K; Israel, F P; Rubio, M; Sandstrom, K; Stanimirović, S

    2009-01-01

    To understand the impact of low metallicities on giant molecular cloud (GMC) structure, we compare far infrared dust emission, CO emission, and dynamics in the star-forming complex N83 in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud. Dust emission (measured by Spitzer as part of the S3MC and SAGE-SMC surveys) probes the total gas column independent of molecular line emission and traces shielding from photodissociating radiation. We calibrate a method to estimate the dust column using only the high-resolution Spitzer data and verify that dust traces the ISM in the HI-dominated region around N83. This allows us to resolve the relative structures of H2, dust, and CO within a giant molecular cloud complex, one of the first times such a measurement has been made in a low-metallicity galaxy. Our results support the hypothesis that CO is photodissociated while H2 self-shields in the outer parts of low-metallicity GMCs, so that dust/self shielding is the primary factor determining the distribution of CO emission. Four piec...

  17. Molecular replacement studies on crystal structure of allophycocyanin from red algae Porphyra yezoensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Using the crystal structure of allophycocyanin from cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (APC-SP) as a search model,the crystal structure of allophycocyanin from red algae Porphyra yezoensis (APC-PY) has been studied by molecular replacement methods.The APC-PY crystals (Form 3) belong to the space group of R32,cell dimensions a=b= 10.53 nm,c=18.94 nm,α= β= 90°,γ=120°;there is one αβ monomer in each crystallographic asymmetric unit in the cell.The translation function search gave a unique peak with a correlation coefficient (Cc) of 67.0% and an R-factor of 36.1% for reflection data from 1.0 to 0.4 nm.Using the results by molecular replacement,the initial model of APC-PY was built,and the coincidence of the chromophore in APC-PY initial model with its 2Fo-Fc OMIT map further confirms the results by molecular replacement.

  18. Molecular replacement studies on crystal structure of allophycocyanin from red algae Porphyra yezoensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锦玉; 江涛; 张季平; 常文瑞; 梁栋材

    2000-01-01

    Using the crystal structure of allophycocyanin from cyanobacterium Spirulina platensis (APC-SP) as a search model, the crystal structure of allophycocyanin from red algae Porphyra yezoensis (APC-PY) has been studied by molecular replacement methods. The APC-PY crystals (Form 3) belong to the space group of R32, cell dimensions a = b = 10.53 nm, c = 18.94 nm, α =β = 90°, γ= 120°; there is one αβ monomer in each crystallographic asymmetric unit in the cell. The translation function search gave a unique peak with a correlation coefficient (Cc) of 67.0% and an R-factor of 36.1 % for reflection data from 1.0 to 0.4 nm. Using the results by molecular replacement, the initial model of APC-PY was built, and the coincidence of the chromophore in APC-PY initial model with its 2Fo-FC OMIT map further confirms the results by molecular replacement.

  19. Fabrication variables affecting the structure and properties of supported carbon molecular sieve membranes for hydrogen separation

    KAUST Repository

    Briceño, Kelly

    2012-10-01

    A high molecular weight polyimide (Matrimid) was used as a precursor for fabricating supported carbon molecular sieve membranes without crack formation at 550-700°C pyrolysis temperature. A one-step polymer (polyimide) coating method as precursor of carbon layer was used without needing a prior modification of a TiO 2 macroporous support. The following fabrication variables were optimized and studied to determine their effect on the carbon structure: polymeric solution concentration, solvent extraction, heating rate and pyrolysis temperature. Two techniques (Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopy) were used to determine these effects on final carbon structure. Likewise, the effect of the support was also reported as an additional and important variable in the design of supported carbon membranes. Atomic force microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry quantified the degree of influence. Pure gas permeation tests were performed using CH 4, CO, CO 2 and H 2. The presence of a molecular sieving mechanism was confirmed after defects were plugged with PDMS solution at 12wt%. Gas selectivities higher than Knudsen theoretical values were reached with membranes obtained over 650°C, showing as best values 4.46, 4.70 and 10.62 for H 2/N 2, H 2/CO and H 2/CH 4 ratio, respectively. Permeance values were over 9.82×10 -9mol/(m 2Pas)during pure hydrogen permeation tests. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  20. Structure and dynamics of surfactant and hydrocarbon aggregates on graphite: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammalkorpi, Maria; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z; Haataja, Mikko

    2008-03-13

    We have examined the structure and dynamics of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecane (C12) molecular aggregates at varying surface coverages on the basal plane of graphite via classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that graphite-hydrocarbon chain interactions favor specific molecular orientations at the single-molecule level via alignment of the tail along the crystallographic directions. This orientational bias is reduced greatly upon increasing the surface coverage for both molecules due to intermolecular interactions, leading to very weak bias at intermediate surface coverages. Interestingly, for complete monolayers, we find a re-emergent orientational bias. Furthermore, by comparing the SDS behavior with C12, we demonstrate that the charged head group plays a key role in the aggregate structures: SDS molecules display a tendency to form linear file-like aggregates while C12 forms tightly bound planar ones. The observed orientational bias for SDS molecules is in agreement with experimental observations of hemimicelle orientation and provides support for the belief that an initial oriented layer governs the orientation of hemimicellar aggregates.

  1. Translocation Properties of Primitive Molecular Machines and Their Relevance to the Structure of the Genetic Code

    CERN Document Server

    Aldana, M; Larralde, H; Martínez-Mekler, G; Aldana, Maximino; Cocho, Germinal; Larralde, Hernan; Martinez-Mekler, Gustavo

    2002-01-01

    We address the question, related with the origin of the genetic code, of why are there three bases per codon in the translation to protein process. As a followup to our previous work, we approach this problem by considering the translocation properties of primitive molecular machines, which capture basic features of ribosomal/messenger RNA interactions, while operating under prebiotic conditions. Our model consists of a short one-dimensional chain of charged particles(rRNA antecedent) interacting with a polymer (mRNA antecedent) via electrostatic forces. The chain is subject to external forcing that causes it to move along the polymer which is fixed in a quasi one dimensional geometry. Our numerical and analytic studies of statistical properties of random chain/polymer potentials suggest that, under very general conditions, a dynamics is attained in which the chain moves along the polymer in steps of three monomers. By adjusting the model in order to consider present day genetic sequences, we show that the ab...

  2. Applications of the Information Theory to Problems of Molecular Electronic Structure and Chemical Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman F. Nalewajski

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Recent studies on applications of the information theoretic concepts to molecular systems are reviewed. This survey covers the information theory basis of the Hirshfeld partitioning of molecular electron densities, its generalization to many electron probabilities, the local information distance analysis of molecular charge distributions, the charge transfer descriptors of the donor-acceptor reactive systems, the elements of a “thermodynamic” description of molecular charge displacements, both “vertical” (between molecular fragments for the fixed overall density and “horizontal” (involving different molecular densities, with the entropic representation description provided by the information theory. The average uncertainty measures of bond multiplicities in molecular “communication” systems are also briefly summarized. After an overview of alternative indicators of the information distance (entropy deficiency, missing information between probability distributions the properties of the “stockholder” densities, which minimize the entropy deficiency relative to the promolecule reference, are summarized. In particular, the surprisal analysis of molecular densities is advocated as an attractive information-theoretic tool in the electronic structure theory, supplementary to the familiar density difference diagrams. The subsystem information density equalization rules satisfied by the Hirshfeld molecular fragments are emphasized: the local values of alternative information distance densities of subsystems are equal to the corresponding global value, characterizing the molecule as a whole. These local measures of the information content are semi-quantitatively related to the molecular density difference function. In the density functional theory the effective external potentials of molecular fragments are defined, for which

  3. Molecular mechanics of DNA bricks: in situ structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slone, Scott Michael; Li, Chen-Yu; Yoo, Jejoong; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2016-05-01

    The DNA bricks method exploits self-assembly of short DNA fragments to produce custom three-dimensional objects with subnanometer precision. In contrast to DNA origami, the DNA brick method permits a variety of different structures to be realized using the same library of DNA strands. As a consequence of their design, however, assembled DNA brick structures have fewer interhelical connections in comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures. Although the overall shape of the DNA brick objects has been characterized and found to conform to the features of the target designs, the microscopic properties of DNA brick objects remain yet to be determined. Here, we use the all-atom molecular dynamics method to directly compare the structure, mechanical properties and ionic conductivity of DNA brick and DNA origami structures different only by internal connectivity of their consistituent DNA strands. In comparison to equivalent DNA origami structures, the DNA brick structures are found to be less rigid and less dense and have a larger cross-section area normal to the DNA helix direction. At the microscopic level, the junction in the DNA brick structures are found to be right-handed, similar to the structure of individual Holliday junctions (HJ) in solution, which contrasts with the left-handed structure of HJ in DNA origami. Subject to external electric field, a DNA brick plate is more leaky to ions than an equivalent DNA origami plate because of its lower density and larger cross-section area. Overall, our results indicate that the structures produced by the DNA brick method are fairly similar in their overall appearance to those created by the DNA origami method but are more compliant when subject to external forces, which likely is a consequence of their single crossover design.

  4. Capture Their Attention: Capturing Lessons Using Screen Capture Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Kristina; Lawler, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    When students miss classes for university activities such as athletic and academic events, they inevitably miss important class material. Students can get notes from their peers or visit professors to find out what they missed, but when students miss new and challenging material these steps are sometimes not enough. Screen capture and recording…

  5. MesoBioNano Explorer-A Universal Program for Multiscale Computer Simulations of Complex Molecular Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solov'yov, Ilia; Yakubovich, Alexander V.; Nikolaev, Pavel V.;

    2012-01-01

    We present a multipurpose computer code MesoBioNano Explorer (MBN Explorer). The package allows to model molecular systems of varied level of complexity. In particular, MBN Explorer is suited to compute system's energy, to optimize molecular structure as well as to consider the molecular and random...... higher) than the computational efficiency of other software packages, making MBN Explorer a possible alternative to the available codes....

  6. Structure-function studies of DNA damage using AB INITIO quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.; Miaskiewicz, K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Osman, R. [Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Physiology and Biophysics

    1993-12-01

    Studies of ring-saturated pyrimidine base lesions are used to illustrate an integrated modeling approach that combines quantum-chemical calculations with molecular dynamics simulation. Electronic-structure calculations on the lesions in Isolation reveal strong conformational preferences due to interactions between equatorial substituents to the pyrimidine ring. Large distortions of DNA should result when these interactions force the methyl group of thymine to assume an axial orientation, as is the case for thymine glycol but not for dihydrothymine. Molecular dynamics simulations of the dodecamer d(CGCGAATTCGCG){sub 2} with and without a ring-saturated thymine lesion at position T7 support this conclusion. Implications of these studies for recognition of thymine lesions by endonuclease III are also discussed.

  7. Excited-state proton coupled charge transfer modulated by molecular structure and media polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchenko, Alexander P; Tang, Kuo-Chun; Chou, Pi-Tai

    2013-02-01

    Charge and proton transfer reactions in the excited states of organic dyes can be coupled in many different ways. Despite the complementarity of charges, they can occur on different time scales and in different directions of the molecular framework. In certain cases, excited-state equilibrium can be established between the charge-transfer and proton-transfer species. The interplay of these reactions can be modulated and even reversed by variations in dye molecular structures and changes of the surrounding media. With knowledge of the mechanisms of these processes, desired rates and directions can be achieved, and thus the multiple emission spectral features can be harnessed. These features have found versatile applications in a number of cutting-edge technological areas, particularly in fluorescence sensing and imaging.

  8. Materials for organic photovoltaics: insights from detailed structural models and molecular simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Riccardo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a brief discussion of the role of detailed structural and computational studies, within the general field of organic photovoltaics. We review some of our recent work on poly(3-butylthiophene (P3BT and on [6,6]phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM. The first is a prototypical hole-transporting material, whose crystal forms I.’ and II were solved by us through the combined use of powder Xray diffraction, electron diffraction and molecular modelling. PCBM is a widely used fullerene derivative with electron-transporting properties. It has a rich polymorphism, which to date remains largely unexplored. Our molecular dynamics simulations have revealed interesting features of its solid-state organization, including that in the amorphous phase.

  9. Molecular Adsorption Changes the Quantum Structure of Oxide-Supported Gold Nanoparticles: Chemisorption versus Physisorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiehler, Christian; Calaza, Florencia; Schneider, Wolf-Dieter; Nilius, Niklas; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-07-17

    STM conductance spectroscopy and mapping has been used to analyze the impact of molecular adsorption on the quantized electronic structure of individual metal nanoparticles. For this purpose, isophorone and CO2, as prototype molecules for physisorptive and chemisorptive binding, were dosed onto monolayer Au islands grown on MgO thin films. The molecules attach exclusively to the metal-oxide boundary, while the interior of the islands remains pristine. The Au quantum well states are perturbed due to the adsorption process and increase their mutual energy spacing in the CO2 case but move together in isophorone-covered islands. The shifts disclose the nature of the molecule-Au interaction, which relies on electron exchange for the CO2 ligands but on dispersive forces for the organic species. Our experiments reveal how molecular adsorption affects individual quantum systems, a topic of utmost relevance for heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:26230817

  10. Structural and electronic characterization of self-assembled molecular nanoarchitectures by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulino, Antonino

    2013-02-01

    Molecular monolayers and similar nanoarchitectures are indicative of the promising future of nanotechnology. Therefore, many scientists recently devoted their efforts to the synthesis, characterization, and properties of mono- and multilayer-based systems. In this context, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is an important technique for the in-depth chemical and structural characterization of nanoscopic systems. In fact, it is a surface technique suitable for probing thicknesses of the same order of the photoelectron inelastic mean free paths (a few tens of ångströms) and allows one to immediately obtain qualitative and quantitative data, film thickness, surface coverage, molecule footprint, oxidation states, and presence of functional groups. Nevertheless, other techniques are important in obtaining a complete spectroscopic characterization of the investigated systems. Therefore, in the present review we report on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of self-assembled molecular mono- and multilayer materials including some examples on which other characterization techniques produced important results. PMID:23014858

  11. Photomobile polymer materials with crosslinked liquid-crystalline structures: molecular design, fabrication, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ube, Toru; Ikeda, Tomiki

    2014-09-22

    Crosslinked liquid-crystalline polymer materials that macroscopically deform when irradiated with light have been extensively studied in the past decade because of their potential in various applications, such as microactuators and microfluidic devices. The basic motions of these materials are contraction-expansion and bending-unbending, which are observed mainly in polysiloxanes and polyacrylates that contain photochromic moieties. Other sophisticated motions such as twisting, oscillation, rotation, and translational motion have also been achieved. In recent years, efforts have been made to improve the photoresponsive and mechanical properties of this novel class of materials through the modification of molecular structures, development of new fabrication methods, and construction of composite structures. Herein, we review structures, functions, and working mechanisms of photomobile materials and recent advances in this field. PMID:25196371

  12. Changes in molecular structure and properties of irradiated polymers of different compositions - ESR and NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of molecular structural changes in polymers during exposure to high energy radiation is the long term interest of the Polymer Materials and Radiation Group at the University of Queensland. Recently, the group had looked at a range of polymers including natural and synthetic rubbers, methacrylates and polyesters. The objective of the work has been to investigate the relationships between polymer structure and sensitivity towards high energy radiation, including gamma radiation. This report will focus on the Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies of the effects of gamma irradiation on these polymers. Other methods such as Gas Chromatography (GC), Gel Permeation Chromatography (GPC), Fourier Transformed Infra Red (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) have also been used as these methods combine with ESR and NMR, to provide a more complete picture of the mechanism of the structural changes. (author)

  13. Structure of solvent-free grafted nanoparticles: Molecular dynamics and density-functional theory

    KAUST Repository

    Chremos, Alexandros

    2011-01-01

    The structure of solvent-free oligomer-grafted nanoparticles has been investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and density-functional theory. At low temperatures and moderate to high oligomer lengths, the qualitative features of the core particle pair probability, structure factor, and the oligomer brush configuration obtained from the simulations can be explained by a density-functional theory that incorporates the configurational entropy of the space-filling oligomers. In particular, the structure factor at small wave numbers attains a value much smaller than the corresponding hard-sphere suspension, the first peak of the pair distribution function is enhanced due to entropic attractions among the particles, and the oligomer brush expands with decreasing particle volume fraction to fill the interstitial space. At higher temperatures, the simulations reveal effects that differ from the theory and are likely caused by steric repulsions of the expanded corona chains. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  14. Study of atomic structure of liquid Hg-In alloys using ab-initio molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Nalini; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla(HP)-171005 (India); Thakur, Anil [Department of Physics, Govt. P. G. College Solan (HP)-173212 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the structural properties of liquid Hg-In alloys. The interatomic interactions are described by ab-initio pseudopotentials given by Troullier and Martins. Five liquid Hg-In mixtures (Hg{sub 10}In{sub 90}, Hg{sub 30}In{sub 70}, Hg{sub 50}In{sub 50}, Hg{sub 70}In{sub 30} and Hg{sub 90}In{sub 10}) at 299K are considered. The radial distribution function g(r) and structure factor S(q) of considered alloys are compared with respective experimental results for liquid Hg (l-Hg) and (l-In). The radial distribution function g(r) shows the presence of short range order in the systems considered. Smooth curves of Bhatia-Thornton partial structure factors factor shows the presence of liquid state in the considered alloys.

  15. Study of atomic structure of liquid Hg-In alloys using ab-initio molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study the structural properties of liquid Hg-In alloys. The interatomic interactions are described by ab-initio pseudopotentials given by Troullier and Martins. Five liquid Hg-In mixtures (Hg10In90, Hg30In70, Hg50In50, Hg70In30 and Hg90In10) at 299K are considered. The radial distribution function g(r) and structure factor S(q) of considered alloys are compared with respective experimental results for liquid Hg (l-Hg) and (l-In). The radial distribution function g(r) shows the presence of short range order in the systems considered. Smooth curves of Bhatia-Thornton partial structure factors factor shows the presence of liquid state in the considered alloys

  16. Biodegradation of starch films: the roles of molecular and crystalline structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Witt, Torsten; Xie, Fengwei; Warren, Frederick J; Halley, Peter J; Gilbert, Robert G

    2015-05-20

    The influences of molecular, crystalline and granular structures on the biodegradability of compression-molded starch films were investigated. Fungal α-amylase was used as model degradation agent. The substrates comprised varied starch structures obtained by different degrees of acid hydrolysis, different granular sizes using size fractionation, and different degrees of crystallinity by aging for different times (up to 14 days). Two stages are identified for unretrograded films by fitting degradation data using first-order kinetics. Starch films containing larger molecules were degraded faster, but the rate coefficient was independent of the granule size. Retrograded films were degraded much slower than unretrograded ones, with a similar rate coefficient to that in the second stage of unretrograded films. Although initially the smaller molecules or the easily accessible starch chains on the amorphous film surface were degraded faster, the more ordered structure (resistant starch) formed from retrogradation, either before or during enzymatic degradation, strongly inhibits film biodegradation.

  17. The Interior Structure of the G31.41+0.31 Hot Molecular Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Esteban; Hofner, Peter; Olmi, Luca; Linz, Hendrik; Kurtz, Stan; Cesaroni, Riccardo

    We present interferometric images at 7mm and 3.6cm with a resolution of 1500 AU of the G31.41+0.31 Hot Molecular Core. Our observations show an elongated structure which is oriented perpendicular to the bipolar flow observed by Olmi et al. (1996). If the 7mm emission is entirely due to dust then the total mass in this structure is on the order of 500 solar masses which implies densities of order 1010 cm-3. The 3.6cm emission is unresolved and coincident with the 7mm peak and likely marks the position of the central object. We discuss the elongated structure in terms of an accretion disk scenario as well as a binary scenario. This work is partially supported by Research Corporation grant Nr. CC4996 and NSF grant AST-0098524.

  18. Structural characterization of a recombinant fusion protein by instrumental analysis and molecular modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Wu

    Full Text Available Conbercept is a genetically engineered homodimeric protein for the treatment of wet age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD that functions by blocking VEGF-family proteins. Its huge, highly variable architecture makes characterization and development of a functional assay difficult. In this study, the primary structure, number of disulfide linkages and glycosylation state of conbercept were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, and capillary electrophoresis. Molecular modeling was then applied to obtain the spatial structural model of the conbercept-VEGF-A complex, and to study its inter-atomic interactions and dynamic behavior. This work was incorporated into a platform useful for studying the structure of conbercept and its ligand binding functions.

  19. Structuring and capturing of radioactive strontium-90 from the polluted soil of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site by inter-polymer complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The model and experiments on application of polymer-polymer complexes stabilized by hydrogen and ionic bonds for structuring of Semipalatinsk nuclear test site soils in order to prevent the wind and water erosion of radionuclides from contaminated soil are considered. It is expected that the treatment by inter-polymer complexes (IPC) would cause the structuring of soil particle. Besides IPSs are able to form thin films on the soil particles surface, aggregate and considerably protect the migration of radionuclides. Both the water soluble polymer-polyacrylic acid (PAA), polyethylene glycol (PEG), poly-N,N,-dimethyldiallylammonium chloride (PDMDAACI) and the PAA-PEG, PAA-PDMDAACI inter-polymer complexes were used as structuring agents. The treatment of soil particles was carried out by two methods: the first method is uniform splash of polymer solution and mixing with soil; the second one is pouring of soil surface by polymer solution. The obtained results are summarized as follows: - Optimal concentration of polymer solutions are arranged between 10-4-10-2 mol·l-1. The best results corresponds to concentration 10-2 mol·l-1; - Pouring of soil surface is most preferential in comparison with splash of polymer solution and mixing with soil; - Both the individual polymers (PAA, PEG and PDMDAACI) and the PAA-PEG, PAA-PDMDAACI inter-polymer complexes show the structuring effect. However the best results were observed for IPC solution. The best structuring effect has been obtained for equimolar [PAA]:[PEG]=1:1 complex solution with 10-2 mol·l-1 and at p H=3.0 when the IPC solution is poured through the soil surface. The similar results were obtained for [PAA]:[PDMDAACI]=1:1 system. The capillary moisture capacity and water stability at optimal soil treatment conditions of soil is given. Since PAA, PEG and PAA-PEG complexes form polymer-metal complexes with Sr2+ ions the possibility of capture of soil radionuclides by means of binding into the complex particles was

  20. Molecular Basis of Clay Mineral Structure and Dynamics in Subsurface Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, R. T.

    2015-12-01

    Clay minerals and their interfaces play an essential role in many geochemical, environmental, and subsurface engineering applications. Adsorption, dissolution, precipitation, nucleation, and growth mechanisms, in particular, are controlled by the interplay of structure, thermodynamics, kinetics, and transport at clay mineral-water interfaces. Molecular details of these processes are typically beyond the sensitivity of experimental and analytical methods, and therefore require accurate models and simulations. Also, basal surfaces and interlayers of clay minerals provide constrained interfacial environments to facilitate the evaluation of these complex processes. We have developed and used classical molecular and quantum methods to examine the complex behavior of clay mineral-water interfaces and dynamics of interlayer species. Bulk structures, swelling behavior, diffusion, and adsorption processes are evaluated and compared to experimental and spectroscopic findings. Analysis of adsorption mechanisms of radionuclides on clay minerals provides a scientific basis for predicting the suitability of engineered barriers associated with nuclear waste repositories and the fate of contaminants in the environment. Similarly, the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide into geological reservoirs—to mitigate the impact of climate change—is evaluated by molecular models of multi-fluid interactions with clay minerals. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the wettability of different fluids—water, electrolyte solutions, and supercritical carbon dioxide—on clay surfaces, and which ultimately affects capillary fluid flow and the integrity of shale caprocks. This work is supported as part of Center for Frontiers of Subsurface Energy Security, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science and by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Geosciences Research Program