WorldWideScience

Sample records for capture phenotypic effects

  1. A side effect resource to capture phenotypic effects of drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhn, Michael; Campillos, Monica; Letunic, Ivica; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Bork, Peer

    2010-01-01

    The molecular understanding of phenotypes caused by drugs in humans is essential for elucidating mechanisms of action and for developing personalized medicines. Side effects of drugs (also known as adverse drug reactions) are an important source of human phenotypic information, but so far research...... on this topic has been hampered by insufficient accessibility of data. Consequently, we have developed a public, computer-readable side effect resource (SIDER) that connects 888 drugs to 1450 side effect terms. It contains information on frequency in patients for one-third of the drug-side effect...... pairs. For 199 drugs, the side effect frequency of placebo administration could also be extracted. We illustrate the potential of SIDER with a number of analyses. The resource is freely available for academic research at http://sideeffects.embl.de....

  2. Capturing phenotypes for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Peter N; Mungall, Christopher J; Haendel, Melissa

    2015-10-01

    Deep phenotyping followed by integrated computational analysis of genotype and phenotype is becoming ever more important for many areas of genomic diagnostics and translational research. The overwhelming majority of clinical descriptions in the medical literature are available only as natural language text, meaning that searching, analysis, and integration of medically relevant information in databases such as PubMed is challenging. The new journal Cold Spring Harbor Molecular Case Studies will require authors to select Human Phenotype Ontology terms for research papers that will be displayed alongside the manuscript, thereby providing a foundation for ontology-based indexing and searching of articles that contain descriptions of phenotypic abnormalities-an important step toward improving the ability of researchers and clinicians to get biomedical information that is critical for clinical care or translational research. PMID:27148566

  3. Phenotypic flexibility of gape anatomy fine-tunes the aquatic prey-capture system of newts

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wassenbergh, Sam; Heiss, Egon

    2016-07-01

    A unique example of phenotypic flexibility of the oral apparatus is present in newts (Salamandridae) that seasonally change between an aquatic and a terrestrial habitat. Newts grow flaps of skin between their upper and lower jaws, the labial lobes, to partly close the corners of the mouth when they adopt an aquatic lifestyle during their breeding season. Using hydrodynamic simulations based on μCT-scans and cranial kinematics during prey-capture in the smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris), we showed that this phenotypic flexibility is an adaptive solution to improve aquatic feeding performance: both suction distance and suction force increase by approximately 15% due to the labial lobes. As the subsequent freeing of the corners of the mouth by resorption of the labial lobes is assumed beneficial for the terrestrial capture of prey by the tongue, this flexibility of the mouth fine-tunes the process of capturing prey throughout the seasonal switching between water and land.

  4. Integrating Mouse Anatomy and Pathology Ontologies into a Phenotyping Database: Tools for Data Capture and Training

    OpenAIRE

    Sundberg, John P.; Beth A. Sundberg; Schofield, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The Mouse Disease Information System (MoDIS) is a data capture system for pathology data from laboratory mice designed to support phenotyping studies. The system integrates the mouse anatomy (MA) and mouse pathology (MPATH) ontologies into a Microsoft Access database facilitating the coding of organ, tissue, and disease process to recognized semantic standards. Grading of disease severity provides scores for all lesions that can then be used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses and hap...

  5. CHEMICAL EFFECTS IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS – DATA DICTIONARY (CEBS-DD): A COMPENDIUM OF TERMS FOR THE CAPTURE AND INTEGRATION OF BIOLOGICAL STUDY DESIGN DESCRIPTION, CONVENTIONAL PHENOTYPES AND ‘OMICS’ DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    A critical component in the design of the Chemical Effects in Biological Systems (CEBS) Knowledgebase is a strategy to capture toxicogenomics study protocols and the toxicity endpoint data (clinical pathology and histopathology). A Study is generally an experiment carried out du...

  6. The Effectiveness of Classroom Capture Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Maire B.; Burns, Colleen E.; Mitch, Nathan; Gomez, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of classroom capture systems (systems that capture audio and video footage of a lecture and attempt to replicate a classroom experience) is becoming increasingly popular at the university level. However, research on the effectiveness of classroom capture systems in the university classroom has been limited due to the recent development and…

  7. Capture Reactions with Halo Effective Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, R.

    2015-12-01

    Loosely bound nuclei far from the stability region emerge as a quantum phenomenon with many universal properties. The connection between these properties and the underlying symmetries can be best explored with halo/cluster EFT, an effective field theory where the softness of the binding momentum and the hardness of the core(s) form the expansion parameter of a given perturbative approach. In the following I highlight a particular application where these ideas are being tested, namely capture reactions.

  8. Exploiting the Capture Effect to Improve WLAN Throughput

    OpenAIRE

    Patras, Paul; Qi, Hanghang; Malone, David

    2012-01-01

    In practical WLAN deployments, the capture effect has been shown to enhance the performance of stations residing close to the AP, while putting at disadvantage the distant nodes. In this paper, we introduce an analytical model to characterise the performance of 802.11 devices with heterogeneous capture probabilities and different network loads, and explore the interaction between the MAC operation and PHY capture. Unlike previous studies, we reveal that the throughput of ...

  9. Calculation of doublet capture rate for muon capture in deuterium within chiral effective field theory

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adam, Jiří; Tater, Miloš; Truhlík, Emil; Epelbaum, E.; Machleidt, R.; Ricci, P.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 709, 1-2 (2012), s. 93-100. ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06002; GA ČR GAP203/11/0701 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : negative muon capture * deuteron * effective field theory * meson exchange currents Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 4.569, year: 2012

  10. Present status of the radiative neutron capture mechanisms -nonstatistical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of our knowledge about neutron radiative capture mechanisms is described. In the first section there are given a review on mathematical description of the neutron capture cross section and possible sources of correlation effects. The point of lecture is the explanation of connections between the intermediate structures and correlation effects. In one of the sections the explanation of the bump in γ-ray spectra is discussed. The typical experimental results are presented. (author)

  11. Radiative Neutron Capture on Carbon-14 in Effective Field Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Rupak, Gautam; Fernando, Lakma; Vaghani, Akshay

    2012-01-01

    The cross section for radiative capture of neutron on carbon-14 is calculated using the model-independent formalism of halo effective field theory. The dominant contribution from E1 transition is considered, and the cross section is expressed in terms of elastic scattering parameters of the effective range expansion. Contributions from both resonant and non-resonant interaction are calculated. Significant interference between these leads to a capture contribution that deviates from simple Bre...

  12. Effective Fingerprint Quality Estimation for Diverse Capture Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Sun Park; Sook Yoon; Shan Juan Xie; Jinwook Shin

    2010-01-01

    Recognizing the quality of fingerprints in advance can be beneficial for improving the performance of fingerprint recognition systems. The representative features to assess the quality of fingerprint images from different types of capture sensors are known to vary. In this paper, an effective quality estimation system that can be adapted for different types of capture sensors is designed by modifying and combining a set of features including orientation certainty, local orientation quality an...

  13. Capturing the Dimensions of Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    In the largest study of instructional practice ever undertaken, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation's Measures of Effective Teaching (MET) project is searching for tools to save the world from perfunctory teacher evaluations. The first report (released in December 2010) described the potential usefulness of student surveys for providing…

  14. LITTER EFFECT IN MOUSE PHENOTYPIC STUDIES

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimeček, Petr; Dzúr-Gejdošová, Mária; Chvátalová, I.; Forejt, Jiří

    SETUBAL, PORTUGAL: SCITEPRESS, AV D MANUELL, 27A 2 ESQ, SETUBAL, 2910-595, PORTUGAL, 2011, s. 238-243. ISBN 978-989-8425-36-2. [BIOINFORMATICS 2011, Proceedings of the International Conference on Bioinformatics Models, Methods and Algorithms. Setubal (PT), 26.01.2011-29.01.2011] Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Litter effect * Mixed-effect models * Phenome databases * Mouse genetics Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  15. Effect of cryopreservation protocols on the phenotypic stability of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gujjari, Pushpa; Muldrow, Tamara; Zhou, Jianlong Jim

    2010-01-01

    Eight cryopreservation protocols were assessed for their effects on the viability and phenotypic stability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae during a five-year study. It is found that viability and phenotypic features have remained largely unchanged when the yeast was preserved in glycerol, dimethyl sulphoxide, or sucrose at -80 degrees C or in liquid nitrogen. When sorbitol was used as a cryoprotectant, yeast cells frozen and stored at -80 degrees C manifested great decreases in viability after six months in storage and concomitantly large fluctuations in the rate of the trpl auxotrophic reversion. This phenotypic reversion was stable passage after passage. Such a degree of phenotypic fluctuations, however, was not observed for yeast cells preserved in the same sorbitol solution that went through a controlled freezing program and were subsequently stored in liquid nitrogen. These results indicate that some combinations of cryoprotective agent, freezing program, and storage temperature disturb biomaterials more profoundly during cryopreservation and imply a genetic basis of this phenotypic change. PMID:20919455

  16. Effect of Surface Modification and Macrophage Phenotype on Particle Internalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daniel [Iowa State University; Phan, Ngoc [Iowa State University; Isely, Christopher [Iowa State University; Bruene, Lucas [Iowa State University; Bratlie, Kaitlin M [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-10

    Material properties play a key role in the cellular internalization of polymeric particles. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of material characteristics such as water contact angle, zeta potential, melting temperature, and alternative activation of complement on particle internalization for pro-inflammatory, pro-angiogenic, and naïve macrophages by using biopolymers (~600 nm), functionalized with 13 different molecules. Understanding how material parameters influence particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes is important for targeted delivery to specific cell populations. Here, we demonstrate that material parameters affect the alternative pathway of complement activation as well as particle internalization for different macrophage phenotypes. Here, we show that the quantitative structure–activity relationship method (QSAR) previously used to predict physiochemical properties of materials can be applied to targeting different macrophage phenotypes. These findings demonstrated that targeted drug delivery to macrophages could be achieved by exploiting material parameters.

  17. Effectiveness of Audio on Screen Captures in Software Application Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronikas, Susan Walsh; Maushak, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    Presentation of software instruction has been supported by manuals and textbooks consisting of screen captures, but a multimedia approach may increase learning outcomes. This study investigated the effects of modality (text, audio, or dual) on the achievement and attitudes of college students learning a software application through the computer.…

  18. Capturing the spectrum of interaction effects in genetic association studies by simulated evaporative cooling network analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett A McKinney

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from human genetic studies of several disorders suggests that interactions between alleles at multiple genes play an important role in influencing phenotypic expression. Analytical methods for identifying Mendelian disease genes are not appropriate when applied to common multigenic diseases, because such methods investigate association with the phenotype only one genetic locus at a time. New strategies are needed that can capture the spectrum of genetic effects, from Mendelian to multifactorial epistasis. Random Forests (RF and Relief-F are two powerful machine-learning methods that have been studied as filters for genetic case-control data due to their ability to account for the context of alleles at multiple genes when scoring the relevance of individual genetic variants to the phenotype. However, when variants interact strongly, the independence assumption of RF in the tree node-splitting criterion leads to diminished importance scores for relevant variants. Relief-F, on the other hand, was designed to detect strong interactions but is sensitive to large backgrounds of variants that are irrelevant to classification of the phenotype, which is an acute problem in genome-wide association studies. To overcome the weaknesses of these data mining approaches, we develop Evaporative Cooling (EC feature selection, a flexible machine learning method that can integrate multiple importance scores while removing irrelevant genetic variants. To characterize detailed interactions, we construct a genetic-association interaction network (GAIN, whose edges quantify the synergy between variants with respect to the phenotype. We use simulation analysis to show that EC is able to identify a wide range of interaction effects in genetic association data. We apply the EC filter to a smallpox vaccine cohort study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and infer a GAIN for a collection of SNPs associated with adverse events. Our results suggest an important

  19. An Effective Method to Identify Heritable Components from Multivariate Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangwen Sun

    Full Text Available Multivariate phenotypes may be characterized collectively by a variety of low level traits, such as in the diagnosis of a disease that relies on multiple disease indicators. Such multivariate phenotypes are often used in genetic association studies. If highly heritable components of a multivariate phenotype can be identified, it can maximize the likelihood of finding genetic associations. Existing methods for phenotype refinement perform unsupervised cluster analysis on low-level traits and hence do not assess heritability. Existing heritable component analytics either cannot utilize general pedigrees or have to estimate the entire covariance matrix of low-level traits from limited samples, which leads to inaccurate estimates and is often computationally prohibitive. It is also difficult for these methods to exclude fixed effects from other covariates such as age, sex and race, in order to identify truly heritable components. We propose to search for a combination of low-level traits and directly maximize the heritability of this combined trait. A quadratic optimization problem is thus derived where the objective function is formulated by decomposing the traditional maximum likelihood method for estimating the heritability of a quantitative trait. The proposed approach can generate linearly-combined traits of high heritability that has been corrected for the fixed effects of covariates. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated in simulations and by a case study of cocaine dependence. Our approach was computationally efficient and derived traits of higher heritability than those by other methods. Additional association analysis with the derived cocaine-use trait identified genetic markers that were replicated in an independent sample, further confirming the utility and advantage of the proposed approach.

  20. A computer program for calculating effective capture cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FORTRAN program CPCS (Computer Program to analyze Capture TOF Spectra) was developed to deduce effective neutron capture cross sections from raw data obtained by a time-of-flight facility at the JAERI Electron Linear Accelerator. The data processing system for capture experiments consists of three stages, i.e. data acquisition, data handling (summing, listing, plotting, etc.), and data analysis (background determination, flux determination, normalization, etc.). In the three stages of processing, three respective computers are used; USC-3, FACOM U-200, and FACOM 230/75. CPCS is included in the stage of data analysis. A feature of this program is that the magnetic disk file is effectively used as INPUT/OUTPUT data storage interconnecting with other programs to determine neutron flux, to average calculated cross sections and to fit data with strength functions. This program is able to handle eight sets of TOF spectra with 8192 channels including channel block option simultaneously. Particular attention is paid to determine a precise background in the wide neutron energy range. (author)

  1. Effective Fingerprint Quality Estimation for Diverse Capture Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sun Park

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Recognizing the quality of fingerprints in advance can be beneficial for improving the performance of fingerprint recognition systems. The representative features to assess the quality of fingerprint images from different types of capture sensors are known to vary. In this paper, an effective quality estimation system that can be adapted for different types of capture sensors is designed by modifying and combining a set of features including orientation certainty, local orientation quality and consistency. The proposed system extracts basic features, and generates next level features which are applicable for various types of capture sensors. The system then uses the Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier to determine whether or not an image should be accepted as input to the recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed method can perform better than previous methods in terms of accuracy. In the meanwhile, the proposed method has an ability to eliminate residue images from the optical and capacitive sensors, and the coarse images from thermal sensors.

  2. Hydrodynamics of prey capture in sharks: effects of substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Wilga, Cheryl; Sanford, Christopher; Lauder, George

    2007-04-22

    In suction feeding, a volume of water is drawn into the mouth of a predator. Previous studies of suction feeding in fishes have shown that significant fluid velocities are confined to a region within one mouth width from the mouth. Therefore, the predator must be relatively close to the prey to ensure capture success. Here, theoretical modelling is combined with empirical data to unravel the mechanism behind feeding on a substrate. First, we approached the problem theoretically by combining the stream functions of two sinks. Computational fluid dynamics modelling is then applied to make quantitative predictions regarding the effects of substrate proximity on the feeding hydrodynamics of a benthic shark. An oblique circular cylinder and a shark head model were used. To test the models, we used digital particle image velocimetry to record fluid flow around the mouth of white-spotted bamboo sharks, Chiloscyllium plagiosum, during suction feeding on the substrate and in the water column. Empirical results confirmed the modelling predictions: the length of the flow field can be doubled due to passive substrate effects during prey capture. Feeding near a substrate extends the distance over which suction is effective and a predator strike can be effective further from the prey. PMID:17251144

  3. Towards capturing innovation effects of a CDSS (NjuRen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wass, Sofie; Carlsson, Bertil; Vimarlund, Vivian; Korkmaz, Seher; Shemeikka, Tero; Vég, Anikó

    2013-01-01

    The e-service NjuRen is a clinical decision support system used by physicians to calculate patients' renal function and provide support for selection of appropriate drug and dosage for patients with renal failure. Project NjuRen is a collaboration between Stockholm County Council and Jönköping International Business School and aims at evaluating the socio-economic impact of implementing IT-systems in healthcare. The project consist of several steps, first the development and adaptation of a model to measure innovation effects. In the second step the development of a survey to capture factual impacts and effects. Finally, in the third step to translate the effects into socio-economic terms. The result will help decision makers to identify the achieved benefits and outcomes that the implementation of the system has brought with it. PMID:23920823

  4. Calculation of Doublet Capture Rate for Muon Capture in Deuterium within Chiral Effective Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, J; Tater, M; Truhlik, E; Epelbaum, E; Machleidt, R; Ricci, P

    2011-01-01

    The doublet capture rate of the negative muon capture in deuterium is calculated employing the nuclear wave functions generated from accurate nucleon-nucleon potentials constructed at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory and the weak meson exchange current operator derived within the same formalism. All but one of the low-energy constants that enter the calculation were fixed from pion-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon scattering data. The low-energy constant d^R (c_D), which cannot be determined from the purely two-nucleon data, was extracted recently from the triton beta-decay and the binding energies of the three-nucleon systems. The calculated values of the doublet capture rates show a rather large spread for the used values of the d^R. Precise measurement of the doublet capture rate in the future will not only help to constrain the value of d^R, but also provide a highly nontrivial test of the nuclear chiral EFT framework. Besides, the precise knowledge of the consta...

  5. Effective goaf gas capture design at Ravensworth Underground Mine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miles Brown; Scott Hobden

    2014-01-01

    This paper highlights a reliable goaf gas capture system developed and used at Ravensworth Under-ground Mine since its trial in 2009. The method utilises horizontal holes drilled from underground sites and connected to an underground gas pipeline. This system incorporates a gas suction and flaring plant designed specifically for this method. The current method has captured effectively a total longwall, and adjacent goaf gas accounts for over 85%. The design of the holes drilled has been the success of the gas flow reliability. The flow is extraordinarily consistent and predictable. The management of the under-ground pipeline determines the overall reliability of flow. The design has resulted in Ravensworth Man-agement being confident to remove a gas bearing bleeder roadway and still manage the existing tailgate roadway for allowing access as required. The reduction of CO2 equivalent emissions recorded is approx-imately 0.35 ? 106 tons annually. This design has further improvements to be added to allow use at any other site with gas in the overlying strata.

  6. Capturing Thoughts, Capturing Minds?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni

    2004-01-01

    Think Aloud is cost effective, promises access to the user's mind and is the applied usability technique. But 'keep talking' is difficult, besides, the multimodal interface is visual not verbal. Eye-tracking seems to get around the verbalisation problem. It captures the visual focus of attention....... However, it is expensive, obtrusive and produces huge amount of data. Besides, eye-tracking do not give access to user's mind. Capturing interface/cursor tracking may be cost effective. It is easy to install, data collection is automatic and unobtrusive and replaying the captured recording to the user and...

  7. Mutagenic effect of boronophenylalanine and borocaptate in neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the mutagenic effect in BNCT, CHO cells were incubated for 2 hours or 20 hours in culture medium with borocaptate sodium (BSH: Na2B12H11SH), or boronophenylalanine (BPA) prior exposure to neutrons from the heavy water facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) and the occurrence of mutations at the HPRT locus was measured. The mutagenicity of BSH and BPA was almost similar to the mutagenicity of 10B-boric acid at the same 10B concentration when cells were irradiated by iso-survival neutron dose. Pre-incubation to BSH for 20 hours caused an increase both in the cell killing effect and mutagenic effect in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) compared with pre-incubation to BSH for 2 hours. However, pre-incubation to BPA for 20 hours caused an increase in the cell killing effect but induced a decrease in mutagenic effect in BNCT compared with pre-incubation to BPA for 2 hours. (author)

  8. Short term effects of capture on movements in free-ranging wolves (Canis lupus) in Scandinavia

    OpenAIRE

    Teräväinen, Malin

    2016-01-01

    Remote monitoring of wild animals by radio-tags and bio-sensors is frequently applied in wildlife research, monitoring and management. These methods require capture and often anaesthesia of animals that in turn may affect post-capture behaviour. Assessment of post-capture effects is needed to avoid biases in the research data due to capture-related effect on behaviour, but also to measure unnecessary discomfort and suffering for the animals. The Scandinavian wolf population has...

  9. Effects of Electron Screening on Electron Capture Rates in High Density Presupernova Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋广飞; 彭秋和; 邹志刚

    2003-01-01

    Considering that the electron capture rate can be greatly reduced by the electron screening effect in the regime of high temperature and high density, we calculate the effect of electron screening on the electron capture rate for two important elements 56Ni and 55Co in the high density condition of a pre-supernova star. The effect of electron screening is so effective that the electron capture rate may be reduced to about 20%.

  10. Proton-Proton Weak Capture in Chiral Effective Field Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcucci, Laura Elisa [Pisa U., INFN-Pisa; Schiavilla, Rocco [Old Dominion U., JLAB; Viviani, MIchele [INFN-Pisa

    2013-05-01

    The astrophysical $S$-factor for proton-proton weak capture is calculated in chiral effective field theory over the center-of-mass relative-energy range 0--100 keV. The chiral two-nucleon potential derived up to next-to-next-to-next-to leading order is augmented by the full electromagnetic interaction including, beyond Coulomb, two-photon and vacuum-polarization corrections. The low-energy constants (LEC's) entering the weak current operators are fixed so as to reproduce the $A=3$ binding energies and magnetic moments, and the Gamow-Teller matrix element in tritium $\\beta$ decay. Contributions from $S$ and $P$ partial waves in the incoming two-proton channel are retained. The $S$-factor at zero energy is found to be $S(0)=(4.030 \\pm 0.006)\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$, with a $P$-wave contribution of $0.020\\times 10^{-23}$ MeV fm$^2$. The theoretical uncertainty is due to the fitting procedure of the LEC's and to the cutoff dependence. It is shown that polynomial fits to parametrize the energy dependence of the $S$-factor are inherently unstable.

  11. Chemical Effects following Thermal Neutron Capture in Potassium Chromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The chemical effects accompanying radiative thermal neutron capture in potassium chromate have been extensively studied in the past few years. The presence of radioactive chromic ions formed upon dissolving neutron irradiated potassium chromate and the reactions from heating the material above 150°C have been explained by reactions involving the presence of CrO4+ ions in the crystal lattice. A new analytical method, based on the slow rate of exchange between chromo and chromic ions, has been used to show that more than 90% of the reduced chromium ions are present in the +2 valence state. The results obtained, using the new analytical method, indicate that the processes taking place during dissolution are hydration processes while the reduction of chromium fragments takes place in the crystal. Isothermal and isochronical annealing experiments carried out on crystals irradiated at room temperature show that three annealing reactions occur between 60° and 275°C. The influence of quenching and foreign ions on the three annealing reactions has been studied. Investigations made in parallel with chemical changes of Cr51 recoil species and electronic changes in irradiated potassium chromate during post-irradiation treatment have been carried out measuring the thermoluminescence spectrum, the electrical conductivity and the chemical distribution of Cr51 fragments. The results show that the chemical annealing reactions are associated with electronic changes indicating a close relation between chemical annealing and the disappearance of charge carriers. (author)

  12. Isotopic effect in nuclear capture of negative muons in xenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life time of negative muons in 1s-state of 129Xe was measured. Muon nuclear capture rate in 129Xe obtained from the measurements is compared with similar results for 132,136Xe isotopes. Essential dependence of muon nuclear capture rate on mass number of isotopes mentioned above is observed. Experimental results are compared with calculations by the Goulard-Primakov semiempirical formula

  13. Similarity-based search of model organism, disease and drug effect phenotypes

    KAUST Repository

    Hoehndorf, Robert

    2015-02-19

    Background: Semantic similarity measures over phenotype ontologies have been demonstrated to provide a powerful approach for the analysis of model organism phenotypes, the discovery of animal models of human disease, novel pathways, gene functions, druggable therapeutic targets, and determination of pathogenicity. Results: We have developed PhenomeNET 2, a system that enables similarity-based searches over a large repository of phenotypes in real-time. It can be used to identify strains of model organisms that are phenotypically similar to human patients, diseases that are phenotypically similar to model organism phenotypes, or drug effect profiles that are similar to the phenotypes observed in a patient or model organism. PhenomeNET 2 is available at http://aber-owl.net/phenomenet. Conclusions: Phenotype-similarity searches can provide a powerful tool for the discovery and investigation of molecular mechanisms underlying an observed phenotypic manifestation. PhenomeNET 2 facilitates user-defined similarity searches and allows researchers to analyze their data within a large repository of human, mouse and rat phenotypes.

  14. The Effect of Selection on the Phenotypic Variance

    OpenAIRE

    Shnol, E.E.; Kondrashov, A S

    1993-01-01

    We consider the within-generation changes of phenotypic variance caused by selection w(x) which acts on a quantitative trait x. If before selection the trait has Gaussian distribution, its variance decreases if the second derivative of the logarithm of w(x) is negative for all x, while if it is positive for all x, the variance increases.

  15. Hydrodynamics of prey capture in sharks: effects of substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Nauwelaerts, Sandra; Wilga, Cheryl; Sanford, Christopher; Lauder, George

    2006-01-01

    In suction feeding, a volume of water is drawn into the mouth of a predator. Previous studies of suction feeding in fishes have shown that significant fluid velocities are confined to a region within one mouth width from the mouth. Therefore, the predator must be relatively close to the prey to ensure capture success. Here, theoretical modelling is combined with empirical data to unravel the mechanism behind feeding on a substrate. First, we approached the problem theoretically by combining t...

  16. BARRIER EFFECT IN CO2 CAPTURE AND STORAGE FEASIBILITY STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    Montegrossi, G.; CNR-IGG Firenze; Cantucci, B.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia; Bicocchi, G.; Department of Earth Science Via La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Vaselli, O.; Department of Earth Science Via La Pira 4, 50121 Florence (Italy); Quattrocchi, F.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma1, Roma, Italia

    2009-01-01

    CO2 Capture & Storage (CCS) in saline aquifer is one of the most promising technologies for reducing anthropogenic emission of CO2. Feasibility studies for CO2 geo-sequestration in Italy have increased in the last few years. Before planning a CCS plant an appropriate precision and accuracy in the prediction of the reservoir evolution during injection, in terms of both geochemical calculation and fluid flow properties, is demanded. In this work a geochemical model will be presented for an offs...

  17. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Brandão, Fabiana AS; Lorena S Derengowski; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work,...

  18. IGF-1 Has Plaque-Stabilizing Effects in Atherosclerosis by Altering Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    von der Thüsen, Jan H; Borensztajn, Keren S.; Moimas, Silvia; van Heiningen, Sandra; Teeling, Peter; Van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Biessen, Erik A. L.

    2011-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) signaling is important for the maintenance of plaque stability in atherosclerosis due to its effects on vascular smooth muscle cell (vSMC) phenotype. To investigate this hypothesis, we studied the effects of the highly inflammatory milieu of the atherosclerotic plaque on IGF-1 signaling and stability-related phenotypic parameters of murine vSMCs in vitro, and the effects of IGF-1 supplementation on plaque phenotype in an atherosclerotic mouse model. M1-pol...

  19. Transgenerational Effects of Stress Exposure on Offspring Phenotypes in Apomictic Dandelion

    OpenAIRE

    Verhoeven, K.J.F.; Van Gurp, T.P.

    2012-01-01

    Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various stresses was previously shown to heritably alter DNA methylation patterns. In this study we explore whether these induced changes are accompanied by heritable effects on offspring phenotypes. We o...

  20. A Statistical Approach for Testing Cross-Phenotype Effects of Rare Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadaway, K Alaine; Cutler, David J; Duncan, Richard; Moore, Jacob L; Ware, Erin B; Jhun, Min A; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Smith, Jennifer A; Peyser, Patricia A; Kardia, Sharon L R; Ghosh, Debashis; Epstein, Michael P

    2016-03-01

    Increasing empirical evidence suggests that many genetic variants influence multiple distinct phenotypes. When cross-phenotype effects exist, multivariate association methods that consider pleiotropy are often more powerful than univariate methods that model each phenotype separately. Although several statistical approaches exist for testing cross-phenotype effects for common variants, there is a lack of similar tests for gene-based analysis of rare variants. In order to fill this important gap, we introduce a statistical method for cross-phenotype analysis of rare variants using a nonparametric distance-covariance approach that compares similarity in multivariate phenotypes to similarity in rare-variant genotypes across a gene. The approach can accommodate both binary and continuous phenotypes and further can adjust for covariates. Our approach yields a closed-form test whose significance can be evaluated analytically, thereby improving computational efficiency and permitting application on a genome-wide scale. We use simulated data to demonstrate that our method, which we refer to as the Gene Association with Multiple Traits (GAMuT) test, provides increased power over competing approaches. We also illustrate our approach using exome-chip data from the Genetic Epidemiology Network of Arteriopathy. PMID:26942286

  1. Environmental induction and phenotypic retention of adaptive maternal effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Kevin P

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The origin of complex adaptations is one of the most controversial questions in biology. Environmental induction of novel phenotypes, where phenotypic retention of adaptive developmental variation is enabled by organismal complexity and homeostasis, can be a starting point in the evolution of some adaptations, but empirical examples are rare. Comparisons of populations that differ in historical recurrence of environmental induction can offer insight into its evolutionary significance, and recent colonization of North America by the house finch (Carpodacus mexicanus provides such an opportunity. Results In both native (southern Arizona and newly established (northern Montana, 18 generations populations, breeding female finches exhibit the same complex adaptation – a sex-bias in ovulation sequence – in response to population-specific environmental stimulus of differing recurrence. We document that, in the new population, the adaptation is induced by a novel environment during females' first breeding and is subsequently retained across breeding attempts. In the native population, first-breeding females expressed a precise adaptive response to a recurrent environmental stimulus without environmental induction. We document strong selection on environmental cue recognition in both populations and find that rearrangement of the same proximate mechanism – clustering of oocytes that become males and females – can enable an adaptive response to distinct environmental stimuli. Conclusion The results show that developmental plasticity induced by novel environmental conditions confers significant fitness advantages to both maternal and offspring generations and might play an important role not only in the successful establishment of this invasive species across the widest ecological range of extant birds, but also can link environmental induction and genetic inheritance in the evolution of novel adaptations.

  2. Effects of prey size and mobility on prey-capture kinematics in leopard sharks triakis semifasciata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry-Graham

    1998-08-01

    Recent work on teleosts suggests that attack behaviors or kinematics may be modified by a predator on the basis of the size of the prey or the ability of the prey to sense predators and escape capture (elusivity). Sharks are generally presumed to be highly visual predators; thus, it is reasonable to expect that they might also be capable of such behavioral modulation. In this study, I investigated the effect of prey item size and type on prey-capture behavior in leopard sharks (Triakis semifasciata) that had been acclimated to feeding in the laboratory. Using high-speed video, sharks were filmed feeding on two sizes of the same prey item (thawed shrimp pieces) and two potentially more elusive prey items (live earthworms and live mud shrimp). In leopard sharks, little effect of prey elusivity was found for kinematic variables during prey capture. However, the large proportion of successful captures of the live prey suggests that they did not prove to be truly elusive prey items for the leopard shark. There were significant size effects on prey-capture kinematics, with the larger non-elusive items inducing greater head expansion during prey capture. Ram-suction index values also indicated that strikes on large, non-elusive prey had a significantly larger suction component than strikes on similar small prey items. This finding is interesting given that the two sizes of non-elusive prey item offered no differential challenge in terms of a performance consequence (reduced capture success). PMID:9679105

  3. The effect of oxcarbazepine in peripheral neuropathic pain depends on pain phenotype: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled phenotype-stratified study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demant, Dyveke T; Lund, Karen; Vollert, Jan;

    2014-01-01

    In neuropathic pain it has been suggested that pain phenotype based on putative pain mechanisms may predict response to treatment. This was a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, and phenotype-stratified study with 2 6-week treatment periods of oxcarbazepine (1800-2400mg) and placebo. The...... primary efficacy measure was change in median pain intensity between baseline and the last week of treatment measured on an 11-point numeric rating scale, and the primary objective was to compare the effect of oxcarbazepine in patients with and without the irritable nociceptor phenotype as defined by...

  4. Effects of inlet/outlet configurations on the electrostatic capture of airborne nanoparticles and viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motivated by capture and detection of airborne biological agents in real time with a cantilever biosensor without introducing the agents into liquids, we present the effects of inlet/outlet configurations of a homemade particle collector on the electrostatic capture of airborne 100 nm diameter nanoparticles under swirling gas flows. This particle collector has three different inlet/outlet configurations: forward inlet/outlet (FO), backward inlet/outlet (BO) and straight inlet/outlet (SO) configurations. We also present the electrostatic capture of Vaccinia viruses using the same particle collector and compare these virus measurements with the nanoparticle cases. The most particles were collected in the FO configuration. The numbers of particles captured in the BO and SO configurations were close within their standard deviations. For all the three configurations tested, the number of particles captured in the center electrode C was much smaller than those captured in the other electrodes at a flow rate of 1.1 l min−1 and an applied potential of 2 kV. Using a commercial CFD code FLUENT, we also simulated the effects of the three inlet/outlet configurations on the particle capture in terms of particle trajectories, velocities and travel times. This simulation was in a good agreement with measurements that the FO configuration is the most favorable to particle capture among the tested configurations at a flow rate of 1.1 l min−1. The effects of particle diameters on the capture will also be discussed. This collector can be used for real-time monitoring of bioaerosols along with cantilever biosensors

  5. Figural vividness and persuasion: capturing the "elusive" vividness effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, Rosanna E; Rhoads, Kelton V L; Sagarin, Brad J

    2011-05-01

    Despite the widespread belief that the use of vividness in persuasive communications is effective, many laboratory studies have failed to find vividness effects. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is that many laboratory tests have not vivified solely the central thesis of the message but have vivified irrelevant portions of the message as well or instead. Two experiments examined the effect of vivifying the central ("figure") or noncentral ("ground") features of a message on persuasion. In both experiments, the formerly "elusive vividness effect" of superior persuasion was found, but only in vivid-figure communications. A mediation analysis revealed the salutary role of supportive cognitive elaborations, rather than memory for the communication, in mediating the vividness effect. The findings caution against attempts to persuade by increasing overall message vividness because off-thesis vividness has the unintended and undercutting consequence of distracting recipients from the point of the communication. PMID:21383069

  6. Subsidising carbon capture. Effects on energy prices and market shares in the power market

    OpenAIRE

    Aune, Finn Roar; Liu, Gang; Rosendahl, Knut Einar; Sagen, Eirik Lund

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines how ambitious climate policies and subsidies to carbon capture may affect international energy prices and market shares in the power market. A detailed numerical model of the international energy markets is used. We first conclude that an ambitious climate policy alone will have substantial effects in the power market, with considerable growth in renewable power production and eventually use of carbon capture. Gas power production will also benefit from such a policy. Subs...

  7. Effects of nanopillar array diameter and spacing on cancer cell capture and cell behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shunqiang; Wan, Yuan; Liu, Yaling

    2014-10-01

    While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs and manipulation of cytomorphology in future.While substrates with nanopillars (NPs) have emerged as promising platforms for isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs), the influence of diameter and spacing of NPs on CTC capture is still unclear. In this paper, CTC-capture yield and cell behaviors have been investigated by using antibody functionalized NPs of various diameters (120-1100 nm) and spacings (35-800 nm). The results show a linear relationship between the cell capture yield and effective contact area of NP substrates where a NP array of small diameter and reasonable spacing is preferred; however, spacing that is too small or too large adversely impairs the capture efficiency and specificity, respectively. In addition, the formation of pseudopodia between captured cells and the substrate is found to be dependent not only on cell adhesion status but also on elution strength and shear direction. These findings provide essential guidance in designing NP substrates for more efficient capture of CTCs

  8. Ripple Effect Mapping: A "Radiant" Way to Capture Program Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollock, Debra Hansen; Flage, Lynette; Chazdon, Scott; Paine, Nathan; Higgins, Lorie

    2012-01-01

    Learn more about a promising follow-up, participatory group process designed to document the results of Extension educational efforts within complex, real-life settings. The method, known as Ripple Effect Mapping, uses elements of Appreciative Inquiry, mind mapping, and qualitative data analysis to engage program participants and other community…

  9. Transgenerational effects of stress exposure on offspring phenotypes in apomictic dandelion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koen J F Verhoeven

    Full Text Available Heritable epigenetic modulation of gene expression is a candidate mechanism to explain parental environmental effects on offspring phenotypes, but current evidence for environment-induced epigenetic changes that persist in offspring generations is scarce. In apomictic dandelions, exposure to various stresses was previously shown to heritably alter DNA methylation patterns. In this study we explore whether these induced changes are accompanied by heritable effects on offspring phenotypes. We observed effects of parental jasmonic acid treatment on offspring specific leaf area and on offspring interaction with a generalist herbivore; and of parental nutrient stress on offspring root-shoot biomass ratio, tissue P-content and leaf morphology. Some of the effects appeared to enhance offspring ability to cope with the same stresses that their parents experienced. Effects differed between apomictic genotypes and were not always consistently observed between different experiments, especially in the case of parental nutrient stress. While this context-dependency of the effects remains to be further clarified, the total set of results provides evidence for the existence of transgenerational effects in apomictic dandelions. Zebularine treatment affected the within-generation response to nutrient stress, pointing at a role of DNA methylation in phenotypic plasticity to nutrient environments. This study shows that stress exposure in apomictic dandelions can cause transgenerational phenotypic effects, in addition to previously demonstrated transgenerational DNA methylation effects.

  10. Oncological therapeutic effect analysis of boron neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the total energy of the alpha particles from 10B(n, α) 7Li, reaction, deposited in tumours leading to the complete destruction of tumour cells is made. Its therapeutic effect on many malignant tumours is highlighted. The behaviour of the energy deposited by the released alpha particles in tumours is demonstrated by some relevant graphical plots. (author). 12 refs, 3 figs

  11. Bottom-up effects on attention capture and choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peschel, Anne; Orquin, Jacob Lund; Mueller Loose, Simone

    information available to form a decision. Does changing one visual cue in the stimulus set affect attention towards this cue and what does that mean for the choice outcome? To address this, we conducted a combined eye tracking and choice experiment in a consumer choice setting with visual shelf simulations of......Attention processes and decision making are accepted to be closely linked together because only information that is attended to can be incorporated in the decision process. Little is known however, to which extent bottom-up processes of attention affect stimulus selection and therefore the...... different product categories. Surface size and visual saliency of a product label were manipulated to determine bottom-up effects on attention and choice. Results show a strong and significant increase in attention in terms of fixation likelihood towards product labels which are larger and more visually...

  12. Selenistasis: Epistatic Effects of Selenium on Cardiovascular Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Loscalzo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although selenium metabolism is intricately linked to cardiovascular biology and function, and deficiency of selenium is associated with cardiac pathology, utilization of selenium in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease remains an elusive goal. From a reductionist standpoint, the major function of selenium in vivo is antioxidant defense via its incorporation as selenocysteine into enzyme families such as glutathione peroxidases and thioredoxin reductases. In addition, selenium compounds are heterogeneous and have complex metabolic fates resulting in effects that are not entirely dependent on selenoprotein expression. This complex biology of selenium in vivo may underlie the fact that beneficial effects of selenium supplementation demonstrated in preclinical studies using models of oxidant stress-induced cardiovascular dysfunction, such as ischemia-reperfusion injury and myocardial infarction, have not been consistently observed in clinical trials. In fact, recent studies have yielded data that suggest that unselective supplementation of selenium may, indeed, be harmful. Interesting biologic actions of selenium are its simultaneous effects on redox balance and methylation status, a combination that may influence gene expression. These combined actions may explain some of the biphasic effects seen with low and high doses of selenium, the potentially harmful effects seen in normal individuals, and the beneficial effects noted in preclinical studies of disease. Given the complexity of selenium biology, systems biology approaches may be necessary to reach the goal of optimization of selenium status to promote health and prevent disease.

  13. Validity of Eye Movement Methods and Indices for Capturing Semantic (Associative) Priming Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odekar, Anshula; Hallowell, Brooke; Kruse, Hans; Moates, Danny; Lee, Chao-Yang

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the usefulness of eye movement methods and indices as a tool for studying priming effects by verifying whether eye movement indices capture semantic (associative) priming effects in a visual cross-format (written word to semantically related picture) priming paradigm. Method: In the…

  14. Effect of phenotypic expression of Brahman breeding on marbling and tenderness traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbeck, J A; Tatum, J D; Field, T G; Morgan, J B; Smith, G C

    1996-02-01

    Steers with known proportions of Brahman and Hereford breeding (80 quarter-bloods, 25% Brahman x 75% Hereford and 79 half-bloods, 50% Brahman x 50% Hereford) were used to determine the effect of phenotype on marbling and beef tenderness characteristics. Three experienced evaluators independently classified each live steer according to estimated proportion of Brahman breeding based on phenotypic evidence of Brahman breed characteristics. The steers were slaughtered, their carcasses were graded, and a carcass. Samples of longissimus muscle were obtained for measurement of 24-h calpastatin activity, sensory panel evaluation, and Warner-Bratzler shear (WBS) force measurements. Paired steaks were aged (6 and 18 d postmortem) and palatability determinations were completed. Estimates of live animal phenotype ranged from 0/16 to 9/16 for quarter-blood Brahman steers and from 1/14 to 13/16 for half-blood Brahman steers. Neither live animal phenotype nor carcass hump height was correlated with marbling score. Live animal phenotype was correlated (P carcass hump height exhibited low, negative correlations (P Brahman were tougher (P Brahman. Steaks from carcasses with hump height measurements of 7.60 cm or greater had lower panel tenderness ratings and higher WBS values (P carcasses with hump heights less than 6.35 cm. Quarter-blood and half-blood Brahman steers that were similar in phenotype produced steaks that were similar in tenderness. Results of this study suggest that as phenotypic evidence of Brahman breeding increases the tenderness of cooked steaks from Brahman crossbred steers decreases. PMID:8690665

  15. PHENOTYPIC ASSORTMENT MEDIATES THE EFFECT OF SOCIAL SELECTION IN A WILD BEETLE POPULATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Formica, Vincent A.; McGlothlin, Joel W.; Wood, Corlett W.; Augat, Malcolm E.; Butterfield, Rebecca E.; Barnard, Mollie E.; Brodie, Edmund D.

    2011-01-01

    Social interactions often have major fitness consequences, but little is known about how specific interacting phenotypes affect the strength of natural selection. Social influences on the evolutionary process can be assessed using a multilevel selection approach that partitions the effects of social

  16. Study of the Effectiveness of OCR for Decentralized Data Capture and Conversion. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, David M.; And Others

    The ERIC network conversion to an OCR (Optical Character Recognition) mode of data entry was studied to analyze the potential effectiveness of OCR data entry for future EPC/s (Editorial Processing Centers). Study results are also applicable to any other system involving decentralized bibliographic data capture and conversion functions. The report…

  17. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using fast neutrons: Effects in two human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results demonstrate that the effect of fast neutrons on cell survival in cell culture can be enhanced by boron neutron capture reaction. Even with lower enhancement ratios, the concept of NCT assisted fast neutron therapy may successfully be applied for tumor treatment with the Essen cyclotron. (orig.)

  18. Relativistic effects in non-radiative electron capture in ion-atom collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a modified eikonal method (Blankenbecler-Goldberger) has been extended to perform calculations for the electron capture processes in relativistic ion-atom collisions. The results are compared with the first order Born approximation and the ordinary eikonal approximation. The relativistic effects are discussed. Some conclusions are drawn. (author)

  19. Motivation for the determination of the 244Cm effective neutron capture cross-section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the effective neutron capture cross-section of 244Cm was tried, and the irradiation test of the 244Cm sample was performed for 1 cycle. Gamma- and alpha-rays measurements were performed to analyze the productions from the 244Cm(n,γ) and fission reactions. (author)

  20. Effects of sample delivery on analyte capture in porous bead sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Jie; Li, Luanyi E; Kulla, Eliona; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Floriano, Pierre N; McDevitt, John T

    2012-12-21

    Sample delivery is a crucial aspect of point-of-care applications where sample volumes need to be low and assay times short, while providing high analytical and clinical sensitivity. In this paper, we explore the influence of the factors surrounding sample delivery on analyte capture in an immunoassay-based sensor array manifold of porous beads resting in individual wells. We model using computational fluid dynamics and a flow-through device containing beads sensitized specifically to C-reactive protein (CRP) to explore the effects of volume of sample, rate of sample delivery, and use of recirculation vs. unilateral delivery on the effectiveness of the capture of CRP on and within the porous bead sensor. Rate of sample delivery lends to the development of a time-dependent, shrinking depletion region around the bead exterior. Our findings reveal that at significantly high rates of delivery, unique to porous bead substrates, capture at the rim of the bead is reaction-limited, while capture in the interior of the bead is transport-limited. While the fluorescence signal results from the aggregate of captured material throughout the bead, multiple kinetic regimes exist within the bead. Further, under constant pressure conditions dictated by the array architecture, we reveal the existence of an optimal flow rate that generates the highest signal, under point-of-care constraints of limited-volume and limited-time. When high sensitivity is needed, recirculation can be implemented to overcome the analyte capture limitations due to volume and time constraints. Computational simulations agree with experimental results performed under similar conditions. PMID:23117481

  1. Photoinhibition and drought in Mediterranean woody saplings: scaling effects and interactions in sun and shade phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Fernando; Dobarro, Iker; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Pearcy, Robert W

    2005-01-01

    Interacting effects of high light and drought on the performance of sun and shade phenotypes were experimentally undertaken following survival, chlorophyll fluorescence and gas exchange in 2-year-old saplings of four Mediterranean trees (Quercus ilex and Q. coccifera as water-saving species, and Pistacia lentiscus and P. terebinthus as water-spending species). Half of the saplings were grown in full sunlight and the other half in the shade (6% sunlight). Half of each combination of species-phenotype was exposed to high light during a simulated late-summer drought. Light absorptance and gas exchange were scaled up to the whole plant with the 3-D geometrical model, Y-Plant. Quercus species were more plastic and tolerated high light and water stress better than Pistacia species, surviving longer and in drier soils, and exhibiting a less pronounced photoinhibition. There was no evidence of disadvantage for shade phenotypes under high light with increasing drought. By contrast, shade phenotypes survived longer despite larger initial decreases in photochemical efficiency and higher sensitivity to drought than sun phenotypes. The enhanced control of transpiration during drought in water-saving versus water-spending species (and also in shade versus sun phenotypes in three out of the four species) allowed extended survival. Photoinhibition reduced whole crown carbon gain in high light by c. 3% and affected significantly more the shaded leaves of a given plant (reducing their carbon gain by up to 7%) than those exposed to direct sunlight. Despite this apparently minor impact, whole plant carbon gain reduction by photoinhibition negatively correlated with survival and drought tolerance. The implications for succession and forest regeneration in arid environments, particularly under a global change scenario, are discussed. PMID:15569705

  2. Postanesthetic Effects of Isoflurane on Behavioral Phenotypes of Adult Male C57BL/6J Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yonezaki, Kumiko; Uchimoto, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Tomoyuki; Asakura, Ayako; Kobayashi, Ayako; Takase, Kenkichi; Goto, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Isoflurane was previously the major clinical anesthetic agent but is now mainly used for veterinary anesthesia. Studies have reported widespread sites of action of isoflurane, suggesting a wide array of side effects besides sedation. In the present study, we phenotyped isoflurane-treated mice to investigate the postanesthetic behavioral effects of isoflurane. We applied comprehensive behavioral test batteries comprising sensory test battery, motor test battery, anxiety test battery, depressio...

  3. Throughput-Delay Trade-Off for Slotted Aloha Multiple Access with Capture Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chehri

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Medium Access Control (MAC protocols are one of most important research issues in communication and networking. There have been proposed several MAC protocols in wireless as well in wired networks. Approach: ALOHA-based protocol is the simplest one, being able to provide prompt access, reliable channels and support for quality of service. However its limited capacity, low throughput and excessive delays make it not suitable for several applications. Results: So there had been many efforts devoted to increase its performance, one of them is the capture effect. With capture effect, the packets arriving with the highest power had a good chance to be detected accurately, even when other packets were present. Conclusion: In this study, a throughput-delay trade-off was investigated to improve the network performance. The capture threshold was assigned to the highest throughout/time delay ratio. Therefore, the capture threshold which provided a high throughput and low time delay was selected by a central node.

  4. Characterization of a flocculation-like phenotype in Cryptococcus neoformans and its effects on pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Zaragoza, Oscar; Casadevall, Arturo; Fries, Bettina C

    2006-11-01

    We investigated the phenomenon of cell-cell aggregation (flocculation) in a serotype D strain of Cryptococcus neoformans (ATCC 24067, isolate RC-2). Cell aggregation into clumps of 5-40 cells (clump+ cells) occurred during the early log phase and disappeared in the beginning of the stationary phase (clump- cells). The cell aggregation phenomenon was medium dependent. Clump+ cells could be dispersed by either vortexing or proteinase K digestion. Most importantly, the transient change in cellular phenotype changed several important host-pathogen interactions. Adherence of clump+ cells to murine macrophage-like cells J774.16 was significantly (P phenotype undergoes significant changes that result in a transient flocculation-like phenotype. We hypothesize that this cell-cell aggregation is the result of changes in protein content in the polysaccharide capsule. We conclude from our data that the change in cellular phenotype has a dramatic effect on cell adherence, and on complement-mediated phagocytosis, both of which can affect the pathogenesis of the disease in the host. Our results underscore the complexity of studies that investigate host pathogen interactions and may explain differences and inconsistencies observed in in vitro and in vivo assays. PMID:16759224

  5. Phenotypic and genetic effects of recessive haplotypes on yield, longevity, and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J B; Null, D J; VanRaden, P M

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypes from the August 2015 US national genetic evaluation were used to compute phenotypic effects of 18 recessive haplotypes in Ayrshire (n=1), Brown Swiss (n=5), Holstein (n=10), and Jersey (n=2) cattle on milk, fat, and protein yields, somatic cell score (SCS), single-trait productive life (PL), daughter pregnancy rate (DPR), heifer conception rate (HCR), and cow conception rate (CCR). The haplotypes evaluated were Ayrshire haplotype 1, Brown Swiss haplotypes 1 and 2, spinal dysmyelination, spinal muscular atrophy, Weaver Syndrome, brachyspina, Holstein cholesterol deficiency, Holstein haplotypes 1 to 5, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, complex vertebral malformation, mulefoot (syndactyly), and Jersey haplotypes 1 and 2. When causal variants are unknown and tests are based only on single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes, it can sometimes be difficult to accurately determine carrier status. For example, 2 Holstein haplotypes for cholesterol deficiency have the same single nucleotide polymorphism genotype, but only one of them carries the causative mutation. Genotyped daughters of carrier bulls included in the analysis ranged from 8 for Weaver Syndrome to 17,869 for Holstein haplotype 3. Lactation records preadjusted for nongenetic factors and direct genomic values (DGV) were used to estimate phenotypic and genetic effects of recessive haplotypes, respectively. We found no phenotypic or genetic differences between carriers and noncarriers of Ayrshire or Brown Swiss defects. Several associations were noted for Holstein haplotypes, including fat and HCR for Holstein haplotype 0 carriers; milk, protein, SCS, PL, and fertility for Holstein haplotype 1; protein, PL, CCR, and HCR for Holstein haplotype 2; milk, protein, and fertility for Holstein haplotype 4; and protein yield and DPR for Holstein haplotype 5. There were no differences among bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency carriers, but complex vertebral malformation affected fat yield and mulefoot

  6. Effect of SO 2 on CO 2 Capture Using Liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2013-08-15

    Liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs), consisting of silica nanoparticles with a grafted polymeric canopy, were synthesized. Previous work on NOHMs has revealed that CO2 capture behaviors in these hybrid materials can be tuned by modifying the structure of the polymeric canopy. Because SO2, which is another acidic gas found in flue gas, would also interact with NOHMs, this study was designed to investigate its effect on CO2 capture in NOHMs. In particular, CO2 capture capacities as well as swelling and CO2 packing behaviors of NOHMs were analyzed using thermogravimetric analyses and Raman and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopies before and after exposure of NOHMs to SO2. It was found that the SO2 absorption in NOHMs was only prominent at high SO2 levels (i.e., 3010 ppm; Ptot = 0.4 MPa) far exceeding the typical SO2 concentration in flue gas. As expected, the competitive absorption between SO2 and CO2 for the same absorption sites (i.e., ether and amine groups) resulted in a decreased CO2 capture capacity of NOHMs. The swelling of NOHMs was not notably affected by the presence of SO 2 within the given concentration range (Ptot = 0-0.68 MPa). On the other hand, SO2, owing to its Lewis acidic nature, interacted with the ether groups of the polymeric canopy and, thus, changed the CO2 packing behaviors in NOHMs. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  7. 8 Good Reasons for Reconsidering Lecture Capturing (of which Cost-Effectiveness is One)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godsk, Mikkel

    Lecture capturing as an educational technology has been the object of much controversy due to the presuppositions that it mainly support passive learning, that the lengthy format is not suitable for online learning, and that it may work as a pretext for inaction for e-learning administrators (as e.......g. expressed by Smithers, 2011; Hallett & Faria, 2006; and others). Some of these presuppositions are probably valid in some contexts; however, in other contexts the technology may be a reasonable and cost-effective alternative. This article presents my initial experiences with implementing lecture captures at...... the Faculty of Science and Technology, Aarhus University, and which costs and educational affordances the implementation have yielded. Furthermore, I will address the relevance of considering cost-effectiveness of technology enhancing learning in terms of costs in proportion to the realized...

  8. The Baldwin effect and genetic assimilation: revisiting two mechanisms of evolutionary change mediated by phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispo, Erika

    2007-11-01

    Two different, but related, evolutionary theories pertaining to phenotypic plasticity were proposed by James Mark Baldwin and Conrad Hal Waddington. Unfortunately, these theories are often confused with one another. Baldwin's notion of organic selection posits that plasticity influences whether an individual will survive in a new environment, thus dictating the course of future evolution. Heritable variations can then be selected upon to direct phenotypic evolution (i.e., "orthoplasy"). The combination of these two processes (organic selection and orthoplasy) is now commonly referred to as the "Baldwin effect." Alternately, Waddington's genetic assimilation is a process whereby an environmentally induced phenotype, or "acquired character," becomes canalized through selection acting upon the developmental system. Genetic accommodation is a modern term used to describe the process of heritable changes that occur in response to a novel induction. Genetic accommodation is a key component of the Baldwin effect, and genetic assimilation is a type of genetic accommodation. I here define both the Baldwin effect and genetic assimilation in terms of genetic accommodation, describe cases in which either should occur in nature, and propose that each could play a role in evolutionary diversification. PMID:17714500

  9. The effects of ablation on the cross section of planetary envelopes at capturing planetesimals

    OpenAIRE

    Benvenuto, Omar Gustavo; Brunini, Adrián

    2008-01-01

    We explore the cross section of giant planet envelopes at capturing planetesimals of different sizes. For this purpose we employ two sets of realistic planetary envelope models (computed assuming for the protoplanetary nebula masses of 10 and 5 times the mass of the minimum mass solar nebula), account for drag and ablation effects and study the trajectories along which planetesimals move. The core accretion of these models has been computed in the oligarchic growth regime [Fortier, A., Benven...

  10. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCMTGF, FCMPDGF) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCMB). FCMTGF stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCMTGF≫FCMPDGF induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCMTGF>FCMPDGF) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin as sign of EMT. • Results qualify CAF as

  11. Effects of genotypic and phenotypic variation on establishment are important for conservation, invasion, and infection biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsman, Anders

    2014-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that the probability of successful establishment in novel environments increases with number of individuals in founder groups and with number of repeated introductions. Theory posits that the genotypic and phenotypic variation among individuals should also be important, but few studies have examined whether founder diversity influences establishment independent of propagule pressure, nor whether the effect is model or context dependent. I summarize the results of 18 experimental studies and report on a metaanalysis that provides strong evidence that higher levels of genotypic and phenotypic diversity in founder groups increase establishment success in plants and animals. The effect of diversity is stronger in experiments carried out under natural conditions in the wild than under seminatural or standardized laboratory conditions. The realization that genetic and phenotypic variation is key to successful establishment may improve the outcome of reintroduction and translocation programs used to vitalize or restore declining and extinct populations. Founder diversity may also improve the ability of invasive species to establish and subsequently spread in environments outside of their native community, and enhance the ability of pathogens and parasites to colonize and invade the environment constituted by their hosts. It is argued that exchange of ideas, methodological approaches, and insights of the role of diversity for establishment in different contexts may further our knowledge, vitalize future research, and improve management plans in different disciplines. PMID:24367109

  12. Underestimated effect sizes in GWAS: fundamental limitations of single SNP analysis for dichotomous phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Stringer

    Full Text Available Complex diseases are often highly heritable. However, for many complex traits only a small proportion of the heritability can be explained by observed genetic variants in traditional genome-wide association (GWA studies. Moreover, for some of those traits few significant SNPs have been identified. Single SNP association methods test for association at a single SNP, ignoring the effect of other SNPs. We show using a simple multi-locus odds model of complex disease that moderate to large effect sizes of causal variants may be estimated as relatively small effect sizes in single SNP association testing. This underestimation effect is most severe for diseases influenced by numerous risk variants. We relate the underestimation effect to the concept of non-collapsibility found in the statistics literature. As described, continuous phenotypes generated with linear genetic models are not affected by this underestimation effect. Since many GWA studies apply single SNP analysis to dichotomous phenotypes, previously reported results potentially underestimate true effect sizes, thereby impeding identification of true effect SNPs. Therefore, when a multi-locus model of disease risk is assumed, a multi SNP analysis may be more appropriate.

  13. Algae Based Carbon Capture and Utilization feasibility study : - initial analysis of carbon capture effect based on Zhoushan case pre-study in China

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, Cong

    2012-01-01

    This pre-feasibility study was taken out by the co-operation with Zhejiang University, the CEU lab in Zhejiang University is taking researches of the algae based carbon dioxide capture technology, this report mainly aims to evaluate the GHG mitigation effect of this technology and give suggestions.   This study was carried out at Zhejiang University based on the Zhoushan islands waste incineration power plant project, the report presents the initial feasibility study for the algae based carbo...

  14. Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, 3He, 4He, 12C, 14N, 16O, 20Ne, 23Na, 24Mg, 27Al, 28Si, 32S, 40Ar, 40Ca, 56Fe, and 59Ni, through numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to the nuclear vector charge gives a larger contribution to the capture rate than the constant spin-dependent interaction commonly included in dark matter searches at neutrino telescopes. Our investigation lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter induced neutrino signals from the Sun. The nuclear response functions obtained in this study are listed in analytic form in an appendix, ready to be used in other projects

  15. Neutron capture effects in lunar gadolinium and the irradiation histories of some lunar rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugmair, G. W.; Marti, K.

    1971-01-01

    The Gd isotopic composition in 19 lunar rock and soil samples from three Apollo sites is reported. The analytical techniques and the high precision mass spectrometric measurements are discussed. Enrichments in the Gd-158 oxide to G-157 oxide ratio due to neutron capture range up to 0.75%. Integrated 'thermal' neutron fluxes derived from the isotopic anomalies of Gd are compared with spallation Kr data from aliquot samples to construct a model which gives both average cosmic-ray irradiation depths and effective neutron exposure ages for some rocks. Rock 14310 is the first lunar sample where Kr anomalies due to resonance neutron capture in Br are observed. A Kr-81/Kr exposure age of 262 (plus or minus 7)m.y. is calculated for this rock.

  16. Wobbly Strings: Calculating the Capture Rate of a Webcam Using the Rolling Shutter Effect in a Guitar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnah, David

    2014-01-01

    In this paper I propose a method of calculating the time between line captures in a standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) webcam using the rolling shutter effect when filming a guitar. The exercise links the concepts of wavelength and frequency, while outlining the basic operation of a CMOS camera through vertical line capture.

  17. Phenotypic and genetic effects of contrasting ethanol environments on physiological and developmental traits in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E Castañeda

    Full Text Available A central problem in evolutionary physiology is to understand the relationship between energy metabolism and fitness-related traits. Most attempts to do so have been based on phenotypic correlations that are not informative for the evolutionary potential of natural populations. Here, we explored the effect of contrasting ethanol environments on physiological and developmental traits, their genetic (covariances and genetic architecture in Drosophila melanogaster. Phenotypic and genetic parameters were estimated in two populations (San Fernando and Valdivia, Chile, using a half-sib family design where broods were split into ethanol-free and ethanol-supplemented conditions. Our findings show that metabolic rate, body mass and development times were sensitive (i.e., phenotypic plasticity to ethanol conditions and dependent on population origin. Significant heritabilities were found for all traits, while significant genetic correlations were only found between larval and total development time and between development time and metabolic rate for flies of the San Fernando population developed in ethanol-free conditions. Posterior analyses indicated that the G matrices differed between ethanol conditions for the San Fernando population (mainly explained by differences in genetic (covariances of developmental traits, whereas the Valdivia population exhibited similar G matrices between ethanol conditions. Our findings suggest that ethanol-free environment increases the energy available to reduce development time. Therefore, our results indicate that environmental ethanol could modify the process of energy allocation, which could have consequences on the evolutionary response of natural populations of D. melanogaster.

  18. Shell-Model Effective Operators for Muon Capture in $^{20}Ne$

    CERN Document Server

    Siiskonen, T; Hjorth-Jensen, M

    1999-01-01

    It has been proposed that the discrepancy between the partially-conserved axial-current prediction and the nuclear shell-model calculations of the ratio $C_P/C_A$ in the muon-capture reactions can be solved in the case of ^{28}Si by introducing effective transition operators. Recently there has been experimental interest in measuring the needed angular correlations also in ^{20}Ne. Inspired by this, we have performed a shell-model analysis employing effective transition operators in the shell-model formalism for the transition $^{20}Ne(0^+_{g.s.})+\\mu^- \\to ^{20}F(1^+; 1.057 MeV) + \

  19. Additive dominant effect of a SOX10 mutation underlies a complex phenotype of PCWH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yukiko; Inoue, Naoko; Inoue, Yukiko U; Nakamura, Shoko; Matsuda, Yoshiki; Inagaki, Masumi; Ohkubo, Takahiro; Asami, Junko; Terakawa, Youhei W; Kohsaka, Shinichi; Goto, Yu-ichi; Akazawa, Chihiro; Inoue, Takayoshi; Inoue, Ken

    2015-08-01

    Distinct classes of SOX10 mutations result in peripheral demyelinating neuropathy, central dysmyelinating leukodystrophy, Waardenburg syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease, collectively known as PCWH. Meanwhile, SOX10 haploinsufficiency caused by allelic loss-of-function mutations leads to a milder non-neurological disorder, Waardenburg-Hirschsprung disease. The cellular pathogenesis of more complex PCWH phenotypes in vivo has not been thoroughly understood. To determine the pathogenesis of PCWH, we have established a transgenic mouse model. A known PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation, c.1400del12, was introduced into mouse Sox10-expressing cells by means of bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis. By crossing the multiple transgenic lines, we examined the effects produced by various copy numbers of the mutant transgene. Within the nervous systems, transgenic mice revealed a delay in the incorporation of Schwann cells in the sciatic nerve and the terminal differentiation of oligodendrocytes in the spinal cord. Transgenic mice also showed defects in melanocytes presenting as neurosensory deafness and abnormal skin pigmentation, and a loss of the enteric nervous system. Phenotypes in each lineage were more severe in mice carrying higher copy numbers, suggesting a gene dosage effect for mutant SOX10. By uncoupling the effects of gain-of-function and haploinsufficiency in vivo, we have demonstrated that the effect of a PCWH-causing SOX10 mutation is solely pathogenic in each SOX10-expressing cellular lineage in a dosage-dependent manner. In both the peripheral and central nervous systems, the primary consequence of SOX10 mutations is hypomyelination. The complex neurological phenotypes in PCWH patients likely result from a combination of haploinsufficiency and additive dominant effect. PMID:25959061

  20. Effects of ACTH, capture, and short term confinement on glucocorticoid concentrations in harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, P.B.; Hollmén, Tuula E.; Atkinson, S.; Mashburn, K.L.; Tuomi, P.A.; Esler, Daniel; Mulcahy, D.M.; Rizzolo, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about baseline concentrations of adrenal hormones and hormonal responses to stress in sea ducks, although significant population declines documented in several species suggest that sea ducks are exposed to increased levels of environmental stress. Such declines have been observed in geographically distinct harlequin duck populations. We performed an adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge to evaluate adrenal function and characterize corticosterone concentrations in captive harlequin ducks and investigated the effects of capture, surgery, and short term confinement on corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks. Harlequin ducks responded to the ACTH challenge with an average three-fold increase in serum corticosterone concentration approximately 90??min post injection, and a four- to five-fold increase in fecal glucocorticoid concentration 2 to 4??h post injection. Serum corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks increased within min of capture and elevated levels were found for several hours post capture, indicating that surgery and confinement maintain elevated corticosterone concentrations in this species. Mean corticosterone concentrations in wild harlequin ducks held in temporary captivity were similar to the maximum response levels during the ACTH challenge in captive birds. However, large variation among individuals was observed in responses of wild birds, and we found additional evidence suggesting that corticosterone responses varied between hatch year and after hatch year birds. ?? 2008.

  1. Indigo snake capture methods: effectiveness of two survey techniques for Drymarchon couperi in Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyslop, N.L.; Meyers, J.M.; Cooper, R.J.; Stevenson, J.

    2009-01-01

    Drymarchon couperi (Eastern Indigo Snake), a federally threatened species of the southeastern Coastal Plain, has presented challenges for surveyors, with few reliable methods developed for its detection or monitoring. Surveys for D. couperi at potential underground shelters conducted in late fall through early spring have been relatively successful when conducted by experienced surveyors, especially in the northern portions of the range. However, trapping efforts for D. couperi conducted throughout the range have met with limited success. To further evaluate detection methods, we conducted trapping and surveying from December 2002 to April 2004 in areas known to support D. couperi in southeastern Georgia. We captured 18 D. couperi through surveys of potential underground shelters from December 2002 to March 2003 (14 person-hours per capture) and six individuals through trapping (141 trap days or 27 in-field person-hours per capture). Trapping was most successful during early fall, a period when surveys are often less effective compared to those conducted in late fall through early spring. We recommend a combination of surveys from mid-fall through March in conjunction with trapping, especially from late-summer through fall in the northern portions of the snake?s range. We also recommend further experimentation with alternative trap designs and survey methods for D. couperi.

  2. Multinucleon effects in muon capture on 3He at high energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy spectra of both protons and deuterons emitted following the capture of negative muons by 3He nuclei have been measured for energies above 15 MeV. A limited number of proton-neutron pairs emitted in coincidence were also observed. A simple plane wave impulse approximation (PWIA) model calculation yields fair agreement with the measured proton energy spectra, but underpredicts the measured rate of deuteron production above our energy threshold by a large factor. A more sophisticated PWIA calculation for the two-body breakup channel, based on a realistic three-body wave function for the initial state, is closer to the deuteron data at moderate energies, but still is significantly lower near the kinematic end point. The proton-neutron coincidence data also point to the presence of significant strength involving more than one nucleon in the capture process at high energy transfer. These results indicate that additional terms in the capture matrix element beyond the impulse approximation contribution may be required to explain the experimental data. Specifically, the inclusion of nucleon-nucleon correlations in the initial or final state and meson exchange current contributions could bring calculations into better agreement with our data. A fully microscopic calculation would thus open the possibility for a quantitative test of multinucleon effects in the weak interaction

  3. Climate effects on historic bluefin tuna captures in the Gibraltar Strait and Western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganzedo, Unai; Polanco-Martínez, Josué M.; Caballero-Alfonso, Ángela M.; Faria, Sérgio H.; Li, Jianke; Castro-Hernández, José J.

    2016-06-01

    Historical capture records of bluefin tuna (Thunnus thynnus; BFT hereafter) from the Gibraltar Strait and Western Mediterranean show pronounced short- and long-term fluctuations. Some of these fluctuations are believed to be associated with biological and ecological process, as well as distinct climate factors. For the period of study (1700-1936) of this work, we found a long-term increasing trend in the BFT captures and in the climate variables. After applying a statistical time series analysis of relevant climate variables and long-term tuna capture records, it is highlighted the role played by sea-surface temperature (SST) on bluefin population variations. The most relevant result of this study is the strong correlation found between the total solar irradiance (TSI) - an external component of the climate system - and bluefin captures. The solar irradiance could have affected storminess during the period under study, mainly during the time interval 1700-1810. We suggest physico-biological mechanisms that explain the BFT catch fluctuations in two consecutive time intervals. In the first period, from 1700 to 1810, this mechanism could be high storm and wind activity, which would have made the BFT fisheries activities more difficult by reducing their efficacy. In contrast, during the interval from 1810 to 1907, the effects of wind and storms could be on spawning behaviour and larval ecology, and hence on year class strength, rather than on fish or fisherman's behaviour. These findings open up a range of new lines of enquiry that are relevant for both, fisheries and climate change research.

  4. Cost Effectiveness of Carbon Capture-Ready Coal Power Plants with Delayed Retrofit

    OpenAIRE

    Rohlfs, Wilko; Madlener, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the cost effectiveness of coal-fired CCS plants. Two different model approaches are used. First, we consider marginal costs to determine the impact of fuel and CO2 certificate prices on electricity generation cost. Second, we apply a net present value evaluation to identify the main factors influencing the NPV, using projections for the price of electricity and CO2 as well as the costs of capturing, transporting and storing CO2. The NPV assessment shows that the t...

  5. Effects of activated fibroblasts on phenotype modulation, EGFR signalling and cell cycle regulation in OSCC cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berndt, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.berndt@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Büttner, Robert, E-mail: Robert-Buettner@gmx.net [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gühne, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie_guehne@gmx.net [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Gleinig, Anna, E-mail: annagleinig@yahoo.com [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Richter, Petra, E-mail: P.Richter@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Chen, Yuan, E-mail: Yuan.Chen@med.uni-jena.de [Center for Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Franz, Marcus, E-mail: Marcus.Franz@med.uni-jena.de [Clinic of Internal Medicine I, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany); Liebmann, Claus, E-mail: Claus.Liebmann@uni-jena.de [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Crosstalk between carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cells is suggested to mediate phenotype transition of cancer cells as a prerequisite for tumour progression, to predict patients’ outcome, and to influence the efficacy of EGFR inhibitor therapies. Here we investigate the influence of activated fibroblasts as a model for CAFs on phenotype and EGFR signalling in OSCC cells in vitro. For this, immortalised hTERT-BJ1 fibroblasts were activated with TGFβ1 and PDGFAB to generate a myofibroblast or proliferative phenotype, respectively. Conditioned media (FCM{sub TGF}, FCM{sub PDGF}) were used to stimulate PE/CA-PJ15 OSCC cells. Results were compared to the effect of conditioned media of non-stimulated fibroblasts (FCM{sub B}). FCM{sub TGF} stimulation leads to an up-regulation of vimentin in the OSCC cells and an enhancement of invasive behaviour, indicating EMT-like effects. Similarly, FCM{sub TGF}≫FCM{sub PDGF} induced up-regulation of EGFR, but not of ErbB2/ErbB3. In addition, we detected an increase in basal activities of ERK, PI3K/Akt and Stat3 (FCM{sub TGF}>FCM{sub PDGF}) accompanied by protein interaction of vimentin with pERK. These effects are correlated with an increased proliferation. In summary, our results suggest that the activated myofibroblast phenotype provides soluble factors which are able to induce EMT-like phenomena and to increase EGFR signalling as well as cell proliferation in OSCC cells. Our results indicate a possible influence of activated myofibroblasts on EGFR-inhibitor therapy. Therefore, CAFs may serve as promising novel targets for combined therapy strategies. - Highlights: • A cell culture model for cancer associated fibroblasts is described. • The mutual interaction with OSCC cells leads to up-regulation of EGFR in tumour cells. • mCAF induces EGFR downstream signalling with increased proliferation in OSCC. • Erk activation is associated with protein interaction with vimentin

  6. Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catena, Riccardo; Schwabe, Bodo [Institut für Theoretische Physik,Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Göttingen (Germany)

    2015-04-24

    In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, {sup 3}He, {sup 4}He, {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N, {sup 16}O, {sup 20}Ne, {sup 23}Na, {sup 24}Mg, {sup 27}Al, {sup 28}Si, {sup 32}S, {sup 40}Ar, {sup 40}Ca, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 59}Ni, through numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to the nuclear vector charge gives a larger contribution to the capture rate than the constant spin-dependent interaction commonly included in dark matter searches at neutrino telescopes. Our investigation lays the foundations for model independent analyses of dark matter induced neutrino signals from the Sun. The nuclear response functions obtained in this study are listed in analytic form in an appendix, ready to be used in other projects.

  7. An effective attentional set for a specific colour does not prevent capture by infrequently presented motion distractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retell, James D; Becker, Stefanie I; Remington, Roger W

    2016-07-01

    An organism's survival depends on the ability to rapidly orient attention to unanticipated events in the world. Yet, the conditions needed to elicit such involuntary capture remain in doubt. Especially puzzling are spatial cueing experiments, which have consistently shown that involuntary shifts of attention to highly salient distractors are not determined by stimulus properties, but instead are contingent on attentional control settings induced by task demands. Do we always need to be set for an event to be captured by it, or is there a class of events that draw attention involuntarily even when unconnected to task goals? Recent results suggest that a task-irrelevant event will capture attention on first presentation, suggesting that salient stimuli that violate contextual expectations might automatically capture attention. Here, we investigated the role of contextual expectation by examining whether an irrelevant motion cue that was presented only rarely (∼3-6% of trials) would capture attention when observers had an active set for a specific target colour. The motion cue had no effect when presented frequently, but when rare produced a pattern of interference consistent with attentional capture. The critical dependence on the frequency with which the irrelevant motion singleton was presented is consistent with early theories of involuntary orienting to novel stimuli. We suggest that attention will be captured by salient stimuli that violate expectations, whereas top-down goals appear to modulate capture by stimuli that broadly conform to contextual expectations. PMID:26299891

  8. Effects of cholesterol on the phenotype of rabbit bile duct fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao-Ying Chen; Jing-Guo Wei; Yao-Cheng Wang; Chun-Mei Wang; Jun Yu; Xiang-Xin Yang

    2003-01-01

    -actinwas signifiantly increased. The average fluorescence valueof middle concentration group was 1 628+189 (P<0.01 vscontrol group). Microfilaments and the expression of α-actinwere greatly decreased in fibroblastes of high concentrationgroup (1.2 g/L). The average fluorescence value of highconcentration group was 1 427±153 (P<0.05 vs middleconcentration group). There were a lower expression of α-actin and few microfilaments in bile duct fibroblasts of controlgroup with an average fluorescence value of 1 224±138.CONCLUSION: Cholesterol can make bile duct fibroblastshave the phenotypic characteristics of smooth muscle cellboth in vitro andin vivo and this effect is more significant invivo. The effect is probably associated with some otherfactors besides cholesterol.

  9. The effect of measurement error of phenotypes on genome wide association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barendse William

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is an unspoken assumption that imprecision of measurement of phenotypes will not have large systematic effects on the location of significant associations in a genome wide association study (GWAS. In this report, the effects of two independent measurements of the same trait, subcutaneous fat thickness, were examined in GWAS of 940 individuals. Results The trait values obtained by two independent groups working to the same trait definition were correlated with r = 0.72. The allele effects obtained from the two analyses were only moderately correlated, with r = 0.53, and there was one significant (P Conclusions It is recommended that trait values in GWAS experiments be examined for repeatability before the experiment is performed. For traits that do not have high repeatability (r

  10. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Lionel; Smeitink, Jan A. M.; van Emst-de Vries, Sjenet E.; Vogels, Caroline; Pellegrini, Mina; Jonckheere, An I.; Rodenburg, Richard J. T.; Buydens, Lutgarde M. C.; Beyrath, Julien; Willems, Peter H. G. M.; Koopman, Werner J. H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to identify these molecules. We combine automated image quantification and artificial intelligence to discriminate between primary fibroblasts of a healthy individual and a LS patient based upon their mitochondrial morpho-functional phenotype. We then evaluate the effects of newly developed Trolox variants in LS patient cells. This revealed that Trolox ornithylamide hydrochloride best counterbalanced mitochondrial morpho-functional aberrations, effectively scavenged ROS and increased the maximal activity of mitochondrial complexes I, IV and citrate synthase. Our results suggest that Trolox-derived antioxidants are promising candidates in therapy development for human mitochondrial disorders.

  11. Form factors for dark matter capture by the Sun in effective theories

    CERN Document Server

    Catena, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    In the effective theory of isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon interactions mediated by a heavy spin-1 or spin-0 particle, 8 isotope-dependent nuclear response functions can be generated in the dark matter scattering by nuclei. We compute the 8 nuclear response functions for the 16 most abundant elements in the Sun, i.e. H, $^{3}$He, $^{4}$He, $^{12}$C, $^{14}$N, $^{16}$O, $^{20}$Ne, $^{23}$Na, $^{24}$Mg, $^{27}$Al, $^{28}$Si, $^{32}$S, $^{40}$Ar, $^{40}$Ca, $^{56}$Fe, and $^{59}$Ni, through detailed numerical shell model calculations. We use our response functions to compute the rate of dark matter capture by the Sun for all isoscalar and isovector dark matter-nucleon effective interactions, including several operators previously considered for dark matter direct detection only. We study in detail the dependence of the capture rate on specific dark matter-nucleon interaction operators, and on the different elements in the Sun. We find that a so far neglected momentum dependent dark matter coupling to...

  12. Amine-modified ordered mesoporous silica: The effect of pore size on CO2 capture performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Larger pore size could decrease the mass transfer resistance and increase the interaction between CO2 and TEPA. • The CO2 uptakes of sorbents were enhanced in the presence of moisture. • The sorbents are stable and regenerable under test conditions. - Abstract: The objective of current research is to investigate the effect of pore size of mesoporous silica supports on the CO2 capture performance of solid amine sorbents. Two ordered mesoporous silicas (OMS) with different pore sizes (5.6 nm and 7.6 nm) were synthesized as tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) supports. A serious of techniques, such as physical adsorption, infrared spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis were used to characterize the solid amine sorbents. The CO2 capture performances of the sorbents were evaluated using breakthrough method with a fixed-bed reactor equipped with an online mass spectrometer. The experimental results indicate that the pore size has significant influence on CO2 capture performance. Larger pore size could decrease the mass transfer resistance and increase the interaction between CO2 and TEPA. Therefore, OMS-7.6 is better than OMS-5.6 as amine support. The highest CO2 sorption capacities achieved with OMS-7.6 with 50 wt% TEPA loading (OMS-7.6-50) in the absence and presence of moisture are 3.45 mmol/g and 4.28 mmol/g, respectively, under the conditions of 10.0% CO2/N2 mixture at 75 °C. Cyclic CO2 adsorption–desorption experiments indicate that the solid amine sorbents are fairly stable and regenerable

  13. Electroporation increases the effect of borocaptate (10B-BSH) in neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The cell membrane permeability of borocaptate (10B-BSH) and its extent of accumulation in cells are controversial. This study was performed to elucidate these points. Methods and Materials: Two different treatments were applied to SCCVII tumor cells. The first group of tumor cells was incubated in culture medium with 10B-BSH or 10B-enriched boric acid, and was exposed to neutrons from the heavy water facility of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR). More than 99% of neutrons were thermal neutrons at flux base. The second group was pretreated by electroporation in combination with 10B-BSH, and thereafter the cells were irradiated with neutrons. The cell killing effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using BSH were investigated by colony formation assay. Results: Surviving cell fraction decreased exponentially with neutron fluence, and addition of BSH significantly enhanced the cell killing effect of neutron capture therapy (NCT) depending on 10B concentration. The effect of BSH-BNCT also increased with preincubation time of cells in the medium containing BSH. The electroporation of cells with BSH at 10 ppm 10B markedly enhanced BSH-BNCT effects in comparison with that of preincubation alone. The effect of BSH-BNCT with electroporation was equal to that of BNCT using 10B-boric acid at a same 10B concentration (10 ppm). Conclusions: BSH is suggested to penetrate the cells slowly and remained after washing. Electroporation can introduce BSH into the cells very efficiently, and BSH stays in the cells and is not lost by washing. Therefore, if electroporation is applied to tumors after BSH injection, 10B remains in tumors but is cleared from normal tissues, and selective accumulation of 10B in tumors will be achieved after an adequate waiting time

  14. A case of radiation-induced osteosarcoma treated effectively by boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We treated a 54-year-old Japanese female with a recurrent radiation-induced osteosarcoma arising from left occipital skull, by reactor-based boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Her tumor grew rapidly with subcutaneous and epidural extension. She eventually could not walk because of cerebellar ataxia. The tumor was inoperable and radioresistant. BNCT showed a marked initial therapeutic effect: the subcutaneous/epidural tumor reduced without radiation damage of the scalp except hair loss and the patient could walk again only 3 weeks after BNCT. BNCT seems to be a safe and very effective modality in the management of radiation-induced osteosarcomas that are not eligible for operation and other treatment modalities

  15. The effect of thermal variance on the phenotype of marine turtle offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, C R; Fuller, W J; Godley, B J; Rhodes, K A; Snape, R; Stokes, K L; Broderick, A C

    2014-01-01

    Temperature can have a profound effect on the phenotype of reptilian offspring, yet the bulk of current research considers the effects of constant incubation temperatures on offspring morphology, with few studies examining the natural thermal variance that occurs in the wild. Over two consecutive nesting seasons, we placed temperature data loggers in 57 naturally incubating clutches of loggerhead sea turtles Caretta caretta and found that greater diel thermal variance during incubation significantly reduced offspring mass, potentially reducing survival of hatchlings during their journey from the nest to offshore waters and beyond. With predicted scenarios of climate change, behavioral plasticity in nest site selection may be key for the survival of ectothermic species, particularly those with temperature-dependent sex determination. PMID:25461644

  16. Effects of low-dose irradiation on phenotype and function of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To study the effect of low-dose irradiation on antigen presenting capacity, phenotype and stimulatory activity of immature dendritic cells (DCs). Methods: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from healthy volunteers. DCs were induced from monocytes with granulocytemacrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (rhIL-4) for 5 days. Immature DCs were harvested and exposed to various irradiation doses (0.1, 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 Gy) from X ray for 24 hours. The variation of phenotypes was analysised for the irradiated cells antigen presenting capacity and stimulatory activity was analysised for the irradiated cells in vitro. Results: The expressions of costimulatory molecules, such as CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, and antigen presenting capacity of mature DCs cells irradiated at a dose of 0.2 Gy was higher than that in the non-irradiated DCs (P < 0.05). However, the stimulatory activity of immature DCs irradiated at higher doses reduced in vitro. Conclusion: Low-dose irradiation can augment antigen presenting capacity and reduce T cell-activation capacity of DCs. (authors)

  17. Chiral effective field theory predictions for muon capture on deuteron and $^3$He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laura E. Marcucci, A. Kievsky, S. Rosati, R. Schiavilla, M. Viviani

    2012-01-01

    The muon-capture reactions {sup 2}H({mu}{sup -}, {nu}{sub {mu}})nn and {sup 3}He({mu}{sup -},{nu}{sub {mu}}){sup 3}H are studied with nuclear strong-interaction potentials and charge-changing weak currents, derived in chiral effective field theory. The low-energy constants (LEC's) c{sub D} and c{sub E}, present in the three-nucleon potential and (c{sub D}) axial-vector current, are constrained to reproduce the A=3 binding energies and the triton Gamow-Teller matrix element. The vector weak current is related to the isovector component of the electromagnetic current via the conserved-vector-current constraint, and the two LEC's entering the contact terms in the latter are constrained to reproduce the A=3 magnetic moments. The muon capture rates on deuteron and {sup 3}He are predicted to be 399 {+-} 3 sec{sup -1} and 1494 {+-} 21 sec{sup -1}, respectively, where the spread accounts for the cutoff sensitivity as well as uncertainties in the LEC's and electroweak radiative corrections. By comparing the calculated and precisely measured rates on {sup 3}He, a value for the induced pseudoscalar form factor is obtained in good agreement with the chiral perturbation theory prediction.

  18. Sensitive imaging and effective capture of Cu(2+): Towards highly efficient theranostics of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Zhaowen; Bu, Wenbo; Fan, Wenpei; Zhang, Jiawen; Ni, Dalong; Liu, Yanyan; Wang, Jing; Liu, Jianan; Yao, Zhenwei; Shi, Jianlin

    2016-10-01

    As a distinct feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the presence of excess metal ions in the brain is most probably one of the main causative factors for the aggregation of β-Amyloid (Aβ) proteins. The design of nanoprobes for detection and control of ion concentrations will be of great importance in predicting the progression of AD and simultaneously providing effective treatments. Herein, we report the design and synthesis of a novel yet smart nanoprobe that can sensitively detect the Cu(2+) concentration and concurrently capture Cu(2+) both in vitro and in vivo. The designed nanoprobe (UCHQ) combines two main components: upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) used for the detection and upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging of Cu(2+) upon 980 nm exposure and the chelator 8-hydroxyquinoline-2-carboxylic acid (HQC) used for chelating Cu(2+) and AD therapy. The results show that the emission intensity of UCHQ is highly dependent on the Cu(2+) concentrations due to the luminescence resonance energy transfer (LRET) from UCNPs to HQC-bonded Cu(2+). Fascinatingly, the as-constructed UCHQs could be used for UCL imaging of Aβ both in cells and AD mice. Most importantly, UCHQs could not only inhibit the Aβ aggregation-induced apoptosis via capturing overmuch Cu(2+) but also accelerate the nontoxic structural transformation of Aβ. PMID:27454062

  19. Study of electric field effect on the carrier captures rates of deep trap in p-type InP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electric field effect on the carrier capture cross section of deep trap has been studied. The experimental results of the H4F and H5 hole traps in p-type InP show an enhancement of the capture cross section with the increase of the applied electric field. This enhancement depends on the nature of the deep traps. Increasing the electric field from 8x106 to 2.4 x 107 V/m leads to an increase of the capture cross section of the H4F trap by a factor of 3 to 4 and of the H5 by a factor 4 to 5. A theoretical model has been suggested to explain the electric field effect on the capture cross section. This model deals with the cascade and multi-phonon processes semi-classically. (author)

  20. Widespread differential maternal and paternal genome effects on fetal bone phenotype at mid-gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Ruidong; Lee, Alice M C; Eindorf, Tanja; Javadmanesh, Ali; Ghanipoor-Samami, Mani; Gugger, Madeleine; Fitzsimmons, Carolyn J; Kruk, Zbigniew A; Pitchford, Wayne S; Leviton, Alison J; Thomsen, Dana A; Beckman, Ian; Anderson, Gail I; Burns, Brian M; Rutley, David L; Xian, Cory J; Hiendleder, Stefan

    2014-11-01

    Parent-of-origin-dependent (epi)genetic factors are important determinants of prenatal development that program adult phenotype. However, data on magnitude and specificity of maternal and paternal genome effects on fetal bone are lacking. We used an outbred bovine model to dissect and quantify effects of parental genomes, fetal sex, and nongenetic maternal effects on the fetal skeleton and analyzed phenotypic and molecular relationships between fetal muscle and bone. Analysis of 51 bone morphometric and weight parameters from 72 fetuses recovered at day 153 gestation (54% term) identified six principal components (PC1-6) that explained 80% of the variation in skeletal parameters. Parental genomes accounted for most of the variation in bone wet weight (PC1, 72.1%), limb ossification (PC2, 99.8%), flat bone size (PC4, 99.7%), and axial skeletal growth (PC5, 96.9%). Limb length showed lesser effects of parental genomes (PC3, 40.8%) and a significant nongenetic maternal effect (gestational weight gain, 29%). Fetal sex affected bone wet weight (PC1, p < 0.0001) and limb length (PC3, p < 0.05). Partitioning of variation explained by parental genomes revealed strong maternal genome effects on bone wet weight (74.1%, p < 0.0001) and axial skeletal growth (93.5%, p < 0.001), whereas paternal genome controlled limb ossification (95.1%, p < 0.0001). Histomorphometric data revealed strong maternal genome effects on growth plate height (98.6%, p < 0.0001) and trabecular thickness (85.5%, p < 0.0001) in distal femur. Parental genome effects on fetal bone were mirrored by maternal genome effects on fetal serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (96.9%, p < 0.001) and paternal genome effects on alkaline phosphatase (90.0%, p < 0.001) and their correlations with maternally controlled bone wet weight and paternally controlled limb ossification, respectively. Bone wet weight and flat bone size correlated positively with muscle weight (r = 0.84 and 0.77, p

  1. Effects of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Germany on European Electricity Exchange and Welfare

    OpenAIRE

    Rübbelke, Dirk; Vögele, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In the course of European efforts to mitigate global warming, the application of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies is discussed as a potential option. Some political opposition was raised – inter alia – by uncertainties about the effective cost of such technologies. Because of the cost structure of CCS power plants with high â€ÂËœflatâ€Ââ„¢ investment cost and – in case of high carbon allowance prices – comparable low...

  2. Rate-dependent interface capture beyond the coffee-ring effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanan; Yang, Qiang; Li, Mingzhu; Song, Yanlin

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism of droplet drying is a widely concerned fundamental issue since controlling the deposition morphology of droplet has significant influence on printing, biology pattern, self-assembling and other solution-based devices fabrication. Here we reveal a striking different kinetics-controlled deposition regime beyond the ubiquitous coffee-ring effect that suspended particles tend to kinetically accumulate at the air-liquid interface and deposit uniformly. As the interface shrinkage rate exceeds the particle average diffusion rate, particles in vertical evaporation flow will be captured by the descending surface, producing surface particle jam and forming viscous quasi-solid layer, which dramatically prevents the trapped particles from being transported to drop edge and results in uniform deposition. This simple, robust drying regime will provide a versatile strategy to control the droplet deposition morphology, and a novel direction of interface assembling for fabricating superlattices and high quality photonic crystal patterns.

  3. Effects of "Moxibustion Serum" on Proliferation and Phenotypes of Tumor Infiltrating Lvmphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈云飞; 赵粹英; 陈汉平; 秦慧莲; 方舫

    2003-01-01

    @@ Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) were cultured with "moxibustion serum" (MS), and the results were examined by flow cytometry. The results indicated that MS could enhance the proliferation of TIL,accelerate it to reach the exponential growth phase, and assist recombinant interleukin 2 (rIL-2) to enhance successively the percentage of CD3+ positive cells, maintain the number of CD4+ positive T cells, promote greatly the percentage of CD8+ positive T cells among TILs, and reverse the CD4+/CD8+ ratio. Such cooperative effects rely on relative specificity of acupoints. It is suggested that MS is beneficial to the growth of TIL both in the aspects of proliferation and phenotypes.

  4. Effect of image capture device on the accuracy of black-box printer models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Jason; Sun, Jian; Ju, Yanling; Kashti, Tamar; Frank, Tal; Kella, Dror; Fischer, Mani; Ulichney, Robert; Adams, Guy; Allebach, Jan

    2014-01-01

    In the process of electrophotograpic (EP) printing, the deposition of toner to the printer-addressable pixel is greatly influenced by the neighboring pixels of the digital halftone. To account for these effects, printer models can either be embedded in the halftoning algorithm, or used to predict the printed halftone image at the input to an algorithm that is used to assess print quality. Most recently,1 we developed a series of six new models to accurately account for local neighborhood effects and the influence of a 45 x 45 neighborhood of pixels on the central printer-addressable pixel. We refer to all these models as black-box models, since they are based solely on measuring what is on the printed page, and do not incorporate any information about the marking process itself. In this paper, we will compare black-box models developed with three different capture devices: an Epson Expression 10000XL (Epson America, Inc., Long Beach, CA, USA) flatbed scanner operated at 2400 dpi with an active field of view of 309.88 mm x 436.88 mm, a QEA PIAS-II (QEA, Inc., Billerica, MA, USA) camera with resolution 7663.4 dpi and a field of view of 2.4 mm x 3.2 mm, and Dr. CID, a 1:1 magnification 3.35 micron true resolution Dyson Relay lens-based 3 Mpixel USB CMOS imaging device2 with resolution 7946.8 dpi and a field of view of 4.91 mm 6.55 mm developed at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories { Bristol. Our target printer is an HP Indigo 5000 Digital Press (HP Indigo, Ness Ziona, Israel). In this paper, we will compare the accuracy of the black-box model predictions of print microstructure using models trained from images captured with these three devices.

  5. Effect of capture stress on plasma enzyme activities in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouck, G.R.; Cairns, M. A.; Christian, A. R.

    1978-01-01

    Four capture methods were used to collect domesticated rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri): angling, electroshocking, seining, and direct netting (control). Blood was sampled rapidly upon capture, usually within 2 min. No significant differences were noted within the time frame of the experiment between the four capture groups for plasma protein concentration, lactate dehydrogenase activity, or leucine aminonaphthylamidase activity. Creatine phosphokinase activity was elevated among electroshocked fish. Acid phosphatase activity was too low for accurate measurement. Hematocrits were significantly elevated by capture struggles. These results indicate that these capture methods do not preclude the use of plasma enzyme levels for investigating the health of wild fish. Key words: plasma enzyme, capture stress, physiology, plasma protein, rainbow trout, lactate dehydrogenase, leucine aminonaphthylamidase, creatine phosphokinase

  6. The "Goldilocks Effect" in Cystic Fibrosis: identification of a lung phenotype in the cftr knockout and heterozygous mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bates Jason HT

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic Fibrosis is a pleiotropic disease in humans with primary morbidity and mortality associated with a lung disease phenotype. However, knockout in the mouse of cftr, the gene whose mutant alleles are responsible for cystic fibrosis, has previously failed to produce a readily, quantifiable lung phenotype. Results Using measurements of pulmonary mechanics, a definitive lung phenotype was demonstrated in the cftr-/- mouse. Lungs showed decreased compliance and increased airway resistance in young animals as compared to cftr+/+ littermates. These changes were noted in animals less than 60 days old, prior to any long term inflammatory effects that might occur, and are consistent with structural differences in the cftr-/- lungs. Surprisingly, the cftr+/- animals exhibited a lung phenotype distinct from either the homozygous normal or knockout genotypes. The heterozygous mice showed increased lung compliance and decreased airway resistance when compared to either homozygous phenotype, suggesting a heterozygous advantage that might explain the high frequency of this mutation in certain populations. Conclusions In the mouse the gene dosage of cftr results in distinct differences in pulmonary mechanics of the adult. Distinct phenotypes were demonstrated in each genotype, cftr-/-, cftr +/-, and cftr+/+. These results are consistent with a developmental role for CFTR in the lung.

  7. Human thiopurine methyltransferase pharmacogenetics: effect of phenotype on sensitivity of cultured lymphocytes to 6-mercaptopurine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Loon, J.; Weinshilboum, R.

    1986-03-05

    Thiopurine methyltransferase (EC 2.1.1.67, TPMT) catalyzes the S-methylation of thiopurine drugs such as 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). TPMT activity in human lymphocytes and other tissues is controlled by a common genetic polymorphism. These experiments were designed to study the relationship between TPMT phenotype and the effect of 6-MP on /sup 3/H-thymidine (/sup 3/H-TdR) incorporation into phytohemaglutinin (PHA) stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Lymphocytes were obtained from the blood of nine subjects, three subjects with each TPMT phenotype. 6-MP dose response curves were performed at optimal (10 ..mu..g/ml) and suboptimal (1 ..mu..g/ml) concentrations of PHA. ED50 values for 6-MP with lymphocytes from subjects who genetically lacked TPMT activity were higher than ED50 values for lymphocytes from subjects with genetically intermediate or high TPMT activity. However, ED50 values decreased as level of stimulation increased. Therefore, the effects of 6-MP were studied at a series of PHA concentrations that ranged from 0.1 ..mu..g/ml to 10 ..mu..g/ml. Lymphocytes from subjects who lacked TPMT activity had significantly higher K/sub ii/ values (1.37 +/- 0.340 ..mu..M; mean +/- SEM) for inhibition of /sup 3/H-TdR incorporation by 6-MP than did lymphocytes from subjects with intermediate or high TPMT activity (0.529 +/- 0.068 ..mu..M and 0.327 +/- 0.064 ..mu..M, respectively, P < .05 for both comparisons).

  8. Effects of environmental colour on mood: a wearable LifeColour capture device

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, Aiden R.; Kelly, Philip; O'flynn, Brendan; Curran, Padraig; Smeaton, Alan F.; Ó Mathúna, S. Cian; O'connor, Noel E.

    2010-01-01

    Colour is everywhere in our daily lives and impacts things like our mood, yet we rarely take notice of it. One method of capturing and analysing the predominant colours that we encounter is through visual lifelogging devices such as the SenseCam. However an issue related to these devices is the privacy concerns of capturing image level detail. Therefore in this work we demonstrate a hardware prototype wearable camera that captures only one pixel - of the dominant colour prevelant in front of ...

  9. Effect of the presence of HCl on cyclic CO2 capture of calcium-based sorbent in calcium looping process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • HCl improves CO2 capture capacity of limestone in the previous a dozen cycles. • HCl sharply decreases limestone reactivity after a dozen cycles. • HCl intensifies effects of carbonation and calcination temperature on CO2 capture. • HCl enlarges effects of particle size on CO2 capture. • HCl severely aggravates the sintering of limestone after a dozen cycles. - Abstract: The effect of the presence of HCl on cyclic CO2 capture behavior of calcium-based sorbent in the calcium looping process was investigated. When HCl was present in the carbonation atmosphere, the effects of carbonation temperature, calcination temperature, HCl concentration and particle size on CO2 capture of the limestone in the multiple calcination/carbonation cycles were studied in a dual fixed-bed reactor. The presence of HCl in the carbonation atmosphere improves CO2 capture capacity of the limestone in the previous a dozen cycles, but sharply decreases its reactivity with further increasing the cycle number above a dozen. The presence of HCl intensifies the effects of carbonation temperature and calcination temperature on CO2 capture capacity of the limestone. The optimum carbonation temperature and the feasible calcination temperature for cyclic CO2 capture of the limestone in the presence of HCl should be 700 °C and below 900 °C, respectively. The cyclic CO2 capture capacity of the limestone in the previous a dozen cycles achieves the maximum in the presence of 300 ppm HCl with increasing the HCl concentration from 100 to 1000 ppm. The higher CO2 capture capacity of the limestone is achieved with smaller particle size in the presence of HCl. The presence of HCl may destroy the compact CaCO3 product layer and it is beneficial to CO2 diffusion through the layer in the initial cycles. The chlorination conversion and the molten CaCl2–CaCO3 product layer thickness of the limestone in the presence of HCl increase with the number of calcination/carbonation cycles. It

  10. The effects of boron neutron capture therapy on liver tumors and normal hepatocytes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To explore the feasibility of employing boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) to treat liver tumors, the effects of BNCT were investigated by using liver tumor models and normal hepatocytes in mice. Liver tumor models in C3H mice were developed by intrasplenic injection of SCCVII tumor cells. After borocaptate sodium (BSH) and boronophenylalanine (BPA) administration, 10B concentrations were measured in tumors and liver and the liver was irradiated with thermal neutrons. The effects of BNCT on the tumor and normal hepatocytes were studied by using colony formation assay and micronucleus assay, respectively. To compare the effects of BSH-BNCT and BPA-BNCT, the compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factor was determined. The CBE factors for BSH on the tumor were 4.22 and 2.29 using D10 and D0 as endpoints, respectively. Those for BPA were 9.94 and 5.64. In the case of hepatocytes, the CBE factors for BSH and BPA were 0.94 and 4.25, respectively. Tumor-to-liver ratios of boron concentration following BSH and BPA administration were 0.3 and 2.8, respectively. Considering the accumulation ratios of 10B, the therapeutic gain factors for BSH and BPA were 0.7-1.3 and 3.8-6.6, respectively. Therefore, it may be feasible to treat liver tumors with BPA-BNCT. (author)

  11. Cost-effective solution to synchronized audio-visual capture using multiple sensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenauer, Jeroen; Valstar, Michel; Shen, Jie; Pantic, Maja

    2009-01-01

    Applications such as surveillance and human motion capture require high-bandwidth recording from multiple cameras. Furthermore, the recent increase in research on sensor fusion has raised the demand on synchronization accuracy between video, audio and other sensor modalities. Previously, capturing s

  12. Effects of carbon dioxide capture and storage in Germany on European electricity exchange and welfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of European efforts to mitigate global warming, the application of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies is discussed as a potential option. Some political opposition was raised – inter alia – by uncertainties about the effective cost of such technologies. Because of the cost structure of CCS power plants with high ‘flat' investment cost and – in case of high carbon allowance prices – comparable low variable cost, the application of CCS will induce a merit-order effect causing a decline in wholesale electricity prices on the spot market. On the one hand, the reduction of electricity supply cost raises suppliers' rents, while the decline of wholesale electricity prices augments consumers' surpluses. These positive welfare effects tend to mitigate political opposition against CCS. On the other hand, the merit-order effect reduces electricity suppliers' revenues as the wholesale prices decline. This mitigates their scope for additional investments in CCS capacity. In this study, we focus on the influence of CCS in Germany on electricity supplier and consumer surpluses and associated impacts on the scope for investments in additional CCS capacity. By means of the applied model of electricity markets, influences on European electricity exchange and welfare levels are investigated. - Highlights: • CCS reduces short-term electricity supply cost and tends to raise suppliers' rents. • Additional suppliers' surpluses could be used to finance CCS investment costs. • CCS induces a merit-order effect lowering electricity prices on the spot market. • This decline in prices raises consumer rents and mitigates political opposition against CCS. • Effects of CCS in Germany on European electricity exchange and welfare levels are assessed

  13. Cytotoxic and phenotypic effects of uranium and lead on osteoblastic cellular models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is involved in the evaluation of bio-hazard associated with the use of uranium in nuclear activities and industrial research. The uranium, known in the literature as potentially carcinogenic or toxic for reproduction, can become a public health problem with the views of the various possibilities of human infections (military of the Gulf War, Finnish populations exposed to drinking water contaminated by example). The skeleton represents the organ of long-term storage of uranium and can be a target of its toxicity. Lead sharing this way of fixing in the bone matrix and have the same adverse effects on bone formation. The osteoblasts, cells responsible in bone formation, are specific targets of these two metals. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of acute toxicity of speciation controlled uranium and lead on osteoblasts culture. The intracellular accumulation, distribution and speciation were then studied to explain the observed toxicity. A cell death and phenotypic disorder were highlighted. The speciation is seen as crucial in biological effects of these metals. The most toxic species of both metals have been identified. The accumulation or cell distribution could not alone explain the impact of speciation on the toxicity observed. However, a phenomenon of intracellular precipitation of uranium and lead has been stressed and could be involved in a detoxification mechanism. (author)

  14. The combined effect of electroporation and borocaptate in boron neutron capture therapy for murine solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    10B-Enriched borocaptate (BSH) was administered intraperitoneally to SCCVII tumor-bearing C3H/He mice. Electroporation (EP) was conducted by using a tweezers-type electrode. The 10B contents in tumors were measured by prompt γ-ray spectrometry. The colony formation assay was applied to investigate the antitumor effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and thereby to estimate the intratumor localization of BSH. The 10B concentrations in tumors decreased with time following BSH administration, falling to 5.4(±0.1) ppm at 3 h, whereas EP treatment (3 repetitions) 15 min after BSH injection delayed the clearance of BSH from tumors, and the 10B level remained at 19.4(±0.9) ppm at 3 h. The effect of BNCT increased with the 10B concentration in tumors, and the combination with EP showed a remarkably large cell killing effect even at 3 h after BSH injection. The effect of BNCT, i.e., slope coefficient of the cell survival curve of tumors, without EP was proportional to tumor 10B level (r=0.982), and that of BSH-BNCT combined with EP lay close to the same correlation line. However, tumors subjected to EP after BSH injection did not show high radiosensitivity when irradiated after conversion to a single cell suspension by enzymatic digestion. This indicates that the increase of the BNCT effect by EP was a consequence of enclosure of BSH in the interstitial space of tumor tissue and not within tumor cells. This is different from a previous in vitro study. The combination of EP and BNCT may be clinically useful, if a procedure to limit EP to the tumor region becomes available or if an alternative similar method is employed. (author)

  15. Temporal expression profiling identifies pathways mediating effect of causal variant on phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumya Gupta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Even with identification of multiple causal genetic variants for common human diseases, understanding the molecular processes mediating the causal variants' effect on the disease remains a challenge. This understanding is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat disease. While static profiling of gene expression is primarily used to get insights into the biological bases of diseases, it makes differentiating the causative from the correlative effects difficult, as the dynamics of the underlying biological processes are not monitored. Using yeast as a model, we studied genome-wide gene expression dynamics in the presence of a causal variant as the sole genetic determinant, and performed allele-specific functional validation to delineate the causal effects of the genetic variant on the phenotype. Here, we characterized the precise genetic effects of a functional MKT1 allelic variant in sporulation efficiency variation. A mathematical model describing meiotic landmark events and conditional activation of MKT1 expression during sporulation specified an early meiotic role of this variant. By analyzing the early meiotic genome-wide transcriptional response, we demonstrate an MKT1-dependent role of novel modulators, namely, RTG1/3, regulators of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, and DAL82, regulator of nitrogen starvation, in additively effecting sporulation efficiency. In the presence of functional MKT1 allele, better respiration during early sporulation was observed, which was dependent on the mitochondrial retrograde regulator, RTG3. Furthermore, our approach showed that MKT1 contributes to sporulation independent of Puf3, an RNA-binding protein that steady-state transcription profiling studies have suggested to mediate MKT1-pleiotropic effects during mitotic growth. These results uncover interesting regulatory links between meiosis and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. In this study, we highlight the advantage

  16. Gene networks underlying convergent and pleiotropic phenotypes in a large and systematically-phenotyped cohort with heterogeneous developmental disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tallulah Andrews

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Readily-accessible and standardised capture of genotypic variation has revolutionised our understanding of the genetic contribution to disease. Unfortunately, the corresponding systematic capture of patient phenotypic variation needed to fully interpret the impact of genetic variation has lagged far behind. Exploiting deep and systematic phenotyping of a cohort of 197 patients presenting with heterogeneous developmental disorders and whose genomes harbour de novo CNVs, we systematically applied a range of commonly-used functional genomics approaches to identify the underlying molecular perturbations and their phenotypic impact. Grouping patients into 408 non-exclusive patient-phenotype groups, we identified a functional association amongst the genes disrupted in 209 (51% groups. We find evidence for a significant number of molecular interactions amongst the association-contributing genes, including a single highly-interconnected network disrupted in 20% of patients with intellectual disability, and show using microcephaly how these molecular networks can be used as baits to identify additional members whose genes are variant in other patients with the same phenotype. Exploiting the systematic phenotyping of this cohort, we observe phenotypic concordance amongst patients whose variant genes contribute to the same functional association but note that (i this relationship shows significant variation across the different approaches used to infer a commonly perturbed molecular pathway, and (ii that the phenotypic similarities detected amongst patients who share the same inferred pathway perturbation result from these patients sharing many distinct phenotypes, rather than sharing a more specific phenotype, inferring that these pathways are best characterized by their pleiotropic effects.

  17. Effect of different doses of ionizing radiation on phenotype and function of dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effect of ionizing radiation on Dendritic Cells (DC), Flow Cytometry (FCM) and Enzyme-linked Immune-sorbent Assay (ELISA) were used to detect the expression of co-stimulatory molecules CD40 and CD80 on DC as well as their secretion of IL-12 and IL-27 in DC/TLC co-culture system after having been exposed to 0.075 Gy and 2.0 Gy X-rays for 6 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h and 72 h respectively. The results demonstrated that 0.075 Gy X-rays can induce CD80 and CD40 on DC and stimulate IL-12 secretion, while they were suppressed by 2.0 Gy. However, IL-27 secretion by DC was stimulated after both low and high doses of radiation. These results suggested that ionizing radiation can cause changes of the phenotype and secretion of cytokines, and this will provide new scientific basis for the study of immune effect following ionizing irradiation. (authors)

  18. Noninvasive ultrasound molecular imaging of the effect of statins on endothelial inflammatory phenotype in early atherosclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Khanicheh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory changes on the endothelium are responsible for leukocyte recruitment to plaques in atherosclerosis. Noninvasive assessment of treatment-effects on endothelial inflammation may be of use for managing medical therapy and developing novel therapies. We hypothesized that molecular imaging of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 with contrast enhanced ultrasound (CEU could assess treatment effects on endothelial phenotype in early atherosclerosis. METHODS: Mice with atherosclerosis produced by gene deletion of the LDL-receptor and Apobec-1-editing protein were studied. At 12 weeks of age, mice received 8 weeks of regular chow or atorvastatin-enriched chow (10 mg/kg/day. At 20 weeks, CEU molecular imaging for aortic endothelial VCAM-1 expression was performed with VCAM-1-targeted (MB(VCAM and control microbubbles (MB(Ctr. Aortic wall thickness was assessed with high frequency ultrasound. Histology, immunohistology and Western blot were used to assess plaque burden and VCAM-1 expression. RESULTS: Plaque burden was reduced on histology, and VCAM-1 was reduced on Western blot by atorvastatin, which corresponded to less endothelial expression of VCAM-1 on immunohistology. High frequency ultrasound did not detect differences in aortic wall thickness between groups. In contrast, CEU molecular imaging demonstrated selective signal enhancement for MB(VCAM in non-treated animals (MB(VCAM 2±0.3 vs MB(Ctr 0.7±0.2, p<0.01, but not in statin-treated animals (MB(VCAM 0.8±0.2 vs MB(Ctr 1.0±0.2, p = ns; p<0.01 for the effect of statin on MB(VCAM signal. CONCLUSIONS: Non-invasive CEU molecular imaging detects the effects of anti-inflammatory treatment on endothelial inflammation in early atherosclerosis. This easily accessible, low-cost technique may be useful in assessing treatment effects in preclinical research and in patients.

  19. Effect of process parameters on power requirements of vacuum swing adsorption technology for CO2 capture from flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the effects of process and operating parameters - feed gas temperature, evacuation pressure and feed concentration - on the performance of carbon dioxide vacuum swing adsorption (CO2VSA) processes for CO2 capture from gas, especially as it affects power consumption. To obtain reliable data on the VSA process, experimental work was conducted on a purposely built three bed CO2VSA pilot plant using commercial 13X zeolite. Both 6 step and 9 step cycles were used to determine the influences of temperature, evacuation pressure and feed concentration on process performance (recovery, purity, power and corresponding capture cost). A simple economic model for CO2 capture was developed and employed herein. Through experiments and analysis, it is found that the feed gas temperature, evacuation pressure and feed concentration have significant effects on power consumption and CO2 capture cost. Our data demonstrate that the CO2VSA process has good recovery (>70%), purity (>90%) and low power cost (4-10 kW/TPDc) when operating with 40 C feed gas provided relatively deep vacuum is used. Enhanced performance is obtained when higher feed gas concentration is fed to the plant, as expected. Our data indicates large potential for application of CO2VSA to CO2 capture from flue gas. (author)

  20. Effects of Taxotere on invasive potential and multidrug resistance phenotype in pancreatic carcinoma cell line SUIT-2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Liut; Edgar Staren; Takeshi Iwamura; Hubert Appert; John Howard

    2001-01-01

    @@ INTRODUCTIONDevelopment of drug-resistance to chemotherapyand subsequent metastasis of tumor are primarilyresponsible for treatment failure and the death fromcancer. There have been many previous studies onthe relationship between expression of multidrugresistance (MDR) phenotype P-glycoprotein (P-gp)and the malignant properties of tumors, but theresults are often conflicting[1-8]. The difference intumor types or MDR phenotype induced by specificagents might account for this discrepancy. Taxotere(TXT), a member of the family of taxanes, hasantitumor activity through its effect of promotingthe polymerization of tubulin[9,10].

  1. Phenotype-dependent effects of EpCAM expression on growth and invasion of human breast cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) has been shown to be overexpressed in breast cancer and stem cells and has emerged as an attractive target for immunotherapy of breast cancer patients. This study analyzes the effects of EpCAM on breast cancer cell lines with epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype. For this purpose, shRNA-mediated knockdown of EpCAM gene expression was performed in EpCAMhigh breast cancer cell lines with epithelial phenotype (MCF-7, T47D and SkBR3). Moreover, EpCAMlow breast carcinoma cell lines with mesenchymal phenotype (MDA-MB-231, Hs578t) and inducible overexpression of EpCAM were used to study effects on proliferation, migration and in vivo growth. In comparison to non-specific silencing controls (n/s-crtl) knockdown of EpCAM (E#2) in EpCAMhigh cell lines resulted in reduced cell proliferation under serum-reduced culture conditions. Moreover, DNA synthesis under 3D culture conditions in collagen was significantly reduced. Xenografts of MCF-7 and T47D cells with knockdown of EpCAM formed smaller tumors that were less invasive. EpCAMlow cell lines with tetracycline-inducible overexpression of EpCAM showed no increased cell proliferation or migration under serum-reduced growth conditions. MDA-MB-231 xenografts with EpCAM overexpression showed reduced invasion into host tissue and more infiltrates of chicken granulocytes. The role of EpCAM in breast cancer strongly depends on the epithelial or mesenchymal phenotype of tumor cells. Cancer cells with epithelial phenotype need EpCAM as a growth- and invasion-promoting factor, whereas tumor cells with a mesenchymal phenotype are independent of EpCAM in invasion processes and tumor progression. These findings might have clinical implications for EpCAM-based targeting strategies in patients with invasive breast cancer

  2. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Sayan; Banerjee, Moloy, E-mail: moloy_kb@yahoo.com

    2015-01-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian–Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (z{sub offset}), particle size (d{sub p}) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the “capture efficiency” (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels. - Highlights: • Two counter rotating vortices forces the fluid flow back through the more viscous region. • The existence of strong recirculation zone just downstream side of the occlusion. • Configuration 4 produces the better efficient MDT system. • Modified Casson model predicts the highest value of CE, whereas the generalized power law gives

  3. Effect of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood on magnetic particle capture in occluded blood vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic nanoparticles drug carriers continue to attract considerable interest for drug targeting in the treatment of cancer and other pathological conditions. Magnetic carrier particles with surface-bound drug molecules are injected into the vascular system upstream from the desired target site, and are captured at the target site via a local applied magnetic field. Herein, a numerical investigation of steady magnetic drug targeting (MDT) using functionalized magnetic micro-spheres in partly occluded blood vessel having a 90° bent is presented considering the effects of non-Newtonian characteristics of blood. An Eulerian–Lagrangian technique is adopted to resolve the hemodynamic flow and the motion of the magnetic particles in the flow using ANSYS FLUENT. An implantable infinitely long cylindrical current carrying conductor is used to create the requisite magnetic field. Targeted transport of the magnetic particles in a partly occluded vessel differs distinctly from the same in a regular unblocked vessel. Parametric investigation is conducted and the influence of the insert configuration and its position from the central plane of the artery (zoffset), particle size (dp) and its magnetic property (χ) and the magnitude of current (I) on the “capture efficiency” (CE) is reported. Analysis shows that there exists an optimum regime of operating parameters for which deposition of the drug carrying magnetic particles in a target zone on the partly occluded vessel wall can be maximized. The results provide useful design bases for in vitro set up for the investigation of MDT in stenosed blood vessels. - Highlights: • Two counter rotating vortices forces the fluid flow back through the more viscous region. • The existence of strong recirculation zone just downstream side of the occlusion. • Configuration 4 produces the better efficient MDT system. • Modified Casson model predicts the highest value of CE, whereas the generalized power law gives the least

  4. Effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Itsuro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan)], E-mail: katoitsu@dent.osaka-u.ac.jp; Fujita, Yusei [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Maruhashi, Akira [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Kumada, Hiroaki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai Research and Development Center, Ibaraki (Japan); Ohmae, Masatoshi [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Izimisano Municipal Hospital, Rinku General Hospital, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); Kirihata, Mitsunori [Graduate School of Environment and Life Science, Osaka prefectural University, Osaka (Japan); Imahori, Yoshio [Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto Prefectural University, Kyoto (Japan); CEO of Cancer Intelligence Care Systems, Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Minoru [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan); Sakrai, Yoshinori [Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University of Medicine, Hokkaido (Japan); Sumi, Tetsuro; Iwai, Soichi; Nakazawa, Mitsuhiro [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, II Osaka University, Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka (Japan); Murata, Isao; Miyamaru, Hiroyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (Japan); Ono, Koji [Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Research Reactor Institut, Kyoto University, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-07-15

    It is necessary to explore new treatments for recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) to avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. We have treated with BNCT 42 times for 26 patients (19 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 4 salivary gland carcinomas and 3 sarcomas) with a recurrent and far advanced HNM since 2001. Results of (1) {sup 10}B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratios (T/N ratio) of FBPA-PET studies were SCC: 1.8-5.7, sarcoma: 2.5-4.0, parotid tumor: 2.5-3.7. (2) Therapeutic effects were CR: 12 cases, PR: 10 cases, PD: 3 cases NE (not evaluated): 1 case. Response rate was 85%. (3) Improvement of QOL such as a relief of severe pain, bleeding, and exudates at the local lesion, improvement of PS, disappearance of ulceration, covered with normal skin and preserved oral and maxillofacial functions and tissues. (4) Survival periods after BNCT were 1-72 months (mean: 13.6 months). Six-year survival rate was 24% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. (5) Adverse-events were transient mucositis and alopecia in most of the cases; three osteomyelitis and one brain necrosis were recognized. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach for advanced HNM.

  5. Early effects of boron neutron capture therapy on rat glioma models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early effects of boron neutron capture therapy on malignant gliomas are characterized by reduction of the enhanced area regression of the peritumoral edema radiologically. The aim of this study is to investigate the early histological changes of tumors and inflammatory cells after BNCT in the rat brain. The rats were treated with BNCT using boronophenyialanine (BPA) 7 days after implantation of C6 glioma cells. The tumors were assessed their sizes and configurations with magnetic resonance imaging, then killed 4 days after BNCT. The mean tumor volumes were 39mm3 in BNCT-treated group, and 138 mm3 in the control group. In the histological examination, tumors of the BNCT group showed less pleomorphic appearance with atypical nuclei and mitotic figures, compared with the control group. Necrosis and edematous changes in the neuropile were negligible. There existed remnant tumors adjacent to the lateral ventricle. The reactions of the inflammatory cells were examined with ED-1 of macrophage marker. ED-1 positive cells and their processes were reduced in the marginal area of tumor in the BNCT group. BNCT reduce the tumor progression by suppression of the proliferation. Inhibition of the activated macrophages may reduce peritumoral edema in early phase. (author)

  6. Effects of aging on iodine capture by silver-exchanged mordenite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is conducting advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing studies that include testing of integrated off-gas treatment systems designed to capture and sequester volatile and semi-volatile radionuclides (H-3, C-14, Kr-85, and I-129) from fuel reprocessing. Numerous technologies based on scrubbing with caustic or acidic solutions and chemisorption on silver-coated or silver-impregnated adsorbents have been developed for the recovery of airborne I-129. Because of its high acid resistance, a silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) sorbent has been developed specifically for application in treating off-gas streams containing iodine. Although extensive tests were conducted in the United States on a form of this sorbent, the specific material previously tested is no longer commercially available, and similar materials are currently being evaluated. As part of this evaluation, tests were conducted to determine the iodine sorption properties of this replacement medium and the effects of long-term (up to 6 month) exposure to simulated off-gas streams. This paper describes the impacts of long-term exposure to dry air on the iodine sorption capacity of the silver-exchanged mordenite. (author)

  7. Effectiveness of boron neutron capture therapy for recurrent head and neck malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is necessary to explore new treatments for recurrent head and neck malignancies (HNM) to avoid severe impairment of oro-facial structures and functions. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is tumor-cell targeted radiotherapy that has significant superiority over conventional radiotherapies in principle. We have treated with BNCT 42 times for 26 patients (19 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 4 salivary gland carcinomas and 3 sarcomas) with a recurrent and far advanced HNM since 2001. Results of (1) 10B concentration of tumor/normal tissue ratios (T/N ratio) of FBPA-PET studies were SCC: 1.8-5.7, sarcoma: 2.5-4.0, parotid tumor: 2.5-3.7. (2) Therapeutic effects were CR: 12 cases, PR: 10 cases, PD: 3 cases NE (not evaluated): 1 case. Response rate was 85%. (3) Improvement of QOL such as a relief of severe pain, bleeding, and exudates at the local lesion, improvement of PS, disappearance of ulceration, covered with normal skin and preserved oral and maxillofacial functions and tissues. (4) Survival periods after BNCT were 1-72 months (mean: 13.6 months). Six-year survival rate was 24% by Kaplan-Meier analysis. (5) Adverse-events were transient mucositis and alopecia in most of the cases; three osteomyelitis and one brain necrosis were recognized. These results indicate that BNCT represents a new and promising treatment approach for advanced HNM.

  8. Ageing Effects on Exhaust Gas Catalysts: Microscopic Changes Captured by X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, G.; Rochet, A.; Baier, S.; Casapu, M.; Ritter, S.; Wilde, F.; Ogurreck, M.; Beckmann, F.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2014-04-01

    In this work we examine the different aspects of catalyst ageing with effects ranging from the nano to the macro scale. Underlining the general importance of combining different characterisation techniques, like transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) for the nanoscale, we focus on the application of X-ray absorption micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) to capture macroscopic changes in the um to mm scale. Two series of tomographic measurements were carried out: (i) investigation of three differently treated samples by collecting one channel from a fresh, a conditioned and an aged monolith and (ii) examination of one single coated honeycomb channel with 4 wt% Pt/γ-Al2O3 and for comparison one with pure γ-Al2O3 washcoat, which have been measured in a non-destructive ex situ manner at the same position after each ageing treatment. Main observations of the tomographic study are: (1) coating inhomogeneities between different channels taken from the same honeycomb and between different honeycombs, (2) formation of cracks in the washcoat material and (3) formation of macroscopic Pt particles in the case of 4 wt% Pt/γ-Al2O3 washcoat. Particularly valuable is the non-destructive ex situ investigation after different ageing steps on the same channel using X-ray tomography.

  9. The Isotopic Effect in the Nuclear Capture of Negative Muons in Xenon

    CERN Document Server

    Mamedov, T N; Gritsaj, K I; Duginov, V N; Zhukov, V A; Olshevsky, V G; Stojkov, A V

    2000-01-01

    The lifetime of negative muons in 1s-state of ^129 Xe has been measured for the first time. The nuclear capture rate of muon for ^129 Xe is compared with the analogous results for ^132,136 Xe isotopes. The noticeable dependence of the nuclear capture rate of muon on mass number for the above-mentioned isotopes is observed. The experimental results are compared with the ones calculated according to the semi-empirical Goulard - Primakoff formula.

  10. Phenotypic plasticity and longevity in plants and animals: cause and effect?

    OpenAIRE

    Borges, Renee M

    2009-01-01

    Immobile plants and immobile modular animals outlive unitary animals. This paper discusses competing but not necessarily mutually exclusive theories to explain this extreme longevity, especially from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity. Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity. Monocarpy versus polycarpy can also influence the kind of senescent processes experien...

  11. Effects of moonlight on the capturability of frugivorous phyllostomid bats (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae at different time scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A. R. Mello

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Some bat species seem to be lunar phobic, i.e., they avoid flying in bright areas or during bright periods of the night; however, the evidence is still controversial. We think that part of this controversy comes from pooling data on bat captures and moonlight intensity according to broad categories, such as moon phases, which conceal the high variability among nights. Therefore, we used detailed, long-term field data on three phyllostomid bat species, in order to test the hypothesis of lunar phobia at two different time scales: 1 among nights, by pooling data of different nights according to moon phases and testing for differences in the distribution of captures; and 2 within a night, by analyzing the relationship between capturability and moonlight intensity (measured as illuminance in one-hour intervals for 29 individual nights. Although most captures of the studied bat species occurred in the first half of the night, their activity pattern varied largely among nights, and was not always unimodal as commonly assumed. At the larger time scale, all studied bat species showed evidence of lunar phobia, as they were more frequently captured on dark moon phases. Nevertheless, at the smaller time scale, only Carollia perspicillata (Linnaeus, 1758 was less frequently captured on brighter periods of the night. We propose that the unimodal activity pattern assumed for frugivorous phyllostomid bats may be an artifact of data organization, and that activity and lunar phobia are much more variable than previously assumed.

  12. Overriding auditory attentional capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Polly; Lavie, Nilli

    2007-02-01

    Attentional capture by color singletons during shape search can be eliminated when the target is not a feature singleton (Bacon & Egeth, 1994). This suggests that a "singleton detection" search strategy must be adopted for attentional capture to occur. Here we find similar effects on auditory attentional capture. Irrelevant high-intensity singletons interfered with an auditory search task when the target itself was also a feature singleton. However, singleton interference was eliminated when the target was not a singleton (i.e., when nontargets were made heterogeneous, or when more than one target sound was presented). These results suggest that auditory attentional capture depends on the observer's attentional set, as does visual attentional capture. The suggestion that hearing might act as an early warning system that would always be tuned to unexpected unique stimuli must therefore be modified to accommodate these strategy-dependent capture effects. PMID:17557587

  13. Phenotypic effects of genetic variability in human clock genes on circadian and sleep parameters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Malcolm Von Schantz

    2008-12-01

    Circadian rhythms and sleep are two separate but intimately related processes. Circadian rhythms are generated through the precisely controlled, cyclic expression of a number of genes designated clock genes. Genetic variability in these genes has been associated with a number of phenotypic differences in circadian as well as sleep parameters, both in mouse models and in humans. Diurnal preferences as determined by the selfreported Horne–Östberg (HÖ) questionnaire, has been associated with polymorphisms in the human genes CLOCK, PER1, PER2 and PER3. Circadian rhythm-related sleep disorders have also been associated with mutations and polymorphisms in clock genes, with the advanced type cosegrating in an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern with mutations in the genes PER2 and CSNK1D, and the delayed type associating without discernible Mendelian inheritance with polymorphisms in CLOCK and PER3. Several mouse models of clock gene null alleles have been demonstrated to have affected sleep homeostasis. Recent findings have shown that the variable number tandem polymorphism in PER3, previously linked to diurnal preference, has profound effects on sleep homeostasis and cognitive performance following sleep loss, confirming the close association between the processes of circadian rhythms and sleep at the genetic level.

  14. Protecting embryos from stress: Corticosterone effects and the corticosterone response to capture and confinement during pregnancy in a live-bearing lizard (Hoplodactylus maculatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cree, A.; Tyrrell, C.L.; Preest, M.R.; Thorburn, D.; Guillette, L.J., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Hormones in the embryonic environment, including those of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, have profound effects on development in eutherian mammals. However, little is known about their effects in reptiles that have independently evolved viviparity. We investigated whether exogenous corticosterone affected embryonic development in the viviparous gecko Hoplodactylus maculatus, and whether pregnant geckos have a corticosterone response to capture and confinement that is suppressed relative to that in non-pregnant (vitellogenic) females and males. Corticosterone implants (5 mg, slow-release) administered to females in mid-pregnancy caused a large elevation of corticosterone in maternal plasma (Pcapture and confinement relative to vitellogenic females, and both groups of females had higher responses than males. Future research should address whether lower maternal doses of corticosterone produce non-lethal effects on development that could contribute to phenotypic plasticity. Corticosterone implants also led to increased basking in pregnant females (P<0.001), and basal corticosterone in wild geckos (independent of reproductive condition) was positively correlated with body temperature (P<0.001). Interactions between temperature and corticosterone may have broad significance to other terrestrial ectotherms, and body temperature should be considered as a variable influencing plasma corticosterone concentrations in all future studies on reptiles. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Overriding auditory attentional capture

    OpenAIRE

    Dalton, Polly; Lavie, Nilli

    2007-01-01

    Attentional capture by color singletons during shape search can be eliminated when the target is not a feature singleton (Bacon & Egeth, 1994). This suggests that a "singleton detection" search strategy must be adopted for attentional capture to occur. Here we find similar effects on auditory attentional capture. Irrelevant high-intensity singletons interfered with an auditory search task when the target itself was also a feature singleton. However, singleton interference was eliminated when ...

  16. Effect of collective response on electron capture and excitation in collisions of highly charged ions with fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadhane, U; Misra, D; Singh, Y P; Tribedi, Lokesh C

    2003-03-01

    Projectile deexcitation Lyman x-ray emission following electron capture and K excitation has been studied in collisions of bare and Li-like sulphur ions (of energy 110 MeV) with fullerenes (C(60)/C(70)) and different gaseous targets. The intensity ratios of different Lyman x-ray lines in collisions with fullerenes are found to be substantially lower than those for the gas targets, both for capture and excitation. This has been explained in terms of a model based on "solidlike" effect, namely, wakefield induced stark mixing of the excited states populated via electron capture or K excitation: a collective phenomenon of plasmon excitation in the fullerenes under the influence of heavy, highly charged ions. PMID:12689221

  17. Effect of CuO on the efficiency of sulfur capture of Ca--based compounds during coal combustion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The efficiency of sulfur capture of CaO, Ca(OH)2 and CaCO3 as well as the effect of CuO on them were studied. Results showed that the efficiency of sulfur capture of Ca(OH)2 is the highest among these three compounds. When CuO was used with each of CaO, Ca(OH)2 and CaCO3 at the same time, the efficiency of all of them would rise, and that of Ca(OH)2 raise most. The efficiency of sulfur capture of Ca(OH)2 with CuO is 14.4% higher than that without CuO.

  18. The genetics of maternal care: direct and indirect genetic effects on phenotype in the dung beetle Onthophagus taurus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, John; Simmons, Leigh W

    2002-05-14

    While theoretical models of the evolution of parental care are based on the assumption of underlying genetic variance, surprisingly few quantitative genetic studies of this life-history trait exist. Estimation of the degree of genetic variance in parental care is important because it can be a significant source of maternal effects, which, if genetically based, represent indirect genetic effects. A major prediction of indirect genetic effect theory is that traits without heritable variation can evolve because of the heritable environmental variation that indirect genetic effects provide. In the dung beetle, Onthophagus taurus, females provide care to offspring by provisioning a brood mass. The size of the brood mass has pronounced effects on offspring phenotype. Using a half-sib breeding design we show that the weight of the brood mass females produce exhibits significant levels of additive genetic variance due to sires. However, variance caused by dams is considerably larger, demonstrating that maternal effects are also important. Body size exhibited low additive genetic variance. However, body size exerts a strong maternal influence on the weight of brood masses produced, accounting for 22% of the nongenetic variance in offspring body size. Maternal body size also influenced the number of offspring produced but there was no genetic variance for this trait. Offspring body size and brood mass weight exhibited positive genetic and phenotypic correlations. We conclude that both indirect genetic effects, via maternal care, and nongenetic maternal effects, via female size, play important roles in the evolution of phenotype in this species. PMID:11983863

  19. Radiation effects of boron neutron capture therapy on brain, skin, and eye of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the radiation effects of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) on the brain, skin, and eyes of nude rats following systemic administration of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and neutron irradiation to the head. A solution containing 120 mg of 10B-enriched-L-BPA complexed with fructose was administered IP to nude rats. Boron concentrations were ∼ 8.4, 9.4, 10.0, and 11.0 μg/g in the brain, blood, skin, and eyes, respectively, at 6 h when the animals were irradiated at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor to cause tumor regression in nude rats carrying intracerebral implants of the human melanoma cell line MRA 27. Mild to moderate increases in loose fibrous tissue were observed in the choroid plexus at estimated physical doses to the brain and blood that ranged from 4.3-7.1 Gy and 4.6-7.7 Gy, respectively, and these appeared to be dose and time dependent. Other changes in the choroid plexus included occasional infiltrates of macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes and vacuolation of epithelial cells. Dose-dependent moist desquamation of the skin was observed in all rats, but this had healed by 28 days following irradiation. Cataracts and keratitis developed in the eyes of most animals, and these were dose dependent. The minimal histopathological changes seen in the brain at doses that were sufficient to eradicate intracerebral melanoma indicates that BNCT has the potential to cure a tumor-bearing host without producing the normal brain injury usually associated with conventional external beam radiation therapy. Studies in canines, which currently are in progress, should further define the dose-effect relationships of BNCT on critical neuroanatomic structures within the brain. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Phenotypic plasticity in response to the social environment: effects of density and sex ratio on mating behaviour following ecotype divergence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Karlsson

    Full Text Available The ability to express phenotypically plastic responses to environmental cues might be adaptive in changing environments. We studied phenotypic plasticity in mating behaviour as a response to population density and adult sex ratio in a freshwater isopod (Asellus aquaticus. A. aquaticus has recently diverged into two distinct ecotypes, inhabiting different lake habitats (reed Phragmites australis and stonewort Chara tomentosa, respectively. In field surveys, we found that these habitats differ markedly in isopod population densities and adult sex ratios. These spatially and temporally demographic differences are likely to affect mating behaviour. We performed behavioural experiments using animals from both the ancestral ecotype ("reed" isopods and from the novel ecotype ("stonewort" isopods population. We found that neither ecotype adjusted their behaviour in response to population density. However, the reed ecotype had a higher intrinsic mating propensity across densities. In contrast to the effects of density, we found ecotype differences in plasticity in response to sex ratio. The stonewort ecotype show pronounced phenotypic plasticity in mating propensity to adult sex ratio, whereas the reed ecotype showed a more canalised behaviour with respect to this demographic factor. We suggest that the lower overall mating propensity and the phenotypic plasticity in response to sex ratio have evolved in the novel stonewort ecotype following invasion of the novel habitat. Plasticity in mating behaviour may in turn have effects on the direction and intensity of sexual selection in the stonewort habitat, which may fuel further ecotype divergence.

  1. Distribution of the phenotypic effects of random homologous recombination between two virus species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Vuillaume

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Recombination has an evident impact on virus evolution and emergence of new pathotypes, and has generated an immense literature. However, the distribution of phenotypic effects caused by genome-wide random homologous recombination has never been formally investigated. Previous data on the subject have promoted the implicit view that most viral recombinant genomes are likely to be deleterious or lethal if the nucleotide identity of parental sequences is below 90%. We decided to challenge this view by creating a bank of near-random recombinants between two viral species of the genus Begomovirus (Family Geminiviridae exhibiting 82% nucleotide identity, and by testing infectivity and in planta accumulation of recombinant clones randomly extracted from this bank. The bank was created by DNA-shuffling-a technology initially applied to the random shuffling of individual genes, and here implemented for the first time to shuffle full-length viral genomes. Together with our previously described system allowing the direct cloning of full-length infectious geminivirus genomes, it provided a unique opportunity to generate hundreds of "mosaic" virus genomes, directly testable for infectivity. A subset of 47 randomly chosen recombinants was sequenced, individually inoculated into tomato plants, and compared with the parental viruses. Surprisingly, our results showed that all recombinants were infectious and accumulated at levels comparable or intermediate to that of the parental clones. This indicates that, in our experimental system, despite the fact that the parental genomes differ by nearly 20%, lethal and/or large deleterious effects of recombination are very rare, in striking contrast to the common view that has emerged from previous studies published on other viruses.

  2. Antiproliferative effect and apoptosis induction in melanoma treatment by boron neutron capture therapy (BCNT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Introduction: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiotherapy where a compound having 10B is administered to cancer patients and is accumulated in tumor tissues. Thus, the tumor is irradiated with thermal neutrons, 10B absorbs and destroys them, producing alpha radiation. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is the agent responsible for delivering boron to the tumor tissue. After BPA administration, BNCT is used as a localized radiotherapy for many tumors treatment, mainly melanoma, which has a high mortality rate among all types of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antiproliferative and antitumor effects of BNCT application in human melanoma treatment. Materials and Methods: MEWO cells (human melanoma) were cultured and treated with different concentrations of BPA (8.36 to 0.52 mg/ml). After 90 minutes, they were irradiated with thermal neutron flux up to a dose of 8.4 Gy. The parameters analyzed were free radical production, cell cycle progression, cell death signaling pathways, cycling D1, caspase-3 and extracellular matrix synthesis produced, beyond the mitochondrial electric potential analysis. Results: After BNCT treatment, MEWO cells showed an amount of free radical increase about 10 times. Still, there was a significant decrease of cyclin D1, G0/G1 proliferation, synthesis and G2/M cell cycle phases. BNCT induced a mitochondrial electrical potential decrease, as well as fibrillar proteins of extracellular matrix. BNCT had a significant number of dead cell increase, mainly by necrosis. However, BNCT induced phosphorylated caspase 3 increase. Discussion/Conclusion: BNCT induced cell death increase by necrosis, mitochondrial electric potential decrease and free radical production increase. BNCT is cytotoxic to melanoma cells. Besides necrosis, phosphorylated caspase 3 increase was observed, accompanied by a proliferative response decrease regulated by the G1/S checkpoint and matrix extracellular synthesis reduction

  3. Antiproliferative effect and apoptosis induction in melanoma treatment by boron neutron capture therapy (BCNT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faiao-Flores, Fernanda; Coelho, Paulo; Arruda-Neto, Joao; Maria, Durvanei [University of Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is an experimental radiotherapy where a compound having {sup 10}B is administered to cancer patients and is accumulated in tumor tissues. Thus, the tumor is irradiated with thermal neutrons, {sup 10}B absorbs and destroys them, producing alpha radiation. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is the agent responsible for delivering boron to the tumor tissue. After BPA administration, BNCT is used as a localized radiotherapy for many tumors treatment, mainly melanoma, which has a high mortality rate among all types of tumors. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro antiproliferative and antitumor effects of BNCT application in human melanoma treatment. Materials and Methods: MEWO cells (human melanoma) were cultured and treated with different concentrations of BPA (8.36 to 0.52 mg/ml). After 90 minutes, they were irradiated with thermal neutron flux up to a dose of 8.4 Gy. The parameters analyzed were free radical production, cell cycle progression, cell death signaling pathways, cycling D1, caspase-3 and extracellular matrix synthesis produced, beyond the mitochondrial electric potential analysis. Results: After BNCT treatment, MEWO cells showed an amount of free radical increase about 10 times. Still, there was a significant decrease of cyclin D1, G0/G1 proliferation, synthesis and G2/M cell cycle phases. BNCT induced a mitochondrial electrical potential decrease, as well as fibrillar proteins of extracellular matrix. BNCT had a significant number of dead cell increase, mainly by necrosis. However, BNCT induced phosphorylated caspase 3 increase. Discussion/Conclusion: BNCT induced cell death increase by necrosis, mitochondrial electric potential decrease and free radical production increase. BNCT is cytotoxic to melanoma cells. Besides necrosis, phosphorylated caspase 3 increase was observed, accompanied by a proliferative response decrease regulated by the G1/S checkpoint and matrix extracellular synthesis

  4. Effects of capture-related injury on postcapture movement of white-tailed deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dechen Quinn, Amy C; Williams, David M; Porter, William F; Fitzgerald, Scott D; Hynes, Kevin

    2014-04-01

    Capture-related injuries or deaths of wildlife study subjects pose concerns to researchers, from considerations for animal welfare to inflated project costs and biased data. Capture myopathy (CM) is an injury that can affect an animal's survival ≤ 30 days postrelease, but is often difficult to detect without close monitoring and immediate necropsy. We evaluated the influence of capture and handling on postcapture movement in an attempt to characterize movement rates of animals suffering from CM. We captured and global positioning system-collared 95 white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) in central and northern New York during 2006-2008. Six juveniles died within 30 days postrelease, and necropsy reports indicated that two suffered CM (2%). We compared postcapture movement rates for juveniles that survived >30 days with those that died ≤ 30 days postcapture. Survivor movement rates (43.74 m/hr, SD = 3.53, n = 28) were significantly higher than rates for deer that died within 30 days (17.70 m/hr, SD = 1.57, n = 6) (Prates of juveniles that died of CM (15.1 m/hr) were 5.1 m/hr lower than those for juveniles that died of other causes ≤ 30 days postcapture (20.2 m/hr), but we were unable to evaluate this statistically because of insufficient sample size. We found no difference in vital rates (temperature, heart rate, respiration rate) during handling between survivors and juveniles that died within 30 days postcapture but observed that survivors were in better body condition at capture. These results suggest that deer likely to die within the 30-day CM window can be identified soon after capture, provided that intensive movement data are collected. Further, even if necropsy reports are unavailable, these animals should be censored from analysis because their behavior is not representative of movements of surviving animals. PMID:24484502

  5. Mercury's capture into the 3/2 spin-orbit resonance including the effect of core-mantle friction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Alexandre C. M.; Laskar, Jacques

    2009-05-01

    The rotation of Mercury is presently captured in a 3/2 spin-orbit resonance with the orbital mean motion. The capture mechanism is well understood as the result of tidal interactions with the Sun combined with planetary perturbations [Goldreich, P., Peale, S., 1966. Astron. J. 71, 425-438; Correia, A.C.M., Laskar, J., 2004. Nature 429, 848-850]. However, it is now almost certain that Mercury has a liquid core [Margot, J.L., Peale, S.J., Jurgens, R.F., Slade, M.A., Holin, I.V., 2007. Science 316, 710-714] which should induce a contribution of viscous friction at the core-mantle boundary to the spin evolution. According to Peale and Boss [Peale, S.J., Boss, A.P., 1977. J. Geophys. Res. 82, 743-749] this last effect greatly increases the chances of capture in all spin-orbit resonances, being 100% for the 2/1 resonance, and thus preventing the planet from evolving to the presently observed configuration. Here we show that for a given resonance, as the chaotic evolution of Mercury's orbit can drive its eccentricity to very low values during the planet's history, any previous capture can be destabilized whenever the eccentricity becomes lower than a critical value. In our numerical integrations of 1000 orbits of Mercury over 4 Gyr, the spin ends 99.8% of the time captured in a spin-orbit resonance, in particular in one of the following three configurations: 5/2 (22%), 2/1 (32%) and 3/2 (26%). Although the present 3/2 spin-orbit resonance is not the most probable outcome, we also show that the capture probability in this resonance can be increased up to 55% or 73%, if the eccentricity of Mercury in the past has descended below the critical values 0.025 or 0.005, respectively.

  6. Electric field effect on the carrier capture of deep traps in p-type InP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwich, R.; Sabra, M. K.

    2010-04-01

    The electric field effect on the carrier capture cross section of deep traps has been studied. The experimental results on the H4F and H5 hole traps in p-type InP show an enhancement of the capture cross section with the increase in the applied electric field. This enhancement depends on the nature of the deep traps and its peak temperature. Increasing the electric field from 4.1×106 to 2.4×107 V/m leads to an increase in the H4F capture cross section by a factor of 3 to 20. While in the case of H5 it increases by a factor of 2 to 5 by increasing the applied electric field from 8.0×106 to 2.4×107 V/m. A theoretical model has been suggested to explain the electric field effect on the capture cross section. This model deals with the cascade and multiphonon processes semiclassically. Applying this model to the above deep traps, we have found that H4F is negatively charged complex and H5 is positively charged complex.

  7. Effects of Dantrolene Therapy on Disease Phenotype in Dystrophin Deficient mdx Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, James L; Huynh, Tony; Uaesoontrachoon, Kitipong; Tatem, Kathleen; Phadke, Aditi; Van der Meulen, Jack H; Yu, Qing; Nagaraju, Kannaboyina

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency causes contraction-induced injury and damage to the muscle fiber, resulting in sustained increase in intracellular calcium levels, activation of calcium-dependent proteases and cell death. It is known that the Ryanodine receptor (RyR1) on the sarcoplasmic reticular (SR) membrane controls calcium release. Dantrolene, an FDA approved skeletal muscle relaxant, inhibits the release of calcium from the SR during excitation-contraction and suppresses uncontrolled calcium release by directly acting on the RyR complex to limit its activation. This study examines whether Dantrolene can reduce the disease phenotype in the mdx mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We treated mdx mice (4 weeks old) with daily intraperitoneal injections of 40mg/kg of Dantrolene for 6 weeks and measured functional (grip strength, in vitro force contractions), behavioral (open field digiscan), imagining (optical imaging for inflammation), histological (H&E), and molecular (protein and RNA) endpoints in a blinded fashion. We found that treatment with Dantrolene resulted in decreased grip strength and open field behavioral activity in mdx mice. There was no significant difference in inflammation either by optical imaging analysis of cathepsin activity or histological (H&E) analysis. In vitro force contraction measures showed no changes in EDL muscle-specific force, lengthening-contraction force deficit, or fatigue resistance. We found Dantrolene treatment significantly reduces serum CK levels. Further, Dantrolene-treated mice showed decreased SERCA1 but not RyR1 expression in skeletal muscle. These results suggest that Dantrolene treatment alone has no significant beneficial effects at the tested doses in young mdx mice. PMID:24270550

  8. Interelectronic effects on the photon angular distribution following the radiative electron capture into lithium-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiative electron capture into medium- and high-Z, lithium-like ions is studied in the framework of the density matrix theory. For these few-electron ions, detailed computations have been carried out for the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays following the capture into the low-lying 1s22s2ljLJ1,3 beryllium-like levels, including the 1s22s2S01 ground state. In these computations, emphasis is placed on the many-electron effects which arise especially at low collision energies. For slow projectiles of a few MeV/u, the interelectronic effects may reduce the angle-differential cross-sections by about 5% when compared with effective one-electron calculations

  9. The effect of pyridine modification of Ni-DOBDC on CO2 capture under humid conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Youn-Sang; Liu, Jian; Wilmer, Christopher E; Sun, Hahnbi; Dickey, Allison N; Kim, Min Bum; Benin, Annabelle I; Willis, Richard R; Barpaga, Dushyant; LeVan, M Douglas; Snurr, Randall Q

    2014-03-28

    The metal-organic framework Ni-DOBDC was modified with pyridine molecules to make the normally hydrophilic internal surface more hydrophobic. Experiments and molecular simulations show that the pyridine modification reduces H2O adsorption while retaining substantial CO2 capacity under the conditions of interest for carbon capture from flue gas. PMID:24527490

  10. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, α)7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,γ)2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning

  11. Kin recognition and the 'armpit effect': evidence of self-referent phenotype matching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, J M; Johnston, R E

    2000-04-01

    In species with multiple paternity or maternity, animals may best assess their relatedness to unfamiliar conspecifics by comparing their own phenotype(s) with those of unidentified individuals. Yet whether animals can recognize kin through self-matching is controversial. Because golden hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) mate multiply and can produce multiply sired litters, they were tested for their ability to use self-matching for kin recognition. Hamsters that were reared only with non-kin since birth responded differentially to odours of unfamiliar relatives and non-relatives. Postnatal association with kin was not necessary for this discrimination. Prenatal learning was unlikely because of delayed production and perception of social odours. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a vertebrate can use its own phenotype for kin-recognition purposes without prior experience with kin. By using itself as a referent, rather than its siblings or parents, a golden hamster may be better able to direct nepotism towards the most appropriate individuals. Kin discrimination via self-inspection may be especially important in nepotistic contexts (to identify most closely related conspecifics), whereas inclusion of the phenotypes of close kin as referents may be favoured in mate-choice contexts (to identify all related individuals). PMID:10821615

  12. A systematic comparison of feature space effects on disease classifier performance for phenotype identification of five diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotfila, Christopher; Uzuner, Özlem

    2015-12-01

    Automated phenotype identification plays a critical role in cohort selection and bioinformatics data mining. Natural Language Processing (NLP)-informed classification techniques can robustly identify phenotypes in unstructured medical notes. In this paper, we systematically assess the effect of naive, lexically normalized, and semantic feature spaces on classifier performance for obesity, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CAD), hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. We train support vector machines (SVMs) using individual feature spaces as well as combinations of these feature spaces on two small training corpora (730 and 790 documents) and a combined (1520 documents) training corpus. We assess the importance of feature spaces and training data size on SVM model performance. We show that inclusion of semantically-informed features does not statistically improve performance for these models. The addition of training data has weak effects of mixed statistical significance across disease classes suggesting larger corpora are not necessary to achieve relatively high performance with these models. PMID:26241355

  13. Childhood adversity moderates the effect of ADH1B on risk for alcohol-related phenotypes in Jewish Israeli drinkers

    OpenAIRE

    Meyers, Jacquelyn L; Shmulewitz, Dvora; Wall, Melanie M.; Keyes, Katherine M; Aharonovich, Efrat; Spivak, Baruch; Weizman, Abraham; Frisch, Amos; Edenberg, Howard J.; Gelernter, Joel; Grant, Bridget F.; Hasin, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Childhood adversity and genetic variant ADH1B-rs1229984 have each been shown to influence heavy alcohol consumption and disorders. However, little is known about how these factors jointly influence these outcomes. We assessed the main and additive interactive effects of childhood adversity (abuse, neglect, parental divorce) and the ADH1B-rs1229984 on the quantitative phenotypes “maximum drinks in a day” (Maxdrinks) and DSM-Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) severity, adjusting for demographic variabl...

  14. Comparison of the radiobiological effects of Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and conventional Gamma Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BNCT is an experimental radiotherapeutic modality that uses the capacity of the isotope 10B to capture thermal neutrons leading to the production of 4He and 7Li, particles with high linear energy transfer (LET). The aim was to evaluate and compare in vitro the mechanisms of response to the radiation arising of BNCT and conventional gamma therapy. We measured the survival cell fraction as a function of the total physical dose and analyzed the expression of p27/Kip1 and p53 by Western blotting in cells of colon cancer (ARO81-1). Exponentially growing cells were distributed into the following groups: 1) BPA (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 2) BOPP (10 ppm 10B) + neutrons; 3) neutrons alone; 4) gamma-rays. A control group without irradiation for each treatment was added. The cells were irradiated in the thermal neutron beam of the RA-3 (flux= 7.5 109 n/cm2 sec) or with 60Co (1Gy/min) during different times in order to obtain total physical dose between 1-5 Gy (±10 %). A decrease in the survival fraction as a function of the physical dose was observed for all the treatments. We also observed that neutrons and neutrons + BOPP did not differ significantly and that BPA was the more effective compound. Protein extracts of irradiated cells (3Gy) were isolated to 24 h and 48 h post radiation exposure. The irradiation with neutrons in presence of 10BPA or 10BOPP produced an increase of p53 at 24 h maintain until 48 h. On the contrary, in the groups irradiated with neutrons alone or gamma the peak was observed at 48 hr. The level of expression of p27/Kip1 showed a reduction of this protein in all the groups irradiated with neutrons (neutrons alone or neutrons plus boron compound), being more marked at 24 h. These preliminary results suggest different radiobiological response for high and low let radiation. Future studies will permit establish the role of cell cycle in the tumor radio sensibility to BNCT. (author)

  15. Synergetic effect of carbon nanopore size and surface oxidation on CO2 capture from CO2/CH4 mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Furmaniak, Sylwester; KOWALCZYK, PIOTR; Terzyk, Artur P.; Gauden, Piotr A.; Harris , P. J. F.

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the synergetic effect of confinement (carbon nanopore size) and surface chemistry (the number of carbonyl groups) on CO2 capture from its mixtures with CH4 at typical operating conditions for industrial adsorptive separation (298 K and compressed CO2CH4 mixtures). Although both confinement and surface oxidation have an impact on the efficiency of CO2/CH4 adsorptive separation at thermodynamics equilibrium, we show that surface functionalization is the most important factor in ...

  16. IGF-I and TGF-beta1 have distinct effects on phenotype and proliferation of intestinal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, James G; Pucilowska, Jolanta B; Keku, Temitope O; Lund, P Kay

    2002-09-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) are upregulated in myofibroblasts at sites of fibrosis in experimental enterocolitis and in Crohn's disease (CD). We compared the sites of expression of IGF-I and TGF-beta1 in a rat peptidoglycan-polysaccharide (PG-PS) model of chronic granulomatous enterocolitis and fibrosis. We used the human colonic CCD-18Co fibroblast/myofibroblast cell line to test the hypothesis that TGF-beta1 and IGF-I interact to regulate proliferation, collagen synthesis, and activated phenotype typified by expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and organization into stress fibers. IGF-I potently stimulated while TGF-beta1 inhibited basal DNA synthesis. TGF-beta1 and IGF-I each had similar but not additive effects to induce type I collagen. TGF-beta1 but not IGF-I potently stimulated expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and stress fiber formation. IGF-I in combination with TGF-beta1 attenuated stress fiber formation without reducing alpha-smooth muscle actin expression. Stress fibers were not a prerequisite for increased collagen synthesis. TGF-beta1 upregulated IGF-I mRNA, which led us to examine the effects of IGF-I in cells previously activated by TGF-beta1 pretreatment. IGF-I potently stimulated proliferation of TGF-beta1-activated myofibroblasts without reversing activated fibrogenic phenotype. We conclude that TGF-beta1 and IGF-I both stimulate type I collagen synthesis but have differential effects on activated phenotype and proliferation. We propose that during intestinal inflammation, regulation of activated phenotype and proliferation may require sequential actions of TGF-beta1 and IGF-I, but they may act in concert to increase collagen deposition. PMID:12181198

  17. Video capture virtual reality as a flexible and effective rehabilitation tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katz Noomi

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Video capture virtual reality (VR uses a video camera and software to track movement in a single plane without the need to place markers on specific bodily locations. The user's image is thereby embedded within a simulated environment such that it is possible to interact with animated graphics in a completely natural manner. Although this technology first became available more than 25 years ago, it is only within the past five years that it has been applied in rehabilitation. The objective of this article is to describe the way this technology works, to review its assets relative to other VR platforms, and to provide an overview of some of the major studies that have evaluated the use of video capture technologies for rehabilitation.

  18. Non-statistical effects in the radiative capture cross sections of the neodymium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron capture cross sections of the stable neodymium isotopes have been measured with high energy resolution in the keV region at the 40 m station of ORELA. Average resonance parameters are extracted for s-wave resonances. Significant positive correlations are found between gamma-n-0 and gamma-gamma for all isotopes. The magnitude of the observed correlation coefficient, particularly for 142Nd (rho = 0.9), cannot be explained in terms of valence neutron capture and additional mechanisms are discussed. The average s-wave radiative widths for the odd-A isotopes are markedly greater than for the even-A isotopes, while the p-wave radiative width for 142Nd is considerably less than the s-wave width. (author)

  19. CO2 capture enhancement in InOF-1 via the bottleneck effect of confined ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, Ricardo A; Campos-Reales-Pineda, Alberto; Pfeiffer, Heriberto; Álvarez, J Raziel; Zárate, J Antonio; Balmaseda, Jorge; González-Zamora, Eduardo; Martínez, Ana; Martínez-Otero, Diego; Jancik, Vojtech; Ibarra, Ilich A

    2016-08-11

    CO2 capture of InOF-1 was enhanced 3.6-fold, at 1 bar and 30 °C, by confining EtOH within its pores. Direct visualisation by single crystal X-ray diffraction revealed that EtOH divides InOF-1 channels in wide sections separated by "bottlenecks" caused by EtOH molecules bonded to the μ2-OH functional groups of InOF-1. PMID:27469274

  20. Effects of Sample Delivery on Analyte Capture in Porous Bead Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Jie; Li, Luanyi E.; Kulla, Eliona; Christodoulides, Nicolaos; Floriano, Pierre N.; McDevitt, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Sample delivery is a crucial aspect of point-of-care applications where sample volumes need to be low and assay times need to be short, while providing high analytical and clinical sensitivity. In this paper, we explore the influence of the factors surrounding sample delivery on analyte capture in an immunoassay-based sensor array manifold of porous beads resting in individual wells. We model using computational fluid dynamics and a flow-through device containing beads sensitized specifically...

  1. Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) pipeline operating temperature effects on UK soils: The first empirical data

    OpenAIRE

    Lake, J A; Johnson, I.; Cameron, D.D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the first empirical data of soil temperature and soil moisture profiles with depth in the context of a buried Carbon Capture and Storage transportation pipeline operating at higher than ambient soil temperatures. In an experimental approach, soil temperature responses are non-linear and are raised and restricted to within 45 cm of the subsurface heat source (hypothetical pipeline). A surface heat source is included to investigate interactions of natural seasonal surface he...

  2. Phenotypic plasticity and longevity in plants and animals: cause and effect?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renee M Borges

    2009-10-01

    Immobile plants and immobile modular animals outlive unitary animals. This paper discusses competing but not necessarily mutually exclusive theories to explain this extreme longevity, especially from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity. Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity. Monocarpy versus polycarpy can also influence the kind of senescent processes experienced by plants. How density-dependent phenomena affecting the establishment of juveniles in these immobile organisms can influence the evolution of senescence, and consequently longevity, is reviewed and discussed. Whether climate change scenarios will favour long-lived or short-lived organisms, with their attendant levels of plasticity, is also presented.

  3. The vigour of glasshouse roses. Scion rootstock relationships, effects of phenotypic & genotypic variation.

    OpenAIRE

    De, Vries

    1993-01-01

    Glasshouse roses commonly are combination plants, consisting of a scion variety and a rootstock of different genotypes. In this study, various environmental and genotypic factors have been investigated that influence the vigour of rootstocks and scion varieties, separately and in graft combination.In a field crop of Edelcanina (selections of R.canina L.) rootstock plants, significant phenotypic variation occurred for all plant characters investigated. Nurserymen partly disguise variation by g...

  4. [Effects of Gut Microbiota on Stress Response and Behavioral Phenotype of the Host].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    Gut microbiota are involved in host patho-physiological functions; however, little is known about whether or not they can affect brain function. Several recent works including ours have shown that gut microbiota play a critical role in the determination of stress response and behavioral phenotype of the host. We here review recent advances in this area, i.e. the interaction between gut microbiota and the brain-gut axis, based on our series of experimental data. PMID:27279157

  5. Abnormalities of the executive control network in multiple sclerosis phenotypes: An fMRI effective connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobryakova, Ekaterina; Rocca, Maria Assunta; Valsasina, Paola; Ghezzi, Angelo; Colombo, Bruno; Martinelli, Vittorio; Comi, Giancarlo; DeLuca, John; Filippi, Massimo

    2016-06-01

    The Stroop interference task is a cognitively demanding task of executive control, a cognitive ability that is often impaired in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The aim of this study was to compare effective connectivity patterns within a network of brain regions involved in the Stroop task performance between MS patients with three disease clinical phenotypes [relapsing-remitting (RRMS), benign (BMS), and secondary progressive (SPMS)] and healthy subjects. Effective connectivity analysis was performed on Stroop task data using a novel method based on causal Bayes networks. Compared with controls, MS phenotypes were slower at performing the task and had reduced performance accuracy during incongruent trials that required increased cognitive control. MS phenotypes also exhibited connectivity abnormalities reflected as weaker shared connections, presence of extra connections (i.e., connections absent in the HC connectivity pattern), connection reversal, and loss. In SPMS and the BMS groups but not in the RRMS group, extra connections were associated with deficits in the Stroop task performance. In the BMS group, the response time associated with correct responses during the congruent condition showed a positive correlation with the left posterior parietal → dorsal anterior cingulate connection. In the SPMS group, performance accuracy during the congruent condition showed a negative correlation with the right insula → left insula connection. No associations between extra connections and behavioral performance measures were observed in the RRMS group. These results suggest that, depending on the phenotype, patients with MS use different strategies when cognitive control demands are high and rely on different network connections. Hum Brain Mapp, 37:2293-2304, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26956182

  6. MicroRNAs enrichment in GWAS of complex human phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background The genotype information carried by Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) seems to have the potential to explain more of the ‘missing heritability’ of complex human phenotypes, given improved statistical approaches. Several lines of evidence support the involvement of microRNA (miRNA) and other non-coding RNA in complex human traits and diseases. We employed a novel, genetic annotation-informed enrichment method for GWAS that captures more polygenic effects than standard GWAS anal...

  7. Water Vapor Adsorption on Biomass Based Carbons under Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Conditions: Effect of Post-Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nausika Querejeta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of post-treatment upon the H2O adsorption performance of biomass-based carbons was studied under post-combustion CO2 capture conditions. Oxygen surface functionalities were partially replaced through heat treatment, acid washing, and wet impregnation with amines. The surface chemistry of the final carbon is strongly affected by the type of post-treatment: acid treatment introduces a greater amount of oxygen whereas it is substantially reduced after thermal treatment. The porous texture of the carbons is also influenced by post-treatment: the wider pore volume is somewhat reduced, while narrow microporosity remains unaltered only after acid treatment. Despite heat treatment leading to a reduction in the number of oxygen surface groups, water vapor adsorption was enhanced in the higher pressure range. On the other hand acid treatment and wet impregnation with amines reduce the total water vapor uptake thus being more suitable for post-combustion CO2 capture applications.

  8. Cost-effective multiplexing before capture allows screening of 25 000 clinically relevant SNPs in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesolowska, Agata; Dalgaard, M. D.; Borst, L.;

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are key determiners of interindividual differences in treatment efficacy and toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although up to 13 chemotherapeutic agents are used in the treatment of this cancer, it remains a...... model disease for exploring the impact of genetic variation due to well-characterized cytogenetics, drug response pathways and precise monitoring of minimal residual disease. Here, we have selected clinically relevant genes and SNPs through literature screening, and on the basis of associations with key...... designed a cost-effective, high-throughput capture assay of â¼25â000 clinically relevant SNPs, and demonstrated that multiple samples can be tagged and pooled before genome capture in targeted enrichment with a sufficient sequencing depth for genotyping. This multiplexed, targeted sequencing method allows...

  9. Experimental uncertainty estimation on the effective capture cross sections measured in the PROFIL experiments in Phenix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A desire of increasing nuclear system safety and fuel depletion is directly translated by a better knowledge on nuclear data. PROFIL and PROFIL-2 experiments give integral information on capture and (n,2n) cross sections and cumulative fission yields for several isotopes (95Mo, 97Mo, 101Pd, 105Pd, 133Cs, 143Nd, 144Nd, 145Nd, 147Sm, 149Sm, 151Eu, 233U, 234U, 235U, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 244Cm ...). Interpretation have been done many times in the past but without experimental uncertainty estimation. The cross section library JEFF-3.1.1, the covariance data base COMAC and the code system ERANOS-2.2 are used for this updated interpretation. This study is focusing on the uncertainty estimation on experimental values sensitive to capture cross sections. Three steps are required: the fluence scaling, the uncertainty propagation on the fluence and finally the uncertainty estimation on ratio variation of interest. This work is done with CONRAD using Bayesian adjustment and marginalization method. Mean C/E results and conclusions are identical to the previous interpretation. A fluence uncertainty of 1.4% is found for the two experimental pins of PROFIL-2 and 1.9% for PROFIL. Propagating this new information on the fluence to ratio variation of interest gives experimental uncertainties between 1% to 2.5% for the isotopes present in the experimental pins. One of the main results are for 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 242Pu capture cross sections: C/E are respectively equal to 1.03, 0.98, 0.97, 1.08 and 1.14 with an uncertainty lower than 2.5%. All the results will provide feedback on variance-covariance matrices for further works. (author)

  10. Capturing and storing CO2 to combat the greenhouse effect. What IFP is doing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growing awareness of the international community and the convergence of the scientific data concerning climate change make it urgent to deploy, throughout the world, technologies to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. Indeed, the growth of the world energy demand will prevent any rapid reduction of the use of fossil fuels - oil, natural gas, and coal - that are the main sources of greenhouse gas emissions. To reconcile the use of these resources with control of the emissions responsible for global warming, the capture and storage of CO2 are a very promising approach; the economic and industrial stakes are high. To meet the objective of reducing CO2 emissions, IFP is exploring three approaches: The first approach is to reduce energy consumption by improving the efficiency of energy converters, in particular internal combustion engines. A second approach is to reduce the carbon content of energy by favoring the use of natural gas or by incorporating in the fuel recycled carbon (biofuels and synfuels) and by developing hydrogen as an energy carrier. The third approach is to capture the CO2 from industrial processes used for electricity, steel, and cement production, which emit it in large quantities, then store it underground so as to keep it out of the atmosphere. This approach for reducing the CO2 emissions consists in capturing the CO2 (Post-combustion, oxy-combustion), transporting it to the place of storage, then injecting it underground to store it. Storage sites are selected and evaluated prior to injection in order to estimate the injectivity, the propagation of CO2 in the subsoil and the impact of geochemical and geomechanical transformations on the tightness of the overburden and of the injection well. The injection phase is followed by a phase of monitoring to ensure the safety and long-term viability of CO2 storage facilities. IFP, through the research it is conducting either alone or in partnership with universities, research centers, and the

  11. Laser capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S Steven; Brunskill, Eric W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter describes detailed methods used for laser capture microdissection (LCM) of discrete subpopulations of cells. Topics covered include preparing tissue blocks, cryostat sectioning, processing slides, performing the LCM, and purification of RNA from LCM samples. Notes describe the fine points of each operation, which can often mean the difference between success and failure. PMID:22639264

  12. Sublethal effects of catch-and-release fishing: measuring capture stress, fish impairment, and predation risk using a condition index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew D.; Patino, Reynaldo; Tolan, J.M.; Strauss, R.E.; Diamond, S.

    2009-01-01

    The sublethal effects of simulated capture of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) were analysed using physiological responses, condition indexing, and performance variables. Simulated catch-and-release fishing included combinations of depth of capture and thermocline exposure reflective of environmental conditions experienced in the Gulf of Mexico. Frequency of occurrence of barotrauma and lack of reflex response exhibited considerable individual variation. When combined into a single condition or impairment index, individual variation was reduced, and impairment showed significant increases as depth increased and with the addition of thermocline exposure. Performance variables, such as burst swimming speed (BSS) and simulated predator approach distance (AD), were also significantly different by depth. BSSs and predator ADs decreased with increasing depth, were lowest immediately after release, and were affected for up to 15 min, with longer recovery times required as depth increased. The impairment score developed was positively correlated with cortisol concentration and negatively correlated with both BSS and simulated predator AD. The impairment index proved to be an efficient method to estimate the overall impairment of red snapper in the laboratory simulations of capture and shows promise for use in field conditions, to estimate release mortality and vulnerability to predation.

  13. Prenatally diagnosed submicroscopic familial aberrations at 18p11.32 without phenotypic effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srebniak Malgorzata I

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent development of MLPA (Multiplex-Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification, MRC-Holland and microarray technology allows detection of a wide range of new submicroscopic abnormalities. Publishing new cases and case reviews associated with both clinical abnormalities and a normal phenotype is of great value. Findings/results We report on two phenotypically normal foetuses carrying a maternally-inherited interstitial submicroscopic abnormality of chromosome 18p11.32. Both abnormalities were found with the aneuploidy MLPA kit P095 during rapid aneuploidy detection, which was offered along with conventional karyotyping. Foetus 1 and its mother have a 1,7 Mb deletion and foetus 2 and its mother have a 1,9 Mb duplication. In both cases normal babies were born. We used the HumanCytoSNP-12 array of Illumina to visualize the CNVs and map the breakpoints. Conclusions We suggest that a CNV at 18p11.32 (528,050-2,337,486 may represent a new benign euchromatic variant.

  14. Muon capture by tritium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The muon capture rate is computed with realistic wave function for the initial tritium nuclei (Faddeev equations on configuration space with realistic potentials), and plane wave approximation for the final three neutrons, with the effective Hamiltonian of Fujii and Primakoff for muon capture and via a non energy weighted sum rule. Such a forbidden transition is hoped to be a probe for exchange current contributions

  15. Pervasive effects of a dominant foliar endophytic fungus on host genetic and phenotypic expression in a tropical tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EdwardAllenHerre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly recognized that macro-organisms (corals, insects, plants, vertebrates consist of both host tissues and multiple microbial symbionts that play essential roles in their host’s ecological and evolutionary success. Consequently, identifying benefits and costs of symbioses, as well as mechanisms underlying them are research priorities. All plants surveyed under natural conditions harbor foliar endophytic fungi (FEF in their leaf tissues, often at high densities. Despite producing no visible effects on their hosts, experiments have nonetheless shown that FEF reduce pathogen and herbivore damage. Here, combining results from three genomic, and two physiological experiments, we demonstrate pervasive genetic and phenotypic effects of the apparently asymptomatic endophytes on their hosts. Specifically, inoculation of endophyte-free (E- Theobroma cacao leaves with Colletotrichum tropicale (E+, the dominant FEF species in healthy T. cacao, induces consistent changes in the expression of hundreds of host genes, including many with known defensive functions. Further, E+ plants exhibited increased lignin and cellulose content, reduced maximum rates of photosynthesis (Amax, and enrichment of nitrogen-15 and carbon-13 isotopes. These phenotypic changes observed in E+ plants correspond to changes in expression of specific functional genes in related pathways. Moreover, a cacao gene (Tc00g04254 highly up-regulated by C. tropicale also confers resistance to pathogen damage in the absence of endophytes or their products in host tissues. Thus, the benefits of increased pathogen resistance in E+ plants are derived in part from up-regulation of intrinsic host defense responses, and appear to be offset by potential costs including reduced photosynthesis, and endophyte metabolism of host tissues. Similar effects are likely in most plant-endophyte interactions, and should be recognized in the design and interpretation of genetic and phenotypic studies

  16. Effects of blood transportation on human peripheral mononuclear cell yield, phenotype and function: implications for immune cell biobanking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Posevitz-Fejfár

    Full Text Available Human biospecimen collection, processing and preservation are rapidly emerging subjects providing essential support to clinical as well as basic researchers. Unlike collection of other biospecimens (e.g. DNA and serum, biobanking of viable immune cells, such as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC and/or isolated immune cell subsets is still in its infancy. While certain aspects of processing and freezing conditions have been studied in the past years, little is known about the effect of blood transportation on immune cell survival, phenotype and specific functions. However, especially for multicentric and cooperative projects it is vital to precisely know those effects. In this study we investigated the effect of blood shipping and pre-processing delay on immune cell phenotype and function both on cellular and subcellular levels. Peripheral blood was collected from healthy volunteers (n = 9: at a distal location (shipped overnight and in the central laboratory (processed immediately. PBMC were processed in the central laboratory and analyzed post-cryopreservation. We analyzed yield, major immune subset distribution, proliferative capacity of T cells, cytokine pattern and T-cell receptor signal transduction. Results show that overnight transportation of blood samples does not globally compromise T- cell subsets as they largely retain their phenotype and proliferative capacity. However, NK and B cell frequencies, the production of certain PBMC-derived cytokines and IL-6 mediated cytokine signaling pathway are altered due to transportation. Various control experiments have been carried out to compare issues related to shipping versus pre-processing delay on site. Our results suggest the implementation of appropriate controls when using multicenter logistics for blood transportation aiming at subsequent isolation of viable immune cells, e.g. in multicenter clinical trials or studies analyzing immune cells/subsets. One important conclusion might

  17. Materials and processes for the effective capture and immobilization of radioiodine: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Brian J.; Vienna, John D.; Strachan, Denis M.; McCloy, John S.; Jerden, James L.

    2016-03-01

    The immobilization of radioiodine produced from reprocessing used nuclear fuel is a growing priority for research and development of nuclear waste forms. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the current issues surrounding processing and containment of 129I, the isotope of greatest concern due to its long half-life of 1.6 × 107 y and potential incorporation into the human body. Strategies for disposal of radioiodine, captured by both wet scrubbing and solid sorbents, are discussed, as well as potential iodine waste streams for insertion into an immobilization process. Next, consideration of direct disposal of salts, incorporation into glasses, ceramics, cements, and other phases is discussed. The bulk of the review is devoted to an assessment of various sorbents for iodine and of waste forms described in the literature, particularly inorganic minerals, ceramics, and glasses. This review also contains recommendations for future research needed to address radioiodine immobilization materials and processes.

  18. Energy deposition and its effects on the E+ capture section at Sector 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature profile and resulting stresses and strains of the capture section (positron source accelerator section) at Sector 20 were investigated. The Electron-Gamma Shower program, Version 4 (EGS4) was used to determine energy deposition. For a 31.68 kW, 33 GeV electron beam, the rate of energy deposition in the first accelerator disk downstream from the 90/10 tantalum-tungsten positron target was determined to be 0.56 kW. The calculated resulting temperature difference from the inner disk diameter to the outer disk diameter is 49.40F. The inner diameter could then reach a temperature of 169.50F. The maximum stress produced in this first disk would be a compressive stress of 4374 psi, also at the inner diameter

  19. Effect of the crystal field on the probability of K-capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The probability of orbital capture of a 1s electron, in the β-process p + e → n + γ, is ruled by a nuclear electron matrix element. In a non-relativistic approximation, assuming separation of the nuclear and the leptonic parts, one has to compute the product of the probability amplitude of the destroyed electron on the nucleus, multiplied by the projector of the remaining electrons from their old wave functions to their new ones. Those projectors have been evaluated by Bahcall and Vatai for free ions and the individual wave functions were evaluated in restricted Hartree-Fock approximation. The phenomenon is studied in solids where the crystal field is not negligible. (Auth.)

  20. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Deans

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility.

  1. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Andrew R; Lewis, Suzanna E; Huala, Eva; Anzaldo, Salvatore S; Ashburner, Michael; Balhoff, James P; Blackburn, David C; Blake, Judith A; Burleigh, J Gordon; Chanet, Bruno; Cooper, Laurel D; Courtot, Mélanie; Csösz, Sándor; Cui, Hong; Dahdul, Wasila; Das, Sandip; Dececchi, T Alexander; Dettai, Agnes; Diogo, Rui; Druzinsky, Robert E; Dumontier, Michel; Franz, Nico M; Friedrich, Frank; Gkoutos, George V; Haendel, Melissa; Harmon, Luke J; Hayamizu, Terry F; He, Yongqun; Hines, Heather M; Ibrahim, Nizar; Jackson, Laura M; Jaiswal, Pankaj; James-Zorn, Christina; Köhler, Sebastian; Lecointre, Guillaume; Lapp, Hilmar; Lawrence, Carolyn J; Le Novère, Nicolas; Lundberg, John G; Macklin, James; Mast, Austin R; Midford, Peter E; Mikó, István; Mungall, Christopher J; Oellrich, Anika; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Parkinson, Helen; Ramírez, Martín J; Richter, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N; Ruttenberg, Alan; Schulz, Katja S; Segerdell, Erik; Seltmann, Katja C; Sharkey, Michael J; Smith, Aaron D; Smith, Barry; Specht, Chelsea D; Squires, R Burke; Thacker, Robert W; Thessen, Anne; Fernandez-Triana, Jose; Vihinen, Mauno; Vize, Peter D; Vogt, Lars; Wall, Christine E; Walls, Ramona L; Westerfeld, Monte; Wharton, Robert A; Wirkner, Christian S; Woolley, James B; Yoder, Matthew J; Zorn, Aaron M; Mabee, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility. PMID:25562316

  2. Opportunities for early Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage development in China. Strategies for harnessing cost-effective integrated Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) project potential in Shaanxi Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Hongguang; Gao, Lin; Li, Sheng [Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Van Sambeek, E. [Azure International, Beijing (China); Porter, R. [University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Mikunda, T.; Dijkstra, J.W.; De Coninck, H.; Jansen, D. [Energy research Centre of the Netherlands ECN, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-06-15

    Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS) is a key technology to reduce China's carbon emissions, while satisfying its increasing demand for electricity and chemical products, and its continuous reliance on coal. Preliminary work on CCUS in China has focused on CCUS in the power sector. However, capture in the power sector is technically challenging, energy-intensive and expensive. Capture can be implemented at lower cost at large point sources of concentrated CO2, such as in ammonia and methanol plants, coal-to-liquids facilities and hydrogen production processes. China has a large industrial base in these sectors, resulting in a significant CO2 emission reduction potential through CCUS. In recent years China has seen the development of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) activities. EOR injects CO2 in oil reservoirs to enhance production and prolong the life of the reservoir. EOR is widely applied in the United States and Canada and is in development in the Middle East. China has a large EOR potential and an EOR industry is emerging. CO2 from nearby high-concentration point sources has a value for EOR operations. This value can be used to develop early cost-effective CCUS projects involving industries where capture costs are relatively low. To date a number of separate preliminary pilots for the capture and storage of CO2 have been and are being undertaken in China. However, none of these pilots succeed in cost-effectively establishing a fully integrated CCUS chain. Early demonstration of cost-effective CCUS potential in selected sectors can significantly advance CCUS development in China in selected industries, in time crossing over into other sectors, including power, as the technology and policy conditions mature. Against this background, this international collaboration project identified cost-effective integrated CCUS opportunities in Shaanxi and developed recommendations to advance the implementation of these opportunities.

  3. Reciprocal crosses between two populations of Trissolcus vassilievi (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) reveal maternal effects on thermal phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iranipour, S; BenaMolaei, P; Asgari, S; Michaud, J P

    2015-06-01

    The egg parasitoid Trissolcus vassilievi (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae) is a significant natural enemy of the sunn pest, Eurygaster integriceps Puton (Hemiptera: Scutelleridae), the most important pest of wheat in Iran. This study examined the developmental time and egg-to-adult survival of two geographically separate populations of T. vassilievi on two corresponding host populations at five constant temperatures ranging from 15.0 to 35.0 ± 1°C. No wasps of either population emerged at 15.0°C and the temperature threshold for development was similar between populations, ranging from 13.1 ± 0.3 to 13.8 ± 0.4°C for males and 12.2 ± 0.1 to 12.6 ± 0.1°C for females, but the thermal constant varied with gender and parasitoid population. Development of wasps from the colder Tabriz location was slower, with thermal constants for males and females of 172.6 ± 3.1 and 204.1 ± 1.2 degree-days, respectively, compared to Varamin wasps with 164.7 ± 3.0 and 195.6 ± 1.3 degree-days, respectively. Based on genetic inheritance patterns, reciprocal crosses between the two populations were expected to result in females with thermal phenotypes intermediate to their parental populations, and males that resembled their mothers. However, female progeny of crosses more closely resembled their maternal population, indicating a maternal effect on thermal phenotype. Furthermore, the magnitude of the maternal effect on the thermal constant was asymmetric and was more strongly expressed by Varmin than Tabriz females. These results suggest the possibility of using selective crosses between wasp populations, in combination with artificial selection in the laboratory, to tune the thermal phenotype of parasitoids to specific regions prior to augmentative releases. PMID:25809416

  4. The expression of HSP in human skeletal muscle. Effects of muscle fiber phenotype and training background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folkesson, Mattias; Mackey, Abigail L; Langberg, Henning;

    2013-01-01

    AIM: Exercise-induced adaptations of skeletal muscle are related to training mode and can be muscle fibre type specific. This study aimed to investigate heat shock protein expression in type I and type II muscle fibres in resting skeletal muscle of subjects with different training backgrounds...... HSPs in human skeletal muscle is influenced by muscle fibre phenotype. The fibre type specific expression of HSP70 is influenced by resistance and endurance training whereas those of αB-crystallin and HSP27 are influenced only by endurance training suggesting the existence of a training......-modality specific action on the adaptive processes including heat shock proteins in human skeletal muscle. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  5. The effects of host age, host nuclear background and temperature on phenotypic effects of the virulent Wolbachia strain popcorn in Drosophila melanogaster.

    OpenAIRE

    Reynolds, K Tracy; Thomson, Linda J; Ary A Hoffmann

    2003-01-01

    Because of their obligate endosymbiotic nature, Wolbachia strains by necessity are defined by their phenotypic effects upon their host. Nevertheless, studies on the influence of host background and environmental conditions upon the manifestation of Wolbachia effects are relatively uncommon. Here we examine the behavior of the overreplicating Wolbachia strain popcorn in four different Drosophila melanogaster backgrounds at two temperatures. Unlike other strains of Wolbachia in Drosophila, popc...

  6. Turner Syndrome Genotype and phenotype and their effect on presenting features and timing of Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Alwan, I; M, Khadora; Amir; G, Nasrat; A, Omair; L, Brown; M, Al Dubayee; M, Badri

    2014-01-01

    Background Turner syndrome (TS) is a common genetic disorder caused by abnormalities of the X chromosome. We aimed to describe the phenotypic characteristics of TS patients and evaluate their association with presenting clinical characteristics and time at diagnosis. Methods We studied females diagnosed with TS at King Abdul Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh between 1983 and 2010. Patients were classified based upon karyotype into females with classical monosomy 45,X (group A) and females with other X chromosome abnormalities (mosaic 45,X/46,XX, Xqisochromosomes, Xp or Xq deletion) (group B). Clinical features of the two groups were analyzed. Results Of the 52 patients included in the study, 16(30.8%) were diagnosed with classical monosomy 45,X and the rest with other X chromosome abnormalities. Only 19(36.5%) patients were diagnosed in infancy and the remaining during childhood or later (odds ratio (OR) = 4.5,95%CI 1.27–15.90, p=0.02). Short stature was universal in group A versus 77.8% in group B. All patients in group A had primary amenorrhea compared with 63.2% of those in group B (P = 0.04); the rest of group B had secondary amenorrhea. Cardiovascular abnormalities were higher in group A (OR=3.50, 95%CI 0.99–12.29, p-value =0.05). Renal defects and recurrent otitis media were similar in both groups. Conclusion This study suggests that karyotype variations might affect the phenotype of TS; however, it may not reliably predict the clinical presentation. Chromosomal analysis for all suspected cases of TS should be promptly done at childhood in order to design an appropriate management plan early in life. PMID:25246887

  7. Additional heritable virus in the parasitic wasp Leptopilina boulardi: prevalence, transmission and phenotypic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Julien; Lepetit, David; Ravallec, Marc; Fleury, Frédéric; Varaldi, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Parasitoid wasps can be found in association with heritable viruses. Although some viruses have been shown to profoundly affect the biology and evolution of parasitoid wasps, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of parasitoid-associated viruses remains largely unexplored. We previously discovered a behaviour-manipulating DNA virus in the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. In this species, which lays its eggs inside Drosophila larvae, Leptopilina boulardi filamentous virus (LbFV) forces the females to lay their eggs in already parasitized Drosophila larvae. This behavioural manipulation increases the chances for the horizontal transmission of the virus. Here, we describe in the same parasitoid species another virus, which we propose to call Leptopilina boulardi toti-like virus (LbTV). This double-stranded RNA virus is highly prevalent in insect laboratory lines as well as in parasitoids caught in the field. In some cases, LbTV was found in coinfection with LbFV, but did not affect the behaviour of the wasp. Instead we found that the presence of LbTV correlates with an increase in the number of offspring, mostly due to increased survival of parasitoid larvae. LbTV is vertically transmitted mostly through the maternal lineage even if frequent paternal transmission also occurs. Unlike LbFV, LbTV is not horizontally transmitted. Its genome encodes a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) showing similarities with RdRps of Totiviridae. These results underline the high incidence and diversity of inherited viruses in parasitoids as well as their potential impact on the phenotype of their hosts. PMID:26642803

  8. Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype: Effect of Birthweight and Weight Gain in Childhood at 23 Years Old

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haack, Ricardo Lanzetta; Horta, Bernardo Lessa; Gigante, Denise Petrucci; Barros, Fernando C.; Oliveira, Isabel; Silveira, Vera M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of birthweight and weight gain during different periods in childhood with the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HWP). Methods In 1982, all hospitals births in Pelotas, South Brazil, were identified, and the 5914 liveborn were examined and their mothers interviewed. This population has been followed for several times. In 2004–05, we tried to follow the whole cohort and the subjects were interviewed, examined, and a blood sample was collected. HWP was defined as a triglycerides ≥ 2 mmol/L and a waist circumference ≥ 90 cm for men, and triglycerides ≥ 1.5 mmol/L and waist circumference ≥ 85 cm for woman. Poisson regression with robust adjustment of the variance was used to obtain adjusted estimates of the prevalence ratio. Results Subjects whose weight-for-age z-score at mean age of 42 months was one or more standard deviation above the mean, according to gender and age, were 8.77 (95% confidence interval: 2.60; 29.64) times more likely of presenting the HWP than those subjects whose weight-for-age z-score at 42 months was more than one standard deviation below the mean. Among those subjects whose birthweight was adequate-for-gestational age (AGA), conditional weight at 20 months was positively associated to the risk of HWP [relative risk: 1.59 (95%: confidence interval: 1.32; 1.92)], whereas for small for gestational age (SGA) subjects conditional weight was not associated with HWP [relative risk: 1.05 (95% confidence interval: 0.77; 1.43)], p-value for interaction 0.08. Conclusion Early weight gain among SGA infants, did not increase the risk of HWP in early adulthood, whereas among those who were AGA, early weight gain increased the risk of the having the phenotype in early adulthood. PMID:26309194

  9. Hypertriglyceridemic Waist Phenotype: Effect of Birthweight and Weight Gain in Childhood at 23 Years Old.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Lanzetta Haack

    Full Text Available To evaluate the association of birthweight and weight gain during different periods in childhood with the prevalence of hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HWP.In 1982, all hospitals births in Pelotas, South Brazil, were identified, and the 5914 liveborn were examined and their mothers interviewed. This population has been followed for several times. In 2004-05, we tried to follow the whole cohort and the subjects were interviewed, examined, and a blood sample was collected. HWP was defined as a triglycerides ≥ 2 mmol/L and a waist circumference ≥ 90 cm for men, and triglycerides ≥ 1.5 mmol/L and waist circumference ≥ 85 cm for woman. Poisson regression with robust adjustment of the variance was used to obtain adjusted estimates of the prevalence ratio.Subjects whose weight-for-age z-score at mean age of 42 months was one or more standard deviation above the mean, according to gender and age, were 8.77 (95% confidence interval: 2.60; 29.64 times more likely of presenting the HWP than those subjects whose weight-for-age z-score at 42 months was more than one standard deviation below the mean. Among those subjects whose birthweight was adequate-for-gestational age (AGA, conditional weight at 20 months was positively associated to the risk of HWP [relative risk: 1.59 (95%: confidence interval: 1.32; 1.92], whereas for small for gestational age (SGA subjects conditional weight was not associated with HWP [relative risk: 1.05 (95% confidence interval: 0.77; 1.43], p-value for interaction 0.08.Early weight gain among SGA infants, did not increase the risk of HWP in early adulthood, whereas among those who were AGA, early weight gain increased the risk of the having the phenotype in early adulthood.

  10. Novel Metal Sulfides to Achieve Effective Capture and Durable Consolidation of Radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the work done under NEUP grant to examine the capability of novel chalcogels and some binary metal chalcogenides as a host matrix for the capture of gaseous iodine and the feasibility of their iodine-laden materials to be converted into a permanent waste form. The presented work was conducted over last two years. A number of novel chalcogels Zn2Sn2S6, Sb4Sn4S12, NiMoS4, CoMoS 4, antimony sulfide (SbSx) chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogels and binary metal sulfides (Sb2S3) were developed and studied for their iodine absorption efficacies. A new and simple route was devised for the large scale preparation of antimony sulfide chalcogel. The chalcogel was obtained by treating Sb2S3 with Na2S in the presence of water followed by addition of formamide. The obtained gels have a low-density sponge-like network of meso-porous nature having BET surface area of 125 m2/g. The chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogel and the binary metal sulfides were exposed to iodine vapors in a closed container. Silver-functionalized chalcogels and Sb2S3 powders showed iodine uptake up to 100 wt%, the highest iodine uptake of 200 wt% was observed for the SbS-III chalcogel. The PXRD patterns of iodine-laden specimens revealed that iodine shows spontaneous chemisorption to the matrix used. The iodine loaded chalcogels and the binary chalcogenides were sealed under vacuum in fused silica ampoules and heated in a temperature controlled furnace. The consolidated products were analyzed by PXRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The final products were found to be amorphous in most of the cases with high amount (∼4-35 wt%) of iodine and approximately ∼60- 90 % of the absorbed iodine could be consolidated into the final waste form. Alginate reinforced composite scaffolds with SbS/SnS chalcogels and Sb2S3 bulk powder were also fabricated aiming to study their efficacy as host matrices in capturing the gaseous molecular iodine in

  11. Capturing transient effects in turbulent flows over complex urban areas with passive pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new variant of the hybrid T-RANS/VLES model is proposed for turbulent flows in complex urban areas. • Dynamical evolution of the T-RANS/VLES interface. • The model captures significantly larger amplitudes and frequencies of the transport variables in the wake regions. • Significant improvement in prediction of the turbulent kinetic energy. • Improved prediction of the passive pollutant dispersion and its variance. - Abstract: The present study addresses numerical modeling and simulations of turbulent flow and dispersion of a passive (non-reactive) pollutant in laboratory scale configurations that mimic complex urban areas. Two generic configurations are selected: a regular array of obstacles (of height ‘h’) with a central tower structure (of height ‘3h’) and an array of randomly distributed obstacles (with heights of ‘1h’, ‘2h’ or ‘3h’). Both arrays exactly mimic the experimental conditions of Hilderman and Chong (2004) for water channel flow around simplified urban areas, with typical values of Reynolds and Schmidt numbers of 36,000 and 1920, respectively. Comparison between T-RANS and a new seamless hybrid T-RANS/VLES approach is performed. It is shown that the presented hybrid T-RANS/VLES approach is able to capture significantly larger amplitudes and frequencies of the transport variables in the wake regions. The long-term time-averaged statistics of the second-moments contain two parts: modeled (from the parent transport equations) and resolved contributions (from collecting the time-dependent evolution of transport variables). The resolved contributions prove to be the dominant mechanism in the wake regions, which result in significant improvement in predictions of the turbulent kinetic energy, and consequently, of the turbulent dispersion of the passive scalar. The version of the hybrid T-RANS/VLES approach proposed here, based on a dynamical evolution of the interface zone (seamless approach), proved to be a

  12. Novel Metal Sulfides to Achieve Effective Capture and Durable Consolidation of Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanatzidis, Mercouri [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Pierce, D. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-01-30

    This report documents the work done under NEUP grant to examine the capability of novel chalcogels and some binary metal chalcogenides as a host matrix for the capture of gaseous iodine and the feasibility of their iodine-laden materials to be converted into a permanent waste form. The presented work was conducted over last two years. A number of novel chalcogels Zn2Sn2S 6, Sb4Sn4S12, NiMoS 4, CoMoS 4, antimony sulfide (SbS x) chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogels and binary metal sulfides (Sb2S3) were developed and studied for their iodine absorption efficacies. A new and simple route was devised for the large scale preparation of antimony sulfide chalcogel. The chalcogel was obtained by treating Sb2S3 with Na2S in the presence of water followed by addition of formamide. The obtained gels have a low-density sponge-like network of meso-porous nature having BET surface area of 125 m2/g. The chalcogels, silver functionalized chalcogel and the binary metal sulfides were exposed to iodine vapors in a closed container. Silver-functionalized chalcogels and Sb2S3 powders showed iodine uptake up to 100 wt%, the highest iodine uptake of 200 wt% was observed for the SbS-III chalcogel. The PXRD patterns of iodine-laden specimens revealed that iodine shows spontaneous chemisorption to the matrix used. The iodine loaded chalcogels and the binary chalcogenides were sealed under vacuum in fused silica ampoules and heated in a temperature controlled furnace. The consolidated products were analyzed by PXRD, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The final products were found to be amorphous in most of the cases with high amount (~4-35 wt%) of iodine and approximately ~60- 90 % of the absorbed iodine could be consolidated into the final waste form. Alginate

  13. Comparative analysis of the effects of electron and hole capture on the power characteristics of a semiconductor quantum-well laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor quantum-well laser calculated using three models are compared. These models are (i) a model not taking into account differences between the electron and hole parameters and using the electron parameters for both types of charge carriers; (ii) a model, which does not take into account differences between the electron and hole parameters and uses the hole parameters for both types of charge carriers; and (iii) a model taking into account the asymmetry between the electron and hole parameters. It is shown that, at the same velocity of electron and hole capture into an unoccupied quantum well, the laser characteristics, obtained using the three models, differ considerably. These differences are due to a difference between the filling of the electron and hole subbands in a quantum well. The electron subband is more occupied than the hole subband. As a result, at the same velocities of electron and hole capture into an empty quantum well, the effective electron-capture velocity is lower than the effective hole-capture velocity. Specifically, it is shown that for the laser structure studied the hole-capture velocity of 5 × 105 cm/s into an empty quantum well and the corresponding electron-capture velocity of 3 × 106 cm/s into an empty quantum well describe the rapid capture of these carriers, at which the light–current characteristic of the laser remains virtually linear up to high pump-current densities. However, an electron-capture velocity of 5 × 105 cm/s and a corresponding hole-capture velocity of 8.4 × 104 cm/s describe the slow capture of these carriers, causing significant sublinearity in the light–current characteristic

  14. Comparative analysis of the effects of electron and hole capture on the power characteristics of a semiconductor quantum-well laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokolova, Z. N., E-mail: Zina.Sokolova@mail.ioffe.ru; Pikhtin, N. A.; Tarasov, I. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Asryan, L. V., E-mail: asryan@vt.edu [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The operating characteristics of a semiconductor quantum-well laser calculated using three models are compared. These models are (i) a model not taking into account differences between the electron and hole parameters and using the electron parameters for both types of charge carriers; (ii) a model, which does not take into account differences between the electron and hole parameters and uses the hole parameters for both types of charge carriers; and (iii) a model taking into account the asymmetry between the electron and hole parameters. It is shown that, at the same velocity of electron and hole capture into an unoccupied quantum well, the laser characteristics, obtained using the three models, differ considerably. These differences are due to a difference between the filling of the electron and hole subbands in a quantum well. The electron subband is more occupied than the hole subband. As a result, at the same velocities of electron and hole capture into an empty quantum well, the effective electron-capture velocity is lower than the effective hole-capture velocity. Specifically, it is shown that for the laser structure studied the hole-capture velocity of 5 × 10{sup 5} cm/s into an empty quantum well and the corresponding electron-capture velocity of 3 × 10{sup 6} cm/s into an empty quantum well describe the rapid capture of these carriers, at which the light–current characteristic of the laser remains virtually linear up to high pump-current densities. However, an electron-capture velocity of 5 × 10{sup 5} cm/s and a corresponding hole-capture velocity of 8.4 × 10{sup 4} cm/s describe the slow capture of these carriers, causing significant sublinearity in the light–current characteristic.

  15. The hairless gene of the mouse: relationship of phenotypic effects with expression profile and genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachón-González, M B; San-José, I; Cano, A; Vega, J A; García, N; Freeman, T; Schimmang, T; Stoye, J P

    1999-10-01

    Various mutations of the hairless (hr) gene of mice result in hair loss and other integument defects. To examine the role of the hr gene in mouse development, the expression profile of hr has been determined by in situ hybridisation and correlated to the nature of genetic changes and morphological abnormalities in different mutant animals. Four variant alleles have been characterised at the molecular level. hr/hr mice produce reduced, but significant, levels of hr mRNA whereas other alleles contain mutations which would be expected to preclude the synthesis of functional product, demonstrating a correlation between allelic variation at the hr locus and phenotypic severity. hr expression was shown to be widespread and temporally regulated. It was identified in novel tissues such as cartilage, developing tooth, inner ear, retina, and colon as well as in skin and brain. Analysis of mice homozygous for the rhino allele of hairless revealed that, although no morphological defects were detectable in many tissues normally expressing hr, previously undescribed abnormalities were present in several tissues including inner ear, retina, and colon. These findings indicate that the hairless gene product plays a wider role in development than previously suspected. Dev Dyn 1999;216:113-126. PMID:10536052

  16. Testing the island effect on phenotypic diversification: insights from the Hemidactylus geckos of the Socotra Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Porta, Joan; Šmíd, Jiří; Sol, Daniel; Fasola, Mauro; Carranza, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Island colonization is often assumed to trigger extreme levels of phenotypic diversification. Yet, empirical evidence suggests that it does not always so. In this study we test this hypothesis using a completely sampled mainland-island system, the arid clade of Hemidactylus, a group of geckos mainly distributed across Africa, Arabia and the Socotra Archipelago. To such purpose, we generated a new molecular phylogeny of the group on which we mapped body size and head proportions. We then explored whether island and continental taxa shared the same morphospace and differed in their disparities and tempos of evolution. Insular species produced the most extreme sizes of the radiation, involving accelerated rates of evolution and higher disparities compared with most (but not all) of the continental groups. In contrast, head proportions exhibited constant evolutionary rates across the radiation and similar disparities in islands compared with the continent. These results, although generally consistent with the notion that islands promote high morphological disparity, reveal at the same time a complex scenario in which different traits may experience different evolutionary patterns in the same mainland-island system and continental groups do not always present low levels of morphological diversification compared to insular groups. PMID:27071837

  17. Attentional capture by evaluative stimuli: gain- and loss-connoting colors boost the additional-singleton effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentura, Dirk; Müller, Philipp; Rothermund, Klaus

    2014-06-01

    In a valence induction task, one color acquired positive valence by indicating the chance to win money (in the case of fast and correct responses), and a different color acquired negative valence by indicating the danger to lose money (in the case of slow or incorrect responses). In the additional-singleton trials of a visual search task, the task-irrelevant singleton color was either the positive one, the negative one, or one of two neutral colors. We found an additional-singleton effect (i.e., longer RTs with a singleton color than in the no-singleton control condition). This effect was significantly increased for the two valent colors (with no differences between them) relative to the two neutral colors (with no differences between them, either). This result favors the hypothesis that the general relevance of stimuli elicits attentional capture, rather than the negativity bias hypothesis. PMID:24488806

  18. Modified dolomite in biomass gasification with simultaneous tar reformation and CO2 capture: effect of metal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CO2 absorption capacity of calcined dolomite [a (CaMg)O solid solution] doped with iron and nickel transition metals has been investigated in a fixed bed reactor operating at temperature conditions (650 deg. C) at which the sorption process is thermodynamically favoured at ambient pressure. The presence of metals (catalytic sites) between CaO grains (CO2 absorption sites) may improve the potential of dolomite for the simultaneous process of catalytic tar reforming and CO2 capture in biomass gasification, with the aim of developing an effective combined catalyst and sorbent particle. It was found that iron and nickel may be optimised in the substrate reducing critical limitations on CO2 capture capacity. A Sorption Enhanced Reforming test is proposed, at 650 deg. C, for both iron and nickel doped calcined dolomite, using toluene as model tar compound: iron has been found to be not active in such conditions, whereas the 4% Ni/(CaMg)O has been indicated as the most suitable combined catalyst and sorbent particle.

  19. Capturing spatial effects, technology interactions, and uncertainty in urban energy and carbon models: Retrofitting newcastle as a case-study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Local authorities often rely upon urban energy and carbon modelling tools to develop mitigation policies and strategies that will deliver reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper the UK example of Newcastle-upon-Tyne is used to critique current practice, noting that important features of urban energy systems are often omitted by bottom-up tools including interactions between technologies, spatial disaggregation of demand, and the ability to pursue over-arching policy goals like cost minimization. An alternative optimization-based approach is then described and applied to the Newcastle case, at the scale of both the whole city and the South Heaton district, and using Monte Carlo techniques to address policy uncertainty. The results show that this new method can help policy makers draw more robust policy conclusions, sensitive to spatial variations in energy demand and capturing the interactions between developments in the national energy system and local policy options. Further work should focus on improving our understanding of local building stocks and energy demands so as to better assess the potential of new technologies and policies. - Highlights: ► Presents an optimization model for planning urban energy system retrofits. ► New tool captures spatial effects, technology interactions, policy uncertainty. ► UK case study shows role of local renewables, energy efficiency measures, and CHP. ► Results emphasise energy efficiency first, but uncertainty in other technologies.

  20. Effects of Bonding Types and Functional Groups on CO 2 Capture using Novel Multiphase Systems of Liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Kun-Yi Andrew

    2011-08-01

    Novel liquid-like nanoparticle organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) which possess unique features including negligible vapor pressure and a high degree of tunability were synthesized and their physical and chemical properties as well as CO 2 capture capacities were investigated. NOHMs can be classified based on the synthesis methods involving different bonding types, the existence of linkers, and the addition of task-specific functional groups including amines for CO 2 capture. As a canopy of polymeric chains was grafted onto the nanoparticle cores, the thermal stability of the resulting NOHMs was improved. In order to isolate the entropy effect during CO 2 capture, NOHMs were first prepared using polymers that do not contain functional groups with strong chemical affinity toward CO 2. However, it was found that even ether groups on the polymeric canopy contributed to CO 2 capture in NOHMs via Lewis acid-base interactions, although this effect was insignificant compared to the effect of task-specific functional groups such as amine. In all cases, a higher partial pressure of CO 2 was more favorable for CO 2 capture, while a higher temperature caused an adverse effect. Multicyclic CO 2 capture tests confirmed superior recyclability of NOHMs and NOHMs also showed a higher selectivity toward CO 2 over N 2O, O 2 and N 2. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Gender differences in career progression: Does the effect of children capture low work effort?

    OpenAIRE

    Kunze, Astrid

    2013-01-01

    This study exploits longitudinal employer-employee matched data to investigate gender differences in the probability to climb the job ladder with focus on the effect of children. We attempt to disentangle whether children directly affect promotions, or whether the effect of children is correlated with effort. We find that the probability to progress on the career ladder is decreased for women through children, but not for men. These effects are particularly strong at the lower and medium rank...

  2. On the Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Why Heisenberg Captures Nonlocality Better Than Schr\\"odinger

    OpenAIRE

    Aharonov, Yakir

    2013-01-01

    I discuss in detail the history of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in Bristol and my encounters with Akira Tonomura later on. I then propose an idea that developed following the publication of the Aharonov-Bohm effect, namely the importance of modulo momentum and Heisenberg representation in dealing with non-local quantum phenomena.

  3. Muon Capture in Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Ricci, P; Mosconi, B; Smejkal, J

    2009-01-01

    Model dependence of the capture rates of the negative muon capture in deuterium is studied starting from potential models and the weak two-body meson exchange currents constructed in the tree approximation and also from an effective field theory. The tree one-boson exchange currents are derived from the hard pion chiral Lagrangians of the $N \\Delta \\pi \\rho \\omega a_1$ system. If constructed in conjunction with the one-boson exchange potentials, the capture rates can be calculated consistently. On the other hand, the effective field theory currents, constructed within the heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, contain a low energy constant $\\hat d ^R$ that cannot be extracted from data at the one-particle level nor determined from the first principles. Comparative analysis of the results for the doublet transition rate allows us to extract the constant $\\hat d ^R$.

  4. The novelty-seeking phenotype modulates the long-lasting effects of intermittent ethanol administration during adolescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Montagud-Romero

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to investigate if a novelty-seeking phenotype mediates the long-lasting consequences of intermittent EtOH intoxication during adolescence. The hole board test was employed to classify adolescent mice as High- or Low-Novelty Seekers. Subsequently, animals were administered ethanol (1.25 or 2.5 g/kg on two consecutive days at 48-h intervals over a 14-day period. Anxiety levels--measured using the elevated plus maze- spontaneous motor activity and social interaction test were studied 3 weeks later. A different set of mice underwent the same procedure, but received only the 2.5 g/kg dose of ethanol. Three weeks later, in order to induce CPP, the same animals were administered 1 or 6 mg/kg of cocaine or 1 or 2.5 mg/kg MDMA. The results revealed a decrease in aggressive behaviors and an anxiolytic profile in HNS mice and longer latency to explore the novel object by LNS mice. Ethanol exposure enhanced the reinforcing effects of cocaine and MDMA in both groups when CPP was induced with a sub-threshold dose of the drugs. The extinguished cocaine-induced CPP (1 and 6 mg/kg was reinstated after a priming dose in HNS animals only. Our results confirm that intermittent EtOH administration during adolescence induces long-lasting effects that are manifested in adult life, and that there is an association between these effects and the novelty-seeking phenotype.

  5. Measurement of the effective thermal cross section of {sup 134}Cs by triple neutron capture reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Harada, Hideo; Katoh, Toshio [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works; Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Shinohara, Nobuo; Hata, Kentaro; Kobayashi, Katsutoshi; Motoishi, Shoji; Tanase, Masakazu

    1998-03-01

    The effective thermal cross section ({sigma}{sub eff}) of the {sup 134}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 135}Cs reaction was measured by the activation method and the {gamma}-ray spectroscopic method in order to obtain fundamental data for research on the transmutation of nuclear wastes. The effective thermal cross section of the reaction {sup 134}Cs(n,{gamma}){sup 135}Cs was found to be 140.6{+-}8.5 barns. (author)

  6. Enhanced therapeutic effect on murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells by boron neutron capture therapy using a boronated metalloporphyrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have already achieved successful treatment of several human patients with malignant melanoma by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) using 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (10B1-BPA·HCl). In this study we used a new compound, a manganese boronated protoporphyrin (Mn-10BOPP), and compared it to 10B1-BPA·HCl with respect to uptake in murine melanoma and angiosarcoma cells as well as to their cell killing effect. 10B uptake was measured in a new method, and the new compound was much more incorporated into both cells than 10B1-BPA·HCl. Furthermore, melanoma and angiosarcoma cells preincubated with the new compound were 15 to 20 times more efficiently killed by BNCT than cells preincubated with 10B1-BPA·HCl. (author)

  7. The effect of ethylene glycol additive and growth rate on the capture of water by potassium acid phthalate crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types and quantities of the volatile products formed in cleavage of potassium acid phthalate crystals were detected by mass spectroscopy. The crystals analyzed were grown by conventional and fast-growth techniques from a nominally pure solution and from a solution containing 0.2 wt. % ethylene glycol additive. It was found that the amount of water released from the cleavage surface was reduced from 5.6x1015 to 2x1014 molecules/cm2 with an increase in the growth rate from 0.2 to 2 mm/day, and to 6.6x1013 molecules/cm2 with the addition of ethylene glycol. This effect was attributed to the fact that an increased growth rate and the presence of ethylene glycol hinder ordering of the adsorption layer and, therefore, make the capture of adsorbed water less probable

  8. Sex-specific Effects of Exercise Ancestry on Metabolic, Morphological, and Gene Expression Phenotypes in Multiple Generations of Mouse Offspring

    OpenAIRE

    Guth, Lisa M.; Andrew T. Ludlow; Witkowski, Sarah; Marshall, Mallory R.; Lima, Laila C. J.; Venezia, Andrew C.; Xiao, Tao; Lee, Mei-Ling Ting; Spangenburg, Espen E.; Roth, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Early life and pre-conception environmental stimuli can affect adult health-related phenotypes. Exercise training is an environmental stimulus affecting many systems throughout the body and appears to alter offspring phenotypes. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of parental exercise training, or “exercise ancestry,” on morphological and metabolic phenotypes in two generations of mouse offspring. F0 C57BL/6 mice were exposed to voluntary exercise or sedentary lifestyle and bre...

  9. Transcriptome-based exon capture enables highly cost-effective comparative genomic data collection at moderate evolutionary scales

    OpenAIRE

    Bi Ke; Vanderpool Dan; Singhal Sonal; Linderoth Tyler; Moritz Craig; Good Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To date, exon capture has largely been restricted to species with fully sequenced genomes, which has precluded its application to lineages that lack high quality genomic resources. We developed a novel strategy for designing array-based exon capture in chipmunks (Tamias) based on de novo transcriptome assemblies. We evaluated the performance of our approach across specimens from four chipmunk species. Results We selectively targeted 11,975 exons (~4 Mb) on custom capture a...

  10. Muon capture at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Measuring the rate of muon capture in hydrogen provides one of the most direct ways to study the axial current of the nucleon. The MuCap experiment uses a negative muon beam stopped in a time projection chamber operated with ultra-pure hydrogen gas. Surrounded by a decay electron detector, the lifetime of muons in hydrogen can be measured to determine the singlet capture rate Lambda_s to a final precision of 1%. The capture rate determines the nucleon's pseudoscalar form factor g_p. A first result, g_p = 7.3 +- 1.1, has been published and the final analysis of the full statistics will reduce the error by a factor of up to 3. Muon capture on the deuteron probes the weak axial current in the two-nucleon system. Within the framework of effective field theories the calculation of such two-nucleon processes involving the axial current requires the knowledge of one additional low energy constant which can be extracted from the doublet capture rate Lambda_d. The same constant then allows to model-independently calcu...

  11. Capturing atmospheric effects on 3D millimeter wave radar propagation patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Richard D.; Fiorino, Steven T.; Keefer, Kevin J.; Stringer, Jeremy

    2016-05-01

    Traditional radar propagation modeling is done using a path transmittance with little to no input for weather and atmospheric conditions. As radar advances into the millimeter wave (MMW) regime, atmospheric effects such as attenuation and refraction become more pronounced than at traditional radar wavelengths. The DoD High Energy Laser Joint Technology Offices High Energy Laser End-to-End Operational Simulation (HELEEOS) in combination with the Laser Environmental Effects Definition and Reference (LEEDR) code have shown great promise simulating atmospheric effects on laser propagation. Indeed, the LEEDR radiative transfer code has been validated in the UV through RF. Our research attempts to apply these models to characterize the far field radar pattern in three dimensions as a signal propagates from an antenna towards a point in space. Furthermore, we do so using realistic three dimensional atmospheric profiles. The results from these simulations are compared to those from traditional radar propagation software packages. In summary, a fast running method has been investigated which can be incorporated into computational models to enhance understanding and prediction of MMW propagation through various atmospheric and weather conditions.

  12. Effect of oxygen on the response of a constant-current 63Ni electron-capture detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A constant-current electron-capture detector (ECD) with a 63Ni ionization cell has been used in a study of the effect of oxygen in nitrogen carrier gas on its response to several compounds. Because of the greatly increased linear dynamic range and the high temperature capabilities of this instrument, oxygen contamination of the carrier gas was found to be much less harmful to the chromatogram baseline than had been previously reported for earlier ECD models. Measurements of the changes in the molar responses of several compounds caused by the addition of up to 2000 ppm of oxygen to the nitrogen carrier gas have been made. For the chlorinated hydrocarbons studied, an effect of oxygen on their molar responses was observed only with the highest oxygen dopings. Anthracene behaved differently, showing an increased molar response at very low levels of oxygen doping. These results suggest that constant-current ECD analyses of polynuclear aromatics may be very sensitive to uncontrolled oxygen contamination of carrier gas, while those of halocarbons will not. For 1-chlorobutane a greatly enhanced response factor is caused by doping of the carrier gas with large amounts of oxygen. As this effect is observed at high detector temperatures where the baseline frequency is only moderately impared by oxygen, oxygen doping is suggested as a means of improving the ECD sensitivity to molecules that have only one or a few halogen atoms. Two reaction mechanisms are proposed to account for the oxygen effects observed. (Auth.)

  13. Antibacterial activities of selected Cameroonian spices and their synergistic effects with antibiotics against multidrug-resistant phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fankam Aimé G

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR phenotypes is a major public health problem today in the treatment of bacterial infections. The present study was designed to evaluate the antibacterial activities of the methanol extracts of eleven Cameroonian spices on a panel of twenty nine Gram negative bacteria including MDR strains. Methods The phytochemical analysis of the extracts was carried out by standard tests meanwhile the liquid micro-broth dilution was used for all antimicrobial assays. Results Phytochemical analysis showed the presence of alkaloids, phenols and tannins in all plants extracts. The results of the antibacterial assays indicated that all tested extracts exert antibacterial activities, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values varying from 32 to 1024 μg/ml. The extracts from Dichrostachys glomerata, Beilschmiedia cinnamomea, Aframomum citratum, Piper capense, Echinops giganteus, Fagara xanthoxyloïdes and Olax subscorpioïdea were the most active. In the presence of efflux pump inhibitor, PAßN, the activity of the extract from D. glomerata significantly increased on 69.2% of the tested MDR bacteria. At MIC/5, synergistic effects were noted with the extract of D. glomerata on 75% of the tested bacteria for chloramphenicol (CHL, tetracycline (TET and norfloxacin (NOR. With B. cinnamomea synergy were observed on 62.5% of the studied MDR bacteria with CHL, cefepime (FEP, NOR and ciprofloxacin (CIP and 75% with erythromycin (ERY. Conclusion The overall results provide information for the possible use of the studied extracts of the spices in the control of bacterial infections involving MDR phenotypes.

  14. Individual and cumulative effects of GWAS susceptibility loci in lung cancer: associations after sub-phenotyping for COPD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P Young

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies show that approximately 20-30% of chronic smokers develop chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD while 10-15% develop lung cancer. COPD pre-exists lung cancer in 50-90% of cases and has a heritability of 40-77%, much greater than for lung cancer with heritability of 15-25%. These data suggest that smokers susceptible to COPD may also be susceptible to lung cancer. This study examines the association of several overlapping chromosomal loci, recently implicated by GWA studies in COPD, lung function and lung cancer, in (n = 1400 subjects sub-phenotyped for the presence of COPD and matched for smoking exposure. Using this approach we show; the 15q25 locus confers susceptibility to lung cancer and COPD, the 4q31 and 4q22 loci both confer a reduced risk to both COPD and lung cancer, the 6p21 locus confers susceptibility to lung cancer in smokers with pre-existing COPD, the 5p15 and 1q23 loci both confer susceptibility to lung cancer in those with no pre-existing COPD. We also show the 5q33 locus, previously associated with reduced FEV(1, appears to confer susceptibility to both COPD and lung cancer. The 6p21 locus previously linked to reduced FEV(1 is associated with COPD only. Larger studies will be needed to distinguish whether these COPD-related effects may reflect, in part, associations specific to different lung cancer histology. We demonstrate that when the "risk genotypes" derived from the univariate analysis are incorporated into an algorithm with clinical variables, independently associated with lung cancer in multivariate analysis, modest discrimination is possible on receiver operator curve analysis (AUC = 0.70. We suggest that genetic susceptibility to lung cancer includes genes conferring susceptibility to COPD and that sub-phenotyping with spirometry is critical to identifying genes underlying the development of lung cancer.

  15. Effects of a selectively bred novelty-seeking phenotype on the motivation to take cocaine in male and female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cummings Jennifer A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gender and enhanced novelty reactivity can predispose certain individuals to drug abuse. Previous research in male and female rats selectively bred for high or low locomotor reactivity to novelty found that bred High Responders (bHRs acquire cocaine self-administration more rapidly than bred Low Responders (bLRs and that bHR females in particular self-administered more cocaine than the other groups. The experiments presented here aimed to determine whether an individual's sex and behavioral phenotype interact to affect motivation to take cocaine. Methods We examined motivation for taking cocaine in two experiments using a range of doses on a progressive ratio (PR schedule of responding in bHR or bLR males and females. Additionally, we included a measure of continuing to respond in the absence of reinforcement, a feature of addiction that has been recently incorporated into tests of animal models on the basis of the criteria for substance use disorder in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Statistical analyses were performed using PASW Statistics 18.0 software. Data were analyzed using repeated-measures analysis of variance followed by a Bonferroni correction post hoc test when applicable. Results We found sex differences as well as effects of novelty reactivity on the motivation to self-administer cocaine. Specifically, females demonstrated higher breaking points on the PR schedule compared with males, regardless of phenotype, and bHR males and females exhibited higher motivation than bLR animals at a number of the doses studied. Conclusions An individual's sex continues to be a predisposing factor with respect to drug abuse liability and can be compounded by additional individual differences such as reactivity to novelty.

  16. Strong effect of SNP rs4988300 of the LRP5 gene on bone phenotype of Caucasian postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Péter; Balla, Bernadett; Kósa, János P; Tóbiás, Bálint; Szili, Balázs; Kirschner, Gyöngyi; Győri, Gabriella; Kató, Karina; Lakatos, Péter; Takács, István

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify relationships between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes of the Wnt pathway and bone mineral density (BMD) of postmenopausal women. We chose this pathway due to its importance in bone metabolism that was underlined in several studies. DNA samples of 932 Hungarian postmenopausal women were studied. First, their BMD values at different sites (spine, total hip) were measured, using a Lunar Prodigy DXA scanner. Thereafter, T-score values and the patients' body mass indices (BMIs) were calculated, while information about the fracture history of the sample population was also collected. We genotyped nine SNPs of the following three genes: LRP5, GPR177, and SP7, using a Sequenom MassARRAY Analyzer 4 instrument. The genomic DNA samples used for genotyping were extracted from the buccal mucosa of the subjects. Statistical analyses were carried out using the SPSS 21 and R package. The results of this analysis showed a significant association between SNP rs4988300 of the LRP5 gene and total hip BMD values. We could not reveal any associations between the markers of GPR177, SP7, and bone phenotypes. We found no effect of these genotypes on fracture risk. We could demonstrate a significant gene-gene interaction between two SNPs of LRP5 (rs4988300 and rs634008, p = 0.009) which was lost after Bonferroni correction. We could firmly demonstrate a significant association between rs4988300 of the LRP5 gene and bone density of the hip on the largest homogeneous postmenopausal study group analyzed to date. Our finding corroborates the relationship between LRP5 genotype and bone phenotype in postmenopausal women, however, the complete mechanism of this relationship requires further investigations. PMID:25762437

  17. Proatherosclerotic Effect of the α1-Subunit of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase by Promoting Smooth Muscle Phenotypic Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Mergia, Evanthia; Al-Hasani, Jaafar; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Stoelting, Stephanie; Kremer, Felix; Freyer, Jennifer; Koesling, Doris; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; de Wit, Cor; Aherrahrou, Zouhair

    2016-08-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a key enzyme of the nitric oxide signaling pathway, is formed as a heterodimer by various isoforms of its α and β subunit. GUCY1A3, encoding the α1 subunit, was identified as a risk gene for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, but its specific contribution to atherosclerosis remains unclear. This study sought to decipher the role of Gucy1a3 in atherosclerosis in mice. At age 32 weeks and after 20 weeks of standard or high-fat diet, Gucy1a3(-/-)/Ldlr(-/-) mice exhibited a significant reduction of the atherosclerotic plaque size at the aortic root and the aorta for high-fat diet animals as compared with Ldlr(-/-) control mice. Collagen content in plaques in the aortic root was reduced, suggesting an alteration of smooth muscle cell function. Proliferation and migration were reduced in Gucy1a3(-/-) primary aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs), and proliferation was also reduced in human AoSMCs after inhibition of sGC by 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one. Gucy1a3 deficiency in AoSMCs prevents their phenotypic switching, as indicated by the differential expression of marker proteins. The inherited Gucy1a3(-/-) loss exerts an atheroprotective effect. We suggest that sGC activity promotes the phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state, fostering the formation of atherosclerosis. Preventing this switch by sGC inhibition may provide a novel target in atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27315776

  18. Protective Effect of Antenatal Antioxidant on Nicotine-Induced Heart Ischemia-Sensitive Phenotype in Rat Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, DaLiao; Wang, Lei; Huang, Xiaohui; Li, Yong; Dasgupta, Chiranjib; Zhang, Lubo

    2016-01-01

    Fetal nicotine exposure increased risk of developing cardiovascular disease later in life. The present study tested the hypothesis that perinatal nicotine-induced programming of heart ischemia-sensitive phenotype is mediated by enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS) in offspring. Nicotine was administered to pregnant rats via subcutaneous osmotic minipumps from day 4 of gestation to day 10 after birth, in the absence or presence of a ROS inhibitor, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) in drinking water. Experiments were conducted in 8 month old age male offspring. Isolated hearts were perfused in a Langendorff preparation. Perinatal nicotine treatment significantly increased ischemia and reperfusion-induced left ventricular injury, and decreased post-ischemic recovery of left ventricular function and coronary flow rate. In addition, nicotine enhanced cardiac ROS production and significantly attenuated protein kinase Cε (PKCε) protein abundance in the heart. Although nicotine had no effect on total cardiac glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) protein expression, it significantly increased the phosphorylation of GSK3β at serine 9 residue in the heart. NAC inhibited nicotine-mediated increase in ROS production, recovered PKCε gene expression and abrogated increased phosphorylation of GSK3β. Of importance, NAC blocked perinatal nicotine-induced increase in ischemia and reperfusion injury in the heart. These findings provide novel evidence that increased oxidative stress plays a causal role in perinatal nicotine-induced developmental programming of ischemic sensitive phenotype in the heart, and suggest potential therapeutic targets of anti-oxidative stress in the treatment of ischemic heart disease. PMID:26918336

  19. Quantum Dynamics Study of the Isotopic Effect on Capture Reactions: HD, D2 + CH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dunyou; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Time-dependent wave-packet-propagation calculations are reported for the isotopic reactions, HD + CH3 and D2 + CH3, in six degrees of freedom and for zero total angular momentum. Initial state selected reaction probabilities for different initial rotational-vibrational states are presented in this study. This study shows that excitations of the HD(D2) enhances the reactivities; whereas the excitations of the CH3 umbrella mode have the opposite effects. This is consistent with the reaction of H2 + CH3. The comparison of these three isotopic reactions also shows the isotopic effects in the initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The cumulative reaction probabilities (CRP) are obtained by summing over initial-state-selected reaction probabilities. The energy-shift approximation to account for the contribution of degrees of freedom missing in the six dimensionality calculation is employed to obtain approximate full-dimensional CRPs. The rate constant comparison shows H2 + CH3 reaction has the biggest reactivity, then HD + CH3, and D2 + CH3 has the smallest.

  20. Equilibrium and Disequilibrium of River Basins: Effects on Stream Captures in Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    DA Silva, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Landscapes are mainly driven by river processes that control the dynamic reorganization of networks. Discovering and identifying whether river basins are in geometric equilibrium or disequilibrium requires an analysis of water divides, channels that shift laterally or expand upstream and river captures. Issues specifically discussed include the variation of drainage area change and erosion rates of the basins. In southeastern Brazil there are two main escarpments with extensive geomorphic surfaces: Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira Mountains. These landscapes are constituted of Neoproterozoic and early Paleozoic rocks, presenting steep escarpments with low-elevation coastal plains and higher elevation interior plateaus. To identify whether river basins and river profiles are in equilibrium or disequilibrium in Serra do Mar and Serra da Mantiqueira Mountains, we used the proxy (χ), evaluating the effect of drainage area change and erosion rates. We selected basins that drain both sides of these two main escarpments (oceanic and continental sides) and have denudation rates derived from pre-existing cosmogenic isotopes data (Rio de Janeiro, Paraná and Minas Gerais). Despite being an ancient and tectonically stable landscape, part of the coastal plain of Serra do Mar Mountain in Rio de Janeiro and Paraná is in geometric disequilibrium, with water divides moving in the direction of higher χ values. To achieve equilibrium, some basins located in the continental side are retracting and disappearing, losing area to the coastal basins. On the contrary, there are some adjacent sub-basins that are close to equilibrium, without strong contrasts in χ values. The same pattern was observed in Serra da Mantiqueira (Minas Gerais state), with stream captures and river network reorganization in its main rivers. The initial results suggest a strong contrast between erosion rates in the continental and the oceanic portions of the escarpments.

  1. Effect of rice husk ash addition on CO2 capture behavior of calcium-based sorbent during calcium looping cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice husk ash/CaO was proposed as a CO2 sorbent which was prepared by rice husk ash and CaO hydration together. The CO2 capture behavior of rice husk ash/CaO sorbent was investigated in a twin fixed bed reactor system, and its apparent morphology, pore structure characteristics and phase variation during cyclic carbonation/calcination reactions were examined by SEM-EDX, N2 adsorption and XRD, respectively. The optimum preparation conditions for rice husk ash/CaO sorbent are hydration temperature of 75 C, hydration time of 8 h, and mole ratio of SiO2 in rice husk ash to CaO of 1.0. The cyclic carbonation performances of rice husk ash/CaO at these preparation conditions were compared with those of hydrated CaO and original CaO. The temperature at 660 C-710 C is beneficial to CO2 absorption of rice husk ash/CaO, and it exhibits higher carbonation conversions than hydrated CaO and original CaO during multiple cycles at the same reaction conditions. Rice husk ash/CaO possesses better anti-sintering behavior than the other sorbents. Rice husk ash exhibits better effect on improving cyclic carbonation conversion of CaO than pure SiO2 and diatomite. Rice husk ash/CaO maintains higher surface area and more abundant pores after calcination during the multiple cycles; however, the other sorbents show a sharp decay at the same reaction conditions. Ca2SiO4 found by XRD detection after calcination of rice husk ash/CaO is possibly a key factor in determining the cyclic CO2 capture behavior of rice husk ash/CaO. (author)

  2. Mixed phenotype acute leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zixing; Wang Shujie

    2014-01-01

    Objective To highlight the current understanding of mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL).Data sources We collected the relevant articles in PubMed (from 1985 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia","hybrid acute leukemia","biphenotypic acute leukemia",and "mixed lineage leukemia".We also collected the relevant studies in WanFang Data base (from 2000 to present),using the terms "mixed phenotype acute leukemia" and "hybrid acute leukemia".Study selection We included all relevant studies concerning mixed phenotype acute leukemia in English and Chinese version,with no limitation of research design.The duplicated articles are excluded.Results MPAL is a rare subgroup of acute leukemia which expresses the myeloid and lymphoid markers simultaneously.The clinical manifestations of MPAL are similar to other acute leukemias.The World Health Organization classification and the European Group for Immunological classification of Leukaemias 1998 cdteria are most widely used.MPAL does not have a standard therapy regimen.Its treatment depends mostly on the patient's unique immunophenotypic and cytogenetic features,and also the experience of individual physician.The lack of effective treatment contributes to an undesirable prognosis.Conclusion Our understanding about MPAL is still limited.The diagnostic criteria have not been unified.The treatment of MPAL remains to be investigated.The prognostic factor is largely unclear yet.A better diagnostic cdteria and targeted therapeutics will improve the therapy effect and a subsequently better prognosis.

  3. Solid Adsorbents for Low Temperature CO2 Capture with Low Energy Penalties Leading to More Effective Integrated Solutions for Power Generation and Industrial Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nannan eSun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available CO2 capture represents the key technology for CO2 reduction within the framework of CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS. In fact, the implementation of CO2 capture extends far beyond CCUS since it will link the CO2 emission and recycling sectors, and when renewables are used to provide necessary energy input, CO2 capture would enable a profitable zero- or even negative-emitting and integrated energy-chemical solution. To this end, highly efficient CO2 capture technologies are needed, and adsorption using solid adsorbents has the potential to be one of the ideal options. Currently, the greatest challenge in this area is the development of adsorbents with high performance that balances a range of optimization-needed factors, those including costs, efficiency, and engineering feasibility. In this review, recent advances on the development of carbon-based and immobilized organic amines-based CO2 adsorbents are summarized, the selection of these particular categories of materials is because they are among the most developed low temperature (<100 oC CO2 adsorbents up to date, which showed important potential for practical deployment at pilot-scale in the near future. Preparation protocols, adsorption behaviors as well as pros and cons of each type of the adsorbents are presented, it was concluded that encouraging results have been achieved already, however, the development of more effective adsorbents for CO2 capture remains challenging and further innovations in the design and synthesis of adsorbents are needed.

  4. Dynamics of basaltic glass dissolution - Capturing microscopic effects in continuum scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aradóttir, E. S. P.; Sigfússon, B.; Sonnenthal, E. L.; Björnsson, G.; Jónsson, H.

    2013-11-01

    The method of 'multiple interacting continua' (MINC) was applied to include microscopic rate-limiting processes in continuum scale reactive transport models of basaltic glass dissolution. The MINC method involves dividing the system up to ambient fluid and grains, using a specific surface area to describe the interface between the two. The various grains and regions within grains can then be described by dividing them into continua separated by dividing surfaces. Millions of grains can thus be considered within the method without the need to explicity discretizing them. Four continua were used for describing a dissolving basaltic glass grain; the first one describes the ambient fluid around the grain, while the second, third and fourth continuum refer to a diffusive leached layer, the dissolving part of the grain and the inert part of the grain, respectively. The model was validated using the TOUGHREACT simulator and data from column flow through experiments of basaltic glass dissolution at low, neutral and high pH values. Successful reactive transport simulations of the experiments and overall adequate agreement between measured and simulated values provides validation that the MINC approach can be applied for incorporating microscopic effects in continuum scale basaltic glass dissolution models. Equivalent models can be used when simulating dissolution and alteration of other minerals. The study provides an example of how numerical modeling and experimental work can be combined to enhance understanding of mechanisms associated with basaltic glass dissolution. Column outlet concentrations indicated basaltic glass to dissolve stoichiometrically at pH 3. Predictive simulations with the developed MINC model indicated significant precipitation of secondary minerals within the column at neutral and high pH, explaining observed non-stoichiometric outlet concentrations at these pH levels. Clay, zeolite and hydroxide precipitation was predicted to be most abundant within

  5. Long-Term Effects of Prenatal Hypoxia on Schizophrenia-Like Phenotype in Heterozygous Reeler Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Kristy R; Pillai, Anilkumar

    2016-07-01

    Prenatal hypoxia (PHX) is a well-known environmental factor implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. However, the long-term effects of PHX on schizophrenia-related neuroplasticity are poorly understood. Using behavioral tasks, MRI imaging, and biochemical studies, we examined the long-term effects of PHX in heterozygous reeler mice (HRM; mice deficient for reelin, a candidate gene for schizophrenia). PHX at E17 failed to induce any significant deficits in prepulse inhibition, spatial memory, anxiety-like behavior, or blood flow in wild type (WT) and HRM at 6 months of age. However, PHX induced a significant increase in frontal cortex volume in WT whereas the higher frontal cortical volume found in HRM was significantly reduced by PHX. A significant decrease in reelin levels was observed in frontal cortex of WT and HRM and hippocampus of HRM following PHX. In addition, PHX induced significant reductions in hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus of HRM. Although no significant effect of PHX was observed in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) protein levels in frontal cortex and hippocampus of WT and HRM, serum VEGF levels were found higher in HRM following PHX. Moreover, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) protein levels were significantly lower in frontal cortex of WT and HRM and hippocampus of HRM following PHX. We found a significant reduction in serum corticosterone levels of PHX-treated WT mice. These findings suggest that future experiments addressing gene-environment interaction in schizophrenia should consider age-dependent effects of the environmental factor, in addition to the specificity of the gene of interest. PMID:26059812

  6. The novelty-seeking phenotype modulates the long-lasting effects of adolescent MDMA exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Arias, Marta; Vaccaro, Sonia; Arenas, M Carmen; Aguilar, María A; Miñarro, José

    2015-03-15

    Exposure to drugs such as ethanol or cocaine during adolescence induces alterations in the central nervous system that are modulated by the novelty-seeking trait. Our aim was to evaluate the influence of this trait on the long-term effects of MDMA administration during adolescence on spontaneous behavior and conditioned rewarding effects in adulthood. Adolescent mice were classified as high or low novelty seekers (HNS or LNS) according to the hole-board test and received either MDMA (0, 10 or 20mg/kg PND 33-42) or saline. Three weeks later, having entered adulthood (PND>68), one set of mice performed the elevated plus maze and social interaction tests, while another set performed the conditioning place preference (CPP) test induced by cocaine-(1mg/kg) or MDMA-(1mg/kg). Only HNS mice treated with MDMA during adolescence acquired CPP in adulthood with a non-effective dose of cocaine or MDMA. Although it did not produce changes in motor activity, exposure to MDMA during adolescence was associated with more aggressive behaviors (threat and attack) and increased social contacts in HNS mice, while an anxiolytic effect was noted in LNS mice pre-treated with the highest dose of MDMA (20mg/kg). Administration of MDMA (10 or 20mg/kg) induced a decrease in DA levels in the striatum in LNS mice only and lower striatal serotonin levels in mice treated with the highest MDMA dose. Our findings show that adolescent MDMA exposure results in higher sensitivity to the conditioned reinforcing properties of MDMA and cocaine in adult HNS mice, which suggests that the relationship between exposure to MDMA in adolescence and a higher probability of substance is a feature of high novelty seekers only. PMID:25619952

  7. Effect of Biofield Treatment on Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristic of Provindencia rettgeri

    OpenAIRE

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Providencia rettgeri (P. rettgeri) is a clinically significant Gram-negative bacterium of genus Providencia, and commonly associated with hospital-acquired infection like urinary tract infection (UTI), gastroenteritis, and ocular infections. Present study was designed to evaluate the effect of biofield treatment on P. rettgeri against antimicrobial susceptibility, biochemical reaction pattern, biotype number, and 16S rDNA sequence. The samples of P. rettgeri (ATCC 9250) were divided into thre...

  8. Effects of semi-natural environmental conditions on phenotypic plasticity in Rattus norvegicus

    OpenAIRE

    Margerum, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Controlled laboratory experiments find there is normal variation in maternal care that regulates the development of the endocrine, cognitive and behavioral responses to stress in rats. As housing conditions of laboratory rats can have pronounced effects on experimental outcomes, I examined how semi-naturalistic environmental conditions affect maternal care and how or if variation in maternal care affects neural and behavioral development in adult female offspring. Specifically, I assessed ma...

  9. Oxidative Stress -a Phenotypic Hallmark of Fanconi Anemia and Down Syndrome: The Effect of Antioxidants

    OpenAIRE

    El-Bassyouni, HT; Afifi, HH; Eid, MM; Kamal, RM; El-Gebali, HH; El-Saeed, GSM; Thomas, MM; Abdel-Maksoud, SA

    2015-01-01

    Background: Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of leukemia-prone diseases such as Fanconi anemia (FA) and Down syndrome (DS) Aim: To explore the oxidative stress state in children with DS and FA by estimating the levels of antioxidants (e.g., malondialdehyde [MDA], total antioxidant capacity, and superoxide dismutase [SOD] activity) and DNA damage, and to evaluate of the effect of antioxidant treatment on these patients. Subjects and methods The study included 32 children...

  10. Quantifying small molecule phenotypic effects using mitochondrial morpho-functional fingerprinting and machine learning

    OpenAIRE

    Blanchet, L.M.; Smeitink, J; van Emst-de Vries, S E; Vogels, C.; Pellegrini, M; Jonckheere, A.I.; Rodenburg, R J; Buydens, L.M.; Beyrath, J.D.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Koopman, W.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    In primary fibroblasts from Leigh Syndrome (LS) patients, isolated mitochondrial complex I deficiency is associated with increased reactive oxygen species levels and mitochondrial morpho-functional changes. Empirical evidence suggests these aberrations constitute linked therapeutic targets for small chemical molecules. However, the latter generally induce multiple subtle effects, meaning that in vitro potency analysis or single-parameter high-throughput cell screening are of limited use to id...

  11. Effect of breed composition on phenotypic residual feed intake and growth in Angus, Brahman, and Angus x Brahman crossbred cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzo, M A; Riley, D G; Hansen, G R; Johnson, D D; Myer, R O; Coleman, S W; Chase, C C; Wasdin, J G; Driver, J D

    2009-12-01

    The influence of additive and nonadditive genetic effects and temperament on 4 postweaning feed intake and growth traits was evaluated in a group of 581 bull, heifer, and steer calves born in 3 Florida herds in 2006 and 2007. Calves had breed compositions ranging from 100% Angus (A) to 100% Brahman (B). They were randomly allocated to 24 pens each year by herd (Brooksville, Gainesville, Marianna, FL), sire group (A, 3/4 A 1/4 B, Brangus, 1/2 A 1/2 B, 1/4 A 3/4 B, and B), and sex (bull, heifer, and steer) in a GrowSafe automated feeding facility at Marianna. Calves were fed a concentrate diet during the 21-d adjustment and the 70-d trial periods. Individual feed intakes were recorded daily, and BW, chute scores, and exit velocities were recorded every 2 wk. Traits were phenotypic daily residual feed intake (RFI), mean daily feed intake (DFI), mean daily feed conversion ratio (FCR), and postweaning BW gain. Phenotypic RFI was computed as the difference between actual and expected feed intakes. Calves were assigned to 3 RFI groups: high (RFI greater than 0.9 kg of DM/d), low (RFI less than -0.9 kg of DM/d), and medium (RFI between mean +/- 0.9 kg of DM/d; SD = 1.8 kg of DM/d). The mixed model included the fixed effects of contemporary group (herd-year-pen), RFI group (except when trait was RFI), age of dam, sex of calf, age of calf, B fraction of calf, heterozygosity of calf, mean chute score, and mean exit velocity. Brahman fraction and heterozygosity of calf were nested within sex of calf for RFI and within RFI group for DFI, FCR, and postweaning BW gain. Random effects were sire and residual. Feed efficiency tended to improve (decreased RFI) as the B fraction increased. However, calves required larger amounts of feed per kilogram of BW gain (larger FCR) as the B fraction increased. Postweaning BW gain tended to decrease as the B fraction increased. Temperament traits were unimportant for all traits except exit velocity for DFI, suggesting perhaps a lack of

  12. Committed Tc17 cells are phenotypically and functionally resistant to the effects of IL-27.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Behi, Mohamed; Dai, Hong; Magalhaes, Joao G; Hwang, Daniel; Zhang, Guang-Xian; Rostami, Abdolmohamad; Ciric, Bogoljub

    2014-10-01

    IL-17-secreting CD8(+) T cells (Tc17 cells) have been implicated in immunity to infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Thus far, studies on Tc17 cells have primarily investigated their development from naïve precursors, while the biology of committed Tc17 cells has been less characterized, in particular during the effector phase of immune responses. IL-27 is an important regulator of inflammation through the induction of regulatory Tr1 cells, as well as a suppressor of Th17-cell development. IL-27 suppresses the development of Tc17 cells, but its effects on committed Tc17 cells are unknown. Here we demonstrate that even though IL-27 completely inhibited the development of C57BL/6 mouse Tc17 cells, it had little effect on previously committed Tc17 cells. Although committed Tc17 cells were capable of responding to IL-27, it had no effect on expression of RORγt and RORα, or production of various cytokines. Committed Tc17 cells did not express granzyme B and lacked cytotoxicity in vitro, features that remained unaltered by IL-27 treatment. Nonetheless, they efficiently induced diabetes, irrespective of treatment with IL-27 prior to transfer into RIP-mOVA mice. These findings suggest that use of IL-27 to modulate autoimmune diseases might have limited therapeutic efficacy if autoaggressive Tc17 cells have already developed. PMID:25070084

  13. Effects of novel auto-inducible medium on growth, activity and CO₂ capture capacity of Escherichia coli expressing carbonic anhydrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Stuart K; Kan, Eunsung

    2015-10-01

    A glucose-based auto-inducible medium (glucose-AIM) has been developed to enhance both growth and expression of lac operon-linked carbonic anhydrase (CA) expression in a recombinant strain of Escherichia coli. When the E. coli expressing CA was grown on various media, the glucose-based auto-inducible medium (glucose AIM) resulted in a CA activity of 1022 mU OD(600 nm)(-1) mL(-1) at 24 h and a specific growth rate of 0.082 h(-1). The CA activity was four to fourteen times higher than those by LB-IPTG. The E. coli expressing CA grown on the glucose-AIM showed highest activity at pH8.5 while it kept high stability up to 40°C and an inlet CO2 concentration of 6%. These findings indicate that the glucose-AIM would be a cost-effective medium to support high cell growth, CA activity and stability for effective CO2 capture. PMID:26264623

  14. Positive effects of early androgen therapy on the behavioral phenotype of boys with 47,XXY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samango-Sprouse, Carole; Stapleton, Emily J; Lawson, Patrick; Mitchell, Francie; Sadeghin, Teresa; Powell, Sherida; Gropman, Andrea L

    2015-06-01

    47, XXY occurs in up to 1 in 650 male births and is associated with androgen deficiency, neurodevelopmental delays, and atypical social-behaviors. Previously, we showed that young boys with 47, XXY who received early hormonal therapy (EHT) had significantly improved neurodevelopment. The objective of this follow-up study was to examine the effects of EHT on social behavior in boys with 47, XXY. The study consisted of boys prenatally diagnosed with 47, XXY who were referred for evaluations. Twenty-nine boys received three injections of 25 mg testosterone enanthate and 57 controls did not receive EHT. Behavioral functioning was assessed using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function, Social Responsiveness Scale, 2nd Ed., and the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 6-18. The hypothesis that EHT may affect behavior was formulated prior to data collection. Questionnaire data was prospectively obtained and analyzed to test for significance between two groups. Significant differences were identified between group's scores over time in Social Communication (P=0.007), Social Cognition (P=0.006), and Total T-score (P=0.001) on the SRS-2; Initiation (P=0.05) on the BRIEF; and Externalizing Problems (P=0.024), Affective Problems (P=0.05), and Aggressive Behaviors (P=0.031) on the CBCL. This is the third study revealing positive effects of EHT on boys with XXY. There was a significant improvements associated with the 47, XXY genotype in boys who received EHT. Research is underway on the neurobiological mechanisms, and later developmental effects of EHT. PMID:25939399

  15. Inhibitory effect of IGF-Ⅱ antisense RNA on malignant phenotype of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Hua Yang; Ming Qing Zhang; Han Rong Qin; Zi Rong Fan; Jiang Du; Chong Xu; Qiao Ming Liang; Ji Fang Mao

    2000-01-01

    @@INTRODUCTION According to the therapeutic effect and strategy of antisense RNA for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we have specifically synthesized partial cDNA of human insulin-like growth factor Ⅱ (IGFⅡ ) and constructed IGF-Ⅱ cDNA antisense eukaryotic expression vector. The constructed vector was introduced into hepatoma cell line SMMC-7721 to block the intrinsic IGF- Ⅱexpression. The biological behavior changes of hepatoma cells were observed. All these would provide scientific basis for IGF- Ⅱ antisense RNA in the treatment of HCC.

  16. Antibacterial Activities of Selected Cameroonian Plants and Their Synergistic Effects with Antibiotics against Bacteria Expressing MDR Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T. Lacmata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work was designed to assess the antibacterial properties of the methanol extracts of some Cameroonian medicinal plants and the effect of their associations with currently used antibiotics on multidrug resistant (MDR Gram-negative bacteria overexpressing active efflux pumps. The antibacterial activities of twelve methanol extracts of medicinal plants were evaluated using broth microdilution. The results of this test showed that three extracts Garcinia lucida with the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC varying from 128 to 512 μg/mL, Garcinia kola (MIC of 256 to 1024 μg/mL, and Picralima nitida (MIC of 128 to 1024 μg/mL were active on all the twenty-nine studied bacteria including MDR phenotypes. The association of phenylalanine arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN or efflux pumps inhibitor to different extracts did not modify their activities. At the concentration of MIC/2 and MIC/5, the extracts of P. nitida and G. kola improved the antibacterial activities of some commonly used antibiotics suggesting their synergistic effects with the tested antibiotics. The results of this study suggest that the tested plant extracts and mostly those from P. nitida, G. lucida and G. kola could be used alone or in association with common antibiotics in the fight of bacterial infections involving MDR strains.

  17. The effect of high-fat diet on the composition of the gut microbiota in cloned and non-cloned pigs of lean and obese phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Stagsted, Jan; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-far-high-energy diet on cloned and non-cloned domestic pigs of both lean and obese phenotype and to evaluate if the lean cloned pigs had a lower inter-individual variation as compared with non-cloned pigs. The microbiota of colon and terminal ileum was investigated in cloned and non-cloned pigs that received a high-far-high-energy diet with either restricted or ad libitum access to feed, resulting in lean and obese phenotypes, respec...

  18. Tumor cell killing effect of boronated dipeptide. Boromethylglycylphenylalanine on boron neutron capture therapy for malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagaki, Masao; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Kinashi, Yuko; Kobayashi, Toru [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Oda, Yoshifumi; Kikuchi, Haruhiko; Spielvogel, B.F.

    1994-03-01

    The killing effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy; BNCT, is dependant on the boron concentration ratio of tumor to normal brain (T/N ratio), and also that of tumor to blood (T/B ratio). The clinical boron carrier of boro-captate (BSH) showed the large T/N ratio of ca. 8, however the T/B ratio was around 1, which indicated nonselective accumulation into tumor. Indeed high boron concentration of blood restrict the neutron irradiation dose in order to circumvent the normal endothelial damage, especially in the case of deeply seated tumor. Phenylalanine analogue of para borono-phenylalanine (BPA) is an effective boron carrier on BNCT for malignant melanoma. For the BNCT on brain tumors, however, BPA concentration in normal brain was reported to be intolerably high. In order to improve the T/N ratio of BPA in brain, therefore, a dipeptide of boromethylglycylphenylalanine (BMGP) was synthesized deriving from trimethylglycine conjugated with BPA. It is expected to be selectively accumulated into tumor with little uptake into normal brain. Because a dipeptide might not pass through the normal blood brain barrier (BBB). Its killing effect on cultured glioma cell, T98G, and its distribution in rat brain bearing 9L glioma have been investigated in this paper. The BNCT effect of BMGP on cultured cells was nearly triple in comparison with DL-BPA. The neutron dose yielding 1% survival ratio were 7x10{sup 12}nvt for BMGP and 2x10{sup 13}nvt for BPA respectively on BNCT after boron loading for 16 hrs in the same B-10 concentration of 20ppm. Quantitative study of boron concentration via the {alpha}-auto radiography and the prompt gamma ray assay on 9L brain tumor rats revealed that T/N ratio and T/B ratio are 12.0 and 3.0 respectively. Those values are excellent for BNCT use. (author).

  19. Functional and phenotypic effects of AhR activation in inflammatory dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) activation by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induces immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen presenting cells governing T cell activation and differentiation. However, the consequences of AhR activation in DCs are not fully defined. We hypothesized that AhR activation alters DC differentiation and generates dysfunctional DCs. To test this hypothesis, inflammatory bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from C57Bl/6 mice were generated in the presence of vehicle or TCDD. TCDD decreased CD11c expression but increased MHC class II, CD86 and CD25 expression on the BMDCs. The effects of TCDD were strictly AhR-dependent but not exclusively DRE-mediated. Similar effects were observed with two natural AhR ligands, 6-formylindolo[3,2-b]carbazole (FICZ) and 2-(1H-Indol-3-ylcarbonyl)-4-thiazolecarboxylic acid (ITE). TCDD increased LPS- and CpG-induced IL-6 and TNF-α production by BMDCs but decreased their NO production. TCDD decreased CpG-induced IL-12p70 production by BMDCs but did not affect their secretion of IL-10. TCDD downregulated LPS- and CpG-induced NF-kB p65 levels and induced a trend towards upregulation of RelB levels in the BMDCs. AhR activation by TCDD modulated BMDC uptake of both soluble and particulate antigens. Induction of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and TGF-β3 has been implicated in the generation of regulatory T cells following AhR activation. TCDD increased IDO1, IDO2 and TGF-β3 mRNA levels in BMDCs as compared to vehicle. Despite the induction of regulatory mediators, TCDD-treated BMDCs failed to suppress antigen-specific T cell activation. Thus, AhR activation can directly alter the differentiation and innate functions of inflammatory DCs without affecting their ability to successfully interact with T cells.

  20. Uncovering Local Trends in Genetic Effects of Multiple Phenotypes via Functional Linear Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vsevolozhskaya, Olga A; Zaykin, Dmitri V; Barondess, David A; Tong, Xiaoren; Jadhav, Sneha; Lu, Qing

    2016-04-01

    Recent technological advances equipped researchers with capabilities that go beyond traditional genotyping of loci known to be polymorphic in a general population. Genetic sequences of study participants can now be assessed directly. This capability removed technology-driven bias toward scoring predominantly common polymorphisms and let researchers reveal a wealth of rare and sample-specific variants. Although the relative contributions of rare and common polymorphisms to trait variation are being debated, researchers are faced with the need for new statistical tools for simultaneous evaluation of all variants within a region. Several research groups demonstrated flexibility and good statistical power of the functional linear model approach. In this work we extend previous developments to allow inclusion of multiple traits and adjustment for additional covariates. Our functional approach is unique in that it provides a nuanced depiction of effects and interactions for the variables in the model by representing them as curves varying over a genetic region. We demonstrate flexibility and competitive power of our approach by contrasting its performance with commonly used statistical tools and illustrate its potential for discovery and characterization of genetic architecture of complex traits using sequencing data from the Dallas Heart Study. PMID:27027515

  1. Gravitational unloading effects on muscle fiber size, phenotype and myonuclear number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Y.; Yoshinaga, T.; Nomura, T.; Kawano, F.; Ishihara, A.; Nonaka, I.; Roy, R. R.; Edgerton, V. R.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of gravitational unloading with or without intact neural activity and/or tension development on myosin heavy chain (MHC) composition, cross-sectional area (CSA), number of myonuclei, and myonuclear domain (cytoplasmic volume per myonucleus ratio) in single fibers of both slow and fast muscles of rat hindlimbs are reviewed briefly. The atrophic response to unloading is generally graded as follows: slow extensors > fast extensors > fast flexors. Reduction of CSA is usually greater in the most predominant fiber type of that muscle. The percentage of fibers expressing fast MHC isoforms increases in unloaded slow but not fast muscles. Myonuclear number per mm of fiber length and myonuclear domain is decreased in the fibers of the unloaded predominantly slow soleus muscle, but not in the predominantly fast plantaris. Decreases in myonuclear number and domain, however, are observed in plantaris fibers when tenotomy, denervation, or both are combined with hindlimb unloading. All of these results are consistent with the view that a major factor for fiber atrophy is an inhibition or reduction of loading of the hindlimbs. These data also indicate that predominantly slow muscles are more responsive to unloading than predominantly fast muscles. c2002 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Cytotoxic and phenotypic effects of uranium and lead on osteoblastic cells are highly dependent on metal speciation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bone is one of the main retention organs for uranium (U) and lead (Pb). The clinical effects of U or Pb poisoning are well known: acute and chronic intoxications impair bone formation. However, only few studies dealt with the cellular and molecular mechanisms of their toxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate acute cytotoxicity of U and Pb and their phenotypic effects on rat and human osteoblasts, the cells responsible for bone formation. The most likely species of the toxicants in contact with cells after blood contamination were selected for cell exposure. Results showed that the cytotoxic effect of U and Pb is highly dependent on their speciation. Thus, Pb was cytotoxic when left free in the exposure medium or when complexed with carbonate, cystein or citrate, but not when complexed with albumin or phosphate, under an insoluble form. U was cytotoxic whatever its speciation, but differences in sensitivity were observed as a function of speciation. Population growth recovery could be obtained after exposure to low doses of U or Pb, except for some U-carbonate complexes which had irreversible effects whatever the dose. The activation of two markers of bone formation and mineralization, osteocalcin and bone sialoprotein (BSP), was observed after exposure to non-toxic doses or non-toxic species of U or Pb while their inhibition was observed after toxic exposure to both metals. This work provides new elements to better understand the complex mechanisms of U and Pb toxicity to osteoblasts. Our results also illustrate the importance of a strictly controlled speciation of the metals in toxicological studies

  3. The effects of birth order and birth interval on the phenotypic expression of autism spectrum disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loren A Martin

    Full Text Available A rise in the prevalence of diagnosed cases of autism spectrum disorder (ASD has been reported in several studies in recent years. While this rise in ASD prevalence is at least partially related to increased awareness and broadened diagnostic criteria, the role of environmental factors cannot be ruled out, especially considering that the cause of most cases of ASD remains unknown. The study of families with multiple affected children can provide clues about ASD etiology. While the majority of research on ASD multiplex families has focused on identifying genetic anomalies that may underlie the disorder, the study of symptom severity across ASD birth order may provide evidence for environmental factors in ASD. We compared social and cognitive measures of behavior between over 300 first and second affected siblings within multiplex autism families obtained from the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange dataset. Measures included nonverbal IQ assessed with the Ravens Colored Progressive Matrices, verbal IQ assessed with the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, and autism severity assessed with the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS, an instrument established as a quantitative measure of autism. The results indicated that females were more severely impacted by ASD than males, especially first affected siblings. When first and second affected siblings were compared, significant declines in nonverbal and verbal IQ scores were observed. In addition, SRS results demonstrated a significant increase in autism severity between first and second affected siblings consistent with an overall decline in function as indicated by the IQ data. These results remained significant after controlling for the age and sex of the siblings. Surprisingly, the SRS scores were found to only be significant when the age difference between siblings was less than 2 years. These results suggest that some cases of ASD are influenced by a dosage effect involving unknown epigenetic

  4. Effect of UV radiation on the killer phenotype in the wine yeast-saccharomycetes and spontaneous variation of this character

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous and ultraviolet-induced changeabilities of wine yeasts from the killer state to sensitive one have been studied. Observed often spontaneous changes of killer and neutral phenotypes under laboratory store conditions as well as high mutation frequency of genetic elements responsible for the killer indication on ultraviolet irradiation testify that often encounterability in nature and in the production of sensitive yeasts is attributed to high frequency of mutation changes of the killer and neutral phenotypes to the sensitive state

  5. Role of p53 mutation in the effect of boron neutron capture therapy on oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiotherapy, being effective for the treatment of even advanced malignancies in head and neck regions as well as brain tumors and skin melanomas. To clarify the role of p53 gene, the effect of BNCT on oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells showing either wild- (SAS/neo) or mutant-type (SAS/mp53) p53 was examined. Cells were exposed to neutron beams in the presence of boronophenylalanine (BPA) at Kyoto University Research Reactor. Treated cells were monitored for modulations in colony formation, proliferation, cell cycle, and expression of cell cycle-associated proteins. When SAS/neo and SAS/mp53 cells were subjected to BNCT, more suppressive effects on colony formation and cell viability were observed in SAS/neo compared with SAS/mp53 cells. Cell cycle arrest at the G1 checkpoint was observed in SAS/neo, but not in SAS/mp53. Apoptotic cells increased from 6 h after BNCT in SAS/neo and 48 h in SAS/mp53 cells. The expression of p21 was induced in SAS/neo only, but G2 arrest-associated proteins including Wee1, cdc2, and cyclin B1 were altered in both cell lines. These results indicate that oral SCC cells with mutant-type are more resistant to BNCT than those with wild-type p53, and that the lack of G1 arrest and related apoptosis may contribute to the resistance. At a physical dose affecting the cell cycle, BNCT inhibits oral SCC cells in p53-dependent and -independent manners

  6. Transcriptome-based exon capture enables highly cost-effective comparative genomic data collection at moderate evolutionary scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Ke

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To date, exon capture has largely been restricted to species with fully sequenced genomes, which has precluded its application to lineages that lack high quality genomic resources. We developed a novel strategy for designing array-based exon capture in chipmunks (Tamias based on de novo transcriptome assemblies. We evaluated the performance of our approach across specimens from four chipmunk species. Results We selectively targeted 11,975 exons (~4 Mb on custom capture arrays, and enriched over 99% of the targets in all libraries. The percentage of aligned reads was highly consistent (24.4-29.1% across all specimens, including in multiplexing up to 20 barcoded individuals on a single array. Base coverage among specimens and within targets in each species library was uniform, and the performance of targets among independent exon captures was highly reproducible. There was no decrease in coverage among chipmunk species, which showed up to 1.5% sequence divergence in coding regions. We did observe a decline in capture performance of a subset of targets designed from a much more divergent ground squirrel genome (30 My, however, over 90% of the targets were also recovered. Final assemblies yielded over ten thousand orthologous loci (~3.6 Mb with thousands of fixed and polymorphic SNPs among species identified. Conclusions Our study demonstrates the potential of a transcriptome-enabled, multiplexed, exon capture method to create thousands of informative markers for population genomic and phylogenetic studies in non-model species across the tree of life.

  7. Getting the phenotypes right: an essential ingredient for understanding aetiological mechanisms underlying persistent violence and developing effective treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheilagh Hodgins

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce societal levels of violence, it is essential to advance understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms involved in initiating and maintaining individual patterns of physical aggression. New technologies such as Magnetic Resonance Imagining and analyses of DNA provide tools for identifying these mechanisms. The reliability and validity of the results of studies using these tools depend not only on aspects of the technology, but also on the methodological rigour with which the studies are conducted, particularly with respect to characterizing the phenotype. The present article discusses five challenges confronting scientists who aim to advance understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms associated with persistent violence. These challenges are: (1 to develop evidence-based hypotheses and to design studies that test alternate hypotheses; (2 to recruit samples that are homogeneous with respect to variables that may be linked to neurobiological mechanisms underpinning violent behaviour; (3 to use reliable and valid measures in order to fully characterize participants so that the external validity of the results is evident; (4 to restrict the range of age of participants so as not to confuse developmental change with group differences; and (5 to take account of sex. Our goal is to contribute to elevating methodological standards in this new field of research and to thereby improve the validity of results and move closer to finding effective ways to reduce violence

  8. Gadolinium neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadolinium neutron capture therapy makes use of photons and electrons produced by nuclear reactions between gadolinium and lower-energy neutrons which occur within the tumor. The results of our studies have shown that its radiation effect is mostly of low LET and that the electrons are the significant component in the over-all dose. The dose from gadolinium neutron capture reactions does not seem to increase in proportion to the gadolinium concentration, and the Gd-157 concentration of about 100 μg/ml appears most optimal for therapy. Close contact between gadolinium and the cell is not necessarily required for cell inactivation, however, the effect of electrons released from intracellular gadolinium may be significant. Experimental studies on tumor-bearing mice and rabbits have shown that this is a very promising modality though further improvements in gadolinium delivery to tumors are needed. (author)

  9. Hypoxia and hypoglycaemia in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma: regulation and phenotypic effects of Hypoxia-Inducible Factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hypoxia regulates gene expression via the transcription factor HIF (Hypoxia-Inducible Factor). Little is known regarding HIF expression and function in primary bone sarcomas. We describe HIF expression and phenotypic effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and HIF in Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma. HIF-1α and HIF-2α immunohistochemistry was performed on a Ewing's tumour tissue array. Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma cell lines were assessed for HIF pathway induction by Western blot, luciferase assay and ELISA. Effects of hypoxia, hypoglycaemia and isoform-specific HIF siRNA were assessed on proliferation, apoptosis and migration. 17/56 Ewing's tumours were HIF-1α-positive, 15 HIF-2α-positive and 10 positive for HIF-1α and HIF-2α. Expression of HIF-1α and cleaved caspase 3 localised to necrotic areas. Hypoxia induced HIF-1α and HIF-2α in Ewing's and osteosarcoma cell lines while hypoglycaemia specifically induced HIF-2α in Ewing's. Downstream transcription was HIF-1α-dependent in Ewing's sarcoma, but regulated by both isoforms in osteosarcoma. In both cell types hypoglycaemia reduced cellular proliferation by ≥ 45%, hypoxia increased apoptosis and HIF siRNA modulated hypoxic proliferation and migration. Co-localisation of HIF-1α and necrosis in Ewing's sarcoma suggests a role for hypoxia and/or hypoglycaemia in in vivo induction of HIF. In vitro data implicates hypoxia as the primary HIF stimulus in both Ewing's and osteosarcoma, driving effects on proliferation and apoptosis. These results provide a foundation from which to advance understanding of HIF function in the pathobiology of primary bone sarcomas

  10. Advanced phenotyping and phenotype data analysis for the study of plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahaman, Md Matiur; Chen, Dijun; Gillani, Zeeshan; Klukas, Christian; Chen, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increase in the consumption of food, feed, fuel and to meet global food security needs for the rapidly growing human population, there is a necessity to breed high yielding crops that can adapt to the future climate changes, particularly in developing countries. To solve these global challenges, novel approaches are required to identify quantitative phenotypes and to explain the genetic basis of agriculturally important traits. These advances will facilitate the screening of germplasm with high performance characteristics in resource-limited environments. Recently, plant phenomics has offered and integrated a suite of new technologies, and we are on a path to improve the description of complex plant phenotypes. High-throughput phenotyping platforms have also been developed that capture phenotype data from plants in a non-destructive manner. In this review, we discuss recent developments of high-throughput plant phenotyping infrastructure including imaging techniques and corresponding principles for phenotype data analysis. PMID:26322060

  11. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  12. Structure effects in the 15N(n ,γ )16N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of 16N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam, Shubhchintak, Chatterjee, R.

    2015-10-01

    Background: The 15N(n ,γ )16N reaction plays an important role in red giant stars and also in inhomogeneous big bang nucleosynthesis. However, there are controversies regarding spectroscopic factors of the four low-lying states of 16N, which have direct bearing on the total direct capture cross section and also on the reaction rate. Direct measurements of the capture cross section at low energies are scarce and available only at three energies below 500 keV. Purpose: The aim of this paper is to calculate the 15N(n ,γ )16N radiative capture cross section and its subsequent reaction rate by an indirect method and in that process investigate the effects of spectroscopic factors of different levels of 16N to the cross section. Method: A fully quantum mechanical Coulomb breakup theory under the aegis of post-form distorted wave Born approximation is used to calculate the Coulomb breakup of 16N on Pb at 100 MeV/u . This is then related to the photodisintegration cross section of 16N(γ ,n )15N and subsequently invoking the principle of detailed balance, the 15N(n ,γ )16N capture cross section is calculated. Results: The nonresonant capture cross section is calculated with spectroscopic factors from the shell model and those extracted (including uncertainties) from two recent experiments. The data seem to favor a more single particle nature for the low-lying states of 16N. The total neutron capture rate is also calculated by summing up nonresonant and resonant (significant only at temperatures greater than 1 GK) contributions and comparison is made with other charged particle capture rates. In the typical temperature range of 0.1 -1.2 GK, almost all the contributions to the reaction rate come from capture cross sections below 0.25 MeV. Conclusion: We have attempted to resolve the discrepancy in the spectroscopic factors of low-lying 16N levels and conclude that it would certainly be useful to perform a Coulomb dissociation experiment to find the low energy capture

  13. Effects of Ultraviolet-B Irradiance on Intraspecific Competition and Facilitation of Plants: Self-Thinning, Size Inequality, and Phenotypic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Rui-Chang; Lin, Yue; Yue, Ming; Li, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Xiao; Chi, Hong; Chai, Yong-Fu; Wang, Mao

    2012-01-01

    (1) The effects of facilitation on the structure and dynamics of plant populations have not been studied so widely as competition. The UV-B radiation, as a typical environmental factor causing stress, may result in direct stress and facilitation. (2) The effects of UV-B radiation on intraspecific competition and facilitation were investigated based on the following three predictions on self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity: i) Self-thinning is the reduction in density that...

  14. Particle capture by aquatic vegetation modeled in flume experiments: the effects of particle size, stem density, biofilm, and flow velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerwin, R.; Fauria, K.; Nover, D.; Schladow, G.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated floodplains and wetlands can trap and remove particles from suspension thereby affecting water quality, land accretion, and wetland functioning. However, the rate of particle removal by vegetation remains poorly characterized, especially for fine particles. In this study, we monitored particle concentration and size distribution (1.25 - 250 µm diameter suspended road dust) in a laboratory flume as flow velocity, plant stem density, initial particle concentration, and the presence of biofilm on vegetation were varied. We characterized change in particle concentration through time by calculating decay constants, termed capture rates. Based on our experiments, we found that suspended particle concentration decayed more rapidly in the presence, rather than in the absence, of vegetation. Additionally, particle capture rates increased with stem density, particle size, and the presence of biofilm, while decreasing with flow velocity. These results demonstrate that low flow velocities and the presence of biofilm optimize particle capture by vegetation. Our results are relevant to floodplain and wetland restoration efforts.

  15. Hypomethylation of ERVs in the sperm of mice haploinsufficient for the histone methyltransferase Setdb1 correlates with a paternal effect on phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daxinger, Lucia; Oey, Harald; Isbel, Luke; Whitelaw, Nadia C; Youngson, Neil A; Spurling, Alex; Vonk, Kelly K D; Whitelaw, Emma

    2016-01-01

    The number of reports of paternal epigenetic influences on the phenotype of offspring in rodents is increasing but the molecular events involved remain unclear. Here, we show that haploinsufficiency for the histone 3 lysine 9 methyltransferase Setdb1 in the sire can influence the coat colour phenotype of wild type offspring. This effect occurs when the allele that directly drives coat colour is inherited from the dam, inferring that the effect involves an "in trans" step. The implication of this finding is that epigenetic state of the sperm can alter the expression of genes inherited on the maternally derived chromosomes. Whole genome bisulphite sequencing revealed that Setdb1 mutant mice show DNA hypomethylation at specific classes of transposable elements in the sperm. Our results identify Setdb1 as a paternal effect gene in the mouse and suggest that epigenetic inheritance may be more likely in individuals with altered levels of epigenetic modifiers. PMID:27112447

  16. Effect of field capture on the measurement of cellular immune responses in wild ferrets (Mustela furo), vectors of bovine tuberculosis in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, M L; Swale, E; Young, G; Mackintosh, C

    1999-01-01

    Ferrets are recognised as significant wildlife vectors of bovine tuberculosis (Tb) in New Zealand. Disease management strategies, such as the development of a protective wildlife vaccine, could be assisted by the ability to measure pertinent cellular immune responses among wild animals. In the present study, we investigated whether it is possible to measure in vitro lymphocyte reactivity in wild-caught ferrets, and also determined levels of physiological stress in these animals, and we compared these responses to those observed in laboratory-maintained domesticated ferrets. Over a 12-month period, 80 ferrets were live-captured from a Tb-endemic region (Otago, southern New Zealand); cardiac blood was withdrawn on-site, and mononuclear cell cultures were successfully established from 75 of these animals. Lymphocyte transformation (LT) responses to T cell and T/B cell mitogens (Concanavalin A [Con A] and pokeweed mitogen) were measured via uridine incorporation assay. The magnitude of these responses did not differ significantly between animals that had been captured in wire-framed cage traps and those captured using soft-jawed leg-hold traps. Levels of serum cortisol and glucose (as indicators of physiological and oxidative stress, respectively) were highest in animals captured using leg-hold traps. In comparison to domesticated ferrets, wild-caught ferrets had lower overall LT responses to Con A, but significantly higher levels of serum cortisol. Finally, 10/80 animals captured from the wild were severely diseased (Tb+), as evidenced by gross tuberculous lesions at autopsy. Successful mononuclear cell cultures were established from nine of these animals; LT responses to Con A were significantly lower in Tb+ ferrets than in either wild-caught/non-diseased (Tb-) or domesticated ferrets. These results demonstrate that it is possible to measure cellular immune responses from the blood of wild-caught ferrets, but that field capture and disease status may have detrimental

  17. Effect of water on the physical properties and carbon dioxide capture capacities of liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials and their corresponding polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Petit, Camille

    2013-10-01

    Binary systems composed of liquid-like Nanoparticle Organic Hybrid Materials (NOHMs) and the secondary fluid (i.e., water) were prepared, and their thermal stabilities, densities, viscosities, and CO2 absorption capacities were investigated. Recent work has suggested NOHMs as an alternative CO2 capture media with interesting chemical and physical tunability. Anhydrous CO2 capture solvents often degrade when they are exposed to water, while flue gas generally contains about 8-16% water. Thus, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of water on the NOHMs\\' properties relevant to CO2 capture as well as the chemical and thermal stabilities of H2O-loaded NOHMs. It was found that water acted as an antisolvent of NOHMs, and therefore, caused a decreased CO2 capture capacity. On the other hand, the results indicated that while water did not affect the NOHMs\\' thermal stability, it significantly helped lowering their density and viscosity. In order to investigate the effect of intermolecular interactions among two fluids on the density and viscosity, the excess volumes and viscosity deviations were calculated and correlated with Redlich-Kister equations. The trends revealed the existence of strong intermolecular interactions between water molecules and the poly(ethlyne glycol) component of NOHMs, which may have caused the drastic decrease in the NOHMs\\' viscosity with the addition of water. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister (Hemiptera, Reduviidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Simone L

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion or death (apoptosis, necrosis responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a single heat (35 or 40°C, 1 h or cold (5 or 0°C, 1 h shock and then subjected to a second shock for 12 h at 40 or 0°C, respectively, after 8, 18, 24 and 72 h at 28°C (control temperature. As with specimen survival, sequential heat and cold shocks induced changes in frequency of the mentioned nuclear phenotypes although their patterns differed. The heat shock tolerance involved decrease in apoptosis simultaneous to increase in cell survival responses. Sequential cold shocks did not involve cell/nuclear fusion and even elicited increase in necrosis with advancing time after shocks. The temperatures of 40 and 0ºC were more effective than the temperatures of 35 and 5ºC in eliciting the heat and cold shock tolerances, respectively, as shown by cytological analysis of the nuclear phenotypes. It is concluded that different sequential thermal shocks can trigger different mechanisms of cellular protection against stress in P. megistus, favoring the insect to adapt to various ecotopes.

  19. After-Effects of the Cobalt-57-Iron-57 Electron-Capture Reaction in Hexacyanocobaltate (III) Complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Jørgen Folkvard; Siekierska, K.E.; Olsen, J.

    1973-01-01

    (CN)6 4– and a doublet, those of all the other sources result in two doublets, of which one corresponds to the ion Fe III (CN)6 3–. The extra doublet in these spectra shows that the 57Co–57Fe electron-capture reaction gives rise to the formation of a new 57Fe labelled species, tentatively identified...

  20. Field evaluation of effectiveness of the BG-Sentinel, a new trap for capturing adult Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Maciel-de-Freitas

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the development of new tools to gather field information about vector ecological parameters has increased. This report evaluated the BG-Sentinel Trap (BGS-Trap, a promising new attempt to improve collection of the dengue vector, Aedes aegypti. The efficacy of the BGS-Trap was compared with the CDC backpack aspirator, one of the commonest used methods for capturing adult mosquitoes. BGS-Traps captured significantly more Ae. aegypti males (chi2 = 21.774, df = 1, P < 0.05 and females (chi2 = 56.007, df = 1, P < 0.05 than CDC aspirator during all days of field collection. However, CDC aspirator was significantly more efficient to capture Culex quinquefasciatus males (chi2 = 5.681, df = 1, P < 0.05 and females (chi2 = 6.553, df = 1, P < 0.05. BGS-Traps captured host-seeking females (varying between 68.75 to 89.8% in detriment of females in other behavioral and physiological stages. BGS-Traps proved to be efficient and can be used for monitoring adult mosquito populations.

  1. Effects of carbon capture on the performance of an advanced coal-based integrated gasification fuel cell system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, M.; Rao, A.D.; Brouwer, J.; Samuelsen, G.S. [University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Integrated gasification fuel cell (IGFC) power plants combining gasification and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technologies are very promising for highly efficient and environmentally friendly power generation from coal. IGFC plant amenability to carbon capture for sequestration makes the technology more attractive given the increasing concern over global climate change caused by greenhouse gas emissions. With the support of the US Department of Energy and the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the Advanced Power and Energy Program has conducted a study to identify promising conceptual designs for IGFC plants. The most promising IGFC concept identified so far is a system with catalytic hydro-gasification, a pressurized (operating pressure of 10 bar) SOFC followed by a turbo-expander and a steam cycle. The design requirement for recycling de-carbonized anode exhaust back to the gasifier for hydro-gasification not only produces a synergistic integration of SOFC and gasification subsystems, but also makes carbon separation a natural result. The current analyses of this system show an efficiency of 58.4 per cent (coal higher heating value basis) while capturing 94 per cent of the CO{sub 2}. Using this system as a baseline case, this work investigates the sensitivity of IGFC system performance on the extent of carbon capture. It is shown that the proposed IGFC system can achieve ultra-high carbon capture ({gt} 99 per cent) at small system efficiency expense while reducing carbon capture to below 90 per cent actually diminishes the system efficiency because less fuel is converted in the SOFC.

  2. Cloning of the Zygosaccharomyces bailii GAS1 homologue and effect of cell wall engineering on protein secretory phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dato Laura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zygosaccharomyces bailii is a diploid budding yeast still poorly characterized, but widely recognised as tolerant to several stresses, most of which related to industrial processes of production. Because of that, it would be very interesting to develop its ability as a cell factory. Gas1p is a β-1,3-glucanosyltransglycosylase which plays an important role in cell wall construction and in determining its permeability. Cell wall defective mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, deleted in the GAS1 gene, were reported as super-secretive. The aim of this study was the cloning and deletion of the GAS1 homologue of Z. bailii and the evaluation of its deletion on recombinant protein secretion. Results The GAS1 homologue of Z. bailii was cloned by PCR, and when expressed in a S. cerevisiae GAS1 null mutant was able to restore the parental phenotype. The respective Z. bailii Δgas1 deleted strain was obtained by targeted deletion of both alleles of the ZbGAS1 gene with deletion cassettes having flanking regions of ~400 bp. The morphological and physiological characterization of the Z. bailii null mutant resulted very similar to that of the corresponding S. cerevisiae mutant. As for S. cerevisiae, in the Z. bailii Δgas1 the total amount of protein released in the medium was significantly higher. Moreover, three different heterologous proteins were expressed and secreted in said mutant. The amount of enzymatic activity found in the medium was almost doubled in the case of the Candida rugosa lipase CRL1 and of the Yarrowia lipolytica protease XPR2, while for human IL-1β secretion disruption had no relevant effect. Conclusions The data presented confirm that the engineering of the cell wall is an effective way to improve protein secretion in yeast. They also confirmed that Z. bailii is an interesting candidate, despite the knowledge of its genome and the tools for its manipulation still need to be improved. However, as

  3. Calcium-looping for post-combustion CO2 capture. On the adverse effect of sorbent regeneration under CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Carbonation/calcination tests are reported in which the sorbent is regenerated under high CO2 partial pressure. • A drastic drop of CaO conversion occurs in just a few carbonation/calcination cycles. • Recarbonation has an adverse effect. • The growth of the CaO crystal structure along reactive oriented surfaces is precluded. • The presence of H2O would counteract the adverse effect of regeneration under CO2. - Abstract: The multicyclic carbonation/calcination (c/c) of CaO solid particles at high temperature is at the basis of the recently emerged Calcium-looping (CaL) technology, which has been shown to be potentially suitable for achieving high and sustainable post-combustion CO2 capture efficiency. Despite the success of pilot plant projects at the MWth scale, a matter of concern for scaling-up the CaL technology to a commercial level (to the GWth scale) is that the CaO carbonation reactivity can be recovered only partially when the sorbent is regenerated by calcination at high temperatures (around 950 °C) as required by the CO2 high concentration in the calciner. In order to reactivate the sorbent, a novel CaL concept has been proposed wherein a recarbonator reactor operated at high temperature/high CO2 concentration leads to further carbonation of the solids before entering into the calciner for regeneration. Multicyclic thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) tests demonstrate the feasibility of recarbonation to reactivate the sorbent regenerated at high calcination temperatures yet at unrealistically low CO2 partial pressure mainly because of technical limitations concerning low heating/cooling rates. We report results from multicyclic c/c and carbonation/recarbonation/calcination (c/r/c) TGA tests at high heating/coling rates and in which the sorbent is regenerated in a dry atmosphere at high CO2 partial pressure. It is shown that at these conditions there is a drastic drop of CaO conversion to a very small residual value in just a few

  4. Irisin and FNDC5: effects of 12-week strength training, and relations to muscle phenotype and body mass composition in untrained women

    OpenAIRE

    Ellefsen, Stian; Vikmoen, Olav; Slettaløkken, Gunnar; Whist, Jon Elling; Nygård, Håvard; Hollan, Ivana; Rauk, Irene; Vegge, Geir; Strand, Tor A.; Raastad, Truls; Rønnestad, Bent

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effects of strength training on abundances of irisin-related biomarkers in skeletal muscle and blood of untrained young women, and their associations with body mass composition, muscle phenotype and levels of thyroid hormones. Methods: Eighteen untrained women performed 12 weeks of progressive whole-body heavy strength training, with measurement of strength, body composition, expression of irisin-related genes (FNDC5 and PGC1α) in two different skeletal muscles,...

  5. Effects of lunar cycle and fishing operations on longline-caught pelagic fish: fishing performance, capture time, and survival of fish

    OpenAIRE

    Poisson, Francois; Gaertner, Jean-claude; Taquet, Marc; Durbec, Jean-Pierre; Bigelow, Keith

    2010-01-01

    Commercial longline fishing data were analyzed and experiments were conducted with gear equipped with hook timers and time-depth recorders in the Reunion Island fishery (21 degrees 5'S lat., 53 degrees 28'E long.) to elucidate direct and indirect effects of the lunar cycle and other operational factors that affect catch rates, catch composition, fish behavior, capture time, and fish survival. Logbook data from 1998 through 2000, comprising 2009 sets, indicated that swordfish (Xiphias gladius)...

  6. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus

    OpenAIRE

    Susana Cid Fernández

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with target processing (N2b and P3b) and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-). An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided into three...

  7. Discriminating the Drivers of Edge Effects on Nest Predation: Forest Edges Reduce Capture Rates of Ship Rats (Rattus rattus), a Globally Invasive Nest Predator, by Altering Vegetation Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Ruffell, Jay; Didham, Raphael K; Barrett, Paul; Gorman, Nic; Pike, Rhonda; Hickey-Elliott, Andrée; Sievwright, Karin; Armstrong, Doug P.

    2014-01-01

    Forest edges can strongly affect avian nest success by altering nest predation rates, but this relationship is inconsistent and context dependent. There is a need for researchers to improve the predictability of edge effects on nest predation rates by examining the mechanisms driving their occurrence and variability. In this study, we examined how the capture rates of ship rats, an invasive nest predator responsible for avian declines globally, varied with distance from the forest edge within...

  8. Large-scale carbon capture and storage for coal-fired power: Effect on global carbon dioxide emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Torvanger, Asbjørn

    2007-01-01

    The scenarios in this report show that large-scale deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies for new coal-fired power plants from year 2015 may reduce global CO2 emissions by 8-18% by 2030 and 22-25% by 2100. These estimates are sensitive to the Business-as-Usual scenarios chosen, both for total CO2 emissions and for power production based on coal.

  9. Metabolic profiling of plant extracts using direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry allows for high-throughput phenotypic characterization according to genetic and environmental effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Flores, Martín; Juárez-Colunga, Sheila; García-Casarrubias, Adrián; Trachsel, Samuel; Winkler, Robert; Tiessen, Axel

    2015-01-28

    In comparison to the exponential increase of genotyping methods, phenotyping strategies are lagging behind in agricultural sciences. Genetic improvement depends upon the abundance of quantitative phenotypic data and the statistical partitioning of variance into environmental, genetic, and random effects. A metabolic phenotyping strategy was adapted to increase sample throughput while saving reagents, reducing cost, and simplifying data analysis. The chemical profiles of stem extracts from maize plants grown under low nitrogen (LN) or control trial (CT) were analyzed using optimized protocols for direct-injection electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DIESI-MS). Specific ions significantly decreased or increased because of environmental (LN versus CT) or genotypic effects. Biochemical profiling with DIESI-MS had a superior cost-benefit compared to other standard analytical technologies (e.g., ultraviolet, near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, high-performance liquid chromatography, and gas chromatography with flame ionization detection) routinely used for plant breeding. The method can be successfully applied in maize, strawberry, coffee, and other crop species. PMID:25588121

  10. Evaluation of Hybridization Capture Versus Amplicon-Based Methods for Whole-Exome Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samorodnitsky, Eric; Jewell, Benjamin M; Hagopian, Raffi; Miya, Jharna; Wing, Michele R; Lyon, Ezra; Damodaran, Senthilkumar; Bhatt, Darshna; Reeser, Julie W; Datta, Jharna; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2015-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing has aided characterization of genomic variation. While whole-genome sequencing may capture all possible mutations, whole-exome sequencing remains cost-effective and captures most phenotype-altering mutations. Initial strategies for exome enrichment utilized a hybridization-based capture approach. Recently, amplicon-based methods were designed to simplify preparation and utilize smaller DNA inputs. We evaluated two hybridization capture-based and two amplicon-based whole-exome sequencing approaches, utilizing both Illumina and Ion Torrent sequencers, comparing on-target alignment, uniformity, and variant calling. While the amplicon methods had higher on-target rates, the hybridization capture-based approaches demonstrated better uniformity. All methods identified many of the same single-nucleotide variants, but each amplicon-based method missed variants detected by the other three methods and reported additional variants discordant with all three other technologies. Many of these potential false positives or negatives appear to result from limited coverage, low variant frequency, vicinity to read starts/ends, or the need for platform-specific variant calling algorithms. All methods demonstrated effective copy-number variant calling when evaluated against a single-nucleotide polymorphism array. This study illustrates some differences between whole-exome sequencing approaches, highlights the need for selecting appropriate variant calling based on capture method, and will aid laboratories in selecting their preferred approach. PMID:26110913

  11. Effect of trap design, bait type, and age on captures of Drosophila suzukii (Diptera: Drosophilidae) in berry crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Lindsy E; Nyoike, Teresia W; Liburd, Oscar E

    2014-08-01

    Field experiments were conducted in commercial southern highbush blueberries and wild blackberries to evaluate the attractiveness of different trap designs, bait types, and bait age on captures of the spotted wing drosophila, Drosophila suzukii (Matsumura) (Diptera: Drosophilidae). During the 2012 trap design study, the five treatments evaluated were four 1-liter clear plastic cup traps (with and without a yellow visual stimulus or odorless dish detergent) and the fifth treatment was a Pherocon AM yellow sticky card trap. Cup traps were baited with 150 ml of apple cider vinegar (ACV) and the Pherocon AM trap had a 7.4-ml glass vial containing ACV. In 2013, the Pherocon AM yellow sticky card was omitted because of low spotted wing drosophila captures in 2012. The four treatments evaluated were four 1-liter cup traps with and without a yellow visual stimulus. One cup trap (with a yellow stimulus) was baited with yeast + sugar in place of ACV and the other cup traps were baited with ACV. In both years, there were no differences in spotted wing drosophila captures among cup traps baited with ACV with and without yellow visual stimulus. However, the cup trap baited with yeast + sugar and yellow visual stimulus captured more spotted wing drosophila than the ACV-baited cup traps irrespective of visual stimulus or detergent. In another study, four baits including 1) ACV, 2) yeast + sugar mixture, 3) yeast + flour mixture (yeast, sugar, water, whole wheat flour, and ACV), and 4) wine + vinegar mixture (rice vinegar and merlot wine) were evaluated in a commercial blueberry planting using 1-liter clear plastic cup traps (as described above). The experiment was repeated in wild blackberries but the yeast + flour bait was replaced with ACV + merlot wine + sugar. Results indicated that the two yeast baits captured significantly more spotted wing drosophila and more nontarget organisms than the vinegar baits. In the final study, although we found that the attraction of ACV and

  12. Effects of Withania somnifera and Tinospora cordifolia extracts on the side population phenotype of human epithelial cancer cells: toward targeting multidrug resistance in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliyakkal, Naseer; Appadath Beeran, Asmy; Balaji, Sai A; Udupa, Nayanabhirama; Ranganath Pai, Sreedhara; Rangarajan, Annapoorni

    2015-03-01

    Recent reports suggest the existence of a subpopulation of stem-like cancer cells, termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs), which bear functional and phenotypic resemblance with the adult, tissue-resident stem cells. Side population (SP) assay based on differential efflux of Hoechst 33342 has been effectively used for the isolation of CSCs. The drug resistance properties of SP cells are typically due to the increased expression of ABC transporters leading to drug efflux. Conventionally used chemotherapeutic drugs may often leads to an enrichment of SP, revealing their inability to target the drug-resistant SP and CSCs. Thus, identification of agents that can reduce the SP phenotype is currently in vogue in cancer therapeutics. Withania somnifera (WS) and Tinospora cordifolia (TC) have been used in Ayurveda for treating various diseases, including cancer. In the current study, we have investigated the effects of ethanolic (ET) extracts of WS and TC on the cancer SP phenotype. Interestingly, we found significant decrease in SP on treatment with TC-ET, but not with WS-ET. The SP-inhibitory TC-ET was further fractionated into petroleum ether (TC-PET), dichloromethane (TC-DCM), and n-butyl alcohol (TC-nBT) fractions using bioactivity-guided fractionation. Our data revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM, but not TC-nBT, significantly inhibited SP in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, flow cytometry-based functional assays revealed that TC-PET and TC-DCM significantly inhibited ABC-B1 and ABC-G2 transporters and sensitized cancer cells toward chemotherapeutic drug-mediated cytotoxicity. Thus, the TC-PET and TC-DCM may harbor phytochemicals with the potential to reverse the drug-resistant phenotype, thus improving the efficacy of cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25549922

  13. Correlation of the radioprotective effect of the methyl gallate on the ruptures induction in DNA and it effect in the capture of free radicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown in alive, the capacity of the methyl gallate to reduce the induced ruptures in the DNA for γ radiation. As well as to capture free radicals in a system in vitro. This suggests that the methyl gallate can be a radioprotector that acts capturing free radicals. (Author)

  14. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  15. Structural effect of the in situ generated titania on its ability to oxidize and capture the gas-phase elemental mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai Gyu; Hyun, Jung Eun

    2006-01-01

    Structural effect of the in situ generated TiO(2) sorbent particle was examined for its ability to capture elemental mercury under UV irradiation in a simulated combustion flue gas. Titania particles were prepared by thermal gas-phase oxidation of Titanium (IV) isopropoxide (TTIP) using a high temperature electric furnace reactor. The structural characteristics of the in situ generated TiO(2) at various synthesis temperatures were investigated; size distribution and the geometric mean diameter were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer, while fractal dimension and radius of gyration were evaluated from the transmission electron microscopy images. Results from the Hg(0) capture experiment show that with increasing titania synthesis temperature, the overall aggregate size increases and the morphology becomes more open-structured to gas-phase Hg(0) and UV light, resulting in the improved mercury removal capability. PMID:15949836

  16. Reply to comments on `Structure effects in the $^{15}$N($n,\\gamma$)$^{16}$N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of $^{16}$N'

    CERN Document Server

    Shubhchintak,; Chatterjee, R

    2016-01-01

    We reply to the comments (arXiv:1605.07499 [nucl-th]) on "Structure effects in the $^{15}$N($n,\\gamma$)$^{16}$N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of $^{16}$N". We have investigated the issue of "energy dependence of branching ratios" and believe that this energy dependence is due to the proper inclusion of the non-resonant continuum in the post-form reaction theory. Interestingly, this energy dependence is sensitive to the relative orbital angular momentum content of the state. We reiterate that we have attempted to resolve the discrepancy in the spectroscopic factors of low-lying $^{16}$N levels and that it is essential to know the low energy $^{15}$N($n,\\gamma$)$^{16}$N capture cross section, especially below 0.25 MeV.

  17. Effect of dolomite decomposition under CO2 on its multicycle CO2 capture behaviour under calcium looping conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Calle Martos, Antonio; Valverde, Jose Manuel; Sanchez-Jimenez, Pedro E; Perejón, Antonio; García-Garrido, Cristina; Perez-Maqueda, Luis A

    2016-06-28

    One of the major drawbacks that hinder the industrial competitiveness of the calcium looping (CaL) process for CO2 capture is the high temperature (∼930-950 °C) needed in practice to attain full calcination of limestone in a high CO2 partial pressure environment for short residence times as required. In this work, the multicycle CO2 capture performance of dolomite and limestone is analysed under realistic CaL conditions and using a reduced calcination temperature of 900 °C, which would serve to mitigate the energy penalty caused by integration of the CaL process into fossil fuel fired power plants. The results show that the fundamental mechanism of dolomite decomposition under CO2 has a major influence on its superior performance compared to limestone. The inert MgO grains resulting from dolomite decomposition help preserve a nanocrystalline CaO structure wherein carbonation in the solid-state diffusion controlled phase is promoted. The major role played by the dolomite decomposition mechanism under CO2 is clearly demonstrated by the multicycle CaO conversion behaviour observed for samples decomposed at different preheating rates. Limestone decomposition at slow heating rates yields a highly crystalline and poorly reactive CaCO3 structure that requires long periods to fully decarbonate and shows a severely reduced capture capacity in subsequent cycles. On the other hand, the nascent CaCO3 produced after dolomite half-decomposition consists of nanosized crystals with a fast decarbonation kinetics regardless of the preheating rate, thus fully decomposing from the very first cycle at a reduced calcination temperature into a CaO skeleton with enhanced reactivity as compared to limestone derived CaO. PMID:27253328

  18. Radiative electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some data are presented for radiative electron capture by fast moving ions. The radiative electron capture spectrum is shown for O8+ in Ag, along with the energy dependence of the capture cross-section. A discrepancy between earlier data, theoretical prediction, and the present data is pointed out. (3 figs) (U.S.)

  19. Effect of the porous structure in carbon materials for CO2 capture at atmospheric and high-pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Casco, Mirian Elizabeth; Martínez Escandell, Manuel; Silvestre Albero, Joaquín; Rodríguez Reinoso, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Activated carbons prepared from petroleum pitch and using KOH as activating agent exhibit an excellent behavior in CO2 capture both at atmospheric (∼168 mg CO2/g at 298 K) and high pressure (∼1500 mg CO2/g at 298 K and 4.5 MPa). However, an exhaustive evaluation of the adsorption process shows that the optimum carbon structure, in terms of adsorption capacity, depends on the final application. Whereas narrow micropores (pores below 0.6 nm) govern the sorption behavior at 0.1 MPa, large microp...

  20. Calculating the mean time to capture for tethered ligands and its effect on the chemical equilibrium of bound ligand pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lu; Decker, Caitlin G; Maynard, Heather D; Levine, Alex J

    2016-09-01

    We present here the calculation of the mean time to capture of a tethered ligand to the receptor. This calculation is then used to determine the shift in the partitioning between (1) free, (2) singly bound, and (3) doubly bound ligands in chemical equilibrium as a function of the length of the tether. These calculations are used in the research article Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 Dimer with Superagonist in vitro Activity Improves Granulation Tissue Formation During Wound Healing (Decker et al., in press [1]) to explain quantitatively how changes in polymeric linker length in the ligand dimers modifies the efficacy of these molecules relative to that of free ligands. PMID:27408925

  1. Effect of breast cancer phenotype on diagnostic performance of MRI in the prediction to response to neoadjuvant treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufi, Enida, E-mail: reagandus@alice.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Belli, Paolo; Di Matteo, Marialuisa [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Terribile, Daniela; Franceschini, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Breast Unit, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Nardone, Luigia [Department of Radiotherapy, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Petrone, Gianluigi [Department of Pathology, Catholic University, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University, Rome (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    Aim: The estimation of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is useful in the surgical decision in breast cancer. We addressed the diagnostic reliability of conventional MRI, of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and of a merged criterion coupling morphological MRI and DWI. Diagnostic performance was analysed separately in different tumor subtypes, including HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)/HR+ (hormone receptor) (hybrid phenotype). Materials and methods: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients underwent MRI before and after NAC. The response to treatment was defined according to the RECIST classification and the evaluation of DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The complete pathological response – pCR was assessed (Mandard classification). Results: Tumor phenotypes were Luminal (63.6%), Triple Negative (16.4%), HER2+ (7.6%) or Hybrid (12.4%). After NAC, pCR was observed in 17.3% of cases. Average ADC was statistically higher after NAC (p < 0.001) among patients showing pCR vs. those who had not pCR. The RECIST classification showed adequate performance in predicting the pCR in Triple Negative (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, ROC AUC = 0.9) and in the HER2+ subgroup (AUC = 0.826). Lower performance was found in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC 0.693 and 0.611, respectively), where the ADC criterion yielded an improved performance (AUC = 0.787 and 0.722). The coupling of morphological and DWI criteria yielded maximally improved performance in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC = 0.797 and 0.761). Conclusion: The diagnostic reliability of MRI in predicting the pCR to NAC depends on the tumor phenotype, particularly in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups. In these cases, the coupling of morphological MRI evaluation and DWI assessment may facilitate the diagnosis.

  2. Effect of breast cancer phenotype on diagnostic performance of MRI in the prediction to response to neoadjuvant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The estimation of response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is useful in the surgical decision in breast cancer. We addressed the diagnostic reliability of conventional MRI, of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) and of a merged criterion coupling morphological MRI and DWI. Diagnostic performance was analysed separately in different tumor subtypes, including HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2)/HR+ (hormone receptor) (hybrid phenotype). Materials and methods: Two-hundred and twenty-five patients underwent MRI before and after NAC. The response to treatment was defined according to the RECIST classification and the evaluation of DWI with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). The complete pathological response – pCR was assessed (Mandard classification). Results: Tumor phenotypes were Luminal (63.6%), Triple Negative (16.4%), HER2+ (7.6%) or Hybrid (12.4%). After NAC, pCR was observed in 17.3% of cases. Average ADC was statistically higher after NAC (p < 0.001) among patients showing pCR vs. those who had not pCR. The RECIST classification showed adequate performance in predicting the pCR in Triple Negative (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, ROC AUC = 0.9) and in the HER2+ subgroup (AUC = 0.826). Lower performance was found in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC 0.693 and 0.611, respectively), where the ADC criterion yielded an improved performance (AUC = 0.787 and 0.722). The coupling of morphological and DWI criteria yielded maximally improved performance in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups (AUC = 0.797 and 0.761). Conclusion: The diagnostic reliability of MRI in predicting the pCR to NAC depends on the tumor phenotype, particularly in the Luminal and Hybrid subgroups. In these cases, the coupling of morphological MRI evaluation and DWI assessment may facilitate the diagnosis

  3. The Novelty-Seeking Phenotype Modulates the Long-Lasting Effects of Intermittent Ethanol Administration during Adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Montagud-Romero, Sandra; Daza-Losada, Manuel; Vidal-Infer, Antonio; Maldonado, Concepción; Aguilar, María A.; Miñarro, Jose; Rodríguez-Arias, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate if a novelty-seeking phenotype mediates the long-lasting consequences of intermittent EtOH intoxication during adolescence. The hole board test was employed to classify adolescent mice as High- or Low-Novelty Seekers. Subsequently, animals were administered ethanol (1.25 or 2.5 g/kg) on two consecutive days at 48-h intervals over a 14-day period. Anxiety levels - measured using the elevated plus maze- spontaneous motor activity and social intera...

  4. Capturing the Daylight Dividend

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Boyce; Claudia Hunter; Owen Howlett

    2006-04-30

    Capturing the Daylight Dividend conducted activities to build market demand for daylight as a means of improving indoor environmental quality, overcoming technological barriers to effective daylighting, and informing and assisting state and regional market transformation and resource acquisition program implementation efforts. The program clarified the benefits of daylight by examining whole building systems energy interactions between windows, lighting, heating, and air conditioning in daylit buildings, and daylighting's effect on the human circadian system and productivity. The project undertook work to advance photosensors, dimming systems, and ballasts, and provided technical training in specifying and operating daylighting controls in buildings. Future daylighting work is recommended in metric development, technology development, testing, training, education, and outreach.

  5. Effect of total pressure on sulfur capture of Ca-ion exchanged coal; Kaatsu jokenka ni okeru Ca-tanjitan no datsuryu koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, S.; Benjamin, G.; Abe, H.; Harano, A.; Takarada, T. [Gunma University, Gunma (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-28

    In relation to coal gasification and combustion under high pressure as highly efficient coal utilization, the effect of total pressure and sintering on the SO2 capture ability of Ca-ion exchanged coal and other desulfurizing agents were studied. In experiment, specimens were filled into a small pressurized reactor to heat them under high-pressure N2 atmosphere. After the completion of combustion reaction of char at 850{degree}C, SO2, CO2 and CO gases were measured at an outlet while flowing SO2/N2. As the experimental result, all of the S content in Ca-ion exchanged coal was not absorbed by Ca content in coal during pyrolysis and combustion, resulting in discharge of 36% of the S content. Since Ca-ion exchanged coal is fast in combustion reaction, most of the S content was desulfurized by coal ash. The ash content yielded from Ca-ion exchanged coal was more excellent in SO2 capture ability than limestone even under higher pressure. In the case of CO2 partial pressure lower than equilibrium CO2 pressure for CaCO3 decomposition, the capture ability decreased with an increase in total pressure, while in higher CO2 partial pressure, it was improved. 1 ref., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Monte Carlo assessment of soil moisture effect on high-energy thermal neutron capture gamma-ray by {sup 14}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Physics Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: paziran@ut.ac.ir; Azizi, Maryam [Physics Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhad Masoudi, S. [Physics Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-01-01

    Among many conventional techniques, nuclear techniques have shown to be faster, more reliable, and more effective in detecting explosives. In the present work, neutrons from a 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source being in water tank are captured by elements of soil and landmine (TNT), namely {sup 14}N, H, C, and O. The prompt capture gamma-ray spectrum taken by a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector indicates the characteristic photo peaks of the elements in soil and landmine. In the high-energy region of the gamma-ray spectrum, besides 10.829 MeV of {sup 15}N, single escape (SE) and double escape (DE) peaks are unmistakable photo peaks, which make the detection of concealed explosive possible. The soil has the property of moderating neutrons as well as diffusing the thermal neutron flux. Among many elements in soil, silicon is more abundant and {sup 29}Si emits 10.607 MeV prompt capture gamma-ray, which makes 10.829 MeV detection difficult. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to adjust source-target-detector distances and soil moisture content to yield the best result. Therefore, we applied MCNP4C for configuration very close to reality of a hidden landmine in soil.

  7. Capture Their Attention: Capturing Lessons Using Screen Capture Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumheller, Kristina; Lawler, Gregg

    2011-01-01

    When students miss classes for university activities such as athletic and academic events, they inevitably miss important class material. Students can get notes from their peers or visit professors to find out what they missed, but when students miss new and challenging material these steps are sometimes not enough. Screen capture and recording…

  8. The use of an in situ portable flume to examine the effect of flow properties on the capture probability of juvenile Atlantic salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M. L.; Roy, A. G.; Grant, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    For stream fish, flow properties have been shown to influence energy expenses and habitat selection. Furthermore, flow properties directly influence the velocity of drifting prey items, therefore influencing the probability of fish at catch prey. Flow properties might also have an effect on prey trajectories that can become more unpredictable with increased turbulence. In this study, we combined field and experimental approaches to examine the foraging behaviour and position choice of juvenile Atlantic salmon in various flow conditions. We used an in situ portable flume, which consists in a transparent enclosure (observation section) equipped with hinged doors upstream allowing to funnel the water inside and modify flow properties. Portable flumes have been developed and used to simulate benthic invertebrate drift and sediment transport, but have not been previously been used to examine fish behaviour. Specifically, we tested the predictions that 1) capture probability declined with turbulence, 2) the number of attacks and the proportion of time spent on the substrate decreased with turbulence and 3) parr will preferably selected focal positions with lower turbulence than random locations across the observation section. The portable flume allowed creating four flow treatments on a gradient of mean downstream velocity and turbulence. Fish were fed with brine shrimps and filmed through translucent panels using a submerged camera. Twenty-three juvenile salmon were captured and submitted to each flow treatment for 20 minutes feeding trials. Our results showed high inter-individual variability in the foraging success and time budget within each flow treatment associated to levels of velocity and turbulence. However, the average prey capture probability for the two lower velocity treatments was higher than that for the two higher velocity treatments. An inverse relationship between flow velocity and prey capture probability was observed and might have resulted from a

  9. Single electron capture cross sections for protons colliding with neon and methane targets: effects of the initial vibrational state of CH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Hernández, L.; Hernández, E. M.; Hinojosa, G.

    2016-02-01

    The process of neutralization of ions induced by collisions is crucial to understanding the chemical evolution of interstellar gas. However, the role of the initial vibrational state of the target molecule is not completely understood. In this work, we carry out a combined experimental and theoretical study of the vibrational target effects on the single electron charge exchange cross sections for protons colliding with CH4 in the keV energy region. We complement our study by analyzing the single electron capture from the iso-electronic neon atom to discern similarities and differences. For our experimental study, we use the growth-rate method for the determination of the single electron capture cross section on both systems. For the theoretical study, we use an electron-nuclear dynamics approach for the time evolution of the system wave function to find out the final projectile charge state. We report charge exchange probabilities and cross sections for H+ projectiles when colliding on both targets. We find that these ten-electron systems would have an asymptotically similar charge exchange cross section at high collision energies and would differentiate in the intermediate to low collision energies due to the energetics of the valence electrons and initial vibrational state. In the case of the protons colliding with CH4, we find that it is easier to capture an electron from a CH4 target than from the Ne. Furthermore, we find that low vibrational states have a higher contribution to the electron capture cross section as the collision energy is reduced. We stress the importance of taking into account the initial bending and stretching vibrational modes in the study of the electron capture process. For the neon target, the high ionization potential of the valence electrons produces a smaller charge exchange cross section for low proton collision energies when compared to the CH4 target. We report good comparison to available experimental data. We expect our findings

  10. Capture reactions at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some few body capture reaction studies at low energies are reviewed. The emphasis is on the use of polarized beams. New calculations of n+d and p+d capture had just recently been completed by the Los Alamos group (Friar, Gibson, and Payne). Their results are in good agreement with existing data, and emphasize the importance of meson exchange current effects in these processes at thermal energies. The effects of M1 radiation can be seen in the vector analyzing power of the p+d radiative capture reaction from its interference with E1 radiation. The vector analyzing powers of the rvec p+T → 4He + γ reaction can be used to search for M1 radiation in 4He. Low energy data show a substantial b1 coefficient which can only be accounted for with a substantial M1 contribution. The author is also working on studying the rvec d+T and rvec d+3He capture reactions in the region of the fusion resonance. His (published) rvec d+T capture data indicate that the reaction goes via ∼95% S = 3/2, E1 capture with small S = 1/2, E1 and small M1 admixtures. In the course of obtaining the d+T and d+3He data, he realized that he could use his spectra to obtain the ground state widths of 5He and 5Li. Finally, he will discuss the d+d reaction at very low energies. The simplest picture of this reaction dominated by S wave capture to the D-state below 1 MeV

  11. Scale-Up Effects of CO2 Capture by Methyldiethanolamine (MDEA Solutions in Terms of Loading Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, results from three different CO2 capture experimental scales (laboratory, pilot unit, and a larger pilot unit, using aqueous amine solutions of methyldiethanolamine (MDEA 20 wt %, are compared in terms of loading capacity. All three tested scales produced results regarding CO2 absorption using MDEA aqueous solutions, which were largely in accordance with the theoretical loading capacity of the used amine. Nevertheless, the observed differences between the theoretical and actual absorption behaviors of MDEA solutions for the different scales can be justified with the relative weight that process variables exhibit when the process is scaled up. Therefore, in order to achieve a correct scale-up of the process, simulations should be performed in order to define the best set of operational parameters in order to achieve high production yields and therefore more process profitability.

  12. Angular distribution effect on the integrated cross section for radiative capture of 14 MeV neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Cvelbar, F; Vidmar, T

    1999-01-01

    In the past, many reported integrated cross sections for the 14 MeV neutron radiative capture were measured at 90 deg. relative to the neutron beam direction and multiplied by 4 pi, so as to obtain a measure of the angle-integrated cross sections. In such a procedure, an isotropic angular distribution of gamma-rays is assumed. We calculated this distribution using the consistent direct-semi-direct model, in which the need for the model-free parameters has been eliminated. The result is that the a sub 1 Legendre polynomial, averaged over the bound state transitions, is practically zero (distribution is forward-backward symmetric) and that the a sub 2 coefficient is a smooth function of the mass number with the values between -0.4 and -0.6, indicating anisotropy of the distribution. Reported integrated cross sections are therefore for about 20% to 30% too high relative to the properly angle integrated cross sections.

  13. After-effects of electron capture of 57Co in frozen aqueous solutions of 57CoCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moessbauer spectra of 57Co in dilute frozen aqueous solutions of 57CoCl2 and in 0.11 at.% frozen aqueous solutions of CoCl2 with and without glass former have been studied. The spectra reveal the presence of a small fraction of Fe3+ ions besides the Fe2+ as a consequence of the Auger cascade following the electron capture. The addition of glycerol to the 57CoCl2 solution resulted in decreasing the fraction of Fe3+. The quadrupole splitting of the ferrous ions was found to be less by 13% than that of the Fe(H2O)62+ complex as measured in absorption geometry. This is suggested as being the consequence of the autoradiolysis of water molecules resulting in a metastable state of the complex. (orig.)

  14. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT TRAPS ON CAPTURES OF ADULT CORN ROOTWORM BEETLES (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte IN EAST SLAVONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Ivezić

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1995 the corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte was detected for the first time in east Slavonia, Croatia. Its expansion to the west part has been very fast and from year to year populations of the pest are higher, especially when corn is planted after corn. The aim of this investigation was to find the best trap for monitoring Diabrotica. The studies were conducted by using three types of traps: the USA Trece lure trap, Multigard yellow sticky trap and Hungarian pheromone trap. The treatments were replicated four times in a maize field located in the east of Croatia, very near to the Yugoslavia border. The traps were placed in the field on the 23rd of June and the experiment continued until the 15th of September. Pheromone and Multigard sticky traps were replaced with new ones each month. Traps were positioned 60 m apart within a row and 70 m apart across maize rows. Silking occurred from 30 June to 8 August (exposed silk thoroughly brown and dry. This year was extremely dry, and the first beetles were noticed on the 15th of June. It was 20 days earlier than in 1999. Adult rootworm beetles were removed from the traps once weekly. Pheromone traps captured the most beetles (2263, Multigard sticky traps caught the second most (214 and lure traps the fewest (182 for the whole period. After the replacement of pheromone and Multigard traps, the capture of beetles increased. Of the total number of beetles caught, 85.10% was caught by the pheromone traps, 8.05% by the Multigard sticky traps and 6.85% by the lure traps. Due to this year’s dryness (50% less rainfall than the 20 year average, the investigation should be continued in the future to get more precise results.

  15. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Soloveva

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the biology of selected cellular models. After reverse-transfection of microRNAs and siRNA, the cellular phenotype generated by microRNAs regulated NF-κB expression comparably to the siRNA. The ability to print microRNA molecules for reverse transfection into cells is opening up the wide horizon for the phenotypic high content screening of microRNA libraries using cellular disease models.

  16. Robust automated knowledge capture.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens-Adams, Susan Marie; Abbott, Robert G.; Forsythe, James Chris; Trumbo, Michael Christopher Stefan; Haass, Michael Joseph; Hendrickson, Stacey M. Langfitt

    2011-10-01

    This report summarizes research conducted through the Sandia National Laboratories Robust Automated Knowledge Capture Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The objective of this project was to advance scientific understanding of the influence of individual cognitive attributes on decision making. The project has developed a quantitative model known as RumRunner that has proven effective in predicting the propensity of an individual to shift strategies on the basis of task and experience related parameters. Three separate studies are described which have validated the basic RumRunner model. This work provides a basis for better understanding human decision making in high consequent national security applications, and in particular, the individual characteristics that underlie adaptive thinking.

  17. Modulatory effect of BclI GR gene polymorphisms on the obesity phenotype in Brazilian patients with Cushing's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo P.P. Moreira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Patients with Cushing's disease exhibit wide phenotypic variability in the severity of obesity, diabetes and hypertension. In the general population, several glucocorticoid receptor genes (NR3C1 and HSD11B1 polymorphisms are associated with altered glucocorticoid sensitivity and/or metabolism, resulting in an increased or reduced risk of an adverse metabolic profile. Our aim was to analyze the association of NR3C1 and HSD11B1 gene variants with the severity of some clinical and hormonal features of Cushing's disease. METHODS: Sixty-four patients presenting with Cushing's disease were diagnosed based on adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels, high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests and/or inferior petrosal sinus sampling and magnetic resonance imaging. The A3669G, ER22/23EK, N363S BclI-NR3C1 and HSD11B1-rs12086634 variants were screened. RESULTS: The BclI, HSD11B1-rs12086634 and A3669G variants were found in 36%, 19.5% and 14% of alleles, respectively. The N363S and ER22/23EK polymorphisms were identified in heterozygosis once in only two patients (1.5% of alleles. There were no differences in the weight gain or prevalence of diabetes and hypertension in the patients carrying the abovementioned alleles compared to the wild-type carriers. Interestingly, the mean body mass index (BMI of the BclI carriers was significantly higher than the non-carriers (34.4±7 kg/m2 vs. 29.6±4.7 kg/m2, respectively. None of the polymorphisms were associated with the basal adrenocorticotrophic hormone, FU levels or F level after dexamethasone suppression testing. CONCLUSION: Although Cushing's disease results from increased glucocorticoid secretion, we observed that interindividual variability in the peripheral glucocorticoid sensitivity, mediated by the glucocorticoid receptor, could modulate the obesity phenotype.

  18. In vitro radiobiological evaluation of selective killing effects of 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine.HCl in the thermal neutron capture therapy of malignant melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify the specific affinity of 10B1-p-boronophenylalanine.HCl (10B1-BPA) to melanoma cells, the killing effects of 10B1-BPA in the thermal neutron capture treatment on both cultured melanotic and amelanotic melanoma cells were compared with those on non-melanoma cells, such as Alexander cells, HeLa cells and normal human fibroblasts. Cells in the plateau phase cultured in the usual medium for 4-7 days were incubated with the medium containing 50 μg/ml 10B1-BPA for 20 hours until 2 hours before thermal neutron irradiation. After thermal neutron irradiation, the number of colonies consisting of more than 50 cells was counted to obtain the dose-survival curves. The melanotic cells pre-incubated with 10B1-BPA had more enhanced killing sensitivity to thermal neutron irradiation than amelanotic melanoma cells pre-incubated similarly with 10B1-BPA. 10B1-BPA pre-incubation had no enhanced killing effects on Alexander cells, but had slightly enhanced killing effects on HeLa cells. These results indicate that 10B1-BPA could be incorporated by a specific uptake mechanism of melanoma cells and accumulated within melanotic melanoma cells and that 10B1-BPA at present could be the best chemical for the thermal neutron capture therapy of human malignant melanoma. (Namekawa, K.)

  19. Neutron Capture Nucleosynthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kiss, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements (beyond iron) are formed in neutron capture nucleosynthesis processes. We have proposed a simple unified model to investigate the neutron capture nucleosynthesis in arbitrary neutron density environment. We have also investigated what neutron density is required to reproduce the measured abundance of nuclei assuming equilibrium processes. We found both of these that the medium neutron density has a particularly important role at neutron capture nucleosynthesis. About these resu...

  20. Forest Filter Effect: Role of leaves in capturing/releasing air particulate matter and its associated PAHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, Elisa; Wild, Edward; Zacchello, Gabriele; Cerabolini, Bruno E. L.; Jones, Kevin C.; Di Guardo, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Plants play a key role in removing particulate matter and their associated Semi-volatile Organic Compounds (SVOCs) from the atmosphere. Understanding the processes involved in particle capture by vegetation is essential to understand the interactions between SVOCs, particles and plants. In the present study Two Photon Excitation Microscopy (TPEM) was used to visualise particle matter uptake and encapsulation, together with its distribution on leaf/needle surface of different broadleaf (cornel and maple) and conifer species (stone pine). Phenanthrene accumulation, the number of particles associated with this compound and its migration from particles into the leaf cuticle was also identified and quantified. Species-specific deposition velocities were estimated to model temporal PM10 leaf/needle accumulation and to investigate the role of Planet Boundary Layer (PBL) height variation in influencing PM10 flux to plants. Particles at the leaf/needle surface were visualised to range in size from 0.2 to 70.4 μm, but cuticular encapsulation was negligible for particles larger than 10.6 μm, which were removed by a washing procedure. Phenanthrene concentration varied between ≈5 and ≈10 ng g-1 dw according to plant species and between ≈10 and ≈200 ng g-1 dw depending on needle age; this compound was visualized to migrate from particles into the adjacent leaf cuticle. Species-specific deposition velocity range between 0.57 and 1.28 m h-1 and preliminary simulations showed that the diel variability of PBL structure influenced the temporal PM10 flux and leaf/needle concentration, e.g. during daytime hours characterized by high PBL height, PM10 accumulated on cornel leaves was about 65% lower than the amount accumulated during night time. The capability of vegetation to capture particles from the atmosphere, retain, encapsulate them into the cuticle and release them to soil and/or lower biomass, highlighted the value of vegetation in removing pollutants from the

  1. Neutron Capture Nucleosynthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Kiss, Miklos

    2016-01-01

    Heavy elements (beyond iron) are formed in neutron capture nucleosynthesis processes. We have proposed a simple unified model to investigate the neutron capture nucleosynthesis in arbitrary neutron density environment. We have also investigated what neutron density is required to reproduce the measured abundance of nuclei assuming equilibrium processes. We found both of these that the medium neutron density has a particularly important role at neutron capture nucleosynthesis. About these results most of the nuclei can formed at medium neutron capture density environment e.g. in some kind of AGB stars. Besides these observations our model is capable to use educational purpose.

  2. Effect of communicating genetic and phenotypic risk for type 2 diabetes in combination with lifestyle advice on objectively measured physical activity: protocol of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godino Job G

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Type 2 diabetes (T2D is associated with increased risk of morbidity and premature mortality. Among those at high risk, incidence can be halved through healthy changes in behaviour. Information about genetic and phenotypic risk of T2D is now widely available. Whether such information motivates behaviour change is unknown. We aim to assess the effects of communicating genetic and phenotypic risk of T2D on risk-reducing health behaviours, anxiety, and other cognitive and emotional theory-based antecedents of behaviour change. Methods In a parallel group, open randomised controlled trial, approximately 580 adults born between 1950 and 1975 will be recruited from the on-going population-based, observational Fenland Study (Cambridgeshire, UK. Eligible participants will have undergone clinical, anthropometric, and psychosocial measurements, been genotyped for 23 single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with T2D, and worn a combined heart rate monitor and accelerometer (Actiheart® continuously for six days and nights to assess physical activity. Participants are randomised to receive either standard lifestyle advice alone (control group, or in combination with a genetic or a phenotypic risk estimate for T2D (intervention groups. The primary outcome is objectively measured physical activity. Secondary outcomes include self-reported diet, self-reported weight, intention to be physically active and to engage in a healthy diet, anxiety, diabetes-related worry, self-rated health, and other cognitive and emotional outcomes. Follow-up occurs eight weeks post-intervention. Values at follow-up, adjusted for baseline, will be compared between randomised groups. Discussion This study will provide much needed evidence on the effects of providing information about the genetic and phenotypic risk of T2D. Importantly, it will be among the first to examine the impact of genetic risk information using a randomised controlled trial design, a

  3. Studies on biological effects of ion beams on lethality, molecular nature of mutation, mutation rate, and spectrum of mutation phenotype for mutation breeding in higher plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, heavy ions or ion beams have been used to generate new mutants or varieties, especially in higher plants. It has been found that ion beams show high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of growth inhibition, lethality, and so on, but the characteristics of ion beams on mutation have not been clearly elucidated. To understand the effect of ion beams on mutation induction, mutation rates were investigated using visible known Arabidopsis mutant phenotypes, indicating that mutation frequencies induced by carbon ions were 20-fold higher than by electrons. In chrysanthemum and carnation, flower-color and flower-form mutants, which are hardly produced by gamma rays or X rays, were induced by ion beams. Novel mutants and their responsible genes, such as UV-B resistant, serrated petals and sepals, anthocyaninless, etc. were induced by ion beams. These results indicated that the characteristics of ion beams for mutation induction are high mutation frequency and broad mutation spectrum and therefore, efficient induction of novel mutants. On the other hand, PCR and sequencing analyses showed that half of all mutants induced by ion beams possessed large DNA alterations, while the rest had point-like mutations. Both mutations induced by ion beams had a common feature that deletion of several bases were predominantly induced. It is plausible that ion beams induce a limited amount of large and irreparable DNA damage, resulting in production of a null mutation that shows a new mutant phenotype. (author)

  4. Understanding the effect of side groups in ionic liquids on carbon-capture properties: a combined experimental and theoretical effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Fangyong [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engingeering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division; Lartey, Michael [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Damodaran, Krishnan [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Albenze, Erik [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); URS Corporation, South Park, PA (United States); Thompson, Robert L. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); URS Corporation, South Park, PA (United States); Kim, Jihan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science Div.; Harancyzk, Maciel [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Computational Research Div.; Nulwala, Hunaid B. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Luebke, David R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Smit, Berend [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engingeering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Sciences Division

    2013-01-01

    Ionic liquids are an emerging class of materials with applications in a variety of fields. Steady progress has been made in the creation of ionic liquids tailored to specific applications. However, the understanding of the underlying structure–property relationships has been slower to develop. As a step in the effort to alleviate this deficiency, the influence of side groups on ionic liquid properties has been studied through an integrated approach utilizing synthesis, experimental determination of properties, and simulation techniques. To achieve this goal, a classical force field in the framework of OPLS/Amber force fields has been developed to predict ionic liquid properties accurately. Cu(I)-catalyzed click chemistry was employed to synthesize triazolium-based ionic liquids with diverse side groups. Values of densities were predicted within 3% of experimental values, whereas self-diffusion coefficients were underestimated by about an order of magnitude though the trends were in excellent agreement, the activation energy calculated in simulation correlates well with experimental values. The predicted Henry coefficient for CO{sub 2} solubility reproduced the experimentally observed trends. This study highlights the importance of integrating experimental and computational approaches in property prediction and materials development, which is not only useful in the development of ionic liquids for CO{sub 2} capture but has application in many technological fields.

  5. Fine-grained adaptive divergence in an amphibian: genetic basis of phenotypic divergence and the role of nonrandom gene flow in restricting effective migration among wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter-Boix, Alex; Quintela, María; Kierczak, Marcin; Franch, Marc; Laurila, Anssi

    2013-03-01

    Adaptive ecological differentiation among sympatric populations is promoted by environmental heterogeneity, strong local selection and restricted gene flow. High gene flow, on the other hand, is expected to homogenize genetic variation among populations and therefore prevent local adaptation. Understanding how local adaptation can persist at the spatial scale at which gene flow occurs has remained an elusive goal, especially for wild vertebrate populations. Here, we explore the roles of natural selection and nonrandom gene flow (isolation by breeding time and habitat choice) in restricting effective migration among local populations and promoting generalized genetic barriers to neutral gene flow. We examined these processes in a network of 17 breeding ponds of the moor frog Rana arvalis, by combining environmental field data, a common garden experiment and data on variation in neutral microsatellite loci and in a thyroid hormone receptor (TRβ) gene putatively under selection. We illustrate the connection between genotype, phenotype and habitat variation and demonstrate that the strong differences in larval life history traits observed in the common garden experiment can result from adaptation to local pond characteristics. Remarkably, we found that haplotype variation in the TRβ gene contributes to variation in larval development time and growth rate, indicating that polymorphism in the TRβ gene is linked with the phenotypic variation among the environments. Genetic distance in neutral markers was correlated with differences in breeding time and environmental differences among the ponds, but not with geographical distance. These results demonstrate that while our study area did not exceed the scale of gene flow, ecological barriers constrained gene flow among contrasting habitats. Our results highlight the roles of strong selection and nonrandom gene flow created by phenological variation and, possibly, habitat preferences, which together maintain genetic and

  6. Phenotype characterization of embryoid body structures generated by a crystal comet effect tail in an intercellular cancer collision scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz JA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Jairo A Diaz, Mauricio F MurilloDepartment of Pathology, Hospital Departmental Villavicencio, Hospital Departmental Granada, Medicine School, University Cooperative of Colombia, Villavicencio, Meta, ColombiaAbstract: Cancer is, by definition, the uncontrolled growth of autonomous cells that eventually destroy adjacent tissues and generate architectural disorder. However, this concept cannot be totally true. In three well documented studies, we have demonstrated that cancer tissues produce order zones that evolve over time and generate embryoid body structures in a space-time interval. The authors decided to revise the macroscopic and microscopic material in well-developed malignant tumors in which embryoid bodies were identified to determine the phenotype characterization that serves as a guideline for easy recognition. The factors responsible for this morphogenesis are physical, bioelectric, and magnetic susceptibilities produced by crystals that act as molecular designers for the topographic gradients that guide the surrounding silhouette and establish tissue head-tail positional identities. The structures are located in amniotic-like cavities and show characteristic somite-like embryologic segmentation. Immunophenotypic study has demonstrated exclusion factor positional identity in relation to enolase-immunopositive expression of embryoid body and human chorionic gonadotropin immunopositivity exclusion factor expression in the surrounding tissues. The significance of these observations is that they can also be predicted by experimental image data collected by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in which two-beam subatomic collision particles in the resulting debris show hyperorder domains similar to those identified by us in intercellular cancer collisions. Our findings suggest that we are dealing with true reverse biologic system information in an activated collective cancer stem cell

  7. Recent capture cross-sections validation on 232Th from 0,1 eV to 40 keV and self-shielding effect evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on ADS, related new fuels and their ability for nuclear waste incineration leads to a revival of interest in nuclear cross-sections of many nuclides in a large energy range. Discrepancies observed between nuclear databases require new measurements in several cases. A complete measurement of such cross-sections including resonance resolution consists in an extensive beam time experiment associated to a long analysis. With a slowing down spectrometer associated to a pulsed neutron source, it is possible to determine a good cross-section profile in an energy range from 0.1 eV to 40 keV by making use of a slowing-down time lead spectrometer associated to a pulsed neutron source. These measurements performed at ISN (Grenoble) with the neutron source GENEPI requires only small quantities of matter (as small as 0.1 g) and about one day of beam by target. We present cross-section profile measurements and an experimental study of the self-shielding effect. A CeF3 scintillator coupled with a photomultiplier detects gamma rays from neutronic capture in the studied target. The neutron flux is also measured with a 233U fission detector and a 3He detector at symmetrical position to the PM in relation to the neutron source. Absolute flux values are given by activation of Au and W foils. The cross-section profiles can then be deduced from the target capture rate and are compared with very detailed MCNP simulations, which reproduce the experimental set-up and provide also capture rates and flux. The method is then applied to 232Th, of main interest for new fuel cycle studies, and is complementary to higher energy measurements made by D. Karamanis et al. (CENBG). Results obtained for three target thicknesses will be compared with simulations based on different data bases. Special attention will be paid to the region of unresolved resonances (>100 eV). (author)

  8. Carbon Capture and Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benson, S.M.; Bennaceur, K.; Cook, P.; Davison, J.; Coninck, H. de; Farhat, K.; Ramirez, C.A.; Simbeck, D.; Surles, T.; Verma, P.; Wright, I.

    2012-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide, the most important long-lived anthropogenic greenhouse gas, can be reduced by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS). CCS involves the integration of four elements: CO 2 capture, compression of the CO2 from a gas to a liquid or a denser gas, transportation of pressurized CO 2

  9. CAPTURED India Country Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O'Donoghue, R.; Brouwers, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides the findings of the India Country Evaluation and is produced as part of the overall CAPTURED End Evaluation. After five years of support by the CAPTURED project the End Evaluation has assessed that results are commendable. I-AIM was able to design an approach in which health fol

  10. Effects of diet quality on phenotypic flexibility of organ size and digestive function in Mongolian gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quan-Sheng; Wang, De-Hua

    2007-07-01

    In the context of evolution and ecology, there is a trade-off between the benefits of processing food through a digestive system with specific phenotypic attributes and the cost of maintaining and carrying the digestive system. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that digestive modulations at several levels can match each other to meet the energy and nutrient demands of Mongolian gerbils, a small granivorous rodent species, by acclimating them to a high-quality diet diluted with alfalfa powder. Mongolian gerbils on the diluted diet maintained metabolizable energy intake by an integrated processing response (IPR), which included increases in dry matter intake, gut capacity and rate of digesta passage after 2-weeks of acclimation. Down-regulation of hydrolytic enzyme activity in the intestinal brush-border membrane supported the adaptive modulation hypothesis. The absence of up-modulation of summed enzyme hydrolytic capacity on the diluted diet indicated that greater mass of small intestine on a high-fibre diet is not a direct indicator of digestive or absorptive capacity. Changes in mass of vital organs and carcass suggested that the amount of energy allocated to various organs and hence physiological functions was regulated in response to diet shift. PMID:17333208

  11. Direct thermal neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the direct-capture theory pertaining to primary electric dipole (E1) transitions following slow-neutron capture. For light nuclides that we have studied (including 9Be, 12C, 13C, 24Mg, 25Mg, 26Mg, 32S, 33S, 34S, 40Ca, and 44Ca), estimates of direct-capture cross sections using optical-model potentials with physically realistic parameters, are in reasonable agreement with the data. Minor disagreements that exist are consistent with extrapolations to light nuclides of generally accepted formulations of compound-nucleus capture. We also discuss the channel-capture approximation which is, in general, a good representation of these cross sections in heavier nuclei particularly if the scattering lengths are not different from the corresponding potential radii. We also draw attention to cases where the use of this formula leads to inaccurate predictions. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tab

  12. Muon capture in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture I will mainly speak about the recent results obtained by the Saclay-CERN-Bologna (SCB) collaboration on the muon capture rate at rest in liquid hydrogen.In the first talk I shall first briefly remind the theoretical description of the capture process, then describe the experimental difficulties and procedures and finally present the results obtained. In the second talk I shall compare them to other capture experiments on the proton and present the informations that are provided by muon capture in hydrogen, especially for the PCAC hypothesis, the second class currents and the μ-e universality. Finally I shall present the possible muon capture experiments on the proton that could still be undertaken in order to improve our present knowledge of the subject

  13. Teratogenic effects of triphenyltin on embryos of amphibian (Xenopus tropicalis): a phenotypic comparison with the retinoid X and retinoic acid receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yuan, Jing; Cao, Qinzhen; Liu, Junqi; Zhu, Pan; Shi, Huahong

    2011-09-15

    Triphenyltin (TPT) has high binding affinity with the retinoid X receptor (RXR) in animals. The natural ligand of RXR, 9-cis-retinoic acid (RA), is known to induce featured malformations in vertebrate embryos by disrupting RA signal. Limited information is available on the TPT effects on amphibians. We exposed embryos of amphibian (Xenopus tropicalis) to TPT, 9-cis-RA, all-trans-RA (ligand of retinoic acid receptor, RAR), and LGD1069 (a selective ligand of RXR). The 72h LC50 of TPT was 5.25 μg Sn/L, and 72h EC50 was 0.96 μg Sn/L. TPT induced multiple malformations including enlarged proctodaeum and narrow fins. TPT at 5 μg Sn/L inhibited the differentiation of skins and muscles. The reduced brain, loss of external eyes and bent axis were observed in RXR and RAR ligands treatments. TPT and tributyltin (TBT) inhibited the mRNA expression of RXRα and increased that of TRβ. The phenotypes of malformations induced by TPT were similar to those by TBT and were much different from those by the RXR and RAR ligands. These results indicated that TPT was acute toxic and had high teratogenicity to amphibian embryos, and that TPT induced phenotypes of malformations. TPT and TBT might have a similar teratogenic mechanism, which seems not to be mainly mediated through RA signal. PMID:21820800

  14. The Effects of X Chromosome Loss on Neuroanatomical and Cognitive Phenotypes During Adolescence: a Multi-modal Structural MRI and Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Sheng; Zhang, Zhixin; Zhao, Qiuling; Zhang, Jiaying; Zhong, Suyu; Bi, Yanchao; He, Yong; Pan, Hui; Gong, Gaolang

    2015-09-01

    The absence of all or part of one X chromosome in female humans causes Turner's syndrome (TS), providing a unique "knockout model" to investigate the role of the X chromosome in neuroanatomy and cognition. Previous studies have demonstrated TS-associated brain differences; however, it remains largely unknown 1) how the brain structures are affected by the type of X chromosome loss and 2) how X chromosome loss influences the brain-cognition relationship. Here, we addressed these by investigating gray matter morphology and white matter connectivity using a multimodal MRI dataset from 34 adolescent TS patients (13 mosaic and 21 nonmosaic) and 21 controls. Intriguingly, the 2 TS groups exhibited significant differences in surface area in the right angular gyrus and in white matter integrity of the left tapetum of corpus callosum; these data support a link between these brain phenotypes and the type of X chromosome loss in TS. We further showed that the X chromosome modulates specific brain-cognition relationships: thickness and surface area in multiple cortical regions are positively correlated with working-memory performance in controls but negatively in TS. These findings provide novel insights into the X chromosome effect on neuroanatomical and cognitive phenotypes and highlight the role of genetic factors in brain-cognition relationships. PMID:24770708

  15. Short- and long-term effects of developmental corticosterone exposure on avian physiology,behavioral phenotype,cognition,and fitness: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan J. SCHOECH, Michelle A.RENSEL,Rebecca S. HEISS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence from across taxa suggests that exposure to elevated levels of glucocorticoids during early development can have long-term effects upon physiological and behavioral phenotypes. Additionally, there is some, though limited, evidence that similar early exposure can also negatively impact cognitive ability. Following pioneering mammalian studies, several avian studies have revealed that the responsiveness of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis as an adult can be explained by levels of corticosterone, the avian glucocorticoid, the individual experienced as a nestling or even as an embryo via yolk exposure. Studies also suggest that perinatal exposure to corticosterone can have effects upon avian ‘personalities’ or coping styles, and findings from mammalian studies suggest that these long-term effects are mediated epigenetically via altered expression of relevant DNA sequences. Although a consistent pattern across-species has yet to emerge, recent work in Florida scrub-jays Aphelocoma coerulescens found that baseline corticosterone levels in 11-day-old nestlings explained 84% of the variation in ‘personality’ (bold vs. timid when those individuals were tested approximately seven months later. Nestlings with elevated corticosterone levels were more timid than those individuals that as nestlings experienced relatively low corticosterone levels. Some researchers have suggested that parents might use such mechanisms to ‘program’ their offsprings’ phenotype to best fit prevailing environmental conditions. This review will visit what is known about the links between stressful developmental conditions that result in exposure to elevated corticosterone and the short- and long-term effects of this steroid hormone upon central nervous system function and whether alterations thereof are beneficial, deleterious, or neutral. It will concentrate on examples from birds, although critical supporting studies from the

  16. Solid Adsorbents for Low-Temperature CO2 Capture with Low-Energy Penalties Leading to More Effective Integrated Solutions for Power Generation and Industrial Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Nannan; Tang, Zhiyong; Wei, Wei; Snape, Colin Edward; Sun, Yuhan

    2015-01-01

    CO2 capture represents the key technology for CO2 reduction within the framework of CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). In fact, the implementation of CO2 capture extends far beyond CCUS since it will link the CO2 emission and recycling sectors, and when renewables are used to provide necessary energy input, CO2 capture would enable a profitable zero- or even negative-emitting and integrated energy–chemical solution. To this end, highly efficient CO2 capture technologies are needed,...

  17. Solid Adsorbents for Low Temperature CO2 Capture with Low Energy Penalties Leading to More Effective Integrated Solutions for Power Generation and Industrial Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Nannan eSun; Zhiyong eTang; Wei eWei; Colin Edward Snape; Yuhan eSun

    2015-01-01

    CO2 capture represents the key technology for CO2 reduction within the framework of CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS). In fact, the implementation of CO2 capture extends far beyond CCUS since it will link the CO2 emission and recycling sectors, and when renewables are used to provide necessary energy input, CO2 capture would enable a profitable zero- or even negative-emitting and integrated energy-chemical solution. To this end, highly efficient CO2 capture technologies are needed,...

  18. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid-Fernández, Susana; Lindín, Mónica; Díaz, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs) associated with target processing (N2b and P3b) and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-). An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided into three age groups (Young: 21-29, Middle-aged: 51-64, Old: 65-84 years old). Participants were asked to attend to visual stimuli and to ignore auditory stimuli. Aging was associated with slowed reaction times, target stimulus processing in working memory (WM, longer N2b and P3b latencies) and selection and preparation of the motor response (longer sLRP and earlier rLRP onset latencies). In the novel relative to the standard condition we observed, in the three age groups: (1) a distraction effect, reflected in a slowing of reaction times, of stimuli categorization in WM (longer P3b latency), and of motor response selection (longer sLRP onset latency); (2) a facilitation effect on response preparation (later rLRP onset latency), and (3) an increase in arousal (larger amplitudes of all ERPs evaluated, except for N2b amplitude in the Old group). A distraction effect on the stimulus evaluation processes (longer N2b latency) were also observed, but only in middle-aged and old participants, indicating that the attentional capture slows the stimulus evaluation in WM from early ages (from 50 years onwards, without differences between middle-age and older adults), but not in young adults. PMID:25294999

  19. Effects of aging and involuntary capture of attention on event-related potentials associated with the processing of and the response to a target stimulus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Cid Fernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of the present study was to assess whether aging modulates the effects of involuntary capture of attention by novel stimuli on performance, and on event-related potentials (ERPs associated with target processing (N2b and P3b and subsequent response processes (stimulus-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -sLRP- and response-locked Lateralized Readiness Potential -rLRP-. An auditory-visual distraction-attention task was performed by 77 healthy participants, divided in three age groups (Young: 21-29, Middle-aged: 51-64, Old: 65-84 y. o.. Participants were asked to attend to visual stimuli and to ignore auditory stimuli. Aging was associated with slowed reaction times, target stimulus processing in working memory (WM, longer N2b and P3b latencies and selection and preparation of the motor response (longer sLRP and earlier rLRP onset latencies. In the novel respect to the standard condition we observed, in the three age groups: (1 a distraction effect, reflected in a slowing of reaction times, of stimuli categorization in WM (longer P3b latency, and of motor response selection (longer sLRP onset latency; (2 a facilitation effect on response preparation (later rLRP onset latency, and (3 an increase in arousal (larger amplitudes of all ERPs evaluated, except for N2b amplitude in the Old group. A distraction effect on the stimulus evaluation processes (longer N2b component were also observed, but only in middle-aged and old participants, indicating that the attentional capture slows the stimulus evaluation in WM from early ages (from 50 years onwards, without differences between middle-age and older adults, but not in young adults.

  20. The relationship between ADHD and key cognitive phenotypes is not mediated by shared familial effects with IQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, A. C.; Rijsdijk, F.; Johnson, K. A.; Andreou, P.; Albrecht, B.; Arias-Vasquez, A.; Buitelaar, J. K.; McLoughlin, G.; Rommelse, N. N. J.; Sergeant, J. A.; Sonuga-Barke, E. J. S.; Uebel, H.; van der Meere, J. J.; Banaschewski, T.; Gill, M.; Manor, I.; Miranda, A.; Mulas, F.; Oades, R. D.; Roeyers, H.; Rothenberger, A.; Steinhausen, H. C.; Faraone, S. V.; Asherson, P.; Kuntsi, J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Twin and sibling studies have identified specific cognitive phenotypes that may mediate the association between genes and the clinical symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). ADHD is also associated with lower IQ scores. We aimed to investigate whether the familial association between measures of cognitive performance and the clinical diagnosis of ADHD is mediated through shared familial influences with IQ. Method Multivariate familial models were run on data from 1265 individuals aged 6–18 years, comprising 920 participants from ADHD sibling pairs and 345 control participants. Cognitive assessments included a four-choice reaction time (RT) task, a go/no-go task, a choice–delay task and an IQ assessment. The analyses focused on the cognitive variables of mean RT (MRT), RT variability (RTV), commission errors (CE), omission errors (OE) and choice impulsivity (CI). Results Significant familial association (rF) was confirmed between cognitive performance and both ADHD (rF=0.41–0.71) and IQ (rF=−0.25 to −0.49). The association between ADHD and cognitive performance was largely independent (80–87%) of any contribution from etiological factors shared with IQ. The exception was for CI, where 49% of the overlap could be accounted for by the familial variance underlying IQ. Conclusions The aetiological factors underlying lower IQ in ADHD seem to be distinct from those between ADHD and RT/error measures. This suggests that lower IQ does not account for the key cognitive impairments observed in ADHD. The results have implications for molecular genetic studies designed to identify genes involved in ADHD. PMID:20522277

  1. Phenotype characterization of embryoid body structures generated by a crystal comet effect tail in an intercellular cancer collision scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer is, by definition, the uncontrolled growth of autonomous cells that eventually destroy adjacent tissues and generate architectural disorder. However, this concept cannot be totally true. In three well documented studies, we have demonstrated that cancer tissues produce order zones that evolve over time and generate embryoid body structures in a space-time interval. The authors decided to revise the macroscopic and microscopic material in well-developed malignant tumors in which embryoid bodies were identified to determine the phenotype characterization that serves as a guideline for easy recognition. The factors responsible for this morphogenesis are physical, bioelectric, and magnetic susceptibilities produced by crystals that act as molecular designers for the topographic gradients that guide the surrounding silhouette and establish tissue head-tail positional identities. The structures are located in amniotic-like cavities and show characteristic somite-like embryologic segmentation. Immunophenotypic study has demonstrated exclusion factor positional identity in relation to enolase-immunopositive expression of embryoid body and human chorionic gonadotropin immunopositivity exclusion factor expression in the surrounding tissues. The significance of these observations is that they can also be predicted by experimental image data collected by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) accelerator at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in which two-beam subatomic collision particles in the resulting debris show hyperorder domains similar to those identified by us in intercellular cancer collisions. Our findings suggest that we are dealing with true reverse biologic system information in an activated collective cancer stem cell memory, in which physics participates in the elaboration of geometric complexes and chiral biomolecules that serve to build bodies with embryoid print as it develops during gestation. Reversal mechanisms in biology are intimately

  2. Environment assisted electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrons scattering off isolated atoms or positive atomic ions may be captured in the non-resonant photorecombination or resonant dielectronic recombination processes with the excess energy carried off by a photon. We demonstrate that in a medium a new interatomic process becomes important, where in the electron capture by an atom or atomic ion the energy is transferred to a neigbouring species ionising it. We discuss different manifestations of this interatomic Coulombic electron capture and estimate its efficiency for a number of realistic systems.

  3. Minimizing capture-related stress on white-tailed deer with a capture collar

    Science.gov (United States)

    DelGiudice, G.D.; Kunkel, K.E.; Mech, L.D.; Seal, U.S.

    1990-01-01

    We compared the effect of 3 capture methods for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) on blood indicators of acute excitement and stress from 1 February to 20 April 1989. Eleven adult females were captured by Clover trap or cannon net between 1 February and 9 April 1989 in northeastern Minnesota [USA]. These deer were fitted with radio-controlled capture collars, and 9 deer were recaptured 7-33 days later. Trapping method affected serum cortisol (P capture-collared deer (0.54 .+-. 0.07 [SE] .mu.g/dL) compared to Clover-trapped (4.37 .+-. 0.69 .mu.g/dL) and cannon-netted (3.88 .+-. 0.82 .mu.g/dL) deer. Capture-collared deer were minimally stressed compared to deer captured by traditional methods. Use of the capture collar should permit more accurate interpretation of blood profiles of deer for assessement of condition and general health.

  4. Effects of lithium and valproic acid on gene expression and phenotypic markers in an NT2 neurosphere model of neural development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Hill

    Full Text Available Mood stabilising drugs such as lithium (LiCl and valproic acid (VPA are the first line agents for treating conditions such as Bipolar disorder and Epilepsy. However, these drugs have potential developmental effects that are not fully understood. This study explores the use of a simple human neurosphere-based in vitro model to characterise the pharmacological and toxicological effects of LiCl and VPA using gene expression changes linked to phenotypic alterations in cells. Treatment with VPA and LiCl resulted in the differential expression of 331 and 164 genes respectively. In the subset of VPA targeted genes, 114 were downregulated whilst 217 genes were upregulated. In the subset of LiCl targeted genes, 73 were downregulated and 91 were upregulated. Gene ontology (GO term enrichment analysis was used to highlight the most relevant GO terms associated with a given gene list following toxin exposure. In addition, in order to phenotypically anchor the gene expression data, changes in the heterogeneity of cell subtype populations and cell cycle phase were monitored using flow cytometry. Whilst LiCl exposure did not significantly alter the proportion of cells expressing markers for stem cells/undifferentiated cells (Oct4, SSEA4, neurons (Neurofilament M, astrocytes (GFAP or cell cycle phase, the drug caused a 1.4-fold increase in total cell number. In contrast, exposure to VPA resulted in significant upregulation of Oct4, SSEA, Neurofilament M and GFAP with significant decreases in both G2/M phase cells and cell number. This neurosphere model might provide the basis of a human-based cellular approach for the regulatory exploration of developmental impact of potential toxic chemicals.

  5. Effects of ultraviolet-B irradiance on intraspecific competition and facilitation of plants: self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui-Chang Zhang

    Full Text Available (1 The effects of facilitation on the structure and dynamics of plant populations have not been studied so widely as competition. The UV-B radiation, as a typical environmental factor causing stress, may result in direct stress and facilitation. (2 The effects of UV-B radiation on intraspecific competition and facilitation were investigated based on the following three predictions on self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity: i Self-thinning is the reduction in density that results from the increase in the mean biomass of individuals in crowded populations, and is driven by competition. In this study, the mortality rate of the population is predicted to decrease from UV-B irradiance. ii The size inequality of a population increases with competition intensity because larger individuals receive a disproportionate share of resources, thereby leaving limited resources for smaller individuals. The second hypothesis assumes that direct stress decreases the size inequality of the population. iii Phenotypic plasticity is the ability to alter one's morphology in response to environmental changes. The third hypothesis assumes that certain morphological indices can change among the trade-offs between competition, facilitation, and stress. These predictions were tested by conducting a field pot experiment using mung beans, and were supported by the following results: (3 UV-B radiation increased the survival rate of the population at the end of self-thinning. However, this result was mainly due to direct stress rather than facilitation. (4 Just as competitor, facilitation was also asymmetric. It increased the size inequality of populations during self-thinning, whereas stress decreased the size inequality. (5 Direct stress and facilitation influence plants differently on various scales. Stress inhibited plant growth, whereas facilitation showed the opposite on an individual scale. Stress increased survival rate, whereas facilitation increased

  6. Effects of ultraviolet-B irradiance on intraspecific competition and facilitation of plants: self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Chang; Lin, Yue; Yue, Ming; Li, Qian; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Liu, Xiao; Chi, Hong; Chai, Yong-Fu; Wang, Mao

    2012-01-01

    (1) The effects of facilitation on the structure and dynamics of plant populations have not been studied so widely as competition. The UV-B radiation, as a typical environmental factor causing stress, may result in direct stress and facilitation. (2) The effects of UV-B radiation on intraspecific competition and facilitation were investigated based on the following three predictions on self-thinning, size inequality, and phenotypic plasticity: i) Self-thinning is the reduction in density that results from the increase in the mean biomass of individuals in crowded populations, and is driven by competition. In this study, the mortality rate of the population is predicted to decrease from UV-B irradiance. ii) The size inequality of a population increases with competition intensity because larger individuals receive a disproportionate share of resources, thereby leaving limited resources for smaller individuals. The second hypothesis assumes that direct stress decreases the size inequality of the population. iii) Phenotypic plasticity is the ability to alter one's morphology in response to environmental changes. The third hypothesis assumes that certain morphological indices can change among the trade-offs between competition, facilitation, and stress. These predictions were tested by conducting a field pot experiment using mung beans, and were supported by the following results: (3) UV-B radiation increased the survival rate of the population at the end of self-thinning. However, this result was mainly due to direct stress rather than facilitation. (4) Just as competitor, facilitation was also asymmetric. It increased the size inequality of populations during self-thinning, whereas stress decreased the size inequality. (5) Direct stress and facilitation influence plants differently on various scales. Stress inhibited plant growth, whereas facilitation showed the opposite on an individual scale. Stress increased survival rate, whereas facilitation increased individual

  7. Genetic versus rearing-environment effects on phenotype: hatchery and natural rearing effects on hatchery- and wild-born coho salmon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedar M Chittenden

    Full Text Available With the current trends in climate and fisheries, well-designed mitigative strategies for conserving fish stocks may become increasingly necessary. The poor post-release survival of hatchery-reared Pacific salmon indicates that salmon enhancement programs require assessment. The objective of this study was to determine the relative roles that genotype and rearing environment play in the phenotypic expression of young salmon, including their survival, growth, physiology, swimming endurance, predator avoidance and migratory behaviour. Wild- and hatchery-born coho salmon adults (Oncorhynchus kisutch returning to the Chehalis River in British Columbia, Canada, were crossed to create pure hatchery, pure wild, and hybrid offspring. A proportion of the progeny from each cross was reared in a traditional hatchery environment, whereas the remaining fry were reared naturally in a contained side channel. The resulting phenotypic differences between replicates, between rearing environments, and between cross types were compared. While there were few phenotypic differences noted between genetic groups reared in the same habitat, rearing environment played a significant role in smolt size, survival, swimming endurance, predator avoidance and migratory behaviour. The lack of any observed genetic differences between wild- and hatchery-born salmon may be due to the long-term mixing of these genotypes from hatchery introgression into wild populations, or conversely, due to strong selection in nature--capable of maintaining highly fit genotypes whether or not fish have experienced part of their life history under cultured conditions.

  8. Neutrinoless double electron capture

    CERN Document Server

    Kotila, J; Iachello, F

    2015-01-01

    Direct determination of the neutrino mass is at the present time one of the most important aims of experimental and theoretical research in nuclear and particle physics. A possible way of detection is through neutrinoless double electron capture, $0\

  9. The Prediction Performance of Asset Pricing Models and Their Capability of Capturing the Effects of Economic Crises: The Case of Istanbul Stock Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Muzır

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper is prepared to test the common opinion that the multifactor asset pricing models produce superior predictions as compared to the single factor models and to evaluate the performance of Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT and Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM. For this purpose, the monthly return data from January 1996 and December 2004 of the stocks of 45 firms listed at Istanbul Stock Exchange were used. Our factor analysis results show that 68,3 % of the return variation can be explained by five factors. Although the APT model has generated a low coefficient of determination, 28,3 %, it proves to be more competent in explaining stock return changes when compared to CAPM which has an inferior explanation power, 5,4 %. Furthermore, we have observed that APT is more robust also in capturing the effects of any economic crisis on return variations.

  10. Activists versus Captured Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Daubanes, Julien; Rochet, Jean-Charles

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of activism in a regulated industry where the regulator has been captured by the industry. Unlike ordinary economic agents, activists are insensitive to monetary incentives. Moreover, they are less well informed than regulators and their actions generate dead-weight costs. Yet we find that activism may increase social welfare because it disciplines captured regulators and reduces the social cost of imperfect regulatory systems.

  11. Revision of single atom local density and capture number varying with coverage in uniform depletion approximation and its effect on coalescence and number of stable clusters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Qing-Yi; Zhang Juan

    2011-01-01

    In vapour deposition,single atoms(adatoms)on the substrate surface are the main source of growth.The change in its density plays a decisive role in the growth of thin films and quantum size islands.In the nucleation and cluster coalescence stages of vapour deposition,the growth of stable clusters occurs on the substrate surface covered by stable clusters.Nucleation occurs in the non-covered part,while the total area covered by stable clusters on the substrate surface will gradually increase.Carefully taking into account the coverage effect,a revised single atom density rate equation is given for the famous and widely used thin-film rate equation theory,but the work of solving the revised equation has not been done.In this paper,we solve the equation and obtain the single-atom density and capture number by using a uniform depletion approximation.We determine that the single atom density is much lower than that evaluated from the single atom density rate equation in the traditional rate equation theory when the stable cluster coverage fraction is large,and it goes down very fast with an increase in the coverage fraction.The revised equation gives a higher value for the 'average' capture number than the present equation. It also increases with increasing coverage.That makes the preparation of single crystalline thin film materials difficult and the size control of quantum size islands complicated.We also discuss the effect of the revision on coalescence and the number of stable clusters in vapour deposition.

  12. Carry-over effects of conditions at the wintering grounds on breeding plumage signals in a migratory bird: roles of phenotypic plasticity and selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järvistö, P E; Calhim, S; Schuett, W; Sirkiä, P M; Velmala, W; Laaksonen, T

    2016-08-01

    To understand the consequences of ever-changing environment on the dynamics of phenotypic traits, distinguishing between selection processes and individual plasticity is crucial. We examined individual consistency/plasticity in several male secondary sexual traits expressed during the breeding season (white wing and forehead patch size, UV reflectance of white wing patch and dorsal melanin coloration) in a migratory pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) population over an 11-year period. Furthermore, we studied carry-over effects of three environmental variables (NAO, a climatic index; NDVI, a vegetation index; and rainfall) at the wintering grounds (during prebreeding moult) on the expression of these breeding plumage traits of pied flycatcher males at individual and population levels. Whereas NAO correlates negatively with moisture in West Africa, NDVI correlates positively with primary production. Forehead patch size and melanin coloration were highly consistent within individuals among years, whereas the consistency of the other two traits was moderate. Wing patch size decreased with higher NAO and increased with higher rainfall and NDVI at the individual level. Interestingly, small-patched males suffered lower survival during high NAO winters than large-patched males, and vice versa during low NAO winters. These counteracting processes meant that the individual-level change was masked at the population level where no relationship was found. Our results provide a good example of how variation in the phenotypic composition of a natural population can be a result of both environment-dependent individual plasticity and short-term microevolution. Moreover, when plasticity and viability selection operate simultaneously, their impacts on population composition may not be evident. PMID:27159261

  13. Antiproliferative effects of phenylaminonaphthoquinones are increased by ascorbate and associated with the appearance of a senescent phenotype in human bladder cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones are redox cyclers able to form ROS. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate inhibit T24 cell growth. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate lead to necrotic-like cell death. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate impair cell cycle and affect MAPKs. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate induce a senescent cancer cell phenotype. -- Abstract: Quinone-containing molecules have been developed against cancer mainly for their redox cycling ability leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We have previously shown that donor-acceptor phenylaminonaphthoquinones are biologically active against a panel of cancer cells. In this report, we explored the mechanisms involved in cancer cell growth inhibition caused by two phenylaminonaphthoquinones, namely Q7 and Q9, with or without ascorbate (ASC). The results show that Q7 and Q9 are both redox cyclers able to form ROS, which strongly inhibit the proliferation of T24 cells. Q9 was a better redox cycler than Q7 because of marked stabilization of the semiquinone radical species arising from its reduction by ascorbate. Indeed, ASC dramatically enhances the inhibitory effect of Q9 on cell proliferation. Q9 plus ASC impairs the cell cycle, causing a decrease in the number of cells in the G2/M phase without involving other cell cycle regulating key proteins. Moreover, Q9 plus ASC influences the MAPK signaling pathways, provoking the appearance of a senescent cancer cell phenotype and ultimately leading to necrotic-like cell death. Because cellular senescence limits the replicative capacity of cells, our results suggest that induction of senescence may be exploited as a basis for new approaches to cancer therapy

  14. Phenotypic Characterization of Toxic Compound Effects on Liver Spheroids Derived from iPSC Using Confocal Imaging and Three-Dimensional Image Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirenko, Oksana; Hancock, Michael K; Hesley, Jayne; Hong, Dihui; Cohen, Avrum; Gentry, Jason; Carlson, Coby B; Mann, David A

    2016-09-01

    Cell models are becoming more complex to better mimic the in vivo environment and provide greater predictivity for compound efficacy and toxicity. There is an increasing interest in exploring the use of three-dimensional (3D) spheroids for modeling developmental and tissue biology with the goal of accelerating translational research in these areas. Accordingly, the development of high-throughput quantitative assays using 3D cultures is an active area of investigation. In this study, we have developed and optimized methods for the formation of 3D liver spheroids derived from human iPS cells and used those for toxicity assessment. We used confocal imaging and 3D image analysis to characterize cellular information from a 3D matrix to enable a multi-parametric comparison of different spheroid phenotypes. The assay enables characterization of compound toxicities by spheroid size (volume) and shape, cell number and spatial distribution, nuclear characterization, number and distribution of cells expressing viability, apoptosis, mitochondrial potential, and viability marker intensities. In addition, changes in the content of live, dead, and apoptotic cells as a consequence of compound exposure were characterized. We tested 48 compounds and compared induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived hepatocytes and HepG2 cells in both two-dimensional (2D) and 3D cultures. We observed significant differences in the pharmacological effects of compounds across the two cell types and between the different culture conditions. Our results indicate that a phenotypic assay using 3D model systems formed with human iPSC-derived hepatocytes is suitable for high-throughput screening and can be used for hepatotoxicity assessment in vitro. PMID:27494736

  15. Investigation of gene effects and epistatic interactions between Akt1 and neuregulin 1 in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes and social functions in genetic mouse models of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Hsun eHuang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence from human genetic studies has suggested several functional candidate genes that might contribute to susceptibility to schizophrenia, including AKT1 and neuregulin 1 (NRG1. Recent findings also revealed that NRG1 stimulates the PI3-kinase/AKT signaling pathway, which might be involved in the functional outcomes of some schizophrenic patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of Akt1-deficiency and Nrg1-deficiency alone or in combination in the regulation of behavioral phenotypes, cognition, and social functions using genetically modified mice as a model. Male Akt1+/-, Nrg1+/-, and double mutant mice were bred and compared with their wild-type littermate controls. In experiment 1, general physical examination revealed that all mutant mice displayed a normal profile of body weight during development and a normal brain activity with microPET scan. In experiment 2, no significant genotypic differences were found in our basic behavioral phenotyping, including locomotion, anxiety-like behavior, and sensorimotor gating. However, both Nrg1+/- and double mutant mice exhibited impaired episodic-like memory. Double mutant mice also had impaired sociability. In experiment 3, a synergistic epistasis between Akt1 and Nrg1 was further confirmed in double mutant mice in that they had impaired social interaction compared to the other 3 groups, especially encountering with a novel male or an ovariectomized female. Double mutant and Nrg1+/- mice also emitted fewer female urine-induced ultrasonic vocalization calls. Collectively, our results indicate that double deficiency of Akt1 and Nrg1 can result in the impairment of social cognitive functions, which might be pertinent to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia-related social cognition.

  16. Antiproliferative effects of phenylaminonaphthoquinones are increased by ascorbate and associated with the appearance of a senescent phenotype in human bladder cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felipe, K.B. [Laboratorio de Bioquímica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Benites, J. [Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Arturo Prat, Avenida Arturo Prat 2120, Casilla 121, Iquique (Chile); Glorieux, C.; Sid, B.; Valenzuela, M. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group (GTOX), Brussels (Belgium); Kviecinski, M.R.; Pedrosa, R.C. [Laboratorio de Bioquímica Experimental, Departamento de Bioquímica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis (Brazil); Valderrama, J.A. [Departamento Química Orgánica, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Vicuña Mackenna 4860, Casilla 306, Santiago (Chile); Levêque, Ph.; Gallez, B. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Biomedical Magnetic Resonance Research Group (REMA), Brussels (Belgium); Verrax, J. [Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group (GTOX), Brussels (Belgium); Buc Calderon, P., E-mail: pedro.buccalderon@uclouvain.be [Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Arturo Prat, Avenida Arturo Prat 2120, Casilla 121, Iquique (Chile); Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Toxicology and Cancer Biology Research Group (GTOX), Brussels (Belgium)

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones are redox cyclers able to form ROS. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate inhibit T24 cell growth. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate lead to necrotic-like cell death. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate impair cell cycle and affect MAPKs. •Phenylaminonaphthoquinones plus ascorbate induce a senescent cancer cell phenotype. -- Abstract: Quinone-containing molecules have been developed against cancer mainly for their redox cycling ability leading to reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. We have previously shown that donor-acceptor phenylaminonaphthoquinones are biologically active against a panel of cancer cells. In this report, we explored the mechanisms involved in cancer cell growth inhibition caused by two phenylaminonaphthoquinones, namely Q7 and Q9, with or without ascorbate (ASC). The results show that Q7 and Q9 are both redox cyclers able to form ROS, which strongly inhibit the proliferation of T24 cells. Q9 was a better redox cycler than Q7 because of marked stabilization of the semiquinone radical species arising from its reduction by ascorbate. Indeed, ASC dramatically enhances the inhibitory effect of Q9 on cell proliferation. Q9 plus ASC impairs the cell cycle, causing a decrease in the number of cells in the G2/M phase without involving other cell cycle regulating key proteins. Moreover, Q9 plus ASC influences the MAPK signaling pathways, provoking the appearance of a senescent cancer cell phenotype and ultimately leading to necrotic-like cell death. Because cellular senescence limits the replicative capacity of cells, our results suggest that induction of senescence may be exploited as a basis for new approaches to cancer therapy.

  17. Differential effects of p53 on bystander phenotypes induced by gamma ray and high LET heavy ion radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingyuan; Dong, Chen; Konishi, Teruaki; Tu, Wenzhi; Liu, Weili; Shiomi, Naoko; Kobayashi, Alisa; Uchihori, Yukio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Hei, Tom K.; Dang, Bingrong; Shao, Chunlin

    2014-04-01

    High LET particle irradiation has several potential advantages over γ-rays such as p53-independent response. The purpose of this work is to disclose the effect of p53 on the bystander effect induced by different LET irradiations and underlying mechanism. Lymphocyte cells of TK6 (wild type p53) and HMy2.CIR (mutated p53) were exposed to either low or high LET irradiation, then their mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS generation were detected. The micronuclei (MN) induction in HL-7702 hepatocytes co-cultured with irradiated lymphocytes was also measured. It was found that the mitochondrial dysfunction, p66Shc activation, and intracellular ROS were enhanced in TK6 but not in HMy2.CIR cells after γ-ray irradiation, but all of them were increased in both cell lines after carbon and iron irradiation. Consistently, the bystander effect of MN formation in HL-7702 cells was only triggered by γ-irradiated TK6 cells but not by γ-irradiated HMy2.CIR cells. But this bystander effect was induced by both lymphocyte cell lines after heavy ion irradiation. PFT-μ, an inhibitor of p53, only partly inhibited ROS generation and bystander effect induced by 30 keV/μm carbon-irradiated TK6 cells but failed to suppress the bystander effect induced by the TK6 cells irradiated with either 70 keV/μm carbon or 180 keV/μm iron. The mitochondrial inhibitors of rotenone and oligomycin eliminated heavy ion induced ROS generation in TK6 and HMy2.CIR cells and hence diminished the bystander effect on HL-7702 cells. These results clearly demonstrate that the bystander effect is p53-dependent for low LET irradiation, but it is p53-independent for high LET irradiation which may be because of p53-independent ROS generation due to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  18. An explicit approach to capture diffusive effects in finite water-content method for solving vadose zone flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianting; Ogden, Fred L.; Lai, Wencong; Chen, Xiangfeng; Talbot, Cary A.

    2016-04-01

    Vadose zone flow problems are usually solved from the Richards equation. Solution to the Richards equation is generally challenging because the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity in the equation are strongly non-linear functions of water content. The finite water-content method was proposed as an alternative general solution method of the vadose zone flow problem for infiltration, falling slugs, and vadose zone response to water table dynamics based on discretizing the water content domain into numerous bins instead of the traditional spatial discretization. In this study, we develop an improved approach to the original finite water-content method (referred to as TO method hereinafter) that better simulates diffusive effects but retains the robustness of the TO method. The approach treats advection and diffusion separately and considers diffusion on a bin by bin basis. After discretizing into water content bins, we treat the conductivity and diffusivity in individual bins as water content dependent constant evaluated at given water content corresponding to each bin. For each bin, we can solve the flow equations analytically since the hydraulic conductivity and diffusivity can be treated as a constant. We then develop solutions for each bin to determine the diffusive water amounts at each time step. The water amount ahead of the convective front for each bin is redistributed among water content bins to account for diffusive effects. The application of developed solution is straightforward only involving algebraic manipulations at each time step. The method can mainly improve water content profiles, but has no significant difference for the total infiltration rate and cumulative infiltration compared to the TO method. Although the method separately deals with advection and diffusion, it can account for the coupling effects of advection and diffusion reasonably well.

  19. Using permalloy based planar hall effect sensors to capture and detect superparamagnetic beads for lab on a chip applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies have been carried out on planar Hall effect (PHE) sensors used to detect magnetic nanoparticles employed as labels for biodetection applications. Disk shaped sensors, 1 mm diameter, were structured on Permalloy film, 20 nm thick. To control the sensor magnetisation state and thus the field sensitivity and linearity, a DC biasing field has been applied parallel to the driving current. Maghemite nanoparticles (10 nm) functionalised with Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 6000 were immobilised over the sensor surface using particular magnetisation state and applied magnetic fields. In order to obtain a higher response from the magnetic nanoparticles, it was used a detection setup which allows the application of magnetic fields larger than 100 Oe but avoiding saturation of the PHE signal. Based on this setup, two field scanning methods are presented in this paper. During our experiments, low magnetic moments, of about 1.87×10−5 emu, have been easily detected. This value corresponds to a mass of 9.35 µg of maghemite nanoparticles functionalised with PEG 6000. The results suggest that this type of structure is feasible for building low cost micrometer sized PHE sensors to be used for high-resolution bio sensing applications. - Highlights: • Disk-shaped Permalloy planar Hall effect sensors have been obtained and tested. • Two field scanning methods have been proposed. • The magnetic nanoparticles can be trapped on the sensor surface. • High detection sensitivity has been obtained

  20. The effects of short-chain fatty acids on human colon cancer cell phenotype are associated with histone hyperacetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinnebusch, Brian F; Meng, Shufen; Wu, James T; Archer, Sonia Y; Hodin, Richard A

    2002-05-01

    The short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) butyrate is produced via anaerobic bacterial fermentation within the colon and is thought to be protective in regard to colon carcinogenesis. Although butyrate (C4) is considered the most potent of the SCFA, a variety of other SCFA also exist in the colonic lumen. Butyrate is thought to exert its cellular effects through the induction of histone hyperacetylation. We sought to determine the effects of a variety of the SCFA on colon carcinoma cell growth, differentiation and apoptosis. HT-29 or HCT-116 (wild-type and p21-deleted) cells were treated with physiologically relevant concentrations of various SCFA, and histone acetylation state was assayed by acid-urea-triton-X gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting. Growth and apoptotic effects were studied by flow cytometry, and differentiation effects were assessed using transient transfections and Northern blotting. Propionate (C3) and valerate (C5) caused growth arrest and differentiation in human colon carcinoma cells. The magnitude of their effects was associated with a lesser degree of histone hyperacetylation compared with butyrate. Acetate (C2) and caproate (C6), in contrast, did not cause histone hyperacetylation and also had no appreciable effects on cell growth or differentiation. SCFA-induced transactivation of the differentiation marker gene, intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP), was blocked by histone deacetylase (HDAC), further supporting the critical link between SCFA and histones. Butyrate also significantly increased apoptosis, whereas the other SCFA studied did not. The growth arrest induced by the SCFA was characterized by an increase in the expression of the p21 cell-cycle inhibitor and down-regulation of cyclin B1 (CB1). In p21-deleted HCT-116 colon cancer cells, the SCFA did not alter the rate of proliferation. These data suggest that the antiproliferative, apoptotic and differentiating properties of the various SCFA are linked to the degree of induced histone

  1. Capturing poromechanical coupling effects of the reactive fracturing process in porous rock via a DEM-network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulven, Ole Ivar; Sun, WaiChing

    2016-04-01

    Fluid transport in a porous medium has important implications for understanding natural geological processes. At a sufficiently large scale, a fluid-saturated porous medium can be regarded as a two-phase continuum, with the fluid constituent flowing in the Darcian regime. Nevertheless, a fluid mediated chemical reaction can in some cases change the permeability of the rock locally: Mineral dissolution can cause increased permeability, whereas mineral precipitation can reduce the permeability. This might trigger a complicated hydro-chemo-mechanical coupling effect that causes channeling of fluids or clogging of the system. If the fluid is injected or produced at a sufficiently high rate, the pressure might increase enough to cause the onset and propagation of fractures. Fractures in return create preferential flow paths that enhance permeability, localize fluid flow and chemical reaction, prevent build-up of pore pressure and cause anisotropy of the hydro-mechanical responses of the effective medium. This leads to a complex coupled process of solid deformation, chemical reaction and fluid transport enhanced by the fracture formation. In this work, we develop a new coupled numerical model to study the complexities of feedback among fluid pressure evolution, fracture formation and permeability changes due to a chemical process in a 2D system. We combine a discrete element model (DEM) previously used to study a volume expanding process[1, 2] with a new fluid transport model based on poroelasticity[3] and a fluid-mediated chemical reaction that changes the permeability of the medium. This provides new insights into the hydro-chemo-mechanical process of a transforming porous medium. References [1] Ulven, O. I., Storheim, H., Austrheim, H., and Malthe-Sørenssen, A. "Fracture Initiation During Volume Increasing Reactions in Rocks and Applications for CO2 Sequestration", Earth Planet. Sc. Lett. 389C, 2014a, pp. 132 - 142, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2013.12.039. [2] Ulven, O. I

  2. PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta have both similar and distinct effects on myofiber switching toward an oxidative phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Frandsen, Lis; Schjerling, Peter; Nishimura, Erica; Grunnet, Niels

    2006-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha and -1beta (PGC-1alpha and PGC-1beta) were overexpressed by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in cultures of primary rat skeletal muscle cells derived from neonatal myoblasts. Effects on muscle fiber type transition and metabolism...

  3. Gadolinium-loaded chitosan nanoparticles for cancer neutron-capture therapy. Pharmaceutical characteristics and in vitro antitumor effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparation of Gd-nanoCPs was carried out based on the w/o emulsion-droplet coalescence technique. Chitosan with different molecular weight (Mw) (950, 50, 10 kDa) was applied a various concentrations (0.5, 1.5, 2.5%). B16F10 mouse melanoma cells were employed to evaluate the cell-association properties of Gd-nanoCPs and the antitumor effect with thermal neutron irradiation. In the formulation study, as the Mw of chitosan decreased, the mean particle diameter decreased to 155 nm with 10 kDa chitosan at the smallest. Then, decrease in the chitosan concentration in the chitosan solution contributed to a decrease in mean particle diameter and an increase in gadolinium content. The Gd content in the Gd-nanoCPs prepared with 0.5% chitosan reached 22% at the maximum. The amount of Gd associated with cell was also dependent on the Mw of chitosan. In the subsequent Gd-NCT study in vitro, the most highly Gd-containing (22%) and finest (155 nm) Gd-nanoCPs prepared at 0.5% of 10 kDa chitosan exhibited the strongest tumor cell growth suppression. It is expected that use of Gd-nanoCP prepared here may lead to improved performance in NCT. (author)

  4. Effect of Intrinsic Noise on the Phenotype of Cell Populations Featuring Solution Multiplicity: An Artificial lac Operon Network Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviziotis, Ioannis G; Kavousanakis, Michail E; Boudouvis, Andreas G

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity in cell populations originates from two fundamentally different sources: the uneven distribution of intracellular content during cell division, and the stochastic fluctuations of regulatory molecules existing in small amounts. Discrete stochastic models can incorporate both sources of cell heterogeneity with sufficient accuracy in the description of an isogenic cell population; however, they lack efficiency when a systems level analysis is required, due to substantial computational requirements. In this work, we study the effect of cell heterogeneity in the behaviour of isogenic cell populations carrying the genetic network of lac operon, which exhibits solution multiplicity over a wide range of extracellular conditions. For such systems, the strategy of performing solely direct temporal solutions is a prohibitive task, since a large ensemble of initial states needs to be tested in order to drive the system--through long time simulations--to possible co-existing steady state solutions. We implement a multiscale computational framework, the so-called "equation-free" methodology, which enables the performance of numerical tasks, such as the computation of coarse steady state solutions and coarse bifurcation analysis. Dynamically stable and unstable solutions are computed and the effect of intrinsic noise on the range of bistability is efficiently investigated. The results are compared with the homogeneous model, which neglects all sources of heterogeneity, with the deterministic cell population balance model, as well as with a stochastic model neglecting the heterogeneity originating from intrinsic noise effects. We show that when the effect of intrinsic source of heterogeneity is intensified, the bistability range shifts towards higher extracellular inducer concentration values. PMID:26185999

  5. Effect of Intrinsic Noise on the Phenotype of Cell Populations Featuring Solution Multiplicity: An Artificial lac Operon Network Paradigm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis G Aviziotis

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity in cell populations originates from two fundamentally different sources: the uneven distribution of intracellular content during cell division, and the stochastic fluctuations of regulatory molecules existing in small amounts. Discrete stochastic models can incorporate both sources of cell heterogeneity with sufficient accuracy in the description of an isogenic cell population; however, they lack efficiency when a systems level analysis is required, due to substantial computational requirements. In this work, we study the effect of cell heterogeneity in the behaviour of isogenic cell populations carrying the genetic network of lac operon, which exhibits solution multiplicity over a wide range of extracellular conditions. For such systems, the strategy of performing solely direct temporal solutions is a prohibitive task, since a large ensemble of initial states needs to be tested in order to drive the system--through long time simulations--to possible co-existing steady state solutions. We implement a multiscale computational framework, the so-called "equation-free" methodology, which enables the performance of numerical tasks, such as the computation of coarse steady state solutions and coarse bifurcation analysis. Dynamically stable and unstable solutions are computed and the effect of intrinsic noise on the range of bistability is efficiently investigated. The results are compared with the homogeneous model, which neglects all sources of heterogeneity, with the deterministic cell population balance model, as well as with a stochastic model neglecting the heterogeneity originating from intrinsic noise effects. We show that when the effect of intrinsic source of heterogeneity is intensified, the bistability range shifts towards higher extracellular inducer concentration values.

  6. US Spacesuit Knowledge Capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chullen, Cinda; Thomas, Ken; McMann, Joe; Dolan, Kristi; Bitterly, Rose; Lewis, Cathleen

    2011-01-01

    The ability to learn from both the mistakes and successes of the past is vital to assuring success in the future. Due to the close physical interaction between spacesuit systems and human beings as users, spacesuit technology and usage lends itself rather uniquely to the benefits realized from the skillful organization of historical information; its dissemination; the collection and identification of artifacts; and the education of those in the field. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), other organizations and individuals have been performing United States (U.S.) Spacesuit Knowledge Capture since the beginning of space exploration. Avenues used to capture the knowledge have included publication of reports; conference presentations; specialized seminars; and classes usually given by veterans in the field. More recently the effort has been more concentrated and formalized whereby a new avenue of spacesuit knowledge capture has been added to the archives in which videotaping occurs engaging both current and retired specialists in the field presenting technical scope specifically for education and preservation of knowledge. With video archiving, all these avenues of learning can now be brought to life with the real experts presenting their wealth of knowledge on screen for future learners to enjoy. Scope and topics of U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture have included lessons learned in spacesuit technology, experience from the Gemini, Apollo, Skylab and Shuttle programs, hardware certification, design, development and other program components, spacesuit evolution and experience, failure analysis and resolution, and aspects of program management. Concurrently, U.S. spacesuit knowledge capture activities have progressed to a level where NASA, the National Air and Space Museum (NASM), Hamilton Sundstrand (HS) and the spacesuit community are now working together to provide a comprehensive closed-looped spacesuit knowledge capture system which includes

  7. Intravesical BCG therapy in bladder carcinoma. Effect on cytotoxicity, IL-2 production and phenotype of peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Petersen, K R; Zeuthen, J; Steven, K

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of intravesical BCG treatment on the cytotoxicity, interleukin-2 (IL-2) production and distribution of the subsets of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in patients with carcinoma in situ of the bladder. Treatments were made in 6 patients...... during a conventional BCG treatment schedule. Four patients showed a complete response, one a partial response and one had a progressive disease after BCG treatment. Intravesical BCG did not induce significant changes in the cytotoxicity of PBMC. The distribution of NK-cells and T-cells also remained...

  8. Different morphological effects of γ-rays and boron-10 neutron captured beams on the vegetative cells of Closterium ehrenbergii (green alga)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different cyto-morphological effects of γ-rays and 10B neutron captured beams (BNCB), 10B(n,α)7Li on the cells of Closterium ehrenbergii Meneghini (Chlorophyta) were studied at the stationary phase of cell growth. For BNCB, about 75% of absorbed dose was estimated to be due to α particles and recoiled lithium nuclei. Relative biological effectiveness of BNCB compared to γ-rays was ca. 5 at D37. Colony observations after γ-rays irradiation revealed that each dead cell in a single colony had different morphology at 2- to 4-cell stages. However, after BNCB irradiation, the morphology of some sister cells in a colony was the same or very similar to each other. These qualitative differences of radiation response between γ-rays and BNCB were probably due to the difference in LET. DNA content of this alga is 2C in plateau phase. It was inferred genetically that the two sets of DNA double strands in this alga lie side by side at least partially at this stage, and that simultaneous modification in the same locus on the two sets of DNA strands caused the concurrence of morphologically abnormal sister cells. These abnormal cells could be classified into three major morphogroups which were subgrouped to 12 minor types from the view point of morphogenesis. (author)

  9. Effect of the p53 gene status on the sensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells to boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of the p53 gene in the sensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) to boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) had not been studied. We examined the effect of boronophenylalanine (BPA)-mediated BNCT on oral SCC cells showing either wild-type p53 (SAS/neo) or mutated-type p53 (SAS/mp53). Survival ratio of cells was determined by colony formation. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Apoptotic cells were evaluated by flow cytometric analysis and nuclear DNA staining. When SAS/neo and SAS/mp53 cells were subjected to BNCT, more suppressive effects on colony formation and cell viability were observed in SAS/neo cells as compared with SAS/mp53. The proportion of apoptotic cells with DNA fragmentation was also increased in the cells with functional p53. These results suggest that oral SCC cells with mutated p53 cells are more resistant to BNCT than those with wild-type p53. BNCT must inhibit oral SCC cells in p53-dependent and p53-independent mechanisms. (author)

  10. Effect of divergence in phenotypic residual feed intake on methane emissions, ruminal fermentation, and apparent whole-tract digestibility of beef heifers across three contrasting diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonnell, R P; Hart, K J; Boland, T M; Kelly, A K; McGee, M; Kenny, D A

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to examine the effect of divergent phenotypic ranking for residual feed intake (RFI) on ruminal CH emissions, diet digestibility, and indices of ruminal fermentation in heifers across 3 commercially relevant diets. Twenty-eight Limousin × Friesian heifers were used and were ranked on the basis of phenotypic RFI: 14 low-RFI and 14 high-RFI animals. Ruminal CH emissions were estimated over 5 d using the SF tracer gas technique on 3 successive occasions: 1) at the end of a 6-wk period (Period 1) on grass silage (GS), 2) at the end of an 8-wk period (Period 2) at pasture, and 3) at the end of a 5-wk period (Period 3) on a 30:70 corn silage:concentrate total mixed ration (TMR). Animals were allowed ad libitum access to feed and water at all times. Individual DMI was estimated during CH measurement and rumen samples were taken at the end of each CH measurement period. Diet type affected all feed intake and CH traits measured ( 0.05), but CH yield was greatest in low-RFI heifers ( = 0.03) as a proportion of both DMI and GE intake. Interactions between the main effects were observed ( < 0.05) for CP digestibility (CPD), DM digestibility (DMD), ruminal propionate, and the acetate:propionate ratio. Low-RFI animals had greater ( < 0.05) CPD and DMD than their high-RFI contemporaries when offered GS but not the other 2 diets. Low-RFI heifers also had greater OM digestibility ( = 0.027). Additionally, low-RFI heifers had a lower concentration of propionate ( < 0.05) compared with high-RFI heifers when fed GS, resulting in a greater ( < 0.05) acetate:propionate ratio. However, these differences were not evident for the other 2 diets. Energetically efficient animals do not have a lower ruminal methanogenic potential compared with their more inefficient counterparts and, indeed, some evidence to the contrary was found, which may reflect the greater nutrient digestive potential observed in low-RFI cattle. PMID:27065279

  11. Statistical models for trisomic phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamb, N.E.; Sherman, S.L.; Feingold, E. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Certain genetic disorders are rare in the general population but more common in individuals with specific trisomies, which suggests that the genes involved in the etiology of these disorders may be located on the trisomic chromosome. As with all aneuploid syndromes, however, a considerable degree of variation exists within each phenotype so that any given trait is present only among a subset of the trisomic population. We have previously presented a simple gene-dosage model to explain this phenotypic variation and developed a strategy to map genes for such traits. The mapping strategy does not depend on the simple model but works in theory under any model that predicts that affected individuals have an increased likelihood of disomic homozygosity at the trait locus. This paper explores the robustness of our mapping method by investigating what kinds of models give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity. We describe a number of basic statistical models for trisomic phenotypes. Some of these are logical extensions of standard models for disomic phenotypes, and some are more specific to trisomy. Where possible, we discuss genetic mechanisms applicable to each model. We investigate which models and which parameter values give an expected increase in disomic homozygosity in individuals with the trait. Finally, we determine the sample sizes required to identify the increased disomic homozygosity under each model. Most of the models we explore yield detectable increases in disomic homozygosity for some reasonable range of parameter values, usually corresponding to smaller trait frequencies. It therefore appears that our mapping method should be effective for a wide variety of moderately infrequent traits, even though the exact mode of inheritance is unlikely to be known. 21 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  12. CAPTURED End Evaluation Synthesis Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.H.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides the findings of the Synthesis Study of the CAPTURED Evaluation and is produced as part of the overall CAPTURED End Evaluation. After five years of support by the CAPTURED project the three CAPTURED partners have achieved commendable results. Ten lessons learned are formulated th

  13. Theory of electron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The historical development of a theoretical model for the electron-capture detector, sometimes called the 'classical' model, is presented and the model as it stands today is described. This is followed by a comparison of the model with experimental data obtained with other techniques since the early development of the theory and finally a section on correlations and predictions is presented. (Auth.)

  14. Breed effects, retained heterosis, and estimates of genetic and phenotypic parameters for carcass and meat traits of beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, K E; Cundiff, L V; Koch, R M; Dikeman, M E; Koohmaraie, M

    1994-05-01

    Retained heterosis for meat traits was estimated in F3 generation castrate males in three composite populations of beef cattle finished on two levels of dietary energy density (2.82 Mcal of ME and 3.07 Mcal of ME and 11.50% CP) and serially slaughtered at four end points at intervals of 20 to 22 d. Breed effects were evaluated in nine parental breeds (Red Poll [R], Hereford [H], Angus [A], Limousin [L], Braunvieh [B], Pinzgauer [P], Gelbvieh [G], Simmental [S], and Charolais [C]) that contributed to the three composite populations (MARC I = 1/4 B, 1/4 C, 1/4 L, 1/8 H, 1/8 A; MARC II = 1/4 G, 1/4 S, 1/4 H, 1/4 A; and MARC III = 1/4 R, 1/4 P, 1/4 H, and 1/4 A). Breed effects were important (P carcass and meat traits evaluated. Dietary energy density and slaughter group affected (P carcasses. Estimates of heritability were intermediate to high for measures of fatness but were generally low for palatability attributes. The high negative genetic correlation (-.56) between percentage of retail product and marbling score and the relatively low genetic correlations between percentage of retail product and palatability attributes suggests the need for simultaneous attention to percentage of retail product and palatability attributes rather than to marbling score. Correlations among breed group means were generally high for measures of fatness with palatability attributes and were high and negative for percentage of retail product with marbling score and with other measures of fatness. Limited opportunity exists for selecting among breeds to achieve high levels of marbling in the longissimus muscle simultaneously with a high percentage of retail product. These results suggest that the most logical approach to resolution of the genetic antagonism between favorable carcass composition and less favorable palatability attributes is to form composite breeds with breed contributions organized to achieve an optimum balance between favorable carcass composition and desirable

  15. Changing the Codon Usage of hfq Gene has Profound Effect on Phenotype and Pathogenicity of Salmonella Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Parthasarathi; Kutty, V H Muhammed; Kumar, Ajeet; Sharma, Bhaskar

    2016-03-01

    Genome recoding with bias codons (synonymous rare codons) or codon pair bias is being used as a method to attenuate virulence mostly in viruses. The target gene chosen for attenuation in general in bacteria is mostly toxin or virulence gene. We have used RNA chaperone hfq, a global post-transcriptional regulator of bacterial gene expression that regulates about 20 % genes in Salmonella, as the target of recoding. The hfq gene was recoded by replacing the codons of hfq gene with synonymous rare codons. Recoding decreased the expression of Hfq protein about two-fold in the mutant as compared to the parent strain. Recoding did not affect growth kinetics, but in growth competition the mutant strain was outcompeted by the parent strain. There was significant decrease in survivability of mutant strain in macrophage as compared to the parent strain. The biofilm formation was significantly impaired in case of recoded mutant. The mutants were also less motile as compared to the parent strain. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with the mutant strain had shown better survival as compared to parent strain. The results show that recoding is an effective method of reducing virulence. PMID:26620536

  16. Inhibitory Effects of Anti-sense PTTG on Malignant Phenotype of Human Ovarian Carcinoma Cell Line SK-OV-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈刚; 李静; 李辅军; 李箫; 周剑锋; 卢运萍; 马丁

    2004-01-01

    To construct eukaryotic expression vector expressing full length anti-sense pituitary tumor transforming gene (PTTG) mRNA and observe its blocking effect on the potential invasion of human ovarian carcinoma cell line SK-OV-3. PCR primers containing designed enzyme cut sites were used for cloning full-length PTTG gene fragment, and the resulting PCR product was inserted into the eukaryotic vector pcDNA3. 1 in the antisense direction. The recombinant vector was then transfected into SK-OV-3 by Lipofectamine. The positive cell clone was screened by G418, PTTG and bFGF at protein level expression were detected by Western blot. The biological behavior change of transfection positive cells was observed by colony formation in soft agar assay. Our results showed that SK-OV-3 clones stably expressing full-length recombinant pcDNA3. 1-PTTGas were obtained. The expressions of PTTG and bFGF protein in transfected cells were decreased by 61.5 % and 52.3%, respectively as compared with non-transfected ones. The number of colony formation was reduced significantly in transfected cells as compared with empty vector transfected and non-transfected cells. It is concluded that the recombinant vector pcDNA3. 1-PTTGas is a novel tool and provides an alternative anti-sense gene therapy targeted at PTTG in human carcinoma.

  17. Methods for Analyzing Multivariate Phenotypes in Genetic Association Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Yang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Multivariate phenotypes are frequently encountered in genetic association studies. The purpose of analyzing multivariate phenotypes usually includes discovery of novel genetic variants of pleiotropy effects, that is, affecting multiple phenotypes, and the ultimate goal of uncovering the underlying genetic mechanism. In recent years, there have been new method development and application of existing statistical methods to such phenotypes. In this paper, we provide a review of the available methods for analyzing association between a single marker and a multivariate phenotype consisting of the same type of components (e.g., all continuous or all categorical or different types of components (e.g., some are continuous and others are categorical. We also reviewed causal inference methods designed to test whether the detected association with the multivariate phenotype is truly pleiotropy or the genetic marker exerts its effects on some phenotypes through affecting the others.

  18. Phenotypic Resistance to Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of antibiotic resistance is usually associated with genetic changes, either to the acquisition of resistance genes, or to mutations in elements relevant for the activity of the antibiotic. However, in some situations resistance can be achieved without any genetic alteration; this is called phenotypic resistance. Non-inherited resistance is associated to specific processes such as growth in biofilms, a stationary growth phase or persistence. These situations might occur during infection but they are not usually considered in classical susceptibility tests at the clinical microbiology laboratories. Recent work has also shown that the susceptibility to antibiotics is highly dependent on the bacterial metabolism and that global metabolic regulators can modulate this phenotype. This modulation includes situations in which bacteria can be more resistant or more susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding these processes will thus help in establishing novel therapeutic approaches based on the actual susceptibility shown by bacteria during infection, which might differ from that determined in the laboratory. In this review, we discuss different examples of phenotypic resistance and the mechanisms that regulate the crosstalk between bacterial metabolism and the susceptibility to antibiotics. Finally, information on strategies currently under development for diminishing the phenotypic resistance to antibiotics of bacterial pathogens is presented.

  19. Understanding Motion Capture for Computer Animation

    CERN Document Server

    Menache, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The power of today's motion capture technology has taken animated characters and special effects to amazing new levels of reality. And with the release of blockbusters like Avatar and Tin-Tin, audiences continually expect more from each new release. To live up to these expectations, film and game makers, particularly technical animators and directors, need to be at the forefront of motion capture technology. In this extensively updated edition of Understanding Motion Capture for Computer Animation and Video Games, an industry insider explains the latest research developments in digital design

  20. Gravitational Capture of Asteroids by Gas Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Vieira Neto

    2009-01-01

    captured by the planet got its velocity reduced and could been trapped as an irregular satellite. It is well known that, depending on the time scale of the gas envelope, an asteroid will spiral and collide with the planet. So, we simulate the passage of the asteroid in the gas envelope with its density decreasing along the time. Using this approach, we found effective captures, and have a better understanding of the whole process. Finally, we conclude that the origin of the irregular satellites cannot be attributed to the gas drag capture mechanism alone.

  1. Effect of sequential heat and cold shocks on nuclear phenotypes of the blood-sucking insect, Panstrongylus megistus (Burmeister) (Hemiptera, Reduviidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Simone L; Pacheco Raquel M; Rodrigues Vera LCC; Mello Maria Luiza S.

    2002-01-01

    Thermal shocks induce changes in the nuclear phenotypes that correspond to survival (heterochromatin decondensation, nuclear fusion) or death (apoptosis, necrosis) responses in the Malpighian tubules of Panstrongylus megistus. Since thermal tolerance increased survival and molting rate in this species following sequential shocks, we investigated whether changes in nuclear phenotypes accompanied the insect survival response to sequential thermal shocks. Fifth instar nymphs were subjected to a ...

  2. Clinical Epidemiology of Buruli Ulcer from Benin (2005-2013: Effect of Time-Delay to Diagnosis on Clinical Forms and Severe Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Capela

    Full Text Available Buruli Ulcer (BU is a neglected infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans that is responsible for severe necrotizing cutaneous lesions that may be associated with bone involvement. Clinical presentations of BU lesions are classically classified as papules, nodules, plaques and edematous infiltration, ulcer or osteomyelitis. Within these different clinical forms, lesions can be further classified as severe forms based on focality (multiple lesions, lesions' size (>15 cm diameter or WHO Category (WHO Category 3 lesions. There are studies reporting an association between delay in seeking medical care and the development of ulcerative forms of BU or osteomyelitis, but the effect of time-delay on the emergence of lesions classified as severe has not been addressed. To address both issues, and in a cohort of laboratory-confirmed BU cases, 476 patients from a medical center in Allada, Benin, were studied. In this laboratory-confirmed cohort, we validated previous observations, demonstrating that time-delay is statistically related to the clinical form of BU. Indeed, for non-ulcerated forms (nodule, edema, and plaque the median time-delay was 32.5 days (IQR 30.0-67.5, while for ulcerated forms it was 60 days (IQR 20.0-120.0 (p = 0.009, and for bone lesions, 365 days (IQR 228.0-548.0. On the other hand, we show here that time-delay is not associated with the more severe phenotypes of BU, such as multi-focal lesions (median 90 days; IQR 56-217.5; p = 0.09, larger lesions (diameter >15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-120; p = 0.92 or category 3 WHO classification (median 60 days; IQR 30-150; p = 0.20, when compared with unifocal (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, small lesions (diameter ≤15 cm (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, or WHO category 1+2 lesions (median 60 days; IQR 30-90, respectively. Our results demonstrate that after an initial period of progression towards ulceration or bone involvement, BU lesions become stable regarding size and focal

  3. Effects of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} on the Capture Capacity of a Primary-Amine Based Polymeric CO{sub 2} Sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallenbeck, Alexander P; Kitchin, John R

    2013-08-01

    Post combustion CO{sub 2} capture is most commonly carried out using an amine solution that results in a high parasitic energy cost in the stripper unit due to the need to heat the water which comprises a majority of the amine solution. It is also well known that amine solvents suffer from stability issues due to amine leaching and poisoning by flue gas impurities. Solid sorbents provide an alternative to solvent systems that would potentially reduce the energy penalty of carbon capture. However, the cost of using a particular sorbent is greatly affected by the usable lifetime of the sorbent. This work investigated the stability of a primary amine-functionalized ion exchange resin in the presence of O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}, both of which are constituents of flue gas that have been shown to cause degradation of various amines in solvent processes. The CO{sub 2} capture capacity was measured over multiple capture cycles under continuous exposure to two simulated flue gas streams, one containing 12 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 84% N{sub 2}, and the other containing 12.5 vol% CO{sub 2}, 4% O{sub 2}, 431 ppm SO{sub 2}, balance N{sub 2} using a custom-built packed bed reactor. The resin maintained its CO{sub 2} capture capacity of 1.31 mol/kg over 17 capture cycles in the presence of O{sub 2} without SO{sub 2}. However, the CO{sub 2} capture capacity of the resin decreased rapidly under exposure to SO{sub 2} by an amount of 1.3 mol/kg over 9 capture cycles. Elemental analysis revealed the resin adsorbed 1.0 mol/kg of SO{sub 2}. Thermal regeneration was determined to not be possible. The poisoned resin was, however, partially regenerated with exposure to 1.5M NaOH for 3 days resulting in a 43% removal of sulfur, determined through elemental analysis, and a 35% recovery of CO{sub 2} capture capacity. Evidence was also found for amine loss upon prolonged (7 days) continuous exposure to high temperatures (120 C) in air. It is concluded that desulfurization of the flue gas

  4. Use of boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles with ROS scavenging ability in boron neutron capture therapy to achieve high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhenyu; Horiguchi, Yukichi; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira; Suzuki, Minoru; Ono, Koji; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2016-10-01

    A boron delivery system with high therapeutic efficiency and low adverse effects is crucial for a successful boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this study, we developed boron cluster-containing redox nanoparticles (BNPs) via polyion complex (PIC) formation, using a newly synthesized poly(ethylene glycol)-polyanion (PEG-polyanion, possessing a (10)B-enriched boron cluster as a side chain of one of its segments) and PEG-polycation (possessing a reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger as a side chain of one of its segments). The BNPs exhibited high colloidal stability, selective uptake in tumor cells, specific accumulation, and long retention in tumor tissue and ROS scavenging ability. After thermal neutron irradiation, significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in the BNP-treated group, with only 5-ppm (10)B in tumor tissues, whereas at least 20-ppm (10)B is generally required for low molecular weight (LMW) (10)B agents. In addition, increased leukocyte levels were observed in the LMW (10)B agent-treated group after thermal neutron irradiation, and not in BNP-treated group, which might be attributed to its ROS scavenging ability. No visual metastasis of tumor cells to other organs was observed 1 month after irradiation in the BNP-treated group. These results suggest that BNPs are promising for enhancing the BNCT performance. PMID:27467416

  5. Effects of sublethal fenitrothion ingestion on cholinesterase inhibition, standard metabolism, thermal preference, and prey-capture ability in the Australian central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps, Agamidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, David; Buttemer, William A; Astheimer, Lee; Fildes, Karen; Hooper, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The central bearded dragon (Pogona vitticeps) is a medium-sized lizard that is common in semiarid habitats in Australia and that potentially is at risk of fenitrothion exposure from use of the chemical in plague locust control. We examined the effects of single sublethal doses of this organophosphate (OP; low dose = 2.0 mg/kg; high dose = 20 mg/kg; control = vehicle alone) on lizard thermal preference, standard metabolic rate, and prey-capture ability. We also measured activities of plasma total cholinesterase (ChE) and acetylcholinesterase before and at 0, 2, 8, 24, 120, and 504 h after OP dosing. Predose plasma total ChE activity differed significantly between sexes and averaged 0.66 +/- 0.06 and 0.45 +/- 0.06 micromol/min/ml for males and females, respectively. Approximately 75% of total ChE activity was attributable to butyrylcholinesterase. Peak ChE inhibition reached 19% 2 h after OP ingestion in the low-dose group, and 68% 8 h after ingestion in high-dose animals. Neither OP doses significantly affected diurnal body temperature, standard metabolic rate, or feeding rate. Plasma total ChE levels remained substantially depressed up to 21 d after dosing in the high-dose group, making this species a useful long-term biomonitor of OP exposure in its habitat. PMID:14768874

  6. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás; Koskela, Antti; Tuukkanen, Juha; Ohlsson, Claes; Rozell, Björn; Eriksson, Maria

    2015-08-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse model to study the possibility of recovering from HGPS bone disease upon silencing of the HGPS mutation, and the potential benefits from treatment with resveratrol. We show that complete silencing of the transgenic expression of progerin normalized bone morphology and mineralization already after 7 weeks. The improvements included lower frequencies of rib fractures and callus formation, an increased number of osteocytes in remodeled bone, and normalized dentinogenesis. The beneficial effects from resveratrol treatment were less significant and to a large extent similar to mice treated with sucrose alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS. PMID:25877214

  7. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of lactic acid bacteria isolated from raw goat milk and effect of farming practices on the dominant species of lactic acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, Hélène; Ali Haimoud Lekhal, Djamila; Roques, C

    2015-10-01

    Lactic acid bacteria, in particular Lactococcus lactis, play a decisive role in the cheese making process and more particularly in lactic cheeses which are primarily produced on goat dairy farms. The objective of this study was therefore to identify the main lactic acid bacteria found in raw goats' milk from three different regions in France and evaluate if certain farming practices have an effect on the distribution of species of lactic acid bacteria in the various milk samples. Identification at genus or species level was carried out using phenotypic tests and genotypic methods including repetitive element REP-PCR, species-specific PCR and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The distribution of the main bacterial species in the milk samples varied depending on farms and their characteristics. Out of the 146 strains identified, L. lactis was the dominant species (60% of strains), followed by Enterococcus (38%) of which Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium. Within the species L. lactis, L. lactis subsp lactis was detected more frequently than L. lactis subsp cremoris (74% vs. 26%). The predominance of L. lactis subsp cremoris was linked to geographical area studied. It appears that the animals' environment plays a role in the balance between the dominance of L. lactis and enterococci in raw goats' milk. The separation between the milking parlor and the goat shed (vs no separation) and only straw in the bedding (vs straw and hay) seems to promote L. lactis in the milk (vs enterococci). PMID:26082325

  8. Effects of nuclear deformation and neutron transfer in capture process, and origin of fusion hindrance at deep sub-barrier energies

    OpenAIRE

    Sargsyan, V. V.; Adamian, G.G.; Antonenko, N.V.; W. Scheid; Zhang, H. Q.

    2011-01-01

    The roles of nuclear deformation and neutron transfer in sub-barrier capture process are studied within the quantum diffusion approach. The change of the deformations of colliding nuclei with neutron exchange can crucially influence the sub-barrier fusion. The comparison of the calculated capture cross section and the measured fusion cross section in various reactions at extreme sub- barrier energies gives us information about the fusion and quasifission.

  9. Generation of a multi-locus chicken introgression line to study the effects of genetic interactions on metabolic phenotypes in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weronica eEk

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Most biological traits are regulated by a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors. By intercrossing divergent lines, it is possible to identify individual and interacting QTL involved in the genetic architecture of these traits. When the loci have been mapped, alternative strategies are needed for fine-mapping and studying the individual and interactive effects of the QTL in detail. We have previously identified, replicated and fine-mapped a four-locus QTL network that determines nearly half of the eight-fold difference in body-weight at 56 days of age between two divergently selected chicken lines. Here, we describe, to our knowledge, the first generation of a three-locus QTL introgression line in chickens to further study the effect of three of the interacting loci in this network on metabolic phenotypes. Recurrent marker assisted backcrossing was used to simultaneously transfer QTL alleles from the low-weight selected line into the high-weight selected line. Three generations of backcrossing and one generation of intercrossing resulted in an introgression line where all three introgressed QTL and several unlinked and linked control-loci were segregating at nearly expected allele frequencies. We show that marker-based sexing is an efficient method for sexing breeding populations and how intensive selection can be applied using artificial insemination to generate large half-sib families. Based on our empirical observations, we provide recommendations for future introgression-line breeding experiments. In the future, use of this confirmed introgression line will facilitate detailed studies of the effects of genetic interactions on complex traits.

  10. Inhibition of Polyamine Uptake Potentiates the Anti-Proliferative Effect of Polyamine Synthesis Inhibition and Preserves the Contractile Phenotype of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossi, Mario; Phanstiel, Otto; Rippe, Catarina; Swärd, Karl; Alajbegovic, Azra; Albinsson, Sebastian; Forte, Amalia; Persson, Lo; Hellstrand, Per; Nilsson, Bengt-Olof

    2016-06-01

    Increased vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is a factor in atherosclerosis and injury-induced arterial (re) stenosis. Inhibition of polyamine synthesis by α-difluoro-methylornithine (DFMO), an irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, attenuates VSMC proliferation with high sensitivity and specificity. However, cells can escape polyamine synthesis blockade by importing polyamines from the environment. To address this issue, polyamine transport inhibitors (PTIs) have been developed. We investigated the effects of the novel trimer44NMe (PTI-1) alone and in combination with DFMO on VSMC polyamine uptake, proliferation and phenotype regulation. PTI-1 efficiently inhibited polyamine uptake in primary mouse aortic and human coronary VSMCs in the absence as well as in the presence of DFMO. Interestingly, culture with DFMO for 2 days substantially (>95%) reduced putrescine (Put) and spermidine (Spd) contents without any effect on proliferation. Culture with PTI-1 alone had no effect on either polyamine levels or proliferation rate, but the combination of both treatments reduced Put and Spd levels below the detection limit and inhibited proliferation. Treatment with DFMO for a longer time period (4 days) reduced Put and Spd below their detection limits and reduced proliferation, showing that only a small pool of polyamines is needed to sustain VSMC proliferation. Inhibited proliferation by polyamine depletion was associated with maintained expression of contractile smooth marker genes. In cultured intact mouse aorta, PTI-1 potentiated the DFMO-induced inhibition of cell proliferation. The combination of endogenous polyamine synthesis inhibition with uptake blockade is thus a viable approach for targeting unwanted vascular cell proliferation in vivo, including vascular restenosis. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1334-1342, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26529275

  11. Phenotyping bananas for drought resistance

    OpenAIRE

    IyyakuttyRavi

    2013-01-01

    Drought has emerged as one of the major constraints in banana production. Its effects are pronounced substantially in the tropics and sub-tropics of the world due to climate change. Bananas are quite sensitive to drought; however, genotypes with ‘B’ genome are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than those solely based on ‘A’ genome. In particular, bananas with ‘ABB’ genomes are more tolerant to drought and other abiotic stresses than other genotypes. A good phenotyping plan is a prerequisite f...

  12. Phenotyping bananas for drought resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi, Iyyakkutty; Uma, Subbaraya; Vaganan, Muthu Mayil; Mustaffa, Mohamed M.

    2013-01-01

    Drought has emerged as one of the major constraints in banana production. Its effects are pronounced substantially in the tropics and sub-tropics of the world due to climate change. Bananas are quite sensitive to drought; however, genotypes with “B” genome are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than those solely based on “A” genome. In particular, bananas with “ABB” genomes are more tolerant to drought and other abiotic stresses than other genotypes. A good phenotyping plan is a prerequisite f...

  13. Phenotypic MicroRNA Microarrays

    OpenAIRE

    Veronica Soloveva; Michel Liuzzi; Jin Yeop Kim; Hi Chul Kim; Jin Yeong Heo; Yong-Jun Kwon

    2013-01-01

    Microarray technology has become a very popular approach in cases where multiple experiments need to be conducted repeatedly or done with a variety of samples. In our lab, we are applying our high density spots microarray approach to microscopy visualization of the effects of transiently introduced siRNA or cDNA on cellular morphology or phenotype. In this publication, we are discussing the possibility of using this micro-scale high throughput process to study the role of microRNAs in the bio...

  14. Supernova electron capture rates

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Pinedo, G

    1999-01-01

    We have calculated the Gamow-Teller strength distributions for the ground states and low lying states of several nuclei that play an important role in the precollapse evolution of supernova. The calculations reproduce the experimental GT distributions nicely. The GT distribution are used to calculate electron capture rates for typical presupernova conditions. The computed rates are noticeably smaller than the presently adopted rates. The possible implications for the supernova evolution are discussed.

  15. Inland capture fisheries

    OpenAIRE

    Welcomme, Robin L.; Cowx, Ian G.; Coates, David; Béné, Christophe; Funge-Smith, Simon; Halls, Ashley; Lorenzen, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The reported annual yield from inland capture fisheries in 2008 was over 10 million tonnes, although real catches are probably considerably higher than this. Inland fisheries are extremely complex, and in many cases poorly understood. The numerous water bodies and small rivers are inhabited by a wide range of species and several types of fisher community with diversified livelihood strategies for whom inland fisheries are extremely important. Many drivers affect the fisheries, including inter...

  16. Laser capture microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, S.; McKay, J A; McLeod, H L; Murray, G I

    2000-01-01

    Human tissues are composed of complex admixtures of different cell types and their biologically meaningful analysis necessitates the procurement of pure samples of the cells of interest. Many approaches have been used in attempts to overcome this difficulty, including a variety of microdissection methods. This review concerns a recent advance in microdissection techniques, namely laser capture microdissection (LCM). The principle underlying this technique is outlined, and practical issues per...

  17. Enhanced image capture through fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Peter J.; Hanna, Keith; Kolczynski, Raymond J.

    1993-01-01

    Image fusion may be used to combine images from different sensors, such as IR and visible cameras, to obtain a single composite with extended information content. Fusion may also be used to combine multiple images from a given sensor to form a composite image in which information of interest is enhanced. We present a general method for performing image fusion and show that this method is effective for diverse fusion applications. We suggest that fusion may provide a powerful tool for enhanced image capture with broad utility in image processing and computer vision.

  18. Phenotypic Switching in Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Neena; Hasan, Fahmi; Fries, Bettina C.

    2008-01-01

    Over the past three decades new fungal diseases have emerged that now constitute a major threat, especially for patients with chronic diseases and/or underlying immune defi ciencies. Despite the epidemiologic data, the emergence of stable drug-resistant or hyper-virulent fungal strains in human disease has not been demonstrated as seen in emerging viral and bacterial infections. Fungi are eukaryotic microbes that capitalize on a sophisticated built-in ability to generate phenotypic variabilit...

  19. DISCOVERING PATIENT PHENOTYPES USING GENERALIZED LOW RANK MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Alejandro; Liu, Vincent; Wan, Joe; Callahan, Alison; Udell, Madeleine; Stark, David E; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    The practice of medicine is predicated on discovering commonalities or distinguishing characteristics among patients to inform corresponding treatment. Given a patient grouping (hereafter referred to as a phenotype), clinicians can implement a treatment pathway accounting for the underlying cause of disease in that phenotype. Traditionally, phenotypes have been discovered by intuition, experience in practice, and advancements in basic science, but these approaches are often heuristic, labor intensive, and can take decades to produce actionable knowledge. Although our understanding of disease has progressed substantially in the past century, there are still important domains in which our phenotypes are murky, such as in behavioral health or in hospital settings. To accelerate phenotype discovery, researchers have used machine learning to find patterns in electronic health records, but have often been thwarted by missing data, sparsity, and data heterogeneity. In this study, we use a flexible framework called Generalized Low Rank Modeling (GLRM) to overcome these barriers and discover phenotypes in two sources of patient data. First, we analyze data from the 2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample (NIS), which contains upwards of 8 million hospitalization records consisting of administrative codes and demographic information. Second, we analyze a small (N=1746), local dataset documenting the clinical progression of autism spectrum disorder patients using granular features from the electronic health record, including text from physician notes. We demonstrate that low rank modeling successfully captures known and putative phenotypes in these vastly different datasets. PMID:26776181

  20. Comment on "Structure effects in the $^{15}$N(n,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$N radiative capture reaction from the Coulomb dissociation of $^{16}$N"

    CERN Document Server

    Mohr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In their recent study Neelam, Shubhchintak, and Chatterjee have claimed that "it would certainly be useful to perform a Coulomb dissociation experiment to find the low energy capture cross section for the reaction" $^{15}$N(n,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$N. However, it is obvious that a Coulomb dissociation experiment cannot constrain this capture cross section because the dominating branchings of the capture reaction lead to excited states in $^{16}$N which do not contribute in a Coulomb dissociation experiment. An estimate of the total $^{15}$N(n,$\\gamma$)$^{16}$N cross section from Coulomb dissociation of $^{16}$N requires a precise knowledge of the $\\gamma$-ray branchings in the capture reaction. Surprisingly, the calculation of Neelam, Shubhchintak, and Chatterjee predicts a strongly energy-dependent ground state branching of the order of 0.05\\% to 0.6\\% at energies between 100 and 500 keV which is almost 2 orders of magnitude below calculations in the direct capture model. Additionally, this calculation of Neelam, S...

  1. Understanding mammalian genetic systems: the challenge of phenotyping in the mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve D M Brown

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding mammalian genetic systems is predicated on the determination of the relationship between genetic variation and phenotype. Several international programmes are under way to deliver mutations in every gene in the mouse genome. The challenge for mouse geneticists is to develop approaches that will provide comprehensive phenotype datasets for these mouse mutant libraries. Several factors are critical to success in this endeavour. It will be important to catalogue assay and environment and where possible to adopt standardised procedures for phenotyping tests along with common environmental conditions to ensure comparable datasets of phenotypes. Moreover, the scale of the task underlines the need to invest in technological development improving both the speed and cost of phenotyping platforms. In addition, it will be necessary to develop new informatics standards that capture the phenotype assay as well as other factors, genetic and environmental, that impinge upon phenotype outcome.

  2. U-238 neutron-capture gamma-cascade generation and transport simulation for capture-tank response (final report). Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosener, T.J.

    1992-05-07

    A computer analysis has been performed to evaluate the energy dependent response of a capture tank to the gamma rays emitted in the cascades of the excited U-239 nucleus. This model determines the energies of the gamma-ray cascades, the order of emission of the gamma rays in a cascade, and the gamma-ray multiplicity of the cascades using Monte Carlo techniques. A capture tank responds to the combined effect of the various gamma rays emitted in the cascade. Examined is the energy deposition in a capture tank by the cascades generated in resonant (surface) capture and off-resonant (volumetric) capture, with and without internal conversion. Off-resonant capture deposits, on the average, less energy than resonant capture, due to self-shielding of the gamma-rays in the capture sample. Internal conversion has negligible effect on the average cascade energy deposited in the capture tank. Gamma-ray cascade, Capture tank, U-238 neutron capture.

  3. Target capture and target ghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Steven P.

    1996-05-01

    Optimal detection methods for small targets rely on whitened matched filters, which convolve the measured data with the signal model, and whiten the result with the noise covariance. In real-world implementations of such filters, the noise covariance must be estimated from the data, and the resulting covariance estimate may be corrupted by presence of the target. The resulting loss in SNR is called 'target capture'. Target capture is often thought to be a problem only for bright targets. This presentation shows that target capture also arises for dim targets, leading to an SNR loss which is independent of target strength and depends on the averaging method used to estimate the noise covariance. This loss is due to a 'coherent beat' between the true noise and that portion of the estimated noise covariance due to the target. This beat leads to 'ghost targets', which diminish the target SNR by producing a negative target ghost at the target's position. A quantitative estimate of this effect will be given, and shown to agree with numerical results. The effect of averaging on SNR is also discussed for data scenes with synthetic injected targets, in cases where the noise covariance is estimated using 'no target' data. For these cases, it is shown that the so-called 'optimal' filter, which uses the true noise covariance, is actually worse than a 'sub-optimal' filter which estimates the noise from scene. This apparent contradiction is resolved by showing that the optimal filter is best if the same filter is used for many scenes, but is outperformed by a filter adapted to a specific scene.

  4. MPHASYS: a mouse phenotype analysis system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian I

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic, high-throughput studies of mouse phenotypes have been hampered by the inability to analyze individual animal data from a multitude of sources in an integrated manner. Studies generally make comparisons at the level of genotype or treatment thereby excluding associations that may be subtle or involve compound phenotypes. Additionally, the lack of integrated, standardized ontologies and methodologies for data exchange has inhibited scientific collaboration and discovery. Results Here we introduce a Mouse Phenotype Analysis System (MPHASYS, a platform for integrating data generated by studies of mouse models of human biology and disease such as aging and cancer. This computational platform is designed to provide a standardized methodology for working with animal data; a framework for data entry, analysis and sharing; and ontologies and methodologies for ensuring accurate data capture. We describe the tools that currently comprise MPHASYS, primarily ones related to mouse pathology, and outline its use in a study of individual animal-specific patterns of multiple pathology in mice harboring a specific germline mutation in the DNA repair and transcription-specific gene Xpd. Conclusion MPHASYS is a system for analyzing multiple data types from individual animals. It provides a framework for developing data analysis applications, and tools for collecting and distributing high-quality data. The software is platform independent and freely available under an open-source license 1.

  5. Capture in restricted four body problem

    CERN Document Server

    Rosaev, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    A number of irregular moons of the Jovian planets have recently been discovered. Most adequate way of their origin is capture, but detailed mechanism is unknown. A few possibilities are discussed: collisions, gas drag, tidal destruction of a binary asteroid. In this paper the capture process in restricted four body problem (RFBP) is researched. The interaction with regular satellite can be studied by this way as well as binary asteroid destruction in Hill sphere of planet. The energetic criteria of ballistic capture are studied and some numerical experiments are developed. It is confirmed, that capture in four body problem is more probable on retrograde than on prograde orbit. In according with our results, encounter with regular satellites is more effective mechanism to create an irregular satellite population, than a binary asteroid flyby.

  6. Phenotypic resonance from a single meal in an insectivorous lizard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massot, Manuel; Aragón, Pedro

    2013-07-22

    Environmental variations are usually thought to require a nonanecdotal intensity or duration to have major effects on individuals and evolutionary outputs. However, environmental variations of weak intensity and short duration could be of major importance when they influence key targets or critical stages. Because conditions experienced early in life can be critical determinants of life history trajectories, especially early nutrition, we tested this hypothesis by experimentally manipulating the first meal of life in the lizard Zootoca vivipara. The species is a live-bearing lizard without parental care, and it consumes small arthropods. Neonates face a great challenge in acquiring their first meal, as is the case in many species that develop skills through learning to capture live prey. We show that this single meal had an overall and long-lasting impact. Effects on dispersal arose within 10 days, and we found effects 1-2 months later on growth, recapture probability, and juvenile survival. Interestingly, we detected effects on reproduction up to 2 years later. Such a "phenotypic resonance" reveals that the influence of small and ephemeral events should not be neglected by evolutionary biologists. PMID:23831289

  7. Evidence for field enhanced electron capture by EL2 centers in semi-insulating GaAs and the effect on GaAs radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of Schottky contact semiconductor radiation detectors fabricated from semi-insulating GaAs is highly sensitive to charged impurities and defects in the material. The observed behavior of semi-insulating GaAs Schottky barrier alpha particle detectors does not match well with models that treat the semi-insulating material as either perfectly intrinsic or as material with deep donors (EL2) of constant capture cross section compensated with shallow acceptors. We propose an explanation for the discrepancy based on enhanced capture of electrons by EL2 centers at high electric fields and the resulting formation of a quasineutral region in the GaAs. Presented is a simple model including field enhanced electron capture which shows good agreement with experimental alpha particle pulse height measurements

  8. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to capture greater than 90 percent of sulfur gases evolved during thermal treatment of lunar soils....

  9. Synovectomy by Neutron capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Synovectomy by Neutron capture has as purpose the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis, illness which at present does not have a definitive curing. This therapy requires a neutron source for irradiating the articulation affected. The energy spectra and the intensity of these neutrons are fundamental since these neutrons induce nuclear reactions of capture with Boron-10 inside the articulation and the freely energy of these reactions is transferred at the productive tissue of synovial liquid, annihilating it. In this work it is presented the neutron spectra results obtained with moderator packings of spherical geometry which contains in its center a Pu239 Be source. The calculations were realized through Monte Carlo method. The moderators assayed were light water, heavy water base and the both combination of them. The spectra obtained, the average energy, the neutron total number by neutron emitted by source, the thermal neutron percentage and the dose equivalent allow us to suggest that the moderator packing more adequate is what has a light water thickness 0.5 cm (radius 2 cm) and 24.5 cm heavy water (radius 26.5 cm). (Author)

  10. Properties of anthropogenic soils in ancient run-off capturing agricultural terraces in the Central Negev desert (Israel) and related effects of biochar and ash on crop growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asperen, van H.L.; Bor, A.M.C.; Sonneveld, M.P.W.; Bruins, H.J.; Lazarovitch, N.

    2014-01-01

    In the Central Negev hills (Israel) many ancient terraced wadis exist, which captured run-off and caused gradual soil aggradation, which enabled agricultural practices. In these terraces, dark colored soil horizons were observed, containing charcoal, as can be found in Terra Preta soils, suggesting

  11. Nanosolvation by acetonitrile and 18-crown-6 ether induce strongly different effects on the electron-capture induced dissociation of aromatic tripeptide cations in the gas phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    MacLot, S.; Rangama, J.; Nielsen, Steen Brøndsted; Poully, J.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental gas-phase Electron Capture-Induced Dissociation (ECID) coupled to mass-spectrometry has been performed on the doubly-protonated tripeptides Lys-Trp-Lys (KWK) and Lys-Tyr-Lys (KYK). In this report, we focus on the influence of non-covalent binding of two different molecules, acetonitr......Experimental gas-phase Electron Capture-Induced Dissociation (ECID) coupled to mass-spectrometry has been performed on the doubly-protonated tripeptides Lys-Trp-Lys (KWK) and Lys-Tyr-Lys (KYK). In this report, we focus on the influence of non-covalent binding of two different molecules......, acetonitrile and 18-crown-6 ether (CE), to these tripeptide cations on the relative probabilities of their main fragmentation channels (H loss, NH3 loss and N — Cα bond cleavage) after electron capture from sodium atoms. First, we recorded the spectra of bare peptide ions, and found that N — Cα bond cleavage...... by one and two molecules show that acetonitrile evaporation is almost complete a few microseconds after electron capture, whereas fragments nanosolvated by CE are abundant. This is consistent with the binding energy of these molecules to lysine-containing peptides, which is much higher for CE than...

  12. COPD: Definition and Phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestbo, J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently defined as a common preventable and treatable disease that is characterized by persistent airflow limitation that is usually progressive and associated with an enhanced chronic inflammatory response in the airways and the lung to noxious...... particles or gases. Exacerbations and comorbidities contribute to the overall severity in individual patients. The evolution of this definition and the diagnostic criteria currently in use are discussed. COPD is increasingly divided in subgroups or phenotypes based on specific features and association with...

  13. Assessment of Metals Exposure and Sub-Lethal Effects in Voles and Small Birds Captured Near the DeLong Mountain Regional Transportation System Road, Cape Krusenstern National Monument, Alaska, 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumbaugh, William G.; Mora, Miguel A.; May, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Voles (n=6) and small ground-nesting birds (n=12) were live-captured near the DeLong Mountain Regional Transportation System haul road in Cape Krusenstern National Monument in northwest Alaska in 2006 to assess metals exposure and sub-lethal biological effects. Similar numbers of animals were captured from a reference site in southern Cape Krusenstern National Monument for comparison. Histopathological examination of selected organs, blood analysis, and analysis for aluminum, barium, cadmium, lead, and zinc concentrations in liver and blood samples were performed. Voles and small birds captured from near the haul road had about 20 times greater blood and liver lead concentrations and about 3 times greater cadmium concentrations when compared to those from the reference site. Barium and zinc tissue concentrations of animals collected from different sites were not remarkably different, and aluminum concentrations were below the reporting limits in most samples. There was no clear evidence of serious sub-lethal biological effects such as lesions in internal organs or DNA damage in blood in any of the animals. Accordingly, blood and liver lead concentrations in animals captured near the haul road generally were less than tissue concentration thresholds associated with serious biological effects reported from other studies; however, subtle effects resulting from lead exposure, such as the suppression of the activity of certain enzymes, cannot be ruled out for those animals nearest the haul road. Notably, liver lead concentrations of voles and small birds at the reference location were considerably less than those previously reported for similar animals at reference sites in other parts of the United States, Canada, and Europe. Results from this reconnaissance-level study indicate that voles and small birds inhabiting this area are not suffering serious biological effects as a result of metals exposure; however, continued monitoring of lead and other metals is

  14. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    OpenAIRE

    Lei Li; Qin Zhang; Danfeng Huang

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic st...

  15. Novel R pipeline for analyzing biolog phenotypic microarray data.

    OpenAIRE

    Minna Vehkala; Mikhail Shubin; Connor, Thomas R; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Jukka Corander

    2015-01-01

    Data produced by Biolog Phenotype MicroArrays are longitudinal measurements of cells' respiration on distinct substrates. We introduce a three-step pipeline to analyze phenotypic microarray data with novel procedures for grouping, normalization and effect identification. Grouping and normalization are standard problems in the analysis of phenotype microarrays defined as categorizing bacterial responses into active and non-active, and removing systematic errors from the experimental data, resp...

  16. A mathematical model of cancer cells with phenotypic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Zhou

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells is recently becoming a cutting-edge research area in cancer, which challenges the cellular hierarchy proposed by the conventional cancer stem cell theory. In this study, we establish a mathematical model for describing the phenotypic plasticity of cancer cells, based on which we try to find some salient features that can characterize the dynamic behavior of the phenotypic plasticity especially in comparison to the hierarchical model of cancer cells. Methods: We model cancer as population dynamics composed of different phenotypes of cancer cells. In this model, not only can cancer cells divide (symmetrically and asymmetrically and die, but they can also convert into other cellular phenotypes. According to the Law of Mass Action, the cellular processes can be captured by a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs. On one hand, we can analyze the long-term stability of the model by applying qualitative method of ODEs. On the other hand, we are also concerned about the short-term behavior of the model by studying its transient dynamics. Meanwhile, we validate our model to the cell-state dynamics in published experimental data.Results: Our results show that the phenotypic plasticity plays important roles in both stabilizing the distribution of different phenotypic mixture and maintaining the cancer stem cells proportion. In particular, the phenotypic plasticity model shows decided advantages over the hierarchical model in predicting the phenotypic equilibrium and cancer stem cells’ overshoot reported in previous biological experiments in cancer cell lines.Conclusion: Since the validity of the phenotypic plasticity paradigm and the conventional cancer stem cell theory is still debated in experimental biology, it is worthy of theoretically searching for good indicators to distinguish the two models through quantitative methods. According to our study, the phenotypic equilibrium and overshoot

  17. Particle capture device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-23

    In example embodiments, particle collection efficiency in aerosol analyzers and other particle measuring instruments is improved by a particle capture device that employs multiple collisions to decrease momentum of particles until the particles are collected (e.g., vaporized or come to rest). The particle collection device includes an aperture through which a focused particle beam enters. A collection enclosure is coupled to the aperture and has one or more internal surfaces against which particles of the focused beam collide. One or more features are employed in the collection enclosure to promote particles to collide multiple times within the enclosure, and thereby be vaporized or come to rest, rather than escape through the aperture.

  18. Biodegradable nano-films for capture and non-invasive release of circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Reátegui, Eduardo; Park, Myoung-Hwan; Castleberry, Steven; Deng, Jason Z; Hsu, Bryan; Mayner, Sarah; Jensen, Anne E; Sequist, Lecia V; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L; Hammond, Paula T

    2015-10-01

    Selective isolation and purification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood is an important capability for both clinical medicine and biological research. Current techniques to perform this task place the isolated cells under excessive stresses that reduce cell viability, and potentially induce phenotype change, therefore losing valuable information about the isolated cells. We present a biodegradable nano-film coating on the surface of a microfluidic chip, which can be used to effectively capture as well as non-invasively release cancer cell lines such as PC-3, LNCaP, DU 145, H1650 and H1975. We have applied layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly to create a library of ultrathin coatings using a broad range of materials through complementary interactions. By developing an LbL nano-film coating with an affinity-based cell-capture surface that is capable of selectively isolating cancer cells from whole blood, and that can be rapidly degraded on command, we are able to gently isolate cancer cells and recover them without compromising cell viability or proliferative potential. Our approach has the capability to overcome practical hurdles and provide viable cancer cells for downstream analyses, such as live cell imaging, single cell genomics, and in vitro cell culture of recovered cells. Furthermore, CTCs from cancer patients were also captured, identified, and successfully released using the LbL-modified microchips. PMID:26142780

  19. Global pharmacogenomics: distribution of CYP3A5 polymorphisms and phenotypes in the Brazilian population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Suarez-Kurtz

    Full Text Available The influence of self-reported "race/color", geographical origin and genetic ancestry on the distribution of three functional CYP3A5 polymorphisms, their imputed haplotypes and inferred phenotypes was examined in 909 healthy, adult Brazilians, self-identified as White, Brown or Black ("race/color" categories of the Brazilian census. The cohort was genotyped for CYP3A5*3 (rs776746, CYP3A5*6 (rs10264272 and CYP3A5*7 (rs41303343, CYP3A5 haplotypes were imputed and CYP3A5 metabolizer phenotypes were inferred according to the number of defective CYP3A5 alleles. Estimates of the individual proportions of Amerindian, African and European ancestry were available for the entire cohort. Multinomial log-linear regression models were applied to infer the statistical association between the distribution of CYP3A5 alleles, haplotypes and phenotypes (response variables, and self-reported Color, geographical region and ancestry (explanatory variables. We found that Color per se or in combination with geographical region associates significantly with the distribution of CYP3A5 variant alleles and CYP3A5 metabolizer phenotypes, whereas geographical region per se influences the frequency distribution of CYP3A5 variant alleles. The odds of having the default CYP3A5*3 allele and the poor metabolizer phenotype increases continuously with the increase of European ancestry and decrease of African ancestry. The opposite trend is observed in relation to CYP3A5*6, CYP3A5*7, the default CYP3A5*1 allele, and both the extensive and intermediate phenotypes. No significant effect of Amerindian ancestry on the distribution of CYP3A5 alleles or phenotypes was observed. In conclusion, this study strongly supports the notion that the intrinsic heterogeneity of the Brazilian population must be acknowledged in the design and interpretation of pharmacogenomic studies, and dealt with as a continuous variable, rather than proportioned in arbitrary categories that do not capture the

  20. Electron capture in carbon dwarf supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurek, T. J.; Truran, J. W.; Cameron, A. G. W.

    1974-01-01

    The rates of electron capture on heavier elements under the extreme conditions predicted for dwarf star supernovae have been computed, incorporating modifications that seem to be indicated by present experimental results. An estimate of the maximum possible value of such rates is also given. The distribution of nuclei in nuclear statistical equilibrium has been calculated for the range of expected supernovae conditions, including the effects of the temperature dependence of nuclear partition functions. These nuclide abundance distributions are then used to compute nuclear equilibrium thermodynamic properties. The effects of the electron capture on such equilibrium matter are discussed. In the context of the 'carbon detonation' supernova model, the dwarf central density required to ensure core collapse to a neutron star configuration is found to be slightly higher than that obtained by Bruenn (1972) with the electron capture rates of Hansen (1966).-

  1. Rational elicitation of cold-sensitive phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Chetana; Majhi, Sandipan; Mondal, Kajari; Bhattacharjee, Antara; VijayRaghavan, K; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2016-05-01

    Cold-sensitive phenotypes have helped us understand macromolecular assembly and biological phenomena, yet few attempts have been made to understand the basis of cold sensitivity or to elicit it by design. We report a method for rational design of cold-sensitive phenotypes. The method involves generation of partial loss-of-function mutants, at either buried or functional sites, coupled with selective overexpression strategies. The only essential input is amino acid sequence, although available structural information can be used as well. The method has been used to elicit cold-sensitive mutants of a variety of proteins, both monomeric and dimeric, and in multiple organisms, namely Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Drosophila melanogaster This simple, yet effective technique of inducing cold sensitivity eliminates the need for complex mutations and provides a plausible molecular mechanism for eliciting cold-sensitive phenotypes. PMID:27091994

  2. A Public Platform for the Verification of the Phenotypic Effect of Candidate Genes for Resistance to Aflatoxin Accumulation and Aspergillus flavus Infection in Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyan Shan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A public candidate gene testing pipeline for resistance to aflatoxin accumulation or Aspergillus flavus infection in maize is presented here. The pipeline consists of steps for identifying, testing, and verifying the association of selected maize gene sequences with resistance under field conditions. Resources include a database of genetic and protein sequences associated with the reduction in aflatoxin contamination from previous studies; eight diverse inbred maize lines for polymorphism identification within any maize gene sequence; four Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL mapping populations and one association mapping panel, all phenotyped for aflatoxin accumulation resistance and associated phenotypes; and capacity for Insertion/Deletion (InDel and SNP genotyping in the population(s for mapping. To date, ten genes have been identified as possible candidate genes and put through the candidate gene testing pipeline, and results are presented here to demonstrate the utility of the pipeline.

  3. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas resveratrol treatment does not show overall beneficial effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandgren, Charlotte; Nasser, Hasina Abdul; McKenna, Tomás;

    2015-01-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder that is most commonly caused by a de novo point mutation in exon 11 of the LMNA gene, c.1824C>T, which results in an increased production of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. In this study, we used a mouse...... alone. However, the reversal of the dental phenotype of overgrown and laterally displaced lower incisors in HGPS mice could be attributed to resveratrol. Our results indicate that the HGPS bone defects were reversible upon suppressed transgenic expression and suggest that treatments targeting aberrant...... progerin splicing give hope to patients who are affected by HGPS.-Strandgren, C., Nasser, H. A., McKenna, T., Koskela, A., Tuukkanen, J., Ohlsson, C., Rozell, B., Eriksson, M. Transgene silencing of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome mutation results in a reversible bone phenotype, whereas...

  4. Dabigatran, a direct thrombin inhibitor, blocks differentiation of normal fibroblasts to a myofibroblast phenotype and demonstrates anti-fibrotic effects on scleroderma lung fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Bogatkevich, Galina S.; Ludwicka-Bradley, Anna; Silver, Richard M.

    2009-01-01

    Myofibroblasts are the principal mesenchymal cells responsible for tissue remodeling, collagen deposition, and the restrictive nature of lung parenchyma associated with pulmonary fibrosis. We previously reported that thrombin activates protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 thereby inducing normal lung fibroblasts to differentiate to a myofibroblast phenotype resembling scleroderma lung myofibroblasts. Here we demonstrate that the thrombin inhibitor dabigatran inhibits in a dose-dependant manner...

  5. The Effects of Matrix Stiffness and RhoA on the Phenotypic Plasticity of Smooth Muscle Cells in a 3-D Biosynthetic Hydrogel System

    OpenAIRE

    Peyton, Shelly R.; Kim, Peter D.; Ghajar, Cyrus M.; Seliktar, Dror; Putnam, Andrew J.

    2008-01-01

    Studies using 2-D cultures have shown that the mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) influence cell migration, spreading, proliferation, and differentiation; however, cellular mechanosensing in 3-D remains under-explored. To investigate this topic, a unique biomaterial system based on poly(ethylene glycol)-conjugated fibrinogen was adapted to study phenotypic plasticity in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as a function of ECM mechanics in 3-D. Tuning compressive modulus between 44...

  6. A new model of Pde4d deficiency: Genetic knock-down of PDE4D enzyme in rats produces an antidepressant phenotype without cognitive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Schaefer, Tori L.; Braun, Amanda A.; Amos-Kroohs, Robyn M.; Williams, Michael T.; Ostertag, Eric; Vorhees, Charles V.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of intracellular second messenger cyclic nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes composed of 12 families. The Pde4 family has been implicated in depression and cognition and PDE4 inhibitors have been evaluated as antidepressants and possible cognitive enhancers. Pde4d−/− mice show an antidepressant phenotype and learning enhancement on some tests, but not others as do mice treated with PDE4 inhibitors. Here we report for the first time the behavioral phenoty...

  7. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fairchild, R.G.; Bond, V.P. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior.

  8. Workshop on neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potentially optimal conditions for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) may soon be in hand due to the anticipated development of band-pass filtered beams relatively free of fast neutron contaminations, and of broadly applicable biomolecules for boron transport such as porphyrins and monoclonal antibodies. Consequently, a number of groups in the US are now devoting their efforts to exploring NCT for clinical application. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring these groups together to exchange views on significant problems of mutual interest, and to assure a unified and effective approach to the solutions. Several areas of preclinical investigation were deemed to be necessary before it would be possible to initiate clinical studies. As neither the monomer nor the dimer of sulfhydryl boron hydride is unequivocally preferable at this time, studies on both compounds should be continued until one is proven superior

  9. Helios: resonance capture in zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, natural Zr with resonance-shielding data has been added as a new nuclide to the nuclear-data library of the lattice code HELIOS. This has made it possible to study the importance of resonance shielding by Zr in lattice calculation. Usually, resonance shielding by Zr is neglected because it is a weak absorber. Many lattice codes cannot even treat resonance capture in the clad and even less so in the shroud a WWER, the channel of a BWR, the pressure and calandria tubes of a CANDU, or the pressure tube of an RBMK. This paper shows for some lattice types the effect of resonance shielding by Zr and presents a detailed analysis for SVEA and WWER-440 fuel. Because resonance shielding reduces neutron capture, it increases reactivity. In Zr it occurs mainly in the Zr-91 resonances at 293 and 681 e V, and the Zr-96 resonance at 301 eV, with peaks of 250 b, and 1050 b. Its effect increases when the spectrum hardens, e.g. for SVEA fuel the reactivity increase depends on the void and on whetter the control blades are inserted or not--for uncontrolled at 40% steam void it varies from 160 to 190 pcm between 0 and 50 M Wd/kg. For WWER fuel with ppm B it varies from 180 to 260 pcm. In CANDU fuel, which has a soft spectrum but contains much Zr, the reactivity increase is about 230 pcm. For RBMK fuel it is about 340 pcm, and for an old uncontrolled 8 x 8 BWR assembly it is about 200 and 380 pcm at 0 and 70% steam void (Authors)

  10. Lunar Sulfur Capture System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Mark; Zubrin, Robert; Bostwick-White, Emily

    2013-01-01

    The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) protects in situ resource utilization (ISRU) hardware from corrosion, and reduces contaminant levels in water condensed for electrolysis. The LSCS uses a lunar soil sorbent to trap over 98 percent of sulfur gases and about two-thirds of halide gases evolved during hydrogen reduction of lunar soils. LSCS soil sorbent is based on lunar minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that trap sulfur and halide gas contaminants in a fixed-bed reactor held at temperatures between 250 and 400 C, allowing moisture produced during reduction to pass through in vapor phase. Small amounts of Earth-based polishing sorbents consisting of zinc oxide and sodium aluminate are used to reduce contaminant concentrations to one ppm or less. The preferred LSCS configuration employs lunar soil beneficiation to boost concentrations of reactive sorbent minerals. Lunar soils contain sulfur in concentrations of about 0.1 percent, and halogen compounds including chlorine and fluorine in concentrations of about 0.01 percent. These contaminants are released as gases such as H2S, COS, CS2,HCl, and HF during thermal ISRU processing with hydrogen or other reducing gases. Removal of contaminant gases is required during ISRU processing to prevent hardware corrosion, electrolyzer damage, and catalyst poisoning. The use of Earth-supplied, single-use consumables to entirely remove contaminants at the levels existing in lunar soils would make many ISRU processes unattractive due to the large mass of consumables relative to the mass of oxygen produced. The LSCS concept of using a primary sorbent prepared from lunar soil was identified as a method by which the majority of contaminants could be removed from process gas streams, thereby substantially reducing the required mass of Earth-supplied consumables. The LSCS takes advantage of minerals containing iron and calcium compounds that are present in lunar soil to trap sulfur and halide gases in a fixedbed reactor

  11. Neutron Capture and Neutron Halos

    OpenAIRE

    A.Mengoni; Otsuka, T; Nakamura, T.(International Center for Elementary Particle Physics and Department of Physics, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan); Ishihara, M.

    1996-01-01

    The connection between the neutron halo observed in light neutron rich nuclei and the neutron radiative capture process is outlined. We show how nuclear structure information such as spectroscopic factors and external components of the radial wave function of loosely bound states can be derived from the neutron capture cross section. The link between the direct radiative capture and the Coulomb dissociation process is elucidated.

  12. Resource capture by single leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, S.P.

    1992-05-01

    Leaves show a variety of strategies for maximizing CO{sub 2} and light capture. These are more meaningfully explained if they are considered in the context of maximizing capture relative to the utilization of water, nutrients and carbohydrates reserves. There is considerable variation between crops in their efficiency of CO{sub 2} and light capture at the leaf level. Understanding of these mechanisms indicate some ways in which efficiency of resource capture could be level cannot be meaningfully considered without simultaneous understanding of implications at the canopy level. 36 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall state of the art related with neutron capture therapy(NCT) is surveyed. Since the field related with NCT is very wide, it is not intended to survey all related subjects in depth. The primary objective of this report is to help those working for the installation of a NCT facility and a PGNAA(prompt gamma ray neutron activation analysis) system for the boron analysis understand overall NCT at Hanaro. Therefore, while the parts of reactor neutron source and PGNAA are dealt in detail, other parts are limited to the level necessary to understand related fields. For example, the subject of chemical compound which requires intensive knowledge on chemistry, is not dealt as a separated item. However, the requirement of a compound for NCT, currently available compounds, their characteristics, etc. could be understood through this report. Although the subject of cancer treated by NCT is out of the capability of the author, it is dealt focussing its characteristics related with the success of NCT. Each detailed subject is expected to be dealt more detail by specialists in future. This report would be helpful for the researchers working for the NCT to understand related fields. (author). 128 refs., 3 tabs., 12 figs

  14. Tests of phenotypic and genetic concordance and their application to the conservation of Panamanian golden frogs (Anura, Bufonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Corinne L; Knowles, L Lacey

    2007-08-01

    Evolutionarily significant units (ESUs) differ in the extent to which they capture, or even consider, adaptive variation, and most such designations are based solely on neutral genetic differences that may not capture variation relevant to species' adaptabilities to changing environmental conditions. While concordant patterns of divergence among data sets (i.e. neutral and potentially non-neutral characters) can strengthen ESU designations, determining whether such criteria are met for highly variable taxa is especially challenging. This study tests whether previously defined ESUs for endangered Panamanian golden frogs (Atelopus varius and Atelopus zeteki) exhibit concordant variation among multiple phenotypic traits and mitochondrial DNA sequences, and the extent to which such divergence corresponds to environmental differences. Multivariate analyses identify phenotypic and genetic differentiation consistent with proposed ESUs and support the status of A. varius and A. zeteki as separate species. Moreover, the significant association detected between ESU co-membership and genetic similarity, which remained strong after removing the effect of geographic distance, also indicates that genetic differences are not simply due to isolation by distance. Two phenotypic characters (body size and the extent of dorsal black patterning) that differ among ESUs also co-vary with environmental differences, suggesting that to the extent that these phenotypic differences are heritable, variation may be associated with adaptive divergence. Lastly, discriminant function analyses show that the frogs can be correctly assigned to ESUs based on simultaneous analysis of multiple characters. The study confirms the merit of conserving the previously proposed golden frog ESUs as well as demonstrates the utility and feasibility of combined analyses of ecological, morphological and genetic variation in evaluating ESUs, especially for highly variable taxa. PMID:17651191

  15. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Resistance Phenotypes and Phenotypic Highlighting Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    BĂLĂŞOIU, MARIA; BĂLĂŞOIU, A.T.; MĂNESCU, RODICA; AVRAMESCU, CARMEN; IONETE, OANA

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa genus bacteria are well known for their increased drug resistance (phenotypic ang genotypic resistance). The most important resistance mechanisms are: enzyme production, reduction of pore expression, reduction of the external membrane proteins expression, efflux systems, topoisomerase mutations. These mechanisms often accumulate and lead to multidrug ressitance strains emergence. The most frequent acquired resistance mechanisms are betalactamase-type enzyme production (ESBLs, AmpC, carbapenemases), which determine variable phenotypes of betalactamines resistance, phenotypes which are associated with aminoglycosides and quinolones resistance. The nonenzymatic drug resistance mechanisms are caused by efflux systems, pore reduction and penicillin-binding proteins (PBP) modification, which are often associated to other resistance mechanisms. Phenotypic methods used for testing these mechanisms are based on highlighting these phenotypes using Kirby Bauer antibiogram, clinical breakpoints, and “cut off” values recommended by EUCAST 2013 standard, version 3.1. PMID:25729587

  16. Corrections to measurements of pion capture ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors conclude that the electromagnetic corrections to the C/O pion capture ratios deduced from the summed intensities of pionic Balmer series are small, and much less than their experimental errors. The magnitude of the correction due to nuclear absorption depends on the initial angular momentum distribution which in turn depends on molecular structure. The dependence of the capture ratios on molecular structure has raised serious questions about the effect on dose calculations for pion radiotherapy and on the definition of tissue equivalence for pions. (U.K.)

  17. Muon capture rates within the projected QRPA

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Danilo Sande; Krmpotić, Francisco; Dimarco, Alejandro J

    2012-01-01

    The conservation of the number of particles within the QRPA plays an important role in the evaluation muon capture rates in all light nuclei with A \\precsim 30 . The violation of the CVC by the Coulomb field in this mass region is of minor importance, but this effect could be quite relevant for medium and heavy nuclei studied previously. The extreme sensitivity of the muon capture rates on the 'pp' coupling strength in nuclei with large neutron excess when described within the QRPA is pointed out. We reckon that the comparison between theory and data for the inclusive muon capture is not a fully satisfactory test on the nuclear model that is used. The exclusive muon transitions are much more robust for such a purpose.

  18. Selective gas capture via kinetic trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Joyjit; Pascal, Tod; Prendergast, David; Whitelam, Stephen

    2016-08-21

    Conventional approaches to the capture of CO2 by metal-organic frameworks focus on equilibrium conditions, and frameworks that contain little CO2 in equilibrium are often rejected as carbon-capture materials. Here we use a statistical mechanical model, parameterized by quantum mechanical data, to suggest that metal-organic frameworks can be used to separate CO2 from a typical flue gas mixture when used under nonequilibrium conditions. The origin of this selectivity is an emergent gas-separation mechanism that results from the acquisition by different gas types of different mobilities within a crowded framework. The resulting distribution of gas types within the framework is in general spatially and dynamically heterogeneous. Our results suggest that relaxing the requirement of equilibrium can substantially increase the parameter space of conditions and materials for which selective gas capture can be effected. PMID:27435033

  19. Selective gas capture via kinetic trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Kundu, Joyjit; Prendergast, David; Whitelam, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Conventional approaches to the capture of CO_2 by metal-organic frameworks focus on equilibrium conditions, and frameworks that contain little CO_2 in equilibrium are often rejected as carbon-capture materials. Here we use a statistical mechanical model, parameterized by quantum mechanical data, to suggest that metal-organic frameworks can be used to separate CO_2 from a typical flue gas mixture when used under {\\em nonequilibrium} conditions. The origin of this selectivity is an emergent gas-separation mechanism that results from the acquisition by different gas types of different mobilities within a crowded framework. The resulting distribution of gas types within the framework is in general spatially and dynamically heterogeneous. Our results suggest that relaxing the requirement of equilibrium can substantially increase the parameter space of conditions and materials for which selective gas capture can be effected.

  20. Quantifying protein diffusion and capture on filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Reithmann, Emanuel; Frey, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    The functional relevance of regulating proteins is often limited to specific binding sites such as the ends of microtubules or actin-filaments. A localization of proteins on these functional sites is of great importance. We present a quantitative theory for a diffusion and capture process, where proteins diffuse on a filament and stop diffusing when reaching the filament's end. It is found that end-association after one-dimensional diffusion is the main source for tip-localization of such proteins. As a consequence, diffusion and capture is highly efficient in enhancing the reaction velocity of enzymatic reactions, where proteins and filament ends are to each other as enzyme and substrate. We show that the reaction velocity can effectively be described within a Michaelis-Menten framework. Together one-dimensional diffusion and capture beats the (three-dimensional) Smoluchowski diffusion limit for the rate of protein association to filament ends.

  1. Partial radiative capture of resonance neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiative capture of resonance neutrons has been studied near the Saclay linac between 0.5 and 700 eV with time-of-flight method and a Ge(Li) detector. 195Pt + n and 183W + n allow the study of the distribution of partial radiative widths and their eventual correlation and also the variation of γi > with Eγ. The mean values of Ml and El transition intensities are compared in several tin isotopes. Interference effects, either between resonances or between direct capture and resonant capture are found in 195Pt + n, 197Au + n and 59Co + n. The excited level schemes of a great deal of nuclei are obtained and compared with theoretical predictions. This study has been completed by an analysis of thermal spectrum. (author)

  2. Search for resonant double-electron capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, Sergey; Blaum, Klaus; Roux, Christian [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Heidelberg (Germany); Block, Michael; Minaya Ramirez, Enrique [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Droese, Christian; Schweikhard, Lutz [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, Greifswald (Germany); Nesterenko, Dmitriy; Novikov, Yuri [PNPI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zuber, Kai [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universitaet, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    It is still unknown whether neutrinos are Dirac or Majorana particles. An answer to this question can be obtained from neutrinoless double-electron capture. An observation of this process would prove that the neutrino is a Majorana particle. A measurement of the half-life of this process would allow a determination of the effective Majorana neutrino mass. In the search for the nuclide with the largest probability for neutrinoless double-electron capture, we have determined the Q-values of several potentially suitable nuclides with SHIPTRAP by Penning-trap mass-ratio measurements. The ECEC-transition in {sup 152}Gd has been determined to have the smallest half-life of 10{sup 26} years for a 1 eV neutrino mass among all known 0νECEC-transitions, which makes {sup 152}Gd the most promising candidate for the search for neutrino-less double electron capture. This contribution summarizes the recent experimental results.

  3. Phenotypic approaches to drought in cassava: review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okogbenin, Emmanuel; Setter, Tim L; Ferguson, Morag; Mutegi, Rose; Ceballos, Hernan; Olasanmi, Bunmi; Fregene, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cassava is an important crop in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Cassava can be produced adequately in drought conditions making it the ideal food security crop in marginal environments. Although cassava can tolerate drought stress, it can be genetically improved to enhance productivity in such environments. Drought adaptation studies in over three decades in cassava have identified relevant mechanisms which have been explored in conventional breeding. Drought is a quantitative trait and its multigenic nature makes it very challenging to effectively manipulate and combine genes in breeding for rapid genetic gain and selection process. Cassava has a long growth cycle of 12-18 months which invariably contributes to a long breeding scheme for the crop. Modern breeding using advances in genomics and improved genotyping, is facilitating the dissection and genetic analysis of complex traits including drought tolerance, thus helping to better elucidate and understand the genetic basis of such traits. A beneficial goal of new innovative breeding strategies is to shorten the breeding cycle using minimized, efficient or fast phenotyping protocols. While high throughput genotyping have been achieved, this is rarely the case for phenotyping for drought adaptation. Some of the storage root phenotyping in cassava are often done very late in the evaluation cycle making selection process very slow. This paper highlights some modified traits suitable for early-growth phase phenotyping that may be used to reduce drought phenotyping cycle in cassava. Such modified traits can significantly complement the high throughput genotyping procedures to fast track breeding of improved drought tolerant varieties. The need for metabolite profiling, improved phenomics to take advantage of next generation sequencing technologies and high throughput phenotyping are basic steps for future direction to improve genetic gain and maximize speed for drought tolerance breeding. PMID

  4. Phenotypic Approaches to Drought in Cassava: Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel eOkogbenin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cassava is an important crop in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean. Cassava can be produced adequately in drought conditions making it the ideal food security crop in marginal environments. Although cassava can tolerate drought stress, it can be genetically improved to enhance productivity in such environments. Drought adaptation studies in over three decades in cassava have identified relevant mechanisms which have been explored in conventional breeding. Drought is a quantitative trait and its multigenic nature makes it very challenging to effectively manipulate and combine genes in breeding for rapid genetic gain and selection process. Cassava has a long growth cycle of 12 - 18 months which invariably contributes to a long breeding scheme for the crop. Modern breeding using advances in genomics and improved genotyping, is facilitating the dissection and genetic analysis of complex traits including drought tolerance, thus helping to better elucidate and understand the genetic basis of such traits. A beneficial goal of new innovative breeding strategies is to shorten the breeding cycle using minimized, efficient or fast phenotyping protocols. While high throughput genotyping have been achieved, this is rarely the case for phenotyping for drought adaptation. Some of the storage root phenotyping in cassava are often done very late in the evaluation cycle making selection process very slow. This paper highlights some modified traits suitable for early-growth phase phenotyping that may be used to reduce drought phenotyping cycle in cassava. Such modified traits can significantly complement the high throughput genotyping procedures to fast track breeding of improved drought tolerant varieties. The need for metabolite profiling, improved phenomics to take advantage of next generation sequencing technologies and high throughput phenotyping are basic steps for future direction to improve genetic gain and maximize speed for drought tolerance

  5. Phenotypic variability of TRPV4 related neuropathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Teresinha; Bansagi, Boglarka; Pyle, Angela; Griffin, Helen; Douroudis, Konstantinos; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Antoniadi, Thalia; Bushby, Kate; Straub, Volker; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Horvath, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) gene have been associated with autosomal dominant skeletal dysplasias and peripheral nervous system syndromes (PNSS). PNSS include Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease (CMT) type 2C, congenital spinal muscular atrophy and arthrogryposis and scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy. We report the clinical, electrophysiological and muscle biopsy findings in two unrelated patients with two novel heterozygous missense mutations in the TRPV4 gene. Whole exome sequencing was carried out on genomic DNA using Illumina TruseqTM 62Mb exome capture. Patient 1 harbours a de novo c.805C > T (p.Arg269Cys) mutation. Clinically, this patient shows signs of both scapuloperoneal spinal muscular atrophy and skeletal dysplasia. Patient 2 harbours a novel c.184G > A (p.Asp62Asn) mutation. While the clinical phenotype is compatible with CMT type 2C with the patient's muscle harbours basophilic inclusions. Mutations in the TRPV4 gene have a broad phenotypic variability and disease severity and may share a similar pathogenic mechanism with Heat Shock Protein related neuropathies. PMID:25900305

  6. Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Dan; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Deng, Hexiang; Liu, Cong; Yaghi, Omar M.; Eisenberg, David S.

    2013-01-01

    New and improved materials capable of binding carbon dioxide are essential to addressing the global threat of accelerating climate change. The presently used industrial methods for carbon dioxide capture have severe drawbacks, including toxicity and energy inefficiency. Newer porous materials are so far less effective in water, invariably a component of combustion gases. Here, we present a material for carbon dioxide capture. This material, amyloid fibers in powdered form, selectively capture...

  7. The effectiveness of dolomite and Ni-catalyst mixtures for pure H 2 production by methane steam reforming via CO 2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Seitkaliyeva, Nurgul; Jand, Nader; Foscolo, Pier Ugo

    2016-01-01

    High hydrogen yields have been obtained continuously from steam reforming of methane coupled with simultaneous CO2 capture[1], at lower temperature (630oC) and pressure (1 atm) than those typical of traditional processes (800-900oC,15-30 atm), using calcined dolomite and a pulverized commercial Ni catalyst, in a single step. On the other hand, a pure CO2 stream is obtained by subsequent regeneration of the sorbent, which could be stored. A bubbling fluidized bed contained in a quartz vesse...

  8. Effects of the EU law on the climate protection. On the implementation of the European guideline on carbon capture and storage (CCS) into German legislation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution is covering the implementation of the European guideline on climate protection and carbon capture and storage (CCS) into German legislation. The CCS technology and special critical aspects concerning the CCS technology are described. The specific legal frame includes the facilities for carbon dioxide precipitation, carbon dioxide pipelines, and carbon dioxide storage sites. The legal drafts concerning CCD are discussed including commissioning, and conflicts of interest. The long-term responsibility including transfer of responsibilities and follow-up regulations are further problems with respect to the implementation into German legislation.

  9. Sex hormone binding globulin phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelisse, M M; Bennett, Patrick; Christiansen, M;

    1994-01-01

    Human sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) is encoded by a normal and a variant allele. The resulting SHBG phenotypes (the homozygous normal SHBG, the heterozygous SHBG and the homozygous variant SHBG phenotype) can be distinguished by their electrophoretic patterns. We developed a novel detection...

  10. Gsα Deficiency in Adipose Tissue Leads to a Lean Phenotype with Divergent Effects on Cold Tolerance and Diet-Induced Thermogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Min; Chen, Hui; Nguyen, Annie; Gupta, Divakar; Jie WANG; Lai, Edwin W.; Pacak, Karel; Gavrilova, Oksana; Michael J Quon; Weinstein, Lee S.

    2010-01-01

    Gsα, the G protein which mediates receptor-stimulated cAMP generation, has been implicated as a regulator of adipogenesis and adipose tissue function. Heterozygous Gsα mutations lead to obesity in Albright hereditary osteodystrophy (AHO) patients and in mice. In this study we generated mice with adipose-specific Gsα deficiency. Heterozygotes had 50% loss of Gsα expression in adipose tissue and no obvious phenotype, suggesting that adipose-specific Gsα deficiency is not the cause of obesity in...

  11. Emerging molecular phenotypes of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Anuradha; Oriss, Timothy B; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-01-15

    Although asthma has long been considered a heterogeneous disease, attempts to define subgroups of asthma have been limited. In recent years, both clinical and statistical approaches have been utilized to better merge clinical characteristics, biology, and genetics. These combined characteristics have been used to define phenotypes of asthma, the observable characteristics of a patient determined by the interaction of genes and environment. Identification of consistent clinical phenotypes has now been reported across studies. Now the addition of various 'omics and identification of specific molecular pathways have moved the concept of clinical phenotypes toward the concept of molecular phenotypes. The importance of these molecular phenotypes is being confirmed through the integration of molecularly targeted biological therapies. Thus the global term asthma is poised to become obsolete, being replaced by terms that more specifically identify the pathology associated with the disease. PMID:25326577

  12. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  13. Thomas-forbidden particle capture

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, John H.; Lieber, Michael

    2010-01-01

    At high energies, in particle-capture processes between ions and atoms, classical kinematic requirements show that generally double collision Thomas processes dominate. However, for certain mass-ratios these processes are kinematically forbidden. This paper explores the possibility of capture for such processes by triple or higher order collision processes.

  14. Capturing Common Loons during prenesting and nesting periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenow, K.P.; Wilson, J.M.; Meyer, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques have been used to capture Common Loons (Gavia immer), but effectiveness is limited during periods of the breeding season when loons do not have chicks. From 2005 to 2008, we studied loons in northern Wisconsin and used night lighting to capture loons on nests and also designed a lift net for capturing loons prior to nesting. At night, incubating loons were approached by boat and, when within about 30-60 m, we focused a spotlight on the loon and, once at the nest, captured loons using a landing net. Using this technique, we captured 23 loons in 29 attempts (79%). In addition, taped calls and loon decoys were used to entice prenesting, territorial loons into a shoreline-based, lift-net trap at a capture efficiency of 67% (10 captures in 15 attempts) during the second year of use. Our diurnal lift-net trap and night-light nest-capture techniques allowed us to capture adult Common Loons during periods of the breeding season when previous investigators have found loons difficult to catch. These techniques may also be useful for capturing other species of territorial waterbirds, especially other species of loons. ?? 2009 Association of Field Ornithologists. No claim to original U.S. government works.

  15. Neutron capture reactions at DANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 4π BaF2 array consisting of 160 active detector elements. The primary purpose of the array is to perform neutron capture cross section measurements on small (> or approx.100 μg) and/or radioactive (241,243Am, neutron capture and neutron-induced fission cross sections and capture-to-fission ratio (α = σγ/σf) for 235U using a new fission-tagging detector as well as neutron capture cross sections for several astrophysics branch-point nuclei. Results from several of these measurements will be presented along with a discussion of additional physics information that can be extracted from the DANCE data

  16. Gadolinium as a Neutron Capture Therapy Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Jing-Luen Allen

    The clinical results of treating brain tumors with boron neutron capture therapy are very encouraging and researchers around the world are once again making efforts to develop this therapeutic modality. Boron-10 is the agent receiving the most attention for neutron capture therapy but ^{157}Gd is a nuclide that also holds interesting properties of being a neutron capture therapy agent. The objective of this study is to evaluate ^{157}Gd as a neutron capture therapy agent. In this study it is determined that tumor concentrations of about 300 mug ^{157}Gd/g tumor can be achieved in brain tumors with some FDA approved MRI contrast agents such as Gd-DTPA and Gd-DOTA, and up to 628 mug ^{157 }Gd/g tumor can be established in bone tumors with Gd-EDTMP. Monte Carlo calculations show that with only 250 ppm of ^{157}Gd in tumor, neutron capture therapy can deliver 2,000 cGy to a tumor of 2 cm diameter or larger with 5 times 10^{12} n/cm ^2 fluence at the tumor. Dose measurements which were made with films and TLD's in phantoms verified these calculations. More extended Monte Carlo calculations demonstrate that neutron capture therapy with Gd possesses comparable dose distribution to B neutron capture therapy. With 5 times 10^{12 } n/cm^2 thermal neutrons at the tumor, Auger electrons from the Gd produced an optical density enhancement on the films that is similar to the effect caused by about 300 cGy of Gd prompt gamma dose which will further enhance the therapeutic effects. A technique that combines brachytherapy with Gd neutron capture therapy has been evaluated. Monte Carlo calculations show that 5,000 cGy of prompt gamma dose can be delivered to a treatment volume of 40 cm^3 with a 3-plane implant of a total of 9 Gd needles. The tumor to normal tissue advantage of this method is as good as ^{60} Co brachytherapy. Measurements of prompt gamma dose with films and TLD-700's in a lucite phantom verify the Monte Carlo evaluation. A technique which displays the Gd

  17. A novel mechanism of phenotypic heterogeneity demonstrated by the effect of a polymorphism on a pathogenic mutation in the PRNP (prion protein gene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, R B; Goldfarb, L G; Tabaton, M; Brown, P; Monari, L; Cortelli, P; Montagna, P; Autilio-Gambetti, L; Gajdusek, D C; Lugaresi, E

    1994-01-01

    Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) is a subacute dementing illness originally described in 1986. The phenotypic characteristics of this disease include progressive untreatable insomnia, dysautonomia, endocrine and motor disorders, preferential hypometabolism in the thalamus as determined by PET scanning, and selective thalamic atrophy. These characteristics readily distinguish FFI from other previously described neurodegenerative conditions. Recently, FFI was shown to be linked to a mutation in the prion protein gene (PRNP) at codon 178, which results in the substitution of asparagine for aspartic acid. As such, FFI represents the most recent addition to the growing family of prion protein-related diseases. The mutation that results in FFI had previously been linked to a subtype of familial Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (178Asn CJD). The genotypic basis for the difference between FFI and 178AsnCJD lies in a polymorphism at codon 129 of the mutant prion protein gene: 129Met 178Asn results in FFI, 129Val 178Asn in CJD. The finding that the combination of a polymorphism and a single pathogenic mutation result in two distinct conditions represents a significant advance in our understanding of phenotypic variability. PMID:7999319

  18. Review of techniques for motion capture data processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xiaopeng; Liu Rul; and Zhang Qiang

    2012-01-01

    In order to high reality and efficiency, the technique computer animation. With the development of motion capture, a of motion capture (MoCap) has been widely used in the field of large amount of motion capture databases are available and this is significant for the reuse of motion data. But due to the high degree of freedoms and high capture frequency, the dimension of the mo- tion capture data is usually very high and this will lead to a low efficiency in data processing. So how to process the high dimension data and design an efficient and effective retrieval approach has become a challenge which we can't ignore. In this paper, first we lay out some problems about the key techniques in motion capture data processing. Then the existing approaches are analyzed and sum- marized. At last, some future work is proposed.

  19. Phenotypic plasticity opposes species invasions by altering fitness surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D Peacor

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding species invasion is a central problem in ecology because invasions of exotic species severely impact ecosystems, and because invasions underlie fundamental ecological processes. However, the influence on invasions of phenotypic plasticity, a key component of many species interactions, is unknown. We present a model in which phenotypic plasticity of a resident species increases its ability to oppose invaders, and plasticity of an invader increases its ability to displace residents. Whereas these effects are expected due to increased fitness associated with phenotypic plasticity, the model additionally reveals a new and unforeseen mechanism by which plasticity affects invasions: phenotypic plasticity increases the steepness of the fitness surface, thereby making invasion more difficult, even by phenotypically plastic invaders. Our results should apply to phenotypically plastic responses to any fluctuating environmental factors including predation risk, and to other factors that affect the fitness surface such as the generalism of predators. We extend the results to competition, and argue that phenotypic plasticity's effect on the fitness surface will destabilize coexistence at local scales, but stabilize coexistence at regional scales. Our study emphasizes the need to incorporate variable interaction strengths due to phenotypic plasticity into invasion biology and ecological theory on competition and coexistence in fragmented landscapes.

  20. Materials For Gas Capture, Methods Of Making Materials For Gas Capture, And Methods Of Capturing Gas

    KAUST Repository

    Polshettiwar, Vivek

    2013-06-20

    In accordance with the purpose(s) of the present disclosure, as embodied and broadly described herein, embodiments of the present disclosure, in one aspect, relate to materials that can be used for gas (e.g., CO.sub.2) capture, methods of making materials, methods of capturing gas (e.g., CO.sub.2), and the like, and the like.

  1. Radiative Neutron Capture on Lithium-7

    OpenAIRE

    Rupak, Gautam; Renato, Higa

    2011-01-01

    The radiative neutron capture on lithium-7 is calculated model independently using a low energy halo effective field theory. The cross section is expressed in terms of scattering parameters directly related to the S-matrix element. The cross section depends on the poorly known p-wave effective range parameter r. This constitutes the leading order uncertainty in traditional model calculations. It is explicitly demonstrated by comparing with potential model calculations. A single parameter fit ...

  2. The Trp64Arg mutation of the beta3 adrenergic receptor gene has no effect on obesity phenotypes in the Québec Family Study and Swedish Obese Subjects cohorts.

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, J; Mauriège, P; S Roy; Sjöström, D; Chagnon, Y. C.; Dionne, F.T.; Oppert, J.M.; Pérusse, L.; Sjöström, L.; Bouchard, C

    1996-01-01

    The beta adrenergic system plays a key role in regulating energy balance through the stimulation of both thermogenesis and lipid mobilization in brown and white adipose tissues in human and various animal models. Recent studies have suggested that a missense Trp64Arg mutation in the beta3 adrenergic receptor (ADRB3) gene was involved in obesity and insulin resistance. We have investigated the effect of this mutation on obesity-related phenotypes in two cohorts: the Québec Family Study (QFS) a...

  3. Phenotype as Agent for Epigenetic Inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torday, John S; Miller, William B

    2016-01-01

    The conventional understanding of phenotype is as a derivative of descent with modification through Darwinian random mutation and natural selection. Recent research has revealed Lamarckian inheritance as a major transgenerational mechanism for environmental action on genomes whose extent is determined, in significant part, by germ line cells during meiosis and subsequent stages of embryological development. In consequence, the role of phenotype can productively be reconsidered. The possibility that phenotype is directed towards the effective acquisition of epigenetic marks in consistent reciprocation with the environment during the life cycle of an organism is explored. It is proposed that phenotype is an active agent in niche construction for the active acquisition of epigenetic marks as a dominant evolutionary mechanism rather than a consequence of Darwinian selection towards reproductive success. The reproductive phase of the life cycle can then be appraised as a robust framework in which epigenetic inheritance is entrained to affect growth and development in continued reciprocal responsiveness to environmental stresses. Furthermore, as first principles of physiology determine the limits of epigenetic inheritance, a coherent justification can thereby be provided for the obligate return of all multicellular eukaryotes to the unicellular state. PMID:27399791

  4. Phenotypic plasticity, costs of phenotypes, and costs of plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callahan, Hilary S; Maughan, Heather; Steiner, Uli

    2008-01-01

    Why are some traits constitutive and others inducible? The term costs often appears in work addressing this issue but may be ambiguously defined. This review distinguishes two conceptually distinct types of costs: phenotypic costs and plasticity costs. Phenotypic costs are assessed from patterns of...... covariation, typically between a focal trait and a separate trait relevant to fitness. Plasticity costs, separable from phenotypic costs, are gauged by comparing the fitness of genotypes with equivalent phenotypes within two environments but differing in plasticity and fitness. Subtleties associated with both...... types of costs are illustrated by a body of work addressing predator-induced plasticity. Such subtleties, and potential interplay between the two types of costs, have also been addressed, often in studies involving genetic model organisms. In some instances, investigators have pinpointed the mechanistic...

  5. A possible mechanism for the capture of microparticles by the earth and other planets of the solar system. [planetary gravitation effects on cosmic dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibenedetto, F.

    1973-01-01

    By application of Lyttleton's theory for the formation of comets, it is shown that a possible mechanism for the origin and formation of a concentration of cosmic particles around the earth and the other planets of the solar system exists. In the vicinity of the neutral point, where the velocity of colliding particles is not greater than 6 km/s, it is found that if the solid particles after collision must remain in a solid state, there can be no possibility of accretion for Mercury, Mars, and the Moon, where the maximum value of the distance of the center of the planet to the asymptotic trajectory is less than the radius of the planet. On the other hand, the capture radii of microparticles in solid form varies from a minimum of 2.95 planetary radii for Venus and 3.47 for the Earth, to about 986 for Jupiter.

  6. Molten salt CO2 capture and electro-transformation (MSCC-ET) into capacitive carbon at medium temperature: effect of the electrolyte composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bowen; Chen, Zhigang; Gao, Muxing; Song, Yuqiao; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Tang, Juanjuan; Xiao, Wei; Mao, Xuhui; Wang, Dihua

    2016-08-15

    Electrochemical transformation of CO2 into functional materials or fuels (i.e., carbon, CO) in high temperature molten salts has been demonstrated as a promising way of carbon capture, utilisation and storage (CCUS) in recent years. In a view of continuous operation, the electrolysis process should match very well with the CO2 absorption kinetics. At the same time, in consideration of the energy efficiency, a molten salt electrochemical cell running at lower temperature is more beneficial to a process powered by the fluctuating renewable electricity from solar/wind farms. Ternary carbonates (Li : Na : K = 43.5 : 31.5 : 25.0) and binary chlorides (Li : K = 58.5 : 41.5), two typical kinds of eutectic melt with low melting points and a wide electrochemical potential window, could be the ideal supporting electrolyte for the molten salt CO2 capture and electro-transformation (MSCC-ET) process. In this work, the CO2 absorption behaviour in Li2O/CaO containing carbonates and chlorides were investigated on a home-made gas absorption testing system. The electrode processes as well as the morphology and properties of carbon obtained in different salts are compared to each other. It was found that the composition of molten salts significantly affects the absorption of CO2, electrode processes and performance of the product. Furthermore, the relationship between the absorption and electro-transformation kinetics are discussed based on the findings. PMID:27193751

  7. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  8. No significant effect of monosomy for distal 21q22. 3 on the Down syndrom phenotype in mirror' duplications of chromosome 21

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pangalos, C.; Prieur, M.; Rethore, M.O.; Lejeune, J. (Institut de Progenese, Paris (France)); Theophile, D.; Sinet, P.M.; Chettouh, Z.; Delabar, J.M. (Hopital Necker Enfants Malades, Paris (France)); Marks, A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)); Stamboulieh-Abazis, D. (Diagnostic Genetic Center, Athens (Greece)); Verellen, C. (Centre de Genetique Humaine, Brussels (Belgium))

    1992-12-01

    Three Down syndrome patients for whom karyotypic analysis showed a mirror' (reverse tandem) duplication of chromosome 21 were studied by phenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular methods. On high-resolution R-banding analysis performed in two cases, the size of the fusion 21q22.3 band was apparently less than twice the size of the normal 21q22.3, suggesting a partial deletion of distal 21q. The evaluation of eight chromosome 21 single-copy sequences of the 21q22 region - namely, SOD1, D21S15, D21S42, CRYA1, PFKL, CD18, COL6A1, and S100B - by a slot blot method showed in all three cases a partial deletion of 21q22.3 and partial monosomy. The translocation breakpoints were different in each patient, and in two cases the rearranged chromosome was found to be asymmetrical. The molecular definition of the monosomy 21 in each patient was, respectively, COL6A1-S100B, CD18-S100B, and PFKL-S100B. DNA polymorphism analysis indicated in all cases a homozygosity of the duplicated material. The duplicated region was maternal in two patients and paternal in one patient. These data suggest that the reverse tandem chromosomes did not result from a telomeric fusion between chromosomes 21 but from a translocation between sister chromatids. The phenotypes of these patients did not differ significantly from that of individuals with full trisomy 21, except in one case with large ears with an unfolded helix. The fact that monosomy of distal 21q22.3 in these patients resulted in a phenotype very similar to Down syndrome suggests that the duplication of the genes located in this part of chromosome 21 is not necessary for the pathogenesis of the Down syndrome features observed in these patients, including most of the facial and hand features, muscular hypotonia, cardiopathy of the Fallot tetralogy type, and part of the mental retardation. 54 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Electron capture and stellar collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order, to investigate the function of electron capture in the phenomenon of pre-supernovae gravitacional collapse, an hydrodynamic caculation was carried out, coupling capture, decay and nuclear reaction equation system. A star simplified model (homogeneous model) was adopted using fermi ideal gas approximation for tthe sea of free electrons and neutrons. The non simplified treatment from quasi-static evolution to collapse is presented. The capture and beta decay rates, as wellas neutron delayed emission, were calculated by beta decay crude theory, while the other reaction rates were determined by usual theories. The preliminary results are presented. (M.C.K.)

  10. A Review of Imaging Techniques for Plant Phenotyping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity. These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision, imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing, thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT. This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review.

  11. A review of imaging techniques for plant phenotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Zhang, Qin; Huang, Danfeng

    2014-01-01

    Given the rapid development of plant genomic technologies, a lack of access to plant phenotyping capabilities limits our ability to dissect the genetics of quantitative traits. Effective, high-throughput phenotyping platforms have recently been developed to solve this problem. In high-throughput phenotyping platforms, a variety of imaging methodologies are being used to collect data for quantitative studies of complex traits related to the growth, yield and adaptation to biotic or abiotic stress (disease, insects, drought and salinity). These imaging techniques include visible imaging (machine vision), imaging spectroscopy (multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing), thermal infrared imaging, fluorescence imaging, 3D imaging and tomographic imaging (MRT, PET and CT). This paper presents a brief review on these imaging techniques and their applications in plant phenotyping. The features used to apply these imaging techniques to plant phenotyping are described and discussed in this review. PMID:25347588

  12. The effect of FOXA2 rs1209523 on glucose-related phenotypes and risk of type 2 diabetes in Danish individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banasik, Karina; Hollensted, Mette; Andersson, Ehm;

    2012-01-01

    procedure to enhance the statistical power of genome wide association studies in detecting associations between low-frequency variants and a given trait.Thus, the primary aim of this study was to investigate whether the minor T-allele of rs1205923 in FOXA2 associated with 1) decreased fasting plasma glucose......Variations within the FOXA family have been studied for a putative contribution to the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), and recently the minor T-allele of FOXA2 rs1209523 was reported to associate with decreased fasting plasma glucose levels in a study using a weighted false discovery rate control...... and 2) a lower risk of developing T2D. Secondly, we investigated whether rs1205923 in FOXA2 associated with other glucose-related phenotypes....

  13. Effect of GBA Mutations on Phenotype of Parkinson’s Disease: A Study on Chinese Population and a Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GBA has been identified as a genetic risk factor for PD. Whether the clinical manifestations of PD patients with or without GBA mutations are different has still not reached a consensus. We firstly detected the GBA mutation L444P in 1147 Chinese PD patients and simultaneously evaluated their corresponding clinical data. Then we compared the phenotypes between 646 PD patients with GBA mutations and 10344 PD patients without GBA mutations worldwide through meta-analysis. Through the method of meta-analysis, there was significant difference in age at onset (MD = −3.10 [95% CI: −4.88, −1.32], bradykinesia as an initial symptom (OR = 1.49 [95% CI: 1.15, 1.94], having family history (OR = 1.50 [95% CI: 1.18, 1.91], and dementia (OR = 3.21 [95% CI: 1.97, 5.24] during the comparison between PD patients with and without GBA mutations. While, in the aspect of tremor as an initial symptom (OR = 0.81 [95% CI: 0.64, 1.03], the severity of motor symptoms such as H-Y (MD = 0.06 [95% CI: −0.06, 0.17] and UPDRS-III (MD = 1.61 [95% CI: −0.65, 3.87] and having dyskinesia (OR = 1.60 [95% CI: 0.90, 2.84] during the comparison between the two groups revealed no statistical differences. Our results suggested that the phenotypes of PD patients with GBA mutations are different from GBA noncarriers.

  14. A new model of Pde4d deficiency: genetic knock-down of PDE4D enzyme in rats produces an antidepressant phenotype without spatial cognitive effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, T L; Braun, A A; Amos-Kroohs, R M; Williams, M T; Ostertag, E; Vorhees, C V

    2012-07-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a superfamily of intracellular second messenger cyclic nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes composed of 12 families. The Pde4 family has been implicated in depression and cognition, and PDE4 inhibitors have been evaluated as antidepressants and possible cognitive enhancers. Pde4d(-/-) mice show an antidepressant phenotype and learning enhancement on some tests, but not others as do mice treated with PDE4 inhibitors. Here, we report for the first time the behavioral phenotype of a new Pde4d knock-down (KD) rat model of PDE4D deficiency. Consistent with other data on PDE4D deficiency, Pde4d KD rats showed depression resistance in the Porsolt forced swim test and hyperreactivity of the acoustic startle response with no differential response on prepulse inhibition, suggesting no sensorimotor gating defect. Pde4d KD rats also exhibited a small exploratory activity reduction but no difference following habituation, and no enhanced spatial learning or reference memory in the Morris water maze. A selective improvement in route-based learning in the Cincinnati water maze was seen as well as enhanced contextual and cued fear conditioning and a more rapid rate of cued extinction from their higher freezing level that declined to wild-type (WT) levels only after ∼20 extinction trials. The rat model confirms Pde4d's role in depression but not in spatial learning or memory enhancement and shows for the first time higher fear conditioning and altered extinction compared with controls. The new model provides a tool by which to better understand the role of PDE4D in neuropsychiatric disorders and for the development of alternate treatment approaches. PMID:22487514

  15. Belief propagation in genotype-phenotype networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moharil, Janhavi; May, Paul; Gaile, Daniel P; Blair, Rachael Hageman

    2016-03-01

    Graphical models have proven to be a valuable tool for connecting genotypes and phenotypes. Structural learning of phenotype-genotype networks has received considerable attention in the post-genome era. In recent years, a dozen different methods have emerged for network inference, which leverage natural variation that arises in certain genetic populations. The structure of the network itself can be used to form hypotheses based on the inferred direct and indirect network relationships, but represents a premature endpoint to the graphical analyses. In this work, we extend this endpoint. We examine the unexplored problem of perturbing a given network structure, and quantifying the system-wide effects on the network in a node-wise manner. The perturbation is achieved through the setting of values of phenotype node(s), which may reflect an inhibition or activation, and propagating this information through the entire network. We leverage belief propagation methods in Conditional Gaussian Bayesian Networks (CG-BNs), in order to absorb and propagate phenotypic evidence through the network. We show that the modeling assumptions adopted for genotype-phenotype networks represent an important sub-class of CG-BNs, which possess properties that ensure exact inference in the propagation scheme. The system-wide effects of the perturbation are quantified in a node-wise manner through the comparison of perturbed and unperturbed marginal distributions using a symmetric Kullback-Leibler divergence. Applications to kidney and skin cancer expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) data from different mus musculus populations are presented. System-wide effects in the network were predicted and visualized across a spectrum of evidence. Sub-pathways and regions of the network responded in concert, suggesting co-regulation and coordination throughout the network in response to phenotypic changes. We demonstrate how these predicted system-wide effects can be examined in connection with

  16. Effective strategies for local communication and involvement around CO2 capture storage (CCS) projects. Report on two dissemination workshops in the NearCO2 project. Deliverable 5.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, M.; De Best-Waldhober, M.; Londo, M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands); Upham, P.; Roberts, T. [University of Manchester UNIMAN, Manchester (United Kingdom); Desbarats, J. [Institute for European Environmental Policy IEEP, London (United Kingdom); Oltra, C. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Reiner, D.; Riesch, H. [Judge Business School JBS, University of Cambridge and Tyndall Centre Manchester, Manchester Institute for Innovation Research UCAM JBS, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is considered a serious option for climate change mitigation strategies. In the first CCS projects developed, public resistance has appeared to be a potential showstopper for implementation. Therefore, the NearCO2 project has provided essential ingredients for effective communication and public involvement strategies related to CCS projects. Within the dissemination Work Package of the project, two workshops have been organised in London and Madrid, with the prime objective to inform (communication experts within) project developers about the key out-comes, discuss their merits, and explore needs for further research and implementation implications of the recommendations. This report summarises the workshops' outcomes.

  17. Stress hormones mediate predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in amphibian tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlemis Maher, Jessica; Werner, Earl E; Denver, Robert J

    2013-05-01

    Amphibian tadpoles display extensive anti-predator phenotypic plasticity, reducing locomotory activity and, with chronic predator exposure, developing relatively smaller trunks and larger tails. In many vertebrates, predator exposure alters activity of the neuroendocrine stress axis. We investigated predator-induced effects on stress hormone production and the mechanistic link to anti-predator defences in Rana sylvatica tadpoles. Whole-body corticosterone (CORT) content was positively correlated with predator biomass in natural ponds. Exposure to caged predators in mesocosms caused a reduction in CORT by 4 hours, but increased CORT after 4 days. Tadpoles chronically exposed to exogenous CORT developed larger tails relative to their trunks, matching morphological changes induced by predator chemical cue; this predator effect was blocked by the corticosteroid biosynthesis inhibitor metyrapone. Tadpole tail explants treated in vitro with CORT increased tissue weight, suggesting that CORT acts directly on the tail. Short-term treatment of tadpoles with CORT increased predation mortality, likely due to increased locomotory activity. However, long-term CORT treatment enhanced survivorship, likely due to induced morphology. Our findings support the hypothesis that tadpole physiological and behavioural/morphological responses to predation are causally interrelated. Tadpoles initially suppress CORT and behaviour to avoid capture, but increase CORT with longer exposure, inducing adaptive phenotypic changes. PMID:23466985

  18. COMPUTER APPROACHES TO WHEAT HIGH-THROUGHPUT PHENOTYPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonnikov D.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The growing need for rapid and accurate approaches for large-scale assessment of phenotypic characters in plants becomes more and more obvious in the studies looking into relationships between genotype and phenotype. This need is due to the advent of high throughput methods for analysis of genomes. Nowadays, any genetic experiment involves data on thousands and dozens of thousands of plants. Traditional ways of assessing most phenotypic characteristics (those with reliance on the eye, the touch, the ruler are little effective on samples of such sizes. Modern approaches seek to take advantage of automated phenotyping, which warrants a much more rapid data acquisition, higher accuracy of the assessment of phenotypic features, measurement of new parameters of these features and exclusion of human subjectivity from the process. Additionally, automation allows measurement data to be rapidly loaded into computer databases, which reduces data processing time.In this work, we present the WheatPGE information system designed to solve the problem of integration of genotypic and phenotypic data and parameters of the environment, as well as to analyze the relationships between the genotype and phenotype in wheat. The system is used to consolidate miscellaneous data on a plant for storing and processing various morphological traits and genotypes of wheat plants as well as data on various environmental factors. The system is available at www.wheatdb.org. Its potential in genetic experiments has been demonstrated in high-throughput phenotyping of wheat leaf pubescence.

  19. Determining Which Phenotypes Underlie a Pleiotropic Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Haldar, Tanushree; Witte, John S

    2016-07-01

    Discovering pleiotropic loci is important to understand the biological basis of seemingly distinct phenotypes. Most methods for assessing pleiotropy only test for the overall association between genetic variants and multiple phenotypes. To determine which specific traits are pleiotropic, we evaluate via simulation and application three different strategies. The first is model selection techniques based on the inverse regression of genotype on phenotypes. The second is a subset-based meta analysis ASSET [Bhattacharjee et al., ], which provides an optimal subset of nonnull traits. And the third is a modified Benjamini-Hochberg (B-H) procedure of controlling the expected false discovery rate [Benjamini and Hochberg, ] in the framework of phenome-wide association study. From our simulations we see that an inverse regression-based approach MultiPhen [O'Reilly et al., ] is more powerful than ASSET for detecting overall pleiotropic association, except for when all the phenotypes are associated and have genetic effects in the same direction. For determining which specific traits are pleiotropic, the modified B-H procedure performs consistently better than the other two methods. The inverse regression-based selection methods perform competitively with the modified B-H procedure only when the phenotypes are weakly correlated. The efficiency of ASSET is observed to lie below and in between the efficiency of the other two methods when the traits are weakly and strongly correlated, respectively. In our application to a large GWAS, we find that the modified B-H procedure also performs well, indicating that this may be an optimal approach for determining the traits underlying a pleiotropic signal. PMID:27238845

  20. Phenotypic extremes in rare variant study designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peloso, Gina M; Rader, Daniel J; Gabriel, Stacey; Kathiresan, Sekar; Daly, Mark J; Neale, Benjamin M

    2016-06-01

    Currently, next-generation sequencing studies aim to identify rare and low-frequency variation that may contribute to disease. For a given effect size, as the allele frequency decreases, the power to detect genes or variants of interest also decreases. Although many methods have been proposed for the analysis of such data, study design and analytic issues still persist in data interpretation. In this study we present sequencing data for ABCA1 that has known rare variants associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). We contrast empirical findings from two study designs: a phenotypic extreme sample and a population-based random sample. We found differing strengths of association with HDL-C across the two study designs (P=0.0006 with n=701 phenotypic extremes vs P=0.03 with n=1600 randomly sampled individuals). To explore this apparent difference in evidence for association, we performed a simulation study focused on the impact of phenotypic selection on power. We demonstrate that the power gain for an extreme phenotypic selection study design is much greater in rare variant studies than for studies of common variants. Our study confirms that studying phenotypic extremes is critical in rare variant studies because it boosts power in two ways: the typical increases from extreme sampling and increasing the proportion of relevant functional variants ascertained and thereby tested for association. Furthermore, we show that when combining statistical evidence through meta-analysis from an extreme-selected sample and a second separate population-based random sample, power is lower when a traditional sample size weighting is used compared with weighting by the noncentrality parameter. PMID:26350511

  1. Epigenetics in heart failure phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezin, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Chronic heart failure (HF) is a leading clinical and public problem posing a higher risk of morbidity and mortality in different populations. HF appears to be in both phenotypic forms: HF with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (HFrEF) and HF with preserved left ventricular ejection fraction (HFpEF). Although both HF phenotypes can be distinguished through clinical features, co-morbidity status, prediction score, and treatment, the clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF and HFpEF are similar. In this context, investigation of various molecular and cellular mechanisms leading to the development and progression of both HF phenotypes is very important. There is emerging evidence that epigenetic regulation may have a clue in the pathogenesis of HF. This review represents current available evidence regarding the implication of epigenetic modifications in the development of different HF phenotypes and perspectives of epigenetic-based therapies of HF. PMID:27335803

  2. Next-generation phenotypic screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warchal, Scott J; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Carragher, Neil O

    2016-07-01

    Phenotypic drug discovery (PDD) strategies are defined by screening and selection of hit or lead compounds based on quantifiable phenotypic endpoints without prior knowledge of the drug target. We outline the challenges associated with traditional phenotypic screening strategies and propose solutions and new opportunities to be gained by adopting modern PDD technologies. We highlight both historical and recent examples of approved drugs and new drug candidates discovered by modern phenotypic screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of a new era of PDD underpinned by a wealth of technology advances in the areas of in vitro model development, high-content imaging and image informatics, mechanism-of-action profiling and target deconvolution. PMID:27357617

  3. A multifaceted analysis of HIV-1 protease multidrug resistance phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty Kathleen M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Great strides have been made in the effective treatment of HIV-1 with the development of second-generation protease inhibitors (PIs that are effective against historically multi-PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Nevertheless, mutation patterns that confer decreasing susceptibility to available PIs continue to arise within the population. Understanding the phenotypic and genotypic patterns responsible for multi-PI resistance is necessary for developing PIs that are active against clinically-relevant PI-resistant HIV-1 variants. Results In this work, we use globally optimal integer programming-based clustering techniques to elucidate multi-PI phenotypic resistance patterns using a data set of 398 HIV-1 protease sequences that have each been phenotyped for susceptibility toward the nine clinically-approved HIV-1 PIs. We validate the information content of the clusters by evaluating their ability to predict the level of decreased susceptibility to each of the available PIs using a cross validation procedure. We demonstrate the finding that as a result of phenotypic cross resistance, the considered clinical HIV-1 protease isolates are confined to ~6% or less of the clinically-relevant phenotypic space. Clustering and feature selection methods are used to find representative sequences and mutations for major resistance phenotypes to elucidate their genotypic signatures. We show that phenotypic similarity does not imply genotypic similarity, that different PI-resistance mutation patterns can give rise to HIV-1 isolates with similar phenotypic profiles. Conclusion Rather than characterizing HIV-1 susceptibility toward each PI individually, our study offers a unique perspective on the phenomenon of PI class resistance by uncovering major multidrug-resistant phenotypic patterns and their often diverse genotypic determinants, providing a methodology that can be applied to understand clinically-relevant phenotypic patterns to aid in the

  4. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to recover sulfur compounds from lunar soil using sorbents derived primarily from in-situ resources....

  5. Satellite capture and the restricted three-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a general numerical study of satellite capture in the gravitational palnar restricted three-body problem. The initial motivation is a desire to understand the probable capture origin of the irregular Jovian satellites. The scope is broadened in order to developed a foundation for understanding gravitational capture in general. The two most important parameters are the mass ratio μ and the primary eccentricity ep. Each is varied separately, in order to isolate effects on capture by the smaller mass from the larger mass. The main results are summarized as follows: (1) In C0-x0 space, the capture time is an exceeding complex function. (2) The complexity is due to an infinite number of periodic orbit families. (3) The capture time is intimately connected to the periodic orbit families. (4) The structure of the periodic orbit families in the C0-x0 plane is self-similar, indicating that it is fractal. (5) The C0-x0 structure is very sensitive to ep. (6) There are two well-defined distributions in semimajor axis/eccentricity space of orbits around m1 (the more massive primary) that get capture by m2. The changes in a and e of these distributions are shown as a function of μ and of ep. (7) Capture into retrograde motion is much less probable than capture into prograde motion. (8) There is no distinction in semimajor axis, eccentricity, or orbit orientation between prograde and retrograde capture. (9) Capture occurs near primary pericenter. (10) For the current Jupiter-Sun system, capture occurs for heliocentric elements a ∼ 3.74-4.06 AU, and e ∼ 0.06-0.29

  6. Value Capture for Transportation Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Zhirong (Jerry) Zhao; Michael Iacono; David Levinson

    2009-01-01

    As vehicles become more fuel-efficient and overall levels of travel stagnate in response to increases in fuel prices, conventional sources of revenue for transportation finance such as taxes on motor fuels have been put under increasing pressure. One potential replacement as a source of revenue is a set of policies collectively referred to as value capture policies. In contrast to fuel taxes and other instruments that impose charges on users of transportation networks, value capture policies ...

  7. Toward transformational carbon capture systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States); Litynski, John T. [Office of Fossil Energy, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington DC (United States); Brickett, Lynn A. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States); Morreale, Bryan D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh PA (United States)

    2015-10-28

    This paper will briefly review the history and current state of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) research and development and describe the technical barriers to carbon capture. it will argue forcefully for a new approach to R&D, which leverages both simulation and physical systems at the laboratory and pilot scales to more rapidly move the best technoogies forward, prune less advantageous approaches, and simultaneously develop materials and processes.

  8. Direct Capture at Low Energies

    OpenAIRE

    Balogh, W.; Bieber, R.; Oberhummer, H.; Rauscher, T.; Kratz, K.-L.; Mohr, P; Staudt, G.; Sharma, M. M.

    1994-01-01

    The importance of direct capture for (n,$\\gamma$)--reactions on intermediate-- and heavy--mass target nuclei occuring in the s-- and r--process is investigated. It is shown that the direct mechanism is non--negligible for magic and neutron rich target nuclei. For some double magic and neutron rich nuclei in the r--process direct capture is even the dominant reaction mechanism.

  9. Context Capture in Software Development

    OpenAIRE

    Antunes, Bruno; Correia, Francisco; Gomes, Paulo

    2011-01-01

    The context of a software developer is something hard to define and capture, as it represents a complex network of elements across different dimensions that are not limited to the work developed on an IDE. We propose the definition of a software developer context model that takes into account all the dimensions that characterize the work environment of the developer. We are especially focused on what the software developer context encompasses at the project level and how it can be captured. T...

  10. 基于记忆的注意捕获和注意抑制效应:ERP证据%Electrophysiological evidence for memory-based attentional capture and memory-based attentional rejection effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡艳梅; 张明

    2016-01-01

    Biased competition theory suggests that stimuli matching the contents of visual working memory can always capture attention. However, the tests of this hypothesis failed to product consistent results. Some researches indicated that items matching the contents of visual working memory can automatically capture attention (i.e., memory-based attentional capture). Others argued that the contents of visual working memory are not necessary to capture attention. They can be rejected when they were irrelevant to the goal of the current task (i.e., memory-based attentional rejection). One of the remained questions is that whether or not the memory-based attentional capture effect is obligatory during the early deployments of visual attention, or in other words, whether or not the memory-based attentional rejection effect can be found during the early attentional deployments. Present study conducted an ERP experiment to investigate the time course of memory-based attentional guidance. Participants performed a visual search task while concurrently maintaining an item in visual object working memory. The search task included one target and one distractor. In matching trials, the search distractor shared the same color with the memory item. In control trials, neither the search target nor the distractor matched the color of the memory item. Meantime, the proportion of matching trials (20%/50%/80%) was manipulated. Higher proportion of matching trials elicits higher level of cognitive control incentive. Behavioural results showed search RTs were faster in matching trials than in control trials when the proportion of matching trials was set to be 50% and 80%, suggesting that items matching the contents of working memory can be rejected. However, no effect of trial type was found on search RTs when the proportion of matching trials was 20%. ERP results firstly revealed N2pc components at approximately 200~300 ms post-stimulus in all three proportion conditions (20

  11. Annual Report: Carbon Capture (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luebke, David; Morreale, Bryan; Richards, George; Syamlal, Madhava

    2014-04-16

    Capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a critical component in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-based processes. The Carbon Capture research to be performed is aimed at accelerating the development of efficient, cost-effective technologies which meet the post-combustion programmatic goal of capture of 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from an existing coal-fired power plant with less than a 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE), and the pre-combustion goal of 90% CO{sub 2} capture with less than a 10% increase in COE. The specific objective of this work is to develop innovative materials and approaches for the economic and efficient capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-based processes, and ultimately assess the performance of promising technologies at conditions representative of field application (i.e., slip stream evaluation). The Carbon Capture research includes seven core technical research areas: post-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; pre-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production. The goal of each of these tasks is to develop advanced materials and processes that are able to reduce the energy penalty and cost of CO{sub 2} (or O{sub 2}) separation over conventional technologies. In the first year of development, materials will be examined by molecular modeling, and then synthesized and experimentally characterized at lab scale. In the second year, they will be tested further under ideal conditions. In the third year, they will be tested under realistic conditions. The most promising materials will be tested at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) using actual flue or fuel gas. Systems analyses will be used to determine whether or not materials developed are likely to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) COE targets. Materials which perform well and appear likely to improve in performance will be licensed for further development outside of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL

  12. Pantethine treatment is effective in recovering the disease phenotype induced by ketogenic diet in a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Dario; Dusi, Sabrina; Giordano, Carla; Lamperti, Costanza; Morbin, Michela; Fugnanesi, Valeria; Marchet, Silvia; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Sibon, Ody; Moggio, Maurizio; d'Amati, Giulia; Tiranti, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration, caused by mutations in the PANK2 gene, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by dystonia, dysarthria, rigidity, pigmentary retinal degeneration and brain iron accumulation. PANK2 encodes the mitochondrial enzyme pantothenate kinase type 2, responsible for the phosphorylation of pantothenate or vitamin B5 in the biosynthesis of co-enzyme A. A Pank2 knockout (Pank2(-/-)) mouse model did not recapitulate the human disease but showed azoospermia and mitochondrial dysfunctions. We challenged this mouse model with a low glucose and high lipid content diet (ketogenic diet) to stimulate lipid use by mitochondrial beta-oxidation. In the presence of a shortage of co-enzyme A, this diet could evoke a general impairment of bioenergetic metabolism. Only Pank2(-/-) mice fed with a ketogenic diet developed a pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration-like syndrome characterized by severe motor dysfunction, neurodegeneration and severely altered mitochondria in the central and peripheral nervous systems. These mice also showed structural alteration of muscle morphology, which was comparable with that observed in a patient with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. We here demonstrate that pantethine administration can prevent the onset of the neuromuscular phenotype in mice suggesting the possibility of experimental treatment in patients with pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration. PMID:24316510

  13. Histomorphological Phenotyping of the Adult Mouse Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaleva, Anna; Kannan, Meghna; Wagner, Christel; Yalcin, Binnaz

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a series of standard operating procedures for morphological phenotyping of the mouse brain using basic histology. Many histological studies of the mouse brain use qualitative approaches based on what the human eye can detect. Consequently, some phenotypic information may be missed. Here we describe a quantitative approach for the assessment of brain morphology that is simple and robust. A total of 78 measurements are made throughout the brain at specific and well-defined regions, including the cortex, the hippocampus, and the cerebellum. Experimental design and timeline considerations, including strain background effects, the importance of sectioning quality, measurement variability, and efforts to correct human errors are discussed. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27584555

  14. BLOOD GAS, LACTATE, AND HEMATOLOGY EFFECTS OF VENIPUNCTURE TIMING AND LOCATION AFTER MIST-NET CAPTURE OF MOURNING DOVES (ZENAIDA MACROURA), BOAT-TAILED GRACKLES (QUISCALUS MAJOR), AND HOUSE SPARROWS (PASSER DOMESTICUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Craig A; Jinks, Maggie R; Harms, Ronald V

    2016-04-01

    Venous blood gas partial pressures, pH, bicarbonate and lactate concentrations, packed cell volume, white blood cell differential counts, and heterophil/lymphocyte ratios were measured from Mourning Doves (Zenaida macroura), Boat-tailed Grackles (Quiscalus major), and House Sparrows (Passer domesticus). Birds were bled promptly after mist-net capture and banding or following a targeted delay of 45-60 min, in order to assess the impacts of a brief holding period commonly practiced in large-scale bird banding operations. Additionally, effects of venipuncture location (basilic [=ulnar] vein versus jugular vein) were evaluated in male Boat-tailed Grackles sampled promptly after capture and banding. All comparisons were with unpaired samples; no birds were subjected to more than one venipuncture. All three species exhibited moderate improvements in blood gas and acid-base status after the delay, with reductions in lactate concentrations with or without concurrent increases in pH and bicarbonate. Boat-tailed Grackles exhibited an increased proportion of heterophils in the differential white blood cell count following a delay in sampling, suggestive of a stress leukogram. There were no significant differences between basilic and jugular venipuncture results from male Boat-tailed Grackles. Most metabolic, respiratory, and acid-base alterations were minor, but a small number of birds exhibited values (e.g., temperature-corrected pH 10 mmol/L) that could be of concern if combined with other adverse conditions. For such birds, a short delay between capture and processing could benefit their blood gas and acid-base status, although loss of time foraging or feeding young and greater activation of the hypophyseal-pituitary-adrenal axis are additional considerations. PMID:26845300

  15. Effects of trace gas components in carbon capture and storage: geochemical experiments and simulation of laboratory-scale brine-rock-CO2-trace gas interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Susanne; Nowak, Thomas; Heeschen, Katja; Riße, Andreas; Ostertag-Henning, Christian

    2010-05-01

    In the research activities on geological storage of carbon dioxide many studies mainly focus on the impact of pure CO2 gas on the storage formations. However, flue gas streams of power plants not only contain CO2, but also number of trace gases such as O2, N2, Ar, NOX, SOX, CO, H2, H2S, COS and CH4. These trace gases may not only interact with pipeline material, but can also trigger short-term and long-term changes within the subsurface storage lithology. The chemical reactivity of each of these compounds has to be evaluated and their interactions with each other have to be understood, especially since some of them are far more reactive than CO2. Within the project COORAL (= CO2 Purity for Capture and Storage) we concentrate on geochemical investigations to determine reaction pathways and kinetics of different mineral phases typical for potential German storage formations as influenced by the presence of trace gases within the flue gas stream. Quantitative measurements of these reactions are relatively well described for pure CO2 systems but are so far not well described for multi-component mixtures. We combine laboratory experiments (batch and flow-through) with numerical simulations applying the geochemical simulators PHREEQC and ChemApp, which will be coupled to GeoSys/RockFlow for coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) process simulations. Calculations and experiments are performed for temperatures up to 200°C and pressures up to 50 MPa. The aim of the study is to determine optimal maximum concentration levels of trace gases in flue gas streams to be used in geological CO2 storage.

  16. Transcriptional infidelity promotes heritable phenotypic change in a bistable gene network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Bistable epigenetic switches are fundamental for cell fate determination in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Regulatory proteins associated with bistable switches are often present in low numbers and subject to molecular noise. It is becoming clear that noise in gene expression can influence cell fate. Although the origins and consequences of noise have been studied, the stochastic and transient nature of RNA errors during transcription has not been considered in the origin or modeling of noise nor has the capacity for such transient errors in information transfer to generate heritable phenotypic change been discussed. We used a classic bistable memory module to monitor and capture transient RNA errors: the lac operon of Escherichia coli comprises an autocatalytic positive feedback loop producing a heritable all-or-none epigenetic switch that is sensitive to molecular noise. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the frequency of epigenetic switching from one expression state to the other is increased when the fidelity of RNA transcription is decreased due to error-prone RNA polymerases or to the absence of auxiliary RNA fidelity factors GreA and GreB (functional analogues of eukaryotic TFIIS. Therefore, transcription infidelity contributes to molecular noise and can effect heritable phenotypic change in genetically identical cells in the same environment. Whereas DNA errors allow genetic space to be explored, RNA errors may allow epigenetic or expression space to be sampled. Thus, RNA infidelity should also be considered in the heritable origin of altered or aberrant cell behaviour.

  17. CHAOTIC CAPTURE OF NEPTUNE TROJANS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neptune Trojans (NTs) are swarms of outer solar system objects that lead/trail planet Neptune during its revolutions around the Sun. Observations indicate that NTs form a thick cloud of objects with a population perhaps ∼10 times more numerous than that of Jupiter Trojans and orbital inclinations reaching ∼25 deg. The high inclinations of NTs are indicative of capture instead of in situ formation. Here we study a model in which NTs were captured by Neptune during planetary migration when secondary resonances associated with the mean-motion commensurabilities between Uranus and Neptune swept over Neptune's Lagrangian points. This process, known as chaotic capture, is similar to that previously proposed to explain the origin of Jupiter's Trojans. We show that chaotic capture of planetesimals from an ∼35 Earth-mass planetesimal disk can produce a population of NTs that is at least comparable in number to that inferred from current observations. The large orbital inclinations of NTs are a natural outcome of chaotic capture. To obtain the ∼4:1 ratio between high- and low-inclination populations suggested by observations, planetary migration into a dynamically excited planetesimal disk may be required. The required stirring could have been induced by Pluto-sized and larger objects that have formed in the disk.

  18. Experimental study on fly ash capture mercury in flue gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mercedes; DíAZ-SOMOANO; Patricia; ABAD-VALLE; M.Rosa; MARTíNEZ-TARAZONA

    2010-01-01

    Systematic experiments were conducted on a fixed-bed reactor to investigate the interaction between fly ash and mercury,the results implied that fly ash can capture mercury effectively.Among different fly ashes,the unburned carbon in the FA2 and FA3 fly ashes has the highest mercury capture capacity,up to 10.3 and 9.36 μg/g,respectively,which is close to that of commercial activated carbon.There is no obvious relationship between mercury content and carbon content or BET surface area of fly ash.Petrography classification standard was applied to distinguish fly ash carbon particles.Carbon content is not the only variable that controls mercury capture on fly ash,there are likely significant differences in the mercury capture capacities of the various carbon forms.Mercury capture capacity mainly depends on the content of anisotropy carbon particles with porous network structure.

  19. Sub-barrier capture with quantum diffusion approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheid W.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available With the quantum diffusion approach the behavior of capture cross sections and mean-square angular momenta of captured systems are revealed in the reactions with deformed and spherical nuclei at sub-barrier energies. With decreasing bombarding energy under the barrier the external turning point of the nucleus-nucleus potential leaves the region of short-range nuclear interaction and action of friction. Because of this change of the regime of interaction, an unexpected enhancement of the capture cross section is found at bombarding energies far below the Coulomb barrier. This effect is shown its worth in the dependence of mean-square angular momentum on the bombarding energy. From the comparison of calculated capture cross sections and experimental capture or fusion cross sections the importance of quasifission near the entrance channel is demonstrated for the actinidebased reactions and reactions with medium-heavy nuclei at extreme sub-barrier energies.

  20. Capture cross-section of threading dislocations in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We study the effect of film stress on capture cross-section of interacting threads. ► Capture cross-section area diverges near film channeling stress. ► Thread interactions are much more likely when local stress is near critical stress. - Abstract: The capture cross section for annihilation of two threads with opposite Burgers vectors moving on orthogonal slip planes in a thin film is examined using a numerical model. The initial configurations of threads that lead to annihilation are mapped out for a range of applied film stresses. The area of the region of initial configurations that lead to annihilation at a given stress and thickness is the capture cross-section. The size of the capture cross-section is shown to be highly sensitive to the applied stress relative to the critical stress for dislocation motion imposed by the film thickness.

  1. Proton capture by magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Kazama-Yang approximation, the lowest monopole-proton bound states have binding energies of 938 MeV, 263 keV, 105 eV, and 0.04 eV. The cross section for radiative capture to these states is for velocities β = 10-5 - 10-3 found to be of the order of 10-28 - 10-26 cm2. For the state that has a binding energy of 263 keV, the capture length in water is 171 x (β/10-4)sup(0.48) m. Observation of photons from the capture process would indicate the presence of monopoles. (orig.)

  2. Electron capture by protons and deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross section measurements are reported for electron capture into the 3s state by 20-150 keV protons and deuterons incident on molecular hydrogen and deuterium. Conventional wisdom indicates that these cross sections should be nearly identical at equivalent velocities and researchers routinely use deuteron projectiles to extend proton excitation curves downward in velocity. This practice has been questioned on theoretical grounds and some investigators have reported consistent differences in cross sections for the two isotopes, however, nearly always within the experimental uncertainty of the measurements. The authors have made a systematic study of the 3s electron capture cross sections described above to check for isotopic effects. These cross sections are then compared to previous measurements reported in the literature

  3. Network motifs that stabilize the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Tripathi, Satyendra; Hanash, Samir; Mani, Sendurai; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse - MET - are hallmarks of cancer metastasis. While transitioning between E and M phenotypes, cells can also attain a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M) phenotype that enables collective cell migration as a cluster of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). These clusters can form 50-times more tumors than individually migrating CTCs, underlining their importance in metastasis. However, this hybrid E/M phenotype has been hypothesized to be only a transient one that is attained en route EMT. Here, via mathematically modeling, we identify certain `phenotypic stability factors' that couple with the core three-way decision-making circuit (miR-200/ZEB) and can maintain or stabilize the hybrid E/M phenotype. Further, we show experimentally that this phenotype can be maintained stably at a single-cell level, and knockdown of these factors impairs collective cell migration. We also show that these factors enable the association of hybrid E/M with high stemness or tumor-initiating potential. Finally, based on these factors, we deduce specific network motifs that can maintain the E/M phenotype. Our framework can be used to elucidate the effect of other players in regulating cellular plasticity during metastasis. This work was supported by NSF PHY-1427654 (Center for Theoretical Biological Physics) and the CPRIT Scholar in Cancer Research of the State of Texas at Rice University.

  4. Prognostic significance of cell surface phenotype in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Shiek Aejaz Aziz; Susheel Kumar Sharma; Iram Sabah; M Aleem Jan

    2015-01-01

    Context: To find out the phenotypic character of lymphoblasts of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients in our study cohort and their possible effect on the prognosis. Aims: To investigate the phenotype in ALL in our demographic population and to prognosticate various upfront current protocols employed in our hospital. Settings and Design: The study spanned over a period of 4 years with retrospective and prospective data of January 2008 through December 2011. Materials and Methods: 159 p...

  5. Porous Organic Polymers for CO2 Capture

    KAUST Repository

    Teng, Baiyang

    2013-05-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) has long been regarded as the major greenhouse gas, which leads to numerous negative effects on global environment. The capture and separation of CO2 by selective adsorption using porous materials proves to be an effective way to reduce the emission of CO2 to atmosphere. Porous organic polymers (POPs) are promising candidates for this application due to their readily tunable textual properties and surface functionalities. The objective of this thesis work is to develop new POPs with high CO2 adsorption capacities and CO2/N2 selectivities for post-combustion effluent (e.g. flue gas) treatment. We will also exploit the correlation between the CO2 capture performance of POPs and their textual properties/functionalities. Chapters Two focuses on the study of a group of porous phenolic-aldehyde polymers (PPAPs) synthesized by a catalyst-free method, the CO2 capture capacities of these PPAPs exceed 2.0 mmol/g at 298 K and 1 bar, while keeping CO2/N2 selectivity of more than 30 at the same time. Chapter Three reports the gas adsorption results of different hyper-cross-linked polymers (HCPs), which indicate that heterocyclo aromatic monomers can greatly enhance polymers’ CO2/N2 selectivities, and the N-H bond is proved to the active CO2 adsorption center in the N-contained (e.g. pyrrole) HCPs, which possess the highest selectivities of more than 40 at 273 K when compared with other HCPs. Chapter Four emphasizes on the chemical modification of a new designed polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM) with high CO2/N2 selectivity (50 at 273 K), whose experimental repeatability and chemical stability prove excellent. In Chapter Five, we demonstrate an improvement of both CO2 capture capacity and CO2/N2 selectivity by doping alkali metal ions into azo-polymers, which leads a promising method to the design of new porous organic polymers.

  6. Connectomic intermediate phenotypes for psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eFornito

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Psychiatric disorders are phenotypically heterogeneous entities with a complex genetic basis. To mitigate this complexity, many investigators study so-called intermediate phenotypes that putatively provide a more direct index of the physiological effects of candidate genetic risk variants than overt psychiatric syndromes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a particularly popular technique for measuring such phenotypes because it allows interrogation of diverse aspects of brain structure and function in vivo. Much of this work however, has focused on relatively simple measures that quantify variations in the physiology or tissue integrity of specific brain regions in isolation, contradicting an emerging consensus that most major psychiatric disorders do not arise from isolated dysfunction in one or a few brain regions, but rather from disturbed interactions within and between distributed neural circuits; i.e., they are disorders of brain connectivity. The recent proliferation of new MRI techniques for comprehensively mapping the entire connectivity architecture of the brain, termed the human connectome, has provided a rich repertoire of tools for understanding how genetic variants implicated in mental disorder impact distinct neural circuits. In this article, we review research using these connectomic techniques to understand how genetic variation influences the connectivity and topology of human brain networks. We highlight recent evidence from twin and imaging genetics studies suggesting that the penetrance of candidate risk variants for mental illness, such as those in SLC6A4, MAOA, ZNF804A and APOE, may be higher for intermediate phenotypes characterised at the level of distributed neural systems than at the level of spatially localised brain regions. The findings indicate that imaging connectomics provides a powerful framework for understanding how genetic risk for psychiatric disease is expressed through altered structure and function of

  7. Spice: discovery of phenotype-determining component interplays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Zhengzhang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A latent behavior of a biological cell is complex. Deriving the underlying simplicity, or the fundamental rules governing this behavior has been the Holy Grail of systems biology. Data-driven prediction of the system components and their component interplays that are responsible for the target system’s phenotype is a key and challenging step in this endeavor. Results The proposed approach, which we call System Phenotype-related Interplaying Components Enumerator (Spice, iteratively enumerates statistically significant system components that are hypothesized (1 to play an important role in defining the specificity of the target system’s phenotype(s; (2 to exhibit a functionally coherent behavior, namely, act in a coordinated manner to perform the phenotype-specific function; and (3 to improve the predictive skill of the system’s phenotype(s when used collectively in the ensemble of predictive models. Spice can be applied to both instance-based data and network-based data. When validated, Spice effectively identified system components related to three target phenotypes: biohydrogen production, motility, and cancer. Manual results curation agreed with the known phenotype-related system components reported in literature. Additionally, using the identified system components as discriminatory features improved the prediction accuracy by 10% on the phenotype-classification task when compared to a number of state-of-the-art methods applied to eight benchmark microarray data sets. Conclusion We formulate a problem—enumeration of phenotype-determining system component interplays—and propose an effective methodology (Spice to address this problem. Spice improved identification of cancer-related groups of genes from various microarray data sets and detected groups of genes associated with microbial biohydrogen production and motility, many of which were reported in literature. Spice also improved the predictive skill of the

  8. The Economics of Carbon Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Islegen Ozge; Reichelstein Stefan J

    2009-01-01

    As carbon capture technologies are likely to allow power plants to reduce emissions by up to 90 percent, Ozge Islegen and Stefan Reichelstein of Stanford Business School feel that plants will choose to implement such technologies to avoid paying even modest emissions permit prices.

  9. Prey capture by harbor porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee; Verfuss, Ursula

    2009-01-01

    source levels of clicks decrease by about half (6dB) for each halving of distance to the prey. The sequence ends in a terminal, high repetition rate buzz (~500 clicks/s) just before capturing the prey (a video will be shown). The temporal sequence differs from that of beaked whales, but is like that of...

  10. Prey capture by harbor porpoises

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Lee

    2008-01-01

    ) that progressively decrease when closing on an object.  After detecting the prey, the click interval stabilizes and then becomes progressively shorter while approaching the prey.  The sequence ends in a terminal, high repetition rate buzz (~500 clicks/s) just before capturing the prey (a video will be...

  11. Leaf segmentation in plant phenotyping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scharr, Hanno; Minervini, Massimo; French, Andrew P.; Klukas, Christian; Kramer, David M.; Liu, Xiaoming; Luengo, Imanol; Pape, Jean Michel; Polder, Gerrit; Vukadinovic, Danijela; Yin, Xi; Tsaftaris, Sotirios A.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based plant phenotyping is a growing application area of computer vision in agriculture. A key task is the segmentation of all individual leaves in images. Here we focus on the most common rosette model plants, Arabidopsis and young tobacco. Although leaves do share appearance and shape cha

  12. Gadolinium-loaded chitosan nanoparticles for neutron-capture therapy: Influence of micrometric properties of the nanoparticles on tumor-killing effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a nanoparticulate device for controlled delivery of Gd in NCT, the authors have developed gadolinium-loaded chitosan nanoparticles (Gd-nanoCPs). In the present study, influence of micrometric properties such as particle size, particle-surface charge and Gd content of Gd-nanoCPs on tumor-killing effect by Gd-NCT was investigated with Gd-nanoCPs. Two types of Gd-nanoCPs with different mean particle size, zeta potential and Gd-content (Gd-nanoCP-400; 391 nm, 28 mV, 9 wt% and Gd-nanoCP-200; 214 nm, 19 mV, 24 wt%) could be prepared by using chitosans with different molecular weights. Gd-nanoCPs incorporating 1.2 mg of natural Gd were injected intratumorally once or twice to mice subcutaneously-bearing B16F10 melanoma. Eight hours after the last administration, thermal neutron was irradiated to tumor region of the mice. Remarkable tumor-growth was observed in both hot and cold control groups. In contrast, Gd-NCT groups showed significant tumor-growth suppression effect, though their efficacy was found to depend on the micrometric properties of Gd-nanoCPs. In particular, the Gd-nanoCP-200 exhibited stronger tumor-killing effect than the Gd-nanoCP-400 at the same Gd dose and it was still similar to Gd-nanoCP-400 in tumor-growth suppressing effect even at the half of Gd dose of Gd-nanoCP-400. This significance in tumor-killing effect would be ascribed from a higher Gd retention in the tumor tissue and an improved distribution of Gd with intratumorally administered Gd-nanoCP-200. Indeed, the Gd concentration in tumor tissue at the time corresponding to the onset of thermal neutron irradiation was determined to be significantly higher in Gd-nanoCP-200, compared with Gd-nanoCP-400. These results demonstrated that appropriate modification of Gd-nanoCPs in micrometric properties would be an effective way to improve the retention of Gd in the tumor tissue after intratumoral injection, leading to the enhanced tumor-killing effect in Gd-NCT. - Highlights: • Gadolinium

  13. Constraints on Speciation in Human Populations: Phenotypic Diversity Matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara B. Jones

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A phenotype is an expression of a genotype interacting with a component of an environment. Phenotypic diversity can be generated by mutation, physiological mechanisms, developmental processes, or learning (reinforcing and aversive stimulus-response effects. Causes and consequences of lifetime reproductive success can be partitioned into one or another of the previous mechanisms of phenotypic diversity. This article highlights, in particular, the ways in which behavioral diversity including cultural rules, enhances a phenotype’s relative reproductive success. Expanding Frank’s (2013 theoretical framework, it is argued that, whilea diverse (e.g., “modular” human phenotype may broaden a phenotype’s success in a given landscape, byproducts are produced that increase gene flow between populations, limiting the potential for population divergence and reproductive isolation. The mechanisms discussed herein are not necessarily dependent upon conscious and aware operations.

  14. Earth--Mars Transfers with Ballistic Capture

    OpenAIRE

    Topputo, Francesco; Belbruno, Edward

    2014-01-01

    We construct a new type of transfer from the Earth to Mars, which ends in ballistic capture. This results in a substantial savings in capture $\\Delta v$ from that of a classical Hohmann transfer under certain conditions. This is accomplished by first becoming captured at Mars, very distant from the planet, and then from there, following a ballistic capture transfer to a desired altitude within a ballistic capture set. This is achieved by manipulating the stable sets, or sets of initial condit...

  15. Entrained Flow Reactor Study of K-Capture by Solid Additives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Guoliang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2016-01-01

    collected from the cyclone and filter. The K-capture reaction is evaluated by determining the fraction of water-insoluble K in the products. The results showed that KCl can effectively be captured by kaolin and coal fly ash, forming water-insoluble K-aluminosilicates. The amount of K, captured per gram of...

  16. Influence of wetting layer wave functions on carrier capture in quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Markussen, Troels; Tromborg, Bjarne;

    2005-01-01

    This work numerically solves the effective mass Schrodinger equation and shows that the capture times are strongly influenced by details of the continuum states not accounted for by the approximate wave functions. Results show that calculations of capture time for phonon mediated carrier capture ...

  17. A simple method for the analysis of neutron resonance capture spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarijs, M.C.; Bom, V.R.; Van Eijk, C.W.E.

    2009-01-01

    Neutron resonance capture analysis (NRCA) is a method used to determine the bulk composition of various kinds of objects and materials. It is based on analyzing direct capture resonance peaks. However, the analysis is complicated by scattering followed by capture effects in the object itself. These

  18. Effect of breed composition, temperament, and ELISA scores for paratuberculosis on phenotypic residual feed intake and growth in an Angus-Brahman multibreed herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breed composition, temperament, and subclinical paratuberculosis in dams are factors that may have an effect on growth and feed efficiency in beef cattle. The objective of this research was to assess the effect of breed group (Angus (A), Brahman (B), Brangus, 3/4 A 1/4 B, 1/2 A ½ B, and 1/4 A 3/4 B)...

  19. Guidance on priority setting in health care (GPS-Health): the inclusion of equity criteria not captured by cost-effectiveness analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Norheim, O.F.; Baltussen, R.M.; Johri, M.; Chisholm, D.; Nord, E.; Brock, D.; Carlsson, P.; Cookson, R.; Daniels, N.; Danis, M.; Fleurbaey, M.; Johansson, K.A.; Kapiriri, L.; Littlejohns, P.; Mbeeli, T.; Rao, K.D.; Edejer, T.T.; Wikler, D.

    2014-01-01

    This Guidance for Priority Setting in Health Care (GPS-Health), initiated by the World Health Organization, offers a comprehensive map of equity criteria that are relevant to health care priority setting and should be considered in addition to cost-effectiveness analysis. The guidance, in the form o

  20. Effect of a gas-gas-heater on H2SO4 aerosol formation: implications for mist formation in amine based carbon capture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mertens, J.; Bruns, R.; Schallert, B.; Faniel, N.; Khakharia, P.M.; Albrecht, W.; Goetheer, E.L.V.; Blondeau, J.; Schaber, K.

    2015-01-01

    This study is to our knowledge the first to describe the effect of a Gas-Gas Heater (GGH) of a coal fired power plant's has on (i) the H2SO4 concentration and (ii) the particle/aerosol number concentration and particle size distribution present in the flue gas. In the absence of a GGH, homogenous nu