WorldWideScience

Sample records for capture gamma-ray spectra

  1. Neutron capture cross section and capture gamma-ray spectra of 89Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katabuchi Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The neutron capture cross section of 89Y was measured by the time-of-flight method in an energy range from 15 to 100 keV. A pulse-height weighting technique was applied to derive the capture yield. The absolute cross section was determined based on the standard reaciotn 197 Au(n, γ198 Au reaction. The neutron capture γ-ray spectrum was derived by unfolding the pulse-height spectrum with detector response functions.

  2. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  3. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  4. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234,236,238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, John Leonard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kawano, Toshihiko [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bredeweg, Todd Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Baramsai, Bayarbadrakh [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Couture, Aaron Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haight, Robert Cameron [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jandel, Marian [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Shea Morgan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); O' Donnell, John M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rundberg, Robert S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vieira, David J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilhelmy, Jerry B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Becker, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wu, Ching-Yen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Krticka, Milan [Charles Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)

    2015-05-28

    Neutron capture cross sections in the “continuum” region (>≈1 keV) and gamma-emission spectra are of importance to basic science and many applied fields. Careful measurements have been made on most common stable nuclides, but physicists must rely on calculations (or “surrogate” reactions) for rare or unstable nuclides. Calculations must be benchmarked against measurements (cross sections, gamma-ray spectra, and <Γγ>). Gamma-ray spectrum measurements from resolved resonances were made with 1 - 2 mg/cm2 thick targets; cross sections at >1 keV were measured using thicker targets. The results show that the shape of capture cross section vs neutron energy is not sensitive to the form of the strength function (although the magnitude is); the generalized Lorentzian E1 strength function is not sufficient to describe the shape of observed gamma-ray spectra; MGLO + “Oslo M1” parameters produces quantitative agreement with the measured 238U(n,γ) cross section; additional strength at low energies (~ 3 MeV) -- likely M1-- is required; and careful study of complementary results on low-lying giant resonance strength is needed to consistently describe observations.

  5. Spectra of {gamma} rays feeding superdeformed bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Khoo, T.L.; Henry, R.G. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The spectrum of {gamma}rays coincident with SD transitions contains the transitions which populate the SD band. This spectrum can provide information on the feeding mechanism and on the properties (moment of inertia, collectivity) of excited SD states. We used a model we developed to explain the feeding of SD bands, to calculate the spectrum of feeding {gamma}rays. The Monte Carlo simulations take into account the trigger conditions present in our Eurogam experiment. Both experimental and theoretical spectra contain a statistical component and a broad E2 peak (from transitions occurring between excited states in the SD well). There is good resemblance between the measured and calculated spectra although the calculated multiplicity of an E2 bump is low by {approximately}30%. Work is continuing to improve the quality of the fits, which will result in a better understanding of excited SD states. In addition, a model for the last steps, which cool the {gamma} cascade into the SD yrast line, needs to be developed. A strong M1/E2 low-energy component, which we believe is responsible for this cooling, was observed.

  6. Gamma-ray Output Spectra from 239Pu Fission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ullmann John

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray multiplicities, individual gamma-ray energy spectra, and total gamma energy spectra following neutron-induced fission of 239Pu were measured using the DANCE detector at Los Alamos. Corrections for detector response were made using a forward-modeling technique based on propagating sets of gamma rays generated from a paramaterized model through a GEANT model of the DANCE array and adjusting the parameters for best fit to the measured spectra. The results for the gamma-ray spectrum and multiplicity are in general agreement with previous results, but the measured total gamma-ray energy is about 10% higher. A dependence of the gamma-ray spectrum on the gamma-ray multplicity was also observed. Global model calculations of the multiplicity and gamma energy distributions are in good agreement with the data, but predict a slightly softer total-energy distribution.

  7. Polarization measurements of proton capture gamma rays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suffert, M.; Endt, P.M.; Hoogenboom, A.M.

    1959-01-01

    The linear polarization has been measured of eight different gamma rays of widely differing energies (Eγ = 0.8 - 8.0 MeV) emitted at resonances in the 24Mg(p, γ)25Al, 30Si(p, γ)31P, and 32S(p, γ)33Cl reactions. The gamma rays emitted at 90° to the proton beam were Compton scattered in a 2″ NaI scint

  8. Gamma-rays from Muon Capture in $^{14}$N

    CERN Document Server

    Stocki, T J; Gete, E; Saliba, M A; Moftah, B A; Gorringe, T P

    2001-01-01

    Many new $\\gamma$-rays have been observed, following muon capture on $^{14}$N. One had been reported before, and the low yield is confirmed, indicating that the nuclear structure of $^{14}$N is still not understood. Gamma-rays from $^{13}$C resulting from the reaction $^{14}$N($\\mu^{-}$,$\

  9. Measurements of keV-neutron capture {gamma} rays of fission products. 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashira, Masayuki [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors

    1997-03-01

    {gamma} rays from the keV-neutron capture reactions by {sup 143,145}Nd and {sup 153}Eu have been measured in a neutron energy region of 10 to 80 keV, using a large anti-Compton NaI(Tl) {gamma}-ray spectrometer and the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be pulsed neutron source with a 3-MV Pelletron accelerator. The preliminary results for the capture cross sections and {gamma}-ray spectra of those nuclei are presented and discussed. (author)

  10. Gamma rays from muon capture in {sup 14}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocki, T.J. E-mail: trevor.stocki@crc.ca; Measday, D.F.; Gete, E.; Saliba, M.A.; Moftah, B.A.; Gorringe, T.P

    2002-01-14

    Many new {gamma}-rays have been observed, following muon capture on {sup 14}N. One had been reported before, and the low yield is confirmed, indicating that the nuclear structure of {sup 14}N is still not understood. Gamma rays from {sup 13}C resulting from the reaction {sup 14}N({mu}{sup -},{nu}n){sup 13}C compare favourably with states observed in the reaction {sup 14}N({gamma}, p){sup 13}C. More precise energies are also given for the 7017 and 6730 keV {gamma}-rays in {sup 14}C.

  11. Distribution of iron and titanium on the lunar surface from lunar prospector gamma ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, T.

    2001-01-01

    Gamma ray pulse height spectra acquired by the Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) contain information on the abundance of major elements in the lunar surface, including O, Si, Ti, Al, Fe, Mg, Ca, K, and Th. With the exception of Th and K, prompt gamma rays produced by cosmic ray interactions with surface materials are used to determine elemental abundance. Most of these gamma rays are produced by inelastic scattering of fast neutrons and by neutrons and by neutron capture. The production of neutron-induced gamma rays reaches a maximum deep below the surface (e.g. approximately 140g/cm2 for inelastic scattering and approximately 50 g/cm2 for capture). Consequently, gamma rays sense the bulk composition of lunar materials, in contrast to optical methods (e.g. Clementine Spectral Reflectance (CSR)), which only sample the top few microns. Because most of the gamma rays are produced deep beneath the surface, few escape unscattered and the continuum of scattered gamma rays dominates the spectrum. In addition, due to the resolution of the spectrometer, there are few well-isolated peaks and peak fitting algorithms must be used to deconvolve the spectrum on order to determine the contribution of individual elements.

  12. Resonance capture gamma-ray spectrometry at Lead Slowing-down Neutron Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Pourimani, R; Popov, Y P; Przytula, M; Wojtkiewicz, R

    2002-01-01

    A new method of measurement of the gamma-ray spectra from resonance neutron capture that can be realized at Lead Slowing-down Neutron Spectrometers was proposed and tested experimentally. The specific feature of the method is the shielding of germanium detector by a 'thick' investigated sample that absorbs intensive neutron flux with energies corresponding to sample resonances. In these energy regions the detector response on neutron irradiation is considerably reduced while the sample gamma-ray spectra are greatly strengthened. The detector response gamma-ray spectra are presented and analysed, and the spectra from neutron capture in tantalum resonances at energies 4.28 and 10.36 eV are shown. The obtained results demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed method. Five new excited levels in germanium isotopes are proposed.

  13. Thermal-neutron capture gamma rays from natural calcium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Spilling, P.

    1967-01-01

    Gamma rays from thermal-neutron capture in natural Ca and enriched 40Ca were investigated with a 5 cm3 Ge(Li) detector. Many low-energy γ-lines have been found. More than 90% of the γ-rays result from capture in 40Ca and about 5% from capture in 44Ca. From the data a decay scheme of 41Ca and a parti

  14. A COMPARISON OF GADRAS SIMULATED AND MEASURED GAMMA RAY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffcoat, R.; Salaymeh, S.

    2010-06-28

    Gamma-ray radiation detection systems are continuously being developed and improved for detecting the presence of radioactive material and for identifying isotopes present. Gamma-ray spectra, from many different isotopes and in different types and thicknesses of attenuation material and matrixes, are needed to evaluate the performance of these devices. Recently, a test and evaluation exercise was performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory that required a large number of gamma-ray spectra. Simulated spectra were used for a major portion of the testing in order to provide a pool of data large enough for the results to be statistically significant. The test data set was comprised of two types of data, measured and simulated. The measured data were acquired with a hand-held Radioisotope Identification Device (RIID) and simulated spectra were created using Gamma Detector Response and Analysis Software (GADRAS, Mitchell and Mattingly, Sandia National Laboratory). GADRAS uses a one-dimensional discrete ordinate calculation to simulate gamma-ray spectra. The measured and simulated spectra have been analyzed and compared. This paper will discuss the results of the comparison and offer explanations for spectral differences.

  15. The effect of Compton scattering on gamma-ray spectra of the 2005 January 20 flare

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Wei-Qun Gan

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectroscopy provides a wealth of information about accelerated particles in solar flares,as well as the ambient medium with which these energetic particles interact.The neutron capture line (2.223 MeV),the strongest in the solar gamma-ray spectrum,forms in the deep atmosphere.The energy of these photons can be reduced via Compton scattering.With the fully relativistic GEANT4 toolkit,we have carried out Monte Carlo simulations of the transport of a neutron capture line in solar flares,and applied them to the flare that occurred on 2005 January 20 (X7.1/2B),one of the most powerful gamma-ray flares observed by RHESSI during the 23rd solar cycle.By comparing the fitting results of different models with and without Compton scattering of the neutron capture line,we find that when including the Compton scattering for the neutron capture line,the observed gamma-ray spectrum can be reproduced by a population of accelerated particles with a very hard spectrum (s≤2.3).The Compton effect of a 2.223 MeV line on the spectra is therefore proven to be significant,which influences the time evolution of the neutron capture line flux as well.The study also suggests that the mean vertical depth for neutron capture in hydrogen for this event is about 8 g cm-2.

  16. Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

    2008-07-01

    The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

  17. The Extragalactic Background Light and Absorption in Gamma Ray Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Rudy C.

    2008-03-01

    Recent state-of-the-art semi-analytic models (SAMs) can now accurately model the history of galaxy formation and evolution. These SAMs utilize a 'forward evolution' approach and include all of the important processes for determining photon emission from galaxies, such as cooling and shock heating of gas, galaxy mergers, star formation and aging, supernova and AGN feedback, and the reprocessing of light by dust. I will be presenting our group's latest prediction of the extra-galactic background light based on this work and will discuss the implications for the attenuation of VHE gamma rays from distant sources due to pair-production. These results will be compared to recent limits placed on the EBL by observations of GeV and TeV blazar spectra by experiments such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. The implications for reconstructing the intrinsic spectra of distant blazars will be addressed.

  18. Energetic solar electron spectra and gamma-ray observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dröge, Wolfgang

    1996-06-01

    We analyze solar energetic electron events measured with particle detectors on board of the ISEE-3 (ICE) and Helios 1 and 2 spacecraft. Energy spectra in the range 0.1 to tens of MeV are generated applying the results of a careful re-examination of the electron response function of the instruments. The spectral shapes of events observed simultaneously, among them five on all three s/c, are in very good agreement inspite of the sometimes considerable difference in azimuthal and radial distances of the s/c with respect to the flare. These findings suggest that transport processes at the Sun and in the interplanetary medium depend only weakly on the electron energy and that the observed spectra are representative of the accelerated electron spectra at the Sun. A comparison of the electron spectra with SMM gamma-ray spectra gives evidence for the existence of different acceleration and emission mechanism in flares with long (LDEs) and short duration (SDEs) soft X-ray emission.

  19. Pulse Summing in the gamma-Ray Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gromov, K Ya; Samatov, Zh K; Chumin, V G

    2004-01-01

    It was shown that the peaks formed at the summing of the cascade gamma-rays pulses can be used for the determination of gamma-ray source activity and gamma-ray registration efficency. Possible sources of the determined quantities errors have been investigated. Such a method can be useful at the nuclear reaction cross section measurements, at background analysis in looking for rare decays and so on.

  20. The holistic analysis of gamma-ray spectra in instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaauw, M.

    1993-11-15

    The subject is the computerized analysis of the gamma-ray spectra in INAA. This analysis can be separated in three parts: The conversion of the spectra to information on {gamma}-ray energies and their relative intensities (spectrum reduction), the determination of the relation between the intensity of a {gamma}-ray and the amount of the corresponding element present in the sample (standardization) and the attribution of the {gamma}-ray energies to the elements, including the subsequent computation of the amounts of the elements (interpretation). A {gamma}-ray spectrum can be considered to be the linear sum of the {gamma}-ray spectra of the individual radionuclides present in the sample. Knowing the relative activities of the different radionuclides that may be produced by activation of a single element, a {gamma}-ray spectrum in INAA can also be considered to be the linear sum of the spectra of the elements. This principle has hitherto not been used in INAA to analyze the spectra by linear least squares methods, using all {gamma}-ray energies observed in the spectrum. The implementation of this `holistic` approach required that attention be paid to both spectrum reduction, standardization and interpretation. The thesis describes the methods developed for the holistic analysis of {gamma}-ray spectra in INAA, and present results of experimental comparisons between the holistic and other approaches. (orig./HP).

  1. Broadband turbulent spectra in gamma-ray burst light curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Putten, Maurice H. P. M. [Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong Gwangin-gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Guidorzi, Cristiano; Frontera, Filippo, E-mail: mvp@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy)

    2014-05-10

    Broadband power density spectra offer a window to understanding turbulent behavior in the emission mechanism and, at the highest frequencies, in the putative inner engines powering long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We describe a chirp search method alongside Fourier analysis for signal detection in the Poisson noise-dominated, 2 kHz sampled, BeppoSAX light curves. An efficient numerical implementation is described in O(Nnlog n) operations, where N is the number of chirp templates and n is the length of the light-curve time series, suited for embarrassingly parallel processing. For the detection of individual chirps over a 1 s duration, the method is one order of magnitude more sensitive in signal-to-noise ratio than Fourier analysis. The Fourier-chirp spectra of GRB 010408 and GRB 970816 show a continuation of the spectral slope with up to 1 kHz of turbulence identified in low-frequency Fourier analysis. The same continuation is observed in an average spectrum of 42 bright, long GRBs. An outlook on a similar analysis of upcoming gravitational wave data is included.

  2. Curved crystal study of de-excitation gamma rays in /sup 184/W following neutron capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davidson, W.F.; Reich, C.W.; Greenwood, R.C.; Koch, C.W.

    1981-01-01

    The capture ..gamma..-ray spectrum was studied using the curved-crystal ..gamma..-ray spectrometers installed at the High Flux Reactor of the ILL in Grenoble. Approximately 150 ..gamma..-ray transitions, from approx. 85 keV to 2.33 Mev, were assigned to /sup 184/W. A partial level scheme of /sup 184/W, showing the first four excited positive-parity bands and their de-exciting ..gamma..-ray transitions as observed in this study, is shown. (WHK)

  3. Augmentation of ENDF/B fission product gamma-ray spectra by calculated spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katakura, J. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)); England, T.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Gamma-ray spectral data of the ENDF/B-V fission product decay data file have been augmented by calculated spectra. The calculations were performed with a model using beta strength functions and cascade gamma-ray transitions. The calculated spectra were applied to individual fission product nuclides. Comparisons with several hundred measured aggregate gamma spectra after fission were performed to confirm the applicability of the calculated spectra. The augmentation was extended to a preliminary ENDF/B-VI file, and to beta spectra. Appendix C provides information on the total decay energies for individual products and some comparisons of measured and aggregate values based on the preliminary ENDF/B-VI files. 15 refs., 411 figs.

  4. MCNP modelling of scintillation-detector gamma-ray spectra from natural radionuclides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Maucec, M; de Meijer, RJ

    2002-01-01

    gamma-ray spectra of natural radionuclides are simulated for a BGO detector in a borehole geometry using the Monte Carlo code MCNP. All gamma-ray emissions of the decay of K-40 and the series of Th-232 and U-238 are used to describe the source. A procedure is proposed which excludes the time-consumi

  5. Landmine detection method combined with backscattering neutrons and capture {gamma}-rays from hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: ytaka@rri.kyoto-u.ac.j [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Shiroya, Seiji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Kiyoshi [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokashou, Uji-shi, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2011-07-15

    The usefulness of the measurements of the backscattering neutron and 2.22 MeV capture {gamma}-ray from hydrogen in the landmine detection method is described in this paper. When the soil moisture content is increased, the reaction rates of both the neutron scattering reaction and capture reaction are increased. However, the backscattering neutrons are more influenced than the capture {gamma}-rays by the soil moisture before the reaction with the detector. The facts that the backscattering neutron method is useful in the dry soil case and that the capture {gamma}-ray method is effective in well-wet soil case are confirmed by the experiments and the calculations. The landmine detection efficiency is improved in various soil moisture conditions by combining the backscattering neutron method together with the capture {gamma}-ray method. The effectiveness of the pulse mode operation was confirmed numerically.

  6. The Gamma-ray Blazar Quest: new optical spectra, state of art and future perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F; D'Abrusco, R; Landoni, M; Masetti, N; Ricci, F; Milisavljevic, D; Paggi, A; Chavushyan, V; Jiménez-Bailón, E; Patiño-Álvarez, V; Strader, J; Chomiuk, L; La Franca, F; Smith, Howard A; Tosti, G

    2016-01-01

    We recently developed a procedure to recognize gamma-ray blazar candidates within the positional uncertainty regions of the unidentified/unassociated gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Such procedure was based on the discovery that Fermi blazars show peculiar infrared colors. However, to confirm the real nature of the selected candidates, optical spectroscopic data are necessary. Thus, we performed an extensive archival search for spectra available in the literature in parallel with an optical spectroscopic campaign aimed to reveal and confirm the nature of the selected gamma-ray blazar candidates. Here, we first search for optical spectra of a selected sample of gamma-ray blazar candidates that can be potential counterparts of UGSs using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS DR12). This search enables us to update the archival search carried out to date. We also describe the state-of-art and the future perspectives of our campaign to discover previously unknown gamma-ray blazars.

  7. MCRaT Simulations of Long Gamma Ray Burst Spectra and Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsotan, T.; Lazzati, D.

    2016-10-01

    We present the results of the Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer, MCRaT, simulations of long gamma ray bursts from a variety of stellar progenitors and jet properties, including variable engines. We also compare the resulting spectra to observed data.

  8. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in {sup 13}C with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Renato; Carbonari, Artur W.; Terremoto, Luis A.A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: rsemmler@ipen.br; carbonar@ipen.br; laaterre@ipen.br; Goncalez, Odair L. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados]. E-mail: odairl@ieav.cta.br

    2007-07-01

    Photoneutrons cross sections measurements of {sup 13}C have been obtained in energy interval between 5,3 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 - 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (2MW) research reactor. The sample have been irradiated inside a 4p geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm{sup 3}, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A methodology for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, have been used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma lines energies of the capture targets). The cross sections were compared with experimental data, reported by other authors, using different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed between in this work and reported in the literature. (author)

  9. Review of Past Nuclear Accidents: Source Terms and Recorded Gamma-Ray Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Cresswell, A.; Allyson, J.D.; McConville, P.; Department of the Environment: Radioactive Substances Division

    1997-01-01

    Airborne gamma ray spectrometry using high volume scintillation detectors, optionally in conjunction with Ge detectors, has potential for making rapid environmental measurements in response to nuclear accidents. A literature search on past nuclear accidents has been conducted to define the source terms which have been experienced so far. Selected gamma ray spectra recorded after past accidents have also been collated to examine the complexity of observed behaviour.

  10. Thermal-neutron capture gamma rays from natural magnesium and enriched 25Mg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spilling, P.; Gruppelaar, H.; Kamp, A.M.F. op den

    1967-01-01

    Gamma rays from neutron capture in natural magnesium and in enriched 25Mg have been studied with Ge(Li) detectors. Altogether 101 γ-rays have been observed. Most of these γ-rays could be fitted into the level schemes of 25Mg, 26Mg and 27Mg. If it is assumed that the capture cross section for natura

  11. GAMMA-RAY LIGHT CURVE AND PHASE-RESOLVED SPECTRA FROM GEMINGA PULSAR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG LI; BIAN XIA; MEI DONG-CHENG

    2001-01-01

    We calculate the light curve and phase-resolved spectra of Geminga in a three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere model. The light curve of gamma-rays is consistent with that observed if the magnetic inclination and viewing angle are~50° and~86° respectively. We also model the phase-resolved spectra of the Geminga pulsar.

  12. The gamma-ray spectra of halocarbons in positron–electron annihilation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, X.G., E-mail: hsiaoguangma@188.com; Zhu, Y.H.; Liu, Y.

    2015-10-09

    The gamma-ray spectra of the positron annihilation process in methane CH{sub 4} and its fully substituent halocarbons CF{sub 4}, CCl{sub 4}, and CBr{sub 4} have been studied. The theoretical predictions of the inner valence electrons agree well with the experimental measurements for all these molecules. That the outermost s electrons in carbon or halogen atoms dominate the gamma-ray spectra has been confirmed for the first time. The positrophilic site has also been found in these molecules and understanding of annihilation processes in molecules has been enhanced. - Highlights: • The inner valence electrons in molecules dominate the Doppler shift. • The outermost atomic s electrons in molecules show dominance in the gamma-ray spectra. • The positron can penetrate deeper inside molecules in positrophilic sites to annihilate with inner valence electrons.

  13. Gamma-ray spectra of hexane in gas phase and liquid phase

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Xiaoguang

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical gamma-ray spectra of molecule hexane have been calculated and compared with the experimental results in both gas (Surko et al, 1997) and liquid (Kerr et al, 1965) phases. The present study reveals that in gas phase not all valence electrons of hexane exhibit the same probability to annihilate a positron. Only the positrophilic electrons in the valence space dominate the gamma-ray spectra, which are in good agreement with the gas phase measurement. When hexane is confined in liquid phase, however, the intermolecular interactions ultimately eliminate the free molecular orientation and selectivity for the positrophilic electrons in the gas phase. As a result, the gamma-ray spectra of hexane become an averaged contribution from all valence electrons, which is again in agreement with liquid phase measurement. The roles of the positrophilic electrons in annihilation process for gas and liquid phases of hexane have been recognized for the first time in the present study.

  14. Database of prompt gamma rays from slow neutron capture forelemental analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firestone, R.B.; Choi, H.D.; Lindstrom, R.M.; Molnar, G.L.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Paviotti-Corcuera, R.; Revay, Zs; Trkov, A.; Zhou,C.M.; Zerkin, V.

    2004-12-31

    analysis of complicated capture-gamma spectra by means ofPGAA. Therefore, the main goal of the CRP was to improve the quality andquantity of the required data in order to make possible the reliableapplication of PGAA in fields such as materials science, chemistry,geology, mining, archaeology, environment, food analysis and medicine.This aim wasachieved thanks to the dedicated work and effort of theparticipants. The CD-ROM included with this publication contains thedatabase, the retrieval system, the three CRM reports, and otherimportant electronic documents related to the CRP. The IAEA wishes tothanks all CRP participants who contributed to the success of the CRP andthe formulation of this publication. Special thanks are due to R.B.Firestone for his leading roll in the development of this CRP and hiscomprehensive compilation, analysis and provision of the adopteddatabase, and to V. Zerkin for the software developments associatedwiththe retrieval system. An essential component of this data compilation isthe extensive sets of new measurements of capture gamma-ray energies andintensities undertaken at Budapest by Zs. Revay under the direction ofG.L. Molnar. The extensive participation and assistance of H.D. Choi isalso greatly appreciated. Other participants inthis CRP were: R.M.Lindstrom, S.M. Mughabghab, A.V.R. Reddy, V.H. Tan and C.M. Zhou. Thanksare also due to S.C. Frankle and M.A. Lone for their active participationas consultants at some of the meetings. Finally, the participants wish tothank R. Paviotti-Corcuera (Nuclear Data Section, Division of Physicaland Chemical Sciences), who was the IAEA responsible officer for the CRP,this publication and the resulting database. The participants aregrateful to D.L. Muir and A.L. Nichols, successive Heads of the NuclearData Section, for their active and enthusiastic encouragement infurthering the work of the CRP.

  15. An MS-DOS-based program for analyzing plutonium gamma-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.

    1989-09-07

    A plutonium gamma-ray analysis system that operates on MS-DOS-based computers has been developed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra for plutonium isotopics. The program titled IAEAPU consists of three separate applications: a data-transfer application for transferring spectral data from a CICERO multichannel analyzer to a binary data file, a data-analysis application to analyze plutonium gamma-ray spectra, for plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percents of total plutonium, and a data-quality assurance application to check spectral data for proper data-acquisition setup and performance. Volume 3 contains the software listings for these applications.

  16. Gamma rays from muon capture in sup 1 sup 4 N

    CERN Document Server

    Stocki, T J; Gete, E; Saliba, M A; Moftah, B A; Gorringe, T P

    2002-01-01

    Many new gamma-rays have been observed, following muon capture on sup 1 sup 4 N. One had been reported before, and the low yield is confirmed, indicating that the nuclear structure of sup 1 sup 4 N is still not understood. Gamma rays from sup 1 sup 3 C resulting from the reaction sup 1 sup 4 N(mu sup - ,nu n) sup 1 sup 3 C compare favourably with states observed in the reaction sup 1 sup 4 N(gamma, p) sup 1 sup 3 C. More precise energies are also given for the 7017 and 6730 keV gamma-rays in sup 1 sup 4 C.

  17. Least square fitting of low resolution gamma ray spectra with cubic B-spline basis functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Meng-Hua; LIU Liang-Gang; QI Dong-Xu; YOU Zhong; XU Ao-Ao

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,the least square fitting method with the cubic B-spline basis hmctioas is derived to reduce the influence of statistical fluctuations in the gamma ray spectra.The derived procedure is simple and automatic.The results show that this method is better than the convolution method with a sufficient reduction of statistical fluctuation.

  18. Conversion of Airborne Gamma ray Spectra to Ground Level Air Kerma Rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bargholz, Kim; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    1997-01-01

    A new method for relating airborne gamma-ray spectra to dose rates and kerma rates at ground level is presented. Dependent on flying altitude 50 m to 125 m the method gives correct results for gamma energies above 250 keV respective 350 keV. At lower energies the method underestimate the dose...... or kerma rates; by having a large fraction of the ground level gamma-rays at energies below 350 keV special care should be taken at an interpretation of the results....

  19. The gamma-ray spectra of 5-carbon alkane isomers in the positron annihilation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoguang, E-mail: hsiaoguangma@188.com; Zhu, Yinghao; Liu, Yang

    2016-05-06

    The gamma-ray spectra of pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) and its two isomers, i.e., 2-Methylbutane (CH{sub 3}C(CH{sub 3})HC{sub 2}H{sub 5}) and 2,2-Dimethylpropane (C(CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) have been studied theoretically in the present work. The recent experimental gamma-ray spectra of these three molecules show that they have the same Doppler shifts, although their molecular structures are dramatically different. In order to reveal why the gamma-ray spectra of these molecules are less sensitive to the molecular structures, the one-dimensional gamma-ray spectra and spherically averaged momentum (SAM) distributions, the two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (ACAR), and the three-dimensional momentum distributions of the positron–electron pair are studied. The one-centered momentum distributions of the electrons are found to play more important role than the multi-centered coordinate distributions. The present theoretical predictions have confirmed the experimental findings for the first time. The dominance of the inner valence electrons in the positron–electron annihilation process has also been suggested in the present work. - Highlights: • The structure effects only play a minor role in the one-dimension gamma-ray spectra. • The present study further confirms the dominance of the inner valence electrons in the positron–electron annihilation process. • The momentum distributions of the electrons play more important role than the coordinate distributions.

  20. Full-spectrum analysis of natural gamma-ray spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Peter; Limburg, J; de Meijer, RJ

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new system to measure natural gamma -radiation in situ will be presented. This system combines a high-efficiency EGO scintillation detector with full-spectrum data analysis (FSA). This technique uses the (nearly) full spectral shape and the so-called 'standard spectra' to calculate

  1. Full-spectrum analysis of natural gamma-ray spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, P H; Limburg, J; de Meijer, R J

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, a new system to measure natural gamma-radiation in situ will be presented. This system combines a high-efficiency BGO scintillation detector with full-spectrum data analysis (FSA). This technique uses the (nearly) full spectral shape and the so-called 'standard spectra' to calculate the activity concentrations of 40K, 232Th and 238U present in a geological matrix (sediment, rock, etc.). We describe the FSA and the determination of the standard spectra. Standard spectra are constructed for various geometries and a comparison in intensity and shape will be made. The performance of such a system has been compared to a more traditional system, consisting of a NaI detector in combination with the 'windows' analysis. For count rates typically encountered in field experiments, the same accuracy is obtained 10-20 times faster using the new system. This allows for shorter integration times and hence shorter measurements or a better spatial resolution. The applicability of such a system will be illustrated via an example of an airborne experiment in which the new system produced results comparable to those of much larger traditional systems. This paper will conclude with a discussion of the current status of the system and an outlook for future research.

  2. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal-neutron-capture gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffey, D.; El-Kady, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1970-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal-neutron-capture gamma ray spectrum has been compiled for most of the elements. In addition a second table of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has been compiled according to energy for all significant lines above 3 MeV. Lines that contrast well with adjacent lines are noted as prominent. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1970.

  3. Analytical sensitivities and energies of thermal neutron capture gamma rays II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Moore, H.D.; Leep, D.B.; El-Kady, A.; Duffey, D.

    1971-01-01

    A table of the analytical sensitivities of the principal lines in the thermal neutron capture gamma-ray spectrum from 0 to 3 MeV has been compiled for most of the elements. A tabulation of the full-energy, single-escape, and double-escape peaks has also been made according to energy. The tables are useful for spectral interpretation and calibration. ?? 1971.

  4. Individual power density spectra of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Guidorzi, C; Amati, L

    2016-01-01

    Timing analysis is a powerful tool with which to shed light on the still obscure emission physics and geometry of the prompt emission of GRBs. Fourier power density spectra (PDS) characterise time series as stochastic processes and can be used to search for coherent pulsations and to investigate the dominant variability timescales. Because of the limited duration and of the statistical properties, modelling the PDS of individual GRBs is challenging, and only average PDS of large samples have been discussed in the literature. We characterise the individual PDS of GRBs in terms of a stochastic process, and carry out for the first time a systematic search for periodic signals and for a link between the PDS and other observables. We present a Bayesian procedure that uses a Markov chain Monte Carlo technique and apply it to study 215 bright long GRBs detected with the Swift Burst Alert Telescope from January 2005 to May 2015. The PDS are modelled with a power-law either with or without a break. Two classes of GRBs...

  5. Primary gamma-ray spectra in 44Ti of astrophysical interest

    CERN Document Server

    Larsen, A C; Bürger, A; Guttormsen, M; Görgen, A; Harrisopulos, S; Kmiecik, M; Konstantinopoulos, T; Lagoyannis, A; Lönnroth, T; Mazurek, K; Norrby, M; Nyhus, H T; Perdikakis, G; Schiller, A; Siem, S; Spyrou, A; Syed, N U H; Toft, H K; Tveten, G M; Voinov, A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.014320

    2012-01-01

    Primary gamma-ray spectra for a wide excitation-energy range have been extracted for 44Ti from particle-gamma coincidence data of the 46Ti(p,t gamma)44Ti reaction. These spectra reveal information on the gamma-decay pattern of the nucleus, and may be used to extract the level density and radiative strength function applying the Oslo method. Models of the level density and radiative strength function are used as input for cross-section calculations of the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction. Acceptable models should reproduce data on the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction cross section as well as the measured primary gamma-ray spectra. This is only achieved when a coherent normalization of the slope of the level density and radiative strength function is performed. Thus, the overall shape of the experimental primary gamma-ray spectra puts a constraint on the input models for the rate calculations.

  6. Automatic Estimation of Peak Regions in Gamma-Ray Spectra Measured by NaI Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Meng-Hua; LIU Liang-Gang; XU Ao-Ao; Ma Tao

    2008-01-01

    We present an approach to estimate the width of peak regions for the background elimination of gamma ray spectrum. The synthetic and experimental data are used to test this method. With the estimated peak regions using the proposed method in the whole spectra, we find that the approach is simple and effective enough for the background elimination cooperating with the statistics-sensitive nonlinear iterative peak-clipping method.

  7. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suk Suh, Tae, E-mail: suhsanta@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 505 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jo Hong, Key [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology, Stanford University, 300 Pasteur Drive, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Sil Lee, Keum [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, 875 Blake Wilbur Drive, Stanford, California 94305-5847 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to perform the fast reconstruction of a prompt gamma ray image using a graphics processing unit (GPU) computation from boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) simulations. Methods: To evaluate the accuracy of the reconstructed image, a phantom including four boron uptake regions (BURs) was used in the simulation. After the Monte Carlo simulation of the BNCT, the modified ordered subset expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm using the GPU computation was used to reconstruct the images with fewer projections. The computation times for image reconstruction were compared between the GPU and the central processing unit (CPU). Also, the accuracy of the reconstructed image was evaluated by a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Results: The image reconstruction time using the GPU was 196 times faster than the conventional reconstruction time using the CPU. For the four BURs, the area under curve values from the ROC curve were 0.6726 (A-region), 0.6890 (B-region), 0.7384 (C-region), and 0.8009 (D-region). Conclusions: The tomographic image using the prompt gamma ray event from the BNCT simulation was acquired using the GPU computation in order to perform a fast reconstruction during treatment. The authors verified the feasibility of the prompt gamma ray image reconstruction using the GPU computation for BNCT simulations.

  8. The Imprint of The Extragalactic Background Light in the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2012-01-01

    The light emitted by stars and accreting compact objects through the history of the Universe is encoded in the intensity of the extragalactic background light (EBL). Knowledge of the EBL is important to understand the nature of star formation and galaxy evolution, but direct measurements of the EBL are lim- ited by Galactic and other foreground emissions. Here we report an absorption feature seen in the combined spectra of a sample of gamma-ray blazars out to a redshift of z$\\sim$1.6. This feature is caused by attenuation of gamma rays by the EBL at optical to UV frequencies, and allowed us to measure the EBL flux density in this frequency band.

  9. Investigation of photoneutron and capture gamma-ray production in Pb and W under irradiation from 16N decay radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebwaro, Jeremiah Monari; Zhao, Yaolin; He, Chaohui

    2015-09-01

    Lead and tungsten are potential alternative materials for shielding reactor ex-core components with high 16N activity when available space limits application of concrete. Since the two materials are vulnerable to photonuclear reactions, the nature and intensity of the secondary radiation resulting from (γ,n) and (n,γ) reactions when 16N decay radiation interact with these materials need to be well known for effective shielding design. In this study the MCNP code was used to calculate the photoneutron and capture gamma-ray spectra in the two materials when irradiated by 16N decay radiation. It was observed that some of the photoneutrons generated in the two materials lie in the low-energy range which is considered optimum for (n,γ) reactions. Lead is more transparent to the photoneutrons when compared to tungsten. The calculations also revealed that the bremsstrahlung generated by the beta spectrum was not sufficient to trigger any additional photoneutrons. Both energetic and less energetic capture gamma-rays are observed when photoneutrons interact with nuclei of the two materials. Depending on the strength of the 16N source term, the secondary radiation could affect the effectiveness of the shield and need to be considered during design.

  10. A simple method for conversion of airborne gamma-ray spectra to ground level doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korsbech, Uffe C C; Bargholz, Kim

    1996-01-01

    A new and simple method for conversion of airborne NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectra to dose rates at ground level has been developed. By weighting the channel count rates with the channel numbers a spectrum dose index (SDI) is calculated for each spectrum. Ground level dose rates then are determined...... by multiplying the SDI by an altitude dependent conversion factor. The conversion factors are determined from spectra based on Monte Carlo calculations. The results are compared with measurements in a laboratory calibration set-up. IT-NT-27. June 1996. 27 p....

  11. A code to simulate nuclear reactor inventories and associated gamma-ray spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, A J; Allyson, J D; Sanderson, D C

    2001-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to simulate the gamma-ray spectra that would be measured by airborne gamma spectrometry (AGS) systems from sources containing short-lived fission products. The code uses simple numerical methods to simulate the production and decay of fission products and generates spectra for sodium iodide (NaI) detectors using Monte Carlo codes. A new Monte Carlo code using a virtual array of detectors to reduce simulation times for airborne geometries is described. Spectra generated for a short irradiation and laboratory geometry have been compared with an experimental data set. The agreement is good. Spectra have also been generated for airborne geometries and longer irradiation periods. The application of this code to generate AGS spectra for accident scenarios and their uses in the development and evaluation of spectral analysis methods for such situations are discussed.

  12. Measurement of gamma-ray production from thermal neutron capture on gadolinium for neutrino experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Takatomi

    2017-02-01

    Recently, several scientific applications of gadolinium are found in neutrino physics experiments. Gadolinium-157 is the nucleus, which has the largest thermal neutron capture cross-section among all stable nuclei. Gadolinium-155 also has the large cross-section. These neutron capture reactions provide the gamma-ray cascade with the total energy of about 8 MeV. This reaction is applied for several neutrino experiments, e.g. reactor neutrino experiments and Gd doped large water Cherenkov detector experiments, to recognize inverse-beta-decay reaction. A good Gd(n,γ) simulation model is needed to evaluate the detection efficiency of the neutron capture reaction, i.e. the efficiency of IBD detection. In this presentation, we will report the development and study status of a Gd(n,γ) calculation model and comparison with our experimental data taken at ANNRI/MLF beam line, J-PARC.

  13. MCNP{trademark} simulations for identifying environmental contaminants using prompt gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankle, S.C.; Conaway, J.G.

    1996-12-31

    The primary purposes of the Multispectral Neutron Logging Project, (MSN Project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy), were to assess the effectiveness of existing neutron- induced spectral gamma-ray logging techniques for identifying environmental contaminants along boreholes, to further improve the technology, and to transfer that technology to industry. Using a pulsed neutron source with a high-resolution gamma-ray detector, spectra from thermal neutron capture reactions may be used to identify contaminants in the borehole environment. Direct borehole measurements such as this complement physical sampling and are useful in environmental restoration projects where characterization of contaminated sites is required and long-term monitoring may be needed for many years following cleanup or stabilization. In the MSN Project, a prototype logging instrument was designed which incorporated a pulsed 14-MeV neutron source and HPGe detector. Experimental measurements to determine minimum detection thresholds with the prototype instrument were conducted in the variable-contaminant test model for Cl, Cd, Sm, Gd, and Hg. We benchmarked an enhanced version of the Monte Carlo N-Particle computer code MCNP{trademark} using experimental data for Cl provide by our collaborators and experimental data from the variable-contaminant test model. MCNP was then used to estimate detection thresholds for the other contaminants used in the variable-contaminant model with the goal of validating the use of MCNP to estimate detection thresholds for many other contaminants that were not measured.

  14. The Power Spectra of Two Classes of Long-duration Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, R F

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the averaged power density spectra (PDSs) of two classes of long-duration gamma-ray bursts in the recent classification by Balastegui et al.(2001) based on neural network analysis. Both PDSs follow a power law over a wide frequency range with approximately the same slope, which indicates that a process with a self-similar temporal property may underlie the emission mechanisms of both. The two classes of bursts are divided into groups according to their brightness and spectral hardness respectively and each group's PDS was calculated; For both classes, the PDS is found to flatten both with increasing burst brightness and with increasing hardness.

  15. Apparatus for parity-violation study via capture gamma-ray measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Seestrom, S J; Bowman, J D; Crawford, B C; Haseyama, T; Masaike, A; Matsuda, A; Penttilae, S I; Roberson, R N; Sharapov, E I; Stephenson, S L

    1999-01-01

    The Time Reversal and Parity at Low Energy (TRIPLE) Collaboration uses a short-pulsed longitudinally polarized epithermal neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center to study spatial parity violation (PV) in the compound nucleus. The typical PV experiment measures the longitudinal cross-section asymmetry by the neutron transmission method through thick samples. Neutron capture gamma-ray measurement provides an alternative method for the study of PV, which enables the use of smaller amounts of isotopically pure target material. In 1995 TRIPLE commissioned a new neutron-capture detector consisting of 24 pure CsI scintillators arranged in a cylindrical geometry around the neutron beam. The characteristics and the performance of the detector and spin transport are described.

  16. Qualitative and quantitative validation of the SINBAD code on complex HPGe gamma-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohee, E.; Coulon, R.; Normand, S.; Carrel, F. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Dautremer, T.; Barat, E.; Montagu, T. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Modelisation, Simulation et Systemes, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, (France); Jammes, C. [CEA/DEN/SPEx/LDCI, Centre de Cadarache, F-13109 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, (France)

    2015-07-01

    Radionuclides identification and quantification is a serious concern for many applications as safety or security of nuclear power plant or fuel cycle facility, CBRN risk identification, environmental radioprotection and waste measurements. High resolution gamma-ray spectrometry based on HPGe detectors is a performing solution for all these topics. During last decades, a great number of software has been developed to improve gamma spectra analysis. However, some difficulties remain in the analysis when photoelectric peaks are folded together with a high ratio between theirs amplitudes, when the Compton background is much larger compared to the signal of a single peak and when spectra are composed of a great number of peaks. This study deals with the comparison between conventional methods in radionuclides identification and quantification and the code called SINBAD ('Spectrometrie par Inference Non parametrique Bayesienne Deconvolutive'). For many years, SINBAD has been developed by CEA LIST for unfolding complex spectra from HPGe detectors. Contrary to conventional methods using fitting procedures, SINBAD uses a probabilistic approach with Bayesian inference to describe spectrum data. This conventional fitting method founded for example in Genie 2000 is compared with the nonparametric SINBAD approach regarding some key figures of merit as the peak centroid evaluation (identification) and peak surface evaluation (quantification). Unfriendly cases are studied for nuclides detection with closed gamma-rays energies and high photoelectric peak intensity differences. Tests are performed with spectra from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for gamma spectra analysis software benchmark and with spectra acquired at the laboratory. Results show that SINBAD and Genie 2000 performances are quite similar with sometimes best results for SINBAD with the important difference that to achieve same performances the nonparametric method is user-friendly compared

  17. Gamma-ray spectra of hexane (C6H14) in positron-electron annihilation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoguang; Wang, Feng

    2013-08-01

    Theoretical gamma-ray spectra of molecule hexane have been calculated and compared with the experimental results in both gas (Iwata et al., 1997a) and liquid (Kerr et al., 1965) phases. The present study reveals that in gas phase not all valence electrons of hexane contribute the same degree in the electron-positron annihilation of hexane. The electrons which dominate the positron-electron annihilation of molecules are called positrophilic electrons. The positrophilic electrons are predominately found to involve the electrons on the lowest occupied valence orbital (LOVO) of a free molecule in gas phase. When hexane is confined in liquid phase, however, the intermolecular interactions ultimately eliminate the free molecular orientation and selectivity for the positrophilic electrons in the gas phase. As a result, the gamma-ray spectra of hexane become an "averaged" contribution from all valence electrons, which is again in agreement with liquid phase measurement. The roles of valence electrons in annihilation process for gas and liquid phases of hexane have been recognized for the first time in the present study.

  18. Boron analysis for neutron capture therapy using particle-induced gamma-ray emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakai, Kei; Yamamoto, Yohei; Okamoto, Emiko; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fumiyo; Matsumura, Akira; Yamada, Naoto; Kitamura, Akane; Koka, Masashi; Satoh, Takahiro

    2015-12-01

    The neutron source of BNCT is currently changing from reactor to accelerator, but peripheral facilities such as a dose-planning system and blood boron analysis have still not been established. To evaluate the potential application of particle-induced gamma-ray emission (PIGE) for boron measurement in clinical boron neutron capture therapy, boronophenylalanine dissolved within a cell culture medium was measured using PIGE. PIGE detected 18 μgB/mL f-BPA in the culture medium, and all measurements of any given sample were taken within 20 min. Two hours of f-BPA exposure was required to create a boron distribution image. However, even though boron remained in the cells, the boron on the cell membrane could not be distinguished from the boron in the cytoplasm.

  19. Axion-like particles explain the unphysical redshift-dependence of AGN gamma-ray spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Galanti, Giorgio; De Angelis, Alessandro; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2015-01-01

    Blazars are a class of AGN known to be powerful very-high-energy (VHE, 100 GeV - 100 TeV) celestial gamma-ray emitters. At the time of writing, 41 blazars, spread all over the sky and with known redshift in the range $0.0215 \\leq z \\leq 0.635$ have been observed in the VHE band by the Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes H.E.S.S., MAGIC and VERITAS. Thus, they represent an isotropic and relatively local extragalactic sample, unaffected by significant cosmological evolution. The blazar emitted spectra are well fitted by a power law with index $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$. We show that the $\\Gamma_{\\rm em}$ distribution exhibits an unexpected and previously unnoticed unphysical redshift-dependence. We demonstrate that this result is not due to any selection effect. It is difficult to imagine an intrinsic mechanism which could lead to such a spectral variation, and so this result seriously challenges the conventional view. We propose that such a behaviour is explained by oscillations between the VHE gamma-rays and Axio...

  20. Characterisation of neutron and gamma-ray emission from thick target Be(p,n) reaction for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzek, J.; Mateva, T.; Tapper, U.A.S. [De Beers Diamond Res. Lab., Southdale (South Africa); McMurray, W.R. [National Accelerator Centre, Van de Graaff Group, P.O. Box 72, Faure 7131 (South Africa); Franklyn, C.B. [Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa, P.O. Box 582, Pretoria (South Africa)

    1998-04-01

    Low energy accelerator-based neutron sources have promising potential for use in a clinical treatment of cancer with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS). Such sources often utilise a thick target Be(p,n) reaction using incident proton energies from several hundred keV to 1-2 MeV above the reaction threshold of 2.06 MeV. The resulting neutron and gamma-ray beams require considerable moderation and filtration in order to obtain thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes for therapy. The detailed knowledge of neutron and gamma-ray spectra, yield and angular distribution are necessary in order to design effective moderators and filters to be used for the treatment. Thick and thin beryllium target neutron and gamma spectra have been investigated in detail using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique, for incident proton energies from above threshold to 4 MeV. The results show characteristics of neutron and gamma-ray production of importance for the application of this neutron source for BNCT and BNCS. (orig.) 6 refs.

  1. Progress in numerical modelling of the Cl influence on gamma-ray spectra from an n-gamma logging tool, by using the improved ENDF data for radiative capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywicka-Jakiel, Teresa

    2007-06-01

    Quality of the numerical modelling (MCNP code) of the spectrometric neutron-gamma benchmark experiment, performed at the Polish Calibration Station BGW in Zielona Gora for quantification of the main rock elements: Si, Ca, Fe and H, is considered. Elemental concentrations obtained from the measurements and simulations, for the rock models with water-filled boreholes, are in good agreement. For chlorine present in the borehole, the quality of the numerical reproducibility of the measured elemental concentrations depends on the cross section library used for the Cl(n,gamma)Cl reaction. The standard evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI Release 2 supplies imperfect data for photon production from thermal neutron capture in Cl. The improved cross sections for Cl(n,gamma)Cl are included in the ENDF/B-VI Release 8 library. Superiority of this new compilation over the previous one is shown in the paper. The accuracies for the Si, Ca and Fe determination have been improved by about 36%, 19.9% and 21.4%, respectively, when the ENDF/B-VI Release 8 library has been used for Cl.

  2. Constraining the Lorentz invariance violation from the continuous spectra of short gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan; Sang, Yu; Wang, Ping; Wang, Sai

    2015-01-01

    In quantum gravity, a foamy structure of space-time leads to Lorentz invariance violation (LIV). As the most energetic astrophysical processes in the Universe, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide an effective way to probe quantum gravity effects. We use continuous spectra of 20 short GRBs detected by the Swift satellite to give a conservative lower limit of quantum gravity energy scale $M_\\textrm{QG} $. Due to the LIV effect, photons with different energy have different velocities. This will lead to the delayed arrival of high energy photons relative to the low energy ones. Based on the fact that the LIV-induced time delay can't be longer than the duration of a GRB, we present the most conservative estimation of the quantum gravity energy scales from 20 short GRBs. The most strict constraint, $M_\\textrm{QG}>5.05\\times10^{14}$ GeV, is from GRB 140622A.

  3. Data pre-processing using an FPGA by binning gamma ray energies and forwarding consolidated spectra data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Ana, E-mail: anaf@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Pereira, Rita C. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Neto, André C. [Fusion for Energy, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Sousa, Jorge; Carvalho, Bernardo B. [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Kiptily, Vasily [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Correia, Carlos M.B.A. [Centro de Instrumentação, Dept. de Física, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Gonçalves, Bruno [Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • JET monitor equipped with a DAQ system to digitize gamma signals from 19 detectors. • DAQ FPGAs used for real-time processing and streaming the gamma-ray energy values. • New algorithm was designed to produce at FPGA real-time spectra from energy values. • Spectra built at FPGA ensures streamed packets not limited by count rate. • New algorithm is relevant for future experiments expecting high event count rates. - Abstract: Gamma-ray diagnostics are considered of crucial importance for understanding the plasma behavior of next fusion devices. Among other physical phenomena, gamma-ray spectra can provide information about the fusion reactions rate and the fast ions temperature and confinement, indicators of how close we are from reaching self-sustained burning plasmas. Accordingly, dedicated gamma-ray diagnostics are currently installed at the Joint European Torus (JET). The 2D gamma-ray profile monitor is one of these diagnostics, equipped with an Advanced Telecommunications Computing Architecture (ATCA) Data Acquisition (DAQ) system, capable of digitizing gamma-ray signals from the 19 photodiode detectors. The DAQ system includes Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, with embedded processing algorithms. These algorithms are responsible for processing the gamma-ray signals acquired from each detector in real-time, and for periodically streaming the corresponding energy values to the DAQ host. However, for higher count rates it will be unfeasible to stream periodically all the energy values without loss. Thus, a new algorithm was designed, capable to produce real-time spectra at FPGA from the processed energy values. The spectra should be periodically streamed, delivering binned data rather than a value for each gamma-ray. This allows to reduce the data rate, avoiding data losses. Consequently, the streaming data can be used for control purposes, as demanded by next fusion experiments with long plasma discharges of high energy

  4. ACCURACY OF MEASUREMENT OF NATURAL GAMMA RAY SPECTRA BY HD—8004 NaI(T1) GAMMA SPECTROMETER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱国钦; 郑仁淑

    1995-01-01

    The measurement principle and analysis method of natural gammaray spectra using NaI(T1) scintillation spectrometer are briefly described first,then block diagrams of the HD-8004 NaI(T1) gamma-ray spectrometer,Finally,sample measurements are listed and discussed.The results are quite promising.Based on the analysis of these measurements,measures to improve the accuracy of spectrum measurement are proposed.It is well hoped that these measures can contribute to the development and application of gamma-ray spectrum measurement.

  5. Modelling the TeV gamma-ray spectra of two low redshift AGNs Mkn 501 and Mkn 421

    CERN Document Server

    Konopelko, A K; Kirk, J G; De Jager, O C; Stecker, F W; Konopelko, Alexander K.; Mastichiadis, Apostolos; Kirk, John G.; Jager, Ocker C. de; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the results of modelling the TeV gamma-ray spectra of two AGNs, Mkn 501 and Mkn 421 that have almost the same redshifts: z=0.031 and z=0.034, respectively. The effect of intergalactic gamma-ray absorption is treated as an uncertainty in the measurement of the intrinsic spectrum. Although the objects differ, we obtain satisfactory fits for both of them in a synchrotron self-Compton scenario. Compared to previous models, our fits are characterised by higher values of the Doppler factor (>= 50) and an electron injection spectrum extending to higher energies (Gmax = 1.5x10^5). In the case of Mkn 421, the observed difference in spectral slope in X-rays and TeV gamma-rays between the high and low states can be explained as a variation of a single parameter - the maximum energy Gmax mc^2 at which electrons are injected.

  6. Measurements of neutron distribution in neutrons-gamma-rays mixed field using imaging plate for neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    The imaging plate (IP) technique is tried to be used as a handy method to measure the spatial neutron distribution via the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction for neutron capture therapy (NCT). For this purpose, IP is set in a water phantom and irradiated in a mixed field of neutrons and gamma-rays. The Hiroshima University Radiobiological Research Accelerator is utilized for this experiment. The neutrons are moderated with 20-cm-thick D(2)O to obtain suitable neutron field for NCT. The signal for IP doped with Gd as a neutron-response enhancer is subtracted with its contribution by gamma-rays, which was estimated using IP without Gd. The gamma-ray response of Gd-doped IP to non-Gd IP is set at 1.34, the value measured for (60)Co gamma-rays, in estimating the gamma-ray contribution to Gd-doped IP signal. Then measured distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate agrees within 10% with the calculated value based on the method that has already been validated for its reproducibility of Au activation. However, the evaluated distribution of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate is so sensitive to gamma-ray energy, e.g. the discrepancy of the (157)Gd(n,gamma)(158)Gd reaction rate between measurement and calculation becomes 30% for the photon energy change from 33keV to 1.253MeV.

  7. Monte Carlo assessment of soil moisture effect on high-energy thermal neutron capture gamma-ray by 14N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazirandeh, Ali; Azizi, Maryam; Farhad Masoudi, S

    2006-01-01

    Among many conventional techniques, nuclear techniques have shown to be faster, more reliable, and more effective in detecting explosives. In the present work, neutrons from a 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source being in water tank are captured by elements of soil and landmine (TNT), namely (14)N, H, C, and O. The prompt capture gamma-ray spectrum taken by a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector indicates the characteristic photo peaks of the elements in soil and landmine. In the high-energy region of the gamma-ray spectrum, besides 10.829 MeV of (15)N, single escape (SE) and double escape (DE) peaks are unmistakable photo peaks, which make the detection of concealed explosive possible. The soil has the property of moderating neutrons as well as diffusing the thermal neutron flux. Among many elements in soil, silicon is more abundant and (29)Si emits 10.607 MeV prompt capture gamma-ray, which makes 10.829 MeV detection difficult. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to adjust source-target-detector distances and soil moisture content to yield the best result. Therefore, we applied MCNP4C for configuration very close to reality of a hidden landmine in soil.

  8. Particle Acceleration Inside Thunderstorms and the Variation in Source Spectra of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Eric; Dwyer, Joseph R.; Briggs, Michael S.; Rassoul, Hamid K.

    2016-03-01

    One of the unresolved questions in the atmospheric sciences is the origin of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs). These flashes are short but intense gamma ray bursts emanating from Earth's atmosphere. This phenomenon has been observed by gamma ray detectors on orbiting satellites, e.g. NASA Fermi, intended to study astrophysical phenomena such as Gamma-ray Bursts. TGFs are thought to originate inside thunderstorms where electrons can be accelerated and emit radiation in the multi MeV range due to bremsstrahlung interactions with air molecules. These so called ``runaway electrons'' are seeded from cosmic ray air showers hitting the Earth's atmosphere from (extra) galactic sources. In this work, we present a Monte Carlo model that simulates particle physics inside a thunderstorm region. The subsequent transport of high energy gamma rays through the Earth's atmosphere and up to satellite orbit is also included. We show that by varying both the potential difference and the ambient electric field inside the thundercloud, different electron and photon energy distributions are produced. This effect may be detectable by orbiting spacecraft, and therefore serves as a method to remote sense the electric fields that exist inside thunderstorms.

  9. Local electron spectrum above 100 MeV derived from gamma-ray emissivity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. W.

    1985-01-01

    Two new determinations of the local gamma-ray emmissivity spectrum are in good accord and were used to derive constraints on the local electron spectrum. The requirement for an electron intensity above 1 GeV larger than previously believed is confirmed and no low energy upturn is then needed.

  10. GPU-based prompt gamma ray imaging from boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Do-Kun; Jung, Joo-Young; Suh, Tae Suk [College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This reaction can be applied to the therapy and diagnosis about the tumor simultaneously. After the compound labeled with the boron is accumulated at the tumor site, the alpha particle induced by the reaction between the thermal neutron and the boron induces tumor cell death. Also, the 478 keV prompt gamma ray is emitted from the same reaction point. If this single prompt photon is detected by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), the tomographic image of the therapy region can be monitored during the radiation treatment. However, in order to confirm the therapy region using the image during the treatment, the image needs to be provided promptly. Due to a relatively long acquisition time required to get SPECT images, both reduced number of projections and the fast image reconstruction schemes are needed to provide the images during radiation treatment. The computation time for image reconstruction using the GPU with the modified OSEM algorithm was measured and compared with the computation time using CPU. Through the results, we confirmed the feasibility of the image reconstruction for prompt gamma ray image using GPU for the BNCT. In the further study, the development of the algorithm for faster reconstruction of the prompt gamma ray image during the BNCT using the GPU computation will be conducted. Also, the analysis of the target to background level about the reconstructed image will be performed using the extracted image profile.

  11. Hints of the Existence of Axion-Like-Particles From the Gamma-Ray Spectra of Cosmological Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Conde, M.A.; /IAA, Granada /SLAC; Paneque, D.; Bloom, E.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Prada, F.; /IAA, Granada /UC, Santa Cruz; Dominguez, A.; /IAA, Granada /Seville U.

    2009-06-23

    Axion Like Particles (ALPs) are predicted to couple with photons in the presence of magnetic fields. This effect may lead to a significant change in the observed spectra of gamma-ray sources such as AGNs. Here we carry out a detailed study that for the first time simultaneously considers in the same framework both the photon/axion mixing that takes place in the gamma-ray source and that one expected to occur in the intergalactic magnetic fields. An efficient photon/axion mixing in the source always means an attenuation in the photon flux, whereas the mixing in the intergalactic medium may result in a decrement and/or enhancement of the photon flux, depending on the distance of the source and the energy considered. Interestingly, we find that decreasing the value of the intergalactic magnetic field strength, which decreases the probability for photon/axion mixing, could result in an increase of the expected photon flux at Earth if the source is far enough. We also find a 30% attenuation in the intensity spectrum of distant sources, which occurs at an energy that only depends on the properties of the ALPs and the intensity of the intergalactic magnetic field, and thus independent of the AGN source being observed. Moreover, we show that this mechanism can easily explain recent puzzles in the spectra of distant gamma-ray sources, like the possible detection of TeV photons from 3C 66A (a source located at z=0.444) by MAGIC and VERITAS, which should not happen according to conventional models of photon propagation over cosmological distances. Another puzzle is the recent published lower limit to the EBL intensity at 3.6 {micro}m (which is almost twice larger as the previous one), which implies very hard spectra for some detected TeV gamma-ray sources located at z=0.1-0.2. The consequences that come from this work are testable with the current generation of gamma-ray instruments, namely Fermi (formerly known as GLAST) and imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like

  12. Gamma-ray bursts from magnetospheric plasma oscillations. II - Model spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melia, Fulvio

    1990-01-01

    Several mechanisms for the primary release of energy in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) may result in the excitation of relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations above the polar cap of a neutron star. This paper presents a survey of detailed calculations of the inverse Compton scattering interaction between the sinusoidally accelerated particles in relativistic, magnetospheric plasma oscillations and the self-consistently determined thermal radiation from the stellar surface. The upscattered photons are boosted to gamma-ray energies and a Monte Carlo simulation is used to obtain the spectrum for different viewing angles relative to the magnetic field in the oscillating region. It is shown that several GRB spectral characteristics may be understood in the context of a model wherein the overall spectrum changes with aspect angle as a result of the superposition of four components with different angular distributions.

  13. NEUTRON CAPTURE GAMMA RAY FIELD WITH ENERGY TO 10 MeV FOR METROLOGICAL SUPPORT OF RADIATION PROTECTION DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Komar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical, and technological linear particle accelerators, and nuclear reactors are vastly widespread worldwide today. These facility generate fields of secondary gamma radiation with energy to 10 MeV. Therefore, we have a need to calibrate spectrometric and dosimetric ionization measurement instruments for the energies to 10 MeV. The aim of this work is to determine possibility to use thermal neutron collimator of АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility with 238Pu-Be fast neutron source (IBN-8-6 for this. Below 3 MeV we use a set of point gamma standard spectrometry sources OSGI. We can acquire gamma rays with energies above 3 MeV using radioactive thermal neutron capture on target, i.e. (n, γ-nuclear reaction. We can use neutron capture gamma-ray from titanium target (to 7 MeV or nickel target (to 10 MeV situated in thermal neutron field for calibration. We can use thermal neutron collimator of АТ140 Neutron Calibration Facility with 238Pu-Be fast neutron source (IBN-8-6 for slowing down neutrons from radionuclide fast neutron sources to thermal energies in polyethylene. Thermal neutron collimator forms a beam from radionuclide source with a significant amount of neutrons with thermal energies. We placed Ti and Ni targets in collimator’s canal. We got experimental spectral data on detection unit BDKG-19M NaI(Tl 63 × 160 mm with nonlinear channel-energy conversion characteristic in range to 10 MeV. For additional filtration we proposed to use polyethylene neutron reflector and lead discs. We experimentally determined that placement of lead discs in collimator in front of the target allows to filter all spectrum while insignificantly weakening target’s emission. Using theoretical and experimental data we proved the ability to calibrate gamma-ray spectrometers in the range to 10 MeV. 

  14. Monitoring the distribution of prompt gamma rays in boron neutron capture therapy using a multiple-scattering Compton camera: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Taewoong; Lee, Hyounggun; Lee, Wonho, E-mail: wonhol@korea.ac.kr

    2015-10-21

    This study evaluated the use of Compton imaging technology to monitor prompt gamma rays emitted by {sup 10}B in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) applied to a computerized human phantom. The Monte Carlo method, including particle-tracking techniques, was used for simulation. The distribution of prompt gamma rays emitted by the phantom during irradiation with neutron beams is closely associated with the distribution of the boron in the phantom. Maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM) method was applied to the information obtained from the detected prompt gamma rays to reconstruct the distribution of the tumor including the boron uptake regions (BURs). The reconstructed Compton images of the prompt gamma rays were combined with the cross-sectional images of the human phantom. Quantitative analysis of the intensity curves showed that all combined images matched the predetermined conditions of the simulation. The tumors including the BURs were distinguishable if they were more than 2 cm apart.

  15. Light curves and spectra from off-axis gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salafia, O. S.; Ghisellini, G.; Pescalli, A.; Ghirlanda, G.; Nappo, F.

    2016-10-01

    If gamma-ray burst prompt emission originates at a typical radius, and if material producing the emission moves at relativistic speed, then the variability of the resulting light curve depends on the viewing angle. This is due to the fact that the pulse evolution time-scale is Doppler contracted, while the pulse separation is not. For off-axis viewing angles θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1, the pulse broadening significantly smears out the light-curve variability. This is largely independent of geometry and emission processes. To explore a specific case, we set up a simple model of a single pulse under the assumption that the pulse rise and decay are dominated by the shell curvature effect. We show that such a pulse observed off-axis is (i) broader, (ii) softer and (iii) displays a different hardness-intensity correlation with respect to the same pulse seen on-axis. For each of these effects, we provide an intuitive physical explanation. We then show how a synthetic light curve made by a superposition of pulses changes with increasing viewing angle. We find that a highly variable light curve (as seen on-axis) becomes smooth and apparently single-pulsed (when seen off-axis) because of pulse overlap. To test the relevance of this fact, we estimate the fraction of off-axis gamma-ray bursts detectable by Swift as a function of redshift, finding that a sizeable fraction (between 10 per cent and 80 per cent) of nearby (z < 0.1) bursts are observed with θview ≳ θjet + Γ-1. Based on these results, we argue that low-luminosity gamma-ray bursts are consistent with being ordinary bursts seen off-axis.

  16. Short gamma-ray bursts from tidal capture and collisions of compact stars in globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, William H; van de Ven, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    A new mechanism is proposed by which short gamma-ray burst (SGRB) production can be achieved. In this new paradigm, it is supposed that the compact objects contained within a globular cluster (GC) interact through close encounters, rather than being driven together by pure gravitational wave emission in existing binaries. Here we perform a careful assessment of the relevant processes and stellar dynamics within GCs as these undergo core collapse over cosmic time. We show that such events are frequent enough in their cores to be consistent both with current observational rate demands for SGRB production and with the widening range of observed redshifts of the associated hosts. Precise modeling of the hydrodynamics allows for a detailed description of the encounter, and our calculations show that there is in principle no problem in accounting for the global energy budget of a typical SGRB. The particulars of each collision, are variable in several aspects, and can lead to interesting diversity. First, the chara...

  17. A new method of reconstructing very-high-energy gamma-ray spectra: the Template Background Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandes, M V; Kosack, K; Raue, M; Rowell, G

    2014-01-01

    Very-high-energy (VHE, E>0.1 TeV) gamma-ray emission regions with angular extents comparable to the field-of-view of current imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) require additional observations of source-free regions to estimate the background contribution to the energy spectrum. This reduces the effective observation time and deteriorates the sensitivity. A new method of reconstructing spectra from IACT data without the need of additional observations of source-free regions is developed. Its application is not restricted to any specific IACT or data format. On the basis of the template background method, which defines the background in air-shower parameter space, a new spectral reconstruction method from IACT data is developed and studied, the Template Background Spectrum (TBS); TBS is tested on published H.E.S.S. data and H.E.S.S. results. Good agreement is found between VHE gamma-ray spectra reported by the H.E.S.S. collaboration and those re-analysed with TBS. This includes analyses of point-like sourc...

  18. Light curves and spectra from off-axis gamma-ray burst single pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Salafia, Om S; Pescalli, Alessio; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Nappo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We set up a simple model to compute the bolometric light curve and time dependent spectrum of a single pulse of a Gamma-Ray Burst under the assumption that the pulse rise and decay are dominated by the shell curvature effect. For the first time, our model includes the effect of an arbitrary off-axis viewing angle. We show that a pulse observed off-axis is (i) longer, (ii) softer and (iii) displays a different hardness-intensity correlation with respect to the same pulse seen on-axis. For each of these effects, we provide an intuitive physical explanation. We then show how a synthetic light curve made by a superposition of pulses changes with increasing viewing angle. We find that many observed properties found in time-resolved spectral analysis of Gamma-Ray Burst light curves are reproduced in curves with a slightly off-axis viewing angle. Such properties include the fact that the spectral peak energy evolution tracks the variations in flux, leading them slightly. Based on these results, we argue that low lum...

  19. Modeling Gamma-Ray Attenuation in High-Redshift GeV Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Gilmore, Rudy C; Primack, Joel R; Somerville, Rachel S

    2008-01-01

    We present two models for the cosmological UV background light, and calculate the opacity of GeV gamma--rays out to redshift 9. The contributors to the background include 2 possible quasar emissivities, and output from star--forming galaxies as determined by recent a semi--analytic model (SAM) of structure formation. The SAM used in this work is based upon a hierarchical build-up of structure in a $\\Lambda$CDM universe and is highly successful in reproducing a variety of observational parameters. Above 1 Rydberg energy, ionizing radiation is subject to reprocessing by the IGM, which we treat using our radiative transfer code, CUBA. The two models for quasar emissivity differing above z = 2.3 are chosen to match the ionization rates observed using flux decrement analysis and the higher values of the line-of-sight proximity effect. We also investigate the possibility of a flat star formation rate density at z $>5$. We conclude that observations of gamma--rays from 10 to 100 GeV by Fermi (GLAST) and the next gen...

  20. Measurements of gamma rays from keV-neutron resonance capture by odd-Z nuclei in the 2s-1d shell region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Igashira, Masayuki; Lee, Sam Yol; Mizuno, Satoshi; Hori, Jun-ichi [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Kitazawa, Hideo

    1998-03-01

    Measurements of gamma rays from keV-neutron resonance capture by {sup 19}F, {sup 23}Na, and {sup 27}Al, which are odd-Z nuclei in the 2s-1d shell region, were performed, using an anti-Compton HPGe spectrometer and a pulsed neutron source by the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Capture gamma rays from the 27-, 49-, and 97-keV resonances of {sup 19}F, the 35- and 53-keV resonances of {sup 23}Na, and the 35-keV resonance of {sup 27}Al were observed. Some results are presented. (author)

  1. Quantitative comparison between experimental and simulated gamma-ray spectra induced by 14 MeV tagged neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perot, B., E-mail: bertrand.perot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); El Kanawati, W.; Carasco, C.; Eleon, C. [CEA, DEN, Cadarache, Nuclear Measurement Laboratory, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Valkovic, V. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Sannie, G. [CEA, LIST, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2012-07-15

    Fast neutron interrogation with the associated particle technique can be used to identify explosives in cargo containers (EURITRACK FP6 project) and unexploded ordnance on the seabed (UNCOSS FP7 project), by detecting gamma radiations induced by 14 MeV neutrons produced in the {sup 2}H({sup 3}H,{alpha})n reaction. The origin of the gamma rays can be determined in 3D by the detection of the alpha particle, which provides the direction of the opposite neutron and its time-of-flight. Gamma spectroscopy provides the relative counts of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which are converted to chemical fractions to differentiate explosives from other organic substances. To this aim, Monte Carlo calculations are used to take into account neutron moderation and gamma attenuation in cargo materials or seawater. This paper presents an experimental verification that C, N, and O counts are correctly reproduced by numerical simulation. A quantitative comparison is also reported for silicon, iron, lead, and aluminium. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gamma-ray spectra produced by 14 MeV neutrons in C, N, O, Si, Al, Fe, and Pb elements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantitative comparison with MCNPX simulations using the ENDF/B-VII.0 library. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C, N, and O counts correctly reproduced and chemical proportions recovered using calculation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Application to the detection of explosives or illicit drugs in cargo containers.

  2. Neutron capture gamma-ray spectroscopy and its analytical applications for gold ore sample using the reactor neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, A.M.; El-Kady, A.A.; Rofail, N.B.; Hamouda, I.

    1981-01-01

    Prompt gamma-rays which immediately follow thermal neutrons capture have been used as a technique for non-destructive elemental analysis for gold ore sample. The thermal column of the Egyptian Research Reactor - 1 (ET-RR-1) was used. This requires a design of a well collimated and thermalized neutron beam. A high resolution and high efficiency Ge (Li) detector was required. In order to estimate the content of gold in its ore, calibration curves were constructed. For testing the results obtained, an empirical formula including the thermal neutron flux, the microscopic cross-section and the absolute efficiency of the detection system were applied. The concentration of gold in its ore sample was found to be as low as 5 ppM. Several elements beside gold could be identified in the ore sample. 10 references.

  3. Pair Production Absorption Troughs in $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Spectra A Potential Distance Discriminator

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Baring, Matthew G.; Harding, Alice K.

    1997-01-01

    Relativistic bulk motion with large Lorentz factors has recently been inferred for gamma-ray bursts regardless of whether they are of galactic or cosmological origin. This conclusion results from calculations of internal pair production transparency in bursts that usually assume an infinite power-law source spectrum for simplicity, an approximation that is quite adequate for some bursts detected by EGRET. However, for a given bulk Lorentz factor sub-MeV photons in such calculations. Hence it is essential to accurately address the spectral curvature in bursts seen by BATSE. In this paper we present the major properties induced in photon-photon opacity considerations by such spectral curvature. The observed spectral breaks around 1 MeV turn out to be irrelevant to opacity in cosmological bursts, but are crucial to estimates of source transparency in the 1 GeV -- 1 TeV range for sources located in the galactic halo. We find that broad absorption troughs can arise at these energies for suitable bulk motion parame...

  4. Influence of Gamma-Ray Irradiation on Absorption and Fluorescent Spectra of Nd:YAG and Yb:YAG Laser Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Dun-Lu; ZHANG Qing-Li; XIAO Jing-Zhong; LUO Jian-Qiao; JIANG Hai-He; YIN Shao-Tang

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the influence of gamma-ray irradiation on the absorption and fluorescent spectra of Nd3+ : Y3Al5O12 (Nd:YAG) and Yb3+ :Y3Al5O12 (Yb:YAG) crystals grown by the Czochralski method. Two additional absorption (AA) bands induced by gamma-ray irradiation appear at 255nm and 340nm. The former is eontributed due to Fe3+ impurity, the latter is due to Fe2+ ions and F-type colour centres. The intensity of the excitation and emission spectra as well as the fluorescent lifetime of Nd:YAG crystal decrease after the irradiation of 100 Mrad gamma-ray. In contrast, the same dose irradiation does not impair the fluorescent properties of Yb: YA G crystal. These results indicate that Yb: YA G crystal possesses the advantage over Nd: YA G crystal that has better reliability for applications in harsh radiant environment.

  5. Emission probabilities of {gamma}-rays from {sup 238}Np and their use for determination of the thermal neutron capture cross section of {sup 237}Np

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A. [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)], E-mail: aletourneau@cea.fr; Marie, F. [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Mutti, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38000 Grenoble (France); AlMahamid, I. [Wadsworth Center, Laboratory of Inorganic and Nuclear Chemistry, Albany, NY (United States)

    2010-03-15

    The relevant absolute {gamma}-ray emission probabilities from the {beta}-decay of {sup 238}Np were measured by means of {alpha}- and {gamma}-spectroscopic techniques. We obtained values of (25.6{+-}0.4)%, (8.9{+-}0.2)% and (18.8{+-}0.3)% for the 984.45-, 1025.87- and 1028.54-keV {gamma}-rays, respectively, in agreement with the previous measured ones. These intensities were used to deduce the thermal neutron capture cross section of {sup 237}Np for which a value of (182.2{+-}4.5) b is obtained higher by 11% than the recommended value.

  6. Ge(Li) detector gamma-ray spectrometer system for measurement of the spectra and production cross sections of. gamma. -rays produced by 14 MeV neutron nonelastic interaction with nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen Ronglin; Shi Xiamin; Wu Yongshun; Xing Jinjiang; Ding Dazhao

    1982-02-01

    A 42 cm/sup 3/ Ge(Li) detector gamma-ray spectrometer system for measuring the spectra and the production cross sections of ..gamma..-rays produced by fast neutron nonelastic interaction with nuclei is described in this paper. The incident neutrons are produced by T(d,n)/sup 4/He reaction in an high tension set with the incident deuteron energy of 200 keV. The time of flight technique is used to discriminate between the scattered neutrons and gamma-rays resulting from nonelastic interaction. The ..cap alpha..-particles are picked up by a Si(Au) surface barrier detector and the ARC timing discriminaters are used in both Si(Au) and Ge(Li) channels. The overall time resolution (FWHM) of this system is 4.1 ns typically for energy selection threshold at 400keV. The block diagram of spectrometer system is described in detail. The complex complete shielding damage of Ge(Li) detector in this fast neutron field is well discussed.

  7. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    A new method - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition, NASVD - for processing gamma-ray spectra has been developed as part of a Ph.D. project. By using this technique one is able to decompose a large set of data - for example from airborne gamma-ray surveys - into a few spectral components. ...

  8. Derivation of a Relation for the Steepening of TeV Selected Blazar Gamma-Ray Spectra with Energy and Redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, F.

    2010-01-01

    We derive a relation for the steepening of blazar gamma-ray spectra between the multi-GeV Fermi energy range and the TeV energy range observed by atmospheric Cerenkov telescopes. The change in spectral index is produced by two effects: (1) an intrinsic steepening, independent of redshift, owing to the properties of emission and absorption in the source, and (2) a redshift-dependent steepening produced by intergalactic pair production interactions of blazar gamma-rays with low energy photons of the "intergalactic background light" (IBL). Given this relation, with good enough data on the mean gamma-ray SED of TeV Selected BL Lacs, the redshift evolution of the IBL can, in principle, be determined independently of stellar evolution models. We apply our relation to the results of new Fermi observations of TeV selected blazars.

  9. Microanalysis system of ppm-order 10B concentrations in tissue for neutron capture therapy by prompt gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tooru; Kanda, Keiji

    1983-01-01

    For neutron capture therapy, a new technique for measuring 10B concentrations of ppm order in tissue has been developed by using 10B(n, α) 7Li ∗ prompt gamma-ray spectrometry. The measuring system consists of a Ge(Li) detector and a 6LiF tile neutron shield attached to the neutron guide tube of the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) with very low background gamma-rays. The 10B concentrations of unknown samples were determined in comparison with gamma-ray data obtained from known samples. The detection limit of the system is 0.1-0.5 ppm 10B concentration. In the practical use of the system for neutron capture therapy, 10B concentrations of 10 ppm, which is ordinarily pre-injected into the tumor, can be measured in less than 30 s with 10% accuracy by using 1 g samples. Moreover, the system has the advantage that pre-treatment of the sample is not required. As a neutron monitor in a homogeneous sample, gamma-rays emitted from H(n, γ)D reactions are used. Therefore, neutron irradiation conditions of this system, i.e. fluence rate, energy spectrum, and distribution in the sample do not affect the analyzing results, and the quantity and dimensions of the sample are also not restricted.

  10. Searching for narrow absorption and emission lines in XMM-Newton spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, S; D'Avanzo, P; Ghirlanda, G; Melandri, A; Pescalli, A; Salafia, O S; Salvaterra, R; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic search for narrow emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Using XMM-Newton data, both EPIC and RGS spectra, of six bright (fluence >10^{-7} erg cm^{-2}) and relatively nearby (z=0.54-1.41) GRBs, we performed a blind search for emission or absorption lines that could be related to a high cloud density or metal-rich gas in the environ close to the GRBs. We detected five emission features in four of the six GRBs with an overall statistical significance, assessed through Monte Carlo simulations, of <3.0 sigma. Most of the lines are detected around the observed energy of the oxygen edge at ~0.5 keV, suggesting that they are not related to the GRB environment but are most likely of Galactic origin. No significant absorption features were detected. A spectral fitting with a free Galactic column density (N_H) testing different models for the Galactic absorption confirms this origin because we found an indication of an...

  11. On the Light Curve and Spectra of X-Rays and Gamma-Rays from the Crab Pulsar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; K. S. Cheng; MEI Dong-Cheng

    2000-01-01

    We use a three-dimensional pulsar magnetosphere model to study the light curve and spectra of x-rays and gamma-rays from the Crab pulsar. In this model, the vertical size of the outer gap is first determined by a self-consistent model in which the outer gap is limited by pair production from collisions of thermal photons produced by polar cap heating of backflow outer gap current and curvature photons emitted by gap accelerated charged particles. The transverse size of the outer gap is determined by local pair production conditions. In principle, there are two topologically disconnected outer gaps present in the magnetosphere of a pulsar, and both incoming and outgoing particle flows are allowed. However, double-peak light curves with strong bridges are most common, Making use of the three-dimensional structure of the outer gap and its local properties, we compare the results of our model with the light curve and phase-resolved spectra of the Crab pulsar.

  12. Elemental analysis of a concrete sample by capture gamma rays with a radioisotope neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collico Savio, D.L. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Mariscotti, M.A.J. [Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina). Lab. de Fisica Nuclear; Ribeiro Guevara, S. [Laboratorio Analisis por Activacion Neutronica, Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    1995-03-15

    Gamma radiation from capture of neutrons in concrete has been studied in the energy region from 0.3 to 10.5 MeV with a HPGe spectrometer and an AmBe neutron source. A careful analysis of the Fe, Si, Ca, and Cl peak intensities made it possible to determine their relative concentrations in the sample. A comparison has been made between this nuclear method and chemical techniques, resulting in good agreement. The employment of these nuclear reactions constitutes a promising technique for the bulk analysis of samples in the concrete industry, because of its nondestructive and in-situ nature. ((orig.)).

  13. On the sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1,113 spectra being analysed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrot...

  14. Determination of the optimum-size californium-252 neutron source for borehole capture gamma-ray analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senftle, F.E.; Macy, R.J.; Mikesell, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fast- and thermal-neutron fluence rates from a 3.7 ??g 252Cf neutron source in a simulated borehole have been measured as a function of the source-to-detector distance using air, water, coal, iron ore-concrete mix, and dry sand as borehole media. Gamma-ray intensity measurements were made for specific spectral lines at low and high energies for the same range of source-to-detector distances in the iron ore-concrete mix and in coal. Integral gamma-ray counts across the entire spectrum were also made at each source-to-detector distance. From these data, the specific neutron-damage rate, and the critical count-rate criteria, we show that in an iron ore-concrete mix (low hydrogen concentration), 252Cf neutron sources of 2-40 ??g are suitable. The source size required for optimum gamma-ray sensitivity depends on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium such as coal, similar measurements were made. The results show that sources from 2 to 20 ??g are suitable to obtain the highest gamma-ray sensitivity, again depending on the energy of the gamma ray being measured. In a hydrogeneous medium, significant improvement in sensitivity can be achieved by using faster electronics; in iron ore, it cannot. ?? 1979 North-Holland Publishing Co.

  15. A method of searching for peaks and multiplets in {gamma}-ray spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loska, L.; Janczyszyn, J. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland). Inst. Wiertniczo-Naftowy

    1997-01-01

    A new method of searching peaks in gamma spectra is proposed. The method makes use of the well known Sterlinski`s algorithm. The number proportional to peak area and the variance of this number (from the Sterlinski`s method) are used in the criterion selecting ``true`` peaks. A comparison of performance in searching single and multiple peaks of the proposed method and others frequently used in practice shows a better quality of our method. (Author).

  16. Portable microcomputer for the analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. Volume II. Software description and listings. [IAEAPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhter, W.D.

    1984-05-01

    A portable microcomputer has been developed and programmed for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to perform in-field analysis of plutonium gamma-ray spectra. The unit includes a 16-bit LSI-11/2 microprocessor, 32-K words of memory, a 20-character display for user prompting, a numeric keyboard for user responses, and a 20-character thermal printer for hard-copy output of results. The unit weights 11 kg and has dimensions of 33.5 x 30.5 x 23.0 cm. This compactness allows the unit to be stored under an airline seat. Only the positions of the 148-keV /sup 241/Pu and 208-keV /sup 237/U peaks are required for spectral analysis that gives plutonium isotopic ratios and weight percent abundances. Volume I of this report provides a detailed description of the data analysis methodology, operation instructions, hardware, and maintenance and troubleshooting. Volume II describes the software and provides software listings.

  17. Monte Carlo assessment of soil moisture effect on high-energy thermal neutron capture gamma-ray by {sup 14}N

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, Ali [Physics Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) and Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: paziran@ut.ac.ir; Azizi, Maryam [Physics Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farhad Masoudi, S. [Physics Department, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Theoretical and Applied Physics, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-01-01

    Among many conventional techniques, nuclear techniques have shown to be faster, more reliable, and more effective in detecting explosives. In the present work, neutrons from a 5 Ci Am-Be neutron source being in water tank are captured by elements of soil and landmine (TNT), namely {sup 14}N, H, C, and O. The prompt capture gamma-ray spectrum taken by a NaI (Tl) scintillation detector indicates the characteristic photo peaks of the elements in soil and landmine. In the high-energy region of the gamma-ray spectrum, besides 10.829 MeV of {sup 15}N, single escape (SE) and double escape (DE) peaks are unmistakable photo peaks, which make the detection of concealed explosive possible. The soil has the property of moderating neutrons as well as diffusing the thermal neutron flux. Among many elements in soil, silicon is more abundant and {sup 29}Si emits 10.607 MeV prompt capture gamma-ray, which makes 10.829 MeV detection difficult. The Monte Carlo simulation was used to adjust source-target-detector distances and soil moisture content to yield the best result. Therefore, we applied MCNP4C for configuration very close to reality of a hidden landmine in soil.

  18. Applied gamma-ray spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    Dams, R; Crouthamel, Carl E

    1970-01-01

    Applied Gamma-Ray Spectrometry covers real life application of the gamma-ray and the devices used in their experimental studies. This book is organized into 9 chapters, and starts with discussions of the various decay processes, the possible interaction mechanisms of gamma radiation with matter, and the intrinsic and extrinsic variables, which affect the observed gamma-ray and X-ray spectra. The subsequent chapters deal with the properties and fabrication of scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and proportional gas counters. These chapters present some of the most widely utilized

  19. DELIN and DELOG codes for graphic representation of gamma ray spectra; Programas DELIN y DELOG para la representacion grafica de espectros gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, L.; Travesi, A.

    1983-07-01

    Two Fortran IV Codes has been developed for graphic representation of the gamma-ray spectra obtained with Ge Li detectors and multichannel analyzers. The grafic plotting es carried out with the H.P. Graphic Plotter Mod HP-7221 A, using the graphic package software GRAPHICS-1000 from Hewlett-Packard. The codes have a great versatility and the representation of gamma spectra can ba done in a lineal, semi log, or log-log scale, as desired. The gamma ray spectra data are feed into the computer through magnetic tape or perfored paper tape. The different out-put options and complementary data are given in a conversational way through a terminal with T.V. displays. Among the options that can be selected by the user are the following: - smoothing the spectra - drawing the spectra point by point or continuous - out-put drawing an 1, 2, or 4 sheet with automatic division of the energy scale. - overlapping of selected spectra regions in Y scale ampliation with automatic print-out of the region limits and ampliation factor. - Printing spectra data and identifications of selected photo peaks. The codes can be employed with any computer using printing devices, HP-Graphics 1000 software compatible, but are easily modified for another printing software since their modular structure with Fortran IV written.

  20. Photoluminescence spectra of thin films containing CdSe/ZnS quantum dots irradiated by 532-nm laser radiation and gamma-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Suresh C. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)], E-mail: sharma@uta.edu; Murphree, Jay; Chakraborty, Tonmoy [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX 76019 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    We have investigated temporal behavior of the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of thin films containing CdSe/ZnS quantum dots irradiated by 532 nm laser radiation and gamma-rays. Under {approx}100 W/cm{sup 2} laser radiation, the PL intensity (I{sub PL}) increases with irradiation time upto about 500 s and thereafter declines linearly. The wavelength of the PL emission ({lambda}{sub peak}) exhibits a blue-shift with exposure time. Upon simultaneous irradiation by 100 W/cm{sup 2} 532-nm laser, as well as 0.57 and 1.06 MeV gamma-rays, the temporal behaviors of both I{sub PL} and {lambda}{sub peak} are significantly different; I{sub PL} increases to a saturation level, and the magnitude of the blue-shift in {lambda}{sub peak} is reduced. We discuss possible mechanisms underlying these results.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of prompt gamma-ray spectra from depleted uranium under D-T neutron irradiation and electron recoil spectra in a liquid scintillator detector

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Jianguo; Liu, Rong; Zhu, Tonghua; Zhang, Xinwei; Ye, Bangjiao

    2015-01-01

    To overcome the problem of inefficient computing time and unreliable results in MCNP5 calculation, a two-step method is adopted to calculate the energy deposition of prompt gamma-rays in detectors for depleted uranium spherical shells under D-T neutrons irradiation. In the first step, the gamma-ray spectrum for energy below 7 MeV is calculated by MCNP5 code; secondly, the electron recoil spectrum in a BC501A liquid scintillator detector is simulated based on EGSnrc Monte Carlo Code with the gamma-ray spectrum from the first step as input. The comparison of calculated results with experimental ones shows that the simulations agree well with experiment in the energy region 0.4-3 MeV for the prompt gamma-ray spectrum and below 4 MeVee for the electron recoil spectrum. The reliability of the two-step method in this work is validated.

  2. Energetic neutron and gamma-ray spectra under the earth radiation belts according to "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686" orbital complex and "CORONAS-I" satellite data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, A V; Dmitriev, A V; Myagkova, I N; Ryumin, S P; Smirnova, O N; Sobolevsky, I M

    1998-01-01

    The spectra of neutrons >10 MeV and gamma-rays 1.5-100 MeV under the Earth Radiation Belts, restored from the data, obtained onboard orbital complex "SALYUT-7" [correction of "SALUTE-7"]-"KOSMOS-1686", are presented. The spectra shapes are similar to those for albedo neutrons and gamma-rays, but absolute values of their fluxes (0.2 cm-2 s-1 for neutrons, 0.8 cm-2 s-1 for gamma-rays at the equator and 1.2 cm-2 s-1, 1.9 cm-2 s-1, accordingly, at L=1.9) are several times as large. It is possibly explained by the fact that most of the detected particles were produced by the cosmic ray interactions with the orbital complex matter. Neutron and gamma-ray fluxes obtained from "CORONAS-1" data are near those for albedo particles.

  3. A measurement of parity-violating gamma-ray asymmetries in polarized cold neutron capture on 35Cl, 113Cd, and 139La

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, G S; Bowman, J D; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Gericke, M T W; Jones, G L; Leuschner, M B; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttila, S I; Smith, T B; Snow, W M; Wilburn, W S

    2004-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring parity-violating asymmetries in gamma-ray emission following polarized cold neutron capture was constructed as a 1/10th scale test of the design for the forthcoming n+p->d+gamma experiment at LANSCE. The elements of the polarized neutron beam, including a polarized 3He neutron spin filter and a radio frequency neutron spin rotator, are described. Using CsI(Tl) detectors and photodiode current mode readout, measurements were made of asymmetries in gamma-ray emission following neutron capture on 35Cl, 113Cd, and 139La targets. Upper limits on the parity-allowed asymmetry $s_n \\cdot (k_{\\gamma} \\times k_n)$ were set at the level of 7 x 10^-6 for all three targets. Parity-violating asymmetries $s_n \\cdot k_{\\gamma}$ were observed in 35Cl, A_gamma = (-29.1 +- 6.7) x 10^-6, and 139La, A_gamma = (-15.5 +- 7.1) x 10^-6, values consistent with previous measurements.

  4. $\\gamma$-ray energy spectra and multiplicities from the neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U using STEFF

    CERN Multimedia

    An experiment is proposed to use the STEFF spectrometer at n_TOF to study fragment $\\gamma$-correlations following the neutron-induced fission of $^{235}$U. The STEFF array of 12 NaI detectors will allow measurements of the single $\\gamma$-energy, the $\\gamma$ multiplicity, and the summed $\\gamma$energy distributions as a function of the mass and charge split, and deduced excitation energy in the fission event. These data will be used to study the origin of fission-fragment angular momenta, examining angular distribution eects as a function of incident neutron energy. The principal application of this work is in meeting the NEA high-priority request for improved $\\gamma$ray data from $^{235}$U(n; F). To improve the detection rate and expand the range of detection angles, STEFF will be modied to include two new ssion-fragment detectors each at 45 to the beam direction.

  5. First tests of the applicability of $\\gamma$-ray imaging for background discrimination in time-of-flight neutron capture measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Magán, D L Pérez; Domingo-Pardo, C; Agramunt-Ros, J; Albiol, F; Casanovas, A; González, A; Guerrero, C; Lerendegui-Marco, J; Tarifeño-Saldivia, A

    2016-01-01

    In this work we explore for the first time the applicability of using $\\gamma$-ray imaging in neutron capture measurements to identify and suppress spatially localized background. For this aim, a pinhole gamma camera is assembled, tested and characterized in terms of energy and spatial performance. It consists of a monolithic CeBr$_3$ scintillating crystal coupled to a position-sensitive photomultiplier and readout through an integrated circuit AMIC2GR. The pinhole collimator is a massive carven block of lead. A series of dedicated measurements with calibrated sources and with a neutron beam incident on a $^{197}$Au sample have been carried out at n\\_TOF, achieving an enhancement of a factor of 2 in the signal-to-background ratio when selecting only those events coming from the direction of the sample.

  6. Measurements of neutron-induced capture and fission reactions on $^{235}$ U: cross sections and ${\\alpha}$ ratios, photon strength functions and prompt ${\\gamma}$-ray from fission

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose to measure the neutron-induced capture cross section of the fissile isotope $^{235}$U using a fission tagging set-up. This new set-up has been tested successfully in 2010 and combines the n_TOF 4${\\pi}$ Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC) with MicroMegas (MGAS) fission detectors. It has been proven that such a combination of detectors allows distinguishing with very good reliability the electromagnetic cascades from the capture reactions from dominant ${\\gamma}$-ray background coming from the fission reactions. The accurate discrimination of the fission background is the main challenge in the neutron capture cross section measurements of fissile isotopes. The main results from the measurement will be the associated capture cross section and ${\\alpha}$ ratio in the resolved (0.3-2250 eV) and unresolved (2.25-30 keV) resonance regions. According to the international benchmarks and as it is mentioned in the NEA High Priority Request List (HPRL), the 235U(n,${\\gamma}$) cross section is of utmost impo...

  7. Neutron photoproduction in sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U using thermal neutron capture gamma-rays in the energy range 5.61 to 10.83 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalez, O L

    1998-01-01

    Neutron photoproduction studies for sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U were carried out from 5.6 to 10.8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 to 21 eV), produced by 30 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 2 MW research reactor. The samples (17.76 g of U sub 3 sub O sub 8 depleted to 0.349% in sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U and 19.93 g of natural Th O sub 2) have been irradiated inside a 4 pi geometry neutron detector system sup L ong Counter sup , 520.5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (E G and G Ortec, 25 cm sup 3 , 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A methodology for unfolding the set of expe...

  8. Novae in gamma-rays

    CERN Document Server

    Hernanz, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission (511 keV line and a continuum below this energy, with a cut-off at 20-30 keV). The analysis of gamma-ray spectra and light curves is a potential unique and powerful tool both to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope determining its transparency. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected in some particular novae, in symbiotic binaries, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main ...

  9. Gantry orientation effect on the neutron and capture gamma ray dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiasi Hosein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of gantry orientation on the photoneutron and capture gamma dose calculations for maze entrance door was evaluated. A typical radiation therapy room made of ordinary concrete was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Gantry rotation was simulated at eight different angles around the isocenter. Both neutron and capture gamma dose vary considerably with gantry angle. The ratios of the maximum to the minimum values for neutron and capture gamma dose equivalents were 1.9 and 1.4, respectively. On the other hand, comparison of the Monte Carlo calculated mean value over all orientations with Monte Carlo calculated neutron and gamma dose showed that the Wu-McGinley method differed by 5% and 2%, respectively. However, for more conservative shielding calculations, factors of 1.6 and 1.3 should be applied to the calculated neutron and capture gamma doses at downward irradiation. Finally, it can be concluded that the gantry angle influences neutron and capture gamma dose at the maze entrance door and it should be taken into account in shielding considerations.

  10. "Discrepant hardenings" in cosmic ray spectra: a first estimate of the effects on secondary antiproton and diffuse gamma-ray yields

    CERN Document Server

    Donato, Fiorenza

    2010-01-01

    Recent data from CREAM seem to confirm early suggestions that primary cosmic ray spectra at few TeV/nucleon are harder than in the 10-100 GeV range. Also, helium and heavier nuclei spectra appear systematically harder than the proton fluxes at corresponding energies. We note here that if the measurements reflect intrinsic features in the interstellar fluxes, appreciable modifications are expected in the sub-TeV range for the secondary yields, such as antiprotons and diffuse gamma-rays. Presently, this effect represents a systematic error in the extraction of astrophysical parameters as well as for background estimates for indirect dark matter searches. We find that the spectral modifications are appreciable above 100 GeV, and can be responsible for ~30% effects for antiprotons at energies close to 1 TeV or for gamma's at energies close to 300 GeV, compared to currently considered predictions based on simple extrapolation of input fluxes from low energy data.

  11. A new processing technique for airborne gamma-ray data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens

    1997-01-01

    The mathematical-statistical background for at new technique for processing gamma-ray spectra is presented. The technique - Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition - decomposes at set of gamma-ray spectra into a few basic spectra - the spectral components. The spectral components can...

  12. Upper Bounds on Parity Violating Gamma-Ray Asymmetries in Compound Nuclei from Polarized Cold Neutron Capture

    CERN Document Server

    Gericke, M T; Carlini, R D; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Dabaghyan, M; Dawkins, M; Desai, D; Freedman, S J; Gentile, T R; Gillis, R C; Greene, G L; Hersman, F W; Ino, T; Jones, G L; Kandes, M; Lauss, B; Leuschner, M; Lozowski, W R; Mahurin, R; Mason, M; Masuda, Y; Mitchell, G S; Muto, S; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttila, S I; Ramsay, W D; Santra, S; Seo, P N; Sharapov, E I; Smith, T B; Snow, W M; Wilburn, W S; Yuan, V; Zhu, H

    2006-01-01

    Parity-odd asymmetries in the electromagnetic decays of compound nuclei can sometimes be amplified above values expected from simple dimensional estimates by the complexity of compound nuclear states. In this work we use a statistical approach to estimate the root mean square (RMS) of the distribution of expected parity-odd correlations $\\vec{s_{n}} \\cdot \\vec{k_{\\gamma}}$, where $\\vec {s_{n}}$ is the neutron spin and $\\vec{k_{\\gamma}}$ is the momentum of the gamma, in the integrated gamma spectrum from the capture of cold polarized neutrons on Al, Cu, and In and we present measurements of the asymmetries in these and other nuclei. Based on our calculations, large enhancements of asymmetries were not predicted for the studied nuclei and the statistical estimates are consistent with our measured upper bounds on the asymmetries.

  13. A new gamma-ray diagnostic for energetic ion distributions - The Compton tail on the neutron capture line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestrand, W. Thomas

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new radiation diagnostic for assaying the energy spectrum and the angular distribution of energetic ions incident on thick hydrogen-rich thermal targets. This diagnostic compares the number of emergent photons in the narrow neutron capture line at 2.223 MeV to the number of Compton scattered photons that form a low-energy tail on the line. It is shown that the relative strength of the tail can be used as a measure of the hardness of the incident ion-energy spectrum. Application of this diagnostic to solar flare conditions is the main thrust of the work presented here. It is examined how the strength of the Compton tail varies with flare viewing angle and the angular distribution of the flare-accelerated particles. Application to compact X-ray binary systems is also briefly discussed.

  14. Reproducibility of (n,γ) gamma ray spectrum in Pb under different ENDF/B releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kebwaro, J.M., E-mail: jeremiahkebwaro@gmail.com [Department of Physical Sciences, Karatina University, P.O. Box 1957-10101, Karatina (Kenya); He, C.H.; Zhao, Y.L. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xian Jiaotong University, Xian, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Radiative capture reactions are of interest in shielding design and other fundamental research. In this study the reproducibility of (n,γ) reactions in Pb when cross-section data from different ENDF/B releases are used in the Monte-Carlo code, MCNP, was investigated. Pb was selected for this study because it is widely used in shielding applications where capture reactions are likely to occur. Four different neutron spectra were declared as source in the MCNP model which consisted of a simple spherical geometry. The gamma ray spectra due to the capture reactions were recorded at 10 cm from the center of the sphere. The results reveal that the gamma ray spectrum produced by ENDF/B-V is in reasonable agreement with that produced when ENDF/B-VI.6 is used. However the spectrum produced by ENDF/B-VII does not reveal any primary gamma rays in the higher energy region (E > 3 MeV). It is further observed that the intensities of the capture gamma rays produced when various releases are used differ by a some margin showing that the results are not reproducible. The generated spectra also vary with the spectrum of the source neutrons. The discrepancies observed among various ENDF/B releases could raise concerns to end users and need to be addressed properly during benchmarking calculations before the next release. The evaluation from ENDF to ACE format that is supplied with MCNP should also be examined because errors might have arisen during the evaluation.

  15. Photon propagation and the VHE gamma-ray spectra of blazars: how transparent is really the Universe?

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, A; Persic, M; Roncadelli, M

    2008-01-01

    Recent findings by Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACTs) suggest a transparency of the Universe to Very-High-Energy (VHE) photons beyond expectations based on realistic models of the Extragalactic Background Light. It has recently been shown that such transparency can be naturally explained by the mixing between the photon and a new very light Axion-Like Particle (ALP) predicted by many extensions of the Standard Model of elementary particles (DARMA scenario). We discuss the implications of the DARMA scenario for the observed spectra of blazars detected in the VHE band. In fact, contemplating all such blazars at once allows us to correlate the emitted and observed spectral indexes. Besides confirming the DARMA scenario in more general terms, we show that this picture automatically explains why - even starting from the same nominal value of 2.4 for the spectral index of all VHE blazars at emission - the observed spectral index predicted by the DARMA scenario reproduces the observations, becoming asy...

  16. Gamma-ray blazar spectra with H.E.S.S. II mono analysis: The case of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.E.S.S. Collaboration; Abdalla, H.; Abramowski, A.; Aharonian, F.; Ait Benkhali, F.; Akhperjanian, A. G.; Andersson, T.; Angüner, E. O.; Arrieta, M.; Aubert, P.; Backes, M.; Balzer, A.; Barnard, M.; Becherini, Y.; Becker Tjus, J.; Berge, D.; Bernhard, S.; Bernlöhr, K.; Blackwell, R.; Böttcher, M.; Boisson, C.; Bolmont, J.; Bordas, P.; Brun, F.; Brun, P.; Bryan, M.; Bulik, T.; Capasso, M.; Carr, J.; Casanova, S.; Cerruti, M.; Chakraborty, N.; Chalme-Calvet, R.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chen, A.; Chevalier, J.; Chrétien, M.; Colafrancesco, S.; Cologna, G.; Condon, B.; Conrad, J.; Couturier, C.; Cui, Y.; Davids, I. D.; Degrange, B.; Deil, C.; Devin, J.; deWilt, P.; Dirson, L.; Djannati-Ataï, A.; Domainko, W.; Donath, A.; Drury, L. O.'C.; Dubus, G.; Dutson, K.; Dyks, J.; Edwards, T.; Egberts, K.; Eger, P.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Eschbach, S.; Farnier, C.; Fegan, S.; Fernandes, M. V.; Fiasson, A.; Fontaine, G.; Förster, A.; Funk, S.; Füßling, M.; Gabici, S.; Gajdus, M.; Gallant, Y. A.; Garrigoux, T.; Giavitto, G.; Giebels, B.; Glicenstein, J. F.; Gottschall, D.; Goyal, A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, J.; Haupt, M.; Hawkes, J.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henri, G.; Hermann, G.; Hervet, O.; Hillert, A.; Hinton, J. A.; Hofmann, W.; Hoischen, C.; Holler, M.; Horns, D.; Ivascenko, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Janiak, M.; Jankowsky, D.; Jankowsky, F.; Jingo, M.; Jogler, T.; Jouvin, L.; Jung-Richardt, I.; Kastendieck, M. A.; Katarzyński, K.; Katz, U.; Kerszberg, D.; Khélifi, B.; Kieffer, M.; King, J.; Klepser, S.; Klochkov, D.; Kluźniak, W.; Kolitzus, D.; Komin, Nu.; Kosack, K.; Krakau, S.; Kraus, M.; Krayzel, F.; Krüger, P. P.; Laffon, H.; Lamanna, G.; Lau, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefaucheur, J.; Lefranc, V.; Lemière, A.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Lenain, J.-P.; Leser, E.; Lohse, T.; Lorentz, M.; Liu, R.; López-Coto, R.; Lypova, I.; Marandon, V.; Marcowith, A.; Mariaud, C.; Marx, R.; Maurin, G.; Maxted, N.; Mayer, M.; Meintjes, P. J.; Meyer, M.; Mitchell, A. M. W.; Moderski, R.; Mohamed, M.; Mohrmann, L.; Morå, K.; Moulin, E.; Murach, T.; de Naurois, M.; Niederwanger, F.; Niemiec, J.; Oakes, L.; O'Brien, P.; Odaka, H.; Öttl, S.; Ohm, S.; Ostrowski, M.; Oya, I.; Padovani, M.; Panter, M.; Parsons, R. D.; Paz Arribas, M.; Pekeur, N. W.; Pelletier, G.; Perennes, C.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Peyaud, B.; Pita, S.; Poon, H.; Prokhorov, D.; Prokoph, H.; Pühlhofer, G.; Punch, M.; Quirrenbach, A.; Raab, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renaud, M.; de los Reyes, R.; Rieger, F.; Romoli, C.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rowell, G.; Rudak, B.; Rulten, C. B.; Sahakian, V.; Salek, D.; Sanchez, D. A.; Santangelo, A.; Sasaki, M.; Schlickeiser, R.; Schüssler, F.; Schulz, A.; Schwanke, U.; Schwemmer, S.; Settimo, M.; Seyffert, A. S.; Shafi, N.; Shilon, I.; Simoni, R.; Sol, H.; Spanier, F.; Spengler, G.; Spies, F.; Stawarz, Ł.; Steenkamp, R.; Stegmann, C.; Stinzing, F.; Stycz, K.; Sushch, I.; Tavernet, J.-P.; Tavernier, T.; Taylor, A. M.; Terrier, R.; Tibaldo, L.; Tiziani, D.; Tluczykont, M.; Trichard, C.; Tuffs, R.; Uchiyama, Y.; van der Walt, D. J.; van Eldik, C.; van Soelen, B.; Vasileiadis, G.; Veh, J.; Venter, C.; Viana, A.; Vincent, P.; Vink, J.; Voisin, F.; Völk, H. J.; Vuillaume, T.; Wadiasingh, Z.; Wagner, S. J.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. M.; White, R.; Wierzcholska, A.; Willmann, P.; Wörnlein, A.; Wouters, D.; Yang, R.; Zabalza, V.; Zaborov, D.; Zacharias, M.; Zdziarski, A. A.; Zech, A.; Zefi, F.; Ziegler, A.; Żywucka, N.; LAT Collaboration; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bellazzini, R.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Di Lalla, N.; Di Mauro, M.; Di Venere, L.; Donaggio, B.; Favuzzi, C.; Focke, W. B.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Horan, D.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kensei, S.; Kocevski, D.; Larsson, S.; Li, J.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Negro, M.; Nuss, E.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Principe, G.; Rainò, S.; Razzano, M.; Simone, D.; Siskind, E. J.; Spada, F.; Spinelli, P.; Thayer, J. B.; Torres, D. F.; Torresi, E.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Wood, K. S.

    2017-04-01

    Context. The addition of a 28 m Cherenkov telescope (CT5) to the H.E.S.S. array extended the experiment's sensitivityto lower energies. The lowest energy threshold is obtained using monoscopic analysis of data taken with CT5, providing access to gamma-ray energies below 100 GeV for small zenith angle observations. Such an extension of the instrument's energy range is particularly beneficial for studies of active galactic nuclei with soft spectra, as expected for those at a redshift ≥0.5. The high-frequency peaked BL Lac objects PKS 2155-304 (z = 0.116) and PG 1553+113 (0.43 100 GeV interpreted as being due to interactions with the extragalactic background light (EBL). Aims: The aims of this work are twofold: to demonstrate the monoscopic analysis of CT5 data with a low energy threshold, and to obtain accurate measurements of the spectral energy distributions (SED) of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 near their SED peaks at energies ≈100 GeV. Methods: Multiple observational campaigns of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 were conducted during 2013 and 2014 using the full H.E.S.S. II instrument (CT1-5). A monoscopic analysis of the data taken with the new CT5 telescope was developed along with an investigation into the systematic uncertainties on the spectral parameters which are derived from this analysis. Results: Using the data from CT5, the energy spectra of PKS 2155-304 and PG 1553+113 were reconstructed down to conservative threshold energies of 80 GeV for PKS 2155-304, which transits near zenith, and 110 GeV for the more northern PG 1553+113. The measured spectra, well fitted in both cases by a log-parabola spectral model (with a 5.0σ statistical preference for non-zero curvature for PKS 2155-304 and 4.5σ for PG 1553+113), were found consistent with spectra derived from contemporaneous Fermi-LAT data, indicating a sharp break in the observed spectra of both sources at E ≈ 100 GeV. When corrected for EBL absorption, the intrinsic H.E.S.S. II mono and Fermi

  17. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1997-01-21

    A gamma ray camera is disclosed for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array. 6 figs.

  18. Gamma ray camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Mendez, Victor

    1997-01-01

    A gamma ray camera for detecting rays emanating from a radiation source such as an isotope. The gamma ray camera includes a sensor array formed of a visible light crystal for converting incident gamma rays to a plurality of corresponding visible light photons, and a photosensor array responsive to the visible light photons in order to form an electronic image of the radiation therefrom. The photosensor array is adapted to record an integrated amount of charge proportional to the incident gamma rays closest to it, and includes a transparent metallic layer, photodiode consisting of a p-i-n structure formed on one side of the transparent metallic layer, and comprising an upper p-type layer, an intermediate layer and a lower n-type layer. In the preferred mode, the scintillator crystal is composed essentially of a cesium iodide (CsI) crystal preferably doped with a predetermined amount impurity, and the p-type upper intermediate layers and said n-type layer are essentially composed of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H). The gamma ray camera further includes a collimator interposed between the radiation source and the sensor array, and a readout circuit formed on one side of the photosensor array.

  19. SVOM gamma ray monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor(SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection,localization and broad-band study of gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena.The gamma ray monitor(GRM) onboard is designed to observe GRBs up to 5 MeV.With this instrument,one of the key GRB parameters,Epeak,can be easily measured in the hard X-ray band.It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  20. SVOM Gamma Ray Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Yongwei; Li, Yanguo; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2009-01-01

    The Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor (SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection, localization and broad-band study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena. The Gamma Ray Monitor (GRM) onboard is designed to observe the GRBs up to 5 MeV. With this instrument one of the key GRB parameter, Epeak, can be easily measured in the hard x-ray band. It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  1. Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, S. T.

    2000-01-01

    The project has progressed successfully during this period of performance. The highlights of the Gamma Ray Astronomy teams efforts are: (1) Support daily BATSE data operations, including receipt, archival and dissemination of data, quick-look science analysis, rapid gamma-ray burst and transient monitoring and response efforts, instrument state-of-health monitoring, and instrument commanding and configuration; (2) On-going scientific analysis, including production and maintenance of gamma-ray burst, pulsed source and occultation source catalogs, gamma-ray burst spectroscopy, studies of the properties of pulsars and black holes, and long-term monitoring of hard x-ray sources; (3) Maintenance and continuous improvement of BATSE instrument response and calibration data bases; (4) Investigation of the use of solid state detectors for eventual application and instrument to perform all sky monitoring of X-Ray and Gamma sources with high sensitivity; and (5) Support of BATSE outreach activities, including seminars, colloquia and World Wide Web pages. The highlights of this efforts can be summarized in the publications and presentation list.

  2. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear], e-mail: laaterre@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The recording of gamma-ray spectra along an irradiated fuel rod allows the fission products to be qualitatively and quantitatively examined. Among all nondestructive examinations performed on irradiated fuel rods by gamma-ray spectroscopy, the most comprehensive one is the average burnup measurement, which is quantitative. Moreover, burnup measurements by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy are less time-consuming and waste-generating than burnup measurements by radiochemical, destructive methods. This work presents the theoretical foundations and experimental techniques necessary to measure, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the average burnup of irradiated fuel rods in a laboratory equipped with hot cells. (author)

  3. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  4. Gamma rays from Galactic pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Gamma rays from young pulsars and milli-second pulsars are expected to contribute to the diffuse gamma-ray emission measured by the {\\it Fermi} Large Area Telescope (LAT) at high latitudes. We derive the contribution of the pulsars undetected counterpart by using information from radio to gamma rays and we show that they explain only a small fraction of the isotropic diffuse gamma-ray background.

  5. $\\gamma$-Ray Absorption at High Redshifts and the $\\gamma$-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1997-01-01

    We present results of a calculation of absorption of 10-500 GeV gamma-rays at high redshifts. This calculation requires the determination of the high- redshift evolution of the full spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic photon field. For this, we have primarily followed the recent analysis of Fall, Charlot and Pei. We give our results for the gamma-ray opacity as a function of redshift out to a redshift of 3. We then give predicted gamma-ray spectra for selected blazars and also extend our results on the background from unresolved blazars to an energy of 500 GeV. Absorption effects are predicted to significantly steepen the background spectrum above 20 GeV. Our absorption calculations can be used to place limits on the redshifts of gamma-ray bursts. Our background calculations can be used to determine the observability of multi-GeV lines from dark matter neutralino particles.

  6. Very High Energy Gamma Ray Extension of GRO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, Trevor C.

    1994-01-01

    The membership, progress, and invited talks, publications, and proceedings made by the Whipple Gamma Ray Collaboration is reported for june 1990 through May 1994. Progress was made in the following areas: the May 1994 Markarian Flare at Whipple and EGRET (Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope) energies; AGN's (Active Galactic Nuclei); bursts; supernova remnants; and simulations and energy spectra.

  7. Formation of very hard electron and gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars in the fast-cooling regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dahai; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Shuang-Nan

    2016-07-01

    In the external Compton scenario, we investigate the formation of a very hard electron spectrum in the fast-cooling regime, using a time-dependent emission model. It is shown that a very hard electron distribution, N^' }_e({γ ^' })∝ {γ ^' }^{-p}, with spectral index p ˜ 1.3 is formed below the minimum energy of injection electrons when inverse Compton scattering takes place in the Klein-Nishina regime, i.e. inverse Compton scattering of relativistic electrons on broad-line region radiation in flat-spectrum radio quasars. This produces a very hard gamma-ray spectrum and can explain in reasonable fashion the very hard Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) spectrum of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 279 during the extreme gamma-ray flare in 2013 December.

  8. Time-of-flight discrimination between gamma-rays and neutrons by neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In gamma-ray spectroscopy, a number of neutrons are emitted from the nuclei together with the gamma-rays and these neutrons influence gamma-ray spectra. An obvious method of separating between neutrons and gamma-rays is based on the time-of-flight (tof) technique. This work aims obtaining tof distributions of gamma-rays and neutrons by using feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN). It was shown that, ANN can correctly classify gamma-ray and neutron events. Testing of trained networks on ...

  9. Gamma-Ray Localization of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes

    CERN Document Server

    Marisaldi, M; Trois, A; Giuliani, A; Tavani, M; Labanti, C; Fuschino, F; Bulgarelli, A; Longo, F; Barbiellini, G; Del Monte, E; Moretti, E; Trifoglio, M; Costa, E; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; D'Ammando, F; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Froysland, T; Galli, M; Gianotti, F; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Lipari, P; Mereghetti, S; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Piano, G; Pilia, M; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rubini, A; Sabatini, S; Soffitta, P; Striani, E; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Antonelli, L A; Colafrancesco, S; Cutini, S; Giommi, P; Lucarelli, F; Pittori, C; Santolamazza, P; Verrecchia, F; Salotti, L; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.128501

    2010-01-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) are very short bursts of high energy photons and electrons originating in Earth's atmosphere. We present here a localization study of TGFs carried out at gamma-ray energies above 20 MeV based on an innovative event selection method. We use the AGILE satellite Silicon Tracker data that for the first time have been correlated with TGFs detected by the AGILE Mini-Calorimeter. We detect 8 TGFs with gamma-ray photons of energies above 20 MeV localized by the AGILE gamma-ray imager with an accuracy of 5-10 degrees at 50 MeV. Remarkably, all TGF-associated gamma rays are compatible with a terrestrial production site closer to the sub-satellite point than 400 km. Considering that our gamma rays reach the AGILE satellite at 540 km altitude with limited scattering or attenuation, our measurements provide the first precise direct localization of TGFs from space.

  10. Novel Features of Gamma Ray from Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Tang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we present some general and novel features of gamma ray from dark matter. We find that gamma-ray spectra with sharp features exist in a wide class of dark matter models and mimic the gamma line signals. The generated gamma rays would generally have polynomial-type spectra or power-law with positive index. We illustrate our results in a model-independent framework with generic kinematic analysis. Similar results can also apply for cosmic rays or neutrino cases.

  11. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.;

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...... the SIGMA telescope field of view are reviewed....

  12. Computers in activation analysis and gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, B. S.; D' Agostino, M. D.; Yule, H. P. [eds.

    1979-01-01

    Seventy-three papers are included under the following session headings: analytical and mathematical methods for data analysis; software systems for ..gamma..-ray and x-ray spectrometry; ..gamma..-ray spectra treatment, peak evaluation; least squares; IAEA intercomparison of methods for processing spectra; computer and calculator utilization in spectrometer systems; and applications in safeguards, fuel scanning, and environmental monitoring. Separate abstracts were prepared for 72 of those papers. (DLC)

  13. Detection efficiency for radionuclides decaying by electron capture and gamma-Ray; Calculo de la eficiencia de deteccion de nucleidos que se desintegran por captura elec- tronica y emision gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grau, A.; Fernandez, A.

    1985-07-01

    In this paper, the electron capture partial counting efficiency vs the figure of merit for electron-capture and gamma-ray emitters has been computed. The radionuclides tabulated are 48{sup c}r, 54{sup M}n, 57{sup C}o 56{sup N}i, 72{sup S}e, 73{sup A}s, 85{sup S}r, 88{sup Z}r, 92{sup N}b, 103{sup P}d, 111{sup l}n, 119{sup S}b, 125{sup I}, 139{sup C}e and 152{sup D}y. It has been assumed that the liquid is a toluene based scintillator solution in standard glass vials containing 15 cm{sup 3}. (Author) 17 refs.

  14. Gamma-ray emission from nova outbursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hernanz, M

    2013-01-01

    Classical novae produce radioactive nuclei which are emitters of gamma-rays in the MeV range. Some examples are the lines at 478 and 1275 keV (from 7Be and 22Na) and the positron-electron annihilation emission, with the 511 keV line and a continuum. Gamma-ray spectra and light curves are potential unique tools to trace the corresponding isotopes and to give insights on the properties of the expanding envelope. Another possible origin of gamma-rays is the acceleration of particles up to very high energies, so that either neutral pions or inverse Compton processes produce gamma-rays of energies larger than 100 MeV. MeV photons during nova explosions have not been detected yet, although several attempts have been made in the last decades; on the other hand, GeV photons from novae have been detected with the Fermi satellite in V407 Cyg, a nova in a symbiotic binary, where the companion is a red giant with a wind, instead of a main sequence star as in the cataclysmic variables hosting classical novae. Two more nov...

  15. Numerical simulations on efficiency and measurement of capabilities of BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray

    CERN Document Server

    Wen Wan Xin

    2002-01-01

    The energy resolution and time resolution of two phi 75 x 100 BGO detectors for high energy gamma ray newly made were measured with sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co resources. The two characteristic gamma rays of high energy emitted from the thermal neutron capture of germanium in BGO crystal were used for the energy calibration of gamma spectra. The intrinsic photopeak efficiency, single escape probability and double escape probabilities of BGO detectors in photon energy range of 4-30 MeV are numerically calculated with GEANT code. The real count response and count ratio of the uniformly distributed incident photons in energy range of 0-30 MeV are also calculated. The distortion of gamma spectra caused by the photon energy loss extension to lower energy in detection medium is discussed

  16. Photon energy conversion efficiency in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švec, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Photon energy conversion efficiency coefficient is presented as the ratio of total energy registered in the collected spectrum to the emitted photon energy. This parameter is calculated from the conventional gamma-ray histogram and in principle is not affected by coincidence phenomena. This feature makes it particularly useful for calibration and measurement of radionuclide samples at close geometries. It complements the number of efficiency parameters used in gamma-ray spectrometry and can partly change the view as to how the gamma-ray spectra are displayed and processed.

  17. GAMMA-RAY DIAGNOSTICS OF ALPHA-SLOWING IN INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION-TARGETS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DENDOOVEN, PG; DRAKE, RP; CABLE, MD; Dendooven, Peter

    1993-01-01

    For large inertial confinement fusion deuterium-tritium targets, a way to diagnose alpha slowing might be via capture reaction gamma rays. Calculations are presented for two such methods: one uses the alpha+T direct capture gamma rays, the other is based on a series of resonant alpha-capture reactio

  18. $\\gamma$-rays and neutrinos from dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1996-01-01

    High energy gamma-rays and neutrinos can be produced both by the annihilation and by the possible slow decay of dark matter particles. We discuss the fluxes and spectra of such secondaries produced by dark matter particles in the universe and their observability in competition with other astrophysical gamma-ray signals and with atmospheric neutrinos. To do this, we work within the assumption that the dark matter particles are neutralinos which are the lightest supersymmetric particles (LSPs) predicted by supersymmetry theory.

  19. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  20. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  1. Method for converting in-situ gamma ray spectra of a portable Ge detector to an incident photon flux energy distribution based on Monte Carlo simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A matrix stripping method for the conversion of in-situ gamma ray spectrum, obtained with portable Ge detector, to photon flux energy distribution is proposed. The detector response is fully described by its stripping matrix and full absorption efficiency curve. A charge collection efficiency function is introduced in the simulation to take into account the existence of a transition zone of increasing charge collection after the inactive Ge layer. Good agreement is obtained between simulated and experimental full absorption efficiencies. The characteristic stripping matrix is determined by Monte Carlo simulation for different incident photon energies using the Geant4 toolkit system. The photon flux energy distribution is deduced by stripping the measured spectrum of the partial absorption and cosmic ray events and then applying the full absorption efficiency curve. The stripping method is applied to a measured in-situ spectrum. The value of the absorbed dose rate in air deduced from the corresponding flux energy distribution agrees well with the value measured directly in-situ.

  2. Formation of the 0.511.-MeV line in solar flares. [statistical mechanics of line spectra for gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crannell, C. J.; Joyce, G.; Ramaty, R.; Werntz, C.

    1976-01-01

    The gamma-ray line produced at 0.51-MeV was studied and is shown to be the result of either of free annihilation of positrons with electrons or of the decay of positronium by 2-photon emission. Positron annihilation from the bound state of positronium may also proceed by 3-photon emission, resulting in a continuum with energies up to 0.51-MeV. Accurate calculations of the rates of free annihilation and positronium formation in a solar-flare plasma are presented. Estimates of the positronium-formulation rates by charge exchange and the rates of dissociation and quenching are also considered. The temperature and density dependence of the ratio of 3-photon to 2-photon emission was obtained. It is shown that when the ratio of free electrons to neutral atoms in the plasma is approximately unity or greater, the Doppler width of the 0.51-MeV line is a function of the temperature of the annihilation region. For the small ion densities characteristics of the photosphere, the width is predominantly a function of the density.

  3. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  4. Gamma-ray-selected AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giommi, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    The gamma-ray band is the most energetic part of the electromagnetic spectrum. As such it is also where selection effects are most severe, as it can only be reached by the most extreme non-thermal AGN. Blazars, with their emission dominated by non-thermal blue-shifted radiation arising in a relativistic jet pointed in the direction of the observer, naturally satisfy this though requirement. For this reason, albeit these sources are intrisically very rare (orders of magnitude less abundant than radio quiet AGN of the same optical magnitude) they almost completely dominate the extragalactic gamma-ray and very high energy sky. I will discuss the emission of different types of blazars and the selection effects that are at play in the gamma-ray band based on recent results from the current generation of gamma-ray astronomy satellites, ground-based Cherenkov telescopes, and Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Gamma-ray Pulsar Revolution

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, Patrizia A

    2013-01-01

    Isolated Neutron Stars (INSs) were the first sources identified in the field of high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. At first, in the 70s, there were only two identified sources, the Crab and Vela pulsars. However, although few in number, these objects were crucial in establishing the very concept of a gamma-ray source. Moreover, they opened up significant discovery space both in the theoretical and phenomenological fronts. The need to explain the copious gamma-ray emission of these pulsars led to breakthrough developments in understanding the structure and physics of neutron star magnetospheres. In parallel, the 20-year-long chase to understand the nature of Geminga unveiled the existence of a radio-quiet, gamma-ray-emitting, INS, adding a new dimension to the INS family. Today we are living through an extraordinary time of discovery. The current generation of gamma-ray detectors has vastly increased the population of known of gamma-ray-emitting neutron stars. The 100 mark was crossed in 2011 and we are now appr...

  6. Gamma-ray emission from individual classical novae

    CERN Document Server

    Gómez-Gomar, J; José, J; Isern, J

    1997-01-01

    Classical novae are important producers of radioactive nuclei, such as be7, n13, f18, na22 and al26. The disintegration of these nuclei produces positrons (except for be7) that through annihilation with electrons produce photons of energies 511 keV and below. Furthermore, be7 and na22 decay producing photons with energies of 478 keV and 1275 keV, respectively, well in the gamma-ray domain. Therefore, novae are potential sources of gamma-ray emission. The properties of gamma-ray spectra and gamma-ray light curves (for the continuum and for the lines at 511, 478 and 1275 keV) have been analyzed, with a special emphasis on the difference between carbon-oxygen and oxygen-neon novae. Predictions of detectability of individual novae by the future SPI spectrometer on board the INTEGRAL satellite are made.

  7. Photoneutron cross sections measurements in {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C e {sup 17}O with thermal neutron capture gamma-rays; Medidas das secoes de choque de fotoneutrons do {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C e {sup 17}O com radiacao gama de captura de neutrons termicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semmler, Renato

    2006-07-01

    Photoneutron cross sections measurements of {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C and {sup 17}O have been obtained in the energy interval between 1,6 and 10,8 MeV, using neutron capture gamma-rays with high resolution in energy (3 a 21 eV), produced by 21 target materials, placed inside a tangential beam port, near the core of the IPEN/CNEN-SP IEA-R1 (5 MW) research reactor. The samples have been irradiated inside a 4{pi} geometry neutron detector system 'Long Counter', 520,5 cm away from the capture target. The capture gamma-ray flux was determined by means of the analysis of the gamma spectrum obtained by using a Ge(Li) solid-state detector (EG and G ORTEC, 25 cm{sup 3}, 5%), previously calibrated with capture gamma-rays from a standard target of Nitrogen (Melamine). The neutron photoproduction cross section has been measured for each target capture gamma-ray spectrum (compound cross section). A inversion matrix methodology to solve inversion problems for unfolding the set of experimental compound cross sections, was used in order to obtain the cross sections at specific excitation energy values (principal gamma line energies of the capture targets). The cross sections obtained at the energy values of the principal gamma lines were compared with experimental data reported by other authors, with have employed different gamma-ray sources. A good agreement was observed among the experimental data in this work with reported in the literature. (author)

  8. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, G C

    2002-01-01

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce ...

  9. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Models and Predictions

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed emission from gamma-ray pulsars originates inside the magnetosphere, from radiation by charged particles accelerated near the magnetic poles or in the outer gaps. In polar cap models, the high energy spectrum is cut off by magnetic pair production above an energy that is dependent on the local magnetic field strength. While most young pulsars with surface fields in the range B = 10^{12} - 10^{13} G are expected to have high energy cutoffs around several GeV, the gamma-ray spectra of old pulsars having lower surface fields may extend to 50 GeV. Although the gamma-ray emission of older pulsars is weaker, detecting pulsed emission at high energies from nearby sources would be an important confirmation of polar cap models. Outer gap models predict more gradual high-energy turnovers at around 10 GeV, but also predict an inverse Compton component extending to TeV energies. Detection of pulsed TeV emission, which would not survive attenuation at the polar caps, is thus an important test of outer gap models. N...

  10. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  11. Hadronic Gamma Rays from Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Moskalenko, I V; Malkov, M A; Diamond, P H

    2007-01-01

    A gas cloud near a supernova remnant (SNR) provides a target for pp-collisions leading to subsequent gamma-ray emission through neutral pion decay. The assumption of a power-law ambient spectrum of accelerated particles with index near -2 is usually built into models predicting the spectra of very-high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission from SNRs. However, if the gas cloud is located at some distance from the SNR shock, this assumption is not necessarily correct. In this case, the particles which interact with the cloud are those leaking from the shock and their spectrum is approximately monoenergetic with the injection energy gradually decreasing as the SNR ages. The gamma-ray spectrum resulting from particle interactions with the gas cloud will be flatter than expected, with the cutoff defined by the pion momentum distribution in the laboratory frame. We evaluate the flux of particles escaping from a SNR shock and apply the results to the VHE diffuse emission detected by the HESS at the Galactic centre.

  12. Varying Faces of Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Axelsson, M

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 1000 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, a large fraction show narrow and hard spectra inconsistent with non-thermal emission, signifying optically thick emission from the photosphere. However, only a few of these bursts have spectra consistent with a pure Planck function. We will discuss the observational features of photospheric emission in these GRBs as well as in the ones showing multi-component spectra. We interpret the observations in light of models of subphotospheric dissipation, geometrical broadening and multi-zone emission, and show what we can learn about the dissipation mechanism and properties of GRB jets.

  13. Muon capture on Chlorine-35

    CERN Document Server

    Arole, S; Gorringe, T P; Hasinoff, M D; Kovash, M A; Kuzmin, V; Moftah, B A; Sedlar, R; Stocki, T J; Tetereva, T

    2002-01-01

    We report measurements of $\\gamma$--ray spectra from muon capture on $^{35}$Cl. For the allowed Gamow--Teller transitions to the $^{35}$S$(2939, 3/2^+)$ state and the $^{35}$S$(3421, 5/2^+)$ state we obtained their capture rates, hyperfine dependences and $\\gamma$--$\

  14. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...

  15. On the possibility of sub-TeV Gamma-ray emission from Cyg X-3

    CERN Document Server

    Bednarek, W

    2010-01-01

    The compact X-ray binary system Cyg X-3 has been recently discovered as a source of GeV gamma-rays by the AGILE and the {\\it Fermi} satellites. It shows emission features in the GeV gamma-rays similar to other gamma-ray binaries which were also observed in the TeV gamma-rays (LS 5039 and LSI +61 303). The question appears whether Cyg X-3 can be also detected in the TeV gamma-rays by the Cherenkov telescopes. Here we discuss this problem in detail based on the anisotropic inverse Compton (IC) e-p pair cascade model successfully applied to TeV gamma-ray binaries. We calculate the gamma-ray light curves and gamma-ray spectra expected from the cascade process occurring inside the Cyg X-3 binary system. It is found that the gamma-ray light curves at GeV energies can be consistent with the gamma-ray light curve observed by the Fermi for reasonable parameters of the orbit of the injection source of relativistic electrons. Moreover, we show that in such a model the sub-TeV gamma-ray emission (above 100 GeV) is expect...

  16. Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    During the last decades, various classes of radio-loud active galactic nuclei have been established as sources of high-energy radiation extending over a very broad range from soft gamma-rays (photon energies E~MeV) up to very-high-energy gamma-rays (E>100 GeV). These include blazars of different types, as well as young and evolved radio galaxies. The observed gamma-ray emission from such implies efficient particle acceleration processes taking place in highly magnetized and relativistic jets produced by supermassive black holes, processes that have yet to be identified and properly understood. In addition, nearby starforming and starburst galaxies, some of which host radio-quiet Seyfert-type nuclei, have been detected in the gamma-ray range as well. In their cases, the observed gamma-ray emission is due to non-thermal activity in the interstellar medium, possibly including also a contribution from accretion disks and nuclear outflows. Finally, the high-energy emission from clusters of galaxies remains elusive...

  17. Reducing Statistical Noise in Airborne Gamma-Ray Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Jens; Grasty, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    By using the Noise Adjusted Singular Value Decomposition (NASVD) technique it is possible to reconstruct the measured airborne gamma-ray spectra with a noise content that is significant smaller than the noise contained in the original measured spectra. The method can be used for improving...

  18. Late Time Emission of Prompt Fission Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Talou, P; Stetcu, I; Lestone, J P; McKigney, E; Chadwick, M B

    2016-01-01

    The emission of prompt fission $\\gamma$ rays within a few nanoseconds to a few microseconds following the scission point is studied in the Hauser-Feshbach formalism applied to the deexcitation of primary excited fission fragments. Neutron and $\\gamma$-ray evaporations from fully accelerated fission fragments are calculated in competition at each stage of the decay, and the role of isomers in the fission products, before $\\beta$-decay, is analyzed. The time evolution of the average total $\\gamma$-ray energy, average total $\\gamma$-ray multiplicity, and fragment-specific $\\gamma$-ray spectra, is presented in the case of neutron-induced fission reactions of $^{235}$U and $^{239}$Pu, as well as spontaneous fission of $^{252}$Cf. The production of specific isomeric states is calculated and compared to available experimental data. About 7% of all prompt fission $\\gamma$ rays are predicted to be emitted between 10 nsec and 5 $\\mu$sec following fission, in the case of $^{235}$U and $^{239}$Pu $(n_{\\rm th},f)$ reactio...

  19. Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marisaldi, Martino, E-mail: marisaldi@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Fuschino, Fabio; Labanti, Claudio [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tavani, Marco [INAF-IASF Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Argan, Andrea [INAF, Viale del Parco Mellini 84, 00136 Roma (Italy); Del Monte, Ettore [INAF-IASF Roma, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Longo, Francesco; Barbiellini, Guido [Dipartimento di Fisica Università di Trieste and INFN Trieste, via A. Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Giuliani, Andrea [INAF-IASF Milano, Via Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Trois, Alessio [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, loc. Poggio dei Pini, strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy); Bulgarelli, Andrea; Gianotti, Fulvio; Trifoglio, Massimo [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-08-21

    Lightning and thunderstorm systems in general have been recently recognized as powerful particle accelerators, capable of producing electrons, positrons, gamma-rays and neutrons with energies as high as several tens of MeV. In fact, these natural systems turn out to be the highest energy and most efficient natural particle accelerators on Earth. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are millisecond long, very intense bursts of gamma-rays and are one of the most intriguing manifestation of these natural accelerators. Only three currently operative missions are capable of detecting TGFs from space: the RHESSI, Fermi and AGILE satellites. In this paper we review the characteristics of TGFs, including energy spectrum, timing structure, beam geometry and correlation with lightning, and the basic principles of the associated production models. Then we focus on the recent AGILE discoveries concerning the high energy extension of the TGF spectrum up to 100 MeV, which is difficult to reconcile with current theoretical models.

  20. Zeptosecond $\\gamma$-ray pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Klaiber, Michael; Keitel, Christoph H

    2007-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in the relativistic regime is employed to obtain zeptosecond pulses of $\\gamma$-rays. The harmonics are generated from atomic systems in counterpropagating strong attosecond laser pulse trains of linear polarization. In this setup recollisions of the ionized electrons can be achieved in the highly relativistic regime via a reversal of the commonly deteriorating drift and without instability of the electron dynamics such as in a standing laser wave. As a result, coherent attosecond $\\gamma$-rays in the 10 MeV energy range as well as coherent zeptosecond $\\gamma$-ray pulses of MeV photon energy for time-resolved nuclear spectroscopy become feasible.

  1. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  2. Material recognition using fission gamma rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)], E-mail: giuseppe.viesti@pd.infn.it; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon-Bolivar, Laboratorio Fisica Nuclear, Apartado 8900, 1080 A. Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Fabris, D. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Lunardon, M.; Moretto, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell' Universita di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G.; Pesente, S. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2009-07-21

    Material recognition is studied by measuring the transmission spectrum of {sup 252}Cf fission gamma rays in the energy range E{sub {gamma}}=0.1-5.5 MeV for 0.1-MeV-wide energy bins through a number of elementary samples. Each transmitted spectrum is compared with a library of reference spectra for different elements providing the possibility of material identification. In case of elemental samples with known thickness, this procedure allows the identification of the sample Z with uncertainty typically lower than 3 Z-units over a wide range of elements. Applications to composite materials are also reported.

  3. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  4. Gamma-ray Imaging Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetter, K; Mihailescu, L; Nelson, K; Valentine, J; Wright, D

    2006-10-05

    In this document we discuss specific implementations for gamma-ray imaging instruments including the principle of operation and describe systems which have been built and demonstrated as well as systems currently under development. There are several fundamentally different technologies each with specific operational requirements and performance trade offs. We provide an overview of the different gamma-ray imaging techniques and briefly discuss challenges and limitations associated with each modality (in the appendix we give detailed descriptions of specific implementations for many of these technologies). In Section 3 we summarize the performance and operational aspects in tabular form as an aid for comparing technologies and mapping technologies to potential applications.

  5. Multiwavelength Studies of gamma-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragona, Christina

    2011-01-01

    High mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) consist of an O or B star orbited by either a neutron star or a black hole. Of the 114 known Galactic HMXBs, a handful of these objects, dubbed gamma-ray binaries, have been observed to produce MeV-TeV emission. The very high energy emission can be produced either by accretion from the stellar wind onto a black hole or a collision between the stellar wind and a relativistic pulsar wind. Both these scenarios make gamma-ray binaries valuable nearby systems for studying the physics of shocks and jets. Currently, the nature of the compact object and the high energy production mechanism is unknown or unconfirmed in over half of these systems. My goal for this dissertation is to constrain the parameters describing two of these systems: LS 5039 and HD 259440. LS 5039 exhibits gamma-ray emission modulated with its orbital period. The system consists of an ON6.5V((f)) star and an unidentified compact companion. Using optical spectra from the CTIO 1.5m telescope, we found LS 5039 to have an orbital period of 3.90608 d and an eccentricity of 0.337. Spectra of the Halpha line observed with SOAR indicate a mass loss rate of ˜ 1.9x10 -8 M yr-1. Observations taken with ATCA at 13 cm, 6 cm, and 3 cm indicate radio fluxes between 10--40 mJy. The measurements show variability with time, indicating a source other than thermal emission from the stellar wind. HD 259440 is a B0pe star that was proposed as the optical counterpart to the gamma-ray source HESS J0632+057. Using optical spectra from the KPNO CF, KPNO 2.1m, and OHP telescopes, we find a best fit stellar effective temperature of 27500--30000 K, a log surface gravity of 3.75--4.0, a mass of 13.2--19.0 Msolar, and a radius of 6.0--9.6 Rsolar. By fitting the spectral energy distribution, we find a distance between 1.1--1.7 kpc. We do not detect any significant radial velocity shifts in our data, ruling out orbital periods shorter than one month. If HD 259440 is a binary, it is likely a long

  6. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  7. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  8. Study of X-Ray and $\\gamma$-Ray Spectra from Antiprotonic Atoms at the Slowly Extracted Antiproton Beam of LEAR

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment will study the X-ray spectra of antiprotonic atoms and the $\\gamma$ spectra of residual nuclei after the antiproton absorption. We intend to begin with measurements on selected isotopically pure targets. Strong interaction effects, the antiproton absorption and the atomic cascade are analysed through the measurement of energies, lineshapes, relative and absolute intensities of all observable lines. The experiments are continued to determine st in resolved fine structure levels and in different isotopes of the same element. Coincidence techniques may be applied. All components of the experimental set-up are already existing from previous experiments and we could begin the measurements with any slowly extracted beam of low energy at LEAR.

  9. Mechanism of spin diffusion in electron spin resonance spectra of trapped electrons in aqueous glasses. Electron--Electron double resonance studies. [. gamma. -rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, D.P.; Kevan, L.

    1977-05-19

    Electron--electron double resonance (ELDOR) has been used to test the validity of the noninteracting spin packet model for inhomogeneously broadened ESR lines. For trapped electrons in 10M NaOD/D/sub 2/O glassy ice the saturation of field-swept ELDOR spectra fits the above mentioned model in contrast to earlier work on trapped electrons in protiated matrices. In the protiated matrix spin diffusion produces significant interaction between the spin packets. The difference between the protiated and deuterated matrices suggests that nuclear relaxation is the mechanism for spin diffusion. The deuterated matrices show no structure in frequency-swept ELDOR spectra due to deuteron spin--flip transitions whereas structure due to proton spin--flips is seen in protiated matrices.

  10. TPASS: a gamma-ray spectrum analysis and isotope identification computer code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickens, J.K.

    1981-03-01

    The gamma-ray spectral data-reduction and analysis computer code TPASS is described. This computer code is used to analyze complex Ge(Li) gamma-ray spectra to obtain peak areas corrected for detector efficiencies, from which are determined gamma-ray yields. These yields are compared with an isotope gamma-ray data file to determine the contributions to the observed spectrum from decay of specific radionuclides. A complete FORTRAN listing of the code and a complex test case are given.

  11. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for Dark Matter Searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, A. M.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Boyarchuk, K. A.; Fradkin, M. I.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kachanov, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Leonov, A. A.; Longo, F.; Mazets, E. P.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P.; Mereminskiy, I. A.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons (+) positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma-rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is approximately 0.01deg (E(sub gamma) greater than 100 GeV), the energy resolution approximately 1% (E(sub gamma) greater than 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor approximately 10(exp 6). GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  12. Design and Performance of the GAMMA-400 Gamma-Ray Telescope for the Dark Matter Searches

    CERN Document Server

    Galper, A M; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Boyarchuk, K A; Fradkin, M I; Gusakov, Yu V; Kaplin, V A; Kachanov, V A; Kheymits, M D; Leonov, A A; Longo, F; Mazets, E P; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P; Mereminskiy, I A; Mikhailov, V V; Moiseev, A A; Mocchiutti, E; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Picozza, P; Rodin, V G; Runtso, M F; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Topchiev, N P; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G; Zirakashvili, V N

    2012-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, which can be produced by annihilation or decay of the dark matter particles, as well as to survey the celestial sphere in order to study point and extended sources of gamma rays, measure energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, gamma-ray bursts, and gamma-ray emission from the Sun. The GAMMA-400 covers the energy range from 100 MeV to 3000 GeV. Its angular resolution is ~0.01 deg (E{\\gamma} > 100 GeV), the energy resolution ~1% (E{\\gamma} > 10 GeV), and the proton rejection factor ~10E6. GAMMA-400 will be installed on the Russian space platform Navigator. The beginning of observations is planned for 2018.

  13. The Gamma-ray Sky with Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland, 20771 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Gamma rays reveal extreme, nonthermal conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been exploring the gamma-ray sky for more than four years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as clusters of galaxies. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance violation derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge gamma-ray structure in the direction of the center of our Galaxy, and strong constraints on some Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) models for dark matter.

  14. Cosmic Rays: What Gamma Rays Can Say

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We will review the main channels of gamma ray emission due to the acceleration and propagation of cosmic rays, discussing the cases of both galactic and extra-galactic cosmic rays and their connection with gamma rays observations.

  15. The Gamma-ray Universe through Fermi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Gamma rays, the most powerful form of light, reveal extreme conditions in the Universe. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and its smaller cousin AGILE have been exploring the gamma-ray sky for several years, enabling a search for powerful transients like gamma-ray bursts, novae, solar flares, and flaring active galactic nuclei, as well as long-term studies including pulsars, binary systems, supernova remnants, and searches for predicted sources of gamma rays such as dark matter annihilation. Some results include a stringent limit on Lorentz invariance derived from a gamma-ray burst, unexpected gamma-ray variability from the Crab Nebula, a huge ga.nuna-ray structure associated with the center of our galaxy, surprising behavior from some gamma-ray binary systems, and a possible constraint on some WIMP models for dark matter.

  16. Investigating Gamma-Ray Lines from Dark Matter with Future Observatories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Bergström; G. Bertone; J. Conrad; C. Farnier; C. Weniger

    2012-01-01

    We study the prospects for studying line features in gamma-ray spectra with upcoming gamma-ray experiments, such as HESS-II, the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), and the GAMMA-400 satellite. As an example we use the narrow feature at 130 GeV seen in public data from the Fermi-LAT satellite. We found

  17. Determination of correction factors for borehole natural gamma-ray measurements by Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M.; Hendriks, Peter; Limburg, J.; de Meijer, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of natural gamma-ray spectra measured in boreholes has to take into account borehole parameters such as the presence of casings and borehole diameter. For large, high-efficiency gamma-ray detectors, such as BGO-based systems, which employ full-spectrum data analysis, corresponding corre

  18. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog: Four Years of Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, D.; Goldstein, A.; Weller von Ahlefeld, V.; Bhat, N.P.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M.S.; Byrne, D.; Cleveland, W.H.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, M.; Giles, M.M.; Greiner, J.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Layden, E.; Lin, L.; Meegan, C.A.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W.S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.D.; Rau, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Xiong, S.; Younes, G.; Yu, H-F.

    2014-01-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 tri

  19. Prompt gamma-ray spectra measurement of typical sample in explosive detection%爆炸物检测中典型样品的瞬发γ谱测量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭海萍; 郑普; 安力; 王新华; 阳剑; 何铁; 杨小飞; 朱传新

    2013-01-01

    In research of explosive detection by neutron probe,the gamma rays was produced by 14 MeV neutron bombardment on the sample nucleus with atom numbers bigger than 5.The gamma spectra of typical elements,such as C,N,O and simulated explosive,were measured by associated particle technique (APT) and time of flight (TOF).The large NaI(Tl) detector with the dimension of φ12.5 cm×20 cm was used.The measured gamma spectra were compared with those of European Union (EU).The results show that both of the experiments were at the same level.%在中子检测爆炸物的研究中,利用14 MeV中子与原子序数大于5的原子核相互作用可产生特征γ射线的特性,采用伴随粒子法结合D-T中子飞行时间技术,使用尺寸为φ12.5 cm×20 cm的大体积NaI(Tl)探测器,对爆炸物所含元素C,N,O以及一些模拟炸药样品进行了瞬发γ谱测量.获得了几种典型样品的特征γ谱,并对其进行了分析.实验结果与欧盟同期结果进行了比较,表明本实验研究达到了目前国际同类实验的水平,可以为中子检测爆炸物识别技术提供实验支持.

  20. Gamma rays from dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Bringmann, Torsten

    2011-01-01

    A leading hypothesis for the nature of the elusive dark matter are thermally produced, weakly interacting massive particles that arise in many theories beyond the standard model of particle physics. Their self-annihilation in astrophysical regions of high density provides a potential means of indirectly detecting dark matter through the annihilation products, which nicely complements direct and collider searches. Here, I review the case of gamma rays which are particularly promising in this respect: distinct and unambiguous spectral signatures would not only allow a clear discrimination from astrophysical backgrounds but also to extract important properties of the dark matter particles; powerful observational facilities like the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope or upcoming large, ground-based Cherenkov telescope arrays will be able to probe a considerable part of the underlying, e.g. supersymmetric, parameter space. I conclude with a more detailed comparison of indirect and direct dark matter searches, showing...

  1. Gammapy - A Python package for {\\gamma}-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Donath, Axel; Arribas, Manuel P; King, Johannes; Owen, Ellis; Terrier, Régis; Reichardt, Ignasi; Harris, Jon; Bühler, Rolf; Klepser, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope arrays such as H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, as well as the Fermi-LAT space telescope have provided us with detailed images and spectra of the {\\gamma}-ray universe for the first time. Currently the {\\gamma}-ray community is preparing to build the next-generation Cherenkov Telecope Array (CTA), which will be operated as an open observatory. Gammapy (available at https://github.com/gammapy/gammapy under the open-source BSD li- cense) is a new in-development Astropy affiliated package for high-level analysis and simulation of astronomical {\\gamma}-ray data. It is built on the scientific Python stack (Numpy, Scipy, matplotlib and scikit-image) and makes use of other open-source astronomy packages such as Astropy, Sherpa and Naima to provide a flexible set of tools for {\\gamma}-ray astronomers. We present an overview of the current Gammapy features and example analyses on real as well as simulated {\\gamma}-ray datasets. We would like Gammapy to become a commu...

  2. The gamma ray background from large scale structure formation

    CERN Document Server

    Gabici, S; Gabici, Stefano; Blasi, Pasquale

    2003-01-01

    Hierarchical clustering of dark matter halos is thought to describe well the large scale structure of the universe. The baryonic component of the halos is shock heated to the virial temperature while a small fraction of the energy flux through the shocks may be energized through the first order Fermi process to relativistic energy per particle. It has been proposed that the electrons accelerated in this way may upscatter the photons of the universal microwave background to gamma ray energies and indeed generate a diffuse background of gamma rays that compares well to the observations. In this paper we calculate the spectra of the particles accelerated at the merger shocks and re-evaluate the contribution of structure formation to the extragalactic diffuse gamma ray background (EDGRB), concluding that this contribution adds up to at most 10% of the observed EDGRB.

  3. A new method for the reconstruction of very-high-energy gamma-ray spectra and application to galatic cosmic-ray accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Milton Virgilio

    2014-09-15

    In this thesis, high-energy (HE; E>0.1 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE; E>0.1 TeV) γ-ray data were investigated to probe Galactic stellar clusters (SCs) and star-forming regions (SFRs) as sites of hadronic Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) acceleration. In principle, massive SCs and SFRs could accelerate GCRs at the shock front of the collective SC wind fed by the individual high-mass stars. The subsequently produced VHE γ rays would be measured with imaging air-Cherenkov telescopes (IACTs). A couple of the Galactic VHE γ-ray sources, including those potentially produced by SCs, fill a large fraction of the field-of-view (FoV) and require additional observations of source-free regions to determine the dominant background for a spectral reconstruction. A new method of reconstructing spectra for such extended sources without the need of further observations is developed: the Template Background Spectrum (TBS). This methods is based on a method to generate skymaps, which determines background in parameter space. The idea is the creation of a look-up of the background normalisation in energy, zenith angle, and angular separation and to account for possible systematics. The results obtained with TBS and state-of-the-art background-estimation methods on H.E.S.S. data are in good agreement. With TBS even those sources could be reconstructed that normally would need further observations. Therefore, TBS is the third method to reconstruct VHE γ-ray spectra, but the first one to not need additional observations in the analysis of extended sources. The discovery of the largest VHE γ-ray source HESSJ1646-458 (2.2 in size) towards the SC Westerlund 1 (Wd1) can be plausibly explained by the SC-wind scenario. But owing to its size, other alternative counterparts to the TeV emission (pulsar, binary system, magnetar) were found in the FoV. Therefore, an association of HESSJ1646-458 with the SC is favoured, but cannot be confirmed. The SC Pismis 22 is located in the centre of the

  4. DUAL Gamma-Ray Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Boggs, S; von Ballmoos, P; Takahashi, T; Gehrels, N; Tueller, J; Baring, M; Beacom, J; Diehl, R; Greiner, J; Grove, E; Hartmann, D; Hernanz, M; Jean, P; Johnson, N; Kanbach, G; Kippen, M; Knödlseder, J; Leising, M; Madejski, G; McConnell, M; Milne, P; Motohide, K; Nakazawa, K; Oberlack, U; Phlips, B; Ryan, J; Skinner, G; Starrfield, S; Tajima, H; Wulf, E; Zoglauer, A; Zych, A

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray astronomy presents an extraordinary scientific potential for the study of the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. In order to take full advantage of this potential, the next generation of instrumentation for this domain will have to achieve an improvement in sensitivity over present technologies of at least an order of magnitude. The DUAL mission concept takes up this challenge in two complementary ways: a very long observation of the entire sky, combined with a large collection area for simultaneous observations of Type Ia SNe. While the Wide-Field Compton Telescope (WCT) accumulates data from the full gamma-ray sky (0.1-10 MeV) over the entire mission lifetime, the Laue-Lens Telescope (LLT) focuses on 56Co emission from SNe Ia (0.8-0.9 MeV), collecting gamma-rays from its large area crystal lens onto the WCT. Two separated spacecraft flying in formation will maintain the DUAL payloads at the lens' focal distance.

  5. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts the Four Crises

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some open problems concerning the origin and the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in light of recent developments. If GRBs originate at extragalactic distances, we are facing four crises: (1) an energy crisis, models have to account for more than 10^{53} ergs of energy emitted in the gamma-ray energy band; (2) a spectral crisis, emission models have to account for the surprising `smoothness' of GRB broad-band spectra, with no indication of the predicted spectral `distorsions' caused by inverse Compton scattering in large radiation energy density media, and no evidence for beaming; (3) an afterglow crisis, relativistic shock models have to explain the complexity of the afterglow behavior, the longevity of optical transients detectable up to six months after the burst, the erratic behavior of the radio emission, and the lack of evidence for substantial beaming as indicated by recent searches for GRB afterglows in the X-ray band; (4) a population crisis, from data clearly indicating that ...

  6. Measurements of gamma-ray production cross sections for shielding materials of space nuclear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orphan, V. J.; John, J.; Hoot, C. G.

    1972-01-01

    Measurements of secondary gamma ray production from neutron interactions have been made over the entire energy range of interest in shielding applications. The epithermal capture gamma ray yields for both resolved gamma ray lines and continuum have been measured from thermal energies to 100 KeV for natural tungsten and U-238, two important candidate shield materials in SNAP reactor systems. Data are presented to illustrate the variation of epithermal capture gamma ray yields with neutron energy. The gamma ray production cross sections from (n,xy) reactions have been measured for Fe and Al from the threshold energies for inelastic scattering to approximately 16 MeV. Typical Fe and Al cross sections obtained with high-neutron energy resolution and averaged over broad neutron-energy groups are presented.

  7. The development of a new edition of the gamma-ray spectrum catalogues designed for presentation in electronic format

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heath, R.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1997-11-01

    New editions of the original Gamma-ray Spectrum Catalogues are being prepared for publication in electronic format. The objective of this program is to produce versions of the Catalogues in CD-ROM format and as an Internet resource. Additions to the original content of the Catalogues will include integrated decay scheme drawings, tables of related decay data, and updated text on the techniques of gamma-ray spectrometry. Related decay data from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) are then added, and all data converted to the Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format for CD-ROM production and availability on the large-volume Ge detectors, alpha-particle spectra, prompt neutron capture and inelastic scattering gamma-ray spectra, and gross fission product spectra characteristic of fuel cycle waste materials. Characterization of radioactivity in materials is a requirement in many phases of radioactive waste management. Movement, shipping, treatment, all activities which involve handling of mixed waste or TRU categories of waste at all DOE sites will require that measurements and assessment documentation utilize basic nuclear data which are tracable to internationally accepted standard values. This program will involve the identification of data needs unique to the development and application of specialized detector systems for radioactive waste characterization. 8 refs., 8 figs.

  8. Fermi Large Area Telescope Measurements of the Diffuse Gamma-Ray Emission at Intermediate Galactic Latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A.A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; /SLAC; Anderson, B.; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Baughman, B.M.; /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R.D.; Bloom, E.D.; /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /George Mason U. /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Padua U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Pisa /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Udine U. /INFN, Trieste /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U.; /more authors..

    2012-04-11

    The diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission is produced by cosmic rays (CRs) interacting with the interstellar gas and radiation field. Measurements by the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory indicated excess {gamma}-ray emission {ge}1 GeV relative to diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission models consistent with directly measured CR spectra (the so-called 'EGRET GeV excess'). The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has measured the diffuse {gamma}-ray emission with improved sensitivity and resolution compared to EGRET. We report on LAT measurements for energies 100 MeV to 10 GeV and galactic latitudes 10{sup o} {le} |b| {le} 20{sup o}. The LAT spectrum for this region of the sky is well reproduced by a diffuse galactic {gamma}-ray emission model that is consistent with local CR spectra and inconsistent with the EGRET GeV excess.

  9. The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope characteristics. Angular resolution and electrons/protons separation

    CERN Document Server

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Boyarchuk, K A; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2014-01-01

    The measurements of gamma-ray fluxes and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV, which will be implemented by the specially designed GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope, concern with the following broad range of science topics. Searching for signatures of dark matter, surveying the celestial sphere in order to study gamma-ray point and extended sources, measuring the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, studying gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measuring spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons and nuclei up to the knee. To clarify these scientific problems with the new experimental data the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics comparing with previous and present experiments. For gamma-ray energies more than 100 GeV GAMMA-400 provides the energy resolution of ~1% and angular resolution better than 0.02 deg. The methods developed to reconstru...

  10. Neutron Capture Cross Sections and Gamma Emission Spectra from Neutron Capture on 234,236,238U Measured with DANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Mosby, S.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Kawano, T.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wu, C.-Y.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krticka, M.

    2014-05-01

    A new measurement of the 238U(n, γ) cross section using a thin 48 mg/cm2 target was made using the DANCE detector at LANSCE over the energy range from 10 eV to 500 keV. The results confirm earlier measurements. Measurements of the gamma-ray emission spectra were also made for 238U(n, γ) as well as 234,236U(n, γ). These measurements help to constrain the radiative strength function used in the cross-section calculations.

  11. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  12. Gravitational microlensing of gamma-ray blazars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    F. Torres, Diego; E. Romero, Gustavo; F. Eiroa, Ernesto;

    2003-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the effects of gravitational microlensing on compact and distant $\\gamma$-ray blazars. These objects have $\\gamma$-ray emitting regions which are small enough as to be affected by microlensing effects produced by stars lying in intermediate galaxies. We analyze...... the temporal evolution of the gamma-ray magnification for sources moving in a caustic pattern field, where the combined effects of thousands of stars are taken into account using a numerical technique. We propose that some of the unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources (particularly some of those lying at high...... galactic latitude whose gamma-ray statistical properties are very similar to detected $\\gamma$-ray blazars) are indeed the result of gravitational lensing magnification of background undetected Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs)....

  13. Gamma-Ray Astronomy Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Cannizzo, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades gamma-ray observations have become a valuable tool for studying the universe. Progress made in diverse 8re1lS such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), nucleosynthesis, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) has complimented and enriched our astrophysical understanding in many ways. We present an overview of current and future planned space y-ray missions and discussion technology needs for- the next generation of space gamma-ray instruments.

  14. Magnetars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucciantini, N

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, evidences for a long-lived and sustained engine in Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have increased the attention to the so called millisecond-magnetar model, as a competitive alternative to the standard collapsar scenario. I will review here the key aspects of the {\\it millisecond magnetar} model for Long Duration Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs). I will briefly describe what constraints, present observations put on any engine model, both in term of energetic, outflow properties, and the relation with the associated Supernova (SN). For each of these I will show how the millisecond magnetar model satisfies the requirements, what are the limits of the model, how can it be further tested, and what observations might be used to discriminate against it. I will also discuss numerical results that show the importance of the confinement by the progenitor star in explaining the formation of a collimated outflow, how a detailed model for the evolution of the central engine can be built, and show that a wide varie...

  15. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  16. An optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De la Torre, F.; Rios M, C.; Ruvalcaba A, M. G.; Mireles G, F.; Saucedo A, S.; Davila R, I.; Pinedo, J. L., E-mail: fta777@hotmail.co [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Centro Regional de Estudis Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    This work aims to obtain an optimum analysis sequence for environmental gamma-ray spectroscopy by means of Genie 2000 (Canberra). Twenty different analysis sequences were customized using different peak area percentages and different algorithms for: 1) peak finding, and 2) peak area determination, and with or without the use of a library -based on evaluated nuclear data- of common gamma-ray emitters in environmental samples. The use of an optimum analysis sequence with certified nuclear information avoids the problems originated by the significant variations in out-of-date nuclear parameters of commercial software libraries. Interference-free gamma ray energies with absolute emission probabilities greater than 3.75% were included in the customized library. The gamma-ray spectroscopy system (based on a Ge Re-3522 Canberra detector) was calibrated both in energy and shape by means of the IAEA-2002 reference spectra for software intercomparison. To test the performance of the analysis sequences, the IAEA-2002 reference spectrum was used. The z-score and the reduced {chi}{sup 2} criteria were used to determine the optimum analysis sequence. The results show an appreciable variation in the peak area determinations and their corresponding uncertainties. Particularly, the combination of second derivative peak locate with simple peak area integration algorithms provides the greater accuracy. Lower accuracy comes from the combination of library directed peak locate algorithm and Genie's Gamma-M peak area determination. (Author)

  17. Gamma-Ray Spectral States of Galactic Black Hole Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Grove, J E; Kroeger, R A; McNaron-Brown, K; Skibo, J G; Phlips, B F

    1998-01-01

    OSSE has observed seven transient black hole candidates: GRO J0422+32, GX339-4, GRS 1716-249, GRS 1009-45, 4U 1543-47, GRO J1655-40, and GRS 1915+105. Two gamma-ray spectral states are evident and, based on a limited number of contemporaneous X-ray and gamma-ray observations, these states appear to be correlated with X-ray states. The former three objects show hard spectra below 100 keV (photon number indices Gamma < 2) that are exponentially cut off with folding energy ~100 keV, a spectral form that is consistent with thermal Comptonization. This "breaking gamma-ray state" is the high-energy extension of the X-ray low, hard state. In this state, the majority of the luminosity is above the X-ray band, carried by photons of energy ~100 keV. The latter four objects exhibit a "power-law gamma-ray state" with a relatively soft spectral index (Gamma ~ 2.5-3) and no evidence for a spectral break. For GRO J1655-40, the lower limit on the break energy is 690 keV. GRS 1716-249 exhibits both spectral states, with th...

  18. Experiment Signal for Gamma-Ray Research of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galper, Arkady; Arkhangelskaja, Irene; Arkhangelsky, Andrey; Shustov, Alexander; Ulin, Sergey; Novikov, Alexander; Grachev, Viktor; Uteshev, Ziyaetdin; Petrenko, Denis; Vlasik, Konstantin; Krivova, Kira; Dmitrenko, Valery; Chernysheva, Irina

    Description as well as physical and technical characteristics of Scientific Instrument (SI) “Signal” are presented. This equipment will be installed onboard the spacecraft (SC) “Interhelioprobe” for researching the Sun and Heliosphere at close distance. “Signal” will be developed for study cosmic gamma-rays. It consists of Xenon Gamma-Spectrometer (XeGS), the anticoincidence scintillation system and the digital electronic module. XeGS is based on cylindrical pulse ionization chamber with Frisch grid filled with high pressure xenon. Anticoincidence system will be made of polystyrene organic scintillator and silicon photomultipliers. Digital electronic module provides analyzing and data processing, collecting measured gamma-ray spectra and communication with onboard systems of SC “Interhelioprobe”. Main “Signal” scientific tasks are: begin{itemize} Research of X-ray and gamma emission in lines and continuum in energy range 30 keV - 5 MeV; begin{itemize} Study of gamma-ray bursts with Galactic and Metagalactic origin; begin{itemize} Analysis of gamma-ray lines near the Earth and Venus; begin{itemize} Charged particle fluxes registration along the spacecraft trajectory.

  19. Shock Acceleration and Gamma-Ray Emitting Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Reynolds, S P; Grenier, I A; Goret, P; Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Reynolds, Stephen P; Grenier, Isabelle A.; Goret, Philippe

    1997-01-01

    Diffusive shock acceleration in the environs of a remnant's expanding shell is a popular candidate for the origin of SNR gamma-rays. In this paper, results from our study of non-linear effects in shock acceleration theory and their impact on the gamma-ray spectra of SNRs are presented. These effects describe the dynamical influence of the accelerated cosmic rays on the shocked plasma at the same time as addressing how the non-uniformities in the fluid flow force the distribution of the cosmic rays to deviate from pure power-laws. Such deviations are crucial to gamma-ray spectral determination. Our self-consistent Monte Carlo approach to shock acceleration is used to predict ion and electron distributions that spawn neutral pion decay, bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton emission components for SNRs. We demonstrate how the spatial and temporal limitations imposed by the expanding SNR shell quench acceleration above critical energies in the 500 GeV - 10 TeV range, thereby spawning gamma-ray spectral cutoffs that...

  20. A gamma-ray spectrometer system for fusion applications

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Kaschuck, Y A; Martin-Solis, J R; Portnov, D V

    2002-01-01

    A NaI scintillator spectrometer system for the measurement of gamma-ray spectra in tokamak discharges has been developed and installed on the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. Two NaI scintillators are viewing the plasma at two different angles with respect to the equatorial plane. The main features of the spectrometer system (energy range: 0.3-23 MeV) and of the unfolding technique used to restore physical spectra from the pulse-height distributions are described: a method of solution with regularisation for matrix equations of large size, allowing to process count distributions with significant statistical noise, has been developed. A dedicated software, portable to any platform, has been written both for the acquisition and the analysis of the spectra. The typical gamma-ray spectra recorded in hydrogen and deuterium discharges, also with additional heating, are presented and discussed; two components have been observed: (a) thick-target Bremsstrahlung gamma-rays produced by runaway electrons hitting the Inconel po...

  1. Origin of $\\gamma$ Ray Bursters

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, P

    1999-01-01

    The successful discovery of X-ray, optical and radio afterglows of GRB hasmade possible the identification of host galaxies at cosmological distances.The energy release inferred in these outbursts place them among the mostenergetic and violent events in the Universe. They are thought to be theoutcome of a cataclysmic stellar collapse or compact stellar merger, leading toa relativistically expanding fireball, in which particles are accelerated atshocks and produce nonthermal radiation. The substantial agreement betweenobservations and the theoretical predictions of the fireball shock modelprovide confirmation of the basic aspects of this scenario. Among recent issuesare the collimation of the outflow and its implications for the energetics, theproduction of prompt bright flashes at wavelenghts much longer than gamma-rays,the time structure of the afterglow, its dependence on the central engine orprogenitor system behavior, and the role of the environment on the afterglow.

  2. Prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kern, J. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique

    1996-11-01

    The paper deals with a brief description of the principles of prompt gamma-ray activation analysis (PGAA), with the detection of gamma-rays, the PGAA project at SINQ and with the expected performances. 8 figs., 3 tabs., 10 refs.

  3. Gamma ray spectroscopy with PPM resolving power

    CERN Document Server

    Börner, H; Mutti, P

    2002-01-01

    Applications of gamma-ray spectroscopy with ppm resolving power are presented. The extraordinary resolution allows via the Gamma Ray Induced Doppler broadening (GRID) technique to determine lifetimes of excited nuclear levels. This has contributed to important nuclear structure information. We report on the current status of the technique

  4. GAMMA-400 gamma-ray observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Topchiev, N P; Bonvicini, V; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bakaldin, A V; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dalkarov, O D; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Finetti, N; Gascon, D; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Martinez, M; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Paredes, J M; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Suchkov, S I; Taraskin, A A; Tavani, M; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Ward, J E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The energy range of GAMMA-400 is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 20 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 10E15 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For high-energy gamma rays with energy from 10 to 100 GeV, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution improves from 0.1{\\deg} to ~0.01{\\deg} and energy resolution from 3% to ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x10E5. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  5. Gamma-Ray Interactions for Reachback Analysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Myers, Steven Charles [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-02

    This presentation is a part of the DHS LSS spectroscopy training course and presents an overview of the following concepts: identification and measurement of gamma rays; use of gamma counts and energies in research. Understanding the basic physics of how gamma rays interact with matter can clarify how certain features in a spectrum were produced.

  6. Handbook on Mobile Gamma-ray Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Helle Karina; Korsbech, Uffe C C

    2003-01-01

    Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing......Basic physics and mathematics for Airborne and Car-borne Gamma-ray Spectrometry supplemented with practical examples and methods for advanced data processing...

  7. New possibilities for improving the accuracy of parameter calculations for cascade gamma-ray decay of heavy nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhovoj, A M; Khitrov, V A

    2001-01-01

    The level density and radiative strength functions which accurately reproduce the experimental intensity of two- step cascades after thermal neutron capture and the total radiative widths of the compound states were applied to calculate the total gamma-ray spectra from the (n,gamma) reaction. In some cases, analysis showed far better agreement with experiment and gave insight into possible ways in which these parameters need to be corrected for further improvement of calculation accuracy for the cascade gamma-decay of heavy nuclei.

  8. Calculations of gamma-ray spectral profiles of linear alkanes in the positron annihilation process

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, X G

    2014-01-01

    The positron-electron annihilation gamma-ray spectra of linear alkanes CnH2n+2 (n=1-12) have been studied systematically. A profile quality (PQ) parameter, is introduced to assess the agreement between the obtained theoretical profiles and the experimental measurements in the entire region of energy shift of the spectra. Together with the Doppler shift of the gamma-ray spectra, the two parameters,PQ and Doppler shift, are able to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the calculated gamma-ray spectra with respect to available experiment. Applying the recently developed docking model, the present study determines the positrophilic electrons for individual alkanes from which the gamma-ray spectral profiles are calculated. The results achieve an excellent agreement with experiment, not only with respect to the Doppler shift, but also with respect to the gamma-ray profiles in the photon energy region up to 5 keV. The study further calculates the gamma-ray spectra of other linear alkanes in the series without ...

  9. Instrumentation for gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertsch, David L.; Fichtel, Carl E.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of gamma-ray-telescope technology for ground, airborne, and space observations is surveyed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and graphs and tables of typical data. For the low- and medium-energy ranges, consideration is given to detectors and detector cooling systems, background-rejection methods, radiation damage, large-area detectors, gamma-ray imaging, data analysis, and the Compton-interaction region. Also discussed are the gamma-ray interaction process at high energies; multilevel automated spark-chamber gamma-ray telescopes; the Soviet Gamma-1 telescope; the EGRET instrument for the NASA Gamma-Ray Observatory; and Cerenkov, air-shower, and particle-detector instruments for the TeV and PeV ranges. Significant improvements in resolution and sensitivity are predicted for the near future.

  10. Gamma-ray pulsars: a gold mine

    CERN Document Server

    Grenier, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    The most energetic neutron stars, powered by their rotation, are capable of producing pulsed radiation from the radio up to gamma rays with nearly TeV energies. These pulsars are part of the universe of energetic and powerful particle accelerators, using their uniquely fast rotation and formidable magnetic fields to accelerate particles to ultra-relativistic speed. The extreme properties of these stars provide an excellent testing ground, beyond Earth experience, for nuclear, gravitational, and quantum-electrodynamical physics. A wealth of gamma-ray pulsars has recently been discovered with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. The energetic gamma rays enable us to probe the magnetospheres of neutron stars and particle acceleration in this exotic environment. We review the latest developments in this field, beginning with a brief overview of the properties and mysteries of rotation-powered pulsars, and then discussing gamma-ray observations and magnetospheric models in more detail.

  11. A separation of electrons and protons in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Leonov, A A; Bonvicini, V; Topchiev, N P; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, S; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Popov, A V; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Taraskin, A A; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern with the following scientific goals: search for signatures of dark matter, investigation of gamma-ray point and extended sources, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the active Sun, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons, protons, and nuclei up to the knee. The main components of cosmic rays are protons and helium nuclei, whereas the part of lepton component in the total flux is ~10E-3 for high energies. In present paper, the capability of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope to distinguish electrons and positrons from protons in cosmic rays is investigated. The individual contribution to the proton rejection is studied for each detector system of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray tel...

  12. High energy gamma-rays and hadrons at Mount Fuji

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenomori, M.; Nanjo, H.; Konishi, E.; Hotta, N.; Mizutani, K.; Kasahara, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Mikumo, E.; Sato, K.; Yuda, T.

    1985-01-01

    The energy spectra of high energy gamma-rays and hadrons were obtained by the emulsion chamber with 40 c.u. thickness at Mt. Fuji (3750 m). These results are compared with the Monte Carlo calculation based on the same model which is used in a family analysis. Our data are compatible with the model of heavy-enriched primary and scaling in the fragmentation region.

  13. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krtička, M.; Bečvář, F.

    2009-03-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF2 scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  14. Modifications of a method for low energy gamma-ray incident angle reconstruction in the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonov, A. A.; Galper, A. M.; Topchiev, N. P.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Egorov, A. E.; Glushkov, N. A.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Longo, F.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Picozza, P.; Runtso, M. F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zverev, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is designed to measure the gamma-ray fluxes in the energy range from ∼20 MeV to ∼1 TeV, performing a sensitive search for high-energy gamma-ray emission when annihilating or decaying dark matter particles. Such measurements will be also associated with the following scientific goals: searching for new and studying known Galactic and extragalactic discrete high-energy gamma-ray sources (supernova remnants, pulsars, accreting objects, microquasars, active galactic nuclei, blazars, quasars). It will be possible to study their structure with high angular resolution and measuring their energy spectra and luminosity with high-energy resolution; identify discrete gamma-ray sources with known sources in other energy ranges. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolutions for gamma rays above 10 GeV. The gamma-ray telescope angular and energy resolutions for the main aperture at 100-GeV gamma rays are ∼0.01% and ∼1%, respectively. The motivation of presented results is to improve physical characteristics of the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope in the energy range of ∼20-100 MeV, most unexplored range today. Such observations are crucial today for a number of high-priority problems faced by modern astrophysics and fundamental physics, including the origin of chemical elements and cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the applicability range of the fundamental laws of physics. To improve the reconstruction accuracy of incident angle for low-energy gamma rays the special analysis of topology of pair-conversion events in thin layers of converter performed. Choosing the pair-conversion events with more precise vertical localization allows us to obtain significantly better angular resolution in comparison with previous and current space and ground-based experiments. For 50-MeV gamma rays the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope angular resolution is better than 50.

  15. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Observations of Nova Lupus 2016 (ASASSN-16kt)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C. C.; Jean, P.; Shore, S. N.; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope performed a ~6-day Target of Opportunity (ToO) observation of Nova Lupus 2016 (ATel #9538, #9539, CBET #4322) that commenced on September 28. Considering earlier all-sky survey Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations as well, preliminary analysis indicates gamma-ray emission at ~2 sigma was detected around 1 to 2 days after the optical peak on September 25th (pre-validated AAVSO visual lightcurve; ATel #9550, CBET #4322) when the optical spectra show opaque ejecta, similar to previous gamma-ray detected novae (Fermi-LAT collaboration, 2014 Science 345, 554; Cheung et al. 2016 ApJ 826, 142).

  16. Measurements of high-energy {gamma}-rays with LaBr{sub 3}:Ce detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciemala, M. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)], E-mail: Michal.Ciemala@ifj.edu.pl; Balabanski, D. [INRNE, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, BG-1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Csatlos, M. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Daugas, J.M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon Cedex (France); Georgiev, G. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3-CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, Bat 104-108, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Gulyas, J. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Kmiecik, M. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Krasznahorkay, A. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lalkovski, S. [Faculty of Physics, University of Sofia, BG-1164 (Bulgaria); Lefebvre-Schuhl, A. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse (CSNSM), IN2P3-CNRS and Universite Paris-Sud, Bat 104-108, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Lozeva, R. [Instituut voor Kernen Stralingsfysica (IKS), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Maj, A. [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Vitez, A. [Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary)

    2009-09-01

    The full-energy peak efficiency calibration and the energy resolution measurements of the 2in.x2in.LaBr{sub 3}{gamma}-ray detector are presented for {gamma}-ray energies in the 700 keV-17.6 MeV range. Measurements were done using a combination of proton-capture nuclear reactions on {sup 27}Al, {sup 23}Na, {sup 39}K, {sup 7}Li and {sup 11}B for high-energy {gamma}-rays, and radioactive sources such as {sup 60}Co and {sup 152}Eu for the lowest energies. At high energies, two {gamma}-rays in a cascade from proton resonance capture were employed using Al, Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}, K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and LiBO{sub 2} targets. The obtained results were compared to the simulations performed using a GEANT4 code.

  17. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    Discovered serendipitously in the late 1960s, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are huge explosions of energy that happen at cosmological distances. They provide a grand physical playground to those who study them, from relativistic effects such as beaming, jets, shocks and blastwaves to radiation mechanisms such as synchrotron radiation to galatic and stellar populations and history. Through the Swift and Fermi space telescopes dedicated to observing GRBs over a wide range of energies (from keV to GeV), combined with accurate pinpointing that allows ground based follow-up observations in the optical, infrared and radio, a rich tapestry of GRB observations has emerged. The general picture is of a mysterious central engine (CE) probably composed of a black hole or neutron star that ejects relativistic shells of matter into intense magnetic fields. These shells collide and combine, releasing energy in "internal shocks" accounting for the prompt emission and flaring we see and the "external shock" or plowing of the first blastwave into the ambient surrounding medium has well-explained the afterglow radiation. We have developed a shell model code to address the question of how X-ray flares are produced within the framework of the internal shock model. The shell model creates randomized GRB explosions from a central engine with multiple shells and follows those shells as they collide, merge and spread, producing prompt emission and X-ray flares. We have also included a blastwave model, which can constrain X-ray flares and explain the origin of high energy (GeV) emission seen by the Fermi telescope. Evidence suggests that gamma-ray prompt emission and X-ray flares share a common origin and that at least some flares can only be explained by long-lasting central engine activity. We pay special attention to the time history of central engine activity, internal shocks, and observed flares. We calculate the gamma-ray (Swift/BAT band) and X-ray (Swift/XRT band) lightcurves for arbitrary

  18. Sensitivity of HAWC to gamma ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taboada, Ignacio; HAWC Collaboration

    2012-12-01

    HAWC is a ground based very high-energy gamma ray detector under construction in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m a.s.l. Higher altitude, improved design and a larger physical size used to reject CR background, make HAWC 10-20 times more sensitive than its predecessor Milagro. HAWC's large field of view, ~2sr, and over 90% duty cycle make it ideal to search for GRBs. We review the sensitivity of HAWC to GRBs with two independent data acquisition systems. We show that some of the brightest GRBs observed by Fermi LAT (e.g. GRB 090510) could result in >5 σ observation by HAWC. The observations (or limits) of GRBs by HAWC will provide information on the high-energy spectra of GRBs. The high-energy spectra will teach us about extra galactic background light, the Lorentz boost factor of the jets tha power GRBs and/or particle acceleration models of GRBs. Finally we present limits on > 10 GeV emission from GRB 111016B, recently studied with HAWC's engineering array VAMOS.

  19. Studying the WHIM with Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Branchini, E; Corsi, A; Martizzi, D; Amati, L; Herder, J W den; Galeazzi, M; Gendre, B; Kaastra, J; Moscardini, L; Nicastro, F; Ohashi, T; Paerels, F; Piro, L; Roncarelli, M; Takei, Y; Viel, M

    2009-01-01

    We assess the possibility to detect and characterize the physical state of the missing baryons at low redshift by analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra of the Gamma Ray Burst [GRB] afterglows, measured by a micro calorimeters-based detector with 3 eV resolution and 1000 cm2 effective area and capable of fast re-pointing, similar to that on board of the recently proposed X-ray satellites EDGE and XENIA. For this purpose we have analyzed mock absorption spectra extracted from different hydrodynamical simulations used to model the properties of the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium [WHIM]. These models predict the correct abundance of OVI absorption lines observed in UV and satisfy current X-ray constraints. According to these models space missions like EDGE and XENIA should be able to detect about 60 WHIM absorbers per year through the OVII line. About 45 % of these have at least two more detectable lines in addition to OVII that can be used to determine the density and the temperature of the gas. Systematic error...

  20. Perspectives of the GAMMA-400 space observatory for high-energy gamma rays and cosmic rays measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topchiev, N. P.; Galper, A. M.; Bonvicini, V.; Adriani, O.; Aptekar, R. L.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Bakaldin, A. V.; Bergstrom, L.; Berti, E.; Bigongiari, G.; Bobkov, S. G.; Boezio, M.; Bogomolov, E. A.; Bonechi, S.; Bongi, M.; Bottai, S.; Castellini, G.; Cattaneo, P. W.; Cumani, P.; Dalkarov, O. D.; Dedenko, G. L.; De Donato, C.; Dogiel, V. A.; Finetti, N.; Gorbunov, M. S.; Gusakov, Yu V.; Hnatyk, B. I.; Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplin, V. A.; Kaplun, A. A.; Kheymits, M. D.; Korepanov, V. E.; Larsson, J.; Leonov, A. A.; Loginov, V. A.; Longo, F.; Maestro, P.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Men'shenin, A. L.; Mikhailov, V. V.; Mocchiutti, E.; Moiseev, A. A.; Mori, N.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Naumov, P. Yu; Papini, P.; Pearce, M.; Picozza, P.; Rappoldi, A.; Ricciarini, S.; Runtso, M. F.; Ryde, F.; Serdin, O. V.; Sparvoli, R.; Spillantini, P.; Stozhkov, Yu I.; Suchkov, S. I.; Taraskin, A. A.; Tavani, M.; Tiberio, A.; Tyurin, E. M.; Ulanov, M. V.; Vacchi, A.; Vannuccini, E.; Vasilyev, G. I.; Yurkin, Yu T.; Zampa, N.; Zirakashvili, V. N.; Zverev, V. G.

    2016-02-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope is intended to measure the fluxes of gamma-rays and cosmic-ray electrons and positrons in the energy range from 100 MeV to several TeV. Such measurements concern the following scientific tasks: investigation of point sources of gamma-rays, studies of the energy spectra of Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, studies of gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun, as well as high precision measurements of spectra of high-energy electrons and positrons. Also the GAMMA- 400 instrument provides the possibility for protons and nuclei measurements up to knee. But the main goal for the GAMMA-400 mission is to perform a sensitive search for signatures of dark matter particles in high-energy gamma-ray emission. To fulfill these measurements the GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope possesses unique physical characteristics in comparison with previous and present experiments. The major advantage of the GAMMA-400 instrument is excellent angular and energy resolution for gamma-rays above 10 GeV. The GAMMA-400 experiment will be installed onboard of the Navigator space platform, manufactured by the NPO Lavochkin Association. The expected orbit will be a highly elliptical orbit (with apogee 300.000 km and perigee 500 km) with 7 days orbital period. An important profit of such an orbit is the fact that the full sky coverage will always be available for gamma ray astronomy.

  1. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Observations with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) have now been detected with four different orbiting spacecraft. The latest observations are being made with the scintillation detectors of Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi). Although this experiment was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations, surpassing those of the experiment that discovered TGFs, the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory. Launched in June 2008 from the Kennedy Space Center, the Fermi-GBM has been detecting about one TGF every four weeks. The thick bismuth germinate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM have now observed photon energies from TGFs at energies up to approx.40 MeV. Individual photons are detected with an absolute timing accuracy of 2 microsec. Unlike the BATSE instrument, the GBM data system allows higher counting rates to be recorded and deadtime characteristics are well-known and correctable; thus the saturation effects seen with BATSE are avoided. TGF pulses as narrow as approx.0.1ms have been observed with the GBM. Like BATSE (and unlike RHESSI) an on-board trigger is required to detect TGFs. The minimum time window for this trigger is 16ms. A trigger window this wide greatly reduces the number of detected TGFs, since they most often have a much shorter duration than this window, thus reducing the signal-to-background. New on-board trigger algorithms based on detected photon energies are about to be implemented; this should increase the number of TGF triggers. High-energy spectra from TGFs observed with Fermi-GBM will be described.

  2. On-line. gamma. -ray investigation of the /sup 14/N + /sup 27/Al reaction at 30 Mev/u

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charvet, A.; Beraud, R.; Duffait, R.; Ollivier, T.; Meyer, M.; Kossakowski, R.; Andre, S.; Barneoud, D.; Foin, C.; Genevey, J.

    1985-03-01

    The cross-sections of target-like residues following the /sup 14/N+/sup 27/Al reaction at 30 MeV/u have been measured from in-beam and radioactive ..gamma..-ray spectra. The recoil velocities of some fragments have been estimated from the ..gamma..-ray Doppler broadening.

  3. Prompt gamma-ray imaging for small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Libai

    Small animal imaging is recognized as a powerful discovery tool for small animal modeling of human diseases, which is providing an important clue to complete understanding of disease mechanisms and is helping researchers develop and test new treatments. The current small animal imaging techniques include positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission tomography (SPECT), computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasound (US). A new imaging modality called prompt gamma-ray imaging (PGI) has been identified and investigated primarily by Monte Carlo simulation. Currently it is suggested for use on small animals. This new technique could greatly enhance and extend the present capabilities of PET and SPECT imaging from ingested radioisotopes to the imaging of selected non-radioactive elements, such as Gd, Cd, Hg, and B, and has the great potential to be used in Neutron Cancer Therapy to monitor neutron distribution and neutron-capture agent distribution. This approach consists of irradiating small animals in the thermal neutron beam of a nuclear reactor to produce prompt gamma rays from the elements in the sample by the radiative capture (n, gamma) reaction. These prompt gamma rays are emitted in energies that are characteristic of each element and they are also produced in characteristic coincident chains. After measuring these prompt gamma rays by surrounding spectrometry array, the distribution of each element of interest in the sample is reconstructed from the mapping of each detected signature gamma ray by either electronic collimations or mechanical collimations. In addition, the transmitted neutrons from the beam can be simultaneously used for very sensitive anatomical imaging, which provides the registration for the elemental distributions obtained from PGI. The primary approach is to use Monte Carlo simulation methods either with the specific purpose code CEARCPG, developed at NC State University or with the general purpose

  4. Gamma-ray burst progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Levan, Andrew; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, ii) parameters derived from modeling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous an...

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, Andrew; Crowther, Paul; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-12-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; (i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, (ii) parameters derived from modelling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and (iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous and super-luminous supernovae to long and short GRBs.

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2005-01-01

    The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

  7. Atmospheric Cherenkov Gamma-ray Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Holder, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    The stereoscopic imaging atmospheric Cherenkov technique, developed in the 1980s and 1990s, is now used by a number of existing and planned gamma-ray observatories around the world. It provides the most sensitive view of the very high energy gamma-ray sky (above 30 GeV), coupled with relatively good angular and spectral resolution over a wide field-of-view. This Chapter summarizes the details of the technique, including descriptions of the telescope optical systems and cameras, as well as the most common approaches to data analysis and gamma-ray reconstruction.

  8. Unveiling the nature of the unidentified gamma-ray sources VI: gamma-ray blazar candidates in the WISH survey and their radio properties

    CERN Document Server

    Nori, M; Massaro, F; D'Abrusco, R; Paggi, A; Tosti, G; Funk, S

    2015-01-01

    According to the second Fermi LAT Catalog (2FGL), about one third of the gamma-ray sources listed have no assigned counterparts at lower energies. Many statistical methods have been developed to find proper counterparts for these sources. We explore the sky area covered at low radio frequency by Westerbork in the Southern Hemisphere (WISH) survey to search for blazar-like associations among the unidentified gamma-ray sources listed in the 2FGL (UGSs). Searching the WISH and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) radio surveys within the positional uncertainty regions of the 2FGL UGSs, we select as gamma-ray blazar candidates the radio sources characterized by flat radio spectra between 352 MHz and 1400 MHz. We propose new gamma-ray blazar associations for eight UGSs and we also discuss their spectral properties at low radio frequencies. We compare the radio flux density distribution of the low radio frequency gamma-ray blazar candidates with that of gamma-ray blazars associated with other methods. We find significant dif...

  9. A mobile gamma ray spectrometer system for nuclear hazard mapping

    CERN Document Server

    Smethurst, M A

    2000-01-01

    The Geological Survey of Norway has developed a system for mobile gamma ray spectrometer surveying suitable for use in nuclear emergencies where potentially dangerous radioactive materials have been released into the environment. The measuring system has been designed for use with different kinds of transportation platforms. These include fixed-wing aircraft, helicopters and vans. The choice of transportation platform depends on the nature of the nuclear emergency. Widespread fallout from a distant source can be mapped quickly from the air while local sources of radiation can be delineated by a car-borne system. The measuring system processes gamma ray spectra in real time. The operator of the system is therefore able to guide surveying in accordance with meaningful data values and immediately report these values to decision making The operator is presented with a number of different displays suited to different kinds of nuclear emergencies that lead to more efficient surveying. Real time processing of data m...

  10. High Energy Gamma-rays from Globular Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sitarek, W B J

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that specific globular clusters can contain up to a hundred of millisecond pulsars. These pulsars can accelerate leptons at the shock waves originated in collisions of the pulsar winds and/or inside the pulsar magnetospheres. Energetic leptons diffuse gradually through the globular cluster comptonizing stellar and microwave background radiation. We calculate the GeV-TeV $\\gamma$-ray spectra for different models of injection of leptons and parameters of the globular clusters assuming reasonable, of the order of 1%, efficiency of energy conversion from the pulsar winds into the relativistic leptons. It is concluded that leptons accelerated in the globular cluster cores should produce well localized $\\gamma$-ray sources which are concentric with these globular clusters. The results are shown for four specific globular clusters (47 Tuc, Ter 5, M13, and M15), in which significant population of millisecond pulsars have been already discovered. We argue that the best candidates, which might be potenti...

  11. GAMMA-RAY AND X-RAY EMISSION FROM GAMMA-RAY-LOUD BLAZARS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XIONG; ZHAO GANG; XIE GUANG-ZHONG; ZHENG GUANG-SHENG; ZHANG LI

    2001-01-01

    We present a strong correlation of the gamma-ray (above 100 MeV) mean spectral indices aγ and X-ray (1 keV)mean spectral indices cX for 34 gamma-ray-loud blazars (16 BL Lac objects and 18 flat spectrum radio quasars). Astrong correlation is also found between the gamma-ray flux densities F-γ and X-ray flux densities Fx in the low state for 47 blazars (17 BL Lac and 30 flat spectrum radio quasars). Possible correlation on the gamma-ray emission mechanism is discussed. We suggest that the main gamma-ray radiation mechanism is probably the synchrotron process. The gamma-ray emission may be somewhat different from that of BL Lac objects and flat spectrum radio quasars.

  12. Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pe'er, Asaf

    2016-01-01

    A major breakthrough in our understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) prompt emission physics occurred in the last few years, with the realization that a thermal component accompanies the over-all non-thermal prompt spectra. This thermal part is important by itself, as it provides direct probe of the physics in the innermost outflow regions. It further has an indirect importance, as a source of seed photons for inverse-Compton scattering, thereby it contributes to the non-thermal part as well. In this short review, we highlight some key recent developments. Observationally, although so far it was clearly identified only in a minority of bursts, there are indirect evidence that thermal component exists in a very large fraction of GRBs, possibly close to 100%. Theoretically, the existence of thermal component have a large number of implications as a probe of underlying GRB physics. Some surprising implications include its use as a probe of the jet dynamics, geometry and magnetization.

  13. Gamma-Ray Astrophysics NSSTC Fermi GBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is not a pointed or imaging instrument. To determine fluxes for known sources, we measure the change in the count rate...

  14. Supernova remnants and gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Combi, J A; Butt, Y M; Torres, Diego F.; Romero, Gustavo E.; Dame, Thomas M.; Combi, Jorge A.; Butt, Yousaf M.

    2003-01-01

    A review of the possible relationship between $\\gamma$-ray sources and supernova remnants (SNRs) is presented. Particular emphasis is given to the analysis of the observational status of the problem of cosmic ray acceleration at SNR shock fronts. All positional coincidences between SNRs and unidentified $\\gamma$-ray sources listed in the Third EGRET Catalog at low Galactic latitudes are discussed on a case by case basis. For several coincidences of particular interest, new CO(J=1-0) and radio continuum maps are shown, and the mass content of the SNR surroundings is determined. The contribution to the $\\gamma$-ray flux observed that might come from cosmic ray particles (particularly nuclei) locally accelerated at the SNR shock fronts is evaluated. We discuss the prospects for future research in this field and remark on the possibilities for observations with forthcoming $\\gamma$-ray instruments.

  15. Searching for Gamma-Ray Blazar Candidates Among the Unidentified INTEGRAL Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; /SLAC; Paggi, A.; D' Abrusco, R.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Tosti, G.; /Perugia U.

    2012-04-02

    The identification of low-energy counterparts for {gamma}-ray sources is one of the biggest challenge in modern {gamma}-ray astronomy. Recently, we developed and successfully applied a new association method to recognize {gamma}-ray blazar candidates that could be possible counterparts for the unidentified {gamma}-ray sources above 100 MeV in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) catalog (2FGL). This method is based on the Infrared (IR) colors of the recent Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) all-sky survey. In this letter we applied our new association method to the case of unidentified INTEGRAL sources (UISs) listed in the fourth soft gamma-ray source catalog (4IC). Only 86 UISs out of the 113 can be analyzed, due to the sky coverage of the WISE Preliminary data release. Among these 86 UISs, we found that 18 appear to have a {gamma}-ray blazar candidate within their positional error region. Finally, we analyzed the Swift archival data available for 10 out these 18 {gamma}-ray blazar candidates, and we found that 7 out of 10 are clearly detected in soft X-rays and/or in the optical-ultraviolet band. We cannot confirm the associations between the UISs and the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates due to the discrepancies between the INTEGRAL and the soft X-ray spectra. However, the discovery of the soft X-ray counterparts for the selected {gamma}-ray blazar candidates adds an important clue to help understand their origin and to confirm their blazar nature.

  16. Soft gamma rays from heavy WIMPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Manuel Ernst; Opferkuch, Toby; Staub, Florian; Winkler, Martin Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    We propose an explanation of the galactic center gamma ray excess by supersymmetric WIMPs as heavy as 500 GeV. The lightest neutralino annihilates into vector-like leptons or quarks which cascade decay through intermediate Higgs bosons. Due to the long decay chains, the gamma ray spectrum is much softer than naively expected and peaks at GeV energies. The model predicts correlated diboson and dijet signatures to be tested at the LHC.

  17. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  18. Inverse Compton gamma-ray models for remnants of Galactic type Ia supernovae?

    CERN Document Server

    Völk, H J; Berezhko, E G

    2008-01-01

    We theoretically and phenomenologically investigate the question whether the gamma-ray emission from the remnants of the type Ia supernovae SN 1006, Tycho's SN and Kepler's SN can be the result of electron acceleration alone. The observed synchrotron spectra of the three remnants are used to determine the average momentum distribution of nonthermal electrons as a function of the assumed magnetic field strength. Then the inverse Compton emission spectrum in the Cosmic Microwave Background photon field is calculated and compared with the existing upper limits for the very high energy gamma-ray flux from these sources. It is shown that the expected interstellar magnetic fields substantially overpredict even these gamma-ray upper limits. Only rather strongly amplified magnetic fields could be compatible with such low gamma-ray fluxes. However this would require a strong component of accelerated nuclear particles whose energy density substantially exceeds that of the synchrotron electrons, compatible with existing...

  19. An Overview of the XGAM Code and Related Software for Gamma-ray Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-11-13

    The XGAM spectrum-fitting code and associated software were developed specifically to analyze the complex gamma-ray spectra that can result from neutron-induced reactions. The XGAM code is designed to fit a spectrum over the entire available gamma-ray energy range as a single entity, in contrast to the more traditional piecewise approaches. This global-fit philosophy enforces background continuity as well as consistency between local and global behavior throughout the spectrum, and in a natural way. This report presents XGAM and the suite of programs built around it with an emphasis on how they fit into an overall analysis methodology for complex gamma-ray data. An application to the analysis of time-dependent delayed gamma-ray yields from 235U fission is shown in order to showcase the codes and how they interact.

  20. The Space-Based Gamma-Ray Telescope GAMMA-400 and Its Scientific Goals

    CERN Document Server

    Galper, A M; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Avanesov, G A; Bergstrom, L; Bogomolov, E A; Boezio, M; Bonvicini, V; Boyarchuk, K A; Dogiel, V A; Gusakov, Yu V; Fradkin, M I; Fuglesang, Ch; Hnatyk, B I; Kachanov, V A; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Suchkov, S I; Tavani, M; Topchiev, N P; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasiliev, G I; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zarikashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2013-01-01

    The design of the new space-based gamma-ray telescope GAMMA-400 is presented. GAMMA-400 is optimized for the energy 100 GeV with the best parameters: the angular resolution ~0.01 deg, the energy resolution ~1%, and the proton rejection factor ~10E6, but is able to measure gamma-ray and electron + positron fluxes in the energy range from 100 MeV to 10 TeV. GAMMA-400 is aimed to a broad range of science topics, such as search for signatures of dark matter, studies of Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources, Galactic and extragalactic diffuse emission, gamma-ray bursts, as well as high-precision measurements of spectra of cosmic-ray electrons + positrons, and nuclei.

  1. Gamma-ray upper limits on magnetars with 6 years of Fermi-LAT observations

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian; Torres, Diego F; de Ona-Wilhelmi, Emma

    2016-01-01

    We report on the search for gamma-ray emission from 20 magnetars using 6 years of Fermi, Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations. No significant evidence for gamma-ray emission from any of the currently-known magnetars is found. We derived the most stringent upper limits to date on the 0.1--10 GeV emission of Galactic magnetars, which are estimated between $\\sim10^{-12}-10^{-11}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$. Gamma-ray pulsations were searched for the four magnetars having reliable ephemerides over the observing period, but none were detected. On the other hand, we also studied the gamma-ray morphology and spectra of seven Supernova Remnants associated or adjacent to the magnetars.

  2. Removal cross sections and total mass attenuation coefficients of fast neutrons and gamma rays for steel

    CERN Document Server

    Elsayed, A A

    2003-01-01

    The present work deals with the study of the attenuation properties and determination of the cross sections of fast neutrons and gamma rays for structure steel used in different applications in nuclear power plants, particle accelerators, research reactors and different radiation attenuation fields. Investigation has been performed by measuring the transmitted fast neutron and gamma ray spectra behind cylindrical samples of steel (rho=7.87 gem sup - sup 3) of different thicknesses. A reactor collimated beam and neutron - gamma spectrometer with stiblbene scintillator were used for measurements. The pluse shape disriminate technique based on zero cross over method was used to discriminate between neutron and gamma ray pulses. Effective removal cross-section (sigma sub R) and total mass attenuation coefficient (mu) of neureons and gamma rays have been achieved using the attenuation relations. Microscopic removal cross sections sigma sup 9 sup 8 and mass removal cross sections sigma sub R sub / subrho of fast ne...

  3. Monitoring radioactive plumes by airborne gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasty, R.L. [Exploranium, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Hovgaard, J. [Danish Emergency Management Agency, Birkerod (Germany); Multala, J. [Geological Survey of Finland, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-06-01

    Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer surveys using large volume sodium-iodide detectors are routinely flown throughout the world for mineral exploration and geological mapping. Techniques have now been developed to detect and map man-made sources of radiation. In Canada, airborne gamma-rays surveys have been flown around nuclear reactors to map {sup 41}Ar plumes from nuclear reactors and to calculate the dose rate at ground level. In May 1986, the Finnish Geological survey aircraft flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. As the aircraft flew through the plume, the aircraft became increasingly contaminated. By measuring the final aircraft contamination, the activity of the plume could be separated from the contamination due to the aircraft. Within 1 h of encountering the plume, the aircraft activity was comparable to the maximum levels found in the plume. From an analysis of the gamma-ray spectra, the concentration of {sup 131}I and {sup 140}La within the plume were calculated as a function of time.

  4. Gamma photometric redshifts for long gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bagoly, Z; Mészáros, A; Mészáros, P; Horváth, I; Balázs, L G; Vavrek, R

    2003-01-01

    It is known that the soft tail of the gamma-ray bursts' spectra show excesses from the exact power-law dependence. In this article we show that this departure can be detected in the peak flux ratios of different BATSE DISCSC energy channels. This effect allows to estimate the redshift of the bright long gamma-ray bursts in the BATSE Catalog. A verification of these redshifts is obtained for the 8 GRB which have both BATSE DISCSC data and measured optical spectroscopic redshifts. There is good correlation between the measured and esti redshifts, and the average error is $\\Delta z \\approx 0.33$. The method is similar to the photometric redshift estimation of galaxies in the optical range, hence it can be called as "gamma photometric redshift estimation". The estimated redshifts for the long bright gamma-ray bursts are up to $z \\simeq 4$. For the the faint long bursts - which should be up to $z \\simeq 20$ - the redshifts cannot be determined unambiguously with this method.

  5. Active galactic nuclei at gamma-ray energies

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, Charles Dennison

    2016-01-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei can be copious extragalactic emitters of MeV-GeV-TeV gamma rays, a phenomenon linked to the presence of relativistic jets powered by a super-massive black hole in the center of the host galaxy. Most of gamma-ray emitting active galactic nuclei, with more than 1500 known at GeV energies, and more than 60 at TeV energies, are called "blazars". The standard blazar paradigm features a jet of relativistic magnetized plasma ejected from the neighborhood of a spinning and accreting super-massive black hole, close to the observer direction. Two classes of blazars are distinguished from observations: the flat-spectrum radio-quasar class (FSRQ) is characterized by strong external radiation fields, emission of broad optical lines, and dust tori. The BL Lac class (from the name of one of its members, BL Lacertae) corresponds to weaker advection-dominated flows with gamma-ray spectra dominated by the inverse Compton effect on synchrotron photons. This paradigm has been very successful for modeling t...

  6. Modeling of Pulses in Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Celestin, Sebastien; Pasko, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) are high-energy photon bursts originating from the Earth's atmosphere that are associated with lightning activities. After their discovery in 1994 by the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) detector aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory [Fishman et al., Science, 264, 1313, 1994], this phenomenon has been further observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) [Smith et al., Science, 307, 1085, 2005], the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope [Briggs et al., JGR, 115, A07323, 2010] and the Astrorivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE) satellite [Marisaldi et al., JGR, 115, A00E13, 2010]. Photon spectra corresponding to the mechanism of relativistic runaway electron avalanches (RREAs) usually provide a very good agreement with satellite observations [Dwyer and Smith, GRL, 32, L22804, 2005]. On the other hand, Celestin and Pasko [JGR, 116, A03315, 2011] have shown theoretically that the large flux of thermal runaway electrons generated by streamers during the negative corona flash stage of stepping lightning leaders in intracloud lightning flashes could be responsible for TGFs. Recently, based on analysis of the temporal profiles of 278 TGF events observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor, Foley et al. [JGR, 119, 5931, 2014] have suggested that 67% of TGF pulses detected are asymmetric and these asymmetric pulses are consistent with the production mechanism of TGFs by relativistic feedback discharges. In the present work, we employ a Monte Carlo model to study the temporal distribution of photons at low-orbit satellite altitudes during TGF events. Using the pulse fitting method described in [Foley et al., 2014], we further investigate the characteristics of TGF pulses. We mainly focus on the effects of Compton scattering on the symmetry properties and the rise and fall times of TGF pulses.

  7. The relativistic feedback discharge model of terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2012-02-01

    As thunderclouds charge, the large-scale fields may approach the relativistic feedback threshold, above which the production of relativistic runaway electron avalanches becomes self-sustaining through the generation of backward propagating runaway positrons and backscattered X-rays. Positive intracloud (IC) lightning may force the large-scale electric fields inside thunderclouds above the relativistic feedback threshold, causing the number of runaway electrons, and the resulting X-ray and gamma ray emission, to grow exponentially, producing very large fluxes of energetic radiation. As the flux of runaway electrons increases, ionization eventually causes the electric field to discharge, bringing the field below the relativistic feedback threshold again and reducing the flux of runaway electrons. These processes are investigated with a new model that includes the production, propagation, diffusion, and avalanche multiplication of runaway electrons; the production and propagation of X-rays and gamma rays; and the production, propagation, and annihilation of runaway positrons. In this model, referred to as the relativistic feedback discharge model, the large-scale electric fields are calculated self-consistently from the charge motion of the drifting low-energy electrons and ions, produced from the ionization of air by the runaway electrons, including two- and three-body attachment and recombination. Simulation results show that when relativistic feedback is considered, bright gamma ray flashes are a natural consequence of upward +IC lightning propagating in large-scale thundercloud fields. Furthermore, these flashes have the same time structures, including both single and multiple pulses, intensities, angular distributions, current moments, and energy spectra as terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and produce large current moments that should be observable in radio waves.

  8. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Diehl

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at ~MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from β-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured though 56Ni, 56Co, and 44Ti lines, and a beginning has thus been made to complement conventional supernova observations with such measurements of the prime energy sources of supernova light created in their deep interiors. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massive-star nucleosynthesis in gamma rays is now being exploited towards astrophysical studies on how massive stars feed back their energy and ejecta into interstellar gas, as part of the cosmic cycle of matter through generations of stars enriching the interstellar gas and stars with metals. Large interstellar cavities and superbubbles have been recognised to be the dominating structures where new massive-star ejecta are injected, from 26Al gamma-ray spectroscopy. Also, constraints on the complex interiors of stars derive from the ratio of 60Fe/26Al gamma rays. Finally, the puzzling bulge-dominated intensity distribution of positron annihilation gamma rays is measured in greater detail, but still not understood; a recent microquasar flare provided evidence that such objects may be prime sources for positrons in interstellar space, rather than

  9. On the difference between gamma-ray-detected and non-gamma-ray-detected pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Rookyard, Simon C; Johnston, Simon; Kerr, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    We compare radio profile widths of young, energetic gamma-ray-detected and non-gamma-ray-detected pulsars. We find that the latter typically have wider radio profiles, with the boundary between the two samples exhibiting a dependence on the rate of rotational energy loss. We also find that within the sample of gamma-ray-detected pulsars, radio profile width is correlated with both the separation of the main gamma-ray peaks and the presence of narrow gamma-ray components. These findings lead us to propose that these pulsars form a single population where the main factors determining gamma ray detectability are the rate of rotational energy loss and the proximity of the line of sight to the rotation axis. The expected magnetic inclination angle distribution will be different for radio pulsars with and without detectable gamma rays, naturally leading to the observed differences. Our results also suggest that the geometry of existing radio and outer-magnetosphere gamma-ray emission models are at least qualitative...

  10. Gamma-Ray Pulsars Expected in the Outer Gap Model of Gamma-Ray Emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 吴杰; 姜泽军; 梅冬成

    2003-01-01

    We study the possibility of high-energy gamma-ray emission from the known 1130 radio pulsars based on the outer gap model of high-energy emission from pulsars. We estimate the fractional size of outer gap, the integrated flux, the gamma-ray luminosity for each known radio pulsar, and find that only 14% of the known radio pulsars are gamma-ray emitters according to the outer gap model. In the sample of possible 156 gamma-ray pulsars, our statistical analysis indicates that the distributions of the spin-down powers and the ages of these pulsars concentrate mainly on 1033.5-1039 erg/s and 103-107 y, respectively. The predictions of gamma-ray pulsars detected by the AGILE and GLAST missions are given.

  11. Gamma-Ray Lenses for Astrophysics-and the Gamma-Ray Imager Mission GRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wunderer, C. B.; Ballmoos, P. V.; Barriere, N.

    2009-01-01

    Observations of the gamma-ray sky reveal the most powerful sources and the most violent events in the Universe. While at lower wavebands the observed emission is generally dominated by thermal processes, the gamma-ray sky provides us with a view on the non-thermal Universe. Here particles...... are accelerated to extreme relativistic energies by mechanisms which are still poorly understood, and nuclear reactions are synthesizing the basic constituents of our world. Cosmic accelerators and cosmic explosions are major science themes that are addressed in the gamma-ray regime. While Fermi will take......, albeit at much more modest sensitivities. There will be clearly a growing need to perform deeper, more focused investigations of gamma-ray sources in the 100-keV to MeV regime. Recent technological advances in the domain of gamma-ray focusing using Lane diffraction and multilayer-coated mirror techniques...

  12. The Infrared-Gamma-Ray Connection: A WISE View of the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Massaro, F

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the WISE all-sky survey we discovered that the non-thermal infrared (IR) emission of blazars, the largest known population of extragalactic gamma-ray sources, has peculiar spectral properties. In this work, we confirm and strengthen our previous analyses using the latest available releases of both the WISE and the Fermi source catalogs. We also show that there is a tight correlation between the mid-IR colors and the gamma-ray spectral index of Fermi blazars. We name this correlation "the infrared--gamma-ray connection". We discuss how this connection links both the emitted powers and the spectral shapes of particles accelerated in jets arising from blazars over ten decades in energy. Based on this evidence, we argue that the infrared--gamma-ray connection is stronger than the well known radio--gamma-ray connection.

  13. Gamma-Ray Astronomy from the Ground

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, D

    2016-01-01

    The observation of cosmic gamma-rays from the ground is based upon the detection of gamma-ray initiated air showers. At energies between approximately $10^{11}$ eV and $10^{13}$ eV, the imaging air Cherenkov technique is a particularly successful approach to observe gamma-ray sources with energy fluxes as low as $\\approx 10^{-13}$ erg\\,cm$^{-2}\\,$s$^{-1}$. The observations of gamma-rays in this energy band probe particle acceleration in astrophysical plasma conditions and are sensitive to high energy phenomena beyond the standard model of particle physics (e.g., self-annihilating or decaying dark matter, violation of Lorentz invariance, mixing of photons with light pseudo-scalars). The current standing of the field and its major instruments are summarised briefly by presenting selected highlights. A new generation of ground based gamma-ray instruments is currently under development. The perspectives and opportunities of these future facilities will be discussed.

  14. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ < z < $6, using deep survey galaxy observations from Spitzer, Hubble and GALEX and have consequently predicted spectral absorption features for extragalactic gamma-ray sources. This procedure can also be reversed. Determining the cutoff energies of gamma-ray sources with known redshifts using the recently launched Fermi gamma-ray space telescope may enable a more precise determination of the IBL photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  15. A spectral study of gamma-ray emitting active galactic nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Hartman, R.C.; Jones, B.B.;

    1997-01-01

    In this paper we present a statistical analysis of the gamma-ray spectra of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQ) compared to those of BL Lacs. The average spectra and possible systematic deviations from power-law behaviour are investigated by summing up the intensity and the power-law fit statistic...... is not a one component spectrum....

  16. Design of a Multi-Channel Ultra-High Resolution Superconducting Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S; Terracol, S F; Miyazaki, T; Drury, O B; Ali, Z A; Cunningham, M F; Niedermayr, T R; Barbee Jr., T W; Batteux, J D; Labov, S E

    2004-11-29

    Superconducting Gamma-ray microcalorimeters operated at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K offer an order of magnitude improvement in energy resolution over conventional high-purity Germanium spectrometers. The calorimeters consist of a {approx}1 mm{sup 3} superconducting or insulating absorber and a sensitive thermistor, which are weakly coupled to a cold bath. Gamma-ray capture increases the absorber temperature in proportion to the Gamma-ray energy, this is measured by the thermistor, and both subsequently cool back down to the base temperature through the weak link. We are developing ultra-high-resolution Gamma-ray spectrometers based on Sn absorbers and superconducting Mo/Cu multilayer thermistors for nuclear non-proliferation applications. They have achieved an energy resolution between 60 and 90 eV for Gamma-rays up to 100 keV. We also build two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for user-friendly detector operation at 0.1 K. We present recent results on the performance of single pixel Gamma-ray spectrometers, and discuss the design of a large detector array for increased sensitivity.

  17. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  18. Radial distribution of the diffuse gamma-ray emissivity in the galactic disk

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Rui-zhi; Evoli, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi-LAT data accumulated over 7 years of {\\gamma}-ray observations, together with the high resolution gas (CO & HI) and the dust opacity maps, are used to study the emissivity of {\\gamma}-rays induced by interactions of cosmic rays (CRs) with the interstellar medium. Based on the dust opacity templates, the {\\gamma}-ray emissivity was measured for 36 segments of the Galactic plane. Furthermore, the {\\gamma}-ray emissivity was evaluated in six Galactocentric rings. Both the absolute emissivity and the energy spectra of {\\gamma}-rays derived in the interval 0.2-100 GeV show significant variations along the galactic plane. The density of CRs, derived under the assumption that {\\gamma}-rays are predominately produced in CR interactions with the interstellar gas, is characterised by a strong radial dependence. In the inner Galaxy the CR density substantially exceeds the density in the outer parts of the Galaxy: by a factor of a few at 10 GeV, and by more than an order of magnitude at 1 TeV. Remarkably, t...

  19. Frequency spectrum analysis for spectrum stabilization in airborne gamma-ray spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guoqiang; Tan, Chengjun; Ge, Liangquan; Zhang, Qingxian; Gu, Yi

    2014-02-01

    Abnormal multi-crystal spectral drifts often can be observed when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer. Currently, these spectral drifts of each crystal are generally eliminated through manual adjustment, which is time-consuming and labor-ineffective. To realize this quick automatic spectrum stabilization of multi-crystal, a frequency spectrum analysis method for natural gamma-ray background spectrum is put forward in this paper to replace traditional spectrum stabilization method used characteristic peak. Based on the polynomial fitting of high harmonics in frequency spectrum and gamma-ray spectral drift, it calculates overall spectral drift of natural gamma-ray spectrum and adjusts the gain of spectrometer by this spectral drift value, thus completing quick spectrum stabilization in the power on stage of spectrometer. This method requires no manual intervention and can obtain the overall spectral drift value automatically under no time-domain pre-processing to the natural gamma-ray spectra. The spectral drift value calculated by this method has an absolute error less than five channels (1024 resolution) and a relative error smaller than 0.80%, which can satisfy the quick automatic spectrum stabilization requirement when power on the airborne gamma-ray spectrometer instead of manual operation.

  20. Constraining the location of rapid gamma-ray flares in the FSRQ 3C 273

    CERN Document Server

    Rani, B; Krichbaum, T P; Fuhrmann, L; Zensus, J A

    2013-01-01

    We present a \\gamma-ray photon flux and spectral variability study of the flat-spectrum radio quasar 3C 273 over a rapid flaring activity period between September 2009 to April 2010. Five major flares are observed in the source during this period. The most rapid flare observed in the source has a flux doubling time of 1.1 hr. The rapid \\gamma-ray flares allow us to constrain the location and size of the \\gamma-ray emission region in the source. The \\gamma \\gamma-opacity constrains the Doppler factor, $\\delta_{\\gamma} \\geq$ 10 for the highest energy (15 GeV) photon observed by the {\\it Fermi}-Large Area Telescope (LAT). Causality arguments constrain the size of the emission region to 1.6$\\times 10^{15}$ cm. The \\gamma-ray spectra measured over this period show clear deviations from a simple power law with a break in 1-2 GeV energy range. We discuss possible explanations for the origin of the \\gamma-ray spectral breaks. Our study suggests that the \\gamma-ray emission region in 3C 273 is located within the broad...

  1. A search for optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Sook

    1995-03-09

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBS) are mysterious flashes of gamma rays lasting several tens to hundreds of seconds that occur approximately once per day. NASA launched the orbiting Compton Gamma Ray Observatory to study GRBs and other gamma ray phenomena. CGRO carries the Burst and Transient Experiment (BATSE) specifically to study GRBS. Although BATSE has collected data on over 600 GRBS, and confirmed that GRBs are localized, high intensity point sources of MeV gamma rays distributed isotropically in the sky, the nature and origin of GRBs remains a fundamental problem in astrophysics. BATSE`s 8 gamma ray sensors located on the comers of the box shaped CGRO can detect the onset of GRBs and record their intensity and energy spectra as a function of time. The position of the burst on the sky can be determined to < {plus_minus}10{degrees} from the BATSE data stream. This position resolution is not sufficient to point a large, optical telescope at the exact position of a GRB which would determine its origin by associating it with a star. Because of their brief duration it is not known if GRBs are accompanied by visible radiation. Their seemingly large energy output suggests thatthis should be. Simply scaling the ratio of visible to gamma ray intensities of the Crab Nebula to the GRB output suggests that GRBs ought to be accompanied by visible flashes of magnitude 10 or so. A few photographs of areas containing a burst location that were coincidentally taken during the burst yield lower limits on visible output of magnitude 4. The detection of visible light during the GRB would provide information on burst physics, provide improved pointing coordinates for precise examination of the field by large telescope and provide the justification for larger dedicated optical counterpart instruments. The purpose of this experiment is to detect or set lower limits on optical counterpart radiation simultaneously accompanying the gamma rays from

  2. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  3. A Strange Supernova with a Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    ESO PR Photo 39b/98 [Preview - JPEG: 800 x 987 pix - 432k] [High-Res - JPEG: 3000 x 3703 pix - 2.5Mb] PR Photo 39a/98 (left) shows a colour composite of three images obtained with the EMMI multi-mode instrument at the ESO 3.58-m New Technology Telescope (NTT) at La Silla on May 4, 1998. The short exposures were obtained through V (green), R (red) and I (near-infrared) filtres. SN 1998bw is the very bright, bluish star at the center (indicated with an arrow), located on an arm of spiral galaxy ESO 184-G82 . There are several other galaxies in the field. Compare with Photo 39b/98 (right) that was obtained before the explosion (ESO 1-m Schmidt Telescope; 15 May 1985; 120-min exposure in red light). In both photos, the field of view measures 3.6 x 3.6 arcmin; North is up and East is left. Note that while the brighter objects are more prominent on the long-exposure Schmidt photo (39b/98), considerably more details can be seen on that obtained by the NTT (39a/98). The ESO astronomers at La Silla decided to continue observations of the new star-like object and set up a comprehensive programme with several telescopes at that observatory. During the subsequent weeks and months, they obtained images through various filtres to determine the brightness in different colours, as well as detailed spectra. These observations soon showed the object to be a supernova . This is a heavy star that explodes during a late and fatal evolutionary stage. The new supernova now received the official designation SN 1998bw . From a careful study based on these observations, it has been concluded that SN 1998bw underwent an exceptionally powerful explosion, more violent than most other supernovae observed so far. It was also unusual in the sense that very strong radio emission was observed within a few days after the explosion - normally this only happens after several weeks. In fact, at radio wavelengths, SN 1998bw was the brightest supernova ever observed. The origin of the Gamma-Ray Burst SN

  4. New insights from cosmic gamma rays

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays from cosmic sources at MeV energies is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and their impacts on objects and phenomena throughout the universe. Gamma rays trace nuclear processes most directly, as they originate from nuclear transitions following radioactive decays or high-energy collisions with excitation of nuclei. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this astronomical window and is discussed here: Cosmic positrons are often produced from beta-decays, thus also of nuclear physics origins. The nuclear reactions leading to radioactive isotopes occur inside stars and stellar explosions, which therefore constitute the main objects of such studies. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivities have been measured, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of their prime energy sources. The diffuse radioactive afterglow of massi...

  5. Technology Needs for Gamma Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray astronomy is currently in an exciting period of multiple missions and a wealth of data. Results from INTEGRAL, Fermi, AGILE, Suzaku and Swift are making large contributions to our knowledge of high energy processes in the universe. The advances are due to new detector and imaging technologies. The steps to date have been from scintillators to solid state detectors for sensors and from light buckets to coded aperture masks and pair telescopes for imagers. A key direction for the future is toward focusing telescopes pushing into the hard X-ray regime and Compton telescopes and pair telescopes with fine spatial resolution for medium and high energy gamma rays. These technologies will provide finer imaging of gamma-ray sources. Importantly, they will also enable large steps forward in sensitivity by reducing background.

  6. TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Ribó, M

    2008-01-01

    The window of TeV Gamma-Ray Astrophysics was opened less than two decades ago, when the Crab Nebula was detected for the first time. After several years of development, the technique used by imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes like HESS, MAGIC or VERITAS, is now allowing to conduct sensitive observations in the TeV regime. Water Cherenkov instruments like Milagro are also providing the first results after years of integration time. Different types of extragalactic and galactic sources have been detected, showing a variety of interesting phenomena that are boosting theory in very high energy gamma-ray astrophysics. Here I review some of the most interesting results obtained up to now, making special emphasis in the field of X-ray/gamma-ray binaries.

  7. The Spectral Sharpness Angle of Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    We explain the results of Yu et al. (2015b) of the novel sharpness angle measurement to a large number of spectra obtained from the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor. The sharpness angle is compared to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. It is found that more than 91% of the high temporally and spectrally resolved spectra are inconsistent with any kind of optically thin synchrotron emission model alone. It is also found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to 58+23 -18% of the peak flux. These results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed spectra. Since any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically...

  8. Neutron and Gamma-ray Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, Anatoly V.; Sasao, Mamiko; Kaschuck, Yuri A.; Kiptily, Vasily G.; Nishitani, Takeo; Popovichev, Sergey V.; Bertalot, Luciano

    2008-03-01

    Due to high neutron and gamma-ray yields and large size plasmas many future fusion reactor plasma parameters such as fusion power, fusion power density, ion temperature, fuel mixture, fast ion energy and spatial distributions can be well measured by various fusion product diagnostics. Neutron diagnostics provide information on fusion reaction rate, which indicates how close is the plasma to the ultimate goal of nuclear fusion and fusion power distribution in the plasma core, which is crucial for optimization of plasma breakeven and burn. Depending on the plasma conditions neutron and gamma-ray diagnostics can provide important information, namely about dynamics of fast ion energy and spatial distributions during neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron heating and generated by fast ions MHD instabilities. The influence of the fast particle population on the 2-D neutron source profile was clearly demonstrated in JET experiments. 2-D neutron and gamma-ray source measurements could be important for driven plasma heating profile optimization in fusion reactors. To meat the measurement requirements in ITER the planned set of neutron and gamma ray diagnostics includes radial and vertical neutron and gamma cameras, neutron flux monitors, neutron activation systems and neutron spectrometers. The necessity of using massive radiation shielding strongly influences the diagnostic designs in fusion reactor, determines angular fields of view of neutron and gamma-ray cameras and spectrometers and gives rise to unavoidable difficulties in the absolute calibration. The development, testing in existing tokomaks and a possible engineering integration of neuron and gamma-ray diagnostic systems into ITER are presented.

  9. Nuclear forensics using gamma-ray spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Norman, Eric B

    2016-01-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the past several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low- resolution gamma ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  10. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Much of George Dracoulis’s research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  11. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  12. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  13. Nuclear Forensics using Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, E. B.

    2016-09-01

    Much of George Dracoulis's research career was devoted to utilising gamma-ray spectroscopy in fundamental studies in nuclear physics. This same technology is useful in a wide range of applications in the area of nuclear forensics. Over the last several years, our research group has made use of both high- and low-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers to: identify the first sample of plutonium large enough to be weighed; determine the yield of the Trinity nuclear explosion; measure fission fragment yields as a function of target nucleus and neutron energy; and observe fallout in the U. S. from the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident.

  14. Thermoluminescence of Simulated Interstellar Matter after Gamma-ray Irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Koike, K; Koike, C; Okada, M; Chihara, H

    2002-01-01

    Interstellar matter is known to be strongly irradiated by radiation and several types of cosmic ray particles. Simulated interstellar matter, such as forsterite $\\rm Mg_{2}SiO_{4}$, enstatite $\\rm MgSiO_{3}$ and magnesite $\\rm MgCO_{3}$ has been irradiated with the $\\rm ^{60}Co$ gamma-rays in liquid nitrogen, and also irradiated with fast neutrons at 10 K and 70 K by making use of the low-temperature irradiation facility of Kyoto University Reactor (KUR-LTL. Maximum fast neutron dose is $10^{17}n_f{\\rm /cm^{2}}$). After irradiation, samples are stored in liquid nitrogen for several months to allow the decay of induced radioactivity. We measured the luminescence spectra of the gamma ray irradiated samples during warming to 370K using a spectrophotometer. For the forsterite and magnesite, the spectra exhibit a rather intense peak at about 645 -- 655 nm and 660 nm respectively, whereas luminescence scarcely appeared in olivine sample. The spectra of forsterite is very similar to the ERE of the Red Rectangle.

  15. Relativistic feedback models of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes and gamma-ray glows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Relativistic feedback discharges, also known as dark lightning, are capable of explaining many of the observed properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) and gamma-ray glows, both created within thunderstorms. During relativistic feedback discharges, the generation of energetic electrons is self-sustained via the production of backward propagating positrons and back-scattered x-rays, resulting in very larges fluxes of energetic radiation. In addition, ionization produces large electric currents that generate LF/VLF radio emissions and eventually discharge the electric field, terminating the gamma-ray production. In this presentation, new relativistic feedback model results will be presented and compared to recent observations.

  16. Time series data correction for the Chang'E-1 gamma-ray spectrometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-Yan Zhang; Yong-Liao Zou; Jian-Zhong Liu; Jian-Jun Liu; Ji Shen; Ling-Li Mu; Xin Ren; Wei-Bin Wen; Chun-Lai Li

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) onboard Chang'E-l (CE-1) is to acquire global maps of elemental abundances and their distributions on the moon, since such maps will significantly improve our understanding of lunar formation and evolution. To derive the elemental maps and enable research on lunar formation and evolution, raw data that are received directly from the spacecraft must be converted into time series corrected gamma-ray spectra. The data correction procedures for the CE-1 GRS time series data are thoroughly described. The processing procedures to create the time series gamma-ray spectra described here include channel processing, optimal data selection, energy calibration, gain correction, dead time correction, geometric correction, orbit altitude normalization, eliminating unusable data and galactic cosmic ray correction. Finally, descriptions are also given on data measurement uncertainties, which will help the interested scientists to understand and estimate various uncertainties associated with the above data processing.

  17. Exploring the Edge of the Stellar Universe with Gamma-Ray Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    2006-01-01

    The determination of the densities of intergalactic photons from the FIR to the UV produced by stellar emission and dust reradiation at various redshifts can provide an independent measure of the star formation history of the universe. High energy gamma-rays can annihilate with FIR-UV photons to produce electron-positron pairs which result in high-end absorption cutoffs in the gamma-ray spectra of extragalactic sources. Future measurements of such absorption in the spectra of extragalactic high energy gamma-ray sources at higher redshifts from detectors such as the (soon to be launched) GLAST space telescope can be used to determine intergalactic photon densities in the distant past, thereby shedding light on the history of star formation and galaxy evolution. (abridged),

  18. Gamma Rays, Electrons, Hard X-Rays, and the Central Parsec of the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Kistler, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    The complex interplay of processes at the Galactic Center is at the heart of numerous past, present, and (likely) future mysteries. We aim at a more complete understanding of how spectra extending to >10 TeV result. We first construct a simplified model to account for the peculiar energy and angular dependence of the intense central parsec photon field. This allows for calculating anisotropic inverse Compton scattering and mapping gamma-ray extinction due to gamma gamma -> e^+ e^- attenuation. Coupling these with a method for evolving electron spectra, we examine several clear and present excesses, including the diffuse hard X-rays seen by NuSTAR and GeV gamma rays by Fermi. We address further applications to cosmic rays, dark matter, neutrinos, and gamma rays from the Center and beyond.

  19. Cosmic Connections:. from Cosmic Rays to Gamma Rays, Cosmic Backgrounds and Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusenko, Alexander

    2013-12-01

    Combined data from gamma-ray telescopes and cosmic-ray detectors have produced some new surprising insights regarding intergalactic and galactic magnetic fields, as well as extragalactic background light. We review some recent advances, including a theory explaining the hard spectra of distant blazars and the measurements of intergalactic magnetic fields based on the spectra of distant sources. Furthermore, we discuss the possible contribution of transient galactic sources, such as past gamma-ray bursts and hypernova explosions in the Milky Way, to the observed ux of ultrahigh-energy cosmicrays nuclei. The need for a holistic treatment of gamma rays, cosmic rays, and magnetic fields serves as a unifying theme for these seemingly unrelated phenomena.

  20. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  1. Gamma-Ray Telescope and Uncertainty Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivalingaswamy, T.; Kagali, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle is one of the important basic principles of quantum mechanics. In most of the books on quantum mechanics, this uncertainty principle is generally illustrated with the help of a gamma ray microscope, wherein neither the image formation criterion nor the lens properties are taken into account. Thus a better…

  2. Gamma-Rays from Intergalactic Shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Keshet, U; Loeb, A; Springel, V; Hernquist, L E; Keshet, Uri; Waxman, Eli; Loeb, Abraham; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2003-01-01

    Structure formation in the intergalactic medium (IGM) produces large-scale, collisionless shock waves, where electrons can be accelerated to highly relativistic energies. Such electrons can Compton scatter cosmic microwave background photons up to gamma-ray energies. We study the radiation emitted in this process using a hydrodynamic cosmological simulation of a LCDM universe. The resulting radiation, extending beyond TeV energies, has roughly constant energy flux per decade in photon energy, in agreement with the predictions of Loeb & Waxman (2000). Assuming that a fraction \\xi_e=0.05 of the shock energy is transferred to the relativistic electrons, as inferred from collisionless non-relativistic shocks in the interstellar medium, we find that the radiation energy flux, e^2 (dJ/de) ~ 50-160 eV cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1}, constitutes ~10% of the extragalactic gamma-ray background flux. The associated gamma-ray point-sources are too faint to account for the ~60 unidentified EGRET gamma-ray sources, but GLAST s...

  3. Gamma ray observations of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    Two general categories are discussed concerning the evolution of the solar system: the dualistic view, the planetesimal approach; and the monistic view, the nebular hypothesis. The major points of each view are given and the models that are developed from these views are described. Possible applications of gamma ray astronomical observations to the question of the dynamic evolution of the solar system are discussed.

  4. Gamma Rays From Rotation-Powered Pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Harding, A K

    2002-01-01

    The seven known gamma-ray pulsars represent a very small fraction of the more than 1000 presently known radio pulsars, yet they can give us valuable information about pulsar particle acceleration and energetics. Although the theory of acceleration and high-energy emission in pulsars has been studied for over 25 years, the origin of the pulsed gamma rays is a question that remains unanswered. Characteristics of the pulsars detected by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory could not clearly distinguish between an emission site at the magnetic poles (polar cap models) and emission from the outer magnetosphere (outer gap models). There are also a number of theoretical issues in both type of model which have yet to be resolved. The two types of models make contrasting predictions for the numbers of radio-loud and radio-quiet gamma-ray pulsars and of their spectral characteristics. GLAST will probably detect at least 50 radio-selected pulsars and possibly many more radio-quiet pulsars. With this large sample, it will b...

  5. New shield for gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brar, S. S.; Gustafson, P. F.; Nelson, D. M.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma-ray shield that can be evacuated, refilled with a clean gas, and pressurized for exclusion of airborne radioactive contaminants effectively lowers background noise. Under working conditions, repeated evacuation and filling procedures have not adversely affected the sensitivity and resolution of the crystal detector.

  6. Effects of Shielding on Gamma Rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-13

    The interaction of gamma rays with matter results in an effect we call attenuation (i.e. ‘shielding’). Attenuation can dramatically alter the appearance of a spectrum. Attenuating materials may actually create features in a spectrum via x-ray fluorescence

  7. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  8. Chandra Imaging of Gamma-Ray Binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Hare, Jeremy; Pavlov, George G

    2013-01-01

    We review the multiwavelength properties of the few known gamma-ray binaries, focusing on extended emission recently resolved with Chandra. We discuss the implications of these findings for the nature of compact objects and for physical processes operating in these systems.

  9. Gamma-ray Novae: Rare or Nearby?

    CERN Document Server

    Morris, Paul J; Brown, Anthony M; Chadwick, Paula M

    2016-01-01

    Classical Novae were revealed as a surprise source of gamma-rays in Fermi LAT observations. During the first 8 years since the LAT was launched, 6 novae in total have been detected to > 5 sigma in gamma-rays, in contrast to the 69 discovered optically in the same period. We attempt to resolve this discrepancy by assuming all novae are gamma-ray emitters, and assigning peak one-day fluxes based on a flat distribution of the known emitters to a simulated population. To determine optical parameters, the spatial distribution and magnitudes of bulge and disc novae in M31 are scaled to the Milky Way, which we approximate as a disc with a 20 kpc radius and elliptical bulge with semi major axis 3 kpc and axis ratios 2:1 in the xy plane. We approximate Galactic reddening using a double exponential disc with vertical and radial scale heights of r_d = 5 kpc and z_d = 0.2 kpc, and demonstrate that even such a rudimentary model can easily reproduce the observed fraction of gamma-ray novae, implying that these apparently r...

  10. HAWC observatory catches first gamma rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frías Villegas, Gabriela

    2013-06-01

    The world's largest and most modern gamma-ray observatory has carried out its first successful observations. Located inside the Pico de Orizaba national park in the Mexican state of Puebla, the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory (HAWC) is a collaboration between 26 Mexican and US institutions.

  11. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  12. Calculations of gamma-ray spectral profiles of linear alkanes in the positron annihilation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoguang [Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Science, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria, 3122 (Australia); School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Ludong University, Shandong, Yantai, 264025 (China); Wang, Feng, E-mail: fwang@swin.edu.au [Molecular Model Discovery Laboratory, Department of Chemistry and Biotechnology, School of Science, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria, 3122 (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The study calculates gamma-ray profiles for linear alkanes (n up to 12) quantum mechanically;. • “Profile quality” has been defined as the root-mean square deviation (RMSD) between the theoretical and the experimental results in the entire region of the profile. • Excellent agreement with measurements suggests that the theory model is applicable to predict other alkanes such as heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}) etc. • The study suggested that gamma-ray spectra may be more sensitive to study smaller alkanes (and their isomers), rather than larger alkanes (i.e., n > 12). - Abstract: The positron–electron annihilation gamma-ray spectra of linear alkanes C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2} (n = 1–12) have been studied systematically. A profile quality (PQ) parameter, χ, is introduced to assess the agreement between the obtained theoretical profiles and the experimental measurements in the entire region of energy shift of the spectra. Together with the Doppler shift (Δε) of the gamma-ray spectra, the two parameters, χ and Δε, are able to provide a more comprehensive assessment of the calculated gamma-ray spectra with respect to available experiment. Applying the recently developed docking model, the present study determines the positrophilic electrons for individual alkanes from which the gamma-ray spectral profiles are calculated. The results achieve an excellent agreement with experiment, not only with respect to the Doppler shift, but also with respect to the gamma-ray profiles in the photon energy region up to 5 keV. The study further calculates the gamma-ray spectra of other linear alkanes in the series without available experimental measurements, such as heptane (C{sub 7}H{sub 16}), octane (C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), decane (C{sub 10}H{sub 22}) and undecane (C{sub 11}H{sub 24}). The results obtained show a dominance of the positrophilic electrons in the lowest occupied valence orbital (LOVO) in the positron–electron annihilation process, in agreement with

  13. Systematic Study of Gamma-ray bright Blazars with Optical Polarization and Gamma-ray Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Itoh, Ryosuke; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Uemura, Makoto; Tanaka, Yasuyuki T; Kawabata, Koji S; Madejski, Grzegorz M; Schinzel, Frank K; Kanda, Yuka; Shiki, Kensei; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Kawabata, Miho; Moritani, Yuki; Nakaoka, Tatsuya; Ohsugi, Takashi; Sasada, Mahito; Takaki, Katsutoshi; Takata, Koji; Ui, Takahiro; Yamanaka, Masayuki; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Blazars are highly variable active galactic nuclei which emit radiation at all wavelengths from radio to gamma-rays. Polarized radiation from blazars is one key piece of evidence for synchrotron radiation at low energies and it also varies dramatically. The polarization of blazars is of interest for understanding the origin, confinement, and propagation of jets. However, even though numerous measurements have been performed, the mechanisms behind jet creation, composition and variability are still debated. We performed simultaneous gamma-ray and optical photopolarimetry observations of 45 blazars between Jul. 2008 and Dec. 2014 to investigate the mechanisms of variability and search for a basic relation between the several subclasses of blazars. We identify a correlation between the maximum degree of optical linear polarization and the gamma-ray luminosity or the ratio of gamma-ray to optical fluxes. Since the maximum polarization degree depends on the condition of the magnetic field (chaotic or ordered), thi...

  14. Emission mechanism of GeV-quiet soft gamma-ray pulsars; A case for peculiar geometry?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Y; Takata, J; Leung, Gene C K; Cheng, K S

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing new class of young spin-down powered pulsars called GeV-quiet soft gamma-ray pulsar; (1) spectral turnover appears around~10MeV, (2) the X-ray spectra of below 20 keV can be described by power law with photon index around 1.2 and (3) the light curve in X-ray/soft gamma-ray bands shows single broad pulse. Their emission properties are distinct from the normal gamma-ray pulsars, for which the spectral peak in $\

  15. Gamma ray spectroscopy in astrophysics: Solar gamma ray astronomy on solar maximum mission. [experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    The SMM gamma ray experiment and the important scientific capabilities of the instrument are discussed. The flare size detectable as a function of spectrum integration time was studied. A preliminary estimate indicates that a solar gamma ray line at 4.4 MeV one-fifth the intensity of that believed to have been emitted on 4 August 1972 can be detected in approximately 1000 sec with a confidence level of 99%.

  16. Zinc oxide nanowire gamma ray detector with high spatiotemporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Daniel C.; Nolen, J. Ryan; Cook, Andrew; Mu, Richard R.; Haglund, Richard F.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional scintillation detectors are typically single crystals of heavy-metal oxides or halides doped with rare-earth ions that record the recombination of electron-hole pairs by photon emission in the visible to ultraviolet. However, the light yields are typically low enough to require photomultiplier detection with the attendant instrumental complications. Here we report initial studies of gamma ray detection by zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires, grown by vapor-solid deposition. The nanowires grow along the c-axis in a wurtzite structure; they are typically 80 nm in diameter and have lengths of 1- 2 μm. The nanowires are single crystals of high quality, with a photoluminescence (PL) yield from band-edge exciton emission in the ultraviolet that is typically one hundred times larger than the PL yield from defect centers in the visible. Nanowire ensembles were irradiated by 662 keV gamma rays from a Cs-137 source for periods of up to ten hours; gamma rays in this energy range interact by Compton scattering, which in ZnO creates F+ centers that relax to form singly-charged positive oxygen vacancies. Following irradiation, we fit the PL spectra of the visible emission with a sum of Gaussians at the energies of the known defects. We find highly efficient PL from the irradiated area, with a figure of merit approaching 106 photons/s/MeV of deposited energy. Over a period of days, the singly charged O+ vacancies relax to the more stable doubly charged O++ vacancies. However, the overall defect PL returns to pre-irradiation values after about a week, as the vacancies diffuse to the surface of these very thin nanowires, indicating that a self-healing process restores the nanowires to their original state.

  17. Software developments for gamma-ray data with high multiplicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauritsen, T.; Crowell, B.; Ahmad, I. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Software capabilities for angle sort of data from the new powerful gamma detector arrays like Gammasphere and EUROGAM which were developed in preceding years, were enhanced and extended to read new data formats. In addition, we can now sort the data for directional correlation ratios (DCO). This version of the software was exported to a university group. For the analysis of, e.g., the quasi-continuum of gamma-rays it is necessary to angle sort the high multiplicity data and perform a careful background subtraction in order to extract the continuum of gamma rays from the feeding and decay of superdeformed bands. We need to angle sort in order to untangle the parts of the spectra which are of E1 nature from those of quadrupole or of M1/E2 nature. We further developed software running on new fast SUN workstations. We now have two such workstations, each equipped with a stacker and a secondary 8-mm tape drive. We enhanced the software to apply an energy-dependent time gate. We can enhance the events that are in true prompt coincidence, and reject random and signals in the germanium detectors coming from neutrons hitting the detector in coincidence with the gamma-ray burst. By applying energy-dependent time gates, in form of a {open_quotes}reduced time{close_quotes}, we can perform this rejection without the loss of efficiency at low energy. Effort has gone into developing low-level tape reader routines for data from the new EUROGAM array with cluster detectors as well as from the new flexible data format from Gammasphere phase II. In addition, we developed software to read data tapes from the local DAPHNE and MSU data-acquisition systems on the new fast UNIX platforms.

  18. Acceleration of cosmic rays and gamma-ray emission from supernova remnants in the Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristofari, P.; Gabici, S.; Casanova, S.; Terrier, R.; Parizot, E.

    2013-10-01

    Galactic cosmic rays are believed to be accelerated at supernova remnant shocks. Though very popular and robust, this conjecture still needs a conclusive proof. The strongest support to this idea is probably the fact that supernova remnants are observed in gamma-rays, which are indeed expected as the result of the hadronic interactions between the cosmic rays accelerated at the shock and the ambient gas. However, also leptonic processes can, in most cases, explain the observed gamma-ray emission. This implies that the detections in gamma-rays do not necessarily mean that supernova remnants accelerate cosmic ray protons. To overcome this degeneracy, the multiwavelength emission (from radio to gamma-rays) from individual supernova remnants has been studied and in a few cases it has been possible to ascribe the gamma-ray emission to one of the two processes (hadronic or leptonic). Here, we adopt a different approach and, instead of a case-by-case study we aim for a population study and we compute the number of supernova remnants which are expected to be seen in TeV gamma-rays above a given flux under the assumption that these objects indeed are the sources of cosmic rays. The predictions found here match well with current observational results, thus providing a novel consistency check for the supernova remnant paradigm for the origin of Galactic cosmic rays. Moreover, hints are presented for the fact that particle spectra significantly steeper than E-2 are produced at supernova remnants. Finally, we expect that several of the supernova remnants detected by HESS in the survey of the Galactic plane should exhibit a gamma-ray emission dominated by hadronic processes (i.e. neutral-pion decay). The fraction of the detected remnants for which the leptonic emission dominates over the hadronic one depends on the assumed values of the physical parameters (especially the magnetic field strength at the shock) and can be as high as roughly a half.

  19. Gamma-Ray Telescopes: 400 Years of Astronomical Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Cannizzo, John K.

    2010-01-01

    The last half-century has seen dramatic developments in gamma-ray telescopes, from their initial conception and development through to their blossoming into full maturity as a potent research tool in astronomy. Gamma-ray telescopes are leading research in diverse areas such as gamma-ray bursts, blazars, Galactic transients, and the Galactic distribution of Al-26.

  20. NEW GAMMA RAYS FROM DECAY OF 189W

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨维凡; 赵之正; 等

    1995-01-01

    Radioactivities of 189W are produced through an 192Os(n,α189W reaction.Gamma ray spectroscopy from chemically separated tungsten sources using HPGe detector has revealed the presence of 22 gamma rays assigned to the decay of 189W,of them,18 gamma rays are new ones unreported until now.

  1. BL Lacertae Objects and the Extragalactic Gamma-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Fan

    2011-01-01

    A tight correlation between gamma-ray and radio emission is found for a sample of BL Lacertae (BL Lac) objects detected by Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) and the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET). The gamma-ray emission of BL Lac objects exhibits strong variability, and the detection rate of gamma-ray BL Lac objects is low, which may be related to the gamma-ray duty cycle of BL Lac objects. We estimate the gamma-ray duty cycle ~ 0.11, for BL Lac objects detected by EGRET and Fermi. Using the empirical relation of gamma-ray emission with radio emission and the estimated gamma-ray duty cycle, we derive the gamma-ray luminosity function (LF) of BL Lac objects from their radio LF. Our derived gamma-ray LF of BL Lac objects can almost reproduce that calculated with the recently released Fermi bright active galactic nuclei (AGN) sample. We find that about 45% of the extragalactic diffuse gamma-ray background (EGRB) is contributed by BL Lac objects. Combining the estimate of the quasar contri...

  2. Practical flux prescriptions for gamma-ray burst afterglows, from early to late times

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leventis, K.; van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present analytic flux prescriptions for broad-band spectra of self-absorbed and optically thin synchrotron radiation from gamma-ray burst afterglows, based on 1D relativistic hydrodynamic simulations. By treating the evolution of critical spectrum parameters as a power-law break between the ultra

  3. Gamma-Ray Library and Uncertainty Analysis: Passively Emitted Gamma Rays Used in Safeguards Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, W

    2009-09-18

    Non-destructive gamma-ray analysis is a fundamental part of nuclear safeguards, including nuclear energy safeguards technology. Developing safeguards capabilities for nuclear energy will certainly benefit from the advanced use of gamma-ray spectroscopy as well as the ability to model various reactor scenarios. There is currently a wide variety of nuclear data that could be used in computer modeling and gamma-ray spectroscopy analysis. The data can be discrepant (with varying uncertainties), and it may difficult for a modeler or software developer to determine the best nuclear data set for a particular situation. To use gamma-ray spectroscopy to determine the relative isotopic composition of nuclear materials, the gamma-ray energies and the branching ratios or intensities of the gamma-rays emitted from the nuclides in the material must be well known. A variety of computer simulation codes will be used during the development of the nuclear energy safeguards, and, to compare the results of various codes, it will be essential to have all the {gamma}-ray libraries agree. Assessing our nuclear data needs allows us to create a prioritized list of desired measurements, and provides uncertainties for energies and especially for branching intensities. Of interest are actinides, fission products, and activation products, and most particularly mixtures of all of these radioactive isotopes, including mixtures of actinides and other products. Recent work includes the development of new detectors with increased energy resolution, and studies of gamma-rays and their lines used in simulation codes. Because new detectors are being developed, there is an increased need for well known nuclear data for radioactive isotopes of some elements. Safeguards technology should take advantage of all types of gamma-ray detectors, including new super cooled detectors, germanium detectors and cadmium zinc telluride detectors. Mixed isotopes, particularly mixed actinides found in nuclear reactor

  4. Evaluation of the 1077keV gamma-ray emission probability from 68Ga decay

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, X L; Chen, X J; Chen, G C

    2013-01-01

    68Ga decays to the excited states of 68Zn through the electron capture decay mode. New recommended values for the emission probability of 1077keV gamma-ray given by the ENSDF and DDEP databases all use data from absolute measurements. In 2011 Jiang Liyang deduced a new value for 1077keV gamma-ray emission probability by measuring the 69Ga(n,2n)68Ga reaction cross section. The new value is about 20% lower than values obtained from previous absolute measurements and evaluations. In this paper, the discrepancies among the measurements and evaluations are analyzed carefully and the new values are re-recommended. Our recommended value for the emission probability of 1077keV gamma-ray is 2.72+-0.16 %.

  5. Undergraduate Research Projects in Atomic Collisions and Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, J. M.; Varghese, S. L.; Haywick, D. W.; Fearn, M. L.

    2003-08-01

    Research projects at University of South Alabama, an undergraduate physics department, have employed a 150-kV Cockcroft-Walton accelerator for atomic collisions and sodium-iodide and high-purity germanium detectors for gamma-ray studies. The atomic collision experiments dealt with electron capture and electron loss in collisions of protons and hydrogen atoms with hydrocarbon molecules. Gamma-ray studies with NaI scintillators determined the potassium content of food using 40K gamma-rays. Environmental studies of river sedimentation use a HPGe detector to determine 137Cs and 210Pb content. Students learn the physics of the interactions of ionizing radiation with matter, while acquiring a familiarity with high-vacuum technique, electronics, data acquisition and analysis, and reporting of results.

  6. TeV gamma-ray astronomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Cui

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma-ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this re-view, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play in advancing this young but exciting field.

  7. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  8. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades.

  9. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  10. The future of gamma-ray astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödlseder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The field of gamma-ray astronomy has experienced impressive progress over the last decade. Thanks to the advent of a new generation of imaging air Cherenkov telescopes (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS) and thanks to the launch of the Fermi-LAT satellite, several thousand gamma-ray sources are known today, revealing an unexpected ubiquity of particle acceleration processes in the Universe. Major scientific challenges are still ahead, such as the identification of the nature of Dark Matter, the discovery and understanding of the sources of cosmic rays, or the comprehension of the particle acceleration processes that are at work in the various objects. This paper presents some of the instruments and mission concepts that will address these challenges over the next decades. xml:lang="fr"

  11. Stellar Photon Archaeology with Gamma-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.

    2009-01-01

    Ongoing deep surveys of galaxy luminosity distribution functions, spectral energy distributions and backwards evolution models of star formation rates can be used to calculate the past history of intergalactic photon densities and, from them, the present and past optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays from pair production interactions with these photons. The energy-redshift dependence of the optical depth of the Universe to gamma-rays has become known as the Fazio-Stecker relation (Fazio & Stecker 1970). Stecker, Malkan & Scully have calculated the densities of intergalactic background light (IBL) photons of energies from 0.03 eV to the Lyman limit at 13.6 eV and for 0$ photon densities in the past, i.e., the "archaeo-IBL.", and therefore allow a better measure of the past history of the total star formation rate, including that from galaxies too faint to be observed.

  12. TeV Gamma Ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Cui, Wei

    2009-01-01

    The field of ground-based gamma ray astronomy has enjoyed rapid growth in recent years. As an increasing number of sources are detected at TeV energies, the field has matured and become a viable branch of modern astronomy. Lying at the uppermost end of the electromagnetic rainbow, TeV photons are always preciously few in number but carry essential information about the particle acceleration and radiative processes involved in extreme astronomical settings. Together with observations at longer wavelengths, TeV gamma-ray observations have drastically improved our view of the universe. In this review, we briefly describe recent progress in the field. We will conclude by providing a personal perspective on the future of the field, in particular, on the significant roles that China could play to advance this young but exciting field.

  13. The Future of Gamma Ray Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Over the past decade, gamma ray astrophysics has entered the astrophysical mainstream. Extremely successful space-borne (GeV) and ground-based (TeV) detectors, combined with a multitude of partner telescopes, have revealed a fascinating “astroscape" of active galactic nuclei, pulsars, gamma ray bursts, supernova remnants, binary stars, star-forming galaxies, novae much more, exhibiting major pathways along which large energy releases can flow. From  a basic physics perspective, exquisitely sensitive measurements have constrained the nature of dark matter, the cosmological origin of magnetic field and the properties of black holes. These advances have motivated the development of new facilities, including HAWC, DAMPE, CTA and SVOM, which will further our understanding of the high energy universe. Topics that will receive special attention include merging neutron star binaries, clusters of galaxies, galactic cosmic rays and putative, TeV dark matter.

  14. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Mark [Alamo, CA; Gosnell, Tom B [Moraga, CA; Ham, Cheryl [Livermore, CA; Perkins, Dwight [Livermore, CA; Wong, James [Dublin, CA

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  15. Lower limits on the strengths of gamma ray lines from WIMP dark matter annihilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazajian, Kevork N.; Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Kilic, Can

    2012-06-01

    We study the spectra of gamma ray signals that arise from dark matter annihilation in the Universe. We focus on the large class of theories where the photon spectrum includes both continuum spectrum of gamma rays that arise from annihilation into standard model states at tree level, as well as monochromatic gamma rays arising from annihilation directly into two photons at the one-loop level. In this class of theories we obtain lower bounds on the ratio of the strength of the gamma ray line relative to the gamma ray continuum as a function of the dark matter mass and spin. These limits are obtained from the unitarity relation between the tree-level amplitude of the primary annihilation channel and the imaginary part of the loop-level amplitude for annihilation directly into photons, with the primary decay products running in the loop. These results are exact in the limit that dark matter annihilation at tree level is exclusively to a single standard model species, occurs through the lowest partial wave and respects CP. Away from this limit the bounds are approximate. Our conclusions agree with known results in the literature for the cases of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, universal extra dimensions and the littlest Higgs with T parity. We use the Fermi-LAT observations to translate these limits into upper bounds on the dark matter annihilation cross section into any specific standard model state.

  16. Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes Above Thunderstorms on the Earth and Other Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    Intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons have been observed with space-borne detectors in Earth orbit. They are expected to be present on other planets that exhibit lightning. The terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in the early 1990s. They are now being observed with several other instruments, including the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Although Fermi- GBM was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations. The TGFs usually have extremely hard continuous spectra, typical of highly- Comptonized bremsstrahlung radiation. These spectral are harder than those of GRBs, with photons extending to over 40 MeV. The most likely origin of these high-energy photons is bremsstrahlung radiation produced by a relativistic "runaway avalanche" electron beam. Such a beam is expected to be produced in an extended, intense electric field in or above thunderstorm regions. The altitude of origin and beaming characteristics of the radiation are quite uncertain. They have generated considerable observational and theoretical interest in recent years. This talk will give an overview of the all of the space-borne observations of TGFs that have been made thus far. Instruments are being designed specifically for TGF observations from new spacecraft as well as from airborne platforms

  17. The second fermi large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  18. The second FERMI large area telescope catalog of gamma-ray pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ajello, M.; Allafort, A.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Belfiore, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhattacharyya, B.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bottacini, E.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgay, M.; Burnett, T. H.; Busetto, G.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Camilo, F.; Caraveo, P. A.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chaty, S.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chen, A. W.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cognard, I.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Cominsky, L. R.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D' Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; DeCesar, M. E.; De Luca, A.; den Hartog, P. R.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desvignes, G.; Digel, S. W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Espinoza, C. M.; Falletti, L.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Focke, W. B.; Franckowiak, A.; Freire, P. C. C.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Gotthelf, E. V.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M. -H.; Grove, J. E.; Guillemot, L.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Harding, A. K.; Hayashida, M.; Hays, E.; Hessels, J.; Hewitt, J.; Hill, A. B.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Jackson, M. S.; Janssen, G. H.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, R. P.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, T. J.; Johnson, W. N.; Johnston, S.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Keith, M.; Kerr, M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kramer, M.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Lyne, A. G.; Manchester, R. N.; Marelli, M.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Mehault, J.; Michelson, P. F.; Mignani, R. P.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monzani, M. E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakamori, T.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Pierbattista, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Pletsch, H. J.; Porter, T. A.; Possenti, A.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Ransom, S. M.; Ray, P. S.; Razzano, M.; Rea, N.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Renault, N.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romani, R. W.; Roth, M.; Rousseau, R.; Roy, J.; Ruan, J.; Sartori, A.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Scargle, J. D.; Schulz, A.; Sgrò, C.; Shannon, R.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, D. A.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stappers, B. W.; Strong, A. W.; Suson, D. J.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Theureau, G.; Thompson, D. J.; Thorsett, S. E.; Tibaldo, L.; Tibolla, O.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Uchiyama, Y.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Vasileiou, V.; Venter, C.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; Wang, N.; Weltevrede, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wolff, M. T.; Wood, D. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Yang, Z.

    2013-09-19

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  19. Gamma-ray diagnostics of Type Ia supernovae: Predictions of observables from three-dimensional modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Summa, A; Kromer, M; Boyer, S; Roepke, F K; Sim, S A; Seitenzahl, I R; Fink, M; Mannheim, K; Pakmor, R; Ciaraldi-Schoolmann, F; Diehl, R; Maeda, K; Hillebrandt, W

    2013-01-01

    Besides the fact that the gamma-ray emission due to radioactive decays is responsible for powering the light curves of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), gamma rays themselves are of particular interest as a diagnostic tool because they provide a direct way to obtain deeper insights into the nucleosynthesis and the kinematics of these explosion events. Focusing on two of the most broadly discussed SN Ia progenitor scenarios - a delayed detonation in a Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf (WD) and a violent merger of two WDs - we use three-dimensional explosion models and perform radiative transfer simulations to obtain synthetic gamma-ray spectra. Both chosen models produce the same mass of 56Ni and have similar optical properties that are in reasonable agreement with the recently observed supernova SN 2011fe. In contrast to the optical regime, the gamma-ray emission of our two chosen models proves to be rather different. The almost direct connection of the emission of gamma rays to fundamental physical processes occurin...

  20. THE SECOND FERMI LARGE AREA TELESCOPE CATALOG OF GAMMA-RAY PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Allafort, A.; Bloom, E. D.; Bottacini, E. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Belfiore, A. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhattacharyya, B. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune 411 007 (India); Bissaldi, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, and Università di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brigida, M., E-mail: hartog@stanford.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica ' ' M. Merlin' ' dell' Università e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); and others

    2013-10-01

    This catalog summarizes 117 high-confidence ≥0.1 GeV gamma-ray pulsar detections using three years of data acquired by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi satellite. Half are neutron stars discovered using LAT data through periodicity searches in gamma-ray and radio data around LAT unassociated source positions. The 117 pulsars are evenly divided into three groups: millisecond pulsars, young radio-loud pulsars, and young radio-quiet pulsars. We characterize the pulse profiles and energy spectra and derive luminosities when distance information exists. Spectral analysis of the off-peak phase intervals indicates probable pulsar wind nebula emission for four pulsars, and off-peak magnetospheric emission for several young and millisecond pulsars. We compare the gamma-ray properties with those in the radio, optical, and X-ray bands. We provide flux limits for pulsars with no observed gamma-ray emission, highlighting a small number of gamma-faint, radio-loud pulsars. The large, varied gamma-ray pulsar sample constrains emission models. Fermi's selection biases complement those of radio surveys, enhancing comparisons with predicted population distributions.

  1. Gamma-ray Emission from the Vela Pulsar Modeled with the Annular Gap and Core Gap

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Y J; Qiao, G J; Chou, C K

    2011-01-01

    The Vela pulsar represents a distinct group of {\\gamma}-ray pulsars. Fermi {\\gamma}-ray observations reveal that it has two sharp peaks (P1 and P2) in the light curve with a phase separation of 0.42 and a third peak (P3) in the bridge. The location and intensity of P3 are energy-dependent. We use the 3D magnetospheric model for the annular gap and core gap to simulate the {\\gamma}-ray light curves, phase-averaged and phase-resolved spectra. We found that the acceleration electric field along a field line in the annular gap region decreases with heights. The emission at high energy GeV band is originated from the curvature radiation of accelerated primary particles, while the synchrotron radiation from secondary particles have some contributions to low energy {\\gamma}-ray band (0.1 - 0.3 GeV). The {\\gamma}-ray light curve peaks P1 and P2 are generated in the annular gap region near the altitude of null charge surface, whereas P3 and the bridge emission is generated in the core gap region. The intensity and loc...

  2. Space-Borne Observations of Intense Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Above Thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    Intense millisecond flashes of MeV photons are being observed with space-borne detectors. These terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) were discovered with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) in the early 1990s. They are now being observed with several other instruments, including the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detectors on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Although Fermi-GBM was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations. The TGFs usually have extremely hard continuous spectra, typical of highly-Comptonized bremsstrahlung radiation. These spectral are harder than those of GRBs, with photons extending to over 40 MeV. The most likely origin of these high-energy photons is bremsstrahlung radiation produced by a relativistic runaway avalanche electron beam. Such a beam is expected to be produced in an extended, intense electric field in or above thunderstorm regions. The altitude of origin and beaming characteristics of the radiation are quite uncertain. These TGFs may produce an appreciable radiation dose to passengers and crew in nearby aircraft. They have generated considerable observational and theoretical interest in recent years. Instruments are being designed specifically for TGF observations from new spacecraft as well as from airborne platforms.

  3. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  4. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, NEW COSMOLOGICAL BEACONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Avila-Reese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs are the brightest electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, associated to the death of massive stars. As such, GRBs are potential tracers of the evolution of the cosmic massive star formation, metallicity, and Initial Mass Function. GRBs also proved to be appealing cosmological distance indicators. This opens a unique opportunity to constrain the cosmic expansion history up to redshifts 5-6. A brief review on both subjects is presented here.

  5. Attosecond gamma-ray pulses via nonlinear Compton scattering in the radiation dominated regime

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Xing; Galow, Benjamin J; Keitel, Christoph H

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of a relativistic electron bunch with a counter-propagating tightly-focused laser beam is investigated for intensities when the dynamics is strongly affected by its own radiation. The Compton scattering spectra of gamma-radiation are evaluated employing a semiclassical description for the laser-driven electron dynamics and a quantum electrodynamical description for the photon emissions. We show for laser facilities under construction that gamma-ray bursts of few hundred attoseconds and dozens of megaelectronvolt photon energies may be detected in the near-backwards direction of the initial electron motion. Tight focussing of the laser beam and radiation reaction are demonstrated to be jointly responsible for such short gamma-ray bursts which are independent of both duration of electron bunch and laser pulse. Furthermore, the stochastic nature of the gamma-photon emission features signatures in the resulting gamma-ray comb in the case of the application of a multi-cycle laser pulse.

  6. First light at the HAWC high altitude TeV gamma ray detector in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Daniel

    2012-03-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory -- currently under construction at 4100m altitude at Pico de Orizaba in Mexico -- is a high duty cycle, large field of view detector for gamma rays at TeV energies. The HAWC Observatory will locate and provide spectra for extended and point sources of TeV gamma rays, probe the cosmic ray anisotropy, search for gamma ray bursts, and set limits on extragalactic background light. Data taking at our smaller test array (VAMOS) is currently under way. I will present results of a first study of several months of VAMOS data, including a first skymap, performance tests, and a search for the shadow of the moon in cosmic rays.

  7. Diffuse Galactic Gamma Rays at Intermediate and High Latitudes, Constraints on ISM Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Tavakoli, Maryam; Evoli, Carmelo; Ullio, Piero

    2011-01-01

    The spectral data on the diffuse Galactic gamma-rays, at medium and high latitudes (|b| > 10) and energies of 1-100 GeV, recently published by the Fermi Collaboration are used to produce a novel study on the gamma-ray emissivity in the Galaxy. We focus on analyzing the properties of propagation of cosmic rays (CRs), using the publicly available DRAGON code. We critically address some of the models for the interstellar HI and H2 gas distributions commonly used in the literature, as well as test a variety of propagation models. Each model assumes a distinct global profile for the diffusion and the re-acceleration of CRs. Fitting propagation parameters to well measured local CRs such as, the B/C ratio, protons, antiprotons and electron, positron fluxes, we evaluate the gamma-ray spectra at medium and high latitudes in order to place further constraints on these propagation models.

  8. Gamma ray tracking with the AGATA demonstrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkenbach, Benedikt; Hess, Herbert; Lewandowski, Lars; Reiter, Peter; Steinbach, Tim; Schneiders, David; Vogt, Andreas [IKP, Universitaet zu Koeln (Germany); Collaboration: AGATA-Collaboration

    2014-07-01

    The performance of the AGATA demonstrator will be discussed based on data taken from a multi-nucleon transfer experiment at the AGATA PRISMA setup at LNL (INFN, Italy). A primary {sup 136}Xe beam of 1 GeV hitting a {sup 238}U target was used to produce a multitude of nuclei in the vicinity of {sup 136}Xe and corresponding reaction partners in the actinide region. The obtained results for in-beam gamma-ray spectroscopy allow for a critical assessment of the novel gamma ray tracking technique and comparison with standard procedure. High resolution spectroscopy of both reaction products after multi-nucleon transfer reaction in the presence of a high background from excited fission fragments is based on pulse-shape analysis (PSA) and gamma-ray tracking (GRT). The quality of the position information is crucial for the final energy resolution after Doppler correction. The impact of the calculated PSA libraries and the initial detector characterization for the PSA and GRT are summarized. Details of the achieved position and energy resolution, peak-to-background optimization are presented and illustrated with results from the neutron-transfer products in Xe and U-isotopes.

  9. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book I: Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    Since the suggestion of relativistic shocks as the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in early 90's, the mathematical formulation of this process has stayed at phenomenological level. One of the reasons for the slow development of theoretical works in this domain has been the simple power-law behaviour of the afterglows hours or days after the prompt gamma-ray emission. Nowadays with the launch of the Swift satellite, gamma-ray bursts can be observed in multi-wavelength from a few tens of seconds after trigger onward. These observations have leaded to the discovery of features unexplainable by the simple formulation of the shocks and emission processes used up to now. But "devil is in details" and some of these features may be explained with a more detailed formulation of phenomena and without adhoc addition of new processes. Such a formulation is the goal of this work. We present a consistent formulation of the collision between two spherical relativistic shells. The model can be applied to both internal and ...

  10. Bremsstrahlung gamma rays from light Dark Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cirelli, Marco; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the often-neglected role of bremsstrahlung processes on the interstellar gas in computing indirect signatures of Dark Matter (DM) annihilation in the Galaxy, particularly for light DM candidates in the phenomenologically interesting O(10) GeV mass range. Especially from directions close to the Galactic Plane, the expected gamma-ray spectrum is altered via two effects: directly, by the photons emitted in the bremsstrahlung process on the interstellar gas by energetic electrons which are among the DM annihilation byproducts; indirectly, by the modification of the same electron spectrum, due to the additional energy loss process in the diffusion-loss equation (e.g. the resulting inverse Compton emission is altered). We quantify the importance of the bremsstrahlung emission in the GeV energy range, showing that it is the dominant component of the gamma-ray spectrum for some cases. We also find that, in regions in which bremsstrahlung dominates energy losses, the related gamma-ray emission is only moder...

  11. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  12. Environmental Radioactivity: Gamma Ray Spectroscopy with Germanium detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Gargi; Beausang, Cornelius; Hughes, Richard; Tarlow, Thomas; Gell, Kristen; University of Richmond Physics Team

    2013-10-01

    A CF-1000BRL series portable Air Particle Sampler with filter paper as filter media was placed in one indoor and one outdoor location at 100 LPM flow rate on six dates under alternating rainy and warm weather conditions over the course of sixteen days in May 2013. The machine running times spanned between 6 to 69 hours. Each filter paper was then put in a germanium gamma ray detector, and the counts ranged from 93000 to 250000 seconds. The spectra obtained were analyzed by the CANBERRA Genie 2000 software, corrected using a background spectrum, and calibrated using a 20.27 kBq activity multi-nuclide source. We graphed the corrected counts (from detector analysis time)/second (from air sampler running time)/liter (from the air sampler's flow rate) of sharp, significantly big peaks corresponding to a nuclide in every sample against the sample number along with error bars. The graphs were then used to compare the samples and they showed a similar trend. The slight differences were usually due to the different running times of the air sampler. The graphs of about 22 nuclides were analyzed. We also tried to recognize the nuclei to which several gamma rays belonged that were displayed but not recognized by the Genie 2000 software.

  13. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  14. Extragalactic Absorption of High Energy $\\gamma$-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1999-01-01

    The pair-production absorption of high-energy gamma-rays by intergalactic low-energy photons is expected to produce a high-energy cutoff in the spectra of extragalactic sources which is a sensitive function of redshift. We first discuss the expected absorption coefficient as a function of energy and redshift derived by Stecker and De Jager by making use of a new empirically based calculation of the spectral energy distribution of the intergalactic infrared radiation field as given by Malkan and Stecker. We then discuss the fact that new data on the high energy gamma-ray source Mrk 501 appear to show the amount of intergalactic absorption predicted. The implications of this new HEGRA data, should they be confirmed, are significant for the astrophysics of this source, implying that (1) there is no significant intrinsic absorption inside the source, and (2) the physics of the emission produces a power-law spectrum to energies above 20 TeV. As a further test for intergalactic absorption, we give a predicted spect...

  15. Gamma ray pulsars emission from extended polar cap cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Daugherty, J K; Daugherty, Joseph K; Harding, Alice K

    1995-01-01

    We have used a Monte Carlo simulation of a Polar Cap (PC) model of gamma-ray pulsars to estimate light curves and phase-resolved spectra for sources whose rotational and magnetic axes are oriented so that only one of the magnetic poles produces emission directed at the Earth. In this Single Polar Cap (SPC) scenario, even sources whose light curves have two distinct peaks (Crab, Vela, Geminga, PSR B1951+32) are due to emission concentrated near the rim of a single PC. If the inclination alpha is comparable to the half-width of the PC gamma-beam, alpha ~ theta_{b}, the peak-to-peak phase separation can have the large values (0.4 - 0.5) observed from these sources. In the model presented here we attribute the observed interpeak emission to pair cascades above the PC interior. Our simulation assumes the physics of conventional PC models, in which the gamma rays are due to photon-pair cascades initiated by curvature radiation from the acceleration of electrons above the PCs. In this work we assume that the acceler...

  16. Gamma-ray spectroscopy on irradiated MTR fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, L.A.A. E-mail: laaterre@net.ipen.br; Zeituni, C.A.; Perrotta, J.A.; Silva, J.E.R. da

    2000-08-11

    The availability of burnup data is an important requirement in any systematic approach to the enhancement of safety, economics and performance of a nuclear research reactor. This work presents the theory and experimental techniques applied to determine, by means of nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, the burnup of Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the IEA-R1 research reactor. Burnup measurements, based on analysis of spectra that result from collimation and detection of gamma-rays emitted in the decay of radioactive fission products, were performed at the reactor pool area. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector together with suitable fast electronics and an on-line microcomputer data acquisition module. In order to achieve absolute burnup values, the detection set (collimator tube+HPGe detector) was previously calibrated in efficiency. The obtained burnup values are compared with ones provided by reactor physics calculations, for three kinds of MTR fuel elements with different cooling times, initial enrichment grades and total number of fuel plates. Both values show good agreement within the experimental error limits.

  17. Gamma-ray fluxes in Oklo natural reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, C R; Sonzogni, A A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.054602

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty in the operating temperatures of Oklo reactor zones impacts the precision of bounds derived for time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. Improved $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu thermometry has been discussed but its usefulness may be complicated by photo excitation of the isomeric state $^{176m}$Lu by $^{176}$Lu($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) fluorescence. We calculate prompt, delayed and equilibrium $\\gamma$-ray fluxes due to fission of $^{235}$U in pulsed mode operation of Oklo zone RZ10. We use Monte Carlo modeling to calculate the prompt flux. We use improved data libraries to estimate delayed and equilibrium spectra and fluxes. We find $\\gamma$-ray fluxes as a function of energy and derive values for the coefficients $\\lambda_{\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime}$ that describe burn-up of $^{176}$Lu through the isomeric $^{176m}$Lu state. The contribution of the ($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) channel to the $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu isotopic ratio is negligible in comparison to the neutron burn-up channels. Lutetium...

  18. Neutrino emission from gamma-ray burst fireballs, revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hümmer, Svenja; Baerwald, Philipp; Winter, Walter

    2012-06-08

    We review the neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts, which is estimated from gamma-ray observations and used for the interpretation of recent IceCube data, from a particle physics perspective. We numerically calculate the neutrino flux for the same astrophysical assumptions as the analytical fireball neutrino model, including the dominant pion and kaon production modes, flavor mixing, and magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We demonstrate that taking into account the full energy dependencies of all spectra, the normalization of the expected neutrino flux reduces by about one order of magnitude and the spectrum shifts to higher energies, where we can pin down the exact origin of the discrepancies by the recomputation of the analytical models. We also reproduce the IceCube-40 analysis for exactly the same bursts and same assumptions and illustrate the impact of uncertainties. We conclude that the baryonic loading of the fireballs, which is an important control parameter for the emission of cosmic rays, can be constrained significantly with the full-scale experiment after about ten years.

  19. Search for gamma-ray transients using the SMM spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, G. H.; Harris, M. J.; Leising, M. D.; Messina, D. C.

    1993-01-01

    Observations for transient radiation made by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer on the SMM satellite are summarized. Spectra were obtained from 215 solar flares and 177 gamma-ray bursts. No narrow or moderately broadened lines were observed in any of the bursts. The rate of bursts is consistent with a constant over the mission but is weakly correlated with solar activity. No evidence was found for bursts of 511 keV line emission, unaccompanied by a strong continuum, at levels not less than 0.05 gamma/sq cm s for bursts lasting not more than 16 s. No evidence was found for broad features near 1 MeV from Cyg X-1, the Galactic center, or the Crab in 12-d integrations at levels not less than 0.006 gamma/sq cm s. No evidence was found for transient celestial narrow-line emission from 300 keV to 7 MeV on min-to-hrs-long time scales from 1984 to 1989.

  20. Modelling the $\\gamma$-ray variability of 3C 273

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Y G; Huang, B R; Kang, S J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate MeV-GeV $\\gamma$-ray outbursts in 3C 273 in the frame of a time-dependent one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model. In this model, electrons are accelerated to extra-relativistic energy through the stochastic particle acceleration and evolve with the time, nonthermal photons are produced by both synchrotron and inverse Compton scattering of synchrotron photons. Moreover, nonthermal photons during a quiescent are produced by the relativistic electrons in the steady state and those during a outburst are produced by the electrons whose injection rate is changed at some time interval. We apply the model to two exceptionally luminous $\\gamma$-ray outbursts observed by the Fermi-LAT from 3C 273 in September, 2009 and obtain the multi-wavelength spectra during the quiescent and during the outburst states, respectively. Our results show that the time-dependent properties of outbursts can be reproduced by adopting the appropriate injection rate function of the electron population.

  1. Development of the measurement technique for nuclear data with prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Shoji; Furutaka, Kazuyoshi; Harada, Hideo [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    2002-09-01

    To obtain the thermal neutron capture cross sections of radioactive fission product nuclides as the basic data on transmutation study, a measurement technique with prompt gamma-ray spectroscopy was developed. When daughter nuclides after neutron irradiations are stable, measuring the neutron capture cross sections is impossible. Therefore, a new technique was developed to investigate these. With this, the level schemes from the information of the prompt {gamma}-rays emitted during neutron irradiation are constructed, and the cross section is deduced with the emission probabilities of prompt {gamma}-rays. The measurement system for this technique was developed, and was effective. The system enables obtaining information on the cascade {gamma}-rays necessary for constructing the level-scheme. By measuring {sup nat}Pd, the partial level-scheme was constructed, and two new levels at 1906 keV and 2400 keV were identified. By using this technique, the neutron capture cross sections of nuclides that can't be measured by an activation method can be measured. (author)

  2. News from Cosmic Gamma-ray Line Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Diehl, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of gamma rays at MeV energies from cosmic radioactivities is one of the key tools for nuclear astrophysics, in its study of nuclear reactions and how they shape objects such as massive stars and supernova explosions. Additionally, the unique gamma-ray signature from the annihilation of positrons falls into this same astronomical window, and positrons are often produced from radioactive beta decays. Nuclear gamma-ray telescopes face instrumental challenges from penetrating gamma rays and cosmic-ray induced backgrounds. But the astrophysical benefits of such efforts are underlined by the discoveries of nuclear gamma~rays from the brightest of the expected sources. In recent years, both thermonuclear and core-collapse supernova radioactivity gamma~rays have been measured in spectral detail, and complement conventional supernova observations with measurements of origins in deep supernova interiors, from the decay of $^{56}$Ni, $^{56}$Co, and $^{44}$Ti. The diffuse afterglow in gamma rays of radioa...

  3. Measurement of fast neutrons and secondary gamma rays in graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarious, A.S.; El-Asyd Abdo, A.; Kansouh, W.A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Nuclear Research Centre; Bashter, I.I. [Zagazig Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Science

    1996-05-01

    The spatial fluxes and energy distributions of fast neutrons, total gamma rays and secondary gamma rays transmitted through different thicknesses of graphite have been measured. The graphite samples were arranged in front of one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. Gamma ray measurements were carried out for bare, cadmium filtered and boron carbide filtered reactor beams. A fast neutron and gamma ray spectrometer with a stilbene crystal was used to measure the spectrum of fast neutrons and gamma rays. Pulse shape discrimination using the zero cross over technique was used to distinguish the proton pulses from the electron pulses. The total fast neutrons macroscopic cross section and the linear attenuation coefficient for gamma rays were derived both for the whole energy range and at different energies. The obtained values were used to calculate the relaxation lengths for fast neutrons and gamma rays. (Author).

  4. Cosmological Gamma-Ray Bursts and Hypernovae Conclusively Linked

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    Clearest-Ever Evidence from VLT Spectra of Powerful Event Summary A very bright burst of gamma-rays was observed on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE-II) , in a sky region within the constellation Leo. Within 90 min, a new, very bright light source (the "optical afterglow") was detected in the same direction by means of a 40-inch telescope at the Siding Spring Observatory (Australia) and also in Japan. The gamma-ray burst was designated GRB 030329 , according to the date. And within 24 hours, a first, very detailed spectrum of this new object was obtained by the UVES high-dispersion spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the ESO Paranal Observatory (Chile). It allowed to determine the distance as about 2,650 million light-years (redshift 0.1685). Continued observations with the FORS1 and FORS2 multi-mode instruments on the VLT during the following month allowed an international team of astronomers [1] to document in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the optical afterglow of this gamma-ray burst . Their detailed report appears in the June 19 issue of the research journal "Nature". The spectra show the gradual and clear emergence of a supernova spectrum of the most energetic class known, a "hypernova" . This is caused by the explosion of a very heavy star - presumably over 25 times heavier than the Sun. The measured expansion velocity (in excess of 30,000 km/sec) and the total energy released were exceptionally high, even within the elect hypernova class. From a comparison with more nearby hypernovae, the astronomers are able to fix with good accuracy the moment of the stellar explosion. It turns out to be within an interval of plus/minus two days of the gamma-ray burst. This unique conclusion provides compelling evidence that the two events are directly connected. These observations therefore indicate a common physical process behind the hypernova explosion and the associated emission of strong gamma-ray

  5. Absorption of High Energy $\\gamma$ Rays by Interactions With Starlight Photons in Extragalactic Space at High Redshifts and the High Energy $\\gamma$-Ray Background

    CERN Document Server

    Salamon, M H

    1998-01-01

    We calculate the absorption of 10-500 GeV gamma-rays at high redshifts. This calculation requires the determination of the high-redshift evolution of the intergalactic starlight photon field, including its IR-UV spectral energy distribution. To estimate this evolution, we have followed a recent analysis of Fall, Charlot and Pei which gives results consistent with recent data. We give our results for the gamma-ray opacity as a function of redshift out to a redshift of 3. We also give predicted gamma-ray spectra for selected blazars and give an extragalactic unresolved blazar background spectrum up to 500 GeV. Our results indicate that this background should steepen significantly above 20 GeV owing to intergalactic absorption. Future observations of this steepening would provide a test for the blazar background origin hypothesis. We have used our results to discuss upper limits on the redshifts of gamma-ray bursts. We note that the 17 Feb. 1994 burst observed by EGRET must have originated at a redshift less tha...

  6. An alternative Explanation for the Fermi GeV Gamma-Ray Excess

    CERN Document Server

    de Boer, Wim; Neumann, Alexander; Biermann, Peter L

    2016-01-01

    The "GeV-excess" of the diffuse gamma-rays in the halo is studied with a template fit based on energy spectra for each possible process of gamma-ray emission. Such a fit allows to determine the background and signal simultaneously, so the Galactic Disk can be included in the analysis. We find evidence that the "excess", characterised by a gamma-ray spectrum peaking at 2 GeV, is much stronger in Molecular Clouds in the disk than the "GeV-excess" observed up to now in the halo. The possible reason why the emissivity of Molecular Clouds peaks at 2 GeV are the energy losses and magnetic cutoffs inside MCs, thus depleting the low energy part of the CR spectra and shifting the maximum of the gamma-ray spectra to higher energies. This peaking of the emissivity in Molecular Clouds at 2 GeV was clearly observed from the spectrum of the Central Molecular Zone, which dominates the emission in the inner few degrees of the Galactic Centre. Although the spectrum of the Central Molecular Zone peaks at 2 GeV, it cannot be re...

  7. Response of AGATA Segmented HPGe Detectors to Gamma Rays up to 15.1 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Crespi, F C L; Camera, F; Akkoyun, S; Atac, A; Bazzacco, D; Bellato, M; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Bortolato, D; Bottoni, S; Bracco, A; Brambilla, S; Bruyneel, B; Cerutia, S; Ciemala, M; Coelli, S; Eberth, J; Fanin, C; Farnea, E; Gadea, A; Giaz, A; Gottardo, A; Hess, H; Kmiecik, M; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Mengoni, D; Michelagnoli, C; Million, B; Montanari, D; Pellegri, L; Recchia, F; Reiter, P; Riboldi, S; Ur, C A; Vandone, V; Valiente-Dobon, J J; Wieland, O; Wiens, A

    2012-01-01

    The response of AGATA segmented HPGe detectors to gamma rays in the energy range 2-15 MeV was measured. The 15.1 MeV gamma rays were produced using the reaction d(11B,ng)12C at Ebeam = 19.1 MeV, while gamma-rays between 2 to 9 MeV were produced using an Am-Be-Fe radioactive source. The energy resolution and linearity were studied and the energy-to-pulse-height conversion resulted to be linear within 0.05%. Experimental interaction multiplicity distributions are discussed and compared with the results of Geant4 simulations. It is shown that the application of gamma-ray tracking allows a suppression of background radiation following neutron capture by Ge nuclei. Finally the Doppler correction for the 15.1 MeV gamma line, performed using the position information extracted with Pulse-shape Analysis, is discussed.

  8. 209Tl half-life and gamma-ray measurements of radionuclides belonging to the (4 n + 1) decay chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardisson, G.; Barci, V.; El Samad, O.

    1994-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectra of radiochemically separated 221Fr, 213Bi and 209Tl sources were measured using coaxial and planar HPGe detectors. The energies and emission probabilities of eight new gamma-ray transitions were observed in the decay of 209Tl; a half-life of (2.161±0.007) min was measured. Twenty-two gamma-rays have been attributed to the β-decay of 213Bi, of which 17 are new with respect to previous studies. The 213Po level scheme was determined using γ-γ coincidence measurements: eight excited states are proposed of which six are new. Preliminary measurements of the α-decay of 221Fr revealed the existence of 18 gamma-ray transitions of which eight are reported for the first time.

  9. High energy gamma-ray emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts -- before GLAST

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi-Zhong

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft gamma-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high energy gamma-ray emission (>20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  10. GAMMA RAYS FROM STAR FORMATION IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storm, Emma M.; Jeltema, Tesla E.; Profumo, Stefano [Department of Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission, presumably from non-thermal processes connected to the acceleration of cosmic-ray nuclei and electrons. The detection of gamma rays from starburst galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity. Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 {mu}m) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star-forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study, we apply the functional relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities of galaxies derived by the Fermi Collaboration to a sample of the best candidate galaxy clusters for detection in gamma rays in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with star formation in galaxy clusters. We find that several clusters have predicted gamma-ray emission from star formation that are within an order of magnitude of the upper limits derived in Ackermann et al. based on non-detection by Fermi-LAT. Given the current gamma-ray limits, star formation likely plays a significant role in the gamma-ray emission in some clusters, especially those with cool cores. We predict that both Fermi-LAT over the course of its lifetime and the future Cerenkov Telescope Array will be able to detect gamma-ray emission from star-forming galaxies in clusters.

  11. Determining the solar-flare photospheric scale height from SMM gamma-ray measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A connected series of Monte Carlo programs was developed to make systematic calculations of the energy, temporal and angular dependences of the gamma-ray line and neutron emission resulting from such accelerated ion interactions. Comparing the results of these calculations with the Solar Maximum Mission/Gamma Ray Spectrometer (SMM/GRS) measurements of gamma-ray line and neutron fluxes, the total number and energy spectrum of the flare-accelerated ions trapped on magnetic loops at the Sun were determined and the angular distribution, pitch angle scattering, and mirroring of the ions on loop fields were constrained. Comparing the calculations with measurements of the time dependence of the neutron capture line emission, a determination of the He-3/H ratio in the photosphere was also made. The diagnostic capabilities of the SMM/GRS measurements were extended by developing a new technique to directly determine the effective photospheric scale height in solar flares from the neutron capture gamma-ray line measurements, and critically test current atmospheric models in the flare region.

  12. Implications of plasma beam instabilities for the statistics of the Fermi hard gamma-ray blazars and the origin of the extragalactic gamma-ray background

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Avery E. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Pfrommer, Christoph; Puchwein, Ewald [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang, Philip [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, 1900 East Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Fermi has been instrumental in constraining the luminosity function and redshift evolution of gamma-ray bright BL Lac objects, a subpopulation of blazars with almost featureless optical spectra. This includes limits on the spectrum and anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background (EGRB), redshift distribution of nearby Fermi active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and the construction of a logN-log S relation. Based on these, it has been argued that the evolution of the gamma-ray bright BL Lac population must be much less dramatic than that of other AGNs. However, critical to such claims is the assumption that inverse Compton cascades reprocess emission above a TeV into the Fermi energy range, substantially enhancing the strength of the observed limits. Here we demonstrate that in the absence of such a process, due, e.g., to the presence of virulent plasma beam instabilities that preempt the cascade, a population of TeV-bright BL Lac objects that evolve similarly to quasars is consistent with the population of hard gamma-ray BL Lac objects observed by Fermi. Specifically, we show that a simple model for the properties and luminosity function is simultaneously able to reproduce their logN-log S relation, local redshift distribution, and contribution to the EGRB and its anisotropy without any free parameters. Insofar as the naturalness of a picture in which the hard gamma-ray BL Lac population exhibits the strong redshift evolution observed in other tracers of the cosmological history of accretion onto halos is desirable, this lends support for the absence of the inverse Compton cascades and the existence of the beam plasma instabilities.

  13. Keck Observations of 160 Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Perley, Daniel A; Prochaska, Jason X

    2013-01-01

    We present a preliminary data release from our multi-year campaign at Keck Observatory to study the host galaxies of a large sample of Swift-era gamma-ray bursts via multi-color ground-based optical imaging and spectroscopy. With over 160 targets observed to date (and almost 100 host detections, most of which have not previously been reported in the literature) our effort represents the broadest GRB host survey to date. While targeting was heterogeneous, our observations span the known diversity of GRBs including short bursts, long bursts, spectrally soft GRBs (XRFs), ultra-energetic GRBs, X-ray faint GRBs, dark GRBs, SN-GRBs, and other sub-classes. We also present a preview of our database (currently available online via a convenient web interface) including a catalog of multi-color photometry, redshifts and line ID's. Final photometry and reduced imaging and spectra will be available in the near future.

  14. The effect of a gamma ray flare on Schumann resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Nickolaenko

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe the ionospheric modification by the SGR 1806-20 gamma flare (27 December 2004 seen in the global electromagnetic (Schumann resonance. The gamma rays lowered the ionosphere over the dayside of the globe and modified the Schumann resonance spectra. We present the extremely low frequency (ELF data monitored at the Moshiri observatory, Japan (44.365° N, 142.24° E. Records are compared with the expected modifications, which facilitate detection of the simultaneous abrupt change in the dynamic resonance pattern of the experimental record. The gamma flare modified the current of the global electric circuit and thus caused the "parametric" ELF transient. Model results are compared with observations enabling evaluation of changes in the global electric circuit.

  15. Two new high energy gamma-ray blazar candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, R; Bernieri, E; Massaro, E

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of two new gamma-ray sources in the Fermi-LAT sky (Pass 8) at energies higher than 20 GeV, and confirmed at lower energies, using a source detection tool based on the Minimum Spanning Tree algorithm. One of these sources, at a Galactic latitude of about -4{\\deg}, is a new discovery, while the other was previously reported above 50 GeV in the 2FHL catalogue. We searched for archival multi-wavelength data of possible counterparts and found interesting candidates. Both objects are radio sources and their WISE infrared colours are typical of blazars. While for the former source no optical spectra are available, for the latter a puzzling optical spectrum corresponding to a white dwarf star is found in the 6dF database. We discuss the spectral energy distributions of both sources and possible interpretations.

  16. Flares in Gamma Ray Bursts: Disc Fragmentation and Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Tanaka, Takamitsu L; Margutti, Raffaella

    2016-01-01

    Flaring activity following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), observed in both long and short GRBs, signals a long-term activity of the central engine. However, its production mechanism has remained elusive. Here we develop a quantitative model of the idea proposed by Perna et al. of a disc whose outer regions fragment due to the onset of gravitational instability. The self-gravitating clumps migrate through the disc and begin to evolve viscously when tidal and shearing torques break them apart. Our model consists of two ingredients: theoretical bolometric flare lightcurves whose shape (width, skewness) is largely insensitive to the model parameters, and a spectral correction to match the bandpass of the available observations, that is calibrated using the observed spectra of the flares. This simple model reproduces, with excellent agreement, the empirical statistical properties of the flares as measured by their width-to-arrival time ratio and skewness (ratio between decay and rise time). We present model fits to the ...

  17. On Magnetic Field Amplification in Gamma-Ray Burst Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic fields play a dual role in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). First, GRB and afterglow spectra (the latter interpreted as emission from external shocks) imply synchrotron radiation in a magnetic field that is a significant fraction of equipartition with the particle energy density. Second, magnetized rotators with $\\sim 10^{15}$ Gauss field may power GRB by transporting Poynting flux to large distances where it dissipates and also drives an external shock. The field amplification at external shocks and in the engine involve separate processes. External shock fields are likely either seeded by a pre-GRB wind, or are amplified by two-stream plasma instabilities with MHD turbulence playing a subsequent role. In the engine, the large scale fields are likely produced by MHD helical dynamos, since flux accretion cannot easily compete with turbulent diffusion, and because structures must be large enough to rise to coronae before diffusing. Why helical dynamos are feasible, and their relation to the magnetorotational ...

  18. An in situ gamma ray spectrometer with CsI/p-i-n detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Clarke X.; Williams, Ron R.

    1995-03-01

    The development of a portable gamma ray spectrometer based on a CsI(Tl) scintillator (1.8 cm×1.8 cm×4 cm) with integral p-i-n diode (1.8 cm×4 cm) is described. A single board computer containing the MC68HC11 microcontroller, a single-chip self-contained computer system, is used for system control. The total size of the instrument is only 12 in×7 in. including the spectrometer and power supply. The system provides a low cost, low power gamma ray spectrometer as compared to the more common PMT-based devices. Spectra can be collected in daily intervals for up to 1 week. Special software which monitors the proper working of the spectrometer insures long term stability. This spectrometer can be used for routine monitoring and detection of gamma ray emitting radio nuclides. Performance of the spectrometer as well as gamma ray spectra are presented. The qualitative and quantitative reliability have shown its potential as a stand alone field monitoring instrument due to its low power consumption and intelligence.

  19. Gamma ray constraints on decaying dark matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirelli, M.; Moulin, E.; Panci, P.

    2012-01-01

    We derive new bounds on decaying dark matter from the gamma ray measurements of (i) the isotropic residual (extragalactic) background by Fermi and (ii) the Fornax galaxy cluster by H.E.S.S. We find that those from (i) are among the most stringent constraints currently available, for a large range...... of dark matter masses and a variety of decay modes, excluding half-lives up to similar to 10(26) to few 10(27) seconds. In particular, they rule out the interpretation in terms of decaying dark matter of the e(+/-) spectral features in PAMELA, Fermi and H.E.S.S., unless very conservative choices...

  20. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collap...

  1. Properties of $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Classes

    CERN Document Server

    Hakkila, J; Roiger, R J; Mallozzi, R S; Pendleton, G N; Meegan, C A; Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    The three gamma-ray burst (GRB) classes identified by statistical clustering analysis (Mukherjee et al. 1998) are examined using the pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 (Quinlan 1986). Although the statistical existence of Class 3 (intermediate duration, intermediate fluence, soft) is supported, the properties of this class do not need to arise from a distinct source population. Class 3 properties can easily be produced from Class 1 (long, high fluence, intermediate hardness) by a combination of measurement error, hardness/intensity correlation, and a newly-identified BATSE bias (the fluence duration bias). Class 2 (short, low fluence, hard) does not appear to be related to Class 1.

  2. Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352, 583, and 609keV in the low-energy spectral sections after the energ...

  3. Nucleosynthetic Yields from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rockefeller, Gabriel; Young, Patrick; Bennett, Michael; Diehl, Steven; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hungerford, Aimee; Pignatari, Marco; Magkotsios, Georgios; Timmes, Francis X

    2008-01-01

    The "collapsar" engine for gamma-ray bursts invokes as its energy source the failure of a normal supernova and the formation of a black hole. Here we present the results of the first three-dimensional simulation of the collapse of a massive star down to a black hole, including the subsequent accretion and explosion. The explosion differs significantly from the axisymmetric scenario obtained in two-dimensional simulations; this has important consequences for the nucleosynthetic yields. We compare the nucleosynthetic yields to those of hypernovae. Calculating yields from three-dimensional explosions requires new strategies in post-process nucleosynthesis; we discuss NuGrid's plan for three-dimensional yields.

  4. Polarized gamma-rays with laser-Compton backscattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgaki, H.; Noguchi, T.; Sugiyama, S. [Electrotechnical Lab., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Polarized gamma-rays were generated through laser-Compton backscattering (LCS) of a conventional Nd:YAG laser with electrons circulating in the electron storage ring TERAS at Electrotechnical Laboratory. We measured the energy, the energy spread, and the yield of the gamma-rays to characterize our gamma-ray source. The gamma-ray energy can be varied by changing the energy of the electrons circulating the storage ring. In our case, the energy of electrons in the storage ring were varied its energy from 200 to 750 MeV. Consequently, we observed gamma-ray energies of 1 to 10 MeV with 1064 run laser photons. Furthermore, the gamma-ray energy was extended to 20 MeV by using the 2nd harmonic of the Nd:YAG laser. This shows a good agreement with theoretical calculation. The gamma-ray energy spread was also measured to be 1% FWHM for -1 MeV gamma-rays and to be 4% FWHM for 10 MeV gamma-rays with a narrow collimator that defined the scattering cone. The gamma-ray yield was 47.2 photons/mA/W/s. This value is consistent with a rough estimation of 59.5 photons/mA/W/s derived from theory. Furthermore, we tried to use these gamma-rays for a nuclear fluorescence experiment. If we use a polarized laser beam, we can easily obtain polarized gamma-rays. Elastically scattered photons from {sup 208} Pb were clearly measured with the linearly polarized gamma-rays, and we could assign the parity of J=1 states in the nucleus. We should emphasize that the polarized gamma-ray from LCS is quit useful in this field, because we can use highly, almost completely, polarized gamma-rays. We also use the LCS gamma-rays to measure the photon absorption coefficients. In near future, we will try to generate a circular polarized gamma-ray. We also have a plan to use an FEL, because it can produce intense laser photons in the same geometric configuration as the LCS facility.

  5. Enhanced Analysis Techniques for an Imaging Neutron and Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Amanda C.

    The presence of gamma rays and neutrons is a strong indicator of the presence of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The imaging Neutron and gamma ray SPECTrometer (NSPECT) developed by the University of New Hampshire and Michigan Aerospace corporation detects the fast neutrons and prompt gamma rays from fissile material, and the gamma rays from radioactive material. The instrument operates as a double scatter device, requiring a neutron or a gamma ray to interact twice in the instrument. While this detection requirement decreases the efficiency of the instrument, it offers superior background rejection and the ability to measure the energy and momentum of the incident particle. These measurements create energy spectra and images of the emitting source for source identification and localization. The dual species instrument provides superior detection than a single species alone. In realistic detection scenarios, few particles are detected from a potential threat due to source shielding, detection at a distance, high background, and weak sources. This contributes to a small signal to noise ratio, and threat detection becomes difficult. To address these difficulties, several enhanced data analysis tools were developed. A Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC) helps set instrumental alarm thresholds as well as to identify the presence of a source. Analysis of a dual-species ROC curve provides superior detection capabilities. Bayesian analysis helps to detect and identify the presence of a source through model comparisons, and helps create a background corrected count spectra for enhanced spectroscopy. Development of an instrument response using simulations and numerical analyses will help perform spectra and image deconvolution. This thesis will outline the principles of operation of the NSPECT instrument using the double scatter technology, traditional analysis techniques, and enhanced analysis techniques as applied to data from the NSPECT instrument, and an

  6. Highlights of GeV Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Because high-energy gamma rays are primarily produced by high-energy particle interactions, the gamma-ray survey of the sky by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope offers a view of sites of cosmic ray production and interactions. Gamma-ray bursts, pulsars, pulsar wind nebulae, binary sources, and Active Galactic Nuclei are all phenomena that reveal particle acceleration through their gamma-ray emission. Diffuse Galactic gamma radiation, Solar System gamma-ray sources, and energetic radiation from supernova remnants are likely tracers of high-energy particle interactions with matter and photon fields. This paper will present a broad overview of the constantly changing sky seen with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi spacecraft.

  7. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  8. Relation between $\\gamma$-rays and emission lines for the $\\gamma$-ray loud blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, J H

    2000-01-01

    The relation between the $\\gamma$-ray and the emission line luminosities for a sample of 36 $\\gamma$-ray loud blazars is investigated; an apparent correlation between them, $L_{\\gamma} \\propto L_{Line}^{0.69\\pm0.11}$, with a correlation coefficient $r=0.741$ and a chance probability of $p = 1.9\\times10^{-6}$, is found. It is found, however, that there is no intrinsic correlation between them: the apparent correlation is due to the redshift dependence in a flux-limited sample. Thus no evidence is found to support the argument that the up-scattered soft photons are from the broad emission lines. Our analysis does not conflict with the SSC model. The disk-jet symbiosis and radio/$\\gamma$-ray correlation found in the literature are also discussed. The radio/$\\gamma$-ray correlation may be an apparent correlation caused by the boosting effect since both bands are strongly beamed.

  9. AGNs and microquasars as high energy gamma-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Paredes, J M

    2004-01-01

    The extragalactic analogs of the microquasars, the quasars, are strong gamma-ray emitters at GeV energies. It is expected that microquasars are also gamma-ray sources, because of the analogy with quasars and because theoretical models predict the high-energy emission. There are two microquasars that appear as the possible counterparts for two unidentified high-energy gamma-ray sources.

  10. Gamma ray bursts, neutron star quakes, and the Casimir effect

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, C; Pérez-Mercader, J; Carlson, C; Goldman, T; Perez-Mercader, J

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the dynamic Casimir effect is a mechanism that converts the energy of neutron starquakes into \\gamma--rays. This mechanism efficiently produces photons from electromagnetic Casimir energy released by the rapid motion of a dielectric medium into a vacuum. Estimates based on the cutoff energy of the gamma ray bursts and the volume involved in a starquake indicate that the total gamma ray energy emission is consonant with observational requirements.

  11. Absorption of Very High Energy $\\gamma$-Rays by Intergalactic Infrared Radiation A New Determination

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W

    1998-01-01

    We present a new calculation of the intergalactic gamma-ray absorption coefficient as a function of both energy and redshift. In reexamining this problem, we make use of a new, empirically based calculation (as opposed to previous model calculations) of the intergalactic infrared radiation field. We find smaller opacities than those given previously (Stecker & De Jager 1997). We apply our results to the new observations of the flaring gamma-ray spectra of Mrk421 and Mrk501, both at a redshift of apx. 0.03. Our new calculations indicate that there should be no significant curvature in the spectra of these sources for energies below 10 TeV, as indicated by recent observations. However, the intrinsic spectra of these sources should be harder by apx. 0.2 to 0.45 in the spectral index in the 1 to 10 TeV range with an intergalactic absorption cutoff above apx. 20 TeV.

  12. Characteristics of bursts observed by the SMM Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Share, G. H.; Messina, D. C.; Iadicicco, A.; Matz, S. M.; Rieger, E.; Forrest, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the SMM completed close to 10 years of highly successful operation when the spacecraft reentered the atmosphere on December 2, 1989. During this period the GRS detected 177 events above 300 keV which have been classified as cosmic gamma-ray bursts. A catalog of these events is in preparation which will include time profiles and spectra for all events. Visual inspection of the spectra indicates that emission typically extends into the MeV range, without any evidence for a high-energy cutoff; 17 of these events are also observed above 10 MeV. We find no convincing evidence for line-like emission features in any of the time-integrated spectra.

  13. Long Gamma-Ray Transients from Collapsars

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2011-01-01

    In the collapsar model for common gamma-ray bursts, the formation of a centrifugally supported disk occurs during the first $\\sim$10 seconds following the collapse of the iron core in a massive star. This only occurs in a small fraction of massive stellar deaths, however, and requires unusual conditions. A much more frequent occurrence could be the death of a star that makes a black hole and a weak or absent outgoing shock, but in a progenitor that only has enough angular momentum in its outermost layers to make a disk. We consider several cases where this is likely to occur - blue supergiants with low mass loss rates, tidally-interacting binaries involving either helium stars or giant stars, and the collapse to a black hole of very massive pair-instability supernovae. These events have in common the accretion of a solar mass or so of material through a disk over a period much longer than the duration of a common gamma-ray burst. A broad range of powers is possible, $10^{47}$ to $10^{50}\\,$erg s$^{-1}$, and t...

  14. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  15. Gamma-ray binaries: pulsars in disguise ?

    CERN Document Server

    Dubus, G

    2006-01-01

    LS 5039 and LSI +61 303 are unique amongst high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXB) for their spatially-resolved radio emission and their counterpart at >GeV gamma-ray energies, canonically attributed to non-thermal particles in an accretion-powered relativistic jet. The only other HMXB known to emit very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays, PSR B1259-63, harbours a non-accreting millisecond pulsar. I investigate whether the interaction of the relativistic wind from a young pulsar with the wind from its stellar companion, as in PSR B1259-63, constitutes a viable scenario to explain the observations of LS 5039 and LSI +61 303. Emission would arise from the shocked pulsar wind material, which then flows away to large distances in a comet-shape tail, reproducing on a smaller scale what is observed in isolated, high motion pulsars interacting with the ISM. Simple expectations for the SED are derived and are shown to depend on few input parameters. Detailed modelling of the particle evolution is compared to the observations from ...

  16. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  17. Gamma-ray bursts and collisionless shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2006-01-01

    Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks is believed to be responsible for the production of cosmic-rays over a wide range of energies, from few GeV to >10^{20} eV, as well as for the non-thermal emission of radiation from a wide variety of high energy astrophysical sources. A theory of collisionless shocks based on first principles does not, however, exist. Observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) "afterglows" provide a unique opportunity for diagnosing the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks. Most GRBs are believed to be associated with explosions of massive stars, and their "afterglows," delayed low energy emission following the prompt burst of gamma-rays, are produced by relativistic collisionless shock waves driven by the explosion into the surrounding plasma. Some of the striking characteristics of these shocks include the generation of downstream magnetic fields with energy density exceeding that of the upstream field by ~8 orders of magnitude, the survival of this strong field at distances ...

  18. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  19. Classifying Unidentified Gamma-ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Salvetti, David

    2016-01-01

    During its first 2 years of mission the Fermi-LAT instrument discovered more than 1,800 gamma-ray sources in the 100 MeV to 100 GeV range. Despite the application of advanced techniques to identify and associate the Fermi-LAT sources with counterparts at other wavelengths, about 40% of the LAT sources have no a clear identification remaining "unassociated". The purpose of my Ph.D. work has been to pursue a statistical approach to identify the nature of each Fermi-LAT unassociated source. To this aim, we implemented advanced machine learning techniques, such as logistic regression and artificial neural networks, to classify these sources on the basis of all the available gamma-ray information about location, energy spectrum and time variability. These analyses have been used for selecting targets for AGN and pulsar searches and planning multi-wavelength follow-up observations. In particular, we have focused our attention on the search of possible radio-quiet millisecond pulsar (MSP) candidates in the sample of...

  20. Gamma ray tests of Minimal Dark Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirelli, Marco [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Hambye, Thomas [Service de Physique Theórique, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe, CP225, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Panci, Paolo [Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, Paris 75014 (France); Sala, Filippo; Taoso, Marco [Institut de Physique Théorique, Université Paris Saclay, CNRS, CEA, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2015-10-12

    We reconsider the model of Minimal Dark Matter (a fermionic, hypercharge-less quintuplet of the EW interactions) and compute its gamma ray signatures. We compare them with a number of gamma ray probes: the galactic halo diffuse measurements, the galactic center line searches and recent dwarf galaxies observations. We find that the original minimal model, whose mass is fixed at 9.4 TeV by the relic abundance requirement, is constrained by the line searches from the Galactic Center: it is ruled out if the Milky Way possesses a cuspy profile such as NFW but it is still allowed if it has a cored one. Observations of dwarf spheroidal galaxies are also relevant (in particular searches for lines), and ongoing astrophysical progresses on these systems have the potential to eventually rule out the model. We also explore a wider mass range, which applies to the case in which the relic abundance requirement is relaxed. Most of our results can be safely extended to the larger class of multi-TeV WIMP DM annihilating into massive gauge bosons.

  1. Soft gamma-ray sources detected by INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Petry, D; Halloin, H; Strong, A

    2009-01-01

    We aim to exploit the available INTEGRAL/SPI data to provide time-averaged spectra of the brightest soft gamma-ray sources. Employing a maximum-likelihood fit technique for our SPI data analysis, we take as input to our source model the source catalog derived by Bouchet et al. (2008) from a SPI all-sky study. We use the first four years of public SPI data and extract spectra between 25 keV and 1 MeV for the 20 catalog sources detected by Bouchet et al. at 200 - 600 keV with >= 2.5 sigma. In order to verify our analysis, we also extract spectra for the same sources from the corresponding INTEGRAL/ISGRI data. We fit adequate spectral models to the energy range 25-1000 keV for SPI and 25-600 keV for ISGRI. We use our spectra from the Crab (which is among the 20 sources studied here) and an empty location in a crowded field to derive an estimation of the systematic errors. The agreement between our SPI and ISGRI measurements is good if we normalise them on the Crab spectrum. Our SPI flux measurements also agree w...

  2. Gamma ray production cross sections in proton induced reactions on natural Mg, Si and Fe targets over the proton energy range 30 up to 66 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Yahia-Chérif, W; Kiener, J; Tatischeff, V; Lawrie, E; Lawrie, J J; Belhout, A; Benhabiles, H; Bucher, T D; Chafa, A; Damache, S; Debabi, M; Deloncle, I; Easton, J L; Hamadache, C; Hammache, F; Jones, P; Kheswa, B V; Khumalo, N; Lamula, T; Majola, S T H; Negi, D; Ndayishimye, J; Noncolela, S P; Moussa, D; Nchodu, R; Papka, P; de Sereville, N; Sharpey-Schafer, J F; Shirinda, O; Wiedeking, M; Wyngaardt, S

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray excitation functions have been measured for 30, 42, 54 and 66 MeV proton beams accelerated onto C + O (Mylar), Mg, Si, and Fe targets of astrophysical interest at the separate-sector cyclotron of iThemba LABS in Somerset West (Cape Town, South Africa). A large solid angle, high energy resolution detection system of the Eurogam type was used to record Gamma-ray energy spectra. Derived preliminary results of Gamma-ray line production cross sections for the Mg, Si and Fe target nuclei are reported and discussed. The current cross section data for known, intense Gamma-ray lines from these nuclei consistently extend to higher proton energies previous experimental data measured up to Ep ~ 25 MeV at the Orsay and Washington tandem accelerators. Data for new Gamma-ray lines observed for the first time in this work are also reported.

  3. GRIPS - Gamma-Ray Burst Investigation via Polarimetry and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J

    2008-01-01

    The primary scientific goal of the GRIPS mission is to revolutionize our understanding of the early universe using gamma-ray bursts. We propose a new generation gamma-ray observatory capable of unprecedented spectroscopy over a wide range of gamma-ray energies (200 keV--50 MeV) and of polarimetry (200--1000 keV). Secondary goals achievable by this mission include direct measurements of supernova interiors through gamma-rays from radioactive decays, nuclear astrophysics with massive stars and novae, and studies of particle acceleration near compact stars, interstellar shocks, and clusters of galaxies.

  4. Fermi Large Area Telescope Bright Gamma-ray Source List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Ajello, M.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U., OKC /Stockholm U.; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Band, D.L.; /NASA, Goddard /NASA, Goddard; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bignami, G.F.; /Pavia U.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /ASDC, Frascati /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /NASA, Goddard /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /ASDC, Frascati /NASA, Goddard /Maryland U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /NASA, Goddard; /more authors..

    2009-05-15

    Following its launch in 2008 June, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (Fermi) began a sky survey in August. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi in three months produced a deeper and better resolved map of the {gamma}-ray sky than any previous space mission. We present here initial results for energies above 100 MeV for the 205 most significant (statistical significance greater than {approx}10{sigma}) {gamma}-ray sources in these data. These are the best characterized and best localized point-like (i.e., spatially unresolved) {gamma}-ray sources in the early mission data.

  5. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray...

  6. Mercuric Iodide Anticoincidence Shield for Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We utilize a new detector material, polycrystalline mercuric iodide, for background suppression by active anticoincidence shielding in gamma-ray spectrometers. Two...

  7. Modeling the gamma-ray emission in the Galactic Center with a fading cosmic-ray accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Prosekin, Anton; Chang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Recent HESS observations of the ~200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic Center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic Center shows a cutoff at ~10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single, yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the C...

  8. An investigation of the possibility of detecting gamma-ray flashes originating from the atmosphere of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mahdi; Dwyer, Joseph R.

    2016-09-01

    The Runaway Electrons Avalanche Model Monte Carlo simulation is used to study the propagation of runaway electrons and gamma-ray flashes originating from the atmosphere of Venus, and the possibility of detecting these high-energy gamma rays at low-Venus orbit is also investigated. Relativistic Runaway Electron Avalanche (RREA) lengths and energy spectra at the Venus middle cloud levels have similar values to those of Earth at sea level, with a similar RREA threshold electric field ( 286 kV/m). If electrified clouds in Venus make similar numbers of gamma rays as are made by thunderstorms on Earth during Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs), then the calculated gamma-ray fluences at low-Venus orbit ( 550 km) have an approximate range of 10-3 photons/cm2 to 4 photons/cm2 for the source altitude between 58 km and 70 km. These gamma-ray fluences are similar to those measured by spacecraft in low-Earth orbit from TGFs. Therefore, if TGF-like events initiate in the middle and upper clouds of Venus, they would be detectable by spacecrafts at low-Venus orbit.

  9. Modeling the Gamma-Ray Emission in the GALACTIC CENTER with a Fading Cosmic-ray Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu; Prosekin, Anton; Chang, Xiao-Chuan

    2016-12-01

    Recent HESS observations of the ∼200 pc scale diffuse gamma-ray emission from the central molecular zone (CMZ) suggest the presence of a PeV cosmic-ray accelerator (PeVatron) located in the inner 10 pc region of the Galactic center. Interestingly, the gamma-ray spectrum of the point-like source (HESS J1745-290) in the Galactic center shows a cutoff at ∼10 TeV, implying a cutoff around 100 TeV in the cosmic-ray proton spectrum. Here we propose that the gamma-ray emission from the inner and the outer regions may be explained self-consistently by run-away protons from a single yet fading accelerator. In this model, gamma-rays from the CMZ region are produced by protons injected in the past, while gamma-rays from the inner region are produced by protons injected more recently. We suggest that the blast wave formed in a tidal disruption event (TDE) caused by the supermassive black hole (Sgr A*) could serve as such a fading accelerator. With typical parameters of the TDE blast wave, gamma-ray spectra of both the CMZ region and HESS J1745-290 can be reproduced simultaneously. Meanwhile, we find that the cosmic-ray energy density profile in the CMZ region may also be reproduced in the fading accelerator model when appropriate combinations of the particle injection history and the diffusion coefficient of cosmic rays are adopted.

  10. Attenuation of X and Gamma Rays in Personal Radiation Shielding Protective Clothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlovska, Michaela; Cerny, Radek; Otahal, Petr

    2015-11-01

    A collection of personal radiation shielding protective clothing, suitable for use in case of accidents in nuclear facilities or radiological emergency situations involving radioactive agents, was gathered and tested at the Nuclear Protection Department of the National Institute for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Protection, Czech Republic. Attenuating qualities of shielding layers in individual protective clothing were tested via spectra measurement of x and gamma rays, penetrating them. The rays originated from different radionuclide point sources, the gamma ray energies of which cover a broad energy range. The spectra were measured by handheld spectrometers, both scintillation and High Purity Germanium. Different narrow beam geometries were adjusted using a special testing bench and a set of various collimators. The main experimentally determined quantity for individual samples of personal radiation shielding protective clothing was x and gamma rays attenuation for significant energies of the spectra. The attenuation was assessed comparing net peak areas (after background subtraction) in spectra, where a tested sample was placed between the source and the detector, and corresponding net peak areas in spectra, measured without the sample. Mass attenuation coefficients, which describe attenuating qualities of shielding layers materials in individual samples, together with corresponding lead equivalents, were determined as well. Experimentally assessed mass attenuation coefficients of the samples were compared to the referred ones for individual heavy metals.

  11. Development of a Small-Sized, Flexible, and Insertable Fiber-Optic Radiation Sensor for Gamma-Ray Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wook Jae Yoo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a small-sized, flexible, and insertable fiber-optic radiation sensor (FORS that is composed of a sensing probe, a plastic optical fiber (POF, a photomultiplier tube (PMT-amplifier system, and a multichannel analyzer (MCA to obtain the energy spectra of radioactive isotopes. As an inorganic scintillator for gamma-ray spectroscopy, a cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce crystal was used and two solid-disc type radioactive isotopes with the same dimensions, cesium-137 (Cs-137 and cobalt-60 (Co-60, were used as gamma-ray emitters. We first determined the length of the LYSO:Ce crystal considering the absorption of charged particle energy and measured the gamma-ray energy spectra using the FORS. The experimental results demonstrated that the proposed FORS can be used to discriminate species of radioactive isotopes by measuring their inherent energy spectra, even when gamma-ray emitters are mixed. The relationship between the measured photon counts of the FORS and the radioactivity of Cs-137 was subsequently obtained. The amount of scintillating light generated from the FORS increased by increasing the radioactivity of Cs-137. Finally, the performance of the fabricated FORS according to the length and diameter of the POF was also evaluated. Based on the results of this study, it is anticipated that a novel FORS can be developed to accurately measure the gamma-ray energy spectrum in inaccessible locations such as narrow areas and holes.

  12. Re-estimation of absolute gamma ray intensities of 56Mn using k0- standardization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. AHMAD; W. AHMAD; M. U. RAJPUT; A. QAYYUM

    2005-01-01

    The thermal neutron capture gamma ray facility at Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) is being used for the re-estimation of various properties like capture cross-sections, resonance integral, absolute gamma intensities, etc.of different isotopes. The data for gamma ray transitions from the capture of thermal neutrons by 55Mn are not in good agreement specifically below 2 MeV. So there is a need to re-estimate its intensities with better accuracy. Analytical grade MnCl2 powder and high purity Mn metal pieces were used in this study. Standard 152Eu and 60Co radioactive sources as well as thermal neutron capture γ-rays in chlorine were chosen for efficiency calibration. The k0standardization technique was applied for these measurements to eliminate systematic errors in efficiencies. Chlorine also acted as a comparator in k0- factor calculations. The results have been tabulated for the main gamma rays from 56Mn in the low as well as in the medium energy regions. The absolute intensities are in good agreement with most of the reported values.

  13. CdWO sub 4 scintillator as a compact gamma ray spectrometer for planetary lander missions

    CERN Document Server

    Eisen, Y; Starr, R; Trombka, J I

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop a gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) suitable for use on planetary rover missions. The main characteristics of this detector are low weight, small volume low power and resistance to cosmic ray radiation over a long period of time. We describe a 3 cm diameter by 3 cm thick CdWO sub 4 cylindrical scintillator coupled to a PMT as a GRS for the energy region 0.662-7.64 MeV. Its spectral performance and efficiency are compared to that of a CsI(Tl) scintillator 2.5 cm diameter by 6 cm thick coupled to a 28 mmx28 mm PIN photodiode. The comparison is made experimentally using sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs, sup 6 sup 0 Co, 6.13 MeV gamma rays from a sup 1 sup 3 C(alpha,gamma n)O sup 1 sup 6 * source, 7.64 MeV thermal neutron capture gamma rays emitted from iron bars using a sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf neutron source, and natural radioactivity 1.46 MeV sup 4 sup 0 K and 2.61 MeV sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th gamma rays. We use a Monte Carlo method to calculate the total peak efficiency of these detectors and ...

  14. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  15. Gamma-Ray Observations of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejski, Grzegorz (Greg); Sikora, Marek

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews the recent observational results regarding γ-ray emission from active galaxies. The most numerous discrete extragalactic γ-ray sources are AGNs dominated by relativistic jets pointing in our direction (commonly known as blazars), and they are the main subject of the review. They are detected in all observable energy bands and are highly variable. The advent of the sensitive γ-ray observations, afforded by the launch and continuing operation of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and the AGILE Gamma-ray Imaging Detector, as well as by the deployment of current-generation Air Cerenkov Telescope arrays such as VERITAS, MAGIC, and HESS-II, continually provides sensitive γ-ray data over the energy range of ˜100 MeV to multi-TeV. Importantly, it has motivated simultaneous, monitoring observations in other bands, resulting in unprecedented time-resolved broadband spectral coverage. After an introduction, in Sections 3, 4, and 5, we cover the current status and highlights of γ-ray observations with (mainly) Fermi but also AGILE and put those in the context of broadband spectra in Section 6. We discuss the radiation processes operating in blazars in Section 7, and we discuss the content of their jets and the constraints on the location of the energy dissipation regions in, respectively, Sections 8 and 9. Section 10 covers the current ideas for particle acceleration processes in jets, and Section 11 discusses the coupling of the jet to the accretion disk in the host galaxy. Finally, Sections 12, 13, and 14 cover, respectively, the contribution of blazars to the diffuse γ-ray background, the utility of blazars to study the extragalactic background light, and the insight they provide for study of populations of supermassive black holes early in the history of the Universe.

  16. Determination of the polarization of Bragg-reflected gamma rays by means of the Mössbauer effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J.

    1969-01-01

    Recoil-free 14.4 keV gamma rays from 57Fe are reflected from an aluminium single crystal. By measurements of the intensities of the peaks in the Mössbauer spectra the polarization at different Bragg angles is determined.......Recoil-free 14.4 keV gamma rays from 57Fe are reflected from an aluminium single crystal. By measurements of the intensities of the peaks in the Mössbauer spectra the polarization at different Bragg angles is determined....

  17. Electron acceleration in supernova remnants and diffuse gamma rays above 1 GeV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Esposito, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    important consequences for studies of the Galactic diffuse gamma-ray emission, for which a strong excess over model predictions above 1 GeV has recently been reported. While these models relied on an electron injection spectrum with index 2.4 (chosen to fit the local electron flux up to 1 TeV), we show...... that an electron injection index of around 2.0 would (1) be consistent with the expected Poisson fluctuations in the locally observable electron spectrum and (2) explain the above-mentioned gamma-ray excess above 1 GeV. An electron injection index of around 2 would also correspond to the average radio synchrotron...... spectrum of individual SNRs. We use a three-dimensional propagation code to calculate the spectra of electrons throughout the Galaxy and show that the longitude and latitude distribution of the leptonic gamma-ray production above 1 GeV is in accord with the respective distributions for the gamma-ray excess...

  18. Time-resolved Neutron-gamma-ray Data Acquisition for in Situ Subsurface Planetary Geochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarik, Julie G.; Burger, Dan Michael; Burger, A.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Schweitzer, J. S.; Starr R. D.; Stassun, K. G.

    2013-01-01

    The current gamma-ray/neutron instrumentation development effort at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center aims to extend the use of active pulsed neutron interrogation techniques to probe the subsurface elemental composition of planetary bodies in situ. Previous NASA planetary science missions, that used neutron and/or gamma-ray spectroscopy instruments, have relied on neutrons produced from galactic cosmic rays. One of the distinguishing features of this effort is the inclusion of a high intensity 14.1 MeV pulsed neutron generator synchronized with a custom data acquisition system to time each event relative to the pulse. With usually only one opportunity to collect data, it is difficult to set a priori time-gating windows to obtain the best possible results. Acquiring time-tagged, event-by-event data from nuclear induced reactions provides raw data sets containing channel/energy, and event time for each gamma ray or neutron detected. The resulting data set can be plotted as a function of time or energy using optimized analysis windows after the data are acquired. Time windows can now be chosen to produce energy spectra that yield the most statistically significant and accurate elemental composition results that can be derived from the complete data set. The advantages of post-processing gamma-ray time-tagged event-by-event data in experimental tests using our prototype instrument will be demonstrated.

  19. $\\gamma$-Rays from Supernova Remnants and the Signatures of Diffusive Shock Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G; Grenier, I; Baring, Matthew G.; Ellison, Donald C.; Grenier, Isabelle

    1997-01-01

    While the definitive detection of gamma-rays from known supernova remnants (SNRs) remains elusive, the collection of unidentified EGRET sources that may be associated with SNRs has motivated recent modelling of TeV emission from these sources. Current theoretical models use power-law shock-accelerated protons and electrons in their predictions of expected gamma-ray TeV fluxes from those unidentified EGRET sources with remnant associations. In this paper, we explore a more detailed non-linear shock acceleration model, which generates non-thermal proton distributions and includes a self-consistent determination of shock hydrodynamics. We obtain gamma-ray spectra for SNRs allowing for the cessation of acceleration to high energies that is due to the finite ages and sizes of remnants. Gamma-ray spectral cutoffs can be observed in the TeV range for reasonable remnant parameters, and deviations from power-law behaviour are found at all energies ranging from 1 MeV up to the cutoff. Correlated observations by INTEGRA...

  20. A New Signature of Dark Matter Annihilations: Gamma-Rays from Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Gianfranco; Silk, J; Bertone, Gianfranco; Zentner, Andrew R.; Silk, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    We study the prospects for detecting gamma-rays from Dark Matter (DM) annihilations in enhancements of the DM density (mini-spikes) around intermediate-mass black holes with masses in the range $10^2 \\lsim M / \\msun \\lsim 10^6$. Focusing on two different IMBH formation scenarios, we show that, for typical values of mass and cross section of common DM candidates, mini-spikes, produced by the adiabatic growth of DM around pregalactic IMBHs, would be bright sources of gamma-rays, which could be easily detected with large field-of-view gamma-ray experiments such as GLAST, and further studied with smaller field-of-view, larger-area experiments like Air Cherenkov Telescopes CANGAROO, HESS, MAGIC and VERITAS. The detection of many gamma-ray sources not associated with a luminous component of the Local Group, and with identical cut-offs in their energy spectra at the mass of the DM particle, would provide a potential smoking-gun signature of DM annihilations and shed new light on the nature of intermediate and superm...

  1. The gamma-ray emitting region of the jet in Cyg X-3

    CERN Document Server

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A; Dubus, Guillaume; Yuan, Feng; Cerutti, Benoit; Ogorzalek, Anna

    2011-01-01

    We study models of the gamma-ray emission of Cyg X-3 observed by Fermi. We calculate the average X-ray spectrum, based on Swift data, during the gamma-ray active periods. Then, we calculate spectra from Compton scattering of a photon beam into a given direction by isotropic relativistic electrons with a power-law distribution, both based on the Klein-Nishina cross section and in the Thomson limit. Applying the results to scattering of stellar blackbody radiation in the inner jet of Cyg X-3, we find that a low-energy cut-off in the electron distribution at a Lorentz factor of 10^3 is required by the form of the observed X-ray/gamma-ray spectrum in order to avoid overproducing the observed X-ray flux. The electrons giving rise to the observed gamma-rays are efficiently cooled by Compton scattering, and the power-law index of the acceleration process is 2.5--3. The presence of the low energy electron cut-off is well explained by recent shock acceleration models, in which it is related to the ion/electron mass ra...

  2. A Blind Search for Bursts of Very High Enery Gamma Rays with Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Vasileiou, Vlasios

    2008-01-01

    Milagro is a water-Cherenkov detector that observes the extended air showers produced by cosmic gamma rays of energies E>100GeV. The effective area of Milagro peaks at energies E~10TeV, however it is still large even down to a few hundred GeV (~10m^2 at 100GeV). The wide field of view (~2sr) and high duty cycle (>90%) of Milagro make it ideal for continuously monitoring the overhead sky for transient Very High Energy (VHE) emissions. This study searched the Milagro data for such emissions. Even though the search was optimized primarily for detecting the emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), it was still sensitive to the emission from the last stages of the evaporation of Primordial Black Holes or to any other kind of phenomena that produce bursts of VHE gamma rays. Measurements of the GRB spectra by satellites up to few tens of GeV showed no signs of a cutoff. Even though multiple instruments sensitive to $GeV/TeV$ gamma rays have performed observations of GRBs, there has not yet been a definitive detection ...

  3. Is the Universe More Transparent to Gamma Rays than Previously Thought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecker, Floyd W.; Scully, Sean T.

    2009-01-01

    The MAGIC collaboration has recently reported the detection of the strong gamma-ray blazar 3C279 during a 1-2 day flare. They have used their spectral observations to draw conclusions regarding upper limits on the opacity of the Universe to high energy gamma-rays and, by implication, upper limits on the extragalactic mid-infrared background radiation. In this paper we examine the effect of gamma-ray absorption by the extragalactic infrared radiation on intrinsic spectra for this blazar and compare our results with the observational data on 3C279. We find agreement with our previous results, contrary to the recent assertion of the MAGIC group that the Universe is more transparent to gamma-rays than our calculations indicate. Our analysis indicates that in the energy range between approx. 80 and approx. 500 GeV, 3C279 has a best-fit intrinsic spectrum with a spectral index approx. 1.78 using our fast evolution model and approx. 2.19 using our baseline model. However, we also find that spectral indices in the range of 1.0 to 3.0 are almost as equally acceptable as the best fit spectral indices. Assuming the same intrinsic spectral index for this flare as for the 1991 flare from 3C279 observed by EGRET, viz., 2.02, which lies between our best fit indeces, we estimate that the MAGIC flare was approx.3 times brighter than the EGRET flare observed 15 years earlier.

  4. THE NATURE OF GAMMA-RAY EMISSION OF TYCHO'S SUPERNOVA REMNANT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berezhko, E. G.; Ksenofontov, L. T. [Yu. G. Shafer Institute of Cosmophysical Research and Aeronomy, 31 Lenin Avenue, 677980 Yakutsk (Russian Federation); Voelk, H. J., E-mail: berezhko@ikfia.ysn.ru [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, D-69029 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-01-20

    The nature of the recently detected high-energy and very high-energy {gamma}-ray emission of Tycho's supernova remnant (SNR) is studied. A nonlinear kinetic theory of cosmic-ray (CR) acceleration in SNRs is employed to investigate the properties of Tycho's SNR and their correspondence with the existing experimental data, taking into account that the ambient interstellar medium (ISM) is expected to be clumpy. It is demonstrated that the overall steep {gamma}-ray spectrum observed can be interpreted as the superposition of two spectra produced by the CR proton component in two different ISM phases: the first {gamma}-ray component, extending up to about 10{sup 14} eV, originates in the diluted warm ISM, whereas the second component, extending up to 100 GeV, comes from numerous dense, small-scale clouds embedded in this warm ISM. Given the consistency between acceleration theory and the observed properties of the nonthermal emission of Tycho's SNR, very efficient production of nuclear CRs in Tycho's SNR is established. The excess of the GeV {gamma}-ray emission due to the clouds' contribution above the level expected in the case of a purely homogeneous ISM is inevitably expected in the case of Type Ia SNe.

  5. The Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Dainotti, M G; De Laurentis, M; Izzo, L; Perillo, M

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to their enormous energy release, Gamma Rays Bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted a lot of interest to probe the Hubble diagram (HD) deep into the matter dominated era and hence complement Type Ia Supernovae (SNeIa). We consider here three different calibration methods based on the use of a fiducial LCDM model, on cosmographic parameters and on the local regression on SNeIa to calibrate the scaling relations proposed as an equivalent to the Phillips law to standardize GRBs finding any significant dependence. We then investigate the evolution of these parameters with the redshift to obtain any statistical improvement. Under this assumption, we then consider possible systematics effects on the HDs introduced by the calibration method, the averaging procedure and the homogeneity of the sample arguing against any significant bias.

  6. Search for Gamma Ray Bursts at Chacaltaya

    CERN Document Server

    Vernetto, S

    2001-01-01

    A search for Gamma Ray Bursts in the GeV-TeV energy range has been performed by INCA, an air shower array working at 5200 m of altitude at the Chacaltaya Laboratory (Bolivia). The altitude of the detector and the use of the "single particle technique" allows to lower the energy threshold up to few GeVs. No significant signals are observed during the occurrence of 125 GRBs detected by BATSE, and the obtained upper limits on the energy fluence in the interval 1-1000(100) GeV range from 3.2(8.6) 10^-5 to 2.6(7.0) 10^-2 erg/cm^2 depending on the zenith angle of the events. These limits, thanks to the extreme altitude of INCA, are the lowest ever obtained in the sub-TeV energy region by a ground based esperiment.

  7. Black Holes, Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in our understanding of the nature of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and in particular, of the relationship between short GRBs and long GRBs. The first example of a short GRB is described. The coincidental occurrence of a GRB with a supernova (SN) is explained within the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm, following the sequence: 1) an initial binary system consists of a compact carbon-oxygen (CO) core star and a neutron star (NS); 2) the CO core explodes as a SN, and part of the SN ejecta accretes onto the NS which reaches its critical mass and collapses to a black hole (BH) giving rise to a GRB; 3) a new NS is generated by the SN as a remnant. The observational consequences of this scenario are outlined.

  8. Gamma-ray Production in Supernova Remnants

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1997-01-01

    Supernova remnants are widely believed to be a principal source of galactic cosmic rays, produced by diffusive shock acceleration in the environs of the remnant's expanding shock. This review discusses recent modelling of how such energetic particles can produce gamma-rays via interactions with the remnants' ambient interstellar medium, specifically via neutral pion decay, bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton emission. Predictions that relate to the handful of associations between EGRET unidentified sources and known radio/optical/X-ray emitting remnants are summarized. The cessation of acceleration above 1 TeV - 10 TeV energies in young shell-type remnants is critical to model consistency with Whipple's TeV upper limits; these observations provide important diagnostics for theoretical models.

  9. Relativistic Outflows in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Aloy, M A

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were not isotropic emissions was devised theoretically as a way to ameliorate the huge energetic budget implied by the standard fireball model for these powerful phenomena. However, the mechanism by which after the quasy-isotropic release of a few $10^{50} $erg yields a collimated ejection of plasma could not be satisfactory explained analytically. The reason being that the collimation of an outflow by its progenitor system depends on a very complex and non-linear dynamics. That has made necessary the use of numerical simulations in order to shed some light on the viability of some likely progenitors of GRBs. In this contribution I will review the most relevant features shown by these numerical simulations and how they have been used to validate the collapsar model (for long GRBs) and the model involving the merger of compact binaries (for short GRBs).

  10. Balloon-borne gamma-ray polarimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Pearce, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The physical processes postulated to explain the high-energy emission mechanisms of compact astrophysical sources often yield polarised soft gamma rays (X-rays). PoGOLite is a balloon-borne polarimeter operating in the 25-80 keV energy band. The polarisation of incident photons is reconstructed using Compton scattering and photoelectric absorption in an array of phoswich detector cells comprising plastic and BGO scintillators, surrounded by a BGO side anticoincidence shield. The polarimeter is aligned to observation targets using a custom attitude control system. The maiden balloon flight is scheduled for summer 2011 from the Esrange Space Centre with the Crab and Cygnus X-1 as the primary observational targets.

  11. Statistics of gamma ray burst temporal asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Link, B; Link, Bennett; Epstein, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We study the temporal asymmetry of over 600 bursts from the BATSE 3B catalog, encompassing a 200-fold range in peak flux. By comparing the rates of rise and fall of the flux near the highest burst peak, we find that about two-thirds of the bursts exhibit a preferred asymmetry in the sense that the flux rises more rapidly than it falls, confirming the conclusions of previous studies employing smaller databases. The statistical significance of the average time asymmetry of the sample is >99.999\\%; therefore, models that predict time symmetry of the burst profile are ruled out. We find no statistically significant correlation between burst temporal asymmetry and peak. This result is consistent with both cosmological and local interpretations of the gamma ray burst phenomenon.

  12. Perspectives on Gamma-Ray Pulsar Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, Matthew G

    2010-01-01

    Pulsars are powerful sources of radiation across the electromagnetic spectrum. This paper highlights some theoretical insights into non-thermal, magnetospheric pulsar gamma-ray radiation. These advances have been driven by NASA's Fermi mission, launched in mid-2008. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) instrument on Fermi has afforded the discrimination between polar cap and slot gap/outer gap acceleration zones in young and middle-aged pulsars. Altitude discernment using the highest energy pulsar photons will be addressed, as will spectroscopic interpretation of the primary radiation mechanism in the LAT band, connecting to both polar cap/slot gap and outer gap scenarios. Focuses will mostly be on curvature radiation and magnetic pair creation, including population trends that may afford probes of the magnetospheric accelerating potential.

  13. Critical Test Of Gamma Ray Burst Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Long and precise follow-up measurements of the X-ray afterglow (AG) of very intense gamma ray bursts (GRBs) provide a critical test of GRB afterglow theories. Here we show that the power-law decline with time of X-ray AG of GRB 130427A, the longest measured X-ray AG of an intense GRB with the Swift, Chandra and XMM Newton satellites, and of all other well measured late-time X-ray afterglow of intense GRBs, is that predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs from their measured spectral index, while it disagrees with that predicted by the widely accepted fireball (FB) models of GRBs.

  14. Gamma-ray burst afterglow theory

    CERN Document Server

    van Eerten, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    It is by now fairly well established that gamma-ray burst afterglows result from initially relativistic outflows interacting with the medium surrounding the burster and emitting non-thermal radiation ranging from radio to X-rays. However, beyond that, many big and small questions remain about afterglows, with the accumulating amount of observational data at the various frequencies raising as many questions as they answer. In this review I highlight a number of current theoretical issues and how they fit or do not fit within our basic theoretical framework. In addition to theoretical progress I will also emphasize the increasing role and usefulness of numerical studies of afterglow blast waves and their radiation.

  15. Digital Logarithmic Airborne Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, GuoQiang; Li, Chen; Tan, ChengJun; Ge, LiangQuan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-01-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352, 583, and 609keV in the low-energy spectral sections after the energy calibration. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, effectively measuring energy from 20keV to 10MeV is possible.

  16. Digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guo-Qiang; Zhang, Qing-Xian; Li, Chen; Tan, Cheng-Jun; Ge, Liang-Quan; Gu, Yi; Cheng, Feng

    2014-07-01

    A new digital logarithmic airborne gamma ray spectrometer is designed in this study. The spectrometer adopts a high-speed and high-accuracy logarithmic amplifier (LOG114) to amplify the pulse signal logarithmically and to improve the utilization of the ADC dynamic range because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. After energy calibration, the spectrometer can clearly distinguish photopeaks at 239, 352, 583 and 609 keV in the low-energy spectral sections. The photopeak energy resolution of 137Cs improves to 6.75% from the original 7.8%. Furthermore, the energy resolution of three photopeaks, namely, K, U, and Th, is maintained, and the overall stability of the energy spectrum is increased through potassium peak spectrum stabilization. Thus, it is possible to effectively measure energy from 20 keV to 10 MeV.

  17. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  18. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) were among the greatest mysteries in modern astrophysics. They were first observed 50 years ago but it took three decades before optical counterparts could be found and the underlying physical phenomena studied in detail. GRB research represents currently one of the most rapidly growing areas in extragalactic astronomy. This is due in large part to the numerous connections that GRBs have with other disciplines like cosmology, supernovae, stellar evolution, nuclear physics, astroparticle and gravitational wave astronomy. Therefore, their study is of great importance to understand various astrophysical phenomena such as the formation of the first stars, the chemical evolution and the expansion of the Universe. Since gamma radiation can travel along cosmological distances without being affected by any possible intervening absorption, GRBs can be detected from the most distant universe, reaching redshifts up to z = 10 or more.

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  20. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Pulses and Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hakkila, J. E.; Broadbent, M.; Wasserman, I. M.; Wolpert, R. L.

    2013-04-01

    We describe ongoing work on two projects that are enabling more thorough and accurate use of archival BATSE data for elucidating the nature of GRB sources; the methods and tools we are developing will also be valuable for analyzing data from other missions. The first project addresses modeling the spectro-temporal behavior of prompt gamma ray emission from GRBs by modeling gamma ray count and event data with a population of pulses, with the population drawn from one or more families of single-pulse kernels. Our approach is built on a multilevel nonparametric probabilistic framework we have dubbed "Bayesian droplets," and offers several important advances over previous pulse decomposition approaches: (1) It works in the pulse-confusion regime, quantifying uncertainty in the number, locations, and shapes of pulses, even when there is strong overlap. (2) It can self-consistently model pulse behavior across multiple spectral bands. (3) It readily handles a variety of spatio-temporal kernel shapes. (4) It reifies the idea of a burst as a population of pulses, enabling explicit modeling and estimation of the pulse population distribution. We describe the framework and present analyses of prototypical simple and complex GRB light curves. The second project aims to enable accurate demographic modeling of GRBs using the BATSE catalog. We present new calculations of the BATSE sky exposure, encompassing the full duration of the BATSE catalog for the first time, with many improvements over the currently available exposure map. A similar calculation of the detection efficiency is in progress. We also describe public Python software enabling access and accurate modeling of BATSE GRB data. The software enables demographic studies (e.g., modeling log N - log S distributions) with accurate accounting of both selection effects and measurement errors. It also enables spectro-temporal modeling of detailed data from individual GRBs. These projects are supported by NASA through the AISR

  1. Gamma Rays from Star Formation in Clusters of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Storm, Emma; Profumo, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    Star formation in galaxies is observed to be associated with gamma-ray emission. The detection of gamma rays from star-forming galaxies by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) has allowed the determination of a functional relationship between star formation rate and gamma-ray luminosity (Ackermann et. al. 2012). Since star formation is known to scale with total infrared (8-1000 micrometers) and radio (1.4 GHz) luminosity, the observed infrared and radio emission from a star-forming galaxy can be used to quantitatively infer the galaxy's gamma-ray luminosity. Similarly, star forming galaxies within galaxy clusters allow us to derive lower limits on the gamma-ray emission from clusters, which have not yet been conclusively detected in gamma rays. In this study we apply the relationships between gamma-ray luminosity and radio and IR luminosities derived in Ackermann et. al. 2012 to a sample of galaxy clusters from Ackermann et. al. 2010 in order to place lower limits on the gamma-ray emission associated with sta...

  2. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence...... of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14 in 1992 is verified....

  3. Wolf-Rayet stars as gamma-ray burst progenitors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Langer, N.; van Marle, A. -J; Yoon, S.C.

    2010-01-01

    It became clear in the last few years that long gamma-ray bursts are associated with the endpoints of massive star evolution. They occur in star forming regions at cosmological distances (Jakobsson et al., 2005), and are associated with supernova-type energies. The collapsar model explains gamma-ray

  4. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  5. HEAO C-1 gamma-ray spectrometer. [experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, W. A.; Ling, J. C.; Willett, J. B.; Jacobson, A. S.

    1978-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectroscopy experiment to be launched on the third High Energy Astronomy Observatory (HEAO C) will perform a complete sky search for narrow gamma-ray line emission to the level of about 00001 photons/sq cm -sec for steady point sources. The design of this experiment and its performance based on testing and calibration to date are discussed.

  6. Enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, R.; Ciprini, S.

    2016-01-01

    Preliminary LAT analysis indicates enhanced gamma-ray activity from the Crab nebula. The daily-averaged gamma-ray emission (E > 100 MeV) from the direction of the Crab Nebula has surpassed 4.0 x 10^-6 ph cm^-2 s^-1 five times in the last 12 days.

  7. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  8. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  9. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  10. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 2: Localized sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Because the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. PSR 1818-04 has a gamma ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, whereas the luminosities of PSR 1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations yielded upper limits to gamma ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars. For five of the closest pulsars, upper limits for gamma ray luminosity are found to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of the Crab pulsar. Gamma ray enhancement near the Milky Way satellite galaxy and the galactic plane in the Cygnus region is also discussed.

  11. Gamma-Ray Burst Science in the Era of the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    CERN Document Server

    Inoue, Susumu; O'Brien, Paul T; Asano, Katsuaki; Bouvier, Aurelien; Carosi, Alessandro; Connaughton, Valerie; Garczarczyk, Markus; Gilmore, Rudy; Hinton, Jim; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ioka, Kunihito; Kakuwa, Jun; Markoff, Sera; Murase, Kohta; Osborne, Julian P; Otte, A Nepomuk; Starling, Rhaana; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Teshima, Masahiro; Toma, Kenji; Wagner, Stefan; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Williams, David A; Yamamoto, Tokonatsu; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2013-01-01

    We outline the science prospects for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA), the next-generation ground-based gamma-ray observatory operating at energies above few tens of GeV. With its low energy threshold, large effective area and rapid slewing capabilities, CTA will be able to measure the spectra and variability of GRBs at multi-GeV energies with unprecedented photon statistics, and thereby break new ground in elucidating the physics of GRBs, which is still poorly understood. Such measurements will also provide crucial diagnostics of ultra-high-energy cosmic ray and neutrino production in GRBs, advance observational cosmology by probing the high-redshift extragalactic background light and intergalactic magnetic fields, and contribute to fundamental physics by testing Lorentz invariance violation with high precision. Aiming to quantify these goals, we present some simulated observations of GRB spectra and light curves, together with estimates of their detection rates with CTA. Alth...

  12. Contribution of a germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry. Spectral analysis and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez, S; Bourgeois, C

    2002-01-01

    The sensitivity of the germanium semi-conductor detector is 30 times lower than that of the sodium iodide (NaI) detectors frequently used in airborne spectrometry. Its energy resolution however, is 20 times better, giving more accurate identification of radionuclides, especially when complex spectra are involved. The use of the germanium detector in mobile gamma-ray spectrometry provides a large amount of qualitative and quantitative information. In post-accident situations a germanium detector will be sufficient, and should therefore be used in preference to a NaI detector. An algorithm for detecting the total absorption peaks by studying the variations in the spectral profile of germanium gamma-ray spectra has been developed at the CEA. The use of digital filters that take into account the characteristics of the absorption peaks reduces the statistical fluctuations, making possible detection based on the analysis of the first and second derivatives. The absorption peak is then estimated by subtracting the b...

  13. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  14. Extragalactic Gamma Ray Excess from Coma Supercluster Direction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pantea Davoudifar; S. Jalil Fatemi

    2011-09-01

    The origin of extragalactic diffuse gamma ray is not accurately known, especially because our suggestions are related to many models that need to be considered either to compute the galactic diffuse gamma ray intensity or to consider the contribution of other extragalactic structures while surveying a specific portion of the sky. More precise analysis of EGRET data however, makes it possible to estimate the diffuse gamma ray in Coma supercluster (i.e., Coma\\A1367 supercluster) direction with a value of ( > 30MeV) ≃ 1.9 × 10-6 cm-2 s-1, which is considered to be an upper limit for the diffuse gamma ray due to Coma supercluster. The related total intensity (on average) is calculated to be ∼ 5% of the actual diffuse extragalactic background. The calculated intensity makes it possible to estimate the origin of extragalactic diffuse gamma ray.

  15. Effect of Conversion Efficiency on Gamma-Ray Burst Energy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Xu; Zi-Gao Dai

    2004-01-01

    Beaming effect makes it possible that gamma-ray bursts have a standard energy,but the gamma-ray energy release is sensitive to some parameters.Our attention is focused on the effect of the gamma ray conversion efficiency(ηγ),which may range between 0.01 and 0.9,and which probably has a random value for different GRBs under certain conditions.Making use of the afterglow data from the literature,we carried out a complete correction to the conical opening angle formula.Within the framework of the conical jet model,we ran a simple Monte Carlo simulation for random values of ηγ,and found that the gamma-ray energy release is narrowly clustered,whether we use a constant value of ηγ or random values for different gamma-ray bursts.

  16. Gamma-rays as probes of the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Horns, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of $\\gamma$ rays over very large distances provides new insights on the intergalactic medium and on fundamental physics. On their path to the Earth, $\\gamma$ rays can annihilate with diffuse infrared or optical photons of the intergalactic medium, producing $e^+ \\, e^-$ pairs. The density of these photons is poorly determined by direct measurements due to significant galactic foregrounds. Studying the absorption of $\\gamma$ rays from extragalactic sources at different distances allows the density of low-energy diffuse photons to be measured. Gamma-ray propagation may also be affected by new phenomena predicted by extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics. Lorentz Invariance is violated in some models of Quantum Gravity, leading to an energy-dependent speed of light in vacuum. From differential time-of-flight measurements of the most distant $\\gamma$-ray bursts and of flaring active galactic nuclei, lower bounds have been set on the energy scale of Quantum Gravity. Another effect tha...

  17. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  18. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray; Page, Mathew J.

    2012-01-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope i...... length. All 3 instruments use the same 2k x 2k detector simultaneously so that telescope pointing and tip-tilt control of a fold mirror permit to place the gamma ray burst on the desired instrument without any other mechanism. © 2012 SPIE.......The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope...

  19. Gamma-ray Explosion in Multiple Compton Scattering Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Z; Shou, Y R; Qiao, B; Bulanov, S V; Esirkepov, T Zh; Bulanov, S S; Chen, C E; He, X T; Yan, X Q

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray explosion from near critical density (NCD) target irradiated by four symmetrical imploding laser pulses is numerically investigated. With peak intensities about $10^{23}$ W/cm$^2$, the laser pulses boost electron energy through direct laser acceleration, while pushing them inward with the ponderomotive force. After backscattering with counter-propagating laser, the accelerated electron will be trapped in the optical lattice or the electromagnetic standing waves (SW) created by the coherent overlapping of the laser pulses, and meanwhile emit gamma-ray photon in Multiple Compton Scattering regime, where electron acts as a medium to transfer energy from laser to gamma-ray. The energy conversion rate from laser pulses to gamma-ray can be as high as around 50\\%. It may become one of the most efficient gamma-ray sources in laboratory.

  20. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanbro, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Roberts, O.; McBreen, S.; Bhat, N.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from the catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first release, in January 2015, provided data on 2700 TGFs. Updates are extending the catalog at a rate of ~800 TGFs per year. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and other Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs). In January 2016 additional data will be released online from correlating these TGFs with sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Maps of sferics in the vicinity of each TGF will be provided, as will the locations and times of sferics found to be associated with TGFs.

  1. High Energy Gamma-Ray Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts - Before GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Piran, Tsvi

    2011-11-29

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short and intense emission of soft {gamma}-rays, which have fascinated astronomers and astrophysicists since their unexpected discovery in 1960s. The X-ray/optical/radio afterglow observations confirm the cosmological origin of GRBs, support the fireball model, and imply a long-activity of the central engine. The high-energy {gamma}-ray emission (> 20 MeV) from GRBs is particularly important because they shed some lights on the radiation mechanisms and can help us to constrain the physical processes giving rise to the early afterglows. In this work, we review observational and theoretical studies of the high-energy emission from GRBs. Special attention is given to the expected high-energy emission signatures accompanying the canonical early-time X-ray afterglow that was observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope. We also discuss the detection prospect of the upcoming GLAST satellite and the current ground-based Cerenkov detectors.

  2. More Gamma-ray Bursts from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Fermi GBM Team Team

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Team has developed an offline search for weak gamma-ray bursts which were not already detected in-orbit as ``triggers''. This search is ``untargeted'', searching all of the GBM data without guidance from other observations. The initial version of the search has been operational from January 2016, finding several likely short GRBs per month that are posted to a webpage. The GBM individual photon data are binned to various timescales, a background model is created and the binned data are searched for significant signals above the background that are coincident in two or more detectors. The current search has a latency of several days because several steps require manual intervention. An improved version will be fully automatic so that the latency in detecting candidates will be dominated by the few hours delay in receiving the data. The new version of the search will also include additional detection algorithms to increase the GRB detection rate and will also detect some long GRBs. We will report the candidates via the Gamma-ray Coordinates Network (GCN). These prompt GRB detections and localization should aid multi-messenger observations, in some cases refining localizations on timescales useful for followup observations.

  3. Central Engine Memory of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) are bursts of $\\gamma$-rays generated from relativistic jets launched from catastrophic events such as massive star core collapse or binary compact star coalescence. Previous studies suggested that GRB emission is erratic, with no noticeable memory in the central engine. Here we report a discovery that similar light curve patterns exist within individual bursts for at least some GRBs. Applying the Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) method, we show that similarity of light curve patterns between pulses of a single burst or between the light curves of a GRB and its X-ray flare can be identified. This suggests that the central engine of at least some GRBs carries "memory" of its activities. We also show that the same technique can identify memory-like emission episodes in the flaring emission in Soft Gamma-Ray Repeaters (SGRs), which are believed to be Galactic, highly magnetized neutron stars named magnetars. Such a phenomenon challenges the standard black hole central engine models for GRBs, an...

  4. Fine analysis of the calibration curve for a HPGe spectrometer in gamma ray energy measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Liu Yhi Gang; Wei Long; Chang Tian Ba

    1999-01-01

    A computational method is suggested to analyze gamma ray peak position data of a series of closely shifted spectra of sup 1 sup 9 sup 2 Ir measured by a HPGe spectrometer and an iteration program, Recovery-98 has been designed to find the fine curve of the spectrometer nonlinearity for energy calibration. The program is applied to check a previous experiment (measuring the gamma energies of sup 8 sup 5 Sr, etc.), and the revised result has been reported. (author)

  5. A simple technique for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy using plastic scintillator

    CERN Document Server

    Nandan, Akhilesh P; Neog, Himangshu; Bhuyan, M R; Biswas, S; Mahapatra, S; Mohanty, B; Mohanty, Rudranarayan; Rout, Subasha; Sahu, P K; Sahu, S; Sakthivel, V A; Samal, P K

    2014-01-01

    A new and simple technique has been developed using plastic scintillator detectors for gamma ray and cosmic ray spectroscopy without single channel analyzer (SCA) or multichannel analyzer (MCA). In these experiments only a leading edge discriminator (LED) and NIM scalers have been used. Energy calibration of gamma spectra in plastic scintillators has been done using Co60 and Cs137 sources. The details experimental technique, analysis procedure and experimental results has been presented in this article.

  6. Detailed Investigation of the Gamma-Ray Emission in the Vicinity of SNR W28 with FERMI-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Hewitt, John W; Ballet, Jean; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukui, Yasuo; Hayakawa, Takahiro; Lemoine-Goumard, Marianne; Pedaletti, Giovanna; Strong, Andrew; Torres, Diego F; Yamazaki, Ryo

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed investigation of the $\\gamma$-ray emission in the vicinity of the supernova remnant (SNR) W28 (G6.4$-$0.1) observed by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We detected significant $\\gamma$-ray emission spatially coincident with TeV sources HESS J1800$-$240A, B, and C, located outside the radio boundary of the SNR. Their spectra in the 2-100 GeV band are consistent with the extrapolation of the power-law spectra of the TeV sources. We also identified a new source of GeV emission, dubbed Source W, which lies outside the boundary of TeV sources and coincides with radio emission from the western part of W28. All of the GeV $\\gamma$-ray sources overlap with molecular clouds in the velocity range from 0 to 20 km s$^{-1}$. Under the assumption that the $\\gamma$-ray emission towards HESS J1800-240A, B, and C comes from $\\pi^0$ decay due to the interaction between the molecular clouds and cosmic rays (CRs) escaping from W28, they can be naturally explained b...

  7. Analysis of GeV-band gamma-ray emission from SNR RX J1713.7-3946

    CERN Document Server

    Federici, S; Telezhinsky, I; Wilhelm, A; Dwarkadas, V V

    2015-01-01

    RX J1713.7-3946 is the brightest shell-type Supernova remnant (SNR) of the TeV gamma-ray sky. Earlier Fermi-LAT results on low-energy gamma-ray emission suggested that, despite large uncertainties in the background determination, the spectrum is inconsistent with a hadronic origin. We update the GeV-band spectra using improved estimates for the diffuse galactic gamma-ray emission and more than doubled data volume. We further investigate the viability of hadronic emission models for RX J1713.7-3946. We produced a high-resolution map of the diffuse Galactic gamma-ray background corrected for HI self-absorption and used it in the analysis of more than 5~years worth of Fermi-LAT data. We used hydrodynamic scaling relations and a kinetic transport equation to calculate the acceleration and propagation of cosmic-rays in SNR. We then determined spectra of hadronic gamma-ray emission from RX J1713.7-3946, separately for the SNR interior and the cosmic-ray precursor region of the forward shock, and computed flux varia...

  8. On the possible gamma-ray burst-gravitational wave association in GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Bejger, M.; Charzyński, S.; Sukova, P.

    2017-02-01

    Data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor satellite observatory suggested that the recently discovered gravitational wave source, a pair of two coalescing black holes, was related to a gamma-ray burst. The observed high-energy electromagnetic radiation (above 50 keV) originated from a weak transient source and lasted for about 1 s. Its localization is consistent with the direction to GW150914. We speculate about the possible scenario for the formation of a gamma-ray burst accompanied by the gravitational-wave signal. Our model invokes a tight binary system consisting of a massive star and a black hole which leads to the triggering of a collapse of the star's nucleus, the formation of a second black hole, and finally to the binary black hole merger. For the most-likely configuration of the binary spin vectors with respect to the orbital angular momentum in the GW150914 event, the recoil speed (kick velocity) acquired by the final black hole through gravitational wave emission is of the order of a few hundred km/s and this might be sufficient to get it closer to the envelope of surrounding material and capture a small fraction of matter from the remnant of the host star. The gamma-ray burst is produced by the accretion of this remnant matter onto the final black hole. The moderate spin of the final black hole suggests that the gamma-ray burst jet is powered by weak neutrino emission rather than the Blandford-Znajek mechanism, and hence explains the low power available for the observed GRB signal.

  9. Gamma-ray opacity of the anisotropic stratified broad-line regions in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolmasov, Pavel; Poutanen, Juri

    2016-09-01

    The GeV-range spectra of blazars are shaped not only by non-thermal emission processes internal to the relativistic jet but also by external pair-production absorption on the thermal emission of the accretion disc and the broad-line region (BLR). For the first time, we compute here the pair-production opacities in the GeV range produced by a realistic BLR accounting for the radial stratification and radiation anisotropy. Using photoionization modelling with the CLOUDY code, we calculate a series of BLR models of different sizes, geometries, cloud densities, column densities and metallicities. The strongest emission features in the model BLR are Lyα and He II Lyα. Contribution of recombination continua is smaller, especially for hydrogen, because Ly continuum is efficiently trapped inside the large optical depth BLR clouds and converted to Lyman emission lines and higher-order recombination continua. The largest effects on the gamma-ray opacity are produced by the BLR geometry and localization of the gamma-ray source. We show that when the gamma-ray source moves further from the central source, all the absorption details move to higher energies and the overall level of absorption drops because of decreasing incidence angles between the gamma-rays and BLR photons. The observed positions of the spectral breaks can be used to measure the geometry and the location of the gamma-ray emitting region relative to the BLR. Strong dependence on geometry means that the soft photons dominating the pair-production opacity may be actually produced by a different population of BLR clouds than the bulk of the observed broad line emission.

  10. Gamma-ray opacity of the anisotropic stratified broad-line regions in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolmasov, Pavel; Poutanen, Juri

    2017-01-01

    The GeV-range spectra of blazars are shaped not only by non-thermal emission processes internal to the relativistic jet but also by external pair-production absorption on the thermal emission of the accretion disc and the broad-line region (BLR). For the first time, we compute here the pair-production opacities in the GeV range produced by a realistic BLR accounting for the radial stratification and radiation anisotropy. Using photoionization modelling with the CLOUDY code, we calculate a series of BLR models of different sizes, geometries, cloud densities, column densities and metallicities. The strongest emission features in the model BLR are Ly α and He II Ly α. Contribution of recombination continua is smaller, especially for hydrogen, because Ly continuum is efficiently trapped inside the large optical depth BLR clouds and converted to Lyman emission lines and higher order recombination continua. The largest effects on the gamma-ray opacity are produced by the BLR geometry and localization of the gamma-ray source. We show that when the gamma-ray source moves further from the central source, all the absorption details move to higher energies and the overall level of absorption drops because of decreasing incidence angles between the gamma-rays and BLR photons. The observed positions of the spectral breaks can be used to measure the geometry and the location of the gamma-ray emitting region relative to the BLR. Strong dependence on geometry means that the soft photons dominating the pair-production opacity may be actually produced by a different population of BLR clouds than the bulk of the observed broad line emission.

  11. Development of CDZNTE Detectors for Low-Energy Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.

    1999-01-01

    Under this grant the UC Berkeley PI, K. Hurley, joined a Goddard-led effort to develop large area, multi-pixel Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT) detectors for gamma-ray astronomy. His task was to advise the project of new developments in the area of cosmic gamma-ray bursts, in order to focus the detector development effort on the construction of an instrument which could be deployed on a spacecraft to localize and measure the energy spectra of bursts with good angular and energy resolution, respectively. UC Berkeley had no hardware role in this proposal. The result of this effort was the production, at Goddard, of five CZT prototype modules. A proposal was written for SWIFT, a MIDEX mission to study cosmic gamma-ray bursts. One experiment aboard SWIFT is the Burst Arcminute Telescope (BAT), which consists of a 5200 sq cm hard X-ray detector and a coded mask. The detector comprises 256 CZT modules, each containing 128 4 x 4 x 2 mm CZT detectors. Each detector is read out using an ASIC. The angular resolution achieved with this mask/array combination is 22 arcminutes, and a strong gamma-ray burst can be localized to an accuracy of 4 arcminutes in under 10 seconds. The energy resolution is typically 5 keV FWHM at 60 keV, and the energy range is 10 - 150 keV. The BAT views 2 steradians, and its sensitivity is such that the instrument can detect 350 gamma-ray burst/year, localizing 320 of them to better than 4 arcminute accuracy. The BAT concept therefore met the science goals for gamma-ray bursts. The UCB effort in the SWIFT proposal included the scientific objectives for gamma-ray bursts, and the assembly of a team of optical and radio observers who would use the BAT data to perform rapid multi-wavelength searches for the counterparts to bursts. This proposal was submitted to NASA and peer-reviewed. In January 1999 it was one of five such proposals selected for a Phase A study. This study was completed in June, and SWIFT was formally presented to NASA in

  12. Galactic sources of high energy neutrinos: Expectation from gamma-ray data

    CERN Document Server

    Sahakyan, N

    2015-01-01

    The recent results from ground based $\\gamma$-ray detectors (HESS, MAGIC, VERITAS) provide a population of TeV galactic $\\gamma$-ray sources which are potential sources of High Energy (HE) neutrinos. Since the $\\gamma$-rays and $\

  13. Gamma-rays from dark showers with twin Higgs models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freytsis, Marat; Knapen, Simon; Robinson, Dean J.; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2016-05-01

    We consider a twin WIMP scenario whose twin sector contains a full dark copy of the SM hadrons, where the lightest twin particles are twin pions. By analogy to the standard WIMP paradigm, the dark matter (DM) freezes out through twin electroweak interactions, and annihilates into a dark shower of light twin hadrons. These are either stable or decay predominantly to standard model (SM) photons. We show that this `hadrosymmetric' scenario can be consistent with all applicable astrophysical, cosmological and collider constraints. In order to decay the twin hadrons before the big-bang nucleosynthesis epoch, an additional portal between the SM and twin sector is required. In most cases we find this additional mediator is within reach of either the LHC or future intensity frontier experiments. Furthermore, we conduct simulations of the dark shower and consequent photon spectra. We find that fits of these spectra to the claimed galactic center gamma-ray excess seen by Fermi -LAT non-trivially coincide with regions of parameter space that both successfully generate the observed DM abundance and exhibit minimal fine-tuning.

  14. Testing Einstein's Equivalence Principle with Short Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Sang, Yu; Chang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) can be tested by the time delay between photons with different energies passing through a gravitational field. As one of the most energetic explosions in the Universe, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) provide an effective tool to test the accuracy of EEP. In this paper, we use the continuous spectra of 20 short GRBs detected by the Swift/BAT to test the validity of EEP. Taking the duration of GRBs as the upper limit of the time delay induced by EEP violation (assuming that the high energy photons arrive later than the low energy photons), the difference of the parameterized post-Newtonian parameter is constrained with high accuracy. The strictest constraint, $|\\gamma(150~{\\rm keV})-\\gamma(15~{\\rm keV})|<5.59\\times 10^{-10}$ from GRB 150101B, is about $1\\sim 2$ orders of magnitude tighter than previous constraints. Moreover, our result is more statistically significant than previous results because we use the continuous spectra instead of isolated photons.

  15. Gamma-ray astronomy: From Fermi up to the HAWC high-energy {gamma}-ray observatory in Sierra Negra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carraminana, Alberto [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica Luis Enrique Erro 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla 72840 (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration

    2013-06-12

    Gamma-rays represent the most energetic electromagnetic window for the study of the Universe. They are studied both from space at MeV and GeV energies, with instruments like the Fermi{gamma}-ray Space Telescope, and at TeV energies with ground based instruments profiting of particle cascades in the atmosphere and of the Cerenkov radiation of charged particles in the air or in water. The Milagro gamma-ray observatory represented the first instrument to successfully implement the water Cerenkov technique for {gamma}-ray astronomy, opening the ground for the more sensitive HAWC {gamma}-ray observatory, currently under development in the Sierra Negra site and already providing early science results.

  16. ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Kim, Y. H.; McEvoy, A.; Evans, S.; Sedillo, T.; Batha, S.; Schmitt, M.; Wilson, D. C.; Langenbrunner, J. R.; Malone, R.; Kaufman, M. I.; Cox, B. C.; Frogget, B.; Miller, E. K.; Ali, Z. A.; Tunnell, T. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M.

    2010-08-01

    Reaction history measurements, such as nuclear bang time and burn width, are fundamental components of diagnosing ICF implosions and will be employed to help steer the National Ignition Facility (NIF) towards ignition. Fusion gammas provide a direct measure of nuclear interaction rate (unlike x-rays) without being compromised by Doppler spreading (unlike neutrons). Gas Cherenkov Detectors that convert fusion gamma rays to UV/visible Cherenkov photons for collection by fast optical recording systems have established their usefulness in illuminating ICF physics in several experimental campaigns at OMEGA. In particular, bang time precision better than 25 ps has been demonstrated, well below the 50 ps accuracy requirement defined by the NIF. NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostics are being developed based on optimization of sensitivity, bandwidth, dynamic range, cost, and NIF-specific logistics, requirements and extreme radiation environment. Implementation will occur in two phases. The first phase consists of four channels mounted to the outside of the target chamber at ~6 m from target chamber center (GRH-6m) coupled to ultra-fast photo-multiplier tubes (PMT). This system is intended to operate in the 1013-1017 neutron yield range expected during the early THD campaign. It will have high enough bandwidth to provide accurate bang times and burn widths for the expected THD reaction histories (> 80 ps fwhm). Successful operation of the first GRH-6m channel has been demonstrated at OMEGA, allowing a verification of instrument sensitivity, timing and EMI/background suppression. The second phase will consist of several channels located just inside the target bay shield wall at 15 m from target chamber center (GRH-15m) with optical paths leading through the cement shield wall to well-shielded streak cameras and PMTs. This system is intended to operate in the 1016-1020 yield range expected during the DT ignition campaign, providing higher temporal resolution for the

  17. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Dwarf Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayashri Medhi; H. L. Duorah; A. G. Barua; K. Duorah

    2016-09-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are thought to be good candidates for dark matter search due to their high mass-to-light (M/L) ratio. One of the most favored dark matter candidates is the lightest neutralino(neutral $\\chi$ particle) as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). In this study, we model the gamma ray emission from dark matter annihilation coming from the nearby dSph galaxies Draco, Segue 1, Ursa Minor and Willman 1, taking into account the contribution from prompt photons and photons produced from inverse Compton scattering off starlight and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons by the energetic electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation. We also compute the energy spectra of electrons and positrons from the decay of dark matter annihilation products. Gamma ray spectra and fluxes for both prompt and inverse Compton emission have been calculated for neutralino annihilation over a range of masses and found to be in agreement with the observed data. It has been found that the ultra faint dSph galaxy Segue 1 gives the largest gamma ray flux limits while the lowest gamma ray flux limits has been obtained from Ursa Minor. It is seen that for larger M/L ratio of dwarf galaxies the intensity pattern originating from $e^+e^−-$ pairs scattering off CMB photons is separated by larger amount from that off the starlight photons for the same neutralino mass. As the $e^+e^−-$ energy spectra have an exponential cut off at high energies, this may allow to discriminate some dark matter scenarios from other astrophysical sources. Finally, some more detailed study about the effect of inverse Compton scattering may help constrain the dark matter signature in the dSph galaxies.

  18. Inverse Compton Gamma Rays from Dark Matter Annihilation in the Dwarf Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medhi, Jayashri; Duorah, H. L.; Barua, A. G.; Duorah, K.

    2016-09-01

    Dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies are thought to be good candidates for dark matter search due to their high mass-to-light (M/L) ratio. One of the most favored dark matter candidates is the lightest neutralino (neutral χ particle) as predicted in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). In this study, we model the gamma ray emission from dark matter annihilation coming from the nearby dSph galaxies Draco, Segue 1, Ursa Minor and Willman 1, taking into account the contribution from prompt photons and photons produced from inverse Compton scattering off starlight and Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photons by the energetic electrons and positrons from dark matter annihilation. We also compute the energy spectra of electrons and positrons from the decay of dark matter annihilation products. Gamma ray spectra and fluxes for both prompt and inverse Compton emission have been calculated for neutralino annihilation over a range of masses and found to be in agreement with the observed data. It has been found that the ultra faint dSph galaxy Segue 1 gives the largest gamma ray flux limits while the lowest gamma ray flux limits has been obtained from Ursa Minor. It is seen that for larger M/L ratio of dwarf galaxies the intensity pattern originating from e + e - pairs scattering off CMB photons is separated by larger amount from that off the starlight photons for the same neutralino mass. As the e + e - energy spectra have an exponential cut off at high energies, this may allow to discriminate some dark matter scenarios from other astrophysical sources. Finally, some more detailed study about the effect of inverse Compton scattering may help constrain the dark matter signature in the dSph galaxies.

  19. Possible distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Wang

    2011-01-01

    Distance measurement of gamma-ray pulsars is a current challenge in pulsar studies. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi gamma-ray observatory discovered more than 70 gamma-ray pulsars including 24 new gamma-selected pulsars with almost no distance information. We study the relation between gammaray emission efficiency (η = Lγ/E) and pulsar parameters for young radio-selected gamma-ray pulsars with known distance information in the first gamma-ray pulsar catalog reported by Fermi/LAT. We have introduced three generation-order parameters to describe the gamma-ray emission properties of pulsars, and find a strong correlation of rη- ζ3, a generation-order parameter which reflects γ-ray photon generation in the pair cascade processes induced by magnetic field absorption in a pulsar's magnetosphere.A good correlation of η- BLC, the magnetic field at the light cylinder radius, is also found. These correlations are the distance indicators in gamma-ray pulsars used to evaluate distances for gamma-selected pulsars. Distances of 25 gamma-selected pulsars are estimated, which could be tested by other distance measurement methods. The physical origin of the correlations may also be interesting for pulsar studies.

  20. X-ray and gamma ray astronomy detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decher, Rudolf; Ramsey, Brian D.; Austin, Robert

    1994-01-01

    X-ray and gamma ray astronomy was made possible by the advent of space flight. Discovery and early observations of celestial x-rays and gamma rays, dating back almost 40 years, were first done with high altitude rockets, followed by Earth-orbiting satellites> once it became possible to carry detectors above the Earth's atmosphere, a new view of the universe in the high-energy part of the electromagnetic spectrum evolved. Many of the detector concepts used for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy were derived from radiation measuring instruments used in atomic physics, nuclear physics, and other fields. However, these instruments, when used in x-ray and gamma ray astronomy, have to meet unique and demanding requirements related to their operation in space and the need to detect and measure extremely weak radiation fluxes from celestial x-ray and gamma ray sources. Their design for x-ray and gamma ray astronomy has, therefore, become a rather specialized and rapidly advancing field in which improved sensitivity, higher energy and spatial resolution, wider spectral coverage, and enhanced imaging capabilities are all sought. This text is intended as an introduction to x-ray and gamma ray astronomy instruments. It provides an overview of detector design and technology and is aimed at scientists, engineers, and technical personnel and managers associated with this field. The discussion is limited to basic principles and design concepts and provides examples of applications in past, present, and future space flight missions.

  1. GLAST and Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEnery, Julie

    2008-01-01

    The launch of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope together with the advent of a new generation of ground-based gamma-ray detectors such as VERITAS, HESS, MAGIC and CANGAROO, will usher in a new era of high-energy gamma-ray astrophysics. GLAST and the ground based gamma-ray observatories will provide highly complementary capabilities for spectral, temporal and spatial studies of high energy gamma-ray sources. Joint observations will cover a huge energy range, from 20 MeV to over 20 TeV. The LAT will survey the entire sky every three hours, allowing it both to perform uniform, long-term monitoring of variable sources and to detect flaring sources promptly. Both functions complement the high-sensitivity pointed observations provided by ground-based detectors. Finally, the large field of view of GLAST will allow a study of gamma-ray emission on large angular scales and identify interesting regions of the sky for deeper studies at higher energies. In this poster, we will discuss the science returns that might result from joint GLAST/ground-based gamma-ray observations and illustrate them with detailed source simulations.

  2. Real-Time Airborne Gamma-Ray Background Estimation Using NASVD with MLE and Radiation Transport for Calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Jordan, David V.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.; Kernan, Warnick J.

    2015-06-01

    Helicopter-mounted gamma-ray detectors can provide law enforcement officials the means to quickly and accurately detect, identify, and locate radiological threats over a wide geographical area. The ability to accurately distinguish radiological threat-generated gamma-ray signatures from background gamma radiation in real time is essential in order to realize this potential. This problem is non-trivial, especially in urban environments for which the background may change very rapidly during flight. This exacerbates the challenge of estimating background due to the poor counting statistics inherent in real-time airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy measurements. To address this, we have developed a new technique for real-time estimation of background gamma radiation from aerial measurements. This method is built upon on the noise-adjusted singular value decomposition (NASVD) technique that was previously developed for estimating the potassium (K), uranium (U), and thorium (T) concentrations in soil post-flight. The method can be calibrated using K, U, and T spectra determined from radiation transport simulations along with basis functions, which may be determined empirically by applying maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) to previously measured airborne gamma-ray spectra. The method was applied to both measured and simulated airborne gamma-ray spectra, with and without man-made radiological source injections. Compared to schemes based on simple averaging, this technique was less sensitive to background contamination from the injected man-made sources and may be particularly useful when the gamma-ray background frequently changes during the course of the flight.

  3. NDA via gamma-ray active and passive computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decman, D.J.; Martz, H.E.; Roberson, G.P.; Johansson, E.

    1996-10-01

    Gamma-ray-based computed tomography (CT) requires that two different measurements be made on a closed waste container. [MAR92 and ROB94] When the results from these two measurements are combined, it becomes possible to identify and quantify all detectable gamma-ray emitting radioisotopes within a container. All measurements are made in a tomographic manner, i.e., the container is moved sequentially through well- known and accurately reproducible translation, rotation, and elevation positions in order to obtain gamma-ray data that is reconstructed by computer into images that represent waste contents. [ROB94] The two measurements modes are called active (A) and passive (P) CT. In the ACT mode, a collimated gamma-ray source external to the waste container emits multiple, mono-energetic gamma rays that pass through the container and are detected on the opposite side. The attenuated gamma-rays transmitted are measured as a function of both energy and position of the container. Thus, container contents are `mapped` via the measured amount of attenuation suffered at each gamma-ray energy. In effect, a three dimensional (3D) image of gamma- ray attenuation versus waste content is obtained. In the PCT measurement mode, the external radioactive source is shuttered turned- off, and the waste container, is moved through similar positions used for the ACT measurements. However, this time the radiation detectors record any gamma-rays emitted by radioactive sources on the inside of the waste container. Thus, internal radioactive content is mapped or 3D-imaged in the same tomographic manner as the attenuating matrix materials were in the ACT measurement mode.

  4. Neutrino astronomy and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2007-01-01

    The construction of large volume detectors of high energy, >1 TeV, neutrinos is mainly driven by the search for extra-Galactic neutrino sources. The existence of such sources is implied by observations of ultra-high energy, >10^{19} eV, cosmic-rays, the origin of which is a mystery. In this lecture I briefly discuss the expected extra-Galactic neutrino signal and the current state of the experimental efforts. Neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are likely sources of both high energy protons and neutrinos, is discussed in some detail. The detection of the predicted GRB neutrino signal, which may become possible in the coming few years, will allow one to identify the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays and to resolve open questions related to the underlying physics of GRB models. Moreover, detection of GRB neutrinos will allow one to test for neutrino properties (e.g. flavor oscillations and coupling to gravity) with an accuracy many orders of magnitude better than is currently possible.

  5. Short-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Edo

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) display a bimodal duration distribution, with a separation between the short- and long-duration bursts at about 2 sec. The progenitors of long GRBs have been identified as massive stars based on their association with Type Ic core-collapse supernovae, their exclusive location in star-forming galaxies, and their strong correlation with bright ultraviolet regions within their host galaxies. Short GRBs have long been suspected on theoretical grounds to arise from compact object binary mergers (NS-NS or NS-BH). The discovery of short GRB afterglows in 2005, provided the first insight into their energy scale and environments, established a cosmological origin, a mix of host galaxy types, and an absence of associated supernovae. In this review I summarize nearly a decade of short GRB afterglow and host galaxy observations, and use this information to shed light on the nature and properties of their progenitors, the energy scale and collimation of the relativistic outflow, and the properties ...

  6. The SVOM gamma-ray burst mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, B; Atteia, J -L; Basa, S; Claret, A; Daigne, F; Deng, J; Dong, Y; Godet, O; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Han, X; Klotz, A; Lachaud, C; Osborne, J; Qiu, Y; Schanne, S; Wu, B; Wang, J; Wu, C; Xin, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, S -N

    2015-01-01

    We briefly present the science capabilities, the instruments, the operations, and the expected performance of the SVOM mission. SVOM (Space-based multiband astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade. The SVOM mission encompasses a satellite carrying four instruments to detect and localize the prompt GRB emission and measure the evolution of the afterglow in the visible band and in X-rays, a VHF communication system enabling the fast transmission of SVOM alerts to the ground, and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The pointing strategy of the satellite has been optimized to favor the detection of GRBs located in the night hemisphere. This strategy enables the study of the optical emission in the first minutes after the GRB with robotic observatories and the early spectroscopy of the optical afterglow with large telescopes to measure the redshifts. The study of GRBs in the...

  7. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collapse su- pernovae that happen both temporally and spatially coincident with most L-GRBs. However many outstanding questions regarding the nature of these events exist: How massive are the progenitors? What evolutionary stage are they at when they explode? Do they exist as single stars or in binary systems (or both, and to what fractions)? The work presented in this thesis attempts to further our understanding at the types of progenitors that give rise to long-duration GRB supernovae (GRB-SNe). This work is based on optical ...

  8. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Should cosmologists care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laros, J. G.

    1996-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) locations are distributed isotropically on the sky, but the intensity distribution of the bursts seems clearly incompatible with spatial homogeneity. Of the scenarios that attempt to provide an explanation, there are two that enjoy current popularity: (1) GRBs are produced by high-velocity neutron stars that have formed an extended (˜100 kpc) spherical halo or “corona” around our galaxy. (2) The bursters are at cosmological distances, with redshifts near unity for the weaker events. The major evidence used to argue for or against each of these scenarios remains inconclusive. Assuming, not unreasonably, that the cosmological scenario is correct, one can discuss the advantages and disadvantages of studying GRBs as opposed to other objects at moderate redshift. We find that the advantages of GRBs-high intensity, penetrating radiation, rapid variability, and no expected source evolution-are offset by observational difficulties pertaining to the extraction of cosmological information from GRB data. If the cosmological scenario proves to be correct and if the observational difficulties are overcome, then cosmologists certainly should care.

  9. Blueshifting may explain the gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the basic observed properties of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accounted for if one assumes that the GRBs arise by blueshifting the emission radiation of hydrogen and helium generated during the last scattering epoch. The blueshift generator for a single GRB is a Lema\\^{\\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) region with a nonconstant bang-time function $t_B(r)$ matched into a Friedmann background. Blueshift visible to the observer arises \\textit{only on radial rays} that are emitted in the L--T region. The paper presents three L--T models with different Big Bang profiles, adapted for the highest and the lowest end of the GRB frequency range. The models account for: (1) The observed frequency range of the GRBs; (2) Their limited duration; (3) The afterglows; (4) Their hypothetical collimation into narrow jets; (5) The large distances to their sources; (6) The multitude of the observed GRBs. Properties (2), (3) and (6) are accounted for only qualitatively. With a small correction of the parameters of the mo...

  10. Swift observations of gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-05-15

    Since its launch on 20 November 2004, the Swift mission has been detecting approximately 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) each year, and immediately (within approx. 90s) starting simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical observations of the afterglow. It has already collected an impressive database, including prompt emission to higher sensitivities than BATSE, uniform monitoring of afterglows and a rapid follow-up by other observatories notified through the GCN. Advances in our understanding of short GRBs have been spectacular. The detection of X-ray afterglows has led to accurate localizations and the conclusion that short GRBs can occur in non-star-forming galaxies or regions, whereas long GRBs are strongly concentrated within the star-forming regions. This is consistent with the NS merger model. Swift has greatly increased the redshift range of GRB detection. The highest redshift GRBs, at z approximately 5-6, are approaching the era of reionization. Ground-based deep optical spectroscopy of high redshift bursts is giving metallicity measurements and other information on the source environment to a much greater distance than other techniques. The localization of GRB 060218 to a nearby galaxy, and the association with SN 2006aj, added a valuable member to the class of GRBs with detected supernova.

  11. Multi-wavelength emission from 3C 66A: clues to its redshift and gamma-ray emission location

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Hai Yan; Zhong-Hui Fan; Yao Zhou; Ben-Zhong Dai

    2013-01-01

    The quasi-simultaneous multi-wavelength emission of TeV blazar 3C 66A is studied by using a one-zone multi-component leptonic jet model.It is found that the quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distribution of 3C 66A can be well reproduced; in particular,the first three months of its average Fermi-LAT spectrum can be well reproduced by the synchrotron self-Compton component plus external Compton component of the broad line region (BLR).Clues to its redshift and gamma-ray emission location are obtained.The results indicate the following.(i) On the redshift:The theoretical intrinsic TeV spectra can be predicted by extrapolating the reproduced GeV spectra.Through comparing these extrapolated TeV spectra with the corrected observed TeV spectra from extragalactic background light,it is suggested that the redshift of 3C 66A could be between 0.1 and 0.3,with the most likely value being ~ 0.2.(ii) On the gamma-ray emission location:To well reproduce the GeV emission of 3C 66A under different assumptions on the BLR,the gamma-ray emission region is always required to be beyond the inner zone of the BLR.The BLR absorption effect on gamma-ray emission confirms this point.

  12. Low permeability asphalt concrete gamma ray shielding properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binney, S E; Sykes, K L

    1997-01-01

    Energy-dependent gamma ray shielding properties were measured as a function of gamma ray energy for a low permeability asphalt concrete that is used as a cap to prevent water infiltration into radioactive waste sites. Experimental data were compared to ISO-PC point kernel shielding calculations. Calculated dose equivalent rates compared well with experimental values, especially considering the poor detector resolution involved. The shielding properties of the asphalt concrete closely resembled those of aluminum. The results presented can be used to determine the asphalt concrete thickness required to reduce dose equivalent rates from several gamma ray emitting radionuclides.

  13. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  14. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  15. Fundamental Physics With Cosmic High-Energy Gamma Rays

    CERN Document Server

    De Angelis, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    High-energy photons (above the MeV) are a powerful probe for astrophysics and for fundamental physics under extreme conditions. During the recent years, our knowledge of the high-energy gamma-ray sky has impressively progressed thanks to the advent of new detectors for cosmic gamma rays, at ground (H.E.S.S., MAGIC, VERITAS, HAWC) and in space (AGILE, Fermi). This presentation reviews the present status of the studies of fundamental physics problems with high-energy gamma rays, and discusses the expected experimental developments.

  16. Constraining gamma-ray propagation on cosmic distances

    CERN Document Server

    Biteau, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    Studying the propagation of gamma rays on cosmological distances encompasses a variety of scientific fields, focusing on diffuse radiation fields such as the extragalactic background light, on the probe of the magnetism of the Universe on large scales, and on physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. The measurements, constraints and hints from observations of gamma-ray blazars by airborne and ground-based instruments are briefly reviewed. These observations point to gamma-ray cosmology as one of the major science cases of the Cherenkov Telescope Array, CTA.

  17. Recent Topics on Very High Energy Gamma-ray Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Masaki

    2008-01-01

    With the advent of imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes in late 1980's, ground-based observation of TeV gamma-rays came into reality after struggling trials by pioneers for twenty years, and the number of gamma-ray sources detected at TeV energies has increased to be over seventy now. In this review, recent findings from ground-based very-high-energy gamma-ray observations are summarized (as of 2008 March), and up-to-date problems in this research field are presented.

  18. The Multiwavelength View of Gamma-Ray Loud AGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, Tonia

    2011-01-01

    The gamma-ray sky observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) encodes much information about the high-energy processes in the universe. Of the extragalactic sources sources resolved by the Fermi-LAT, blazars comprise the class of gamma-ray emitters with the largest number of identified members. Unresolved blazars are expected to contribute significantly to the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray emission. However, blazars are also broadband emitters (from radio to TeV energies), and as such the multiwavelength study of blazars can provide insight into the high-energy processes of the universe.

  19. Egret observations of the extragalactic gamma-ray emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sreekumar, P.; Bertsch, D.L.; Dingus, B.L.

    1998-01-01

    with the local interstellar gas and radiation, as well as an almost uniformly distributed component that is generally believed to originate outside the Galaxy. Through a careful study and removal of the Galactic diffuse emission, the flux, spectrum, and uniformity of the extragalactic emission are deduced......The all-sky survey in high-energy gamma rays (E > 30 MeV) carried out by EGRET aboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory provides a unique opportunity to examine in detail the diffuse gamma-ray emission. The observed diffuse emission has a Galactic component arising from cosmic-ray interactions...

  20. The new prompt gamma-ray activation facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland

    CERN Document Server

    Crittin, M; Schenker, J L

    2000-01-01

    Since October 1997, a new Prompt Gamma-ray Activation (PGA) facility at the neutron spallation source SINQ of the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Villigen, Switzerland, is operational. The detection system includes a Compton-suppression spectrometer and a pair spectrometer. An interesting feature of this PGA facility is the capillary-based neutron focusing optics which permits scanning of samples and nuclear spectroscopy of isotopes having small capture cross sections. During the beam periods 1997 and 1998, measurements were undertaken to characterize the PGA facility (gamma-ray background, efficiencies of the two spectrometers, analytical sensitivities and detection limits for several elements, performances of the neutron lens). Elemental analyses of standards were also performed.

  1. Baseline drift effect on the performance of neutron and gamma ray discrimination using frequency gradient analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Guofu; Yang, Jun; Lin, Cunbao; Hu, Qingqing; Peng, Jinxian

    2013-01-01

    Frequency gradient analysis (FGA) effectively discriminates neutrons and gamma rays by examining the frequency-domain features of the photomultiplier tube anode signal. This approach is insensitive to noise but is inevitably affected by the baseline drift, similar to other pulse shape discrimination methods. The baseline drift effect is attributed to the factors such as power line fluctuation, dark current, noise disturbances, hum, and pulse tail in front-end electronics. This effect needs to be elucidated and quantified before the baseline shift can be estimated and removed from the captured signal. Therefore, the effect of baseline shift on the discrimination performance of neutrons and gamma rays with organic scintillation detectors using FGA is investigated in this paper. The relationship between the baseline shift and discrimination parameters of FGA is derived and verified by an experimental system consisting of an americium-beryllium source, a BC501A liquid scintillator detector, and a 5 GSPS 8-bit osc...

  2. Broadband x-ray properties of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    An, Hongjun; Bellm, Eric; Bhalerao, Varun

    2015-01-01

    We report on NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift observations of the gamma-ray binary 1FGL J1018.6-5856. We measure the orbital period to be 16.544 ± 0.008 days using Swift data spanning 1900 days. The orbital period is different from the 2011 gamma-ray measurement which was used in the previous X......, and that the broadband X-ray spectra measured with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton, and Swift are well fit with an unbroken power-law model. This spectrum suggests that the system may not be accretion-powered....

  3. Giant lobes of Centaurus A as seen in radio and gamma-ray images obtained with the Fermi-LAT and Planck satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Xiao-na; Mckinley, Benjamin; Aharonian, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The {\\gamma}-ray data of Fermi-LAT on the giant lobes of Centaurus A are analysed together with the high frequency radio data obtained with the Planck satellite. The large {\\gamma}-ray photon statistics accumulated during seven years of observations, as well as the recently updated Fermi-LAT collaboration software tools allow substantial extension of the detected {\\gamma}-ray emission towards both the higher, up to 30 GeV, and the lower, down to 60 GeV, energies. Moreover, the new {\\gamma}-ray data allow us to explore the spatial features of {\\gamma}-ray emission of the lobes. For the north lobe, we confirm with higher statistical significance, our earlier finding on extension of {\\gamma}-ray emission beyond the radio image. Moreover, the new analysis reveals significant spatial variation of {\\gamma}-ray spectra from both lobes. On the other hand, the Planck observations at microwave frequencies contain important information on spectrum of synchrotron emission in the cutoff region, and thus allow model-indepe...

  4. Nonthermal synchrotron radiation and pair annihilation in gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Robert; Harding, Alice K.

    1989-01-01

    A self-consistent Monte Carlo simulation of quantized synchrotron emission, pair production, and pair annihilation in strong (2 x 10 to the 12th G or greater) magnetic fields is presented as a model of the production of annihilation lines in gamma-ray burst sources. The calculation determines the self-consistent photon spectrum and pair distribution functions resulting from a nonthermal injection of electrons into a region of homogeneous, strong magnetic field. The results indicate that the appearance of observable annihilation features in gamma-ray burst spectra requires isotropic or fan-beamed injection of electrons with energies of at least 5 MeV. The lines are narrow because higher energy electrons escape annihilation and do not contribute to Doppler-broadening. Injection beamed along the field did not produce observable annihilation lines in any of the cases studied. As a result, emission at energies much greater than 1 MeV produced through beaming seems to be incompatible with observable annihilation in this model. These results are discussed in relation to observed features in gamma-ray burst spectra.

  5. Mercuric iodide room-temperature array detectors for gamma-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patt, B. [Xsirius, Inc, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Significant progress has been made recently in the development of mercuric iodide detector arrays for gamma-ray imaging, making real the possibility of constructing high-performance small, light-weight, portable gamma-ray imaging systems. New techniques have been applied in detector fabrication and then low noise electronics which have produced pixel arrays with high-energy resolution, high spatial resolution, high gamma stopping efficiency. Measurements of the energy resolution capability have been made on a 19-element protypical array. Pixel energy resolutions of 2.98% fwhm and 3.88% fwhm were obtained at 59 keV (241-Am) and 140-keV (99m-Tc), respectively. The pixel spectra for a 14-element section of the data is shown together with the composition of the overlapped individual pixel spectra. These techniques are now being applied to fabricate much larger arrays with thousands of pixels. Extension of these principles to imaging scenarios involving gamma-ray energies up to several hundred keV is also possible. This would enable imaging of the 208 keV and 375-414 keV 239-Pu and 240-Pu structures, as well as the 186 keV line of 235-U.

  6. Diffuse galactic gamma rays at intermediate and high latitudes. Pt. 1. Constraints on the ISM properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cholis, Ilias; Tavakoli, Maryam; Ullio, Piero [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Trieste (Italy); Evoli, Carmelo [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    We study the high latitude (vertical stroke b vertical stroke >10 ) diffuse {gamma}-ray emission in the Galaxy in light of the recently published data from the Fermi collaboration at energies between 100 MeV and 100 GeV. The unprecedented accuracy in these measurements allows to probe and constrain the properties of sources and propagation of cosmic rays (CRs) in the Galaxy, as well as confirming conventional assumptions made on the interstellar medium (ISM). Using the publicly available DRAGON code, that has been shown to reproduce local measurements of CRs, we study assumptions made in the literature on HI and H2 gas distributions in the ISM, and non spatially uniform models of diffusion in the Galaxy. By performing a combined analysis of CR and {gamma}-ray spectra, we derive constraints on the properties of the ISM gas distribution and the vertical scale height of galactic CR diffusion, which may have implications also on indirect Dark Matter detection. We also discuss some of the possible interpretations of the break at {proportional_to}230 GeV in CR protons and helium spectra, recently observed by PAMELA and their impact on {gamma}-rays. (orig.)

  7. Gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes form Heavy Dark Matter in the Galactic Center

    CERN Document Server

    Gammaldi, V; de la Cruz-Dombriz, A; Lineros, R A; Maroto, A L

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the Galactic Center region as a possible source of both secondary gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from annihilating dark matter. We have studied the gamma-ray flux observed by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source. The data are well fitted as annihilating dark matter in combination with an astrophysical background. The analysis was performed by means of simulated gamma spectra produced by Monte Carlo event generators packages. We analyze the differences in the spectra obtained by the various Monte Carlo codes developed so far in particle physics. We show that, within some uncertainty, the HESS data can be fitted as a signal from a heavy dark matter density distribution peaked at the Galactic Center, with a power-law for the background with a spectral index which is compatible with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data from the same region. If this kind of dark matter distribution generates the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS, we also expec...

  8. Search for VHE gamma-ray emission from Geminga pulsar and nebula with the MAGIC telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Buson, S.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Clavero, R.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Frantzen, K.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Garrido Terrats, D.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; González Muñoz, A.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; La Barbera, A.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Miranda, J. M.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Overkemping, A.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Rodriguez Garcia, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schultz, C.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Steinbring, T.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Thaele, J.; Torres, D. F.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Verguilov, V.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.

    2016-06-01

    The Geminga pulsar, one of the brighest gamma-ray sources, is a promising candidate for emission of very-high-energy (VHE > 100 GeV) pulsed gamma rays. Also, detection of a large nebula has been claimed by water Cherenkov instruments. We performed deep observations of Geminga with the MAGIC telescopes, yielding 63 h of good-quality data, and searched for emission from the pulsar and pulsar wind nebula. We did not find any significant detection, and derived 95% confidence level upper limits. The resulting upper limits of 5.3 × 10-13 TeV cm-2 s-1 for the Geminga pulsar and 3.5 × 10-12 TeV cm-2 s-1 for the surrounding nebula at 50 GeV are the mostconstraining ones obtained so far at VHE. To complement the VHE observations, we also analyzed 5 yr of Fermi-LAT data from Geminga, finding that the sub-exponential cut-off is preferred over the exponential cut-off that has been typically used in the literature. We also find that, above 10 GeV, the gamma-ray spectra from Geminga can be described with a power law with index softer than 5. The extrapolation of the power-law Fermi-LAT pulsed spectra to VHE goes well below the MAGIC upper limits, indicating that the detection of pulsed emission from Geminga with the current generation of Cherenkov telescopes is very difficult.

  9. Galactic outflow driven by the active nucleus and the origin of the gamma-ray emission in NGC 1068

    CERN Document Server

    Lamastra, A; Guetta, D; Antonelli, L A; Colafrancesco, S; Menci, N; Puccetti, S; Stamerra, A; Zappacosta, L

    2016-01-01

    We compute the non-thermal emissions produced by relativistic particles accelerated by the AGN-driven shocks in NGC 1068, and we compare the model predictions with the observed gamma-ray and radio spectra . The former is contributed by pion decay, inverse Compton scattering, and bremsstrahlung, while the latter is produced by synchrotron radiation. We derive the gamma-ray and radio emissions by assuming the standard acceleration theory, and we discuss how our results compare with those corresponding to other commonly assumed sources of gamma-ray and radio emissions, like Supernova remnants (SNR) or AGN jets. We find that the AGN-driven shocks observed in the circumnuclear molecular disk of such a galaxy provide a contribution to the gamma-ray emission comparable to that provided by the starburst activity when standard particle acceleration efficiencies are assumed, while they can yield the whole gamma-ray emission only when the parameters describing the acceleration efficiency and the proton coupling with the...

  10. Focusing of Alfvenic wave power in the context of gamma-ray burst emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatuzzo, Marco; Melia, Fulvio

    1993-01-01

    Highly dynamic magnetospheric perturbations in neutron star environments can naturally account for the features observed in gamma-ray burst spectra. The source distribution, however, appears to be extragalactic. Although noncatastrophic isotropic emission mechanisms may be ruled out on energetic and timing arguments, MHD processes can produce strongly anisotropic gamma rays with an observable flux out to distances of about 1-2 Gpc. Here we show that sheared Alfven waves propagating along open magnetospheric field lines at the poles of magnetized neutron stars transfer their energy dissipationally to the current sustaining the field misalignment and thereby focus their power into a spatial region about 1000 times smaller than that of the crustal disturbance. This produces a strong (observable) flux enhancement along certain directions. We apply this model to a source population of 'turned-off' pulsars that have nonetheless retained their strong magnetic fields and have achieved alignment at a period of approximately greater than 5 sec.

  11. The gamma-ray sky points to radial gradients in cosmic-ray transport

    CERN Document Server

    Gaggero, Daniele; Valli, Mauro; Ullio, Piero

    2014-01-01

    The standard approach to cosmic-ray (CR) propagation in the Galaxy is based on the assumption that local transport properties can be extrapolated to the whole CR confining volume. Such models tend to underestimate the gamma-ray flux above few GeV measured by the Fermi Large Area Telescope towards the inner Galactic plane. We consider here for the first time a phenomenological scenario allowing for both the rigidity scaling of the diffusion coefficient and convective effects to be position-dependent. We show that within this approach we can reproduce the observed gamma-ray spectra at both low and mid Galactic latitudes - including the Galactic center - without spoiling any local CR observable.

  12. Search for Gamma-Ray Lines towards Galaxy Clusters with the Fermi-LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, B; Conrad, J; Gustafsson, M; Sánchez-Conde, M; Caputo, R

    2015-01-01

    We report on a search for monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray features in the spectra of galaxy clusters observed by the \\emph{Fermi} Large Area Telescope. Galaxy clusters are the largest structures in the Universe that are bound by dark matter (DM), making them an important testing ground for possible self-interactions or decays of the DM particles. Monochromatic $\\gamma$-ray lines provide a unique signature due to the absence of astrophysical backgrounds and are as such considered a smoking-gun signature for new physics. An unbinned joint likelihood analysis of the sixteen most promising clusters using five years of data at energies between 10 and 400 GeV revealed no significant features. For the case of self-annihilation, we set upper limits on the monochromatic velocity-averaged interaction cross section. These limits are compatible with those obtained from observations of the Galactic Center, albeit weaker due to the larger distance to the studied clusters.

  13. SMM hard X-ray observations of the soft gamma-ray repeater 1806-20

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, C.; Norris, J. P.; Cline, T. L.; Dennis, B. R.; Desai, U. D.; Orwig, L. E.

    1987-01-01

    Six bursts from the soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) 1806-20 have been recorded with the SMM Hard X-ray Burst Spectrometer during a highly active phase in 1983. Rise and decay times of less than 5 ns have been detected. Time profiles of these events indicate low-level emission prior to and after the main peaks. The results suggest that SGRs are distinguished from classical gamma-ray bursts by repetition, softer nonvarying spectra, short durations, simple temporal profiles, and a tendency for source locations to correlate with Population I objects. SGR characteristics differ from those of type I X-ray bursts, but they appear to have similarities with the type II bursts from the Rapid Burster.

  14. Measurement of the high-energy gamma-ray emission from the Moon with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ackermann, M.; Albert, A.; Atwood, W. B.; Baldini, L.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bellazzini, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bonino, R.; Bottacini, E.; Bregeon, J.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caragiulo, M.; Caraveo, P.A.; Cavazzuti, E.; Cecchi, C.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Costanza, F.; Cuoco, A.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S.W.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P.S.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S.J.; Focke, W.B.; Franckowiak, A.; Funk, S.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J.E.; Guiriec, S.; Harding, A. K.; Hewitt, J. W.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Iafrate, G.; Jóhannesson, G.; Kamae, T.; Kuss, M.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Li, J.; Li, L.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M.N.; Lubrano, P.; Magill, J.; Maldera, S.; Manfreda, A.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M.N.; Michelson, P.F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Monzani, M.E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nuss, E.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J.F.; Paneque, D.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Petrosian, V.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Sgrò, C.; Reposeur, T.; Siskind, E.J.; Spada, F.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Takahashi, H.; Thayer, J.B.; Thompson, D.J.; Tibaldo, L.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Vianello, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Yassine, M.; Cerutti, F.; Ferrari, A.; Sala, P.R.

    2016-01-01

    We have measured the gamma-ray emission spectrum of the Moon using the data collected by the Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi satellite during its first 7 years of operation, in the energy range from 30 MeV up to a few GeV. We have also studied the time evolution of the flux, finding a correlation with the solar activity. We have developed a full Monte Carlo simulation describing the interactions of cosmic rays with the lunar surface. The results of the present analysis can be explained in the framework of this model, where the production of gamma rays is due to the interactions of cosmic-ray proton and helium nuclei with the surface of the Moon. Finally, we have used our simulation to derive the cosmic-ray proton and helium spectra near Earth from the Moon gamma-ray data.

  15. Lifetime effects for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies and their implications for the RISING spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doornenbal, P., E-mail: pieter@ribf.riken.j [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Reiter, P. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Grawe, H.; Saito, T. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Al-Khatib, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Banu, A.; Beck, T.; Becker, F. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bednarczyk, P. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); The Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Benzoni, G. [INFN Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Bracco, A. [INFN Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Buerger, A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Caceres, L. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Camera, F. [INFN Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Chmel, S. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik, Universitaet Bonn, 53115 Bonn (Germany); Crespi, F.C.L. [INFN Sezione di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, 20133 Milano (Italy); Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Gorska, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Grebosz, J. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 31-342 Krakow (Poland)

    2010-02-01

    The lineshapes and peak position of Doppler corrected gamma-ray spectra from in-beam experiments at relativistic energies are investigated with respect to the intrinsic energy resolution of the employed detectors, the particles' velocities, and the photons' emission angle uncertainties at the moment of gamma-ray emission. The uncertainties in velocity and photon emission angle are dependent on the lifetime of the excited state. The impact of these two observables on the lineshape and energy resolution are studied for the RISING gamma-spectrometer by means of simulations and experimental results from a two-step fragmentation experiment at approx200MeV/u. Potential use of the distinct lineshape for lifetime determination is demonstrated for measured gamma-ray transitions.

  16. Modeling the Production of Beta-Delayed Gamma Rays for the Detection of Special Nuclear Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J M; Pruet, J A; Brown, D A; Descalle, M; Hedstrom, G W; Prussin, S G

    2005-02-14

    The objective of this LDRD project was to develop one or more models for the production of {beta}-delayed {gamma} rays following neutron-induced fission of a special nuclear material (SNM) and to define a standardized formatting scheme which will allow them to be incorporated into some of the modern, general-purpose Monte Carlo transport codes currently being used to simulate inspection techniques proposed for detecting fissionable material hidden in sea-going cargo containers. In this report, we will describe a Monte Carlo model for {beta}-delayed {gamma}-ray emission following the fission of SNM that can accommodate arbitrary time-dependent fission rates and photon collection histories. The model involves direct sampling of the independent fission yield distributions of the system, the branching ratios for decay of individual fission products and spectral distributions representing photon emission from each fission product and for each decay mode. While computationally intensive, it will be shown that this model can provide reasonably detailed estimates of the spectra that would be recorded by an arbitrary spectrometer and may prove quite useful in assessing the quality of evaluated data libraries and identifying gaps in the libraries. The accuracy of the model will be illustrated by comparing calculated and experimental spectra from the decay of short-lived fission products following the reactions {sup 235}U(n{sub th}, f) and {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th}, f). For general-purpose transport calculations, where a detailed consideration of the large number of individual {gamma}-ray transitions in a spectrum may not be necessary, it will be shown that a simple parameterization of the {gamma}-ray source function can be defined which provides high-quality average spectral distributions that should suffice for calculations describing photons being transported through thick attenuating media. Finally, a proposal for ENDF-compatible formats that describe each of the models and

  17. A Kinematic Model for Gamma Ray Bursts and Symmetric Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Thulasidas, M

    2005-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRB) occur at random points in the sky at cosmological distances. The spectra evolve through X-ray, optical region to possibly radio frequency. Though there are some models, the origin and time evolution of GRB are not well understood. Extragalactic radio sources also exhibit a baffling array of features that are poorly understood -- the core emission in ultraviolet region, lobes in RF range, transient gamma and X-ray emissions etc. These two phenomena appear to be very different, but the time evolution of the core emission of radio sources is essentially the same as GRBs, though with different time constants. Here, we present a model unifying GRB and roughly symmetric radio sources based on light travel time effect and superluminality. An object, moving across our field of vision at superluminal speeds, will appear to us as two objects receding from a single point. The time evolution of the Doppler shifted radiation of such a superluminal object bears remarkable similarity to that of GRB an...

  18. Predicted Extragalactic TeV $\\gamma$-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Stecker, F W; Salamon, M H

    1996-01-01

    We suggest that low-redshift XBLs (X-ray selected BL Lacertae objects) may be the only extragalactic gamma-ray sources observable at TeV energies. We use simple physical considerations involving synchrotron and Compton component spectra for blazars to suggest why the observed TeV sources are XBLs, whereas mostly RBLs and FSRQs are seen at GeV energies. These considerations indicate that the differences between XBLs and RBLs cannot be explained purely as relativistic jet orientation effects. We note that the only extragalactic TeV sources which have been observed are XBLs and that a nearby RBL with a very hard spectrum in the GeV range has not been seen at TeV energies. We also note that of the 14 BL Lacs observed by EGRET, 12 are RBLs, whereas only 2 are XBLs. We give a list of nearby XBLs which we consider to be good candidate TeV sources and predict estimated TeV fluxes for these objects.

  19. A segmented detector for airbone gamma ray spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgada, G.; Iovene, A.; Petrucci, S.; Tintori, C., E-mail: g.burgada@caen.it [Costruzioni Apparecchiature Elettroniche Nucleari S.p.A. (CAEN), Viareggio (Italy); Alvarez, M.A.G., E-mail: malvarez@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Baldoncini, M.; Xhixha, G.; Strati, V., E-mail: gerti.xhixha@unife.it [University of Ferrara, Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Ferrara (Italy); Mantovani, F., E-mail: mantovani@fe.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Ferrara (Italy); Garosi, P.; Mou, L., E-mail: li.mou@libero.it [University of Siena (Italy); Alvarez, C. Rossi, E-mail: rossialvarez@pd.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Legnaro (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) is widely acknowledged as a very efficient technique for large areas monitoring. The detector system mounted on a helicopter allows for an extensive survey in a single flight time, thus reducing the exposure risk for the operator. Results from AGRS techniques are exploited in many fields, from the geological research to the homeland security for the search of orphan radioactive sources, from the mining and hydrocarbon exploration to the construction industry. The new generation of compact digital data acquisition and online processing equipment allows for faster airborne survey campaigns, and enhances the flexibility of operations. In addition, the algorithm for the extrapolation of the nuclide concentrations from the acquired gamma spectra is a challenging step of the entire technique. We are going to present a new device for advanced AGRS measurements, with an innovative detector configuration and data processing algorithms for optimizing the source localization and the on-line response capabilities. The new compact structure makes the system easily portable by a single operator, and rapidly mountable on most common helicopters. Preliminary feasibility studies have been performed to test the mechanics and the hardware of the whole system, which is intended to work without any human attendance. The first flights are planned by the end of 2014, with the aim of detecting artificial point sources having intensities on the order of 10^8 Bq and natural enriched fields already monitored. (author)

  20. Flares in gamma-ray bursts: disc fragmentation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Perna, Rosalba; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-02-01

    Flaring activity following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), observed in both long and short GRBs, signals a long-term activity of the central engine. However, its production mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we develop a quantitative model of the idea proposed by Perna et al. of a disc whose outer regions fragment due to the onset of gravitational instability. The self-gravitating clumps migrate through the disc and begin to evolve viscously when tidal and shearing torques break them apart. Our model consists of two ingredients: theoretical bolometric flare light curves whose shape (width, skewness) is largely insensitive to the model parameters, and a spectral correction to match the bandpass of the available observations, that is calibrated using the observed spectra of the flares. This simple model reproduces, with excellent agreement, the empirical statistical properties of the flares as measured by their width-to-arrival time ratio and skewness (ratio between decay and rise time). We present model fits to the observed light curves of two well-monitored flares, GRB 060418 and GRB 060904B. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative model able to reproduce the flare light curves and explain their global statistical properties.